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Sample records for activated peritoneal macrophages

  1. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP. PMID:26529190

  2. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP.

  3. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  4. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects.

  5. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  6. IL-33 Priming Enhances Peritoneal Macrophage Activity in Response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vuvi G; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2014-08-01

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family and plays a role in the host defense against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In this study, we investigated the function of IL-33 and its receptor in in vitro macrophage responses to Candida albicans. Our results demonstrate that pre-sensitization of isolated peritoneal macrophages with IL-33 enhanced their pro-inflammatory cytokine production and phagocytic activity in response to C. albicans. These macrophage activities were entirely dependent on the ST2-MyD88 signaling pathway. In addition, pre-sensitization with IL-33 also increased ROS production and the subsequent killing ability of macrophages following C. albicans challenge. These results indicate that IL-33 may increase anti-fungal activity against Candida through macrophage-mediated resistance mechanisms. PMID:25177252

  7. Activation of peritoneal macrophages to cytoxicity against B16 melanoma cells by Serratia marcescens polyribosome fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Serratia marcescens polyribosomes (SMPR) have been shown to elicit an anti-tumor response in vivo. The in-vitro effects of SMPR on macrophages as the nonspecific mediators of the anti-tumor response have not previously been examined. The first objective of this research project is to corroborate and analyze the in-vivo results by the development and application of an in-vitro cytotoxicity assay. The second objective is to examine the effect of SMPR upon previously unstimulated peritoneal macrophages as representing the mechanism of cytotoxicity. The third objective is to identify the minimal effective component of SMPR responsible for an effect on macrophages. Results revealed that SMPR preparations exert a number of effects upon macrophages. Morphologic changes included increased spreading and increased perinuclear vacuolization. Macrophages were shown to be metabolically activate by two lines of evidence. SMPR-treated macrophages exhibited increased cellular metabolism by the increased uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine and by the increased levels of secreted leucine aminopeptidase as compared to control macrophages. Results also showed that SMPR activates macrophages to cytotoxicity against syngeneic tumor target cells. Buoyant-density fractions were isolated and assayed for macrophage activating ability. Results showed 50S ribosomal subunits to be the smallest fraction effective for macrophage activation. Both the RNA and protein were necessary for complete effectiveness.

  8. [Effect of low-frequency ultrasound on the chemotactic and phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages in rats].

    PubMed

    Kochemasova, Z N; Davydova, N V; Matveeva, E A; Dratvin, S A; Lobashevskiĭ, A L

    1983-12-01

    The influence of low-frequency ultrasound on the chemotactic, ingestive and digestive activity of peritoneal macrophages in rats was studied. The intraoperative treatment of the peritoneum with ultrasound enhanced chemotactic activity 3.3-fold in comparison with that in the control animals. The digestive function of peritoneal macrophages considerably increased, the stimulation of their ingestive capacity also occurred. The activation of the phagocytic function of macrophages was observed within 7 days after a single sonar treatment. The authors believe that the stimulation of the macrophage system is probably one of the mechanisms of the sanative action of ultrasound which is used at present in purulent surgery.

  9. MiR-16 regulates mouse peritoneal macrophage polarization and affects T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoqin; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Yating; Miao, Junjun; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoli; Wang, Zhengbing

    2016-10-01

    MiR-16 is a tumour suppressor that is down-regulated in certain human cancers. However, little is known on its activity in other cell types. In this study, we examined the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of miR-16 on macrophage polarization and subsequent T-cell activation. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were isolated and induced to undergo either M1 polarization with 100 ng/ml of interferon-γ and 20 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide, or M2 polarization with 20 ng/ml of interleukin (IL)-4. The identity of polarized macrophages was determined by profiling cell-surface markers by flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISA. Macrophages were infected with lentivirus-expressing miR-16 to assess the effects of miR-16. Effects on macrophage-T cell interactions were analysed by co-culturing purified CD4(+) T cells with miR-16-expressing peritoneal macrophages, and measuring activation marker CD69 by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion by ELISA. Bioinformatics analysis was applied to search for potential miR-16 targets and understand its underlying mechanisms. MiR-16-induced M1 differentiation of mouse peritoneal macrophages from either the basal M0- or M2-polarized state is indicated by the significant up-regulation of M1 marker CD16/32, repression of M2 marker CD206 and Dectin-1, and increased secretion of M1 cytokine IL-12 and nitric oxide. Consistently, miR-16-expressing macrophages stimulate the activation of purified CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, miR-16 significantly down-regulates the expression of PD-L1, a critical immune suppressor that controls macrophage-T cell interaction and T-cell activation. MiR-16 plays an important role in shifting macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 status, and functionally activating CD4(+) T cells. This effect is potentially mediated through the down-regulation of immune suppressor PD-L1.

  10. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro.

  11. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro. PMID:2099903

  12. Action of ubenimex on aminopeptidase activities in spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, H; Motegi, A; Iwabuchi, M; Takahashi, K; Horinishi, H; Umezawa, H

    1987-11-01

    The action of ubenimex on aminopeptidase (APase) activity was studied in intact spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice. Ubenimex strongly inhibited hydrolyzing activities against arginine-beta-naphtylamide (Arg-NA), Lys-NA and Pro-NA in both cells. Inhibition of hydrolysis of Leu-NA, Met-NA and Ala-NA was relatively small or not observed. When both cells were incubated in HANKS' solution, hydrolyzing activities against Arg-NA, Lys-NA and Pro-NA were released to the medium, while Leu-NA and Met-NA-hydrolyzing activities were mostly bound. In addition, the Leu-NA-hydrolyzing activity in the spleen cells was kinetically studied. The Arg-NA and Leu-NA-hydrolyzing activities in four fractions prepared from the homogenate of spleen cells were also studied kinetically. From these studies it was suggested that ubenimex inhibits aminopeptidase B and a Pro-NA-hydrolyzing enzyme more effectively than Leu-APase in intact spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice.

  13. The response of peritoneal macrophages after implantation of several ceramics as measured by the change of ectoenzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Otto, B; Ogilvie, A

    1998-06-01

    The bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics with various calcium: phosphorus ratios: Ca/P = 1.67 (hydroxyapatite, HA), Ca/P = 1.6 and Ca/P = 1.5 (tricalcium phosphate, beta-TCP), the bioinert aluminium oxide ceramic (Al2O3) and the toxic calcium oxide ceramic (CaO) have been investigated with respect to their ability to activate peritoneal macrophages of NMRI-mice and with respect to their influence on the extracellular nucleotide degradation of these macrophages. Two weeks after the intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of ceramic particles in an isotone salt solution (phosphate-buffered saline = PBS), we observed that the peritoneal macrophages were only slightly activated into the responsive state, independent of the type of ceramic. 5'Nucleotidase (5'N) ectoenzyme hydrolyses adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and a decrease of its activity is a general biochemical marker of activated macrophages. This ectoenzyme activity was slightly reduced after ceramic implantation. The lacking rise of the extracellular diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A)-catabolism by the macrophage ectoenzyme alkaline phosphodiesterase I (APD) demonstrated that the peritoneal macrophages did not completely reach the responsive state. After the implantation of calcium phosphate ceramics the extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-reduction was slightly diminished. After the implantation of tricalcium phosphate ceramic about 30% more peritoneal exsudate cells (PEC) were obtained from the peritoneal cavity than after injections of pure PBS (used as non-inflammatory control). Similar to the phenomena following the injection of thioglycollate (Tg, inflammation producing control agent) a slightly but not significantly increased proportion of pseudopodia-building cells was observed after the implantation of the ceramic with Ca/P = 1.6.

  14. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 months) and aged (14–15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  15. SIGNR1 ligation on murine peritoneal macrophages induces IL-12 production through NFkappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Chiaki; Kojima, Naoya

    2010-07-01

    We have previously shown that murine resident peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) are activated in response to uptake of oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs), leading to production of interleukin (IL)-12. To understand the mechanism of activation of PEMs by OMLs, in the present study we investigated the role of a mannose-binding C-type lectin receptor, SIGNR1, in production of proinflammatory cytokines by PEMs, in which SIGNR1 acts as a physiological receptor for OMLs. Engagement of SIGNR1 on PEMs with an anti-SIGNR1-specific rat IgM antibody, ERTR9, induced production of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha from PEMs, while secretion of IL-6 and IL-1beta was not detected with the same treatment. The level of phosphorylated IkappaB kinase in PEMs also increased in response to ERTR9 treatment of the cells. Treatment of PEMs with a specific nuclear factor kappa-B (NFkappaB) inhibitor, BAY11-7082, reduced ERTR9-dependent IL-12 production. Intraperitoneal treatment with BAY11-7082 also led to reduction of subsequent OML-induced IL-12 production from PEMs. These results indicate that SIGNR1-mediated intercellular signaling may induce production of cytokines such as IL-12 through NFkappaB activation.

  16. Alpha-D-galactosylation of surface fucoglycoconjugate(s) upon stimulation/activation of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petryniak, J

    1992-04-01

    Murine resident macrophages express, on their surface, carbohydrate epitopes which undergo changes during their stimulation/activation as monitored by binding of 125I labelled Evonymus europaea and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 lectins. Treatment of the stimulated macrophages with coffee bean alpha-galactosidase abolished binding of the GS I-B4 isolectin and changed the binding pattern of the Evonymus lectin. The affinity (Ka) of Evonymus lectin for alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages decreased approximately 23-fold, from 1.25 x 10(8) M-1 to 5.5 x 10(6) M-1. Subsequent digestion of alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages with alpha-L-fucosidase from Trichomonas foetus, further reduced binding of Evonymus lectin. Resident macrophages showed the same pattern of Evonymus lectin binding, with the same affinity, as alpha-galactosidase-treated, stimulated macrophages. These results, together with a consideration of the carbohydrate binding specificity of the Evonymus lectin which, in the absence of alpha-D-galactosyl groups, requires alpha-L-fucosyl groups for binding, indicate the presence, on resident macrophages, of glycoconjugates with terminal alpha-L-fucosyl residues. It is also concluded that during macrophage stimulation/activation alpha-D-galactosyl residues are added to this glycoconjugate and that they form part of the receptor for Evonymus lectin. The same glycoconjugate(s) is/are also expressed on the activated macrophage IC-21 cell line which exhibits the same characteristics as that of stimulated peritoneal macrophages, i.e., it contains alpha-D-galactosyl end groups and is resistant to the action of trypsin. Both lectins were also specifically bound to Corynaebacterium parvum activated macrophages. PMID:1344714

  17. Modulation of peritoneal macrophage antimicrobial activity by peritoneal dialysis fluid, Ca++, and 1,25(OH)2D3 in CAPD patients.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, S; Nasini, M G; Schelotto, C; Caviglia, P M; Barocci, S; Cantaluppi, A; Salit, M

    1990-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that Ca++ and 1,25(OH)2D3 modulate peritoneal macrophage (PM0) antimicrobial activity in CAPD patients. Twenty-four CAPD patients were evaluated in vivo (12 who had never had peritonitis, and 12 with an overall peritonitis incidence of more than one episode per 8 patient/months), for the effects of different peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) and Ca++ concentrations (1.25, 1.75, and 2.25 mmol/L) on PM0: cytoplasmic Ca++ concentration; superoxide generation; leukotriene B4 (LTB4) release; and bacterial killing for Staphylococcus epidermidis. The same parameters were also evaluated after adding 1,25(OH)2D3 (0.25 microgram/L) to the PDF. Results showed a direct correlation between the PDF Ca++ concentration and PM0 Ca++ levels, superoxide and LTB4 generation, and bacterial killing such that, with 2.25 mmol/L of Ca++, these values were significantly higher than those seen with 1.75 mmol/L. The addition of 1,25(OH)2D3 potentiated the Ca(++)-induced effects. On the other hand, with PDF Ca++ levels of 1,25 mmol/L, an inhibition of the aforementioned parameters was seen. However, this effect was reversed by the addition of 1,25(OH)2D3. These in vivo results confirm the importance of Ca++ and 1,25(OH)2D3 in PM0 antibacterial function in CAPD patients, and may be useful in determining the prophylaxis and therapy of peritonitis.

  18. Relationship between membrane potential changes and superoxide-releasing capacity in resident and activated mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, S.; Johnston, R.B. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    To understand better the molecular basis for the enhanced respiratory burst of activated macrophages (M phi), the relationship between the stimulus-induced changes in membrane potential and release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mouse peritoneal M phi was investigated. Resident M phi and M phi elicited by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-M phi) or obtained from animals infected with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG-M phi) were used. LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi showed more pronounced changes in membrane potential (depolarization) and greater release of O/sub 2//sup -/ on contact with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than did resident macrophages. The lag time between addition of stimulus and onset of release of O/sub 2//sup -/ was reduced in activated compared with resident cells. Membrane potential changes began 60 to 90 sec before release of O/sub 2//sup -/ could be detected in each cell type. The dose-response curves for triggering of membrane potential changes and O/sub 2//sup -/ release by PMA were identical. The magnitude of membrane potential changes and of O/sub 2//sup -/ release in LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi declined progressively during in vitro culture, and values on day 3 approached those in resident macrophages (deactivation). Extracellular glucose was required for effective stimulated change in membrane potential and O/sub 2//sup -/ release. These findings indicate that membrane potential changes are closely associated with O/sub 2//sup -/-releasing capacity in macrophages, and that the systems that mediate membrane potential changes and production of O/sub 2//sup -/ develop or decline concomitantly during activation or deactivation of the cells.

  19. Effect of the native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate on murine peritoneal macrophage modulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamassaki, F T; Lenzi, R M; Campestrini, L H; Bovo, F; Seyfried, M; Soldera-Silva, A; Stevan-Hancke, F R; Zawadzki-Baggio, S F; Pettolino, F A; Bacic, A; Maurer, J B B

    2015-07-10

    The native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate (CNTG) and its arabinogalactan-protein component (CNTG-AGP) were tested by using immuno-stimulant and anti-inflammatory in vitro assays of murine peritoneal macrophage activities. In the assay for immuno-stimulant activity (without previous treatment with lipopolysaccharide; LPS), CNTG increased the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and both CNTG and CNTG-AGP decreased the concentrations of IL6. When the macrophages were incubated in the presence of LPS and CNTG a decrease in the levels of nitric oxide (NO(·)) and IFN-γ was observed. The results could explain the popular use of CNTG as an anti-inflammatory. In addition, CNTG is the main component of the cashew-nut tree gum exudate, which has been considered a versatile polymer with potential pharmaceutical and food industry applications. These data may contribute to the study of the immunomodulation activity of plant polysaccharides, as well as encourage future experiments in the field of cashew-nut tree gum exudate applications. PMID:25857980

  20. Effect of the native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate on murine peritoneal macrophage modulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamassaki, F T; Lenzi, R M; Campestrini, L H; Bovo, F; Seyfried, M; Soldera-Silva, A; Stevan-Hancke, F R; Zawadzki-Baggio, S F; Pettolino, F A; Bacic, A; Maurer, J B B

    2015-07-10

    The native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate (CNTG) and its arabinogalactan-protein component (CNTG-AGP) were tested by using immuno-stimulant and anti-inflammatory in vitro assays of murine peritoneal macrophage activities. In the assay for immuno-stimulant activity (without previous treatment with lipopolysaccharide; LPS), CNTG increased the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and both CNTG and CNTG-AGP decreased the concentrations of IL6. When the macrophages were incubated in the presence of LPS and CNTG a decrease in the levels of nitric oxide (NO(·)) and IFN-γ was observed. The results could explain the popular use of CNTG as an anti-inflammatory. In addition, CNTG is the main component of the cashew-nut tree gum exudate, which has been considered a versatile polymer with potential pharmaceutical and food industry applications. These data may contribute to the study of the immunomodulation activity of plant polysaccharides, as well as encourage future experiments in the field of cashew-nut tree gum exudate applications.

  1. Regulation of the surface expression of the platelet-activating factor receptor in IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. Effects of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1992-10-15

    The effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of the receptor for platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; AGEPC) was examined in cultured IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. AGEPC binding to its receptors reached saturation within 20 min at 25 degrees C and was reversible. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of AGEPC receptors with a Bmax of approximately 170 fmol/mg cellular protein and a Kd of 0.25 nM. Preincubation of IC-21 cells with LPS (0.01-1,000 ng/ml) induced an increase in the surface expression of AGEPC receptors in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. The maximal effect of LPS on the AGEPC receptor was observed between 5 and 8 h, with a typical increase between 150 and 200%. Scatchard analysis indicated that LPS treatment of IC-21 cells increased the number of AGEPC receptors on the cell surface without any apparent change in the affinity of the receptor for the ligand. The effect of LPS on the surface expression of the AGEPC receptor was nearly abolished by cycloheximide (0.1 mM) and by actinomycin D (3 microM), suggesting the involvement of enhanced receptor protein synthesis and mRNA production in this event. Moreover, LPS treatment increased the capability of the IC-21 cell to respond to AGEPC addition by elevating intracellular free Ca2+ without causing an increase in the basal level of intracellular Ca2+. The present study demonstrates that IC-21 peritoneal macrophages possess high affinity AGEPC receptors and provides the evidence that the number of functional AGEPC receptors on a cell can be increased significantly upon exposure to LPS. PMID:1328211

  2. Evaluation of the Leishmanicidal Activity of Rutaceae and Lauraceae Ethanol Extracts on Golden Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chávez Enciso, N. A.; Coy-barrera, E. D.; Patiño, O. J.; Cuca, L. E.; Delgado, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Traditional medicine has provided a number of therapeutic solutions for the control of infectious agents, cancers, and other diseases. After screening a wide variety of Colombian plant extracts, we have identified promising antileishmanial activity in ethanol extracts from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae) and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum (Rutaceae). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro activity of two ethanol extracts, one from Ocotea macrophylla and the other from Zanthoxyllum monophyllum and one alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, on peritoneal macrophages isolated from golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with Leishmania panamensis and Leishmania major promastigotes. All of the extracts studied displayed promising (≥2) selectivity indices (S/I), the most significant of which were for ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania panamensis (S/I=12) and alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania major (S/I=11). These results support the use of ethanol extracts and alkaloid fractions isolated from Ocotea macrophylla and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, respectively; as therapeutic options for cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25035529

  3. Evaluation of the Leishmanicidal Activity of Rutaceae and Lauraceae Ethanol Extracts on Golden Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chávez Enciso, N A; Coy-Barrera, E D; Patiño, O J; Cuca, L E; Delgado, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    Traditional medicine has provided a number of therapeutic solutions for the control of infectious agents, cancers, and other diseases. After screening a wide variety of Colombian plant extracts, we have identified promising antileishmanial activity in ethanol extracts from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae) and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum (Rutaceae). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro activity of two ethanol extracts, one from Ocotea macrophylla and the other from Zanthoxyllum monophyllum and one alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, on peritoneal macrophages isolated from golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with Leishmania panamensis and Leishmania major promastigotes. All of the extracts studied displayed promising (≥2) selectivity indices (S/I), the most significant of which were for ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania panamensis (S/I=12) and alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania major (S/I=11). These results support the use of ethanol extracts and alkaloid fractions isolated from Ocotea macrophylla and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, respectively; as therapeutic options for cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25035529

  4. A murine platelet-activating factor receptor gene: cloning, chromosomal localization and up-regulation of expression by lipopolysaccharide in peritoneal resident macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, S; Matsuda, Y; Nakamura, M; Waga, I; Kume, K; Izumi, T; Shimizu, T

    1996-01-01

    A murine gene encoding a platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) was cloned. The gene was mapped to a region of the D2.2 band of chromosome 4 both by fluorescence in situ hybridization and by molecular linkage analysis. Northern blot analysis showed a high expression of the PAFR message in peritoneal macrophages. When C3H/HeN macrophages were treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or synthetic lipid A, the PAFR gene expression was induced. Bacterial LPS, but not lipid A, induced the level of PAFR mRNA in LPS unresponsive C3H/HeJ macrophages. These induction patterns were parallel to those of tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA. Thus the PAFR in macrophages is important in LPS-induced pathologies. PMID:8670084

  5. CRIg-expressing peritoneal macrophages are associated with disease severity in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Banh, Xuan; Gadd, Victoria L.; Wojcik, Kyle K.; Ariffin, Juliana K.; Jose, Sara; Lukowski, Samuel; Baillie, Gregory J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Powell, Elizabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and ascites. Hypothesizing that innate immune dysfunction contributes to susceptibility to infection, we assessed ascitic fluid macrophage phenotype and function. The expression of complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily (CRIg) and CCR2 defined two phenotypically and functionally distinct peritoneal macrophage subpopulations. The proportion of CRIghi macrophages differed between patients and in the same patient over time, and a high proportion of CRIghi macrophages was associated with reduced disease severity (model for end-stage liver disease) score. As compared with CRIglo macrophages, CRIghi macrophages were highly phagocytic and displayed enhanced antimicrobial effector activity. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing and comparison with human macrophage and murine peritoneal macrophage expression signatures highlighted similarities among CRIghi cells, human macrophages, and mouse F4/80hi resident peritoneal macrophages and among CRIglo macrophages, human monocytes, and mouse F4/80lo monocyte-derived peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that CRIghi and CRIglo macrophages may represent a tissue-resident population and a monocyte-derived population, respectively. In conclusion, ascites fluid macrophage subset distribution and phagocytic capacity is highly variable among patients with chronic liver disease. Regulating the numbers and/or functions of these macrophage populations could provide therapeutic opportunities in cirrhotic patients. PMID:27699269

  6. CRIg-expressing peritoneal macrophages are associated with disease severity in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Banh, Xuan; Gadd, Victoria L.; Wojcik, Kyle K.; Ariffin, Juliana K.; Jose, Sara; Lukowski, Samuel; Baillie, Gregory J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Powell, Elizabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and ascites. Hypothesizing that innate immune dysfunction contributes to susceptibility to infection, we assessed ascitic fluid macrophage phenotype and function. The expression of complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily (CRIg) and CCR2 defined two phenotypically and functionally distinct peritoneal macrophage subpopulations. The proportion of CRIghi macrophages differed between patients and in the same patient over time, and a high proportion of CRIghi macrophages was associated with reduced disease severity (model for end-stage liver disease) score. As compared with CRIglo macrophages, CRIghi macrophages were highly phagocytic and displayed enhanced antimicrobial effector activity. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing and comparison with human macrophage and murine peritoneal macrophage expression signatures highlighted similarities among CRIghi cells, human macrophages, and mouse F4/80hi resident peritoneal macrophages and among CRIglo macrophages, human monocytes, and mouse F4/80lo monocyte-derived peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that CRIghi and CRIglo macrophages may represent a tissue-resident population and a monocyte-derived population, respectively. In conclusion, ascites fluid macrophage subset distribution and phagocytic capacity is highly variable among patients with chronic liver disease. Regulating the numbers and/or functions of these macrophage populations could provide therapeutic opportunities in cirrhotic patients.

  7. Inhibition of arachidonate release from rat peritoneal macrophage by biflavonoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, S J; Son, K H; Chang, H W; Kang, S S; Kim, H P

    1997-12-01

    Biflavonoid is one of unique classes of naturally-occurring bioflavonoid. Previously, certain biflavonoids were found to possess the inhibitory effects on phospholipase A(2) activity and lymphocytes proliferation(1) suggesting their anti-inflammatory/immunoregulatory potential. In this study, effects of several biflavonoids on arachidonic acid release from rat peritoneal macrophages were investigated, because arachidonic acid released from the activated macrophages is one of the indices of inflammatory conditions. When resident peritoneal macrophages labeled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid were activated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or calcium ionophore, A23187, radioactivity released in the medium was increased approximately 4.1 approximately 7.3 fold after 120 min incubation compared to the spontaneous release in the control incubation. In this condition, biflavonoids (10 uM) such as ochnaflavone, ginkgetin and isoginkgetin, showed inhibition of arachidonate release from macrophages activated by PMA (32.5 approximately 40.0% inhibition) or A23187 (21.7 approximately 41.7% inhibition). Amentoflavone showed protection only against PMA-induced arachidonate release, while apigenin, a monomer of these biflavonoids, did not show the significant inhibition up to 10 uM. Staurosporin (1 uM), a protein kinase C inhibitor, showed an inhibitory effect only against PMA-induced arachidonate release (96.8% inhibition). Inhibition of arachidonate release from the activated macrophages may contribute to an anti-inflammatory potential of biflavonoidsin vivo.

  8. Structure-activity relationships of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate for inhibitory effect on NO production in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisashi; Ando, Shin; Morikawa, Toshio; Kataoka, Shinya; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2005-04-01

    1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate from the rhizomes of Alpinia galanga inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages with an IC(50) value of 2.3 microM. To clarify the structure-activity relationship of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, various natural and synthetic phenylpropanoids and synthetic phenylbutanoids were examined, and the following structural requirements were clarified. (1) The para or ortho substitution of the acetoxyl and 1-acetoxypropenyl groups at the benzene ring was essential. (2) The S configuration of the 1'-acetoxyl group was preferable. (3) The presence of the 3-methoxyl group and disappearance of the 2'-3' double bond by hydrogenation reduced the activity. (4) The substitution of acetyl groups with propionyl or methyl groups reduced the activity. (5) Lengthening of the carbon chain between the 1'- and 2'-positions reduced the activity.

  9. Immunoregulation by macrophages II. Separation of mouse peritoneal macrophages having tumoricidal and bactericidal activities and those secreting PGE and interleukin I

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, K.E.; Cahill, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    Macrophage subpopulations having bactericidal or tumoricidal activities and secreting interleukin I (IL1) or prostaglandin E (PGE) were identified through primary or secondary infection with Salmonella enteritidis and separated by sedimentation velocity. Bactericidal activity was measured by (3H)-thymidine release from Listeria monocytogenes and tumoricidal activity by 51Cr-release from C-4 fibrosarcoma or P815 mastocytoma cells. Macrophages with bactericidal activity were distinguished from those with tumoricidal activity a) during secondary infection when cytolytic activity occurred only at days 1-4 post injection and bactericidal activity remained high throughout and b) after sedimentation velocity separation. Cytolysis was consistently greatest among adherent cells of low sedimentation velocity, whereas cells with bactericidal activity increased in size during the infection. Tumour cytostasis (inhibition and promotion of (3H)-thymidine uptake) differed from cytolysis in that the former was more prolonged during infection and was also detected among large cells. Secretion of immunoregulatory molecules PGE and IL1 occurred maximally among different macrophage subpopulations separated by sedimentation velocity and depending on the type of stimulus used in vitro. There was an inverse correlation between IL1 production and PGE production after stimulation with C3-zymosan or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The development of immunity during infection may therefore be dependent upon the relative proportions of effector and regulatory macrophage subpopulations and the selective effects of environmental stimuli on these functions.

  10. Aging impairs peritoneal but not bone marrow-derived macrophage phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Linehan, Eimear; Dombrowski, Yvonne; Snoddy, Rachel; Fallon, Padraic G; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Fitzgerald, Denise C

    2014-08-01

    Aging results in deterioration of the immune system, which is associated with increased susceptibility to infection and impaired wound healing in the elderly. Phagocytosis is an essential process in both wound healing and immune defence. As such, age-related impairments in phagocytosis impact on the health of the elderly population. Phagocytic efficiency in peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages and bone marrow monocytes from young and old mice was investigated. Aging significantly impaired phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo. However, bone marrow-derived macrophages and bone marrow monocytes did not exhibit age-related impairments in phagocytosis, suggesting no intrinsic defect in these cells. We sought to investigate underlying mechanisms in age-related impairments in phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages. We hypothesized that microenvironmental factors in the peritoneum of old mice impaired macrophage phagocytosis. Indeed, macrophages from young mice injected into the peritoneum of old mice exhibited impaired phagocytosis. Proportions of peritoneal immune cells were characterized, and striking increases in numbers of T cells, B1 and B2 cells were observed in the peritoneum of old mice compared with young mice. In addition, B cell-derived IL-10 was increased in resting and LPS-activated peritoneal cell cultures from old mice. These data demonstrate that aging impairs phagocytosis by tissue-resident peritoneal macrophages, but not by bone marrow-derived macrophages/monocytes, and suggest that age-related defects in macrophage phagocytosis may be due to extrinsic factors in the tissue microenvironment. As such, defects may be reversible and macrophages could be targeted therapeutically in order to boost immune function in the elderly.

  11. Immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Momoko; Ose, Saya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We herein report the immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract (SAE) on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. SAE significantly enhanced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by both J774.1 cells and peritoneal macrophages by enhancing the expression levels of these cytokine genes. In addition, the phagocytosis activity of J774.1 cells was facilitated by SAE. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SAE activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB cascades. It was found that SAE activates macrophages through not only TLR4, but also other receptors. The production of IL-6 was significantly enhanced by peritoneal macrophages from SAE-administered BALB/c mice, suggesting that SAE has a potential to stimulate macrophage activity in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that SAE would be a beneficial functional food with immunostimulatory effects on macrophages.

  12. 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate as a new type inhibitor of interferon-beta production in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ando, Shin; Matsuda, Hisashi; Morikawa, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2005-05-01

    1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate from the rhizomes of Alpinia galanga was known to show potent inhibitory effect on the production of nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages. To clarify its mechanism of action, the effects of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate on the expression of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) mRNA and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), both of which participate in the induction of inducible NO synthase, were examined in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages. The results were compared with those of two inhibitors of the NF-kappaB activation, costunolide and caffeic acid phenethyl ester. 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate inhibited IFN-beta mRNA expression as well as NF-kappaB activation, and two related compounds, (+/-)-1-acetoxy-1-(2-acetoxyphenyl)-2-propene and (+/-)-1-acetoxy-1-(4-acetoxyphenol)-3-butene, also inhibited IFN-beta mRNA expression. In addition, 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate inhibited the production of NO stimulated by poly(I:C) via Toll-like receptor 3.

  13. Isolation and partial characterization of a pectic polysaccharide from the fruit pulp of Spondias cytherea and its effect on peritoneal macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Iacomini, Marcello; Serrato, Rodrigo V; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Lopes, Luciana; Buchi, Dorly F; Gorin, Phillip A J

    2005-12-01

    The total carbohydrate content of the intact pulp of Spondias cytherea was 41%. Polysaccharides were obtained via hot aqueous extraction after defatting with organic solvents. The aqueous extract was treated with excess ethanol to form a precipitate, which was then solubilized in water. The material precipitated upon acidification when HCl was removed. The resulting supernatant fraction was submitted to freeze-thawing treatment yielding a soluble fraction (sFTS). This fraction had Ara, Rha, Gal and GalA in its structure as determined by GC-MS. 13C NMR analysis showed signals assigned to alpha-L-Araf, beta-D-Galp, alpha-D-GalpA and alpha-L-Rhap units, in addition to galacturonic acid units, which were present also as methyl ester. These results suggest a type I rhamnogalacturonan with arabinogalactan branches. Cell eliciting activity in a dose-depending pattern was observed in vitro on peritoneal macrophages treated with sFTS.

  14. Haemorrhagic shock in mice--intracellular signalling and immunomodulation of peritoneal macrophages' LPS response.

    PubMed

    Rani, Meenakshi; Husain, Baher; Lendemans, Sven; Schade, Fritz U; Flohé, Sascha

    2006-01-01

    Haemorrhagic shock leads to decreased proinflammatory cytokine response which is associated with an increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. In the present study, the effect of GM-CSF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha release and MAPkinase activation was analysed on the background of a possible immunostimulating activity of this substance. Male BALB/c mice were bled to a mean arterial blood pressure of 50 mmHg for 45 min followed by resuscitation. Peritoneal macrophages were isolated 20 h after haemorrhage and incubated with 10 ng/ml GM-CSF for 6h before LPS stimulation. TNF-alpha synthesis was studied in the culture supernatants using ELISA. Phosphorylation of ERK, p38MAPK and IkappaBalpha was detected by Western blotting. LPS-induced TNF-alpha production of peritoneal macrophages was significantly decreased 20 h after haemorrhage in comparison to the corresponding cells of sham-operated mice. In parallel the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha was less in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages from haemorrhagic mice. LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was also decreased in peritoneal macrophages isolated after haemorrhagic shock. In contrast, p38MAPK was phosphorylated more intensely after LPS-stimulation in macrophages collected from shocked mice. GM-CSF incubation elevated LPS-induced TNF-alpha response of macrophages from both sham-operated and shocked mice which was accompanied by an elevated IkappaB and ERK phosphorylation. In general, GM-CSF treatment in vitro enhanced peritoneal macrophages LPS-response both in terms of TNF-alpha synthesis and IkappaB and MAPK signalling, but the levels always stayed lower than those of GM-CSF-treated cells from sham-operated animals. In conclusion, GM-CSF preincubation could partly reactivate the depressed functions of peritoneal macrophages and may therefore exert immunostimulating properties after shock or trauma.

  15. Single-cell analysis reveals new subset markers of murine peritoneal macrophages and highlights macrophage dynamics upon Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Accarias, Solène; Genthon, Clémence; Rengel, David; Boullier, Séverine; Foucras, Gilles; Tabouret, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Resident macrophages play a central role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. Here, we used single cell-based qPCR coupled with flow cytometry analysis to further define the phenotypes of large and small resident peritoneal macrophages (LPMs and SPMs, respectively) in mice. We demonstrated that the expression of Cxcl13, IfngR1, Fizz-1 and Mrc-1 clearly distinguished between LPMs and SPMs subsets. Using these markers, the dynamics of peritoneal macrophages in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced peritonitis model were analyzed. We found that S. aureus infection triggers a massive macrophage disappearance reaction in both subsets. Thereafter, inflammatory monocytes rapidly infiltrated the cavity and differentiated to replenish the SPMs. Although phenotypically indistinguishable from resident SPMs by flow cytometry, newly recruited SPMs had a different pattern of gene expression dominated by M2 markers combined with M1 associated features (inos expression). Interestingly, S. aureus elicited SPMs showed a robust expression of Cxcl13, suggesting that these cells may endorse the role of depleted LPMs and contribute to restoring peritoneal homeostasis. These data provide information on both resident and recruited macrophages dynamics upon S. aureus infection and demonstrate that single-cell phenotyping is a promising and highly valuable approach to unraveling macrophage diversity and plasticity. PMID:27220602

  16. Differences in peroxidase localization of rabbit peritoneal macrophages after surface adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Bodel, P. T.; Nichols, B. A.; Bainton, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Unlike resident peritoneal macrophages, which contain peroxidase in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and perinuclear cisternae (PN), macrophages elicited into the rabbit peritoneal cavity by various stimulants lack the enzyme. Since we had previously found that such peroxidase reactivity rapidly appears in the RER and PN of blood monocytes after surface adherence in vitro, we wondered whether the enzyme could be similarly produced in elicited macrophages by adherence. Cells from peritoneal exudates (96 hours after endotoxin injection) were harvested, suspended in culture medium, and allowed to adhere to fibrin-coated or plastic surfaces. Following culture for various intervals, they were fixed, incubated for peroxidase, and examined by electron microscopy. We observed that these elicited cells, which initially contained no cytochemically detectable peroxidase, acquired peroxidatic activity in the RER and PN within 2 hours after adherence in culture. Thus macrophages, like blood monocytes, may rapidly acquire peroxidase reactivity as a consequence of plasma membrane: external surface interaction. In view of this finding, it would seem unwise to use peroxidase localization as the basis for advocating the existence of two separate lines of peritoneal macrophages, as has been proposed by previous investigators. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:645814

  17. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. II. Peritoneal macrophage function

    SciTech Connect

    Rama Rao, G.; Cain, C.A.; Lockwood, J.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acute exposure to hamsters to microwave energy (2.45 GHz; 25 mW/cm2 for 60 min) resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages that were significantly more viricidal to vaccinia virus as compared to sham-exposed or normal (minimum-handling) controls. Macrophages from microwave-exposed hamsters became activated as early as 6 h after exposure and remained activated for up to 12 days. The activation of macrophages by microwave exposure paralleled the macrophage activation after vaccinia virus immunization. Activated macrophages from vaccinia-immunized hamsters did not differ in their viricidal activity when the hamsters were microwave- or sham-exposed. Exposure for 60 min at 15 mW/cm2 did not activate the macrophages while 40 mW/cm2 exposure was harmful to some hamsters. Average maximum core temperatures in the exposed (25 mW/cm2) and sham groups were 40.5 degrees C (+/- 0.35 SD) and 38.4 degrees C (+/- 0.5 SD), respectively. In vitro heating of macrophages to 40.5 degrees C was not as effective as in vivo microwave exposure in activating macrophages to the viricidal state. Macrophages from normal, sham-exposed, and microwave-exposed hamsters were not morphologically different, and they all phagocytosed India ink particles. Moreover, immune macrophage cytotoxicity for virus-infected or noninfected target cells was not suppressed in the microwave-irradiated group (25 mW/cm2, 1 h) as compared to sham-exposed controls, indicating that peritoneal macrophages were not functionally suppressed or injured by microwave hyperthermia.

  18. Elicitation of macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, J.A.; Klesius, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Four chemicals were evaluated for elicitation of macrophages in peritoneal cavities of 250-300g healthy channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Cellular exudates were collected at 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 20 d following intraperitoneal injections with squalene, Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), goat serum, thioglycollate, or as a control, phosphate-buffered saline. Injection with either squalene or FIA induced significantly greater (P ??? 0.0001) macrophage recruitment than the other chemicals. The effectiveness of squalene and FIA was compared further by macrophage collection daily for 7 d. Squalene and FIA elicited similarly high macrophage responses (P ??? 0.0450), the highest being 3.43 x 106 macrophages/mL (SE, 2.4 x l06) at 99% purity at day 2 and 2.1 X 106 macrophages/mL (SE, 0.7 x 106) at day 14 at 80% purity, respectively. In both experiments, the time after injection was not statistically significant, nor was there an interaction between time and chemicals. The occurrence of cells other than macrophages decreased with time to yield macrophage recoveries of 47-99% for squalene and 30-80% for FIA. Two subsets of macrophages were observed by means of flow cytometry. As demonstrated by chemiluminescence, the squalene-elicited cells produced high-energy oxygen compounds important to the phagocytic process.

  19. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.M.B.D.; Seabra, S.H.; Vallim, D.C.; Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L.; Vommaro, R.C.; Domingues, R.M.C.P.

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  20. Isolation of murine peritoneal macrophages to carry out gene expression analysis upon Toll-like receptors stimulation.

    PubMed

    Layoun, Antonio; Samba, Macha; Santos, Manuela M

    2015-01-01

    During infection and inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into tissues, where they differentiate into macrophages. Macrophages express surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize molecular patterns conserved through evolution in a wide range of microorganisms. TLRs play a central role in macrophage activation which is usually associated with gene expression alteration. Macrophages are critical in many diseases and have emerged as attractive targets for therapy. In the following protocol, we describe a procedure to isolate murine peritoneal macrophages using Brewer's thioglycollate medium. The latter will boost monocyte migration into the peritoneum, accordingly this will raise macrophage yield by 10-fold. Several studies have been carried out using bone marrow, spleen or peritoneal derived macrophages. However, peritoneal macrophages were shown to be more mature upon isolation and are more stable in their functionality and phenotype. Thus, macrophages isolated from murine peritoneal cavity present an important cell population that can serve in different immunological and metabolic studies. Once isolated, macrophages were stimulated with different TLR ligands and consequently gene expression was evaluated.

  1. [Effects of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yao-zong; Huang, Tao; Li, Ling; Mou, Shao-xia; Kou, Shu-ming; Li, Xue-gang

    2015-12-01

    This work was mainly studied the effects of the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and preliminarily discussed the regulating mechanisms. The effect of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the vitality of macrophages was measured by the MTT assay. The effect of alkaloids on the phagocytosis of macrophages was determined by neutral red trial and respiratory burst activity was tested by NBT. The expressions of respiratory-burst-associated genes influenced by alkaloids were detected by qRT-PCR. The conformation change of membrane protein in macrophages by the impact of alkaloids was studied by fluorospectro-photometer. Results showed that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could increase the phagocytosis of macrophages in different level and berberine had the best effect. Berberine, coptisine and palmatine had up-regulation effects on respiratory burst activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated by PMA and regulatory activity on the mRNA expression of PKC, p40phox or p47phox, whereas the epiberberine had no significant influence on respiratory burst. Moreover, alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could change the conformation of membrane protein and the berberine showed the strongest activity. The results suggested that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma might activate macrophages through changing the conformation of membrane protein of macrophages and then enhanced the phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of macrophages. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanism of alkaloids on the respiratory burst activity of macrophages may be also related to the expression level of PKC, p40phox and p47phox.

  2. [Effects of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yao-zong; Huang, Tao; Li, Ling; Mou, Shao-xia; Kou, Shu-ming; Li, Xue-gang

    2015-12-01

    This work was mainly studied the effects of the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and preliminarily discussed the regulating mechanisms. The effect of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the vitality of macrophages was measured by the MTT assay. The effect of alkaloids on the phagocytosis of macrophages was determined by neutral red trial and respiratory burst activity was tested by NBT. The expressions of respiratory-burst-associated genes influenced by alkaloids were detected by qRT-PCR. The conformation change of membrane protein in macrophages by the impact of alkaloids was studied by fluorospectro-photometer. Results showed that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could increase the phagocytosis of macrophages in different level and berberine had the best effect. Berberine, coptisine and palmatine had up-regulation effects on respiratory burst activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated by PMA and regulatory activity on the mRNA expression of PKC, p40phox or p47phox, whereas the epiberberine had no significant influence on respiratory burst. Moreover, alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could change the conformation of membrane protein and the berberine showed the strongest activity. The results suggested that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma might activate macrophages through changing the conformation of membrane protein of macrophages and then enhanced the phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of macrophages. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanism of alkaloids on the respiratory burst activity of macrophages may be also related to the expression level of PKC, p40phox and p47phox. PMID:27141680

  3. Weight loss in obese mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is not associated with elevated tumor necrosis factor/cachectin activity in peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Lathey, J. L.; Oldstone, M. B.

    1988-01-01

    C57BL/6 ob/ob (C57 ob/ob) mice infected persistently with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) show cachexia as judged by a weight loss of greater than 20%. Virus persists in a subset of macrophages. Because a cachexic state occurs in several chronic debilitating diseases of humans, often accompanied by persistent microbial infections with macrophage/monocytic involvement and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) cachectin production, the role of TNF in the weightloss of ob/ob mice infected persistently with LCMV was investigated. TNF mRNA expression was not increased in peritoneal cells from such persistently-infected mice, nor did their serum levels of TNF rise above those in uninfected litter-mates. Furthermore, in vitro LCMV infection of adherent peritoneal cells from these C57 ob/ob mice did not enhance TNF mRNA or protein expression. Therefore, the cachexia-like weight loss observed in C57 ob/ob mice during a persistent LCMV infection is apparently not associated with a measurable increase in TNF. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3414785

  4. Mast cells aggravate sepsis by inhibiting peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Albert; Gautier, Gregory; Attout, Tarik; Fiore, Frédéric; Lebourdais, Emeline; Msallam, Rasha; Daëron, Marc; Monteiro, Renato C.; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Davoust, Jean; Blank, Ulrich; Malissen, Bernard; Launay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the overwhelming inflammatory reaction associated with polymicrobial sepsis remains a prevalent clinical challenge with few treatment options. In septic peritonitis, blood neutrophils and monocytes are rapidly recruited into the peritoneal cavity to control infection, but the role of resident sentinel cells during the early phase of infection is less clear. In particular, the influence of mast cells on other tissue-resident cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a mouse model that allows both visualization and conditional ablation of mast cells and basophils to investigate the role of mast cells in severe septic peritonitis. Specific depletion of mast cells led to increased survival rates in mice with acute sepsis. Furthermore, we determined that mast cells impair the phagocytic action of resident macrophages, thereby allowing local and systemic bacterial proliferation. Mast cells did not influence local recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes or the release of inflammatory cytokines. Phagocytosis inhibition by mast cells involved their ability to release prestored IL-4 within 15 minutes after bacterial encounter, and treatment with an IL-4–neutralizing antibody prevented this inhibitory effect and improved survival of septic mice. Our study uncovers a local crosstalk between mast cells and macrophages during the early phase of sepsis development that aggravates the outcome of severe bacterial infection. PMID:25180604

  5. Immunomodulatory effect of Glossogyne tenuifolia in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Ha, Choi-Lan; Weng, Ching-Yi; Wang, Lisu; Lian, Tzi-Wei; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2006-08-11

    Glossogyne tenuifolia Cass., a medicinal plant native to Taiwan, is traditionally used as an anti-inflammatory remedy. Oleanolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside have been previously identified as active components of Glossogyne tenuifolia in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. Current study investigates the effect and mechanism of the ethanol extract of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) and its major constituents on the release of inflammatory mediators in activated elicited murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes. Our results showed that GT (up to 0.15 mg/ml) inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in LPS-activated macrophages, and IFN-gamma in PHA-activated splenocytes. GT also inhibited LPS-activated murine iNOS and COX-2 promoter activities in transiently transfected RAW264.7 cells. The major constituents, oleanolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside, as well as its aglycone, luteolin, inhibited the release of NO, PGE(2), TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in activated peritoneal macrophages. However, only luteolin-7-glucoside and luteolin were able to reduce IFN-gamma release in PHA-stimulated splenocytes. To further investigate the possible mechanisms that interfere with LPS- and PHA-signaling, this study focused on nuclear factor-kappaB activation signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that GT (0.075-0.15 mg/ml) treatment reduces nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Collectively, the results suggest that GT inhibits proinflammatory mediator synthesis in activated murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes, in part through NF-kappaB-dependent pathways.

  6. Immunomodulatory effect of Glossogyne tenuifolia in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Ha, Choi-Lan; Weng, Ching-Yi; Wang, Lisu; Lian, Tzi-Wei; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2006-08-11

    Glossogyne tenuifolia Cass., a medicinal plant native to Taiwan, is traditionally used as an anti-inflammatory remedy. Oleanolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside have been previously identified as active components of Glossogyne tenuifolia in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. Current study investigates the effect and mechanism of the ethanol extract of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) and its major constituents on the release of inflammatory mediators in activated elicited murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes. Our results showed that GT (up to 0.15 mg/ml) inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in LPS-activated macrophages, and IFN-gamma in PHA-activated splenocytes. GT also inhibited LPS-activated murine iNOS and COX-2 promoter activities in transiently transfected RAW264.7 cells. The major constituents, oleanolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside, as well as its aglycone, luteolin, inhibited the release of NO, PGE(2), TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in activated peritoneal macrophages. However, only luteolin-7-glucoside and luteolin were able to reduce IFN-gamma release in PHA-stimulated splenocytes. To further investigate the possible mechanisms that interfere with LPS- and PHA-signaling, this study focused on nuclear factor-kappaB activation signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that GT (0.075-0.15 mg/ml) treatment reduces nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Collectively, the results suggest that GT inhibits proinflammatory mediator synthesis in activated murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes, in part through NF-kappaB-dependent pathways. PMID:16584857

  7. Effect of Kramecyne on the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Miranda, E.; Lemus-Bautista, J.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Ramos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Kramecyne is a new peroxide, it was isolated from Krameria cytisoides, methanol extract, and this plant was mostly found in North and South America. This compound showed potent anti-inflammatory activity; however, the mechanisms by which this compound exerts its anti-inflammatory effect are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of kramecyne on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that kramecyne inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 6. During the inflammatory process, levels of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, kramecyne suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23573152

  8. [Differential growth inhibition of mycobacteria by interferon-gamma-or tumor necrosis factor-alpha-treated murine peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tomioka, H; Saito, H

    1996-11-01

    Growth inhibition of the intracellular mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. kansasii, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. fortuitum, and M. chelonae subsp. abscessus by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)- or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-treated murine peritoneal macrophages elicited by proteose peptone was studied in vitro. Macrophages were infected with slowly growing mycobacteria and the extracellular mycobacteria were washed out. Then, macrophages were treated with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha at a concentration of 10 to 1000 U/ml for 2 days. In another experiment, macrophages were pretreated with these cytokines for 1 day then infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria as before. Macrophages were cultured with or without IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha for additional day. Mycobacterial growth was assessed by determination of colony-forming units on 7H11 agar plates after destruction of the macrophages. Stimulation of macrophages with IFN-gamma reduced the growth of mycobacteria. However, except for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, growth was not inhibited by macrophages treated with TNF-alpha. IFN-gamma seems to be an important cytokine for the activation of mycobactericidal mechanisms in murine macrophages. Stimulation with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha and subsequent phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis or M. intracellulare increased O2- production, which was assayed by the method of cytochrome C reduction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Phorbol myristate acetate-triggered-O2- production was also elevated by the cytokine pretreatment of the macrophages, suggesting that mycobacterial growth inhibition did not parallel the production of reactive oxygen intermediates in TNF alpha-activated murine peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that bactericidal mechanisms of murine macrophages against nontuberculous mycobacteria may not depend on reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8958673

  9. Stimulation of murine peritoneal macrophage functions by neuropeptide Y and peptide YY. Involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Bernaez, I; Del Rio, M; Hernanz, A

    1993-01-01

    The peptides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) at concentrations from 10(-12) M to 10(-8) M have been shown in this study to stimulate significantly, in vitro, several functions of resting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of inert particles (latex beads) and foreign cells (Candida albicans), and production of superoxide anion measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with a maximal stimulation of the macrophage functions studied at 10(-10) M. These effects seem to be produced by specific receptors for the neuropeptides studied in peritoneal macrophages. Whereas the two peptides induced no change of intracellular cyclic AMP, they caused a significant stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) in murine macrophages. These results suggest that NPY and PYY produce their effects on macrophage function through PKC activation. PMID:8262554

  10. Release of lysosomal enzymes in Candida albicans phagocytosis by rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fontenla de Petrino, S E; Sirena, A

    1984-02-15

    The present paper reports the in vitro release of lysosomal enzymes in the supernatant of cultures of rat peritoneal macrophages, with the addition of Candida albicans cells. Macrophages were taken from the rat peritoneal cavity 72 hr after non-specific activation with Brain-Heart-Infusion (B.H.I.) broth containing 10% proteose-peptone No. 3. They were then cultured in Parker medium No. 199 (TC 199). After 24 hr a suspension of Candida albicans cells, in a determined concentration, was added to the peritoneal macrophage cultures. At that time, and during pre-determined periods, the following enzymes in the culture supernatants were studied using colorimetric methods: beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase and acid phosphatase. It is concluded that, under identical conditions, the release of beta-galactosidase and acid phosphatase is higher than for beta-glucuronidase. The release rate of all three enzymes is the highest at a 6 hr incubation period, after which, a gradual decrease leads to the rate down to 50% at 24 hr.

  11. Release of lysosomal enzymes in Candida albicans phagocytosis by rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fontenla de Petrino, S E; Sirena, A

    1984-02-15

    The present paper reports the in vitro release of lysosomal enzymes in the supernatant of cultures of rat peritoneal macrophages, with the addition of Candida albicans cells. Macrophages were taken from the rat peritoneal cavity 72 hr after non-specific activation with Brain-Heart-Infusion (B.H.I.) broth containing 10% proteose-peptone No. 3. They were then cultured in Parker medium No. 199 (TC 199). After 24 hr a suspension of Candida albicans cells, in a determined concentration, was added to the peritoneal macrophage cultures. At that time, and during pre-determined periods, the following enzymes in the culture supernatants were studied using colorimetric methods: beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase and acid phosphatase. It is concluded that, under identical conditions, the release of beta-galactosidase and acid phosphatase is higher than for beta-glucuronidase. The release rate of all three enzymes is the highest at a 6 hr incubation period, after which, a gradual decrease leads to the rate down to 50% at 24 hr. PMID:6425693

  12. Effects of selenizing angelica polysaccharide and selenizing garlic polysaccharide on immune function of murine peritoneal macrophage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Liu, Kuanhui; Tian, Weijun; Wang, Hongchao; Liu, Zhenguang; Li, Youying; Li, Entao; Liu, Cui; Li, Xiuping; Hou, Ranran; Yue, Chanjuan; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2015-07-01

    The effects of two selenizing polysaccharides (sCAP2 and sGPS6) on immune function of murine peritoneal macrophages taking two non-selenizing polysaccharides (CAP and GPS) and modifier Na2SeO3 as control. In vitro test, the changes of selenizing polysaccharides, non-selenizing polysaccharides and Na2SeO3 on murine macrophages function were evaluated by phagocytosis and nitric oxide (NO) secretion tests. In vivo test, the mice were injected respectively with 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg of sCAP2, sGPS6, CAP and GPS, or Na2SeO3 80 μg or normal saline 0.4 mL. The peritoneal macrophages were collected and cultured to determine the contents of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 in supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that sCAP2 and sGPS6 could significantly promote the phagocytosis and secretion of NO and three cytokines of macrophages in comparison with CAP and GPS. sCAP2 possessed the strongest activity. This indicates that selenylation modification can further improve the immune-enhancing activity of polysaccharide, and sCAP2 could be as a new immunopotentiator.

  13. The equine alveolar macrophage: Functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages☆

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Anna E.; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C.; Hume, David A.; Pirie, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  14. Specificity and inhibition of glucocorticoid-induced macrocortin secretion from rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The secretion of the phospholipase A2-inhibitor macrocortin and the binding of dexamethasone were studied in suspensions of rat peritoneal macrophages. Corticosteroid-induced macrocortin secretion was specific for glucocorticoids and did not occur in response to glucocorticoid antagonists or other steroids or in response to non-steroid macrophage activators (formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine f-MLP), the calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide-E.-coli(LPS) ). The apparent potency of competition by secretory glucocorticoids for dexamethasone binding to the macrophage parallelled their ability to induce secretion, implying that these binding sites represent the receptors by which macrocortin secretion is initiated. Agents which interfere with microtubule assembly (colchicine, vinblastine and trimethylcolchicinic acid) and prostacyclin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP inhibit macrocortin secretion. Inhibition studies of glucocorticoid-induced macrocortin secretion also suggest dependence upon metabolic energy, a source of Ca2+ and proteolysis and glycosylation prior to secretion. PMID:6317116

  15. Effects of protein-energy malnutrition on NF-kappaB signalling in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Curi, Rui; Borges, Maria Carolina; Borelli, Primavera

    2010-04-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is an important public health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. PEM decreases resistance to infection, impairing a number of physiological processes. In unstimulated cells, NF-kappaB is kept from binding to its consensus sequence by the inhibitor I kappaB alpha, which retains NF-kappaB in the cytoplasm. Upon various signals, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), I kappaB alpha is rapidly degraded and NF-kappaB is induced to translocate into the nucleus, where it activates expression of various genes that participate in the inflammatory response, including those involved in the synthesis of TNF-alpha. TRAF-6 is a cytoplasmic adapter protein that links the stimulatory signal from Toll like receptor-4 to NF-kappaB. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of malnutrition on induction of TNF-alpha by LPS in murine peritoneal macrophages. We evaluated peritoneal cellularity, the expression of MyD88, TRAF-6, IKK, I kappaB alpha and NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB activation and TNF-alpha mRNA and protein synthesis in macrophages. Two-month-old male BALB/C mice were submitted to PEM with a low-protein diet that contained 2% protein, compared to 12% protein in the control diet. When the experimental group had lost about 20% of the original body weight, it was used in the subsequent experiments. Malnourished animals presented anemia, leucopenia and severe reduction in peritoneal cavity cellularity. TNF-alpha mRNA and protein levels of macrophages stimulated with LPS were significantly lower in malnourished animals. PEM also decreased TRAF-6 expression and NF-kappaB activation after LPS stimulation. These results led us to conclude that PEM changes NF-kB signalling pathway in macrophages to LPS stimulus.

  16. Phorbal esters and calcium ionophore can prime murine peritoneal macrophages for tumor cell destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, S.D.; Weiel, J.E.; Hamilton, T.A.; Adams, D.O.

    1986-06-01

    Murine macrophages from sites of inflammation develop toward tumoricidal competence by exposure to a macrophage-activating factor such as interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..). To explore the biochemical transductional events initiated by IFN-..gamma.., peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6J mice elicited by various sterile irritants were treated in vitro with two pharmacologic agents that mimic the action of certain second messengers. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the ionophore A23187 cooperatively reproduced the ability of IFN-..gamma.. to prime macrophages for tumoricidal function. Neither agent alone was able to prime macrophages. The two agents acted on the macrophages, and target susceptibility to kill was not altered by PMA and A23187. Only active phorbol esters, which are known to bind and stimulate protein kinase C, were able to cooperate with A23187 to induce priming. A cell-permeable synthetic diacylglycerol (sn-1,2-dioctanoyl glycerol) could also prime for cytolysis. In the presence of PMA, A23187, and EGTA, addition of Ca/sup + +/ was sufficient for priming, whereas the addition of Mg/sup + +/ was much less efficient. Priming by IFN-..gamma.., however, was not blocked by EGTA. Efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ from preloaded cells was significantly increased by A23187 and by IFN-..gamma... Quin-2/AM, an intracellular chelator of Ca/sup + +/, blocked priming by IFN-..gamma...

  17. Anti-inflammatory action of γ-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Park, Jae-Nam; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-12-01

    This present study was to examine the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of gamma (γ)-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage. Inflammation to macrophage was induced by adding the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). γ-Irradiated genistein significantly decreased the cytotoxicity to murine peritoneal macrophage in dose ranges from 5 to 10 μM than that of non-irradiated genistein. Anti-inflammatory activity within the doses less than 2 μM showed that γ-irradiated genistein treatment remarkably reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by decreasing the nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) production. In a structural analysis through the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), γ-irradiated genistein showed a new peak production distinguished from main peak of genistein (non-irradiated). Therefore, increase of anti-inflammatory activity may closely mediate with structural changes induced by γ irradiation exposure. Based on the above result, γ-irradiation could be an effective tool for reduction of toxicity and increase of physiological activity of biomolecules.

  18. In vivo glucocorticoids regulate cyclooxygenase-2 but not cyclooxygenase-1 in peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Masferrer, J L; Reddy, S T; Zweifel, B S; Seibert, K; Needleman, P; Gilbert, R S; Herschman, H R

    1994-09-01

    Acute inflammatory stimuli elevate both the production of prostaglandins and the synthesis and activity of prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX) in murine peritoneal macrophages. Adrenalectomy also elevates prostaglandin production, COX synthesis and COX activity in these cells. We have utilized cDNA probes and antisera specific for the products of the prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and TIS10/prostaglandin synthase-2/cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) genes to demonstrate that adrenalectomy causes elevation of mRNA and protein from the COX-2 gene, but not from the COX-1 gene, in peritoneal macrophages. Dexamethasone replacement suppressed the elevation of COX-2 mRNA message, COX-2 protein and the increased COX enzyme activity observed in adrenalectomized animals. In contrast, both COX-1 message and COX-1 protein levels were unaffected either by adrenalectomy or by dexamethasone administration. Thus, under normal physiological conditions, tonic glucocorticoid inhibition appears to play a major role in the in vivo regulation of the COX-2 gene. These data are consistent with COX-1 being the constitutive, housekeeping enzyme in macrophages in normal physiological conditions and with the enhanced prostaglandin synthesis seen after an inflammatory stimulus resulting from the rapid induction and activity of COX-2.

  19. Prodigiosin isolated from Hahella chejuensis suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production by inhibiting p38 MAPK, JNK and NF-kappaB activation in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jung-Eun; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Moon, Eun-Yi; Rhee, Dong-Kwon; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2007-12-15

    Prodigiosin was isolated from marine bacteria Hahella chejuensis which has been recently discovered from Marado, Cheju Island, Republic of Korea. Immunosuppressive properties have been reported for prodigiosin members such as undecylprodigiosin, metacycloprodigiosin, prodigiosin and its synthetic analogue PNU156804 (PNU). However, the effect of this agent on macrophage function has not been characterized in detail. In the present study, we examined the effects of prodigiosin on the production of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage. When thioglycollate-elicited macrophages pre-exposed to prodigiosin (1-100 ng/ml) were stimulated with LPS, pretreatment with prodigiosin resulted in the inhibition of NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 was not altered. Inhibition of iNOS protein expression appears to be at the transcriptional level, since prodigiosin decreased LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity through preventing the degradation of IkBalpha, with significant inhibition achieved following pretreatment with prodigiosin. However, prodigiosin did not exert any effect on AP-1 activity. Prodigiosin blocked phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). These results indicate that the inhibition of these signaling molecules expression was correlated with the reduced production of NO in macrophages. Taken together, the present data suggest that prodigiosin reduces NO production and iNOS expression by inhibiting LPS-triggered p38 MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation, thereby implicating a mechanism by which prodigiosin may exert its immunosuppressive effects.

  20. Intrinsic resistance of feline peritoneal macrophages to coronavirus infection correlates with in vivo virulence.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, C A; Scott, F W

    1989-01-01

    Cats infected with virulent feline coronavirus strains develop feline infectious peritonitis, an invariably fatal, immunologically mediated disease; avirulent strains cause either clinically inapparent infection or mild enteritis. Four virulent coronavirus isolates and five avirulent isolates were assessed by immunofluorescence and virus titration for their ability to infect and replicate in feline peritoneal macrophages in vitro. The avirulent coronaviruses infected fewer macrophages, produced lower virus titers, were less able to sustain viral replication, and spread less efficiently to other susceptible macrophages than the virulent coronaviruses. Thus, the intrinsic resistance of feline macrophages may play a pivotal role in the outcome of coronavirus infection in vivo.

  1. Effect of aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia on functions of peritoneal macrophages isolated from CCl4 intoxicated male albino mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The current practice of ingesting phytochemicals for supporting the immune system or fighting infections is based on centuries-old tradition. Macrophages are involved at all the stages of an immune response. The present study focuses on the immunostimulant properties of Tinospora cordifolia extract that are exerted on circulating macrophages isolated from CCl4 (0.5 ml/kg body weight) intoxicated male albino mice. Methods Apart from damaging the liver system, carbon tetrachloride also inhibits macrophage functions thus, creating an immunocompromised state, as is evident from the present study. Such cell functions include cell morphology, adhesion property, phagocytosis, enzyme release (myeloperoxidase or MPO), nitric oxide (NO) release, intracellular survival of ingested bacteria and DNA fragmentation in peritoneal macrophages isolated from these immunocompromised mice. T. cordifolia extract was tested for acute toxicity at the given dose (150 mg/kg body weight) by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Results The number of morphologically altered macrophages was increased in mice exposed to CCl4. Administration of CCl4 (i.p.) also reduced the phagocytosis, cell adhesion, MPO release, NO release properties of circulating macrophages of mice. The DNA fragmentation of peritoneal macrophages was observed to be higher in CCl4 intoxicated mice. The bacterial killing capacity of peritoneal macrophages was also adversely affected by CCl4. However oral administration of aqueous fraction of Tinospora cordifolia stem parts at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight (in vivo) in CCl4 exposed mice ameliorated the effect of CCl4, as the percentage of morphologically altered macrophages, phagocytosis activity, cell adhesion, MPO release, NO release, DNA fragmentation and intracellular killing capacity of CCl4 intoxicated peritoneal macrophages came closer to those of the control group. No acute toxicity was identified in oral administration of the aqueous extract of Tinospora

  2. Antibody-dependent cytolysis of chicken erythrocytes by an in vitro-established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Walker, W S; Demus, A

    1975-02-01

    An in vitro-established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) was tested for its ability to mediate the cytolysis of 51chromiun-labeled chicken erythrocytes. In the presence of specific antibody, but independently of complement, the macrophages phagocytized and lysed labeled erythrocytes. The phagocytic process proved to be functionally distinct from the cytolytic reaction as demonstrated by enhanced cytolysis in the presence of iodoacetate, an inhibitor of phagocytosis. This cell line, because of its effector activity in antibody-dependent cell-mediated immune reactions, will be useful in characterizing the mechanism(s) involved in macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:1167563

  3. In vitro nicotine-induced oxidative stress in mice peritoneal macrophages: a dose-dependent approach.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Das, Subhasis; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Gautam, N; Majumdar, Subrata; Roy, Somenath

    2009-02-01

    The immune cells use reactive oxygen species (ROS) for carrying out their normal functions while an excess amount of ROS can attack cellular components that lead to cell damage. In the present study, peritoneal macrophages (6 x 10(6) cells, >95% viable) isolated from male Swiss mice were treated with nicotine (1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM, 25 mM, and 50 mM) in vitro for 12 h and the superoxide anion generation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes status were monitored. Maximum superoxide radical generation was found at the dose of 10 mM nicotine. The lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were increased significantly (p < 0.05) along with the increasing dose of nicotine. The reduced glutathione level, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities were decreased significantly (p < 0.05), and oxidized glutathione level was increased significantly (p < 0.05) with the increasing dose of the nicotine. From these experiments, it was also observed that all the changes in peritoneal macrophages with 10 mM, 25 mM, and 50 mM nicotine had no significant difference. To observe the effect of nicotine in vivo, this study examined the liver and spleen antioxidant status after nicotine administration (1 mg/kg BW) intraperitoneally in mice and found the diminished SOD activity and GSH level. It may be concluded that nicotine is able to enhance the production of ROS that produced oxidative stress in murine peritoneal macrophages. It also suggested that, 10 mM in vitro nicotine treatment for 12 h is the effective dose. PMID:19778253

  4. Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2 Translocates to the Phagosome after Zymosan Stimulation of Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages and Regulates Phagocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Balestrieri, Barbara; Hsu, Victor W.; Gilbert, Huiya; Leslie, Christina C.; Han, Won K.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Arm, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that group V secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) amplifies the action of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) α in regulating eicosanoid biosynthesis by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with zymosan (Satake, Y., Diaz, B. L., Balestrieri, B., Lam, B. K., Kanaoka, Y., Grusby, M. J., and Arm, J. P. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 16488–16494). To further understand the role of group V sPLA2, we studied its localization in resting mouse peritoneal macrophages before and after stimulation with zymosan and the effect of deletion of the gene encoding group V sPLA2 on phagocytosis of zymosan. We report that group V sPLA2 is present in the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosome in the juxtanuclear region of resting peritoneal macrophages. Upon ingestion of zymosan by mouse peritoneal macrophages, group V sPLA2 is recruited to the phagosome. There it co-localizes with cPLA2α, 5-lipoxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, and leukotriene C4 synthase. Using immunostaining for the cysteinyl leukotrienes in carbodiimide-fixed cells, we show, for the first time, that the phagosome is a site of cysteinyl leukotriene formation. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages from group V sPLA2-null mice demonstrated a >50% attenuation in phagocytosis of zymosan particles, which was restored by adenoviral expression of group V sPLA2 but not group IIA sPLA2. These data demonstrate that group V sPLA2 contributes to the innate immune response both through regulation of eicosanoid generation in response to a phagocytic stimulus and also as a component of the phagocytic machinery. PMID:16407308

  5. Stimulation of the ceramide pathway partially mimics lipopolysaccharide-induced responses in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, S A; Detore, G; McNally, R; Vogel, S N

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that lipolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates cells by mimicking the second-messenger function of ceramide, a lipid generated in the cell by the action of sphingomyelinase (SMase). To examine this possibility further, we compared the abilities of LPS, SMase, and/or ceramide analogs to induce cytokine secretion, modulate gene expression, and induce endotoxin tolerance in macrophages. SMase and LPS induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) to comparable degrees; however, unlike LPS, SMase failed to stimulate detectable interferon activity. Cell-permeable analogs of ceramide induced the expression of many LPS-inducible genes; however, the expression of interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) mRNAs was significantly lower than that induced by LPS. Both SMase-induced TNF-alpha secretion and LPS-induced TNF-alpha secretion were inhibited by pretreatment with a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A. Macrophages preexposed in vitro to LPS to induce a well-characterized state of endotoxin tolerance secreted little or no TNF-alpha upon secondary challenge with either LPS or SMase, whereas macrophages preexposed to SMase secreted high levels of TNF-alpha upon secondary stimulation with LPS or SMase. Collectively, these results suggest that ceramide activates a subset of LPS-induced signaling pathways in murine peritoneal exudate macrophages. PMID:8757882

  6. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  7. Aqueous extract of Gracilaria tenuistipitata suppresses LPS-induced NF-κB and MAPK activation in RAW 264.7 and rat peritoneal macrophages and exerts hepatoprotective effects on carbon tetrachloride-treated rat.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Yen, Feng-Lin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chen, Wei-Chun; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the previous investigations of bioactivity of aqueous extract of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) against H2O2-induced DNA damage and hepatitis C virus replication, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential therapeutic properties of AEGT against inflammation and hepatotoxicity using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse RAW 264.7 cells, primary rat peritoneal macrophages and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute hepatitis model in rats. AEGT concentration-dependently inhibited the elevated RNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, thereby reducing nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 levels, respectively. Moreover, AEGT significantly suppressed the production of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. These inhibitory effects were associated with the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation by AEGT in LPS-stimulated cells. In addition, we highlighted the hepatoprotective and curative effects of AEGT in a rat model of CCl4-intoxicated acute liver injury, which was evident from reduction in the elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels as well as amelioration of histological damage by pre-treatment or post-treatment of AEGT. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that AEGT may serve as a potential supplement in the prevention or amelioration of inflammatory diseases.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF- α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  10. Regulation of interleukin-1 synthesis by histamine produced by mouse peritoneal macrophages per se.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, H; Nakano, K

    1990-01-01

    The response of mouse peritoneal macrophages to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in induction of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and, consequently, of histamine production. Concanavalin A had no effect on the reactions. Alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of HDC, attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, both spontaneous and LPS-stimulated IL-1 synthesis by macrophages. IL-1 production was significantly blocked by either an H1 anti-histamine, diphenhydramine, or H2 anti-histamine ranitidine, in the absence of any exogenous histamine. Addition of exogenous histamine accentuated the IL-1 production by macrophages as a function of its dose. These results suggest that IL-1 production by mouse peritoneal macrophages is regulated by histamine synthesized in the system per se and that the effect of histamine is dependent on both H1 and H2 histamine receptors located on the surface of the cells. PMID:2312155

  11. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  12. [The effect of products of plant and microbial origin on phagocytic function and on the release of oxygen free radicals by mouse peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Dolganiuc, A; Radu, L D; Olinescu, A

    1997-01-01

    The effect of in vivo stimulation with an aqueous extract obtained from roots of Symphytum officinale and Cantastim on mouse peritoneal macrophages was investigated. The results obtained showed that these products initially activated the respiratory burst of the cells and later inhibited it, activating the synthesis of catalase, SOD etc. These data suggest that macrophages challenged by various ingested antigens destroy them initially through oxygen dependent mechanisms and later through enzymatic digestion in order to retain unimpaired their epitopes. PMID:9235147

  13. [Studies on cell signaling immunomodulated murine peritoneal suppressor macrophages: LPS and PMA mediate the activation of RAF-1, MAPK p44 and MAPK p42 and p38 MAPK].

    PubMed

    Chang, Z L; Lin, M Q; Wang, M Z; Yao, Z

    1997-03-01

    38 MAPK (mammalian equivalents of HOG1 in yeast) and JNK MAPK have been discovered. The requirement for activation of p38 MAPK for both Thr-180 and Tyr-182 (at TGY motif) has been shown. p38 MAPK is important in certain transcriptional regulatory pathways, since it can phosphorylate the following transcriptional factors: 1) Elk at Ser 383/389 for binding with SRE motif; 2). ATF 2 at Ser 69/71, forming a complex with Myc for DNA binding at CRE motif; 3) Max at Ser-62 to combine DNA of E-Box motif. p38 MAPK can be activated by LPS, inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF and IL-1, osmolarity. To examine the possibility that whether activation of Raf-1 and ERK 1, ERK2 and p38 MAPK can be regulated directly or/and differently by PKC and PKA pathways, herbimycin A (Ki = 0.9 mumol/L), a potent PTK inhibitor (J. Immunol. 155:3944-4003, 1995) at 2 mumol/L concentration was utilized to block Ras/Raf-1/MAPK cascade. After pre-incubation of macrophages with herbimycin A for 30 min or 90 min, cells were treated with LPS (10 micrograms/ml) and PMA (100 nmol/L) for 15 min. No inhibition of phosphorylation of Raf-1, MAPK p44 and MAPK p42 in response to LPS and PMA was observed (Fig. 1 and 3). However, forskolin, a cAMP inducer for protein kinase A (PKA) activation, inhibited the phosphorylation of LPS- and PMA-stimulated Raf-1, MAPK p44 and MAPK p42 (Fig. 2 and 4). Similarly, in agreement with a very recent report from David, M et al in NIH, in which they indicated that forskolin (30 mumol/L) inhibited IFN-beta-stimulated ERK activity by U 266 cells (J. Biol. Chem. 271: 4585-4588 1996), we found that the levels of phosphorylations of Raf-1 and ERK1 and ERK2 were declined when forskolin (30 mumol/L) was added to macrophages for 20 min at 37 degrees C prior to the stimulation by LPS and PMA. Interestingly, under the same condition, forskolin (30 mumol/L) stimulated the phosphorylation of LPS- and PMA-triggered p38 MAPK of murine peritoneal suppressor macrophages, suggesting that

  14. A potential role of the NOD genetic background in mouse peritoneal macrophages for the development of primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hiroki; Kariya, Ryusho; Matsuda, Kouki; Kudo, Eriko; Katano, Harutaka; Okada, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Severe immunodeficient mice have become invaluable tools in human stem cell and tumor research. In this study, we compared the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages against primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) among Rag-2/Jak3 double-deficient (Rag-2(-/-)Jak3(-/-)) mice with NOD and non-NOD (Balb/c and C57/BL6). We also evaluated lymphomatous effusion and infiltration in a PEL xenograft mouse model using these severe immunodeficient mice. In the phagocytic assay, peritoneal macrophages in the NOD background phagocytosed CFSE-labeled BCBL-1, a PEL cell line, less efficiently than those in the non-NOD background. BCBL-1 cells were successfully engrafted into both the NOD background and non-NOD background; however, the volume of ascites of the NOD background was significantly higher than that of the non-NOD background. Moreover, the organ invasion of PEL cells was suppressed in non-NOD background mice. Thus, the NOD genetic background is considered to contribute to more lymphomatous effusion and the infiltration of PEL cells than a non-NOD background. Our results showed that the NOD background allowed more lymphomatous effusion and infiltration than other backgrounds and peritoneal macrophages played a critical role in preventing the growth and infiltration of PEL cells. PMID:26859781

  15. Evidence that Resorption of Bone by Rat Peritoneal Macrophages Occurs in an Acidic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    Skeletal loss in space, like any form of osteoporosis, reflects a relative imbalance of the activities of cells resorbing (degrading) or forming bone. Consequently, prevention of weightlessness induced bone loss may theoretically be accomplished by (1) stimulating bone formation or (2) inhibiting bone resorption. This approach, however, requires fundamental understanding of the mechanisms by which cells form or degrade bone, information not yet at hand. An issue central to bone resorption is the pH at which resorption takes place. The pH dependent spectral shift of a fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate) conjugated to bone matrix was used to determine the pH at the resorptive cell bone matrix interface. Devitalized rat bone was used as the substrate, and rat peritoneal macrophages were used as the bone resorbing cells. The results suggest that bone resorption is the result of generation of an acidic microenvironment at the cell matrix junction.

  16. The binding of rabbit IgG and its enzymatically derived fragments to homologous peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ganczakowski, M; Leslie, R G

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit IgG and its Fab, Fc and pFc' fragments, prepared by papain or peptic digestion, were assayed for binding to homologous peritoneal macrophages. The binding affinity of IgG for the peritoneal macrophages (Ka = 5.9 +/- 1.6 x 10(5) L/M) was comparable to that recorded with alveolar macrophages (7.6 +/- 1.8 x 10(5) L/M, Arend & Mannik, 1973) but the number of receptor sites per peritoneal cell (4.6 +/- 2.1 x10(6)) was about four-fold greater than on the latter. Of the fragments, only Fc bound to macrophages with an affinity comparable to intact IgG; pFc' bound weakly and Fab was totally inactive. These data, taken with a recent study involving rabbit IgG and guinea-pig macrophages (Ovary, Saluk, Quijada & Lamm, 1976), indicate that the primary IgG binding site for macrophages is located in the C gamma 2 domain. PMID:437840

  17. Eugenol protects nicotine-induced superoxide mediated oxidative damage in murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Majumdar, Subrata; Bag, Braja Gopal; Roy, Somenath

    2009-11-25

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the protective effect of eugenol against in vitro nicotine-induced toxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with N-acetylcysteine. Eugenol was isolated from Ocimum gratissimum and characterized by HPLC, FTIR, (1)H NMR. To establish most effective protective support, we used five different concentrations of eugenol (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0microg/ml) against 10mM nicotine in mice peritoneal macrophages. A dose-dependent protective effect was observed with all doses of eugenol and N-acetylcysteine, as evidenced by decreased level of superoxide anion generation and malondialdehyde, and also increased level of reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, maximum protection was observed at the concentration of 15.0microg/ml eugenol (0.09nM) and 1.0microg/ml N-acetylcysteine (0.006nM). Further, eugenol (15.0microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1.0microg/ml) were tested against nicotine (10mM) toxicity by analyzing the radical generation, lipid, protein, DNA damage, and endogenous antioxidant status. There was a significant increase in the level of radical generation, NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity, lipid, protein, DNA damage and oxidized glutathione level in nicotine-treated group, which were significantly reduced by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Antioxidant status was significantly depleted in the nicotine-treated group, which was effectively restored by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. The protection by eugenol against nicotine toxicity was merely equal effective to that of N-acetylcysteine. These findings suggest the potential use and benefit of eugenol isolated from O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced cellular damage and it may be used as an immunomodulatory drug against nicotine toxicity.

  18. Eugenol protects nicotine-induced superoxide mediated oxidative damage in murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Majumdar, Subrata; Bag, Braja Gopal; Roy, Somenath

    2009-11-25

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the protective effect of eugenol against in vitro nicotine-induced toxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with N-acetylcysteine. Eugenol was isolated from Ocimum gratissimum and characterized by HPLC, FTIR, (1)H NMR. To establish most effective protective support, we used five different concentrations of eugenol (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0microg/ml) against 10mM nicotine in mice peritoneal macrophages. A dose-dependent protective effect was observed with all doses of eugenol and N-acetylcysteine, as evidenced by decreased level of superoxide anion generation and malondialdehyde, and also increased level of reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, maximum protection was observed at the concentration of 15.0microg/ml eugenol (0.09nM) and 1.0microg/ml N-acetylcysteine (0.006nM). Further, eugenol (15.0microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1.0microg/ml) were tested against nicotine (10mM) toxicity by analyzing the radical generation, lipid, protein, DNA damage, and endogenous antioxidant status. There was a significant increase in the level of radical generation, NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity, lipid, protein, DNA damage and oxidized glutathione level in nicotine-treated group, which were significantly reduced by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Antioxidant status was significantly depleted in the nicotine-treated group, which was effectively restored by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. The protection by eugenol against nicotine toxicity was merely equal effective to that of N-acetylcysteine. These findings suggest the potential use and benefit of eugenol isolated from O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced cellular damage and it may be used as an immunomodulatory drug against nicotine toxicity. PMID:19769960

  19. Participation of protein kinases in staurosporine-induced interleukin-6 production by rat peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yamaki, Kouya; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    The incubation of rat peritoneal macrophages in the presence of staurosporine, a non-specific protein kinase inhibitor, induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner at 6.3–63 nM, but at 210 nM, the stimulant effect on IL-6 production was reduced.The levels of IL-6 mRNA as determined by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were also increased by staurosporine in parallel with the ability to induce IL-6 production.Compounds structurally related to staurosporine including K-252a (non-specific protein kinase inhibitor) and KT-5720 (inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA), did not increase IL-6 production by peritoneal macrophages.Staurosporine-induced increases in IL-6 production and expression of IL-6 mRNA were decreased by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 (2.7–27 μM), Ro 31-8425 (1–10 μM) and calphostin C (0.3–3 μM) and by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) inhibitor LY294002 (30–100 μM), but were further increased by the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor, genistein (12–37 μM).The staurosporine-induced increase in IL-6 production was not affected by the PKA inhibitor, H-89 (0.1–3 μM).These findings suggest that the induction of IL-6 production by staurosporine is secondary to elevation of IL-6 mRNA level, which, in turn, is positively regulated by the activation of PKC and PI 3-kinase and negatively regulated by the activation of PTK. PKA does not appear to play a significant role. PMID:10455280

  20. Methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum protects murine peritoneal macrophages from nicotine toxicity by decreasing free radical generation, lipid and protein damage and enhances antioxidant protection

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Das, Subhasis

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum Linn (ME-Og) was tested against nicotine-induced murine peritoneal macrophage in vitro. Phytochemical analysis of ME-Og shown high amount of flavonoid and phenolic compound present in it. The cytotoxic effect of ME-Og was studied in murine peritoneal macrophages at different concentrations (0.1 to 100 µg/ml) using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. To establish the protective role of ME-Og against nicotine toxicity, peritoneal macrophages from mice were treated with nicotine (10 mM), nicotine + ME-Og (1 to 25 µg/ml) for 12 h in culture media. The significantly (p < 0.05) increased super oxide anion generation, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, oxidized glutathione levels were observed in nicotine-treated group as compared to control group; those were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in ME-Og supplemented groups in concentration dependent manner. More over, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced antioxidant status due to nicotine exposure was effectively ameliorated by ME-Og supplementation in murine peritoneal macrophages. Among the different concentration of ME-Og, maximum protective effect was observed by 25 µg/ml, which does not produce significant cell cytotoxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages. These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role of O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced free radical generation, lipid-protein damage and antioxidant status in important immune cell, peritoneal macrophages. PMID:20716908

  1. Ingestion of yeast forms of Sporothrix schenckii by mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, L M; Kubelka, C F; Alviano, C S; Travassos, L R

    1983-01-01

    The ingestion by thioglycolate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages of yeast forms of two strains of Sporothrix schenckii was studied. Yeast forms opsonized with concanavalin A (ConA) were extensively phagocytized, and the phagocytic indexes depended on the concentration of ConA and apparently on the number of lectin receptors at the yeast surface as well. Neuraminidase treatment of S. schenckii increased the ingestion of unopsonized yeasts 7.7-fold. The addition of monosaccharides and derivatives partially inhibited phagocytosis. Mannose, rhamnose, and galactose, which are major constituents of S. schenckii surface antigens, reduced the phagocytic indexes by 40 to 50%. Glucosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylneuraminic acid were equally effective as inhibitors of phagocytosis. A mixture of five neutral sugars and glucosamine inhibited phagocytosis by 73%. The inhibitory effect of simple sugars could be amplified by using neuraminidase-treated yeast cells. Pentoses and glucose were inactive or slightly inhibitory. A purified rhamnomannan inhibited phagocytosis of the homologous strain, whereas partially purified peptidopolysaccharides were toxic to peritoneal macrophages. A partially purified galactomannan from S. schenckii was inhibitory (62% inhibition), and a peptidopolysaccharide fraction in which the O-linked carbohydrate chains had been removed neither was toxic to macrophages nor inhibited phagocytosis. Pretreatment of macrophages with simple sugars under conditions inhibiting ingestion or binding of S. schenckii did not affect phagocytosis of latex particles or sensitized sheep erythrocytes. The presence of receptors at the peritoneal macrophages which bind S. schenckii cell surface components is suggested. PMID:6832808

  2. Peritonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Acute abdomen; Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; SBP; Cirrhosis - spontaneous peritonitis ... management of adult patients with ascites due to cirrhosis 2012. Hepatology . 2013;57(4):1651-1653. PMID: ...

  3. Antibacterial Responses by Peritoneal Macrophages Are Enhanced Following Vitamin D Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bacchetta, Justine; Chun, Rene F.; Gales, Barbara; Zaritsky, Joshua J.; Leroy, Sandrine; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Boregaard, Niels; Rastogi, Anjay; Salusky, Isidro B.; Hewison, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), who usually display low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D), are at high risk of infection, notably those undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). We hypothesized that peritoneal macrophages from PD patients are an important target for vitamin D-induced antibacterial activity. Dialysate effluent fluid was obtained from 27 non-infected PD patients. Flow cytometry indicated that PD cells were mainly monocytic (37.9±17.7% cells CD14+/CD45+). Ex vivo analyses showed that PD cells treated with 25D (100 nM, 6 hrs) or 1,25D (5 nM, 6 hrs) induced mRNA for antibacterial cathelicidin (CAMP) but conversely suppressed mRNA for hepcidin (HAMP). PD cells from patients with peritonitis (n = 3) showed higher baseline expression of CAMP (18-fold±9, p<0.05) and HAMP (64-fold±7) relative to cells from non-infected patients. In 12 non-infected PD patients, oral supplementation with a single dose of vitamin D2 (100,000 IU) increased serum levels of 25D from 18±8 to 41±15 ng/ml (p = 0.002). This had no significant effect on PD cell CD14/CD45 expression, but mRNA for HAMP was suppressed significantly (0.5-fold, p = 0.04). Adjustment for PD cell CD14/CD45 expression using a mixed linear statistical model also revealed increased expression of CAMP (mRNA in PD cells and protein in effluent) in vitamin D-supplemented patients. These data show for the first time that vitamin D supplementation in vitro and in vivo promotes innate immune responses that may enhance macrophage antibacterial responses in patients undergoing PD. This highlights a potentially important function for vitamin D in preventing infection-related complications in CKD. PMID:25549329

  4. NFATc1 releases BCL6-dependent repression of CCR2 agonist expression in peritoneal macrophages from Saccharomyces cerevisiae infected mice.

    PubMed

    Busch, Rhoda; Murti, Krisna; Liu, Jiming; Patra, Amiya K; Muhammad, Khalid; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter; Lichtinger, Monika; Bonifer, Constanze; Wörtge, Simone; Waisman, Ari; Reifenberg, Kurt; Ellenrieder, Volker; Serfling, Edgar; Avots, Andris

    2016-03-01

    The link between the extensive usage of calcineurin (CN) inhibitors cyclosporin A and tacrolimus (FK506) in transplantation medicine and the increasing rate of opportunistic infections within this segment of patients is alarming. Currently, how peritoneal infections are favored by these drugs, which impair the activity of several signaling pathways including the Ca(++) /CN/NFAT, Ca(++) /CN/cofilin, Ca(++) /CN/BAD, and NF-κB networks, is unknown. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection of peritoneal resident macrophages triggers the transient nuclear translocation of NFATc1β isoforms, resulting in a coordinated, CN-dependent induction of the Ccl2, Ccl7, and Ccl12 genes, all encoding CCR2 agonists. CN inhibitors block the CCR2-dependent recruitment of inflammatory monocytes (IM) to the peritoneal cavities of S. cerevisiae infected mice. In myeloid cells, NFATc1/β proteins represent the most prominent NFATc1 isoforms. NFATc1/β ablation leads to a decrease of CCR2 chemokines, impaired mobilization of IMs, and delayed clearance of infection. We show that, upon binding to a composite NFAT/BCL6 regulatory element within the Ccl2 promoter, NFATc1/β proteins release the BCL6-dependent repression of Ccl2 gene in macrophages. These findings suggest a novel CN-dependent cross-talk between NFAT and BCL6 transcription factors, which may affect the outcome of opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26631626

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of miR-21 in the macrophage response to peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Rebecca Elise; Conklin, Daniel J; Ryan, Lindsey; Keskey, Robert C; Ramjee, Vikram; Sepulveda, Ernesto A; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Cheadle, William G

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the role of microRNA-21 in the macrophage response to peritonitis; microRNA-21 expression increases in peritoneal macrophages after lipopolysaccharide stimulation but is delayed until 48 hours after cecal ligation and puncture. MicroRNA-21-null mice and bone marrow-derived cell lines were exposed to cecal ligation and puncture or lipopolysaccharide, and survival, microRNA-21 levels, target messenger RNAs and proteins, and cytokines were assayed. Macrophages were also transfected with microRNA-21 mimics and antagomirs, and similar endpoints were measured. Survival in microRNA-21-null mice was significantly decreased after lipopolysaccharide-induced peritonitis but unchanged after cecal ligation and puncture compared with similarly treated wild-type mice. MicroRNA-21 expression, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, and programmed cell death protein 4 levels were increased after lipopolysaccharide addition in peritoneal cells. Pelino1 and sprouty (SPRY) messenger RNAs were similarly increased early, whereas programmed cell death protein 4 messenger RNA was decreased after lipopolysaccharide, and all microR-21 target messenger RNAs were subsequently decreased by 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide. Transfection with mimics and antagomirs led to appropriate responses in microRNA-21 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Knockdown of microRNA-21 in bone marrow-derived cells showed increased tumor necrosis factor-α and decreased interleukin 10 in response to lipopolysaccharide. Target proteins were unaffected by knockdown as was extracellular signal-regulated kinase; however, the nuclear factor κB p65 subunit was increased after lipopolysaccharide in the microRNA-21 knockout cells. In contrast, there was little change in these parameters after cecal ligation and puncture induction between null and wild-type mice. MicroRNA-21 is beneficial to survival in mice following lipopolysaccharide peritonitis. Overexpression of microRNA-21 decreased tumor necrosis factor

  6. Leonurus sibiricus induces nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo-Jin; Rim, Hong-Kun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Suh, Se-Eun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyung; Choi, In-Young; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Il Kwang; Lee, Ju-Young; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Using mouse peritoneal macrophages, we have examined the mechanism by which Leonurus sibiricus (LS) regulates nitric oxide (NO) production. When LS was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production; however, LS by itself had no effect on NO production. The increased production of NO from rIFN-gamma plus LS-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB. Furthermore, treatment of peritoneal macrophages with rIFN-gamma plus LS caused a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. PDTC also decreased the effect of LS on TNF-alpha production significantly. Because NO and TNF-alpha play an important role in immune function and host defense, LS treatment could modulate several aspects of host defense mechanisms as a result of stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  7. Novel anti-inflammatory chalcone derivatives inhibit the induction of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Herencia, F; Ferrándiz, M L; Ubeda, A; Guillén, I; Dominguez, J N; Charris, J E; Lobo, G M; Alcaraz, M J

    1999-06-18

    In a previous work, we tested a series of chalcone derivatives as possible anti-inflammatory compounds. We now investigate the effects of three of those compounds, CHI, CH8 and CH12, on nitric oxide and prostanoid generation in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and in the mouse air pouch injected with zymosan, where they showed a dose-dependent inhibition with inhibitory concentration 50% values in the microM range. This effect was not the consequence of a direct inhibitory action on enzyme activities. Our results demonstrated that chalcone derivatives inhibited de novo inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 synthesis, being a novel therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases.

  8. Citral and eugenol modulate DNA damage and pro-inflammatory mediator genes in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Porto, Marilia de Paula; da Silva, Glenda Nicioli; Luperini, Bruno Cesar Ottoboni; Bachiega, Tatiana Fernanda; de Castro Marcondes, João Paulo; Sforcin, José Maurício; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2014-11-01

    Citral and eugenol have been broadly studied because of their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiparasitic potentials. In this study, the effects of citral (25, 50 and 100 µg/mL) and eugenol (0.31, 0.62, 1.24 and 2.48 µg/mL) on the expression (RT-PCR) of the pro-inflammatory mediator genes NF-κB1, COX-2 and TNF-α were evaluated in mouse peritoneal macrophages with or without activation by a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Additionally, the genotoxic potentials of two compounds and their capacities to modulate the DNA damage induced by doxorubicin (DXR) were investigated using the comet assay. The data revealed that neither citral nor eugenol changed COX-2, NF-κB1 or TNF-α expression in resting macrophages. However, in LPS-activated cells, citral induced the hypoexpression of COX-2 (100 µg/mL) and TNF-α (50 and 100 µg/mL). Hypoexpression of TNF-α was also detected after cellular exposure to eugenol at the highest concentration (2.48 µg/mL). Both compounds exhibited genotoxic potential (citral at 50 and 100 µg/mL and eugenol at all concentrations) but also showed chemopreventive effects, in various treatment protocols. Both citral and eugenol might modulate inflammatory processes and DXR-induced DNA damage, but the use of these compounds must be viewed with caution because they are also able to induce primary DNA lesions.

  9. HJB-1, a 17-hydroxy-jolkinolide B derivative, inhibits LPS-induced inflammation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei-Chang; Xu, Xiao-Han; Zhang, Na-Na; Liu, Ning; Wu, Dong-Lin; Wang, Yang; Peng, Qi-Sheng; Vandenplas, Michel; Wang, Hong-Bing; Sun, Wan-Chun

    2014-08-01

    Jolkinolide B (JB) and 17-hydroxy-JB (HJB) are diterpenoids from plants and it has been reported that the presence of a C-17 hydroxy group in JB significantly enhances the anti-inflammatory potency of JB. In this study, two HJB derivatives HJB-1 and HJB-2 were generated by the chemical modification of a 17-hydroxy group of HJB. HJB-1 more effectively inhibited TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 release in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. In addition, HJB-1 reduced LPS-induced mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in a concentration-dependent manner, but did not alter IL-10 mRNA expression. LPS-induced NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation were also effectively inhibited by HJB-1. These results demonstrate that HJB-1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages by inhibiting NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation and modification of a 17-hydroxy group of HJB may enhance the anti-inflammatory potency of HJB derivatives.

  10. Biochemical mechanisms underlying the development of radioresistance by cultured peritoneal exudate macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.S.; Hsu, S.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated changes in radiosensitivity of peritoneal exudate macrophage colony-forming cells (PE-CFC) when exudative peritoneal macrophages were cultured in vitro. The change in the shape of the dose-response curve of PE-CFC to ionizing irradiation was partly dependent on the concentration of oxygen in the gas phase of the incubators. When cells were incubated in an environment containing 20% oxygen, the value of both Dq and D0 for PE-CFC increased. The dose-response curve of PE-CFC cultured for 3 days resembled that of alveolar macrophage colony-forming cells (AL-CFC). The changes in radiosensitivity were accompanied by an increase in the level of three antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. However, when they were cultured in a 6% oxygen environment, only the value of Dq increased. When alveolar macrophages were incubated in vitro, no significant change in the shape of the dose-response curve of AL-CFC was noted whether they were cultured in gas phase containing either 20 or 6% oxygen. It is concluded that the radiosensitivity of PE-CFC changes when they are cultured in vitro. The increase in D0 appears to be related to the intracellular level of antioxidant enzymes.

  11. Adherence of Salmonella typhimurium to murine peritoneal macrophages is mediated by lipopolysaccharide and complement receptors.

    PubMed

    al-Bahry, S N; Pistole, T G

    1997-06-01

    Adherence of Salmonella typhimurium to mouse peritoneal macrophages (Mø) was monitored using a direct microscopic assay and flow cytometry. Competitive binding studies using wild-type lipopolysaccharide and derivatives confirmed a role for this moiety in bacterial adherence. Mø pretreated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose exhibited lower binding activity than did untreated controls, suggesting involvement of either Fc or complement receptors. Pre-exposing Mø to Fc fragments, however, failed to reduce bacterial binding, thus eliminating a role for Fc receptors in this process. Mø pretreated with neutrophil elastase exhibited a diminished ability to bind S. typhimurium, suggesting involvement of complement receptor 1. Monoclonal antibodies M1/70 and M18/2, specific for epitopes on the alpha and beta chains, respectively, of complement receptor 3, also blocked this adherence. In each case we were unable to eliminate completely bacterial adhesion to Mø. Monoclonal antibodies to two additional Mø receptors, Mac-2 and Mac-3, did not block bacterial attachment. These data indicate that multiple mechanisms are involved in the initial adhesion of S. typhimurium to mouse Mø.

  12. Transcriptional switching in macrophages associated with the peritoneal foreign body response.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jane E; Summers, Kim M; Gongora, Milena; Grimmond, Sean M; Campbell, Julie H; Hume, David A; Rolfe, Barbara E

    2014-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that myeloid cells are the source of fibrotic tissue induced by foreign material implanted in the peritoneal cavity. This study utilised the MacGreen mouse, in which the Csf1r promoter directs myeloid-specific enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, to determine the temporal gene expression profile of myeloid subpopulations recruited to the peritoneal cavity to encapsulate implanted foreign material (cubes of boiled egg white). Cells with high EGFP expression (EGFP(hi)) were purified from exudate and encapsulating tissue at different times during the foreign body response, gene expression profiles determined using cDNA microarrays, and data clustered using the network analysis tool, Biolayout Express(3D). EGFP(hi) cells from all time points expressed high levels of Csf1r, Emr1 (encoding F4/80), Cd14 and Itgam (encoding Mac-1) providing internal validation of their myeloid nature. Exudate macrophages (days 4-7) expressed a large cluster of cell cycle genes; these were switched off in capsule cells. Early in capsule formation, Csf1r-EGFP(hi) cells expressed genes associated with tissue turnover, but later expressed both pro- and anti-inflammatory genes alongside a subset of mesenchyme-associated genes, a pattern of gene expression that adds weight to the concept of a continuum of macrophage phenotypes rather than distinct M1/M2 subsets. Moreover, rather than transdifferentiating to myofibroblasts, macrophages contributing to later stages of the peritoneal foreign body response warrant their own classification as 'fibroblastoid' macrophages. PMID:24638066

  13. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages. PMID:8176226

  14. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  15. Estradiol Is a Critical Mediator of Macrophage-Nerve Cross Talk in Peritoneal Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Erin; Temp, Julia; Esnal-Zufiurre, Arantza; Mechsner, Sylvia; Horne, Andrew W.; Saunders, Philippa T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis occurs in approximately 10% of women and is associated with persistent pelvic pain. It is defined by the presence of endometrial tissue (lesions) outside the uterus, most commonly on the peritoneum. Peripheral neuroinflammation, a process characterized by the infiltration of nerve fibers and macrophages into lesions, plays a pivotal role in endometriosis-associated pain. Our objective was to determine the role of estradiol (E2) in regulating the interaction between macrophages and nerves in peritoneal endometriosis. By using human tissues and a mouse model of endometriosis, we demonstrate that macrophages in lesions recovered from women and mice are immunopositive for estrogen receptor β, with up to 20% being estrogen receptor α positive. In mice, treatment with E2 increased the number of macrophages in lesions as well as concentrations of mRNAs encoded by Csf1, Nt3, and the tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptor, TrkB. By using in vitro models, we determined that the treatment of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons with E2 increased mRNA concentrations of the chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 that stimulated migration of colony-stimulating factor 1–differentiated macrophages. Conversely, incubation of colony-stimulating factor 1 macrophages with E2 increased concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3, which stimulated neurite outgrowth from ganglia explants. In summary, we demonstrate a key role for E2 in stimulating macrophage-nerve interactions, providing novel evidence that endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent neuroinflammatory disorder. PMID:26073038

  16. A SIRT3/AMPK/autophagy network orchestrates the protective effects of trans-resveratrol in stressed peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wen-Jun; Li, Yi-Fang; Liu, Fang-Lan; Deng, Jie; Wu, Yan-Ping; Yuan, Wei-Lin; Tsoi, Bun; Chen, Jun-Li; Wang, Qi; Cai, Shao-Hui; Kurihara, Hiroshi; He, Rong-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Resveratrol gains a great interest for its strong antioxidant properties, while the molecular mechanisms underlie the beneficial effects on psychosocial stress remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrated that resveratrol protected peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 cells from stress-induced decrease in the total cell count, phagocytic capability, reactive oxygen species generation, monodansylcadaverine and mitochondrial membrane potential in stressed mice. Resveratrol promoted stress-induced autophagy in both models. Modulation of autophagy by rapamycin or 3-methyladenine regulated the protective effect of resveratrol, suggesting a role of autophagy in the protective mechanisms of resveratrol. The comparison studies revealed that distinct mechanisms were implicated in the protective effect of resveratrol and other antioxidants (vitamin C and edaravone). Resveratrol promoted autophagy via upregulating SIRT3 expression and phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Knockdown of SIRT3 resulted in decreased autophagy and abolished protective effect of resveratrol. SIRT1 was also involved in the protective mechanism of resveratrol, although its effect on autophagy was unnoticeable. Pharmacological manipulation of autophagy modulated the effects of resveratrol on SIRT3 and AMPK, revealing the engagement of a positive feedback loop. In sharp contrast, vitamin C and edaravone effectively protected macrophages from stress-induced cytotoxicity, accompanied by downregulated SIRT3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation, and decreased level of autophagy response. Taken together, we conclude that a SIRT3/AMPK/autophagy network orchestrates in the protective effect of resveratrol in macrophages.

  17. Surface expression and rapid internalization of macrosialin (mouse CD68) on elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, H; Ramprasad, M; Kondratenko, N; Foster, D M; Quehenberger, O; Steinberg, D

    2000-01-01

    Macrosialin, the mouse homolog of human CD68, is a heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein found almost exclusively in macrophages. Its function remains uncertain. It has a high affinity for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in ligand blots and antibodies against the human homolog, CD68, inhibit the binding of oxidized LDL to a human monocyte-derived cell line (THP-1). However, there is still controversy as to whether macrosialin, found predominantly in late endosomes, is expressed at all on the plasma membrane. The present studies, done in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, confirm that macrosialin is predominantly intracellular but show clearly that 10-15% of it is expressed on the cell surface. Exchange with intracellular pools occurs at an extremely high rate. The results are compatible with a surface function, including internalization of bound ligands or adhesion to surfaces.

  18. Transfer to in vitro conditions influences expression and intracellular distribution of galectin-3 in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dumić, J; Lauc, G; Hadzija, M; Flögel, M

    2000-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a beta-galactoside-binding lectin that has been implicated in numerous physiological processes, including mRNA splicing, cell differentiation, tumor metastasis and the stress response. We have studied effects of transfer of resident murine peritoneal macrophages to in vitro conditions on galectin-3 in different cell compartments. Galectin-3 was purified by immunoprecipitation with rat monoclonal antibody M3/38, and analyzed by immunoblotting using the same antibody. Transfer to in vitro conditions nearly doubled the total amount of galectin-3 in cells, and caused significant alterations in its intracellular distribution, indicating that galectin-3 is involved in the adaptation of peritoneal macrophages to in vitro conditions.

  19. Intracellularly survived Staphylococcus aureus after phagocytosis are more virulent in inducing cytotoxicity in fresh murine peritoneal macrophages utilizing TLR-2 as a possible target.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus with high virulence potential is contributing to a current public health crisis in both hospital and community settings. TLR-2 and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytic cells is thought to be an important component of the host's immunity against S. aureus infection. However, response of S. aureus against modulation of host-derived ROS in absence of TLR-2 during acute staphylococcal infection is still remains unclear. Peritoneal macrophages were pretreated with either inhibitors of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase in presence or absence of anti TLR-2 antibody and were infected with S. aureus strain AG-789. Bacteria were recovered after time dependent phagocytosis; intracellular killing, level and expression of SOD and catalase were measured. Phagocytosed bacteria from respective groups were further used for infection to fresh peritoneal macrophages as well as for in vivo infection. Levels of ROS, cytokine, lysozyme, antioxidant enzymes activity and TLR-2 expression were measured. Results revealed that more bacteria were escaped killing in SOD and catalase inhibitor pretreated TLR-2 neutralized macrophages, found to express more catalase and are antibiotic resistant. Infection of fresh macrophages with S. aureus, recovered from SOD and catalase inhibited TLR-2 neutralized macrophages induced lower ROS, lysozyme and cytokine production and caused increased bacterial count. Furthermore, bacterial antioxidants by modulating host-derived ROS could regulate the cell surface TLR-2 expression in murine peritoneal macrophages. So, in the early phase of infection, TLR-2 participates in the innate immune response and targeting bacterial antioxidants might be useful in the alleviation of Staphylococcus aureus infection. PMID:27270212

  20. Fish oil dietary supplementation reduces Ia expression in rat and mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, J; Rodríguez-Iturbe, B; Parra, G

    1990-07-01

    Preliminary studies suggest that administration of fish oil fatty acids may be beneficial in several immunological diseases; therefore, we studied the effect of fish oil dietary supplementation on the expression of Ia in stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages. Rats (n = 19) and mice (n = 27) on standard rodent feeding were separated in experimental (E) and control (C) groups that received fish oil or saline solution, respectively, daily for 4 weeks by esophageal gavage. Cholesterol serum levels were significantly lowered by fish oil (E vs C, P less than 0.01). E and C groups were injected intraperitoneally with Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and peritoneal cells were harvested 4 and 7 days after infection. Decreased expression of Ia induced by LM was found in rats (C = 49.68 +/- 5.09%, E = 16.95 +/- 4.3%, P less than 0.01) and mice (C = 47.38 +/- 7.63%, E = 26.66 +/- 1.92%, P less than 0.01). Animals with a more pronounced depression of serum cholesterol (reduction of 44.04 +/- 1.52% of baseline levels) had more depression of Ia expression (6.47 +/- 1.22%, P less than 0.001 vs control). Reduction of Ia expression was not related to PGE2 production by peritoneal cells. Reduction of Ia expression by fish oil could induce down-regulation of antigen presentation and alloreactivity.

  1. Interaction of plasma fibronectin (pFN) with membranous constituents of peritoneal exudate cells and pulmonary macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Rovin, B.; Molnar, J.; Chevalier, D.; Ng, P.

    1984-11-01

    The prominent role of plasma fibronectin (pFN) in the host defense system as an opsonin for gelatin (collagen)-coated colloids has been established. In the present study the authors investigated the interaction of pFN and membrane isolates from cells devoid of collagen, as well as several tissues. In a liver slice assay system it was shown that subcellular membrane fractions from lung macrophages, peritoneal exudate cells, spleen, testis, and liver were able to competitively inhibit the pFN-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-gelatin coated latex beads (gLtx) at low concentrations. Endocytosis of /sup 125/I-labeled membrane isolates by macrophage monolayers was also promoted by addition of pFN. In an attempt to characterize the membrane component(s) interacting with pFN, it was found that mild extraction procedure with 1 M KBr could release a significant amount of this inhibitory activity. Further studies demonstrated that the agent(s) responsible for inhibition of gLtx uptake was heat sensitive, not altered by trypsin treatment, and did not contain actin, a protein known to interact with pFN. This work indicates that pFN interacts specifically with an as yet unknown membrane component(s) and that such interaction will promote clearance of cellular debris by macrophages. This suggests that pFN may be an important opsonin for the reticuloendothelial system in clearance of collagenous and noncollagenous cellular debris once they are exposed to interact with it.

  2. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  3. Macrophage activation of allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation in the guinea pig mixed leukocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Greineder, D K; Rosenthal, A S

    1975-05-01

    The role of the macrophage in the guinea pig mixed leukocyte culture was investigated. Macrophages obtained from oil-induced peritoneal exudates, peritoneal wash-out cells, spleen, and alveolar washings were found to be effective stimulators of allogeneic lymph node and splenic lymphocyte DNA synthesis. The stimulatory properties of macrophages proved radioresistant but viability dependent. Unfractionated lymph node cells or adherence column purified lymph node lymphocytes and thymocytes were only minimally active as stimulators, even in the presence of macrophages syngeneic to the responder lymphocytes. Allogeneic fibroblasts, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, L2C leukemia cells, and xenogeneic (murine) macrophages failed to simulate. These data provide evidence that the macrophage is the predominant stimulator of the mixed leukocyte culture in the guinea pig.

  4. Yeast mannans inhibit binding and phagocytosis of zymosan by mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, S S; Nelson, R S; Silverstein, S C

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the effects of various mannans, glycoproteins, oligosaccharides, monosaccharides, and sugar phosphates on the binding and phagocytosis of yeast cell walls (zymosan) by mouse peritoneal macrophages. A phosphonomannan (PO(4):mannose ratio = 1:8:6) from kloeckera brevis was the most potent inhibitor tested; it inhibited binding and phagocytosis by 50 percent at concentrations of approximately 3-5 mug/ml and 10 mug/ml, respectively. Removal of the phosphate from this mannan by mild acid and alkaline phosphatase treatment did not appreciably reduce its capacity to inhibit zymosan phagocytosis. The mannan from saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant LB301 inhibits phagocytosis by 50 percent at 0.3 mg/ml, and a neutral exocellular glucomannan from pichia pinus inhibited phagocytosis by 50 percent at 1 mg/ml. Cell wall mannans from wild type S. cervisiae X2180, its mnn2 mutant which contains mannan with predominantly 1(arrow)6- linked mannose residues, yeast exocellular mannans and O-phosphonomannans were less efficient inhibitors requiring concentrations of 1-5 mg/ml to achieve 50 percent reduction in phagocytosis. Horseradish peroxidase, which contains high-mannose type oligosaccharides, was also inhibitory. Mannan is a specific inhibitor of zymosan binding and phagocytosis. The binding and ingestion of zymosan but not of IgG- or complement-coated erythrocytes can be obliterated by plating macrophages on substrates coated with poly-L-lysin (PLL)-mannan. Zymosan uptake was completely abolished by trypsin treatment of the macrophages and reduced by 50-60 percent in the presence of 10 mM EGTA. Pretreatment of the macrophages with chloroquine inhibited zymosan binding and ingestion. These results support the proposal that the macrophage mannose/N-acetylglucosamine receptor (P. Stahl, J.S. Rodman, M.J. Miller, and P.H. Schlesinger, 1978, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75:1399-1403, mediates the phagocytosis of zymosan particles. PMID:6298248

  5. Culture of mouse peritoneal macrophages with mouse serum induces lipid bodies that associate with the parasitophorous vacuole and decrease their microbicidal capacity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Mota, Laura Azeredo Miranda; Roberto Neto, João; Monteiro, Verônica Gomes; Lobato, Caroliny Samary Silva; Oliveira, Marco Antonio de; Cunha, Maura da; D'Ávila, Heloisa; Seabra, Sérgio Henrique; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2014-09-01

    Lipid bodies [lipid droplets (LBs)] are lipid-rich organelles involved in lipid metabolism, signalling and inflammation. Recent findings suggest a role for LBs in host response to infection; however, the potential functions of this organelle in Toxoplasma gondii infection and how it alters macrophage microbicidal capacity during infection are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of host LBs in T. gondii infection in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Macrophages cultured with mouse serum (MS) had higher numbers of LBs than those cultured in foetal bovine serum and can function as a model to study the role of LBs during intracellular pathogen infection. LBs were found in association with the parasitophorous vacuole, suggesting that T. gondii may benefit from this lipid source. Moreover, increased numbers of macrophage LBs correlated with high prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and decreased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Accordingly, LB-enriched macrophages cultured with MS were less efficient at controlling T. gondii growth. Treatment of macrophages cultured with MS with indomethacin, an inhibitor of PGE2 production, increased the microbicidal capacity against T. gondii. Collectively, these results suggest that culture with MS caused a decrease in microbicidal activity of macrophages against T. gondii by increasing PGE2 while lowering NO production.

  6. CYTOTOXIC EFFECTS OF SOME MINERAL DUSTS ON SYRIAN HAMSTER PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Bey, Elke; Harington, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Hamster peritoneal macrophages were grown in cell culture and their response to various conditions was examined. The cultures responded favorably to high concentrations of serum and to medium which had been preconditioned by contact with tumor cells. After 2–3 days of adaptation, they entered into a period of stability which lasted from the 4th to the 9th day. Macrophage cultures in this stable phase were treated with various samples of mineral dusts and their response determined by counting the number of viable macrophages/cm2 at intervals over a period of 72 hr. Crystalline silica Snowit was found to be nontoxic. Amorphous silica Fransil caused a characteristic cytotoxic effect and a rapid decline in cell population at doses less than 150 µg/5 x 105 cells. Of the three different kinds of asbestos used, chrysotile was toxic and amosite and crocidolite nontoxic at equivalent concentrations. A comparison of two preparations of chrysotile which differed in surface area showed that weight rather than surface area determines toxicity. Pretreatment of chrysotile with tryptose phosphate broth under drastic conditions accelerated but did not increase the final intensity of the cytotoxic effect. PMID:4101804

  7. In vitro immune toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptosis and immune cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhao, Lixia; Yang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants and are often detected in the environment, wildlife, and humans, presenting potential threats to ecosystem and human health. PBDEs can cause neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. However, data on PBDE immunotoxicity are limited, and the toxicity mechanisms remain largely unknown. Both immune cell death and dysfunction can modulate the responses of the immune system. This study examined the toxic effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the immune system by using peritoneal macrophages as the model. The macrophages were exposed to PBDEs, and cell death was determined through flow cytometry and immunochemical blot. The results showed that after 24h of exposure, BDE-47 (>5 μM) and BDE-209 (>20 μM) induced cell apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione. BDE-47 was more potent than BDE-209; the cytotoxic concentrations for BDE-47 and BDE-209 were determined to be 5 μM and 20 μM, respectively, during 24h of exposure. However, pretreatment with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (ROS scavenger) partially reversed the cytotoxic effects. Further gene expression analyses on Caspase-3,-8,-9, TNFR1, and Bax revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. More importantly, non-cytotoxic concentrations BDE-47 (<2 μM) and BDE-209 (<10 μM) could impair macrophage accessory cell function in a concentration-dependent manner, but no effects were observed on phagocytic responses. These revealed effects of PBDEs on macrophages may shed light on the toxicity mechanisms of PBDEs and suggest the necessity of evaluating cellular functionality during the risk assessment of PBDE immunotoxicity. PMID:25462306

  8. Infection of white rat peritoneal macrophages with Toxoplasma gondii, (Coccidia: Sarcocystidae) after Trypanosoma lewisi (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) infection.

    PubMed

    Catarinella, G; Chinchilla, M; Guerrero, O M; Castro, A

    1999-09-01

    Peritoneal macrophages from Wistar rats, inoculated and non-inoculated with 10(6) T. lewisi trypomastigotes, were cultured and infected with 10(6) T. gondii tachyzoites. Multiplication rates of this parasite were studied after 1, 24 and 48 h of infection but there were not significant differences between the number of parasites found inside of macrophages coming, either from T. lewisi infected or non infected rats. On the other hand, in vivo studies of Toxoplasma multiplication inside peritoneal macrophages, showed that there is an increase of parasite number in cells from T. lewisi infected rats, as compared with those macrophages from non infected rats. This effect was statistically significant and was more evident after four days of infection. Therefore, it has been demonstrated that in vivo, but not in vitro T. lewisi infections, causes an important decrease of the natural resistance to T. gondii of the white rats, which is manifested by the major invasion and multiplication of the parasite inside of peritoneal macrophages.

  9. Overload training inhibits phagocytosis and ROS generation of peritoneal macrophages: role of IGF-1 and MGF.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Ru; Dong, Jingmei

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that overload training inhibits the phagocytosis and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of peritoneal macrophages (Mϕs), and that insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) and mechano-growth factor (MGF) produced by macrophages may contribute to this process. Rats were randomized to two groups, sedentary control group (n = 10) and overload training group (n = 10). The rats of overload training group were subjected to 11 weeks of experimental training protocol. Blood sample was used to determine the content of hemoglobin, testosterone, and corticosterone. The phagocytosis and the ROS generation of Mϕs were measured by the uptake of neutral red and the flow cytometry, respectively. IGF-1 and MGF mRNA levels in Mϕs were determined by real-time PCR. In addition, we evaluated the effects of IGF-1 and MGF peptide on phagocytosis and ROS generation of Mϕs in vitro. The data showed that overload training significantly decreased the body weight (19.3 %, P < 0.01), the hemoglobin (13.5 %, P < 0.01), the testosterone (55.3 %, P < 0.01) and the corticosterone (40.6 %, P < 0.01) in blood. Moreover, overload training significantly decreased the phagocytosis (27 %, P < 0.05) and the ROS generation (35 %, P < 0.01) of Mϕs. IGF-1 and MGF mRNA levels in Mϕs from overload training group increased significantly compared with the control group (21-fold and 92-fold, respectively; P < 0.01). In vitro experiments showed that IGF-1 had no significant effect on the phagocytosis and the ROS generation of Mϕs. Unlike IGF-1, MGF peptide impaired the phagocytosis of Mϕs in dose-independent manner. In addition, MGF peptide of some concentrations (i.e., 1, 10, 50, 100 ng/ml) significantly inhibited the ROS generation of Mϕs. These results suggest that overload training inhibits the phagocytosis and the ROS generation of peritoneal macrophages, and that MGF produced by macrophages may play a key role in this process. This may represent a novel mechanism of

  10. Peritoneal macrophages from patients with cirrhotic ascites show impaired phagocytosis and vigorous respiratory burst

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Abdel Motaal M.; Bomford, Adrian; Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T.; Davies, Ted; Smith, Roger; Williams, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients (CPs) are susceptible to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Aim of this study was to examine if this susceptibility was related to peritoneal macrophages' (PMs) altered host defence. Absorbance of phagocytosed particles by PMs from CPs was lower than that of control (31.88% vs. 77.2%). Particle opsonisation increased the absorbance to 41% in CPs' PMs, and this value remains lower than the control; 77.2%. Respiratory burst (RB) was expressed as fluorescence index values, and these were higher in PMs from CPs than in controls (82 vs. 41, 73 vs. 26 and 71 vs. 26). IFN-γ made no further increase of RB values in PMs from CPs. CD14 expression was also higher in CPs' PMs. IFN-γ significantly downregulated CD14 expression in both CPs' PMs and control. Reduced phagocytosis by predominantly CD14-positive PMs from CPs could be related to intense RB. Findings suggest altered host defence that could contribute to susceptibility to SBP. PMID:24371553

  11. Effects of β-endorphin on the production of reactive oxygen species, IL-1β, Tnf-Α, and IL-10 by murine peritoneal macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Baeva, T A; Nebogatikov, V O

    2016-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that β-endorphin stimulates the zymosan-induced secretion of reactive oxygen species and suppresses the spontaneous production of IL-1β and IL-10 by murine peritoneal macrophages in vivo. PMID:27595832

  12. Enhanced resistance against Listeria monocytogenes at an early phase of primary infection in pregnant mice: activation of macrophages during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Y; Mitsuyama, M; Sano, M; Nakano, H; Nomoto, K

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the pregnancy-induced changes in macrophage activity which are important in the expression of host defense against infections. Several macrophage functions were examined by using Listeria monocytogenes. In pregnant mice, prolonged survival and enhanced in vivo elimination of bacteria were observed in the early phase of primary infection. Functions of peritoneal macrophages, including in vitro phagocytosis intracellular killing, glucose consumption, generation of superoxide anion, and intracellular beta-glucuronidase activity were shown to be enhanced in pregnant mice. These findings indicate that pregnancy enhances macrophage functions qualitatively. Possible mechanisms for this enhancement and the significance of macrophage activation for pregnant hosts are discussed. PMID:3011673

  13. Isofraxidin exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and inhibited TNF-α production in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro via the MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Xing, Wei; Li, Weifeng; Fan, Ting; Hu, Hua; Li, Yongmei

    2012-10-01

    Isofraxidin (IF) is a Coumarin compound that can be isolated from medicinal plants, such as Sarcandra glabra (Thunb.). Nakai is widely used in Asian countries for the treatment of anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour action. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effect of IF on inflammation and nociception. In addition, we investigated a potential novel mechanism to explain the anti-inflammatory properties of IF. In vivo, xylene-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, LPS-induced mouse endotoxic shock, acetic acid-induced mice writhing and formalin-induced mouse pain models were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of IF. In vitro, we examined the effects of IF inhibition on TNF-α production and the regulation of ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation activity in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrated that IF can significantly decrease xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced pain. Moreover, IF greatly inhibited the production of TNF-α in the serum of LPS-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages, and it decreased phospho-p38 and ERK1/2 protein expression in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Overall, our data suggest that IF possesses significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities that may be mediated through the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2.

  14. Morinda citrifolia Linn. fruit (Noni) juice induces an increase in NO production and death of Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes in peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Souza, Fernando; de Souza, Celeste da Silva Freitas; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Silva, João José Mendes; de Oliveira, Renata Mondêgo; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lúcia; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva

    2016-08-31

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is considered a serious public health problem. Due to the absence of an effective vaccine and debilitating chemotherapy better therapies are urgently needed. This situation has stimulated the search for alternative treatments such as the use of herbal medicines. Several studies conducted with Morinda citrifolia Linn. have shown various biological activities such as antitumor, immunomodulation and antileishmanial activity, however its mechanisms of action are still unknown. This study aimed to analyze the activity of M. citrifolia fruit juice against Leishmania amazonensis and its action on peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c infected with L. amazonensis. Activity against the promastigote forms showed IC50 at 275.3 μg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate the ultrastructural alterations in the promastigotes treated with the juice and the results showed cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid inclusion and increased activity of exocytosis. The juice treatment presented an IC50 at 208.4 μg/mL against intracellular amastigotes and led to an increased nitrite production in infected and non-infected macrophages. When macrophages were pre-treated with iNOS inhibitors, aminoguanidine or 1400W, the intracellular amastigotes increased, demonstrating the important role of NO production in M. citrifolia fruit activity. In conclusion, our results reveal that treatment with M. citrifolia fruit juice can increase NO production in peritoneal macrophages and this ability has an important role in the killing of L. amazonensis intracellular amastigotes.

  15. Morinda citrifolia Linn. fruit (Noni) juice induces an increase in NO production and death of Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes in peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Souza, Fernando; de Souza, Celeste da Silva Freitas; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Silva, João José Mendes; de Oliveira, Renata Mondêgo; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lúcia; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva

    2016-08-31

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is considered a serious public health problem. Due to the absence of an effective vaccine and debilitating chemotherapy better therapies are urgently needed. This situation has stimulated the search for alternative treatments such as the use of herbal medicines. Several studies conducted with Morinda citrifolia Linn. have shown various biological activities such as antitumor, immunomodulation and antileishmanial activity, however its mechanisms of action are still unknown. This study aimed to analyze the activity of M. citrifolia fruit juice against Leishmania amazonensis and its action on peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c infected with L. amazonensis. Activity against the promastigote forms showed IC50 at 275.3 μg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate the ultrastructural alterations in the promastigotes treated with the juice and the results showed cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid inclusion and increased activity of exocytosis. The juice treatment presented an IC50 at 208.4 μg/mL against intracellular amastigotes and led to an increased nitrite production in infected and non-infected macrophages. When macrophages were pre-treated with iNOS inhibitors, aminoguanidine or 1400W, the intracellular amastigotes increased, demonstrating the important role of NO production in M. citrifolia fruit activity. In conclusion, our results reveal that treatment with M. citrifolia fruit juice can increase NO production in peritoneal macrophages and this ability has an important role in the killing of L. amazonensis intracellular amastigotes. PMID:27328771

  16. In vivo effect of fly ash on surface receptors of mice peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Dogra, S.; Khanna, A.K.; Kaw, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Functional activity of macrophages was studied in mice up to 15 days after intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 and 5.0 mg of fly ash using in vitro parameters. Fly ash did not cause any variation in the type of cellular response. The total cell number decreased significantly by 4 days after fly ash treatment but recovered subsequently. The decrease was dose dependent. Fly ash also caused a 50% depression in the FC receptor mediated phagocytosis of IgG coated sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) by macrophages at 2 days of dust treatment. However, the recovery began earlier with 2.5 mg fly ash than with 5.0 mg fly ash. These changes were not associated with any marked changes in esterase activity of macrophages following phagocytosis of fly ash.

  17. Effects of Nanosized Lithium Carbonate Particles on the Functional Activity of Macrophages During Development of Hepatocarcinoma 29.

    PubMed

    Konenkov, V I; Borodin, Yu I; Makarova, O P; Bgatova, N P; Rachkovskaya, L N

    2015-08-01

    The functional activity of macrophages in response to injection of nanosized lithium carbonate particles after initiation of hepatocarcinoma 29 in male CBA mice was evaluated by the production of NO, arginase activity, and absorption of zymosan granules. In intact animals, NO production by peritoneal macrophages increased by 4 times and arginase activity 3.1 times in response to a single injection of nanosized particles into the hip muscle. The level of NO production by macrophages remained high after 4 and 5 injections, while arginase activity returned to normal. The level of phagocytic peritoneal macrophages increased by 1.4 times after 5 injections of the particles. The level of NO production by macrophages gradually increased in animals with hepatocarcinoma developing in the hip muscle: by 1.6 times on day 3, 3.2 times on day 7, and by 2.6 times on day 13 in comparison with the corresponding parameters in intact animals. The increase of NO production by peritoneal macrophages after tumor process initiation was not paralleled by changes in arginase activity and absorption of zymosan granules. The results indicated that injection of nanosized lithium carbonate particles after inoculation of hepatocarcinoma 29 cells in the right hip muscle tissue was inessential for the function of peritoneal macrophages by the studied parameters. PMID:26388569

  18. Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Macrophages Mediates Feedback Inhibition of M2 Polarization and Gastrointestinal Tumor Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Liping; Peek, Richard M; Hao, Xishan; Polk, D Brent; Li, Hui; Yan, Fang

    2016-09-23

    EGF receptor (EGFR) in tumor cells serves as a tumor promoter. However, information about EGFR activation in macrophages in regulating M2 polarization and tumor development is limited. This study aimed to investigate the effects of EGFR activation in macrophages on M2 polarization and development of gastrointestinal tumors. IL-4, a cytokine to elicit M2 polarization, stimulated release of an EGFR ligand, HB-EGF, and transactivation and down-regulation of EGFR in Raw 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages from WT mice. Knockdown of HB-EGF in macrophages inhibited EGFR transactivation by IL-4. IL-4-stimulated STAT6 activation, Arg1 and YM1 gene expression, and HB-EGF production were further enhanced by inhibition of EGFR activity in Raw 264.7 cells using an EGFR kinase inhibitor and in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(wa5) mice with kinase inactive EGFR and by knockdown of EGFR in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice with myeloid cell-specific EGFR deletion. Chitin induced a higher level of M2 polarization in peritoneal macrophages in Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice than that in Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Accordingly, IL-4-conditioned medium stimulated growth and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial and colonic tumor cells, which were suppressed by that from Raw 264.7 cells with HB-EGF knockdown but promoted by that from Egfr(wa5) and Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre peritoneal macrophages. Clinical assessment revealed that the number of macrophages with EGFR expression became less, indicating decreased inhibitory effects on M2 polarization, in late stage of human gastric cancers. Thus, IL-4-stimulated HB-EGF-dependent transactivation of EGFR in macrophages may mediate inhibitory feedback for M2 polarization and HB-EGF production, thereby inhibiting gastrointestinal tumor growth.

  19. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed Central

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  20. Amelioration of oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages by Hippophae salicifolia due to its proton (H+) donation capability: Ex vivo and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mainak; Karmakar, Indrajit; Haldar, Sagnik; Das, Avratanu; Bala, Asis; Haldar, Pallab Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The present study evaluates the antioxidant effect of methanol extract of Hippophae salicifolia (MEHS) bark with special emphasis on its role on oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Material and Methods: In vitro antioxidant activity was estimated by standard antioxidant assays whereas the antioxidant activity concluded the H+ donating capacity. Mouse erythrocytes’ hemolysis and peritoneal macrophages’ DNA damage were determined spectrophotometrically. In vivo antioxidant activity of MEHS was determined in carbon tetrachloride-induced mice by studying its effect on superoxide anion production in macrophages cells, superoxide dismutase in the cell lysate, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and reduces glutathione. Results: The extract showed good in vitro antioxidant activities whereas the inhibitory concentrations values ranged from 5.80 to 106.5 μg/ml. MEHS significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the oxidative DNA damage. It also attenuated the oxidative conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin and elevation of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant in cells. Conclusion: The result indicates MEHS has good in vitro-in vivo antioxidant property as well as the protective effect on DNA and red blood cell may be due to its H+ donating property. PMID:27413349

  1. Macrophages as effector cells of protective immunity in murine schistosomiasis: macrophage activation in mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Natovitz, P C; Farrar, W L; Leonard, E J

    1984-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses contributing to macrophage activation were compared in mice that demonstrated partial resistance to challenge Schistosoma mansoni infection as a result of vaccination with radiation-attenuated cercariae or of ongoing low-grade primary infection. Vaccinated mice developed significant delayed hypersensitivity reactions to soluble schistosome antigens in vivo. Splenocytes from vaccinated animals responded to in vitro culture with various specific antigens (soluble adult worm extract, living or disrupted schistosomula) by proliferation and production of macrophage-activating lymphokines as did lymphocytes from S. mansoni-infected animals. Macrophage-activating factors produced by spleen cells from vaccinated mice upon specific antigen stimulation eluted as a single peak on Sephadex G-100 with a molecular weight of approximately 50,000 and contained gamma interferon activity. Moreover, peritoneal macrophages with larvicidal and tumoricidal activity were recovered from vaccinated mice after intraperitoneal challenge with soluble schistosome antigens, a procedure also observed to elicit activated macrophages in S. mansoni-infected animals. These observations demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated cercariae stimulates many of the same cellular responses observed after primary S. mansoni infection, and suggest that lymphokine-activated macrophages may participate in the effector mechanism of vaccine-induced and concomitant immunity to challenge schistosome infection. This is the first demonstration of a potential immune effector mechanism in the irradiated vaccine model. PMID:6609885

  2. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  3. MicroRNA-223 Induced Repolarization of Peritoneal Macrophages Using CD44 Targeting Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles for Anti-Inflammatory Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Krishnan, Swathi; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate macrophages repolarization from pro-inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype upon transfection with microRNA-223 (miR-223) duplexes and miR-223 expressing plasmid DNA encapsulated in CD44-targeting hyaluronic acid-poly(ethyleneimine) (HA-PEI) nanoparticles (NPs). The HA-PEI/miR-223 NPs with spherical shape and an average diameter of 200 nm were efficiently internalized by J774A.1 alveolar and primary peritoneal macrophages and non-cytotoxic at HA-PEI concentration less than 200 μg/mL. Transfection of HA-PEI/miR-223 NPs in J774A.1 macrophages showed significantly higher miR-223 expression than that with HA-PEI/plasmid DNA expressing miR-223 (pDNA-miR-223). HA-PEI/miR-223 NPs mediated transfection increased miR-223 expression to 90 fold in primary peritoneal macrophages compared to untreated cells. The overexpression of miR-223 in both J774A.1 and peritoneal macrophages induced a phenotypic change from M1 to M2 state as indicated by a decrease in iNOS-2 (M1 marker) and an increase in Arg-1 (M2 marker) levels compared to those in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-stimulated macrophages (M1). The change in macrophage phenotype by HA-PEI/miR-223 NPs could suppress the inflammation in peritoneal macrophages induced by LPS as evidenced by a significant decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, compared to LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages without treatment. The results demonstrated that miR-223-encapsulated HA-PEI NPs modulated macrophage polarity toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, which has potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27148749

  4. Some biochemical and functional characteristics of macrophages activated by Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Makioka, A; Kobayashi, A

    1984-01-01

    Phagocytosis, enzyme activities and capacity to release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2-) of peritoneal macrophages from mice inoculated with Tetrahymena pyriformis, a free-living ciliate, were examined in comparison with resident and BCG-activated macrophages. Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis of sheep erythrocytes was markedly increased in Tetrahymena-activated macrophages to the same level as that seen in BCG-activated ones. Tetrahymena-activated macrophages showed an increased level of acid phosphatase (lysosomal enzyme) and a reduced level of alkaline phosphodiesterase I (plasma membrane ectoenzyme) as compared with resident macrophages. Similar changes in the activities of the two enzymes were also observed in BCG-activated macrophages. Both Tetrahymena- and BCG-activated macrophages exhibited more enhanced capacity to release H2O2 and O2- than resident macrophages when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. In the macrophages from mice inoculated with varying doses of Tetrahymena, a significant correlation was observed between the increased capacity of H2O2 and O2- release as observed in the present study, and the enhanced toxoplasmacidal activity as observed in a previous study, in a dose-dependent fashion.

  5. The role of IgG subclass of mouse monoclonal antibodies in antibody-dependent enhancement of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection of feline macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hohdatsu, T; Tokunaga, J; Koyama, H

    1994-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection was studied in feline alveolar macrophages and human monocyte cell line U937 using mouse neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed to the spike protein of FIPV. Even among the MAbs that have been shown to recognize the same antigenic site, IgG 2a MAbs enhanced FIPV infection strongly, whereas IgG 1 MAbs did not. These IgG 2a MAbs enhanced the infection even when macrophages pretreated with the MAb were washed and then inoculated with the virus. Immunofluorescence flow cytometric analysis of the macrophages treated with each of the MAbs showed that the IgG 2a MAbs but not the IgG 1 MAbs bound to feline alveolar macrophages. Treatment of the IgG 2a MAb with protein A decreased the binding to the macrophages and, in parallel, diminished the ADE activity. Although no infection was observed by inoculation of FIPV to human monocyte cell line U937 cells, FIPV complexed with either the IgG 2a MAb or the IgG 1 MAb caused infection in U937 cells which are shown to express Fc gamma receptor (Fc gamma R) I and II that can bind mouse IgG 2a and IgG 1, respectively. These results suggest that the enhancing activity of MAb is closely correlated with IgG subclass and that the correlation is involved in binding of MAb to Fc gamma R on feline macrophage.

  6. Crosstalk between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics and macrophage bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Oliva-Ramírez, Jacqueline; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B; Pineda-Olvera, Benjamín; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological functions show rhythmic fluctuations with 24-hr periodicity regulated by circadian proteins encoded by the so-called ‘clock’ genes. The absence or deregulation of circadian proteins in mice leads to metabolic disorders and in vitro models have shown that the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages follows a circadian rhythm so showing a link between circadian rhythmicity, metabolism and immunity. Recent evidence reveals that mitochondrial shape, position and size, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics, are related to both cell metabolism and immune function. However, studies addressing the simultaneous crosstalk between circadian rhythm, mitochondrial dynamics and cell immune function are scarce. Here, by using an in vitro model of synchronized murine peritoneal macrophages, we present evidence that the mitochondrial dynamics and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) follow a circadian rhythmic pattern. In addition, it is shown that the fusion of mitochondria along with high Δψm, indicative of high mitochondrial activity, precede the highest phagocytic and bactericidal activity of macrophages on Salmonella typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest a timely coordination between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics, and the bactericidal capacity of macrophages. PMID:24903615

  7. Piroxicam, indomethacin and aspirin action on a murine fibrosarcoma. Effects on tumour-associated and peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Valdéz, J C; Perdigón, G

    1991-01-01

    Growth of a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma in BALB/c mice was accompanied by an increase in the activation state of tumour-associated macrophages (TAM), as measured by their FcIgG receptor expression, phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase levels. All of these parameters were markedly higher in TAM than in peritoneal macrophages (PM) derived from the same animal. On the other hand, PM from tumour-bearing mice showed lower activation parameters than PM from normal animals. We also studied the effect on tumour development of three inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis: indomethacin, piroxicam and aspirin. Intraperitoneal administration of these drugs during 8 d was followed by the regression of palpable tumours. Indomethacin (90 mg/d) induced 45% regression, while with piroxicam (two 400 mg/d doses and six 200 mg/d doses) and aspirin (1 mg/d) 32% and 30% regressions, respectively, were observed. The growth rate of nonregressing tumours, which had reached different volumes by the end of the treatment, was delayed to a similar extent by the three anti-inflammatory non-steroidal drugs (NSAID). With respect to TAM, the treatment did not induce any significant change in their activation state, though both piroxicam and indomethacin increased slightly the TAM number. In contrast, NSAID administration was followed by a remarkable increase in the activation parameters of PM when compared with PM from tumour-bearing mice receiving no treatment. Indeed, these parameters were in some cases higher than those of PM from normal mice. The leukocytosis (60,000/microliters) with neutrophilia (80%) induced by tumour growth on peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) was reversed by the treatment to values close to normal, in parallel with the reduction of tumour size. A drop in haematocrit was also noted which was most probably a consequence of tumour growth rather than of the treatment. This study reveals that the three NSAID tested have a remarkable antitumour activity, which

  8. Effects of immunomodulatory drugs on TNF-α and IL-12 production by purified epidermal langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Langerhans cells constitute a special subset of immature dendritic cells localized in the epidermis that play a key role in the skin's immune response. The production of cytokines is a key event in both the initiation and the regulation of immune responses, and different drugs can be used to remove or modify their production by DC and, therefore, alter immune responses in a broad spectrum of diseases, mainly in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we examined the effects of prednisone, thalidomide, cyclosporine A, and amitriptyline, drugs used in a variety of clinical conditions, on the production of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 by purified epidermal Langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages in BALB/c mice. Findings All drugs inhibited TNF-α production by Langerhans cells after 36 hours of treatment at two different concentrations, while prednisone and thalidomide decreased IL-12 secretion significantly, amitriptyline caused a less pronounced reduction and cyclosporine A had no effect. Additionally, TNF-α and IL-12 production by macrophages decreased, but IL-10 levels were unchanged after all treatments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that these drugs modulate the immune response by regulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production by purified epidermal Langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages, indicating that these cells are important targets for immunosuppression in various clinical settings. PMID:21276247

  9. Effects of Omega-3-Rich Harp Seal Oil on the Production of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myungwon; Ju, Jaehyun; Suh, Jae Soo; Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Kwang Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is an essential fatty acid necessary for human health, and it protects against cardiovascular disease, inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of omega-3-rich harp seal oil (HSO) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-(IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) in peritoneal macrophages of mice. The culture supernatants of murine macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HSO, or HSO+LPS were harvested to assay IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) cytokines and NO. TNF-α, IL-1 β, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) levels, except IL-6, were lower in the culture supernatants of mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to LPS plus HSO than those of the groups exposed to LPS alone. These observations demonstrate that omega-3-rich harp seal oil downregulates the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40). These results suggest that HSO could be potentially used as a preventive agent or as an adjunct in anti-inflammatory therapy, if more research results were accumulated. PMID:26175994

  10. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    PubMed

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  11. Expression of the Homeobox Gene HOXA9 in Ovarian Cancer Induces Peritoneal Macrophages to Acquire an M2 Tumor-Promoting Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Song Yi; Ladanyi, Andras; Lengyel, Ernst; Naora, Honami

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) exhibit an M2 macrophage phenotype that suppresses anti-tumor immune responses and often correlates with poor outcomes in patients with cancer. Patients with ovarian cancer frequently present with peritoneal carcinomatosis, but the mechanisms that induce naïve peritoneal macrophages into TAMs are poorly understood. In this study, we found an increased abundance of TAMs in mouse i.p. xenograft models of ovarian cancer that expressed HOXA9, a homeobox gene that is associated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. HOXA9 expression in ovarian cancer cells stimulated chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages and induced macrophages to acquire TAM-like features. These features included induction of the M2 markers, CD163 and CD206, and the immunosuppressive cytokines, IL-10 and chemokine ligand 17, and down-regulation of the immunostimulatory cytokine, IL-12. HOXA9-mediated induction of TAMs was primarily due to the combinatorial effects of HOXA9-induced, tumor-derived transforming growth factor-β2 and chemokine ligand 2 levels. High HOXA9 expression in clinical specimens of ovarian cancer was strongly associated with increased abundance of TAMs and intratumoral T-regulatory cells and decreased abundance of CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Levels of immunosuppressive cytokines were also elevated in ascites fluid of patients with tumors that highly expressed HOXA9. HOXA9 may, therefore, stimulate ovarian cancer progression by promoting an immunosuppressive microenvironment via paracrine effects on peritoneal macrophages. PMID:24332016

  12. Role of activation in alveolar macrophage-mediated suppression of the plaque-forming cell response.

    PubMed Central

    Mbawuike, I N; Herscowitz, H B

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are highly suppressive of the in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of spleen cells obtained from mice primed with sheep erythrocytes. Comparison of macrophage populations obtained from disparate anatomical sites revealed that although in both cases there was a cell-concentration-dependent suppression of the PFC response, resident AM or AM activated as a result of intravenous injection of Mycobacterium bovis BCG were equally suppressive at the doses examined. Although there was a similar dose-dependent suppression with peritoneal macrophages, BCG-activated cells were more suppressive of the PFC response than were resident cells. In contrast, splenic macrophages at comparable concentrations were not at all suppressive. Resident AM exhibited significantly lower levels of 5'-nucleotidase activity than did resident peritoneal macrophages. Macrophage-mediated suppression of the in vitro PFC response could not be attributed to the release of toxic oxygen metabolites (H2O2, O2- ,and .OH) or prostaglandins, since the addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2-mercaptoethanol, or indomethacin did not completely reverse suppression. These results suggest that the lung microenvironment may maintain AM in an activated state which contributes to their potential immunoregulatory functions. PMID:2830191

  13. Cellular Renewal and Improvement of Local Cell Effector Activity in Peritoneal Cavity in Response to Infectious Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    dos Anjos Cassado, Alexandra; de Albuquerque, José Antônio Tavares; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; de Lima Buzzo, Carina; Faustino, Lucas; Nascimento, Rogério; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina; Alvarez, Jose Maria Mosig; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2011-01-01

    The peritoneal cavity (PerC) is a singular compartment where many cell populations reside and interact. Despite the widely adopted experimental approach of intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation, little is known about the behavior of the different cell populations within the PerC. To evaluate the dynamics of peritoneal macrophage (MØ) subsets, namely small peritoneal MØ (SPM) and large peritoneal MØ (LPM), in response to infectious stimuli, C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with zymosan or Trypanosoma cruzi. These conditions resulted in the marked modification of the PerC myelo-monocytic compartment characterized by the disappearance of LPM and the accumulation of SPM and monocytes. In parallel, adherent cells isolated from stimulated PerC displayed reduced staining for β-galactosidase, a biomarker for senescence. Further, the adherent cells showed increased nitric oxide (NO) and higher frequency of IL-12-producing cells in response to subsequent LPS and IFN-γ stimulation. Among myelo-monocytic cells, SPM rather than LPM or monocytes, appear to be the central effectors of the activated PerC; they display higher phagocytic activity and are the main source of IL-12. Thus, our data provide a first demonstration of the consequences of the dynamics between peritoneal MØ subpopulations by showing that substitution of LPM by a robust SPM and monocytes in response to infectious stimuli greatly improves PerC effector activity. PMID:21799778

  14. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinases with microtubules in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Taxol, a microtubule-binding diterpene, mimics many effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on mouse macrophages. The LPS-mimetic effects of taxol appear to be under the same genetic control as responses to LPS itself. Thus we have postulated a role for microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) in the response of macrophages to LPS. Stimulation of macrophages by LPS quickly induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). MAPK are generally considered cytosolic enzymes. Herein we report that much of the LPS-activatable pool of MAPK in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages is microtubule associated. By immunofluorescence, MAPK were localized to colchicine- and nocodazole- disruptible filaments. From both mouse brain and RAW 264.7 macrophages, MAPK could be coisolated with polymerized tubulin. Fractionation of primary macrophages into cytosol-, microfilament-, microtubule-, and intermediated filament-rich extracts revealed that approximately 10% of MAPK but none of MAPK kinase (MEK1A and MEK2) was microtubule bound. Exposure of macrophages to LPS did not change the proportion of MAPK bound to microtubules, but preferentially activated the microtubule- associated pool. These findings confirm the prediction that LPS activates a kinase bound to microtubules. Together with LPS-mimetic actions of taxol and the shared genetic control of responses to LPS and taxol, these results support the hypothesis that a major LPS-signaling pathway in mouse macrophages may involve activation of one or more microtubule-associated kinases. PMID:8666946

  15. Ultrastructural studies of the killing of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni by activated macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    McLaren, D J; James, S L

    1985-05-01

    Immunologically activated murine macrophages have been shown elsewhere to kill skin stage schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni in vitro, in a manner analogous to the extracellular killing of tumour cell targets. In this study, the kinetics of the interaction between activated macrophages and larval targets and the resultant ultrastructural changes in parasite morphology that culminated in death have been analysed in detail. Unlike granulocyte-mediated schistosomular killing, macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity did not appear to be directed against the surface tissues of the parasite. Macrophages adhered only transiently following initiation of the cultures, yet changes in the subtegumental mitochondria and muscle cells of the larva were detected within the first hour of incubation. Progressive internal disorganisation followed rapidly, but the tegument and tegumental outer membrane remained intact, to form a 'shell' that maintained the general shape of the parasite. Such changes were recognised irrespective of whether the effector cell population comprised peritoneal macrophages activated by lymphokine treatment in vitro, or by infection with Mycobacterium bovis (strain BCG), or S. mansoni in vivo. That macrophages rather than contaminating granulocytes or lymphocytes, had mediated the observed damage was demonstrated by the use of a lymphokine treated macrophage cell line, IC-21. The observation that macrophage cytotoxicity is directed against internal organelles rather than the tegumental outer membrane of this multicellular target, may help to elucidate the general mechanism of extracellular killing by these cells. PMID:3892433

  16. [Cytopathic effect of the tularemia microbe on a culture of peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Maslova, T N; Savel'eva, R A

    1977-10-01

    Morphological analysis of the process of interaction of tularemia microbe strains differing by virulence with macrophages demonstrated that all these strains produced a lethal effect on macrophages obtained from the animales sensitive to the infection. The macrophages obtained from the animals were but little sensitive to tularemia and were resistant to the action of the causative agent of this infection. The data obtained led to a supposition on the presence in the tularemia causative agent of a factor responsible for its lethal action on the macrophages.

  17. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  18. Activation of macrophages for destruction of Francisella tularensis: identification of cytokines, effector cells, and effector molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, A H; Polsinelli, T; Green, S J; Nacy, C A

    1992-01-01

    Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) was grown in culture with nonadherent resident, starch-elicited, or Proteose Peptone-elicited peritoneal cells. Numbers of bacteria increased 4 logs over the input inoculum in 48 to 72 h. Growth rates were faster in inflammatory cells than in resident cells: generation times for the bacterium were 3 h in inflammatory cells and 6 h in resident macrophages. LVS-infected macrophage cultures treated with lymphokines did not support growth of the bacterium, although lymphokines alone had no inhibitory effects on replication of LVS in culture medium devoid of cells. Removal of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) by immunoaffinity precipitation rendered lymphokines ineffective for induction of macrophage anti-LVS activity, and recombinant IFN-gamma stimulated both resident and inflammatory macrophage populations to inhibit LVS growth in vitro. Inflammatory macrophages were more sensitive to effects of IFN-gamma: half-maximal activity was achieved at 5 U/ml for inflammatory macrophages and 20 U/ml for resident macrophages. IFN-gamma-induced anti-LVS activity correlated with the production of nitrite (NO2-), an oxidative end product of L-arginine-derived nitric oxide (NO). Anti-LVS activity and nitrite production were both completely inhibited by the addition of either the L-arginine analog NG-monomethyl-L-arginine or anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies to activated macrophage cultures. Thus, macrophages can be activated by IFN-gamma to suppress the growth of F. tularensis by generation of toxic levels of NO, and inflammatory macrophages are substantially more sensitive to activation activities of IFN-gamma for this effector reaction than are more differentiated resident cells. PMID:1541555

  19. Differential effects of osteopontin on the cytotoxic activity of macrophages from young and old mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rollo, E E; Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphoprotein found in body fluids (e.g. plasma, urine, milk) and in mineralized tissues. Its expression is increased in many transformed cells and in normal cells exposed to various cytokines. When stimulated with the inflammatory mediators lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma, mouse macrophages secrete nitric oxide (NO) as a cytotoxic agent effective against microbial invaders and tumour cells. This report documents (1) that thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, activated with the inflammatory mediators, produced less NO and exhibited reduced cytotoxicity towards target cells when they were obtained from old animals than when they were obtained from young animals; and (2) that OPN was able to inhibit both the induced NO synthesis and cytotoxicity, but more effectively in macrophages from the young animals than those from the old animals. This may be due to the observed higher level of OPN expression in macrophages from old animals. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8881770

  20. SIRT1 Suppresses Activator Protein-1 Transcriptional Activity and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, Jin-Jing; Jia, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Yang, Rui-Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Yu-Sheng; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    SIRT1 (Sirtuin type 1), a mammalian orthologue of yeast SIR2 (silent information regulator 2), has been shown to mediate a variety of calorie restriction (CR)-induced physiological events, such as cell fate regulation via deacetylation of the substrate proteins. However, whether SIRT1 deacetylates activator protein-1 (AP-1) to influence its transcriptional activity and target gene expression is still unknown. Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 directly interacts with the basic leucine zipper domains of c-Fos and c-Jun, the major components of AP-1, by which SIRT1 suppressed the transcriptional activity of AP-1. This process requires the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Notably, SIRT1 reduced the expression of COX-2, a typical AP-1 target gene, and decreased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production of peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs). pMΦs with SIRT1 overexpression displayed improved phagocytosis and tumoricidal functions, which are associated with depressed PGE2. Furthermore, SIRT1 protein level was up-regulated in CR mouse pMΦs, whereas elevated SIRT1 decreased COX-2 expression and improved PGE2-related macrophage functions that were reversed following inhibition of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Thus, our results indicate that SIRT1 may be a mediator of CR-induced macrophage regulation, and its deacetylase activity contributes to the inhibition of AP-1 transcriptional activity and COX-2 expression leading to amelioration of macrophage function. PMID:20042607

  1. Different Effects of the Immunomodulatory Drug GMDP Immobilized onto Aminopropyl Modified and Unmodified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles upon Peritoneal Macrophages of Women with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Antsiferova, Yuliya; Sotnikova, Nataliya

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to compare in vitro the possibility of application of unmodified silica nanoparticles (UMNPs) and modified by aminopropyl groups silica nanoparticles (AMNPs) for topical delivery of immunomodulatory drug GMDP to the peritoneal macrophages of women with endometriosis. The absence of cytotoxic effect and high cellular uptake was demonstrated for both types of silica nanoparticles. The immobilization of GMDP on the UMNPs led to the suppression of the stimulatory effect of GMDP on the membrane expression of scavenger receptors SR-AI and SR-B, mRNAs expression of NOD2 and RAGE, and synthesis of proteolytic enzyme MMP-9 and its inhibitor TIMP-1. GMDP, immobilized onto AMNPs, enhanced the initially reduced membrane expression of SRs and increased NOD2, RAGE, and MMP-9 mRNAs expression by macrophages. Simultaneously high level of mRNAs expression of factors, preventing undesirable hyperactivation of peritoneal macrophages (SOCS1 and TIMP-1), was observed in macrophages incubated in the presence of GMDP, immobilized onto AMNPs. The effect of AMNPs immobilized GMDP in some cases exceeded the effect of free GMDP. Thus, among the studied types of silica nanoparticles, AMNPs are the most suitable nanoparticles for topical delivery of GMDP to the peritoneal macrophages. PMID:24455738

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  3. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  4. Involvement of proton-sensing receptor TDAG8 in the anti-inflammatory actions of dexamethasone in peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao-dong; Tobo, Masayuki; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Komachi, Mayumi; Murata, Naoya; Takano, Mutsumi; Tomura, Hideaki; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucocorticoid (GC) induced the expression of proton-sensing TDAG8 in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC enhanced acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation and inhibition of TNF-{alpha} production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement of the GC-induced actions was lost by TDAG8 deficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC-induced anti-inflammatory actions are partly mediated by TDAG8 expression. -- Abstract: Dexamethasone (DEX), a potent glucocorticoid, increased the expression of T-cell death associated gene 8 (TDAG8), a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, which is associated with the enhancement of acidic pH-induced cAMP accumulation, in peritoneal macrophages. We explored the role of increased TDAG8 expression in the anti-inflammatory actions of DEX. The treatment of macrophages with either DEX or acidic pH induced the cell death of macrophages; however, the cell death was not affected by TDAG8 deficiency. While DEX inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, an inflammatory cytokine, which was independent of TDAG8, at neutral pH, the glucocorticoid enhanced the acidic pH-induced inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} production in a manner dependent on TDAG8. In conclusion, the DEX-induced increase in TDAG8 expression is in part involved in the glucocorticoid-induced anti-inflammatory actions through the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production under the acidic pH environment. On the other hand, the role of TDAG8 in the DEX-induced cell death is questionable.

  5. The macrophage chemotactic activity of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemoattractant capabilities of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products (ECP) were investigated from two isolates, the virulent FL6-60 parent and less virulent RET-04 mutant. Chemotaxis and chemokinesis were assayed in vitro using blind well chambers with peritoneal macrophages obtained from ...

  6. Peritonitis activates transcription of the human prolactin locus in myeloid cells in a humanized transgenic rat model.

    PubMed

    Semprini, Sabrina; McNamara, Anne V; Awais, Raheela; Featherstone, Karen; Harper, Claire V; McNeilly, Judith R; Patist, Amanda; Rossi, Adriano G; Dransfield, Ian; McNeilly, Alan S; Davis, Julian R E; White, Michael R H; Mullins, John J

    2012-06-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is mainly expressed in the pituitary in rodents, whereas in humans, expression is observed in many extrapituitary sites, including lymphocytes. Due to the lack of adequate experimental models, the function of locally produced PRL in the immune system is largely unknown. Using transgenic rats that express luciferase under the control of extensive human PRL regulatory regions, we characterized immune cell responses to thioglycollate (TG)-induced peritonitis. Resident populations of myeloid cells in the peritoneal cavity of untreated rats expressed barely detectable levels of luciferase. In contrast, during TG-induced peritonitis, cell-specific expression in both neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages in peritoneal exudates increased dramatically. Elevated luciferase expression was also detectable in peripheral blood and bone marrow CD11b(+) cells. Ex vivo stimulation of primary myeloid cells showed activation of the human extrapituitary promoter by TNF-α, lipopolysaccharide, or TG. These findings were confirmed in human peripheral blood monocytes, showing that the transgenic rat provided a faithful model for the human gene. Thus, the resolution of an inflammatory response is associated with dramatic activation of the PRL gene promoter in the myeloid lineage.

  7. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by activated macrophages: involvement of H2O2 and a non-prostaglandin E product of the cyclooxygenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Z; Hoffeld, J T; Oppenheim, J J

    1986-07-01

    Macrophages are considered promoters of fibroblast proliferation; however, suppression by activated macrophages may outweigh this effect. Activated murine peritoneal macrophages obtained by in vivo exposure to C. parvum or by in vitro LPS-activation of thioglycollate-induced macrophages, were tested for their effect on normal syngeneic dermal fibroblasts. C. parvum-activated macrophages, but not resident peritoneal macrophages suppressed fibroblast proliferation. Similarly, macrophages activated in vitro by LPS, but not those unexposed to LPS, suppressed fibroblast proliferation. Catalase partially protected fibroblasts from suppression by either activated macrophage population, suggesting involvement of H2O2 in the suppression. The effect of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on the suppression was also tested. Indomethacin, acetylsalicyclic acid, or eicosatetraynoic acid, all partially protected the fibroblasts from macrophage-mediated suppression. Prostaglandins E2, E1, and F2 alpha, added exogenously at concentrations as high as 10(-6) M, failed to suppress the proliferation of the fibroblasts. These findings suggest that a non-prostaglandin product of the cyclooxygenase pathway is involved in macrophage-mediated suppression of fibroblast proliferation.

  8. Enhancing effect of oxygen radical scavengers on murine macrophage anticryptococcal activity through production of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    TOHYAMA, M.; KAWAKAMI, K.; FUTENMA, M.; SAITO, A.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the roles of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced cryptococcostatic activity of murine peritoneal macrophages using NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a competitive inhibitor of RNI synthesis, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, oxygen radical scavengers. IFN-γ-activated macrophages produced nitric oxide (NO) in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by increased nitrite concentration in the culture supernatant. IFN-γ also enhanced the suppressive effect on cryptococcal growth in a similar dose-dependent manner. The induction of killing activity and NO production by an optimal dose of IFN-γ (100 U/ml) was virtually suppressed by 500 μM L-NMMA. These results confirmed the importance of the RNI-mediated effector mechanism in anticryptococcal activity of macrophages. SOD and catalase significantly enhanced the cryptococcostatic activity of macrophages induced by a suboptimal dose of IFN-γ (20 U/ml). The augmenting effect of these reagents was mediated by NO, since they potentiated the production of NO by macrophages and their effects were totally blocked by L-NMMA. Our results indicate that the IFN-γ-induced anticryptococcal activity of macrophages is dependent mostly on RNI, and suggest that the ROI system down-regulates the effector mechanism for cryptococcostasis by suppressing the RNI system. PMID:8608643

  9. Critical Role of Regulator G-Protein Signaling 10 (RGS10) in Modulating Macrophage M1/M2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Kyung; Chung, Jaegwon; Kannarkat, George T.; Tansey, Malú G.

    2013-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 10 (RGS10), a GTPase accelerating protein (GAP) for G alpha subunits, is a negative regulator of NF-κB in microglia. Here, we investigated the role of RGS10 in macrophages, a closely related myeloid-derived cell type. Features of classical versus alternative activation were assessed in Rgs10-/- peritoneal and bone marrow-derived macrophages upon LPS or IL-4 treatments, respectively. Our results showed that Rgs10-/- macrophages produced higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF, IL-1β and IL-12p70 in response to LPS treatment and exerted higher cytotoxicity on dopaminergic MN9D neuroblastoma cells. We also found that Rgs10-/- macrophages displayed a blunted M2 phenotype upon IL-4 priming. Specifically, Rgs10-/- macrophages displayed lower YM1 and Fizz1 mRNA levels as measured by QPCR compared to wild type macrophages upon IL-4 treatment and this response was not attributable to differences in IL-4 receptor expression. Importantly, phagocytic activities of Rgs10-/- macrophages were blunted in response to IL-4 priming and/or LPS treatments. However, there was no difference in chemotaxis between Rgs10-/- and WT macrophages. Our data indicate that Rgs10-/- macrophages displayed dysregulated M1 responses along with blunted M2 alternative activation responses, suggesting that RGS10 plays an important role in determining macrophage activation responses. PMID:24278459

  10. Activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 promotes the viability of peritoneal mesothelial cells exposed to stress of peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H-H; Lin, C-Y; Su, S-H; Chuang, C-T; Chang, Y-L; Lee, T-Y; Lee, S-C; Chang, C-J

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining mesothelial cell viability is critical to long-term successful peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. To clarify the viability mechanism of peritoneal mesothelial cells under PD solutions exposure, we examined the mechanisms of cellular response to this stress conditions. Here we report that the proteasome activity is inhibited when treated with PD solutions. Proteasome inhibition-mediated activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2), an endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein, is important for mesothelial cell viability. SIK2 is mobilized to promote autophagy and protect the cells from apoptosis under PD solution or MG132 treatment. Immunofluorescence staining showed that SIK2 is colocalized with LC3B in the autophagosomes of mesothelial cells treated with PD solution or derived from patients undergoing PD treatment. SIK2 activation is likely via a two-step mechanism, upstream kinases relieving the autoinhibitory conformation of SIK2 molecule followed by autophosphorylation of Thr175 and activation of kinase activity. These results suggest that activation of SIK2 is required for the cell viability when proteasome activity is inhibited by PD solutions. Maintaining or boosting the activity of SIK2 may promote peritoneal mesothelial cell viability and evolve as a potential therapeutic target for maintaining or restoring peritoneal membrane integrity in PD therapy. PMID:27441650

  11. Nucleosomes inhibit phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes by peritoneal macrophages from MRL+/+ lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Laderach, D; Bach, J F; Koutouzov, S

    1998-12-01

    The nucleosome, the basic structure of chromatin and normal product of cell apoptosis, plays a pivotal role both in the induction and the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Nucleosomes have been found to circulate at high levels in patients with SLE and apoptosis of lymphoid cells is increased during human and murine lupus. In this study, we examined the presence of possible defects in clearance mechanisms of apoptotic cells in murine lupus, and questioned further whether nucleosomes could compromise this phagocytic process. There did not appear to be any intrinsic functional defect of macrophages from young MRL+/+ lupus-prone mice to recognize and phagocytose apoptotic thymocytes. Nucleosomes, as a mimic of increased cell apoptotsis in vivo, induced a strong, dose-dependent, inhibition of phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes by young, pre-autoimmune, macrophages of MRL+/+ mice, whereas macrophages of non-autoimmune C3H mice only exhibited a trend to inhibition. The nucleosome-elicited inhibitory effect persisted during the development of the autoimmune response and appeared to be specific for the molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Our data suggest that nucleosome elicited inhibition of phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by MRL+/+ macrophages before the onset of the autoimmune response contribute, in a positive loop, to sustain and/or augment the levels of circulating (and potentially immunogenic) nucleosomes in lupus.

  12. Modulatory effects of alpha-linolenic acid on generation of reactive oxygen species in elaidic acid enriched peritoneal macrophages in rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y Poorna Chandra; Lokesh, B R

    2014-09-01

    Fatty acids are known to influence the ability of macrophages to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). However the effect of elaidic acid (EA, 18:1 trans fatty acid) on ROS generation is not well studied. Rat peritoneal macrophages were enriched with elaidic acid by incubating the cells with 80 1M EA. The macrophages containing EA generated higher amounts of superoxide anion (O2*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) by 54, 123 and 237%, respectively as compared to control cells which did not contain EA. To study the competition of other C18 fatty acids with EA macrophages were incubated with EA along with stearic acid (18:0), oleic acid (18:1), linoleic acid (18:2) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3). ALA significantly reduced the incorporation of EA into macrophage lipids. This also significantly reduced the generation of O2*-, H2O2, NO by macrophages. Studies were also conducted by feeding rats with diet containing partially hydrogenated vegetable fat (PHVF) as a source for EA and linseed oil (LSO) as a source for ALA. The rats were fed AIN-93 diet containing PHVF with 17% EA and incremental amounts of linseed oil for 10 weeks. The peritoneal macrophages from rats fed partially hydrogenated vegetable fat generated higher levels of O2*-, H2O2, NO by 46, 161 and 76% respectively, when compared to rats fed control diets containing ground nut oil. Macrophages from rats fed PHVF with incremental amounts of LSO produced significantly lower levels ROS in a dose dependent manner. Thus ALA reduces the higher levels of ROS generated by macrophages containing EA.

  13. Activation of Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ameliorates DSS-Induced Colitis through Inhibiting NLRP3 Inflammasome in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ping; Shao, Bo-Zong; Xu, Zhe-Qi; Wei, Wei; Han, Bin-Ze; Chen, Xiong-Wen; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) ameliorates inflammation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we examined whether activation of CB2R could suppress the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. In peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice, LPS/DSS challenge for 24 h increased the expression of the components of NLRP3 inflammasome NLRP3, Casp-1 p20/Casp-1 p45 ratio, proIL-1β and IL-1β and also enhanced autophagy (LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, Beclin-1 and SQSTM1). Pretreatment of peritoneal macrophages with HU 308, a selective CB2R agonist, attenuated LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, but further enhanced autophagy. In comparison with wild-type (WT) control, peritoneal macrophages from CB2R knockout (KO) mice had more robust NLRP3 inflammasome activation and attenuated autophagy upon LPS/DSS challenge. Knockdown autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) with a siRNA in peritoneal macrophages attenuated the inhibitory effects of HU 308 on LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vitro. In vivo, HU308 treatment attenuated DSS-induced colitis mice associated with reduced colon inflammation and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in wild-type mice. In CB2R KO mice, DSS-induced inflammation and NLRP3 inflammasome activation were more pronounced than those in WT control. Finally, we demonstrated that AMPK-mTOR-P70S6K signaling pathway was involved in this CB2R-mediated process. We conclude that activation of CB2R ameliorates DSS-induced colitis through enhancing autophagy that may inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:27611972

  14. Activation of Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ameliorates DSS-Induced Colitis through Inhibiting NLRP3 Inflammasome in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe-Qi; Wei, Wei; Han, Bin-Ze; Chen, Xiong-Wen; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) ameliorates inflammation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we examined whether activation of CB2R could suppress the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. In peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice, LPS/DSS challenge for 24 h increased the expression of the components of NLRP3 inflammasome NLRP3, Casp-1 p20/Casp-1 p45 ratio, proIL-1β and IL-1β and also enhanced autophagy (LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, Beclin-1 and SQSTM1). Pretreatment of peritoneal macrophages with HU 308, a selective CB2R agonist, attenuated LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, but further enhanced autophagy. In comparison with wild-type (WT) control, peritoneal macrophages from CB2R knockout (KO) mice had more robust NLRP3 inflammasome activation and attenuated autophagy upon LPS/DSS challenge. Knockdown autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) with a siRNA in peritoneal macrophages attenuated the inhibitory effects of HU 308 on LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vitro. In vivo, HU308 treatment attenuated DSS-induced colitis mice associated with reduced colon inflammation and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in wild-type mice. In CB2R KO mice, DSS-induced inflammation and NLRP3 inflammasome activation were more pronounced than those in WT control. Finally, we demonstrated that AMPK-mTOR-P70S6K signaling pathway was involved in this CB2R-mediated process. We conclude that activation of CB2R ameliorates DSS-induced colitis through enhancing autophagy that may inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:27611972

  15. Activation of Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ameliorates DSS-Induced Colitis through Inhibiting NLRP3 Inflammasome in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ping; Shao, Bo-Zong; Xu, Zhe-Qi; Wei, Wei; Han, Bin-Ze; Chen, Xiong-Wen; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) ameliorates inflammation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we examined whether activation of CB2R could suppress the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. In peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice, LPS/DSS challenge for 24 h increased the expression of the components of NLRP3 inflammasome NLRP3, Casp-1 p20/Casp-1 p45 ratio, proIL-1β and IL-1β and also enhanced autophagy (LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, Beclin-1 and SQSTM1). Pretreatment of peritoneal macrophages with HU 308, a selective CB2R agonist, attenuated LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, but further enhanced autophagy. In comparison with wild-type (WT) control, peritoneal macrophages from CB2R knockout (KO) mice had more robust NLRP3 inflammasome activation and attenuated autophagy upon LPS/DSS challenge. Knockdown autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) with a siRNA in peritoneal macrophages attenuated the inhibitory effects of HU 308 on LPS/DSS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vitro. In vivo, HU308 treatment attenuated DSS-induced colitis mice associated with reduced colon inflammation and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in wild-type mice. In CB2R KO mice, DSS-induced inflammation and NLRP3 inflammasome activation were more pronounced than those in WT control. Finally, we demonstrated that AMPK-mTOR-P70S6K signaling pathway was involved in this CB2R-mediated process. We conclude that activation of CB2R ameliorates DSS-induced colitis through enhancing autophagy that may inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

  16. Mechanisms of glucocorticoid induced suppression of phagocytosis in murine peritoneal macrophage cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoids suppress phagocytosis of heat killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae in macrophage cultures. In order to determine the mechanisms by which this response occurs, this investigation was initiated to examine whether the suppression of phagocytosis is mediated by a steroid induced phagocytosis inhibitory protein (PIP). Furthermore, it is postulated that these suppressive effects may be associated with alterations in macrophage phospholipid metabolism. To assess the association between phospholipid metabolism and phagocytosis, control and 1 ..mu..M dexamethasone treated macrophages were exposed to the phospholipase inhibitor bromophenacylbromide. The enzyme inhibitor suppressed phagocytosis in a time and dose dependent manner. However, supplying dexamethasone treated cultures with arachidonate did not reverse the steroid induced suppression of phagocytosis, whether the arachidonate was supplied alone or together with indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. Control cells, prelabeled with /sup 3/H-arachidonate, exhibited an increased percentage of the radiolabeled fatty acid in neutral lipids following phagocytosis, with a corresponding decrease in the percentage associated with phosphatidylcholine.

  17. A quantitative method for measuring the adherence of group B streptococci to murine peritoneal exudate macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sloan, A R; Pistole, T G

    1992-10-01

    We have developed a solid phase, direct binding, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect and quantify the adherence of group B streptococci to murine macrophages. The assay correlated well with direct microscopic quantification of adherence. As few as 3.8 x 10(4) bacteria/assay well or less than one bacterium per macrophage could be detected. This assay is both quantitative and selective, and is readily adaptable for multiple sample analysis. It provides a valuable alternative to visual detection of bacterial adherence.

  18. Gallium arsenide modulates proteolytic cathepsin activities and antigen processing by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T A; Hartmann, C B; McCoy, K L

    1998-09-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is a semiconductor utilized in the electronics industry. Chemical exposure of animals causes a local inflammatory reaction, but systemic immunosuppression. Mice were administered i.p. 200 mg/kg GaAs crystals or latex beads, or vehicle. Five days after exposure, splenic macrophages were defective, whereas thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (PEC) were more efficient in processing the Ag, pigeon cytochrome c, than vehicle control macrophages. Various aspects of the MHC class II Ag-processing pathway were examined. Both macrophage populations normally presented a peptide fragment to the CD4+ T cells. Surface MHC class II expression on the PEC was up-regulated, but splenic cells had normal MHC class II expression. PEC had elevated levels of glutathione and cysteine, major physiologic reducing thiols. However, the cysteine content of splenic macrophages was diminished. Proteolytic activities of aspartyl cathepsin D, and thiol cathepsins B and L were decreased significantly in splenic macrophages. On the other hand, thiol cathepsin activities were increased selectively in PEC. Latex bead-exposed PEC were not more potent APC, and their thiol cathepsin activities were unchanged, indicating that phagocytosis and nonspecific irritation were not responsible. The phenotype of PEC directly exposed to GaAs mirrored cytokine-activated macrophages, in contrast to splenic macrophages from a distant site. Therefore, GaAs exposure differentially modulated cathepsin activities in splenic macrophages and PEC, which correlated with their Ag-processing efficiency. Perhaps such distinct alterations may contribute to the local inflammation and systemic immunotoxicity caused by chemical exposure.

  19. The respiratory burst is not required for killing of intracellular and extracellular parasites by a lymphokine-activated macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Scott, P; James, S; Sher, A

    1985-06-01

    The macrophage cell line, IC-21, was found to be incapable of producing the oxygen products associated with the respiratory burst. However, IC-21 cells were activated by lymphokine (LK) to kill intracellular (Leishmania donovani amastigotes) and extracellular (Schistosoma mansoni larvae) parasites, as well as tumor cells. In each case, the cytotoxicity exhibited by activated IC-21 cells and activated peritoneal macrophages was indistinguishable. However, nonactivated IC-21 cells were unable to kill L. donovani log-growth phase promastigotes, while nonactivated peritoneal macrophages destroyed greater than 90% of the initial infection. These results indicate that amastigotes and schistosome larvae are susceptible to killing by nonoxidative cytotoxic mechanism induced by lymphokine activation but, on the other hand, support the concept that the killing of log-growth phase promastigotes by nonactivated cells is dependent upon the respiratory burst. We propose that the IC-21 cell line may be a useful model for studying nonoxidative killing functions of activated macrophages. PMID:2988973

  20. Loss of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 alters macrophage polarization and reduces NFκB activation in the foreign body response.

    PubMed

    Moore, Laura Beth; Sawyer, Andrew J; Charokopos, Antonios; Skokos, Eleni A; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials elicits a foreign body response characterized by fusion of macrophages to form foreign body giant cells and fibrotic encapsulation. Studies of the macrophage polarization involved in this response have suggested that alternative (M2) activation is associated with more favorable outcomes. Here we investigated this process in vivo by implanting mixed cellulose ester filters or polydimethylsiloxane disks in the peritoneal cavity of wild-type (WT) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) knockout mice. We analyzed classical (M1) and alternative (M2) gene expression via quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in both non-adherent cells isolated by lavage and implant-adherent cells. Our results show that macrophages undergo unique activation that displays features of both M1 and M2 polarization including induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), which induces the expression and nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Both processes were compromised in fusion-deficient MCP-1 KO macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inclusion of BAY 11-7028, an inhibitor of NFκB activation, reduced nuclear translocation of RelA and fusion in WT macrophages. Our studies suggest that peritoneal implants elicit a unique macrophage polarization phenotype leading to induction of TNF and activation of the NFκB pathway. PMID:25242651

  1. Loss of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 alters macrophage polarization and reduces NFκB activation in the foreign body response.

    PubMed

    Moore, Laura Beth; Sawyer, Andrew J; Charokopos, Antonios; Skokos, Eleni A; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials elicits a foreign body response characterized by fusion of macrophages to form foreign body giant cells and fibrotic encapsulation. Studies of the macrophage polarization involved in this response have suggested that alternative (M2) activation is associated with more favorable outcomes. Here we investigated this process in vivo by implanting mixed cellulose ester filters or polydimethylsiloxane disks in the peritoneal cavity of wild-type (WT) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) knockout mice. We analyzed classical (M1) and alternative (M2) gene expression via quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in both non-adherent cells isolated by lavage and implant-adherent cells. Our results show that macrophages undergo unique activation that displays features of both M1 and M2 polarization including induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), which induces the expression and nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Both processes were compromised in fusion-deficient MCP-1 KO macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inclusion of BAY 11-7028, an inhibitor of NFκB activation, reduced nuclear translocation of RelA and fusion in WT macrophages. Our studies suggest that peritoneal implants elicit a unique macrophage polarization phenotype leading to induction of TNF and activation of the NFκB pathway.

  2. Loss of MCP-1 alters macrophage polarization and reduces NFκB activation in the foreign body response

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Laura Beth; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Charokopos, Antonios; Skokos, Eleni A.; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2014-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials elicits a foreign body response characterized by fusion of macrophages to form foreign body giant cells and fibrotic encapsulation. Studies of macrophage polarization in this response have suggested that alternative (M2) activation is associated with more favorable outcomes. Here we investigated this process in vivo by implanting mixed cellulose ester filters or PDMS disks in the peritoneal cavity of WT and MCP-1 KO mice. We analyzed classical (M1) and alternative (M2) gene expression via Q-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA in both non-adherent cells isolated by lavage and implant-adherent cells. Our results show that macrophages undergo unique activation that displays features of both M1 and M2 polarization including induction of TNF, which induces the expression and nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA determined by immunofluorescence and western blot. Both processes were compromised in fusion-deficient MCP-1 KO macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inclusion of BAY 11-7028, an inhibitor of NFκB activation, reduced nuclear translocation of RelA and fusion in WT macrophages. Our studies suggest that peritoneal implants elicit a unique macrophage polarization phenotype leading to induction of TNF and activation of the NFκB pathway. PMID:25242651

  3. Influence of cadmium on isolated peritoneal macrophage populations: cadmium inhibits Fc receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of cadmium on adherent phagocytic cell populations. The authors were able to demonstrate, in vitro, a phagocytic defect that was originally observed in an in vivo system. Using in vitro methodologies, cadmium was found to inhibit opsonin-dependent but not opsonin-independent phagocytosis in two different populations of macrophages. The receptors through which the opsonized /sup 51/Cr-ElgG were internalized were characterized as Fc receptors. They were able to demonstrate that cadmium could reversibly inhibit internalization of Fc receptors. This mechanism, rather than an alteration of the receptors' binding capabilities, was responsible for the observed inhibition of Fc mediated (opsonin-dependent) phagocytosis in both populations of macrophages tested. The defect was not specific for cadmium per se. Zinc treatment caused a similar inhibition of Fc receptor mediated phagocytosis.

  4. TLR4-mediated activation of mouse macrophages by Korean mistletoe lectin-C (KML-C).

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Hong, Ju-ho; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Jong-Bae; Song, Seong K

    2010-06-01

    Korean mistletoe lectin (KML-C) is an adjuvant that activates systemic and mucosal immune cells to release cytokines including TNF-alpha, which induces immunity against viruses and cancer cells. Although the immunomodulatory activity of KML-C has been well established, the underlying mechanism of action of KML-C has yet to be explored. When mouse peritoneal macrophages were treated with KML-C, both transcription and translation of TLR4 were upregulated. KML-C-induced TLR4 downstream events were similar to those activated by LPS: the upregulation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK1); resulting in macrophage activation and TNF-alpha production. When TLR4 was blocked using a TLR4-specific neutralizing antibody, TNF-alpha production from the macrophages was significantly inhibited. Moreover, TLR4-deficient mouse macrophages treated with KML-C also secreted greatly reduced level of TNF-alpha secretion. Finally, TLR4 molecules were co-precipitated with KML-C, to which agarose beads were conjugated, indicating that those molecules are associated. These data indicate that KML-C activates mouse macrophages to secrete TNF-alpha by interacting with the TLR4 molecule and activating its signaling pathways.

  5. β-(1→3)-Glucan of the Southern Bracket Mushroom, Ganoderma australe (Agaricomycetes), Stimulates Phagocytosis and Interleukin-6 Production in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Renan Henrique; do Amaral, Alex Evangelista; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Ayala, Thais Soprani; de Cassia Garcia Simao, Rita; de Santana-Filho, Arquimedes Paixao; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; da Conceicao Silva, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma australe was studied to determine the composition of the cell wall, and polysaccharide fraction SK5 was obtained after freeze-thawing an aqueous 5% potassium hydroxide extraction. The monosaccharide composition of the SK5 fraction revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed 81.3% glucose, and analyses by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed a β-glucan with glycosidic links of the (1→3)-β type and most likely 4-O substituted. In addition, the biological effect of the β-glucan from G. australe was evaluated via in vitro cell cultures of peritoneal macrophages isolated from Swiss mice. Biological assays were assessed for toxicity and cell activation, interleukin-6 cytokine concentrations, and the ability to stimulate phagocytic activity. There was an increase in interleukin-6 by approximately 111% with 1.0 µg/mL of polysaccharide, and phagocyte activity was increased in all concentrations examined, obtaining 52.3% with 0.25 µg/mL polysaccharide. The results indicate that a β-(1→3)-glucan isolated from G. australe can be classified as a biological response modifier. PMID:27481297

  6. Colorectal cancer-promoting activity of the senescent peritoneal mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Mikuła-Pietrasik, Justyna; Sosińska, Patrycja; Maksin, Konstantin; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Piotrowska, Hanna; Murias, Marek; Woźniak, Aldona; Szpurek, Dariusz; Książek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancers metastasize into the peritoneal cavity in a process controlled by peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). In this paper we examined if senescent HPMCs can intensify the progression of colorectal (SW480) and pancreatic (PSN-1) cancers in vitro and in vivo. Experiments showed that senescent HPMCs stimulate proliferation, migration and invasion of SW480 cells, and migration of PSN-1 cells. When SW480 cells were injected i.p. with senescent HPMCs, the dynamics of tumor formation and vascularization were increased. When xenografts were generated using PSN-1 cells, senescent HPMCs failed to favor their growth. SW480 cells subjected to senescent HPMCs displayed up-regulated expression of transcripts for various pro-cancerogenic agents as well as increased secretion of their products. Moreover, they underwent an epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the Smad 2/3-Snail1-related pathway. The search for mediators of senescent HPMC activity showed that increased SW480 cell proliferation was stimulated by IL-6, migration by CXCL8 and CCL2, invasion by IL-6, MMP-3 and uPA, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by TGF-β1. Secretion of these agents by senescent HPMCs was increased in an NF-κB- and p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism. Collectively, our findings indicate that in the peritoneum senescent HPMCs may create a metastatic niche in which critical aspects of cancer progression become intensified. PMID:26284488

  7. Contribution of complement component C3 and complement receptor type 3 to carbohydrate-dependent uptake of oligomannose-coated liposomes by peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kuboki, Noritaka; Matsushita, Misao; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kojima, Naoya

    2008-11-01

    Peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) preferentially and rapidly take up oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs) and subsequently mature to induce a Th-1 immune response following administration of OMLs into the peritoneal cavity. Here, we examine the contributions of complement component C3 and complement receptor type 3 (CR3) to carbohydrate-dependent uptake of OMLs by PEMs. Effective uptake of OMLs into PEMs in vitro was observed only in the presence of peritoneal fluid (PF), and OMLs incubated with PF were incorporated by PEMs in vitro in the absence of PF. These phenomena were inhibited by methyl-alpha-mannoside, N-acetylglucosamine or EDTA, but not by galactose. Pull-down analysis followed by peptide mass fingerprinting of PF-treated OMLs indicated that the OMLs were opsonized with complement fragment iC3b. In vivo uptake of OMLs by PEMs was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of an antibody against CR3, a receptor for iC3b, and OML uptake by PEMs in the peritoneal cavity was not observed in C3-deficient mice. Thus, our results indicate that OMLs are opsonized with iC3b in a mannose-dependent manner in the peritoneal cavity and then incorporated into PEMs via CR3. PMID:18694897

  8. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator of macrophage helminthotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J; Goldenberg, S; Meltzer, M S; Pearce, E

    1990-01-01

    Lymphokine-activated macrophages are cytotoxic for larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. That soluble secreted factors may mediate this cytotoxicity was suggested by the observation that culture supernatant fluids from stimulated macrophages also exhibited larvacidal activity. These fluids contain the monokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Several observations indicated that TNF is directly toxic to schistosome larvae. Cytotoxic sera taken from BCG- or S. mansoni-immunized mice after endotoxin challenge killed schistosomula in vitro, and upon gel filtration the larvacidal factor(s) in the sera co-eluted with the tumoricidal activity defined as TNF. Recombinant-derived TNF exhibited direct toxicity to schistosomula at high concentrations, or at lower concentrations in the presence of IFN gamma. The larvacidal activity of macrophage supernatant fluids was abrogated by addition of either anti-TNF antisera or Zn+2, which has been shown to inhibit TNF-induced damage of tumour cells. Anti-TNF and Zn+2 likewise suppressed schistosomulum killing by lymphokine-activated peritoneal macrophages or the IC-21 macrophage line, indicating that TNF also plays a role in the effector mechanism of larval killing by whole cells. PMID:2314921

  9. Action of the anti-tumoral zinc(II)phthalocyanine in solution or encapsulated into nanoparticles of poly-ε-caprolactone internalized by peritoneal macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Abe, Amanda Santos Franco; Ricci-Júnior, Eduardo; Teixeira Lima Castelo Branco, Morgana; de Brito Gitirana, Lycia

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used as drug delivery systems (DDS) exhibiting high cell penetration power. As an antitumor photosensitizer, zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was applied in photodynamic therapy (PDT) since its phototoxic activity promotes death of tumor cells in the presence of laser light. Since drugs do not interact only with tumor cells in living organisms, this study aimed to analyze the action of ZnPc-loaded in nanoparticles (ZnPc-NPs) and in solution (free ZnPc) using peritoneal macrophages as a model of non-neoplastic cells that inhabit the tumoral stroma. NPs were produced by emulsion and evaporation of solvent and characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Assays as 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, light microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to evaluate the drug effects in the presence or absence of laser light applied in PDT. NPs exhibited dimensions between 290 and 350 nm and rounded shape. Empty NP did not affect cell viability, showing that these nanocarriers are biocompatible DDS. Free ZnPc was randomly distributed in the cytoplasm, while ZnPc-NP was preferably located near the nucleus. At 5 μg ml‑1, free ZnPc caused greater loss of cell viability in the absence of laser when compared to ZnPc-NPs, in the presence or absence of irradiation. In contrast, free ZnPc and ZnPc-NPs (0.5 μg ml‑1) promoted cell death to the same extent in cells treated with laser light or not. This demonstrates that the performance of this drug is dose dependent in its free form, but not in its nanoencapsulated form. Cells irradiated with laser (100 mW) and treated with free ZnPc or with ZnPc-NPs showed morphological changes. These observations show that both free ZnPc and ZnPc-NPs irradiated with laser light cause cell damage in peritoneal macrophages.

  10. Action of the anti-tumoral zinc(II)phthalocyanine in solution or encapsulated into nanoparticles of poly-ɛ-caprolactone internalized by peritoneal macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Abe, Amanda Santos Franco; Ricci-Júnior, Eduardo; Teixeira Lima Castelo Branco, Morgana; de Brito Gitirana, Lycia

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used as drug delivery systems (DDS) exhibiting high cell penetration power. As an antitumor photosensitizer, zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was applied in photodynamic therapy (PDT) since its phototoxic activity promotes death of tumor cells in the presence of laser light. Since drugs do not interact only with tumor cells in living organisms, this study aimed to analyze the action of ZnPc-loaded in nanoparticles (ZnPc-NPs) and in solution (free ZnPc) using peritoneal macrophages as a model of non-neoplastic cells that inhabit the tumoral stroma. NPs were produced by emulsion and evaporation of solvent and characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Assays as 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, light microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to evaluate the drug effects in the presence or absence of laser light applied in PDT. NPs exhibited dimensions between 290 and 350 nm and rounded shape. Empty NP did not affect cell viability, showing that these nanocarriers are biocompatible DDS. Free ZnPc was randomly distributed in the cytoplasm, while ZnPc-NP was preferably located near the nucleus. At 5 μg ml-1, free ZnPc caused greater loss of cell viability in the absence of laser when compared to ZnPc-NPs, in the presence or absence of irradiation. In contrast, free ZnPc and ZnPc-NPs (0.5 μg ml-1) promoted cell death to the same extent in cells treated with laser light or not. This demonstrates that the performance of this drug is dose dependent in its free form, but not in its nanoencapsulated form. Cells irradiated with laser (100 mW) and treated with free ZnPc or with ZnPc-NPs showed morphological changes. These observations show that both free ZnPc and ZnPc-NPs irradiated with laser light cause cell damage in peritoneal macrophages.

  11. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  12. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-GuC)rin) activates disabled naC/ve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-N1), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1N2), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-N2) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions.

  13. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    PubMed

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  14. MMP-10 Regulates Collagenolytic Activity of Alternatively Activated Resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Maryam G.; McMahan, Ryan S.; Razumova, Maria V.; Hertz, Angie L.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H.; Regnier, Michael; Wang, Ying; Birkland, Timothy P.; Parks, William C.

    2015-01-01

    MMP-10 is expressed by macrophages and epithelium in response to injury, but its functions in wound repair are unknown. We observed increased collagen deposition and skin stiffness in Mmp10−/− wounds with no difference in collagen expression or re-epithelialization. Increased collagen deposition in Mmp10−/− wounds was accompanied by less collagenolytic activity and reduced expression of specific metallocollagenases, particularly MMP-8 and MMP-13, where MMP-13 was the key collagenase. Ablation and adoptive transfer approaches and cell-based models demonstrated that the MMP-10-dependent collagenolytic activity was a product of alternatively activated (M2) resident macrophages. These data demonstrate a critical role for macrophage MMP-10 in controlling the tissue remodeling activity of macrophages and moderating scar formation during wound repair. PMID:25927164

  15. Lysophosphatidylcholine Triggers TLR2- and TLR4-Mediated Signaling Pathways but Counteracts LPS-Induced NO Synthesis in Peritoneal Macrophages by Inhibiting NF-κB Translocation and MAPK/ERK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Alan Brito; Iaciura, Bruna Maria Ferreira; Nohara, Lilian Lie; Lopes, Carla Duque; Veas, Esteban Mauricio Cordero; Mariano, Vania Sammartino; Bozza, Patricia Torres; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Atella, Georgia Correa; Almeida, Igor Correia; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is the main phospholipid component of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and is usually noted as a marker of several human diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancer and diabetes. Some studies suggest that oxLDL modulates Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. However, effector molecules that are present in oxLDL particles and can trigger TLR signaling are not yet clear. LPC was previously described as an attenuator of sepsis and as an immune suppressor. In the present study, we have evaluated the role of LPC as a dual modulator of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings HEK 293A cells were transfected with TLR expression constructs and stimulated with LPC molecules with different fatty acid chain lengths and saturation levels. All LPC molecules activated both TLR4 and TLR2-1 signaling, as evaluated by NF-қB activation and IL-8 production. These data were confirmed by Western blot analysis of NF-қB translocation in isolated nuclei of peritoneal murine macrophages. However, LPC counteracted the TLR4 signaling induced by LPS. In this case, NF-қB translocation, nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were blocked. Moreover, LPC activated the MAP Kinases p38 and JNK, but not ERK, in murine macrophages. Interestingly, LPC blocked LPS-induced ERK activation in peritoneal macrophages but not in TLR-transfected cells. Conclusions/Significance The above results indicate that LPC is a dual-activity ligand molecule. It is able to trigger a classical proinflammatory phenotype by activating TLR4- and TLR2-1-mediated signaling. However, in the presence of classical TLR ligands, LPC counteracts some of the TLR-mediated intracellular responses, ultimately inducing an anti-inflammatory phenotype; LPC may thus play a role in the regulation of cell immune responses and disease progression. PMID:24312681

  16. Effect of Estragole on Leukocyte Behavior and Phagocytic Activity of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wiirzler, Luiz Alexandre Marques; Silva-Filho, Saulo Euclides; Kummer, Raquel; Pedroso, Raissa Bocchi; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Silva, Expedito Leite; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Estragole, a chemical constituent of the essential oils of many aromatic plants, is used as flavoring in beverage and food industries. In vivo and in vitro experimental assays have shown that EST has sedative, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anesthetic activity. In this work, we evaluate the effect of EST on leukocyte behavior and phagocytic activity of macrophages. In the peritonitis model, EST (500 and 750 mg/kg) decreased the infiltration of peritoneal exudate leukocytes. In vitro chemotaxis assay showed that EST (3, 10, 30, and 60 μg/mL) inhibited neutrophil migration toward fMLP. In the in vivo microcirculation assay, EST at doses of 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes and at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg decreased number of leukocyte migrated to perivascular tissue. The results showed that EST (3, 10, and 30 μg/mL) was able to stimulate the macrophages phagocytosis but only at concentration of 10 μg/mL promoted an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. In conclusion, this study showed that EST had potential anti-inflammatory effects, likely by inhibiting leukocyte migration and by stimulating macrophages phagocytosis. PMID:25152763

  17. The interaction of Naegleria fowleri amoebae with murine macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Stenger, K; Cabral, G A; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether murine macrophage cell lines exhibited in vitro amoebicidal activity comparable to that elicited by activated murine peritoneal macrophages. Peritoneal macrophages activated in vivo by bacillus Calmette-Guérin or Propionibacterium acnes demonstrated significant cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae. The macrophage cell line RAW264.7 also effected cytolysis of amoebae, but to a lesser extent than that elicited by activated peritoneal macrophages. However, the macrophage cell lines, J774A.1 and P388D1, did not exhibit amoebicidal activity. Macrophage conditioned medium prepared from RAW264.7 macrophages mediated cytolysis of L929 tumor cells but had no effect on N. fowleri amoebae. In addition, neither recombinant tumor necrosis factor nor recombinant interleukin-1 exhibited amoebicidal activity. Scanning electron microscopy of co-cultures revealed that N. fowleri bound to activated peritoneal macrophages and RAW264.7 macrophages. These results suggest that RAW264.7 macrophages treated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide are similar to macrophages activated in vivo in that they effect contact-dependent cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae. The RAW264.7 macrophages are unlike primary macrophage cultures in that they either do not release soluble amoebicidal factors into the conditioned medium or they release insufficient quantities.

  18. Dimethyl sulfoxide modulates NF-kappa B and cytokine activation in lipopolysaccharide-treated murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, K A; Hill, M R; Youkhana, K; Wanker, F; Gimble, J M

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants are protective against septic shock in animal models. Recently, free radical scavengers have been found to inhibit the activation of the NF-kappa B protein in a number of cell lines. This transcriptional regulatory protein binds to the promoters of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, and the macrophage inflammatory proteins. The current work examined lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappa B activation in the J774 macrophage-like cell line and primary peritoneal macrophages from lipopolysaccharide-responsive (C3HeB/Fej) and -nonresponsive (C3H/HeJ) murine strains. The DNA-binding activity of the NF-kappa B protein directly correlated with mRNA expression for the genes encoding the proinflammatory cytokines and the free radical scavenging enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Both the p50 and p65 NF-kappa B subunits were detected on gel supershift assays. Minimal NF-kappa B activity was observed following exposure of C3H/HeJ macrophages to lipopolysaccharide. The antioxidant dimethyl sulfoxide decreased the level of NF-kappa B activation in the J774 cells. This correlated with decreased expression of cytokine mRNAs and tumor necrosis factor bioactivity. These results suggest that modulation of NF-kappa B activation may provide a mechanism through which antioxidants protect against endotoxemia in murine models. Images PMID:8039880

  19. Vocal Fold Fibroblasts Immunoregulate Activated Macrophage Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N.; Chen, Fei; Jetté, Marie E.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that fibroblasts play a critical role in regulating inflammation during wound healing because they express several inflammatory mediators in response to bacteria. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) on the immunomodulatory properties of vocal fold fibroblasts (VFF) derived from polyps, scar and normal tissue co-cultured with macrophages, to provide insight into their interactions during the inflammatory process. Fibroblasts were co-cultured with CD14+ monocytes and after 7 days, wells were treated with LPS for 24 and 72 hours. Culture supernatants were collected and concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-1β, and MCP-1 were quantified by ELISA. Normal VFF and CD14+ monocultures were used as controls. Twenty-four hours after LPS activation, macrophages co-cultured with polyp VFF had significantly increased expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 compared to controls (p<0.0001). In contrast, macrophages co-cultured with scar VFF had significantly lower expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-12 with significantly higher IL-10 compared to control (p<0.0001). After 72 hours, macrophages co-cultured with polyp VFF increased expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and TGF-β (p<0.01) and macrophages co-cultured with scar VFF significantly decreased their expression of IL-1β and IL-12 compared to control (p<0.0001). Scar VFF at both time points produced significantly lower levels of IL-8, MCP-1, IL-6 and TGF-β compared to controls (p<0.05). Based on our findings, VFF and macrophages secrete several inflammatory mediators that modify their diverse functions. Polyp and scar VFF may play a role in regulating abnormal inflammatory responses, which could result in excessive ECM deposition that disrupts the function of the vocal folds. PMID:23123198

  20. In Vitro Administration of Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with MUC-1 Protein Fragment Generates Anticancer Vaccine Response via Macrophage Activation and Polarization Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Teodora; Matea, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Iancu, Cornel; Orasan, Remus; Mocan, Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines (or active immunotherapy) aim to guide the patient's personal immune system to eradicate cancer cells. An exciting approach to cancer vaccines has been offered by nanoscale drug delivery systems containing tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Their capacity to stimulate the immune system has been suggested during late years. However, the role of the macrophages as key-elements in antigen-presentation process following TAAs-containing nanosystems is not completely understood. We aimed to evaluate the effect of gold nanoparticles functionalized with mucin-1 peptide (MUC-1) on murine peritoneal macrophages. Gold nanoparticles, obtained using a modified Turkevich method, were functionalized with MUC-1 protein using Clealand's reagent. The obtained GNP-MUC-1 solution was used to treat at various concentrations monolayers of peritoneum-derived macrophages that were further analyzed using confocal and hyperspectral microscopy, ELISA assays and spectroscopic techniques. The GNP-MUC-1 nano-construct had proven to function as a powerful macrophage activator with consequent release of cytokines such as: TNF-ɑ, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 on peritoneal macrophages we have isolated from mice. Our results demonstrate optimization of antigen-presenting process and predominant M1 polarization following exposure GNP-MUC-1. To our best knowledge this is the first study to evaluate the anticancer effects of a newly designed nano-biocompound on the complex antigen- processing apparatus of peritoneal macrophages. PMID:26000051

  1. Mediation of macrophage cytolytic and phagocytic activities by antibodies of different classes and class-specific Fc-receptors.

    PubMed

    Walker, W S

    1977-08-01

    The classes of antibodies that mediate the phagocytosis and cytolysis of 51Cr-labeled chicken erythrocytes by IC-21 macrophages, an established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages, were identified. The phagocytic activity of IC-21 macrophages, as determined by a functional inhibition assay with mouse myeloma proteins, depended mainly on IgM and IgG2a antibodies and to a lesser extent on IgG2b antibodies. Extracellular cytolysis of target cells was mediated solely by IgG2b antibodies. These results correlate with the previously documented specificities of discrete Fc-receptors for IgG2a and IgG2b immunoglobulins on IC-21 cells. Thus, phagocytosis and cytolysis appear to be mediated by antibodies of different classes operating through separate and distinct sites on the surface of IC-21 macrophages. PMID:886183

  2. Identification of cyclophilin as a proinflammatory secretory product of lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, B; Yarlett, N; Strupp, A; Cerami, A

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated an 18-kDa peptide (designated sp18, for 18-kDa secreted protein) from the conditioned medium of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Purified sp18 had in vivo inflammatory activity and in vitro chemotactic activity for human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. Surprisingly, N-terminal sequencing and tryptic mapping studies revealed that sp18 and cyclophilin, an intracellular protein that binds the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, are highly homologous. The in vitro chemotactic activity of sp18 on monocytes was blocked by cyclosporin A but not by cyclosporin H, a structural analog of cyclosporin A that does not bind cyclophilin. Like purified porcine cyclophilin, mouse sp18 exhibited peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity. Medium conditioned by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated resident peritoneal exudate macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice contained substantially higher levels of sp18/cyclophilin than medium conditioned by nonstimulated macrophages. The observation that sp18/cyclophilin exhibits proinflammatory activity and is secreted by macrophages in response to endotoxin suggests that this protein may function as a cytokine, and invites the hypothesis that the immunosuppressive action of cyclosporin A results in part from interaction with an extracellular form of cyclophilin released as a mediator of immune and inflammatory functions. Images PMID:1565646

  3. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  4. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  5. Escherichia coli and Candida albicans Induced Macrophage Extracellular Trap-Like Structures with Limited Microbicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chengshui; Liu, Xiaolei; Du, Jing; Shi, Haining; Wang, Xuelin; Bai, Xue; Peng, Peng; Yu, Lu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) has recently been recognized as a novel defense mechanism in several types of innate immune cells. It has been suggested that these structures are toxic to microbes and contribute significantly to killing several pathogens. However, the role of ETs formed by macrophages (METs) in defense against microbes remains little known. In this study, we demonstrated that a subset of murine J774A.1 macrophage cell line (8% to 17%) and peritoneal macrophages (8.5% to 15%) form METs-like structures (METs-LS) in response to Escherichia coli and Candida albicans challenge. We found only a portion of murine METs-LS, which are released by dying macrophages, showed detectable killing effects on trapped E. coli but not C. albicans. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that, in vitro, both microorganisms were entrapped in J774A.1 METs-LS composed of DNA and microbicidal proteins such as histone, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. DNA components of both nucleus and mitochondrion origins were detectable in these structures. Additionally, METs-LS formation occurred independently of ROS produced by NADPH oxidase, and this process did not result in cell lysis. In summary, our results emphasized that microbes induced METs-LS in murine macrophage cells and that the microbicidal activity of these METs-LS differs greatly. We propose the function of METs-LS is to contain invading microbes at the infection site, thereby preventing the systemic diffusion of them, rather than significantly killing them. PMID:24587206

  6. Schisandra polysaccharide evokes immunomodulatory activity through TLR 4-mediated activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Li, Jing; Mao, Riwen; Zou, Ye; Feng, Weiwei; Zheng, Daheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yao; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2014-04-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Previous studies have shown that Schisandra polysaccharide (SCPP11) has robust antitumor activity in vivo. In this study, the immunomodulatory activity and mechanisms of action of SCPP11 were investigated further to reveal its mechanism of action against tumors. Results showed that SCPP11 increased the thymus and spleen indices, pinocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, and hemolysin formation in CTX-induced immunosuppressed mice. Moreover, SCPP11 significantly increased immunoglobulin levels, cytokines levels in vivo and induced RAW264.7 cells to secrete cytokines in vitro. RAW264.7 cells pretreated with SCPP11 significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG-2 cells. In addition, SCPP11 promoted both the expression of iNOS protein and of iNOS and TNF-α mRNA. TLR-4 is a possible receptor for SCPP11-mediated macrophage activation. Therefore, the data suggest that SCPP11 exerted its antitumor activity by improving immune system functions through TLR-4-mediated up-regulation of NO and TNF-α.

  7. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC50 values of 0.78 and 0.41 μM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC50 values of 6.0 and 5.5 μM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  8. Bacterial growth and killing in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugh, H A; Keane, W F; Conroy, W E; Peterson, P K

    1984-01-01

    We determined the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli to survive and grow in peritoneal dialysis fluids from patients undergoing chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Staphylococci did not survive in commercially available dialysis solutions but grew readily in peritoneal effluents obtained from patients after the dialysis dwell time. The number of CFU doubled 6 and 13 times in 24 h for S. epidermidis and S. aureus, respectively. E. coli grew well in both the pre- and postdialysis peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal macrophages as well as peripheral blood leukocytes inhibited bacterial growth in peritoneal dialysis fluid. However, 10(6) phagocytes per ml were minimally required to obtain a bacteriostatic effect. The addition of serum to peritoneal dialysis fluid increased the antibacterial activity of macrophages and blood leukocytes. The capacity of the aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin to reduce bacterial CFU in peritoneal dialysis fluid was only 10% of its bactericidal capacity in standard Mueller-Hinton brush. Peritoneal dialysis fluid had no effect on the antibacterial activity of imipenem. PMID:6386844

  9. Protein-energy malnutrition decreases the expression of TLR-4/MD-2 and CD14 receptors in peritoneal macrophages and reduces the synthesis of TNF-alpha in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice.

    PubMed

    Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; de Moura Sá Rocha, Vanessa; de Sá Rocha, Luiz Carlos; Borelli, Primavera

    2007-11-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) modifies resistance to infection, impairing a number of physiological processes, including hematopoiesis. In this study, we examined a few aspects of the inflammatory response to LPS in a model of PEM. We evaluated the cellularity of the blood, bone marrow and spleen, as well as phagocytic, fungicidal and spreading activity, the production in vivo and in vitro of TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha and IL-6, and the expression of CD14 and TLR-4/MD-2 receptors in macrophages. Two-month-old male Swiss mice were submitted to PEM with a low-protein diet containing 4% protein as compared to 20% protein in the control diet. When the experimental group had attained about 20% loss of their original body weight, they were used in the experiments. Malnourished animals presented anemia, leucopenia and severe reduction in bone marrow, spleen and peritoneal cavity cellularity. The production of TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha and IL-6 stimulated in vivo with LPS and the production of IL-6 in bone marrow cells cultured with LPS and the production of TNF-alpha in bone marrow, spleen and peritoneal cells cultured with LPS were significantly lower in malnourished animals. The expression of CD14 and TLR-4/MD-2 receptors was found to be significantly lower in macrophages of malnourished animals. These findings suggest that malnourished animals present a deficient response to LPS. The lower expression of the CD14 and TLR-4/MD-2 receptors may be partly responsible for the immunodeficiency observed in the malnourished mice. These data lead us to infer that the nutritional state interferes with the activation of macrophages and with the capacity to mount an immune response.

  10. Bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages have different inflammatory response to oxLDL and M1/M2 marker expression – implications for atherosclerosis research

    PubMed Central

    Bisgaard, Line S.; Mogensen, Christina K.; Rosendahl, Alexander; Cucak, Helena; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Rasmussen, Salka E.; Pedersen, Tanja X.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and can polarize into specific subsets, e.g. pro-inflammatory M1-like and re-modelling M2-like macrophages. To determine if peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) or bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) resembled aortic macrophages from ApoE−/− mice, their M1/M2 phenotype, inflammatory status, and lipid metabolism signatures were compared. oxLDL accumulation was similar in PEMs and BMDMs. On protein expression level, BMDMs showed an M2-like CD206highCD11clow profile, while cholesterol loading led to enhanced CD11c expression and reduced MCP-1 secretion. In contrast, PEMs expressed low levels of CD206 and CD11c, and responded to cholesterol loading by increasing CD11c expression and MCP-1 secretion. mRNA expression of M1/M2 markers was higher in PEMS than BMDMs, while lipid metabolism genes were similarly expressed. Whole aorta flow cytometry showed an accumulation of M2-like CD206highCD11clow macrophages in advanced versus early atherosclerotic disease in ApoE−/− mice. In isolated lesions, mRNA levels of the M2 markers Socs2, CD206, Retnla, and IL4 were downregulated with increasing disease severity. Likewise, mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes (SREBP2, ACSL1, SRB1, DGAT1, and cpt1a) was decreased in advanced versus early lesions. In conclusion, PEMs and BMDMs are phenotypically distinct and differ from macrophages in lesions with respect to expression of M1/M2 markers and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27734926

  11. Cytolytic activity against tumor cells by macrophage cell lines and augmentation by macrophage stimulants.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, T; Holden, H T

    1980-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that macrophage cell lines retained the ability to phagocytize, to secrete lysosomal enzymes, and to function as effector cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity. In this paper, the cytolytic activity of murine macrophage cell lines against tumor target cells was assessed using an 18-h 51Cr release assay. Of the macrophage cell lines tested, RAW 264, PU5-1.8 and IC-21 had intermediate to high levels of spontaneous cytolytic activity, P388D, and J774 had low to intermediate levels, while /WEHI-3 showed little or no cytolytic activity against RBL-5, MBL-2 and TU-5 target cells. Tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines could be augmented by the addition of macrophage stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C, indicating that the activation of macrophages by these stimulants does not require the participation of other cell types. Treatment with interferon also augmented the tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines. Although the mechanism by which these cell lines exert their spontaneous or boosted cytotoxic activity is not clear, it does not appear to be due to depletion of nutrients since cell lines with high metabolic and proliferative activities, such as WEHI-3 and RBL-5, showed little or no cytotoxicity and supernatants from the macrophage cell lines did not exert any cytotoxic effects in their essay. Thus, it appears that the different macrophage cell lines represent different levels of activation and/or differentiation and may be useful for studying the development of these processes as well as providing a useful tool for analyzing the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:6165690

  12. Molecular cloning and function characterization of a new macrophage-activating protein from Tremella fuciformis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Liang; Chang, An-Ju; Kuo, Xhao-Kai; Sheu, Fuu

    2014-02-19

    Silver ear mushroom ( Tremella fuciformis ) is an edible fungus with health benefits. In this study, we purified a new T. fuciformis protein (TFP) and demonstrated its ability to activate primary murine macrophages. The isolation procedure involved ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. TFP naturally formed a 24 kDa homodimeric protein and did not contain glycan residues. The TFP gene was cloned using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method, and the cDNA sequence of TFP was composed of 408 nucleotides with a 336 nucleotide open reading frame encoding a 112 amino acid protein. TFP was capable of stimulating TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-1ra, and IL-12 production in addition to CD86/MHC class II expression, mRNA expression of M1-type chemokines, and nuclear NF-κB accumulation in murine peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, TFP failed to stimulate TLR4-neutralized and TLR4-knockout macrophages, suggesting that TLR4 is a required receptor for TFP signaling on macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that TFP may be an important bioactive compound from T. fuciformis that induces M1-polarized activation through a TLR4-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:24400969

  13. Modulation of macrophage activation and programming in immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Yang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are central mediators of the immune, contributing both to the initiation and the resolution of inflammation. The concept of macrophage activation and program has stimulated interest in its definition, and functional significance in homeostasis and diseases. It has been known that macrophages could be differently activated and programmed into different functional subtypes in response to different types of antigen stumuli or different kinds of cytokines present in the microenvironment and could thus profoundly influence immune responses, but little is known about the state and exact regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program from cell or molecular signaling level in immunity. In this review, we summarize the recent finding regarding the regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program toward M1 and M2, especially on M2 macrophages.

  14. A novel CD14(high) CD16(high) subset of peritoneal macrophages from cirrhotic patients is associated to an increased response to LPS.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio José; Tapia-Abellán, Ana; Fernández-Fernández, María Dolores; Tristán-Manzano, María; Hernández-Caselles, Trinidad; Sánchez-Velasco, Eduardo; Miras-López, Manuel; Martínez-Esparza, María; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize monocyte-derived macrophages (M-DM) from blood and ascites of cirrhotic patients comparatively with those obtained from blood of healthy controls. The phenotypic profile based on CD14/CD16 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cells were isolated and stimulated in vitro with LPS and heat killed Candida albicans. Phosphorylation of ERK, c-Jun, p38 MAPK, and PKB/Akt was analyzed by Western blotting. A novel CD14(high)CD16(high) M-DM subpopulation is present in ascites (∼33%). The CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate subset is increased in the blood of cirrhotic patients (∼from 4% to 11%) and is predominant in ascites (49%), while the classical CD14(++)CD16(-) subpopulation is notably reduced in ascites (18%). Basal hyperactivation of ERK and JNK/c-Jun pathways observed in ascites M-DM correlates with CD14/CD16 high expressing subsets, while PI3K/PKB does it with the CD16 low expressing cells. In vitro LPS treatment highly increases ERK1/2, PKB/Akt and c-Jun phosphorylation, while that of p38 MAPK is decreased in M-DM from ascites compared to control blood M-DM. Stimulation of healthy blood M-DM with LPS and C. albicans induced higher phosphorylation levels of p38 than those from ascites. Regarding cytokines secretion, in vitro activated M-DM from ascites of cirrhotic patients produced significantly higher amounts of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, and lower levels of IL-1β and IL-12 than control blood M-DM. In conclusion, a new subpopulation of CD14(high)CD16(high) peritoneal M-DM has been identified in ascites of cirrhotic patients, which is very sensitive to LPS stimulation. PMID:26938502

  15. A novel CD14(high) CD16(high) subset of peritoneal macrophages from cirrhotic patients is associated to an increased response to LPS.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio José; Tapia-Abellán, Ana; Fernández-Fernández, María Dolores; Tristán-Manzano, María; Hernández-Caselles, Trinidad; Sánchez-Velasco, Eduardo; Miras-López, Manuel; Martínez-Esparza, María; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize monocyte-derived macrophages (M-DM) from blood and ascites of cirrhotic patients comparatively with those obtained from blood of healthy controls. The phenotypic profile based on CD14/CD16 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cells were isolated and stimulated in vitro with LPS and heat killed Candida albicans. Phosphorylation of ERK, c-Jun, p38 MAPK, and PKB/Akt was analyzed by Western blotting. A novel CD14(high)CD16(high) M-DM subpopulation is present in ascites (∼33%). The CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate subset is increased in the blood of cirrhotic patients (∼from 4% to 11%) and is predominant in ascites (49%), while the classical CD14(++)CD16(-) subpopulation is notably reduced in ascites (18%). Basal hyperactivation of ERK and JNK/c-Jun pathways observed in ascites M-DM correlates with CD14/CD16 high expressing subsets, while PI3K/PKB does it with the CD16 low expressing cells. In vitro LPS treatment highly increases ERK1/2, PKB/Akt and c-Jun phosphorylation, while that of p38 MAPK is decreased in M-DM from ascites compared to control blood M-DM. Stimulation of healthy blood M-DM with LPS and C. albicans induced higher phosphorylation levels of p38 than those from ascites. Regarding cytokines secretion, in vitro activated M-DM from ascites of cirrhotic patients produced significantly higher amounts of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, and lower levels of IL-1β and IL-12 than control blood M-DM. In conclusion, a new subpopulation of CD14(high)CD16(high) peritoneal M-DM has been identified in ascites of cirrhotic patients, which is very sensitive to LPS stimulation.

  16. Prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4 release from peritoneal macrophages by different osmotic agents in nonuremic guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hain, H; Jörres, A; Kögel, B; Mahiout, A; Gahl, G M; Kessel, M

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (Il-1), prostaglandins, and leukotrienes have been identified as inflammatory parameters in the setting of peritoneal dialysis. Recently, it was postulated that chronic overstimulation of peritoneal macrophages (PM) may result in fibrosis and loss of ultrafiltration. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether alternative osmotic agents (polyglucose, amino acids, glycerol, bicarbonate/glucose, gelatine, hydroxyethyl starch) provoke greater eicosanoid release by PMs than glucose. Fifty milliliters of sterile dialysate containing different osmotic agents were injected intraperitoneally into nonuremic guinea pigs. After 4 hours of dwell time, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane B2 (TXB2), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production was analyzed in peritoneal effluents using specific radioimmunoassays (RIA) after liquid extraction. Cyclooxygenase products were generated with all osmotic agents: PGE2 concentrations ranged from 0.9 to 2.8 ng/4h, and TXB2 levels ranged from 39 to 49 ng/4h. In addition, the lipoxygenase product LTB4 was found in concentrations between 1.8 and 3.5 ng/4h. There were no significant differences in eicosanoid release among the osmotic agents. Thus, in this experimental setting, the capacity of PM to release inflammatory mediators did not correlate with the chemical composition of the dialysis solutions.

  17. The toxic effects of indoor atmospheric fine particulate matter collected from allergic and non-allergic families in Wuhan on mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yan, Biao; Li, Jinquan; Guo, Junhui; Ma, Ping; Wu, Zhuo; Ling, ZhenHao; Guo, Hai; Hiroshi, Yoshino; Yanagi, U; Yang, Xu; Zhu, Shengwei; Chen, Mingqing

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with multiple adverse health outcomes and PM2.5-induced oxidative stress is now commonly known as a proposed mechanism of PM2.5-mediated toxicity. However, the association between allergic symptoms in children and exposure to PM2.5 has not been fully elucidated, particularly the role of PM2.5 on the indoor environment involved in allergy or non-allergy is unknown. The aim of the present study was to explore whether indoor PM2.5 from the homes of children with allergic symptoms had more increased risks of allergy than that of healthy ones and then compare the toxicity and inflammatory response of them. In this study, indoor PM2.5 was collected from the homes of schoolchildren with allergic symptoms and those of healthy ones respectively, and components of PM2.5 were analyzed. PM2.5-mediated oxidative damage and inflammatory response were further evaluated in mouse peritoneal macrophages based on its effects on the levels of reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage or cytokine production. It seems that oxidative stress may contribute to PM2.5-induced toxicity, and PM2.5 from the allergic indoor environment produced more serious toxic effects and an inflammatory response on mouse peritoneal macrophages than that from a non-allergic indoor environment. PMID:26304222

  18. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to the site of injury, internalize necrotic or foreign material. Along with phagocytosis, activated macrophages release proteolytic enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins into the extracellular environment. Pro-inflammatory monocytes and macrophages also induce tissue oxidative damage through the inflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). In this review we will highlight recent advances in molecular macrophage imaging. Particular stress will be given to macrophage functional and enzymatic activity imaging which targets phagocytosis, proteolysis and myeloperoxidase activity imaging. PMID:24729833

  19. The predominance of alternatively activated macrophages following challenge with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide after prior infection with Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Alegranci, Pamela; de Abreu Ribeiro, Livia Carolina; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Negrini, Thais de Cássia; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Tansini, Aline; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2013-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis that is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. This disease generally occurs within the skin and subcutaneous tissues, causing lesions that can spread through adjacent lymphatic vessels and sometimes leading to systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages are crucial for proper immune responses against a variety of pathogens. Furthermore, macrophages can play different roles in response to different microorganisms and forms of activation, and they can be divided into "classic" or "alternatively" activated populations, as also known as M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 cells can lead to tissue injury and contribute to pathogenesis, whereas M2 cells promote angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in a sporotrichosis model. Toward this end, we performed phenotyping of peritoneal exudate cells and evaluated the concomitant production of several immunomediators, including IL-12, IL-10, TGF-β, nitric oxide, and arginase-I activity, which were stimulated ex vivo with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide. Our results showed the predominance of the M2 macrophage population, indicated by peaks of arginase-I activity as well as IL-10 and TGF-β production during the 6th and 8th weeks after infection. These results were consistent with cellular phenotyping that revealed increases in CD206-positive cells over this period. This is the first report of the participation of M2 macrophages in sporotrichosis infections.

  20. In vitro studies of interaction of rickettsia and macrophages: effect of ultraviolet light on Coxiella burnetti inactivation and macrophage enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.S.; Kishimoto, R.A.; Canonico, P.G.

    1980-03-01

    The inactivation of Coxiella burnetii in suspension or in cultures of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages by ultraviolet (uv) light was studied. The effect of uv treatment on the activity of macrophage organelle marker enzymes and their subsequent equilibration in linear sucrose gradients was also determined. It was shown that uv treatment for 15 s at a distance of 10 cm inactivated C. burnetti, either in suspension or within guinea pig peritoneal macrophages. Similar uv treatment had little effect on the activity or equilibration of macrophage organelle marker enzymes in linear sucrose gradients.

  1. AKT mediated glycolytic shift regulates autophagy in classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matta, Sumit Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is considered as an innate defense mechanism primarily due to its role in the targeting of intracellular pathogens for lysosomal degradation. Here we report inhibition of autophagy as an adaptive response in classically activated macrophages that helps achieve high cellular ROS production and cell death-another hallmark of innate mechanisms. We show prolonged classical activation of Raw 264.7 macrophages by treating them with IFN-γ and LPS inhibited autophagy. The inhibition of autophagy was dependent on nitric oxide (NO) production which activated the AKT-mTOR signaling, the known negative regulators of autophagy. Autophagy inhibition in these cells was accompanied with a shift to aerobic glycolysis along with a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MOMP). The decline in MOMP coupled with autophagy inhibition led to increased mitochondrial content and considerably elevated cellular ROS, eventually causing cell death. Next, using specific siRNA mediated knockdowns we show AKT was responsible for the glycolytic shift and autophagy inhibition in activated macrophages. Surprisingly, AKT knockdown in activated macrophages also rescued them from cell death. Finally we show that AKT mediated autophagy inhibition in the activated macrophages correlated with the depletion of glucose from the extracellular medium, and glucose supplementation not only rescued autophagy levels and reversed other phenotypes of activated macrophages, but also inhibited cell death. Thus we report here a novel link between AKT mediated glycolytic metabolism and autophagy in the activated macrophages, and provide a possible mechanism for sustained macrophage activation in vivo.

  2. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  3. Neutralization of feline infectious peritonitis virus: preparation of monoclonal antibody that shows cell tropism in neutralizing activity after viral absorption into the cells.

    PubMed

    Kida, K; Hohdatsu, T; Kashimoto-Tokunaga, J; Koyama, H

    2000-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection of feline macro-phages is enhanced by mouse anti-FIPV monoclonal antibody (MAb). This anti-body-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection is dependent on mouse MAb subclass, and MAb of IgG2a subclass has a strong ADE activity. Furthermore, MAb showing strong neutralizing activity in Felis catus whole fetus (fcwf-4) cells and Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells shows strong enhancing activity in feline macrophages, indicating that the neutralizing epitope and the enhancing epitope are closely related. In this study, we prepared MAb FK50-4 that showed a strong neutralizing activity in feline macrophages, despite the fact that the MAb belonged to the IgG2a subclass. However, MAb FK50-4 did not exhibit neutralizing activity in CrFK cells or fcwf-4 cells, thus showing a very unusual property. MAb FK50-4 recognized FIPV small integral membrane glycoprotein (M protein). Even when feline macrophages were pretreated with MAb FK50-4 prior to FIPV inoculation, this antibody prevented FIPV infection. This reaction disappeared after treatment of FK50-4 with protein A. The neutralizing activity of FK50-4 was also effective on feline macrophages after the cells were inoculated with FIPV. These findings indicated that the FIPV replication mechanism differs between feline macrophages and CrFK/fcwf-4 cells and that a neutralizing epitope that can prevent FIPV infection of feline macrophages after viral absorption is present on M protein.

  4. Macrophage Bactericidal Activities against Staphylococcus aureus Are Enhanced In Vivo by Selenium Supplementation in a Dose-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Aribi, Mourad; Meziane, Warda; Habi, Salim; Boulatika, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary selenium is of fundamental importance to maintain optimal immune function and enhance immunity during infection. To this end, we examined the effect of selenium on macrophage bactericidal activities against Staphylococcus aureus. Methods Assays were performed in golden Syrian hamsters and peritoneal macrophages cultured with S. aureus and different concentrations of selenium. Results Infected and selenium-supplemented animals have significantly decreased levels of serum nitric oxide (NO) production when compared with infected but non-selenium-supplemented animals at day 7 post-infection (p < 0.05). A low dose of 5 ng/mL selenium induced a significant decrease in macrophage NO production, but significant increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels (respectively, p = 0.009, p < 0.001). The NO production and H2O2 levels were significantly increased with increasing concentrations of selenium; the optimal macrophage activity levels were reached at 20 ng/mL. The concentration of 5 ng/mL of selenium induced a significant decrease in the bacterial arginase activity but a significant increase in the macrophage arginase activity. The dose of 20 ng/mL selenium induced a significant decrease of bacterial growth (p < 0.0001) and a significant increase in macrophage phagocytic activity, NO production/arginase balance and S. aureus killing (for all comparisons, p < 0.001). Conclusions Selenium acts in a dose-dependent manner on macrophage activation, phagocytosis and bacterial killing suggesting that inadequate doses may cause a loss of macrophage bactericidal activities and that selenium supplementation could enhance the in vivo control of immune response to S. aureus. PMID:26340099

  5. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  6. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation. PMID:12062184

  7. Antibacterial resistance, macrophage influx, and activation induced by bacterial rRNA with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide.

    PubMed Central

    Gonggrijp, R; Mullers, W J; Dullens, H F; van Boven, C P

    1985-01-01

    Intraperitoneally injected rRNA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa combined with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDA) increased nonspecifically the resistance of mice against an intraperitoneal challenge with extracellular (P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli) and intracellular (Listeria monocytogenes) bacteria. This study concerns the mechanism underlying the nonspecific resistance. RNA with DDA (RNA-DDA) induced a cell influx and activated peritoneal macrophages (M phi) as judged by the decreased 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphodiesterase activities in M phi lysates, the enhanced O2- release, and the increased antitumor activity in comparison with unstimulated M phi. RNA without DDA did not enhance the resistance and did not influence the peritoneal cell numbers or M phi properties. DDA without RNA enhanced the resistance of mice only slightly; it induced a cell influx, yielding elicited M phi as judged by the decreased 5'-nucleotidase activity and increased alkaline phosphodiesterase activity, the slightly enhanced O2- release, and the absence of increased antitumor activity. Both RNA-DDA and DDA M phi showed an enhanced capacity to ingest and kill L. monocytogenes in vitro, DDA M phi being slightly less effective than RNA-DDA M phi with respect to killing. We conclude that the enhanced killing capacity of M phi for L. monocytogenes is characteristic of both elicited DDA M phi and activated RNA-DDA M phi. The relationship between nonspecific resistance, peritoneal cell numbers, and antibacterial M phi activity is discussed. In addition, it is shown that RNA and DDA retain their activity when they are injected apart, suggesting that they activate M phi by sequential action. PMID:2415454

  8. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-01

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  9. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1. PMID:27261736

  10. Effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    DING, YOUCHENG; ZHANG, HUI; LU, AIGUO; ZHOU, ZHUQING; ZHONG, MINGAN; SHEN, DONGWEI; WANG, XUJING; ZHU, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a primary cause of mortality in patients with gastric cancer. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) has been demonstrated to be associated with tumor cell metastasis through the degradation of the extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of the uPA system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. Expression of uPA, uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in four gastric cell lines (AGS, SGC7901, MKN45 and MKN28) was measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. uPA activity was detected using a uPA activity kit. Peritoneal implantation models of rats were established by injecting four gastric cancer cell lines for the selection of the cancer cells with a high planting potential. Biological behaviors, including adhesion, migration and invasion, were determined using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Expression of the uPA system was observed to be highest in the SGC7901 cells among the four gastric cell lines. uPA activity was observed to be highest in the MKN45 cells and lowest in the AGS cells. Furthermore, peritoneal implantation analysis demonstrated that no peritoneal tumors were identified in the AGS cells, whilst the tumor masses observed in the SGC7901 and MKN45 cells were of different sizes. The survival times of the rats injected with the MKN28 and SGC7901 cells were longer than those of the rats injected with the MKN45 cells. Antibodies for uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in the uPA system had the ability to inhibit the adhesion, migration and invasion of peritoneal metastasis in the gastric cancer cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the uPA system was positively associated with peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:27313768

  11. Human macrophage polarization in vitro: maturation and activation methods compared.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Daphne Y S; Glim, Judith E; Stavenuiter, Andrea W D; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla; Amor, Sandra; Dijkstra, Christine D; Beelen, Robert H J

    2014-09-01

    Macrophages form a heterogeneous cell population displaying multiple functions, and can be polarized into pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, by environmental factors. Their activation status reflects a beneficial or detrimental role in various diseases. Currently several in vitro maturation and activation protocols are used to induce an M1 or M2 phenotype. Here, the impact of different maturation factors (NHS, M-CSF, or GM-CSF) and activation methods (IFN-γ/LPS, IL-4, dexamethason, IL-10) on the macrophage phenotype was determined. Regarding macrophage morphology, pro-inflammatory (M1) activation stimulated cell elongation, and anti-inflammatory (M2) activation induced a circular appearance. Activation with pro-inflammatory mediators led to increased CD40 and CD64 expression, whereas activation with anti-inflammatory factors resulted in increased levels of MR and CD163. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was induced by activation with IFN-γ/LPS, and TGF-β production was enhanced by the maturation factors M-CSF and GM-CSF. Our data demonstrate that macrophage marker expression and cytokine production in vitro is highly dependent on both maturation and activation methods. In vivo macrophage activation is far more complex, since a plethora of stimuli are present. Hence, defining the macrophage activation status ex vivo on a limited number of markers could be indecisive. From this study we conclude that maturation with M-CSF or GM-CSF induces a moderate anti- or pro-inflammatory state respectively, compared to maturation with NHS. CD40 and CD64 are the most distinctive makers for human M1 and CD163 and MR for M2 macrophage activation and therefore can be helpful in determining the activation status of human macrophages ex vivo.

  12. Deletion of scavenger receptor A gene in mice resulted in protection from septic shock and modulation of TLR4 signaling in isolated peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Robert; Cauvi, David M; Hawisher, Dennis; Song, Donghuan; Niño, Diego F; Coimbra, Raul; Bickler, Stephen; De Maio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptor A (Sra), also known as macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (Msr1), is a surface glycoprotein preferentially present in macrophages that plays a primary role in innate immunity. Previous studies have shown that Sra is a modifier gene for the response to bacterial LPS in mice at the level of IL-10 production, in particular. In the present study, we found that Sra(−/−) mice are more resistant to septic shock induced by cecal ligation and puncture than wild-type C57BL/6 J (B6) mice. In addition, Sra(−/−) mice displayed initial elevated high density lipoprotein (HDL) circulating levels. Naïve peritoneal macrophages (PMϕs) were isolated from Sra(−/−) mice to understand the possible protective mechanism. Incubation of these cells with LPS was found to modulate TLR4 signaling, leading to a reduction in IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels, but not TNF-α expression, at low concentrations of LPS in comparison with PMϕs isolated from B6 mice. No differences were found in LPS binding between PMϕs derived from Sra(−/−) or B6 mice. The lack of Sra binding to LPS was confirmed after transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the Sra gene. The contribution of Sra to the outcome of sepsis may be a combination of changes in TLR4 signaling pathway and elevated levels of HDL in circulation, but also LPS toxicity. PMID:22751446

  13. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  14. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  15. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis. PMID:27482886

  16. Regulatory role of PI3K-protein kinase B on the release of interleukin-1β in peritoneal macrophages from the ascites of cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Abellán, A; Ruiz-Alcaraz, A J; Antón, G; Miras-López, M; Francés, R; Such, J; Martínez-Esparza, M; García-Peñarrubia, P

    2014-12-01

    Great effort has been paid to identify novel targets for pharmaceutical intervention to control inflammation associated with different diseases. We have studied the effect of signalling inhibitors in the secretion of the proinflammatory and profibrogenic cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in monocyte-derived macrophages (M-DM) obtained from the ascites of cirrhotic patients and compared with those obtained from the blood of healthy donors. Peritoneal M-DM were isolated from non-infected ascites of cirrhotic patients and stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and heat-killed Candida albicans in the presence or absence of inhibitors for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K). The IL1B and CASP1 gene expression were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The expression of IL-1β and caspase-1 were determined by Western blot. IL-1β was also assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in cell culture supernatants. Results revealed that MEK1 and JNK inhibition significantly reduced the basal and stimulated IL-1β secretion, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor had no effect on IL-1β levels. On the contrary, inhibition of PI3K increased the secretion of IL-1β from stimulated M-DM. The activating effect of PI3K inhibitor on IL-1β release was mediated mainly by the enhancement of the intracellular IL-1β and caspase-1 content release to the extracellular medium and not by increasing the corresponding mRNA and protein expression levels. These data point towards the role of MEK1 and JNK inhibitors, in contrast to the PI3K-protein kinase B inhibitors, as potential therapeutic tools for pharmaceutical intervention to diminish hepatic damage by reducing the inflammatory response mediated by IL-1β associated with liver failure.

  17. The influence of different peritoneal dialysis fluids on the in vitro activity of ampicillin, daptomycin, and linezolid against Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Kussmann, M; Schuster, L; Zeitlinger, M; Pichler, P; Reznicek, G; Wiesholzer, M; Burgmann, H; Poeppl, W

    2015-11-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of antibiotics is recommended for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. However, little data are available on a possible interference between peritoneal dialysis fluids and the activity of antimicrobial agents. Thus, the present in vitro study set out to investigate the influence of different peritoneal dialysis fluids on the antimicrobial activity of ampicillin, linezolid, and daptomycin against Enterococcus faecalis. Time-kill curves in four different peritoneal dialysis fluids were performed over 24 h with four different concentrations (1 × MIC, 4 × MIC, 8 × MIC, 30 × MIC) of each antibiotic evaluated. Cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth was used as the comparator solution. All four peritoneal dialysis fluids evaluated had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of Enterococcus faecalis. Compared to the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth comparator solution, the antimicrobial activity of all antibiotics tested was reduced. For ampicillin and linezolid, no activity was found in any peritoneal dialysis fluid, regardless of the concentration. Daptomycin demonstrated dose-dependent activity in all peritoneal dialysis fluids. Bactericidal activity was observed at the highest concentrations evaluated in Dianeal® PDG4 and Extraneal®, but not in concentrations lower than 30 × MIC and not in Nutrineal® PD4 and Physioneal® 40. The antimicrobial activity of ampicillin and linezolid is limited in peritoneal dialysis fluids in vitro. Daptomycin is highly effective in peritoneal dialysis fluids and might, thus, serve as an important treatment option in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical impact of the present findings.

  18. Alternative activation modifies macrophage resistance to Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel; Aranday-Cortés, Elihú; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of macrophage alternative activation in the intracellular pathogen natural disease resistance phenotype of the host. Macrophage monolayers from resistant (R) (3) or susceptible (S) (3) cattle donors were treated with 10 ng/ml of bovine recombinant IL-4 (rbIL-4), and infected with virulent and avirulent Mycobacterium bovis (MOI 10:1). Bactericidal assays were performed to assess the bacterial phagocytic index and intracellular survival. Total RNA was reverse transcribed and used to analyze the relative changes in gene expression of IL-10, IL-12, IL-18 IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1, MCP-2, IL-6, MIP-1, MIP-3, iNOS, ARGII and SLAM by real time PCR. Cell supernatants were collected and nitric oxide and arginase production was assessed. Apoptosis induction was measured by TUNEL. IL-4 treatment increased the phagocytic index in both R and S macrophages; however intracellular survival was augmented mainly in S macrophages. Alternative activation decreased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide production and DNA fragmentation mainly in R macrophages. On the other hand, arginase production was not different between R and S macrophages. Alternative activation modifies the macrophage response against M. bovis. IL-4 treatment minimized the functional differences that exist between R and S macrophages.

  19. Macrophages activation by heparanase is mediated by TLR-2 and TLR-4 and associates with plaque progression

    PubMed Central

    Blich, Miry; Golan, Amnon; Arvatz, Gil; Sebbag, Anat; Shafat, Itay; Sabo, Edmond; Cohen-Kaplan, Victoria; Petcherski, Sirouch; Avniel-Polak, Shani; Eitan, Amnon; Hammerman, Haim; Aronson, Doron; Axelman, Elena; Ilan, Neta; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Objective Factors and mechanisms that activate macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques are incompletely understood. We examined the capacity of heparanase to activate macrophages. Results/Methods Highly purified heparanase was added to mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) and macrophage-like J774 cells and the levels of TNFα, MMP-9, IL-1, and MCP-1 were evaluated by ELISA. Gene expression was determined by RT-PCR. Cells collected from Toll like receptor (TLR)-2 and -4 knockout mice (KO) were evaluated similarly. Heparanase levels in the plasma of patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), stable angina (SA), and healthy subjects were determined by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the expression of heparanase in control specimens and specimens of patients with SA or acute MI. Addition or over expression of heparanase variants resulted in marked increase in TNFα, MMP-9, IL-1 and MCP-1 levels. MPM harvested from TLR-2 or TLR-4 knockout mice were not activated by heparanase. Plasma heparanase level was higher in patients with acute MI, compared to patients with SA and healthy subjects. Pathologic coronary specimens obtained from vulnerable plaques showed increased heparanase staining compared to specimens of stable plaque and controls. Conclusion Heparanase activates macrophages, resulting in marked induction of cytokine expression associated with plaque progression towards vulnerability. PMID:23162016

  20. A critical role for suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 in promoting M1 macrophage activation and function in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christina E; Whyte, Claire S; Gordon, Peter; Barker, Robert N; Rees, Andrew J; Wilson, Heather M

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages respond to their microenvironment and develop polarized functions critical for orchestrating appropriate inflammatory responses. Classical (M1) activation eliminates pathogens while alternative (M2) activation promotes regulation and repair. M1 macrophage activation is strongly associated with suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) expression in vitro, but the functional consequences of this are unclear and the role of SOCS3 in M1-macrophage polarization in vivo remains controversial. To address these questions, we defined the characteristics and function of SOCS3-expressing macrophages in vivo and identified potential mechanisms of SOCS3 action. Macrophages infiltrating inflamed glomeruli in a model of acute nephritis show significant up-regulation of SOCS3 that co-localizes with the M1-activation marker, inducible nitric oxide synthase. Numbers of SOCS3hi-expressing, but not SOCS1hi-expressing, macrophages correlate strongly with the severity of renal injury, supporting their inflammatory role in vivo. Adoptive transfer of SOCS3-short interfering RNA-silenced macrophages into a peritonitis model demonstrated the importance of SOCS3 in driving production of pro-inflammatory IL-6 and nitric oxide, while curtailing expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10 and SOCS1. SOCS3-induced pro-inflammatory effects were due, at least in part, to its role in controlling activation and nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor-κB and activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. We show for the first time that SOCS3 also directs the functions of human monocyte-derived macrophages, including efficient M1-induced cytokine production (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, IL-12), attenuated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity and ability of antigen-loaded macrophages to drive T-cell responses. Hence, M1-associated SOCS3 was a positive regulator of pro-inflammatory responses in our rodent models and up-regulated SOCS3 is essential for effective M1-macrophage

  1. A critical role for suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 in promoting M1 macrophage activation and function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Christina E; Whyte, Claire S; Gordon, Peter; Barker, Robert N; Rees, Andrew J; Wilson, Heather M

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages respond to their microenvironment and develop polarized functions critical for orchestrating appropriate inflammatory responses. Classical (M1) activation eliminates pathogens while alternative (M2) activation promotes regulation and repair. M1 macrophage activation is strongly associated with suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) expression in vitro, but the functional consequences of this are unclear and the role of SOCS3 in M1-macrophage polarization in vivo remains controversial. To address these questions, we defined the characteristics and function of SOCS3-expressing macrophages in vivo and identified potential mechanisms of SOCS3 action. Macrophages infiltrating inflamed glomeruli in a model of acute nephritis show significant up-regulation of SOCS3 that co-localizes with the M1-activation marker, inducible nitric oxide synthase. Numbers of SOCS3(hi) -expressing, but not SOCS1(hi) -expressing, macrophages correlate strongly with the severity of renal injury, supporting their inflammatory role in vivo. Adoptive transfer of SOCS3-short interfering RNA-silenced macrophages into a peritonitis model demonstrated the importance of SOCS3 in driving production of pro-inflammatory IL-6 and nitric oxide, while curtailing expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10 and SOCS1. SOCS3-induced pro-inflammatory effects were due, at least in part, to its role in controlling activation and nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor-κB and activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. We show for the first time that SOCS3 also directs the functions of human monocyte-derived macrophages, including efficient M1-induced cytokine production (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, IL-12), attenuated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity and ability of antigen-loaded macrophages to drive T-cell responses. Hence, M1-associated SOCS3 was a positive regulator of pro-inflammatory responses in our rodent models and up-regulated SOCS3 is essential for effective M1-macrophage

  2. The macrophage response to bacteria. Modulation of macrophage functional activity by peptidoglycan from Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R; Gustafson, J E; Keist, R

    1992-01-01

    Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis organisms have been shown to be particularly efficient in inducing in a pure population of bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes secretory and cellular activities. In the present study, the ability of peptidoglycan from this Gram-negative organism to trigger a macrophage response was compared with that elicited by peptidoglycan from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The results show that the three peptidoglycans were similarly active in triggering the secretion of tumour necrosis factor and tumouricidal activity but differed considerably in their ability to induce the generation of nitrite in macrophages; in this respect, peptidoglycan from M. catarrhalis was particularly potent. The impressive capacity of M. catarrhalis peptidoglycan to induce in low concentration the secretion of tumour necrosis factor and nitrite and tumouricidal activity may, in addition to its lipopolysaccharide, contribute to the extraordinary potential of this organism to trigger the functional activities of macrophages. PMID:1516255

  3. Maternal immune activation leads to activated inflammatory macrophages in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Onore, Charity E.; Schwartzer, Jared J.; Careaga, Milo; Bennan, Robert F.; Ashwood, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown an association between infection or inflammation during pregnancy and increased risk of autism in the child. In addition, animal models have illustrated that maternal inflammation during gestation can cause autism-relevant behaviors in the offspring; so called maternal immune activation (MIA) models. More recently, permanent changes in T cell cytokine responses were reported in children with autism and in offspring of MIA mice; however, the cytokine responses of other immune cell populations have not been thoroughly investigated in these MIA models. Similar to changes in T cell function, we hypothesized that following MIA, offspring will have long-term changes in macrophage function. To test this theory, we utilized the poly (I:C) MIA mouse model in C57BL/6J mice and examined macrophage cytokine production in adult offspring. Pregnant dams were given either a single injection of 20 mg/kg polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid, poly (I:C), or saline delivered intraperitoneally on gestational day 12.5. When offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams reached 10 weeks of age, femurs were collected and bone marrow-derived macrophages were generated. Cytokine production was measured in bone marrow-derived macrophages incubated for 24 h in either growth media alone, LPS, IL-4/LPS, or IFN-γ/LPS. Following stimulation with LPS alone, or the combination of IFN-γ/LPS, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams produced higher levels of IL-12(p40) (p < 0.04) suggesting an increased M1 polarization. In addition, even without the presence of a polarizing cytokine or LPS stimulus, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams exhibited a higher production of CCL3 (p = 0.05). Moreover, CCL3 levels were further increased when stimulated with LPS, or polarized with either IL-4/LPS or IFN-γ/LPS (p < 0.05) suggesting a general increase in production of this chemokine. Collectively, these data suggest that MIA can produce lasting

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis- induced neutrophil extracellular traps activate human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braian, Clara; Hogea, Valentin; Stendahl, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity.

  5. Inhibitory effects of the flavonoids isolated from Waltheria indica on the production of NO, TNF-alpha and IL-12 in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Fang, Shih-Hua; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2005-05-01

    Three flavonoids were isolated from the whole plants of Waltheria indica and biological properties investigated. On the basis of their spectroscopic data, these compounds were identified as (-)-epicatechin, quercetin, and tiliroside. These flavonoids significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the production of the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO), and the cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-12), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-gamma activated murine peritoneal macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. The order of inhibitory activity was quercetin>tiliroside>(-)-epicatechin. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages were pre-activated with LPS/IFN-gamma for 24 h, and the inhibitory effects of the above mentioned isolates on the production of NO were determined after a further 24 h, to address the possible mechanisms of their action. The present study supports the use of W. indica for the treatment of inflammatory diseases in traditional medicine.

  6. Vaginal bacterial flora activates rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska - Błaszczyk, E.; Wasiela, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen strains of physiological and pathological vaginal bacteria were tested for their ability to secrete histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. We noticed that Mycoplasma hominis-induced histamine release was very high (up to 53.6%). The stimulation of rat mast cells with Staphylococccus cohnii, Staphylococcus coagulase(-) (two strains), Ureaplasma urealyticum, Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides capillosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae resulted in lower but significant histamine secretion (11.2%-17.5%). Other bacteria strains (Staphylococcus epidermidids, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces naeslundii (two strains) and Lactobacillus fermentum (two strains) caused very low (4.2% - 8.8%) histamine release.

  7. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  9. Ascitic fluid gamma interferon concentrations and adenosine deaminase activity in tuberculous peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sathar, M A; Simjee, A E; Coovadia, Y M; Soni, P N; Moola, S A; Insam, B; Makumbi, F

    1995-01-01

    The gamma interferon (gamma-IFN) concentration and the adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity were evaluated in 30 patients with tuberculous peritonitis, 21 patients with ascites due to a malignant disorder, and 41 patients with cirrhosis. The gamma-IFN concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in tuberculous peritonitis patients (mean: 6.70 U/ml) than in the malignant (mean: 3.10 U/ml) and cirrhotic (mean: 3.08 U/ml) groups. Use of a cut off value of > or = 3.2 U/ml gave the assay a sensitivity of 93% (25 of 27), a specificity of 98% (54 of 55), positive (P+) and negative (P-) predictive values of 96% and a test accuracy of 96%. The ADA activity was significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in the tuberculous peritonitis group (mean: 101.84 U/l) than in the control groups (cirrhosis (mean: 13.49 U/l) and malignancy (mean: 19.35 U/l)). A cut off value of > 30 U/l gave the ADA test a sensitivity of 93% (26 of 28) a specificity of 96% (51 of 53), a (P+) value of 93%, a (P-) value of 96%, and a test accuracy of 95%. There was a significant (p < 0.0001) correlation (r = 0.72) between ADA activity and gamma-IFN values in patients with tuberculous peritonitis. These results show that a high concentration of gamma-IFN in ascitic fluid is as valuable as the ADA activity in the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis. Both are rapid non-invasive diagnostic tests for tuberculous peritonitis. PMID:7698702

  10. Paeonia japonica, Houttuynia cordata, and Aster scaber water extracts induce nitric oxide and cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin; Park, Chang-Shin; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2009-04-01

    Natural products are increasingly recognized as potential targets for drug discovery and development. We previously reported that Paeonia japonica, Houttuynia cordata, and Aster scaber enhanced macrophage activation both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we investigated the immunomodulating effects of these plants on lipopolysacharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. An aqueous extract of each plant was administered to female BALB/c mice every other day for 4 weeks. Peritoneal macrophages were then collected and incubated to examine the immunoreactivity of macrophages against LPS at different time points. The expression levels of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthetase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inhibitory factor kappaB alpha (IkappaBalpha) proteins and the production of NO metabolite (nitrite), prostaglandin (PG) E(2), and the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined in the activated macrophages treated with extracts from each plant individually or combined. High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were produced by A. scaber-, P. japonica-, and H. cordata-treated macrophages following 24 hours of LPS stimulation. P. japonica, H. cordata, and A. scaber treatment also induced the production of nitrate by LPS-treated macrophages. Induction of iNOS mRNA and protein was also different in each group. PGE(2) secretion was up-regulated by all extract-treated macrophages at early time points; however, no significant differences were observed between the groups by 8 hours post-LPS stimulation. Treatment with A. scaber extract resulted in the highest levels of IkappaBalpha degradation. Our findings illustrate that the natural plant products P. japonica, H. cordata, and A. scaber may enhance immune function by modulating ex vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine and NO production as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2.

  11. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  12. Murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, R M; Hinsdill, R D; Sandok, P L; Horowitz, S D

    1978-01-01

    Light and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions involving the initial contact of peritoneal, spleen, or thymus lymphocytes with peritoneal macrophage processes or microprocesses followed by clustering of lymphocytes over the central nuclear area of the macrophages. Lymphocyte-lymphocyte clustering was not observed in the absence of macrophages. Attachment and subsequent clustering appeared not to require the presence of serum or antigen; the attachment of allogeneic or xenogeneic lymphocytes was comparable to that seen in the syngeneic system, but central clustering of these lymphocytes failed to occur. No attachment or clustering was observed when thymic lymphocytes were cultured with thymus derived fibroblasts rather than with peritoneal macrophages. Lymphocyte attachment to immune, antigen-activated, syngeneic macrophages occurred more rapidly than that to normal unstimulated syngeneic macrophages; however, lymphocytes attached to the "activated" macrophages appeared to be killed by a nonphagocytic mechanism. A similar increase in the rate of lymphocyte attachment to macrophages occurred in the presence of migration inhibitory factor. Subsequent lymphocyte clustering on macrophages was observed in the migration inhibitory factor-stimulated cultures. In addition, lymphocyte-macrophage interactions similar to those in vitro were observed to occur in vivo on intraperitoneally implanted cover slips. Images PMID:101458

  13. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  14. Effects of water-soluble hemicellulose from soybean hull on serum antibody levels and activation of macrophages in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagata, J; Higashiuesato, Y; Maeda, G; Chinen, I; Saito, M; Iwabuchi, K; Onoē, K

    2001-10-01

    Effects of soybean hull water-soluble hemicellulose (WSHC) on serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentration and production of NO and IL-1beta from peritoneal macrophages were examined and compared with those of Agaricus blazei in the rat system. WSHC consisted of arabinose, galactose, xylose, glucose, and rhamnose, and the molecular weight was approximately 500000. Rats were ip administrated each sample at a dose of 0.67, 13.4, or 26.9 mg/kg/day for 14 days. The administration of WSHC resulted in significantly higher productions of IgM (p < 0.01 on day 6, p < 0.05 on day 14) and IgG (p < 0.05 on day 6) than those in other groups. When peritoneal macrophages were stimulated with various concentrations of sample (0.67, 13.4, or 26.9 mg/mL), WSHC significantly increased both NO and IL-1beta productions only at the concentration of 13.4 (mg/mL) compared with those of a saline group. These findings demonstrate that WSHC enhances humoral immunity and activation of macrophages, thereby leading to the augmentation of immune responses in rats.

  15. Structural definition of a potent macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein with adjuvant activity for antibody production.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N

    1996-10-01

    Incubation of human vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), with a mixture of immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, efficiently generated a potent macrophage activating factor, a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, and isolation of the intermediates with immobilized lectins, revealed that either sequence of hydrolysis of Gc glycoprotein by these glycosidases yields the macrophage-activating factor, implying that Gc protein carries a trisaccharide composed of N-acetylgalactosamine and dibranched galactose and sialic acid termini. A 3 hr incubation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with picomolar amounts of the enzymatically generated macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) resulted in a greatly enhanced phagocytic activity. Administration of a minute amount (10-50 pg/mouse) of GcMAF resulted in a seven- to nine-fold enhanced phagocytic activity of macrophages. Injection of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) along with GcMAF into mice produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. PMID:9070663

  16. [The effect of a mite allergen on Na/H metabolic activity in peritoneal mast cells].

    PubMed

    Khlgatian, S V; Pinelis, V G; Berzhets, V M; Strukova, S M

    1992-12-01

    Mite allergen interacting with mast cells treated with sera from bronchial patient sensitized to home dust Dermatophagoides farinae causes changes in intracellular pH. Regulation of pHi peritoneal mast cells is participated by Na/H metabolism probably activated by protein kinase C.

  17. A New Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM) Family Member, TLT-6, is Involved in Activation and Proliferation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Park, Sung-Won; Lee, Seunghoon; Kong, Il-Keun; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Eun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family, which is abundantly expressed in myeloid lineage cells, plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune response. In this study, we aimed to identify a novel receptor expressed on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by using in silico bioinformatics and to characterize the identified receptor. We thus found the TREM-like transcript (TLT)-6, a new member of TREM family. TLT-6 has a single immunoglobulin domain in the extracellular region and a long cytoplasmic region containing 2 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-like domains. TLT-6 transcript was expressed in HSCs, monocytes and macrophages. TLT-6 protein was up-regulated on the surface of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages by lipopolysaccharide stimulation. TLT-6 exerted anti-proliferative effects in macrophages. Our results demonstrate that TLT-6 may regulate the activation and proliferation of macrophages. PMID:26557807

  18. Staphylococcal exotoxins stimulate nitric oxide-dependent murine macrophage tumoricidal activity.

    PubMed Central

    Fast, D J; Shannon, B J; Herriott, M J; Kennedy, M J; Rummage, J A; Leu, R W

    1991-01-01

    The staphylococcal exotoxins toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) and enterotoxin B were tested for their ability to stimulate murine peritoneal macrophages (PM) for tumoricidal activity. Both toxins were found to stimulate oil-elicited, gamma interferon-primed PM monolayers to kill nonadherent P815 tumor targets. The mechanism of killing of toxin-stimulated tumoricidal activity involved the production of nitric oxide, as nitrite could be demonstrated in culture fluids, and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide production, abrogated toxin-stimulated tumoricidal activity. TSST-1 stimulated the secretion of tumor necrosis factor by PM monolayers in the presence and absence of gamma interferon. The mechanism of toxin-stimulated tumoricidal activity was also determined to be independent of the production of reactive oxygen intermediates in that TSST-1 failed to stimulate H2O2 production by PM. These results demonstrate that the staphylococcal exotoxins are capable of stimulating macrophage production of nitric oxide for tumor cytotoxicity and suggest that the nitric oxide thus produced may subsequently play a role in the pathogenesis of the diseases caused by these toxins. PMID:1908828

  19. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, T; Blumenstock, E; Kanegasaki, S

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria. Images PMID:6788707

  20. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, T.; Blumenstock, E.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1981-06-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria.

  1. [Electron microscopic and immunological study of influenza virus interaction with murine peritoneal microphages].

    PubMed

    Kirillova, F M; Berdinskikh, M S; Kiseleva, A S; Avakian, A A; Kosiakov, P N

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopic and immunological investigations of influenza virus HONI interactions with peritoneal macrophages of intact and immune mice were carried out. Both intact and immune macrophages exert phagocytosis and disintegration of virions in phagolysosomes as early as 10 and 30 min after the end of adsorption. This process is most active with eosinophils, less in neutrophils and the least in basophils. Titration of the infectious virus in chick embryos showed that immune macrophages contained considerably less virus than the intact ones.

  2. The effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor and colony-stimulating factor-1 on hematopoietic cells in normal and osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Benis, K A; Schneider, G B

    1996-10-15

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone disorders characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone and by several immunological defects including macrophage dysfunction. Two compounds, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) were used in the present study to evaluate their effects on the peritoneal population of cells and on cells within the bone marrow microenvironment in normal and incisors absent (ia) osteopetrotic rats. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that administration of DBP-MAF to newborn ia animals results in a substantial increase in bone marrow cavity size due to upregulated osteoclast function. To study the effects of these compounds on the macrophage/osteoclast precursors, DBP-MAF, CSF-1, and the combination of these compounds were given to newborn ia and normal littermate animals. Both the normal and mutant phenotypes responded similarly when treated with these compounds. Rats exhibited a profound shift toward the macrophage lineage from the neutrophil lineage when compared with vehicle-treated control animals after treatment with these compounds. In the in vivo peritoneal lavage study, animals received injections of CSF-1, DBP-MAF or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 over a 4-week period. The various types of cells in the peritoneal cavity were then enumerated. The in vitro study consisted of cells isolated from the bone marrow microenvironment and cultured on feeder layers of CSF-1, DBP-MAF, or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 for colony enumeration. The increase in macrophage numbers at the expense of neutrophil numbers could be seen in both the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The macrophage/osteoclast and neutrophil lineages have a common precursor, the granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC). With the addition of CSF-1, the GM-CFC precursor may be induced into the macrophage/osteoclast lineage rather than the granulocyte lineage. This increased pool of cells in the

  3. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  4. Intermittent hypoxia induces murine macrophage foam cell formation by IKK-β-dependent NF-κB pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toshihiro; Poulsen, Orit; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH). Clinical studies have previously shown that OSA is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. Atherogenicity in OSA patients has been assumed to be associated with the NF-κB pathways. Although foam cells are considered to be a hallmark of atherosclerosis, how IH as in OSA affects their development has not been fully understood. Therefore, we hypothesized that IH induces macrophage foam cell formation through NF-κB pathway activation. To test this hypothesis, peritoneal macrophages collected from myeloid-restricted IKK-β-deleted mice were incubated with native LDL and exposed to either IH or normoxia. After exposure, NF-κB pathway activity and intracellular cholesterol were measured. In control macrophages, IH significantly increased NF-κB pathway activity by 93% compared with normoxia (P < 0.05). However, such response to IH was diminished by IKK-β deletion (increased by +31% compared with normoxia; P = 0.64), suggesting that IKK-β is critical for IH-induced NF-κB pathway activation. Likewise, in control macrophages, total cholesterol was increased in IH compared with normoxia (65.7 ± 3.8 μg/mg cellular protein and 53.2 ± 1.2, respectively; P < 0.05). However, this IH-induced foam cell formation was disappeared when IKK-β was deleted (52.2 ± 1.2 μg/mg cellular protein for IH and 46.3 ± 1.7 for normoxia; P = 0.55). This IH-mediated effect still existed in macrophages without LDL receptor. Taken together, our findings show that IH activates the IKK-β-dependent NF-κB pathway and that this, in turn, induces foam cell formation in murine macrophages.

  5. Macrophages generate reactive oxygen species in response to minimally oxidized LDL: TLR4- and Syk-dependent activation of Nox2

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yun Soo; Lee, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Ho; Kim, Sunah; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a causative role in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we demonstrate that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) stimulates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in macrophages through NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91phox/Nox2), which in turn induces production of RANTES and migration of smooth muscle cells. Peritoneal macrophages from gp91phox/Nox2−/− mice or J774 macrophages in which Nox2 was knocked down by siRNA failed to generate ROS in response to mmLDL. Because mmLDL-induced cytoskeletal changes were dependent on TLR4, we analyzed ROS generation in peritoneal macrophages from wild type, TLR4−/−, or MyD88−/− mice and found that mmLDL-mediated ROS was generated in a TLR4-dependent, but MyD88-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that ROS generation required the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that mmLDL also induced PLCγ1 phosphorylation and PKC membrane translocation. Importantly, the PLCγ1 phosphorylation was reduced in J774 cells expressing Syk-specific shRNA. Nox2 modulated mmLDL activation of macrophages by regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and RANTES. We showed that purified RANTES was able to stimulate migration of mouse aortic smooth muscle cells (MASMC) and addition of neutralizing antibody against RANTES abolished the migration of MASMC stimulated by mmLDL-stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that mmLDL induces generation of ROS through sequential activation of TLR4, Syk, PLCγ1, PKC, and gp91phox/Nox2 and thereby stimulates expression of proinflammatory cytokines. These data help explain mechanisms by which endogenous ligands, such as mmLDL, can induce TLR4-dependent, proatherogenic activation of macrophages. PMID:19096031

  6. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models. PMID:27350756

  7. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  8. Enzymatically-Processed Wheat Bran Enhances Macrophage Activity and Has in Vivo Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee; Lee, Mi-Gi; Lee, Jae-Kang; Choi, Yong-Hyun; Choi, Yong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Wheat bran is a rich source of dietary fiber, of which arabinoxylan is the most abundant non-starch polysaccharide. Arabinoxylan has been known to exert in vivo immunological activities. Based on prior findings, we pretreated wheat bran with enzymatic hydrolysis to increase the release of soluble arabinoxylan and investigated whether oral administration of wheat bran altered macrophage activity in a mouse model. After four weeks of treatment, we isolated peritoneal macrophages for phagocytic receptor analysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory changes. In the second experiment, mice given wheat bran were intraperitoneally stimulated with LPS and serum levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined. The expression of SRA and CD36, and phagocytic activity increased (p < 0.05, respectively). Ex vivo stimulation of macrophages by LPS resulted in reduced surface expression of CD40 (p < 0.05) and decreased production of nitric oxide (p < 0.005), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.005), interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.01), and IL-12 (p < 0.05). Mice treated with wheat bran showed decreased levels of serum TNF-α and IL-6 (p < 0.05, respectively) and an increased level of serum anti-inflammatory IL-10 (p < 0.05) in response to intraperitoneal LPS. Enzymatically-processed wheat bran boosts macrophage phagocytic capacity possibly through up-regulation of scavenger receptors and confers anti-inflammatory effects, indicating its potential as an immuno-enhancing functional food. PMID:27043618

  9. Active autophagy but not lipophagy in macrophages with defective lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, Stefanie; Chandak, Prakash G.; Korbelius, Melanie; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Leopold, Christina; Obrowsky, Sascha; Rainer, Silvia; Doddapattar, Prakash; Aflaki, Elma; Wegscheider, Martin; Sachdev, Vinay; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Kolb, Dagmar; Radovic, Branislav; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    During autophagy, autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes to degrade damaged organelles and misfolded proteins. Breakdown products are released into the cytosol and contribute to energy and metabolic building block supply, especially during starvation. Lipophagy has been defined as the autophagy-mediated degradation of lipid droplets (LDs) by lysosomal acid lipase. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme catalyzing the initial step of lipolysis by hydrolyzing triglycerides (TGs) in cytosolic LDs. Consequently, most organs and cells, including macrophages, lacking ATGL accumulate TGs, resulting in reduced intracellular free fatty acid concentrations. Macrophages deficient in hormone-sensitive lipase (H0) lack TG accumulation albeit reduced in vitro TG hydrolase activity. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated in lipase-deficient macrophages to counteract their energy deficit. We therefore generated mice lacking both ATGL and HSL (A0H0). Macrophages from A0H0 mice showed 73% reduced neutral TG hydrolase activity, resulting in TG-rich LD accumulation. Increased expression of cathepsin B, accumulation of LC3-II, reduced expression of p62 and increased DQ-BSA dequenching suggest intact autophagy and functional lysosomes in A0H0 macrophages. Markedly decreased acid TG hydrolase activity and lipid flux independent of bafilomycin A1 treatment, however, argue against effective lysosomal degradation of LDs in A0H0 macrophages. We conclude that autophagy of proteins and cell organelles but not of LDs is active as a compensatory mechanism to circumvent and balance the reduced availability of energy substrates in A0H0 macrophages. PMID:26143381

  10. Killing of Leishmania parasites in activated murine macrophages is based on an L-arginine-dependent process that produces nitrogen derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Maul, J.R.; Ransijn, A.; Buchmueller-Rouiller, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    The experiments described in this report were aimed at determining whether L-arginine (L-arg)-derived nitrogen oxidation products (nitric oxide, nitrous acid, nitrites) are involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania parasites by activated murine macrophages in vitro. Peritoneal or bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected with L. enriettii or L. major, then activated by exposure to recombinant murine interferon-gamma or to macrophage activating factor (MAF)-rich media in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Activation of macrophages in regular (i.e., arginine-containing) culture medium led to complete destruction of the microorganisms within 24 h (L. enriettii) or 48 h (L. major), concomitant with accumulation of nitrites (NO2-) in the culture fluids. When macrophage activation was carried out in L-arg-free medium, however, neither parasite killing nor NO2- production was obtained. A similar inhibition of macrophage leishmanicidal activity and of NO2- release was observed using media treated with arginase (which converts L-arg to urea and ornithine), or supplemented with NG-monomethyl-L-arg or guanidine (which inhibit the conversion of L-arg to nitrogen oxidation products). In all these situations, an excellent correlation between the levels of NO2- production by macrophages and intracellular killing of Leishmania was observed, whereas no strict correlation was detectable between leishmanicidal activity and superoxide production. Intracellular parasite killing by activated macrophages could be prevented by addition of iron salts to the incubation fluids. Incubation of free parasites with NaNO2 at acid pH led to immobilisation, multiplication arrest, and morphological degeneration of the microorganisms. Similarly, exposure of infected cells to NaNO2 led to killing of the intracellular parasite without affecting macrophage viability.

  11. The Inhibition of Macrophage Foam Cell Formation by 9-Cis β-Carotene Is Driven by BCMO1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Bechor, Sapir; Harari, Ayelet; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Kamari, Yehuda; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed societies, and begins when activated endothelial cells recruit monocytes and T-cells from the bloodstream into the arterial wall. Macrophages that accumulate cholesterol and other fatty materials are transformed into foam cells. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a diet rich in carotenoids is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease; while previous work in our laboratory has shown that the 9-cis β-carotene rich alga Dunaliella inhibits atherogenesis in mice. The effect of 9-cis β-carotene on macrophage foam cell formation has not yet been investigated. In the present work, we sought to study whether the 9-cis β-carotene isomer, isolated from the alga Dunaliella, can inhibit macrophage foam cell formation upon its conversion to retinoids. The 9-cis β-carotene and Dunaliella lipid extract inhibited foam cell formation in the RAW264.7 cell line, similar to 9-cis retinoic acid. Furthermore, dietary enrichment with the algal powder in mice resulted in carotenoid accumulation in the peritoneal macrophages and in the inhibition of foam cell formation ex-vivo and in-vivo. We also found that the β-carotene cleavage enzyme β-carotene 15,15’-monooxygenase (BCMO1) is expressed and active in macrophages. Finally, 9-cis β-carotene, as well as the Dunaliella extract, activated the nuclear receptor RXR in hepa1-6 cells. These results indicate that dietary carotenoids, such as 9-cis β-carotene, accumulate in macrophages and can be locally cleaved by endogenous BCMO1 to form 9-cis retinoic acid and other retinoids. Subsequently, these retinoids activate the nuclear receptor RXR that, along with additional nuclear receptors, can affect various metabolic pathways, including those involved in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. PMID:25629601

  12. Intraperitoneal immunization with oligomannose-coated liposome-entrapped soluble leishmanial antigen induces antigen-specific T-helper type immune response in BALB/c mice through uptake by peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Takagi, H; Nakayama, T; Yamakami, K; Tadakuma, T; Yokoyama, N; Kojima, N

    2007-05-01

    The present study demonstrates that the intraperitoneal administration of soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) entrapped in liposomes coated with neoglycolipids containing oligomannose residues (mannopentaose or mannotriose) strongly induces an antigen-specific T-helper type 1 (Th1) immune response in BALB/c mice. In response to in vitro stimulation with SLA, spleen cells from mice that had received oligomannose-coated liposomes encasing SLA (SLA-OML) displayed greater interferon (IFN)-gamma and interleukin (IL)-2 production and lower IL-4 and IL-5 production than spleen cells from mice that had received SLA alone, indicating that the SLA-specific Th1 immune response had predominantly been induced in the mice that had received SLA-OML. After subsequent infection with Leishmania major, mice that had received SLA-OML were effectively protected against the disease, with a predominant production of IFN-gamma. OML were preferentially and rapidly incorporated into peritoneal macrophages, and the transplantation of macrophages containing SLA-OML into the peritoneal cavity also induced protection against L. major infection. Thus, SLA-OML were shown to successfully induce a specific Th1 immune response capable of controlling L. major infection in BALB/c mice through the effective uptake of OML by peritoneal macrophages.

  13. p47 GTPases Regulate Toxoplasma gondii Survival in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Barbara A.; Greene, Robert I.; Henry, Stanley C.; Annecharico, Kimberly L.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Denkers, Eric Y.; Sher, Alan; Taylor, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is critical for resistance to Toxoplasma gondii. IFN-γ strongly activates macrophages and nonphagocytic host cells to limit intracellular growth of T. gondii; however, the cellular factors that are required for this effect are largely unknown. We have shown previously that IGTP and LRG-47, members of the IFN-γ-regulated family of p47 GTPases, are required for resistance to acute T. gondii infections in vivo. In contrast, IRG-47, another member of this family, is not required. In the present work, we addressed whether these GTPases are required for IFN-γ-induced suppression of T. gondii growth in macrophages in vitro. Bone marrow macrophages that lacked IGTP or LRG-47 displayed greatly attenuated IFN-γ-induced inhibition of T. gondii growth, while macrophages that lacked IRG-47 displayed normal inhibition. Thus, the ability of the p47 GTPases to limit acute infection in vivo correlated with their ability to suppress intracellular growth in macrophages in vitro. Using confocal microscopy and sucrose density fractionation, we demonstrated that IGTP largely colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum markers, while LRG-47 was mainly restricted to the Golgi. Although both IGTP and LRG-47 localized to vacuoles containing latex beads, neither protein localized to vacuoles containing live T. gondii. These results suggest that IGTP and LRG-47 are able to regulate host resistance to acute T. gondii infections through their ability to inhibit parasite growth within the macrophage. PMID:15908352

  14. Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoa D.; Qiu, Yifu; Cui, Xiaojin; Goh, Y.P. Sharon; Mwangi, Julia; David, Tovo; Mukundan, Lata; Brombacher, Frank; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    All homeotherms utilize thermogenesis to maintain core body temperature, ensuring that cellular functions and physiologic processes can ensue in cold environments1-3. In the prevailing model, when the hypothalamus senses cold temperatures, it triggers sympathetic discharge, resulting in the release of noradrenaline in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT)4,5. Acting via the β3-adrenergic receptors, noradrenaline induces lipolysis in white adipocytes6, whereas it stimulates the expression of thermogenic genes, such as PPARγ coactivator 1a (Ppargc1a), uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (Acsl1), in brown adipocytes7-9. However, the precise nature of all the cell types involved in this efferent loop is not well established. Here we report an unexpected requirement for the interleukin 4 (IL4)-stimulated program of alternative macrophage activation in adaptive thermogenesis. Cold exposure rapidly promoted alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which secrete catecholamines to induce thermogenic gene expression in BAT and lipolysis in WAT. Absence of alternatively activated macrophages impaired metabolic adaptations to cold, whereas administration of IL4 increased thermogenic gene expression, fatty acid mobilization, and energy expenditure, all in a macrophage-dependent manner. We have thus discovered a surprising role for alternatively activated macrophages in the orchestration of an important mammalian stress response, the response to cold. PMID:22101429

  15. An inducible transgene reports activation of macrophages in live zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Leslie E; Chien, An-Tzu; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Hall, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are the most functionally heterogenous cells of the hematopoietic system. Given many diseases are underpinned by inappropriate macrophage activation, macrophages have emerged as a therapeutic target to treat disease. A thorough understanding of what controls macrophage activation will likely reveal new pathways that can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. Live imaging fluorescent macrophages within transgenic zebrafish larvae has provided a valuable window to investigate macrophage behavior in vivo. Here we describe the first transgenic zebrafish line that reports macrophage activation, as evidenced by induced expression of an immunoresponsive gene 1(irg1):EGFP transgene. When combined with existing reporter lines that constitutively mark macrophages, we reveal this unique transgenic line can be used to live image macrophage activation in response to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and xenografted human cancer cells. We anticipate the Tg(irg1:EGFP) line will provide a valuable tool to explore macrophage activation and plasticity in the context of different disease models.

  16. Activation and trafficking of peritoneal B1a B-cells in response to amphibole asbestos.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Hurley, Kristina; Peterson, Cody; Coker, Lindsey; Fowers, Cody; Marcum, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    B1a B-cells are concentrated in peritoneal and pleural cavities, are producers of 'natural auto-antibodies', and have been implicated in autoimmune responses. Their numbers are increased in humans and mice with systemic autoimmune diseases, but their role in the immune pathology is not known. Asbestos causes pulmonary, pleural, and peritoneal pathologies by accessing these tissues after inhalation. Amphibole asbestos has been shown to elicit immune dysfunction, including chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and autoantibody production. This study tested the hypothesis that asbestos affects immune dysfunction by activating B1a B-cells to traffic to secondary lymphatic tissue. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) either endotracheally or intraperitoneally, and the B1a B-cells in pleural or peritoneal compartments were tested by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adoptive transfer of peritoneal lymphocytes from CD45.1 transgenic to wild-type mice was used to track the migration. The percentage and numbers of B1a B-cells in pleural and peritoneal cavities decreased 3-6 days following exposure. During that time, asbestos exposure led to a decrease in cells expressing alpha-4 (α4) integrin and MHC II antigen. Peritoneal cells treated in vitro showed decreased α4 integrin with no change in CD5, IgM, or MHC II antigen. Therefore, B1a cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), MHC II(+)) traffic from the peritoneal cavity following loss of α4 integrin expression. Following adoptive transfer into the peritoneum of asbestos-exposed mice, CD45.1(+) B1a cells were detected in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes after 3 days, peaking at 6 days. Interestingly, the percentage of splenic suppressor B-cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), CD11b(+), CD1d(+)) decreased following amphibole exposure, demonstrating that the B1a cells did not contribute to an increased pool of suppressive B-cells. These results show that B1a B-cells respond to asbestos exposure by trafficking to secondary lymphatic

  17. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  18. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  19. Electroacupuncture at the ST36 acupoint increases interleukin-4 responsiveness in macrophages, generation of alternatively activated macrophages and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electroacupuncture (EA) has been used to treat inflammatory diseases. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMo) stimulated by cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory and mildly microbicidal. This study aimed to evaluate whether EA at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) would change the profile of healthy murine macrophages, particularly the generation of AAMo and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated with EA (15/30 Hz) at the ST36 acupoint for 20 min/d for 5 d. After the final EA session, the mice were euthanized and their peritoneal cells were harvested and counted for determination of arginase activity, nitric oxide (NO) production and microbicidal activity after culture in the presence or absence of IL-4, interferon-γ (IFNγ) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or both IFNγ and LPS. Twelve mice were infected with L. major promastigotes into the footpads after the final EA session and the infection course was monitored. Results Peritoneal cells freshly obtained from EA-treated mice had similar arginase and microbicidal activities to cells from sham-treated mice. After culture with IL-4, cells from EA-treated mice exhibited significant increases in the arginase activity (sham: 58 ± 11.3 vs. EA: 80.7 ± 4.6%, P = 0.025) and number of parasites/infected cell (sham: 2.5 ± 0.4 vs. EA: 4.3 ± 0.8 cells, P = 0.007). The NO production was lower in cells from EA-treated mice cultured in the presence of a combination of IFNγ and LPS (sham: 31.6 ± 6.5 vs. EA: 22.3 ± 2.1 μM, P = 0.025). The lesion size in mice infected with L. major promastigotes was larger in EA-treated mice (sham: 3.26 ± 0.29 vs. EA: 2.23 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.039). Conclusion EA at the ST36 acupoint increases IL-4 responsiveness in macrophages, Generation of AAMo and susceptibility to L. major infection PMID:22838729

  20. Induction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages incubated with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, A; Shrivastava, A; Kumar, R

    1995-03-01

    The cellular and molecular interaction between monocyte/macrophage and tumor cells leading to macrophage activation is not clearly understood. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event, we checked whether the tumor cells alter tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in macrophages. We found that both L929 and Yac-1 tumor cells induced increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several polypeptides in peritoneal as well as P388D-1 and IC-21 macrophages. Macrophages co-cultured with tumor cells also showed increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These observations suggest that increased tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in tumor cell-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539664

  1. Screening of biomedical polymer biocompatibility in NMRI-mice peritoneal cavity: a comparison between ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET).

    PubMed

    Dahmen, K G; Maurin, N; Richter, H A; Mittermayer, C

    1997-05-01

    The peritoneal resident cell population is influenced by various inflammatory and immunogenic stimuli. The influence of intraperitoneal application of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) (group A) and ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) (group B) powders on peritoneal cell count and macrophage activity was investigated. Powders were tested to mimic wear particles from solid implant devices as these particles often cause chronic granulomatous inflammation. The results were compared with the inflammatory response following an abdominal midline incision (group C) and untreated animals (group D). On days 1, 7, 14 and 30 peritoneal cells were quantified and the number of active macrophages was assessed. Groups A and C mice showed a significant loss of macrophages in the peritoneal lavage at day 1 but this returned to normal values (group D) on day 7. In contrast, group B animals remained at low peritoneal cell counts but showed the highest number of active macrophages. Only in this latter group was adhesion formation and granulomatous clustering of polymer powder observed. Applying the parameters macrophage count and the number of active macrophages it can be concluded that PET elicits a weaker inflammatory reaction than UHMW-PE in mice peritoneal cavity. Thus this animal model may be used as a screening test for biomedical materials, especially their wear products. PMID:15348744

  2. The adhesion GPCR BAI1 mediates macrophage ROS production and microbicidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Emily A.; Lee, Chang Sup; Owen, Katherine A.; D’Souza, Ryan S.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Casanova, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of microbes and initiation of an innate immune response occur through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines and activation of the cellular microbicidal machinery. In particular, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase complex is a critical component of the macrophage bactericidal machinery. We previously characterized brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), a member of the adhesion family of G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a PRR that mediates the selective phagocytic uptake of Gram-negative bacteria by macrophages. We showed that BAI1 promoted phagosomal ROS production through activation of the Rho family guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, thereby stimulating NADPH oxidase activity. Primary BAI1-deficient macrophages exhibited attenuated Rac GTPase activity and reduced ROS production in response to several Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in impaired microbicidal activity. Furthermore, in a peritoneal infection model, BAI1-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to death by bacterial challenge because of impaired bacterial clearance. Together, these findings suggest that BAI1 mediates the clearance of Gram-negative bacteria by stimulating both phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase activation, thereby coupling bacterial detection to the cellular microbicidal machinery. PMID:26838550

  3. Peritoneal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the peritoneum are not common. They include Peritonitis - an inflammation of the peritoneum Cancer Complications from ... peritoneal fluid to diagnose the problem. Treatment of peritoneal disorders depends on the cause.

  4. Inorganic nitrite attenuates NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide generation in activated macrophages via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Peleli, Maria; Zollbrecht, Christa; Giulietti, Alessia; Terrando, Niccolo; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Carlström, Mattias

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Immune cells are major sources of superoxide (O2(∙-)) as part of the innate host defense system, but exaggerated and sustained O2(∙-) generation may lead to progressive inflammation and organ injuries. Previous studies have proven organ-protective effects of inorganic nitrite, a precursor of nitric oxide (NO), in conditions manifested by oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study aimed at investigating the potential role of nitrite in modulating NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity in immune cells. Mice peritoneal macrophages or human monocytes were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with or without coincubation with nitrite. O2(∙-) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation were detected by lucigenin-based chemiluminescence and fluorescence techniques, respectively. The intracellular NO production was measured by DAF-FM DA fluorescence. NOX isoforms and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were detected by qPCR. LPS increased both O2(∙-) and ONOO(-) production in macrophages, which was significantly reduced by nitrite (10µmol/L). Mechanistically, the effects of nitrite are (1) linked to increased NO generation, (2) similar to that observed with the NO donor DETA-NONOate, and (3) can be abolished by the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO or by the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor febuxostat. Nox2 expression was increased in activated macrophages, but was not influenced by nitrite. However, nitrite attenuated LPS-induced upregulation of iNOS expression. Similar to that observed in mice macrophages, nitrite also reduced O2(∙-) generation in LPS-activated human monocytes. In conclusion, XO-mediated reduction of nitrite attenuates NOX activity in activated macrophages, which may modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:25724690

  5. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  6. Effect of swainsonine on the processing and turnover of lysosomal beta-galactosidase and beta-glucuronidase from mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tropea, J E; Swank, R T; Segal, H L

    1988-03-25

    The effect of swainsonine, an inhibitor of Golgi alpha-mannosidase II and lysosomal alpha-mannosidase, on the synthesis, processing, and turnover of two glycoproteins, lysosomal beta-galactosidase and lysosomal beta-glucuronidase, has been studied in cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages. No effect of the inhibitor on the relative rates of synthesis of the precursor form of either enzyme was observed. On the other hand, carbohydrate processing of beta-galactosidase and beta-glucuronidase was markedly altered by swainsonine, consistent with a blockage by the inhibitor of the removal of the alpha-1,3- and alpha-1,6-linked mannose residues which occurs in normal processing. In homogenates of both normal and swainsonine-treated cells, the precursor forms of the enzymes were found exclusively in the light membrane fraction on Percoll gradients and the mature forms exclusively in the lysosomal fractions indicating that translocation from Golgi to lysosomes and proteolytic processing in the lysosome were not impaired by the presence of abnormal oligosaccharide side chains. There was no detectable effect of swainsonine during a 4-day chase period on the total cellular turnover of these enzymes which involves two processes, secretion and degradation. In the absence of swainsonine, secretion represented about 40% of the total turnover of beta-galactosidase and about 50% with beta-glucuronidase. The presence of swainsonine increased these proportions to about 60 and 70%, respectively.

  7. Visualisation of nitric oxide generated by activated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leone, A M; Furst, V W; Foxwell, N A; Cellek, S; Moncada, S

    1996-04-01

    We have visualised the release and approximate diffusion profile of nitric oxide (NO) from activated murine macrophages using a high transmission microscope coupled to a high sensitivity photon counting camera. The images generated by NO were cell-associated and spread over an area of approximately 175 micrometers from the activated macrophage. The signals obtained were dependent on the presence of exogenous L-arginine in the medium and followed a time course similar to that previously described for the generation of NO by the inducible form of NO synthase. The light signal was attenuated by the inhibitor of NO synthase, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Studies using superoxide-deficient macrophages further confirmed that the signals detected were generated by NO rather than reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8660339

  8. Fine-tuning of macrophage activation using synthetic rocaglate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bidisha; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Devine, William G.; Kobzik, Lester; Beeler, Aaron B.; Porco, John A.; Kramnik, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria represent a significant global threat. Given the dearth of new antibiotics, host-directed therapies (HDTs) are especially desirable. As IFN-gamma (IFNγ) plays a central role in host resistance to intracellular bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we searched for small molecules to augment the IFNγ response in macrophages. Using an interferon-inducible nuclear protein Ipr1 as a biomarker of macrophage activation, we performed a high-throughput screen and identified molecules that synergized with low concentration of IFNγ. Several active compounds belonged to the flavagline (rocaglate) family. In primary macrophages a subset of rocaglates 1) synergized with low concentrations of IFNγ in stimulating expression of a subset of IFN-inducible genes, including a key regulator of the IFNγ network, Irf1; 2) suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and type I IFN and 3) induced autophagy. These compounds may represent a basis for macrophage-directed therapies that fine-tune macrophage effector functions to combat intracellular pathogens and reduce inflammatory tissue damage. These therapies would be especially relevant to fighting drug-resistant pathogens, where improving host immunity may prove to be the ultimate resource. PMID:27086720

  9. Inability of tumour cells to elicit the respiratory burst in cytotoxic, activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, S M; Hill, H R

    1982-01-01

    Activated macrophages from Corynebacterium parvum-treated mice are cytotoxic to non-antibody-coated tumour cells and have an augmented respiratory burst potential when compared to resident macrophages. We have investigated the possible involvement of the respiratory burst as an effector mechanism in this type of tumour killing. Scavengers of toxic metabolites of oxygen such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, ethanol, and cytochrome c did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity in this system. To investigate whether or not neoplastic cells stimulate the macrophage respiratory burst, we exposed activated macrophages to viable tumour cells and monitored macrophage superoxide anion production, chemiluminescence, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity. None of these indicators of the macrophage respiratory burst was stimulated by the tumour cells towards which the macrophages were cytotoxic. The data suggest that the macrophages burst is not utilized as an effector mechanism in the non-antibody-mediated macrophage tumour cytotoxicity reaction. PMID:6277777

  10. Stimulation of macrophages with IFN gamma or TNF alpha shuts off the suppressive effect played by PGE2.

    PubMed

    Zicari, A; Lipari, M; Di Renzo, L; Salerno, A; Losardo, A; Pontieri, G M

    1995-09-01

    PGE2 has been shown to be able to interfere with various lymphocyte and macrophage functions, but its effects on macrophage activation are still unclear. In this study, carried out on peritoneal macrophages obtained from healthy, tumour-bearing and Corynebacterium parvum-treated mice, we demonstrated that PGE2 is involved in the down-regulation of macrophage activation, but it cannot exert its inhibiting effect when macrophages are further stimulated with activating cytokines, such as IFN gamma and TNF alpha. Our findings provide new insight into how macrophage tumoricidal activity may be induced and maintained even in presence of significant levels of PGE2. PMID:8582790

  11. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates cross-talk between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and nuclear factor-κB in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Necela, Brian M; Su, Weidong; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is expressed in macrophages and plays an important role in suppressing the inflammatory response. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), reduced PPARγ expression and function in peritoneal macrophages and macrophage cell lines. Moreover, pretreatment with the synthetic PPARγ ligand, rosiglitazone did not prevent LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. Inhibition of PPARγ expression was not blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that de novo protein synthesis is not required for LPS-mediated suppression of PPARγ. Destabilization of PPARγ messenger RNA (mRNA) was not observed in LPS-stimulated macrophages, suggesting that LPS regulates the synthesis of PPARγ mRNA. LPS had no effect on PPARγ expression in macrophages from TLR4 knockout mice, whereas LPS inhibited PPARγ expression in cells that had been reconstituted to express functional TLR4. Targeting the TLR4 pathway with inhibitors of MEK1/2, p38, JNK and AP-1 had no effect on PPARγ downregulation by LPS. However, inhibitors that target NEMO, IκB and NF-κB abolished LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Our data indicate that activation of TLR4 inhibits PPARγ mRNA synthesis by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Low-density genomic profiling of macrophage-specific PPARγ knockout cells indicated that PPARγ suppresses inflammation under basal conditions, and that loss of PPARγ expression is sufficient to induce a proinflammatory state. Our data reveal a regulatory feedback loop in which PPARγ represses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory signalling in unstimulated macrophages; however, upon activation of TLR4, NF-κB drives down PPARγ expression and thereby obviates any potential anti-inflammatory effects of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:18422969

  12. A membrane vesicle/ribosome preparation from Serratia marcescens elicits peritoneal exudate cells expressing both tumoricidal and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    McCall, C; Weimer, L; Baldwin, S; Riches, D W; Canono, B; Campbell, P A

    1992-08-01

    A biological response modifier called ImuVert, derived from the bacterium Serratia marcescens, produced long-lasting elevation of peritoneal exudate cell (PEC) numbers after intraperitoneal injection into mice. These cells had enhanced ability to phagocytose both latex beads and opsonized Listeria monocytogenes. PEC harvested 2-14 days after a single injection of ImuVert killed L. monocytogenes, and ImuVert protected mice from infection by L. monocytogenes, measured both by LD50 and bacterial growth in vivo. Cells harvested 7 and 14 days after ImuVert injection also were tumoricidal, measured as killing of P815 mastocytoma cells, and ImuVert induced macrophages to express tumoricidal properties in vitro. These data suggest that ImuVert has a unique ability to induce a chronic inflammatory response, as other agents do not induce such a long-lasting influx of bactericidal inflammatory cells that also show tumoricidal activity. The consequences of this response appear to include protection from infection by certain bacteria.

  13. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis.

  14. NOTCH reprograms mitochondrial metabolism for proinflammatory macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Chi, Feng; Guo, Tongsheng; Punj, Vasu; Lee, W.N. Paul; French, Samuel W.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is implicated in macrophage activation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the NOTCH1 pathway dictates activation of M1 phenotypes in isolated mouse hepatic macrophages (HMacs) and in a murine macrophage cell line by coupling transcriptional upregulation of M1 genes with metabolic upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ROS (mtROS) to augment induction of M1 genes. Enhanced mitochondrial glucose oxidation was achieved by increased recruitment of the NOTCH1 intracellular domain (NICD1) to nuclear and mitochondrial genes that encode respiratory chain components and by NOTCH-dependent induction of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 (Pdp1) expression, pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, and glucose flux to the TCA cycle. As such, inhibition of the NOTCH pathway or Pdp1 knockdown abrogated glucose oxidation, mtROS, and M1 gene expression. Conditional NOTCH1 deficiency in the myeloid lineage attenuated HMac M1 activation and inflammation in a murine model of alcoholic steatohepatitis and markedly reduced lethality following endotoxin-mediated fulminant hepatitis in mice. In vivo monocyte tracking further demonstrated the requirement of NOTCH1 for the migration of blood monocytes into the liver and subsequent M1 differentiation. Together, these results reveal that NOTCH1 promotes reprogramming of mitochondrial metabolism for M1 macrophage activation. PMID:25798621

  15. Carbon nanohorns allow acceleration of osteoblast differentiation via macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Miyako, Eijiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ushijima, Natsumi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Russier, Julie; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the proof-of-concept on the osteoblast differentiation capacity by CNHs will allow future studies focused on CNHs as ideal therapeutic materials for bone regeneration.Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the

  16. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Lister, Richard J.; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Hurley, Timothy R.; Bradshaw, Cheryl D.; Spahr, Mark A.; Newton, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23709692

  17. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L; Lister, Richard J; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Cramer, Clay T; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Hurley, Timothy R; Bradshaw, Cheryl D; Spahr, Mark A; Newton, Roger S

    2013-08-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome.

  18. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  19. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  20. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation.

  1. Bacillus Calmette Guerin Induces Fibroblast Activation Both Directly and through Macrophages in a Mouse Bladder Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Lodillinsky, Catalina; Langle, Yanina; Guionet, Ariel; Góngora, Adrián; Baldi, Alberto; Sandes, Eduardo O.; Casabé, Alberto; Eiján, Ana María

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the most effective treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. However, a failure in the initial response or relapse within the first five years of treatment has been observed in 20% of patients. We have previously observed that in vivo administration of an inhibitor of nitric oxide improved the response to BCG of bladder tumor bearing mice. It was described that this effect was due to a replacement of tumor tissue by collagen depots. The aim of the present work was to clarify the mechanism involved in this process. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated that BCG induces NIH-3T3 fibroblast proliferation by activating the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways and also differentiation determined by alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression. In vivo, intratumoral inoculation of BCG also increased alpha-SMA and collagen expression. Oral administration of L-NAME enhanced the pro-fibrotic effect of BCG. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from MB49 tumor-bearing mice treated in vivo with combined treatment of BCG with L-NAME also enhanced fibroblast proliferation. We observed that FGF-2 is one of the factors released by BCG-activated macrophages that is able to induce fibroblast proliferation. The involvement of FGF-2 was evidenced using an anti-FGF2 antibody. At the same time, this macrophage population improved wound healing rate in normal mice and FGF-2 expression was also increased in these wounds. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that fibroblasts are targeted by BCG both directly and through activated macrophages in an immunotherapy context of a bladder murine model. We also described, for the first time, that FGF-2 is involved in a dialog between fibroblasts and macrophages induced after BCG treatment. The fact that L-NAME administration improves the BCG effect on fibroblasts, NO inhibition, might represent a new approach to add to the conventional BCG therapy. PMID:21042580

  2. Macrophage activation and human immunodeficiency virus infection: HIV replication directs macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype while previous activation modulates macrophage susceptibility to infection and viral production.

    PubMed

    Porcheray, Fabrice; Samah, Boubekeur; Léone, Cathie; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Gras, Gabriel

    2006-05-25

    Macrophages are pivotal for the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, but whether their role in HIV infection is protective or deleterious remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of pro- and anti-inflammatory stimuli on macrophage sensitivity to two different aspects of HIV infection: their susceptibility to infection stricto sensu, which we measured by endpoint titration method, and their ability to support virus spread, which we measured by using an RT activity assay in infection kinetics. We show a partially protective role for pro-inflammatory agents as well as for IL-4. We also illustrate that various different stimuli display differential effects on macrophage susceptibility to HIV and on virus replication that occurs thereafter. On the other hand, HIV replication strongly repressed CD206 and CD163 expression, thus clearly orientating macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype, but independently of TNF. Taken together, our results emphasize that HIV infection of macrophages sets up inflammation at the cell level but through unexpected mechanisms. This may limit target susceptibility and participate in virus clearance but may also result in tissue damage.

  3. A 25 kDa polypeptide is the ligand for p185neu and is secreted by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tarakhovsky, A; Zaichuk, T; Prassolov, V; Butenko, Z A

    1991-12-01

    Medium conditioned by mouse peritoneal macrophages, activated by muramyl dipeptide (MDP), was used as a possible source of p185neu-specific ligand. MDP-activated macrophage-conditioned medium (MDP-CM) was shown to induce p185neu down-regulation in NEU-expressing NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent and temperature-sensitive manner. To exclude the possibility of an indirect action of proteins/metabolites present in MDP-CM on p185neu turnover, a ligand-trapping approach was used. Secreted NEU protein possessing only the extracellular domain but lacking transmembrane and protein kinase domains was expressed in HeLa cells and then purified from conditioned medium, using affinity chromatography on WGA-Sepharose. Co-incubation of the truncated, soluble NEU protein preparation with MDP-CM abolished MDP-CM-induced p185neu down-regulation and reduced self-phosphorylation. It is concluded that a putative p185neu-specific ligand is produced by macrophages activated by MDP. Using MDP-CM, the presence of a 25 kDa polypeptide distinct from EGF, PDGF, FGF, IGF, TGF-alpha and TGF-beta and TNF-alpha, could be demonstrated by decorating a Western blot with soluble NEU and anti-NEU antibodies. Thus, a 25 kDa (non-reduced) p185neu ligand has been described.

  4. [Murine peritoneal neutrophil activation upon tungsten nanoparticles exposure in vivo].

    PubMed

    Martinova, E A; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Two examples of tungsten carbide nanoparticles (d = 15 nm, 50 nm) and tungsten carbide nanoparticles with 8% cobalt (d = 50 nm) have been found to induce the neutrophil activation 3 h and 36 h after intraperitoneal administration in the doses 0.005; 0.025; 0.05; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2.5 and 5 microgram per 1 gram body weight to FVB mice. Neutrophil activation was calculated based on the CD11b and S100 antigen expression. Effect of nanoparticles is bimodal for all tested examples.

  5. Gallium arsenide differentially affects processing of phagolysosomal targeted antigen by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T A; Hartmann, C B; McCoy, K L

    1998-03-01

    Gallium arsenide, a semiconductor utilized in the electronics industry, causes immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's effect on macrophages to process antigen for activating pigeon cytochrome-specific helper T cell hybridoma was investigated. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg gallium arsenide or vehicle intraperitoneally. Five-day exposure suppressed processing by splenic macrophages but augmented processing by thioglycollate-elicited and resident peritoneal macrophages. Cytochrome coupled to latex beads was targeted to phagolysosomes to examine processing in lysosomes. Cytochrome beads required phagocytosis for processing and were located in phagolysosomes. Gallium arsenide did not alter the phagocytic ability of macrophages. Peritoneal macrophages normally processed the targeted antigen, indicating that gallium arsenide influenced compartment(s) preceding lysosomes. However, the processing efficiency of exposed splenic macrophages depended on the size of particulate cytochrome, suggesting that processing varied in phagolysosomes of different sizes. Gallium arsenide impacted different intracellular compartments in these macrophages, perhaps contributing to systemic immunotoxicity and local inflammation caused by exposure.

  6. Heterogeneous activity of immature and mature cells of the murine monocyte-macrophage lineage derived from different anatomical districts against yeast-phase Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Decker, T; Lohmann-Matthes, M L; Baccarini, M

    1986-01-01

    Mature mononuclear phagocytes have been receiving much attention as effectors of spontaneous candidacidal activity, although with controversial results due to differences in the effector populations and the methods used in different laboratories. We here systematically compare the fungistatic activity of immature and mature cells of the murine macrophage series. The results show that nonadherent, nonphagocytic precursor cells (isolated either [90% purity] from bone marrow liquid cultures or from the organs of mice in which inflammatory conditions had been elicited in vivo) exerted a strong extracellular candidastatic activity. In contrast, mature macrophages, either obtained from different anatomical areas (spleen, liver, lung, peritoneal cavity) or matured in vitro from the precursor populations, displayed striking heterogeneity in their ability to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans, depending on the anatomical site they were derived from. Lymphokine activation did not alter the fungistatic pattern of the untreated cells. The different macrophage populations behaved very differently also in the production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in response to phagocytosis of C. albicans. The amounts of ROI generated, however, showed no correlation with candidastatic ability. Low levels of candidastatic activity exerted by resident peritoneal macrophages (good ROI producers) were inhibited by catalase, whereas high levels of growth inhibition by Kupffer cells (poor ROI producers) after 8 h of assay were hardly influenced by the enzyme. Our data suggest the existence of two different effector mechanisms in macrophage-mediated C. albicans growth inhibition, a rather inefficient ROI-dependent one, and a second, very efficient oxygen-independent mechanism. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:3533781

  7. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  8. Preadipocyte conversion to macrophage. Evidence of plasticity.

    PubMed

    Charrière, Guillaume; Cousin, Béatrice; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; André, Mireille; Bacou, Francis; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis

    2003-03-14

    Preadipocytes are present throughout adult life in adipose tissues and can proliferate and differentiate into mature adipocytes according to the energy balance. An increasing number of reports demonstrate that cells from adipose lineages (preadipocytes and adipocytes) and macrophages share numerous functional or antigenic properties. No large scale comparison reflecting the phenotype complexity has been performed between these different cell types until now. We used profiling analysis to define the common features shared by preadipocyte, adipocyte, and macrophage populations. Our analysis showed that the preadipocyte profile is surprisingly closer to the macrophage than to the adipocyte profile. From these data, we hypothesized that in a macrophage environment preadipocytes could effectively be converted into macrophages. We injected labeled stroma-vascular cells isolated from mouse white adipose tissue or 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice and investigated changes in their phenotype. Preadipocytes rapidly and massively acquired high phagocytic activity and index. 60-70% of preadipocytes also expressed five macrophage-specific antigens: F4/80, Mac-1, CD80, CD86, and CD45. These values were similar to those observed for peritoneal macrophages. In vitro experiments showed that cell-to-cell contact between preadipocytes and peritoneal macrophages partially induced this preadipocyte phenotype conversion. Overall, these results suggest that preadipocyte and macrophage phenotypes are very similar and that preadipocytes have the potential to be very efficiently and rapidly converted into macrophages. This work emphasizes the great cellular plasticity of adipose precursors and reinforces the link between adipose tissue and innate immunity processes. PMID:12519759

  9. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  10. Paricalcitol reduces peritoneal fibrosis in mice through the activation of regulatory T cells and reduction in IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    González-Mateo, Guadalupe T; Fernández-Míllara, Vanessa; Bellón, Teresa; Liappas, Georgios; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Selgas, Rafael; Aroeira, Luiz S

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a significant health problem associated with a chronic inflammatory reaction. The precise mechanisms involved in the fibrotic process are still poorly understood. However, given that inflammation is a major causative factor, immunomodulation is a possible therapeutic approach to reduce fibrosis. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) that is present in all hematopoietic cells has been associated with immunomodulation. We investigated whether the intraperitoneal administration of paricalcitol, a specific activator of the VDR, modulates peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF)-induced peritoneal fibrosis. We characterized the inflammatory process in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated or not treated with paricalcitol and analyzed the ensuing fibrosis. The treatment reduced peritoneal IL-17 levels, which strongly correlated with a significantly lower peritoneal fibrotic response. In vitro studies demonstrate that both CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cells appear to impact the regulation of IL-17. Paricalcitol treatment resulted in a significantly increased frequency of CD8+ T cells showing a regulatory phenotype. The frequency of CD4+ Tregs tends to be increased, but it did not achieve statistical significance. However, paricalcitol treatment increased the number of CD4+ and CD8+ Treg cells in vivo. In conclusion, the activation of immunological regulatory mechanisms by VDR signaling could prevent or reduce fibrosis, as shown in peritoneal fibrosis induced by PDF exposure in mice.

  11. Production of LPS-induced inflammatory mediators in murine peritoneal macrophages: neocuproine as a broad inhibitor and ATP7A as a selective regulator.

    PubMed

    Patel, Om V; Wilson, William B; Qin, Zhenyu

    2013-06-01

    Copper chelation regulates the production of inflammatory mediators in vivo during vascular inflammation and atherogenesis. Little is known about how the copper egress pump ATP7A regulates the production of these mediators. In this study, we isolated ATP7A deficient macrophages (MΦ) from the peritoneal cavity of blotchy mice and identified the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediators that were altered by ATP7A deficiency. These results were compared with the effect of neocuproine (a copper chelator) treatment on both ATP7A deficient and control MΦ. Seven of the 24 inflammatory mediators examined in this study had significant changes in expression in the ATP7A deficient MΦ compared to controls; 16 of these mediators were significantly reduced in MΦ treated with neocuproine compared to controls. Both neocuproine treatment and ATP7A deficiency reduced IFN-γ, MCP-1, MCP-3, and VEGF-A levels. Interestingly, the production of KC/GRO was upregulated by ATP7A deficiency but downregulated by neocuproine treatment. Neocuproine, but not ATP7A deficiency, reduced the production of FGF-9, IL-1α, IL-12p70, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, MIP-1β, MIP-2, RANTES, and TNFα. ATP7A deficiency but not neocuproine treatment reduced IP-10 and MCP-5 levels. In addition, both ATP7A deficiency and neocuproine treatment had no effect on GM-CSF, IL-10, IL-11, IL-7, OSM, and SCF. Together, these findings provide evidence that MΦ ATP7A selectively regulates LPS-induced inflammatory mediators, in part, via modulation of cellular copper availability, whereas neocuproine generally inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators. These results also imply that although copper chelation and ATP7A downregulation may result in different copper concentrations, gradients, and/or distribution in the cells, they may not lead to opposite biological effects on inflammatory mediator production.

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG decreases TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide-activated murine macrophages by a contact-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jeremy Andrew; Versalovic, James

    2003-04-01

    Animal studies and human clinical trials have shown that Lactobacillus can prevent or ameliorate inflammation in chronic colitis. However, molecular mechanisms for this effect have not been clearly elucidated. We hypothesize that lactobacilli are capable of downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokine responses induced by the enteric microbiota. We investigated whether lactobacilli diminish production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by the murine macrophage line, RAW 264.7 gamma (NO-), and alter the TNF-alpha/interleukin-10 (IL-10) balance, in vitro. When media conditioned by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) are co-incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA), TNF-alpha production is significantly inhibited compared to controls, whereas IL-10 synthesis is unaffected. Interestingly, LGG-conditioned media also decreases TNF-alpha production of Helicobacter-conditioned media-activated peritoneal macrophages. Lactobacillus species may be capable of producing soluble molecules that inhibit TNF-alpha production in activated macrophages. As overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-alpha, is implicated in pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation, enteric Lactobacillus-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and alteration of cytokine profiles may highlight an important immunomodulatory role for commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Alternatively activated macrophages derived from monocytes and tissue macrophages are phenotypically and functionally distinct

    PubMed Central

    Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Girgis, Natasha M.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Jenkins, Stephen; Ward, Lauren N.; Kurtz, Zachary D.; Wiens, Kirsten E.; Tang, Mei San; Basu-Roy, Upal; Mansukhani, Alka; Allen, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages adopt an alternatively activated phenotype (AAMs) when activated by the interleukin-4receptor(R)α. AAMs can be derived either from proliferation of tissue resident macrophages or recruited inflammatory monocytes, but it is not known whether these different sources generate AAMs that are phenotypically and functionally distinct. By transcriptional profiling analysis, we show here that, although both monocyte and tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of Arg1, Chi3l3, and Retnla, only monocyte-derived AAMs up-regulated Raldh2 and PD-L2. Monocyte-derived AAMs were also CX3CR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP)high and expressed CD206, whereas tissue-derived AAMs were CX3CR1-GFP and CD206 negative. Monocyte-derived AAMs had high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and promoted the differentiation of FoxP3+ cells from naïve CD4+ cells via production of retinoic acid. In contrast, tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of uncoupling protein 1. Hence monocyte-derived AAM have properties associated with immune regulation, and the different physiological properties associated with AAM function may depend on the distinct lineage of these cells. PMID:24695852

  14. Magnetometric measurements of macrophage activity in the liver after administration of different perfluorochemicals.

    PubMed

    Koester, M B; Lutz, J

    1994-01-01

    The activity of liver macrophages was evaluated using a magnetometric method after administration of different perfluorochemicals. Following treatment with perfluoroctylbromide a significant shorter time period of diminished macrophage activity was found compared with a mixture of perfluorodecalin and perfluorotripropylamine. Results obtained with the magnetometric method on liver macrophages were more sensitive compared with those of colloidal carbon clearance of total body RES.

  15. Rickettsia australis Activates Inflammasome in Human and Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, Claire; Bechelli, Jeremy; Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Saito, Tais; Azar, Sasha R.; Ismail, Nahed; Walker, David H.; Fang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsiae actively escape from vacuoles and replicate free in the cytoplasm of host cells, where inflammasomes survey the invading pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of Rickettsia australis with the inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages. R. australis induced a significant level of IL-1β secretion by human macrophages, which was significantly reduced upon treatment with an inhibitor of caspase-1 compared to untreated controls, suggesting caspase-1-dependent inflammasome activation. Rickettsia induced significant secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in vitro by infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) as early as 8–12 h post infection (p.i.) in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of these cytokines was accompanied by cleavage of caspase-1 and was completely abrogated in BMMs deficient in caspase-1/caspase-11 or apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC), suggesting that R. australis activate the ASC-dependent inflammasome. Interestingly, in response to the same quantity of rickettsiae, NLRP3-/- BMMs significantly reduced the secretion level of IL-1β compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to cytosolic recognition of R. australis in vitro. Rickettsial load in spleen, but not liver and lung, of R. australis-infected NLRP3-/- mice was significantly greater compared to WT mice. These data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome plays a role in host control of bacteria in vivo in a tissue-specific manner. Taken together, our data, for the first time, illustrate the activation of ASC-dependent inflammasome by R. australis in macrophages in which NLRP3 is involved. PMID:27362650

  16. Antibodies Against Glycolipids Enhance Antifungal Activity of Macrophages and Reduce Fungal Burden After Infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Renata A.; Thomaz, Luciana; Muñoz, Julian E.; da Silva, Cássia J.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Pinto, Márcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Taborda, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus. PMID:26870028

  17. The Impact of Myeloperoxidase and Activated Macrophages on Metaphase II Mouse Oocyte Quality

    PubMed Central

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Thakur, Mili; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Drewlo, Sascha; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme-containing enzyme present in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, is produced in high levels during inflammation, and associated with poor reproductive outcomes. MPO is known to generate hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) utilizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride (Cl-). Here we investigate the effect of activated immune cells and MPO on oocyte quality. Mouse metaphase II oocytes were divided into the following groups: 1) Incubation with a catalytic amount of MPO (40 nM) for different incubation periods in the presence of 100 mM Cl- with and without H2O2 and with and without melatonin (100 μM), at 37°C (n = 648/648 total number of oocytes in each group for oocytes with and without cumulus cells); 2) Co-cultured with activated mouse peritoneal macrophage and neutrophils cells (1.0 x 106 cells/ml) in the absence and presence of melatonin (200 μM), an MPO inhibitor/ROS scavenger, for different incubation periods in HTF media, at 37°C (n = 200/200); 3) Untreated oocytes incubated for 4 hrs as controls (n = 73/64). Oocytes were then fixed, stained and scored based on the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. All treatments were found to negatively affect oocyte quality in a time dependent fashion as compared to controls. In all cases the presence of cumulus cells offered no protection; however significant protection was offered by melatonin. Similar results were obtained with oocytes treated with neutrophils. This work provides a direct link between MPO and decreased oocyte quality. Therefore, strategies to decrease MPO mediated inflammation may influence reproductive outcomes. PMID:26982351

  18. The Impact of Myeloperoxidase and Activated Macrophages on Metaphase II Mouse Oocyte Quality.

    PubMed

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N; Thakur, Mili; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Drewlo, Sascha; Saed, Ghassan M; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme-containing enzyme present in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, is produced in high levels during inflammation, and associated with poor reproductive outcomes. MPO is known to generate hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) utilizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride (Cl-). Here we investigate the effect of activated immune cells and MPO on oocyte quality. Mouse metaphase II oocytes were divided into the following groups: 1) Incubation with a catalytic amount of MPO (40 nM) for different incubation periods in the presence of 100 mM Cl- with and without H2O2 and with and without melatonin (100 μM), at 37°C (n = 648/648 total number of oocytes in each group for oocytes with and without cumulus cells); 2) Co-cultured with activated mouse peritoneal macrophage and neutrophils cells (1.0 x 106 cells/ml) in the absence and presence of melatonin (200 μM), an MPO inhibitor/ROS scavenger, for different incubation periods in HTF media, at 37°C (n = 200/200); 3) Untreated oocytes incubated for 4 hrs as controls (n = 73/64). Oocytes were then fixed, stained and scored based on the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. All treatments were found to negatively affect oocyte quality in a time dependent fashion as compared to controls. In all cases the presence of cumulus cells offered no protection; however significant protection was offered by melatonin. Similar results were obtained with oocytes treated with neutrophils. This work provides a direct link between MPO and decreased oocyte quality. Therefore, strategies to decrease MPO mediated inflammation may influence reproductive outcomes. PMID:26982351

  19. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Prior reproductive experience alters prolactin-induced macrophage responses in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Freitas, Maria Isabel Roth; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Palermo-Neto, João; Felicio, Luciano F

    2013-09-01

    Reproductive experience (i.e., pregnancy and lactation) induces physiological changes in mammals. A previous reproductive experience was recently shown to modulate the activity of dopaminergic hypothalamic systems while decreasing serum prolactin levels and oxidative burst activity in peritoneal macrophages. Dopamine receptor antagonists increase serum prolactin levels, and both prolactin and dopamine receptors may be involved in the modulation of macrophage activity, providing a means of communication between the nervous and immune systems. The present study evaluated the in vitro effects of prolactin and a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist on the peritoneal activity of macrophages from primigravid and multigravid female rats during the third trimester of pregnancy. Oxidative bursts and phagocytosis in peritoneal macrophages were evaluated by flow cytometry. Primigravid and multigravid Wistar rats, during the third trimester of pregnancy (i.e., days 17-21), were used. Peritoneal fluid samples from these rats were first incubated with prolactin (10 and 100 nM) for different periods of time. The same procedure was repeated to evaluate the effects of domperidone (10 and 100 nM) on macrophage activity. Our results showed that macrophages from multigravid rats responded more effectively to in vitro incubation with prolactin, especially with regard to the intensity and percentage of phagocytosis. Additionally, these effects were more pronounced after incubation periods of 30 min or 4 h. These data suggest that macrophages during a second pregnancy become more sensitive to the phagocytotic effects of prolactin.

  1. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis.

  2. Mannose-Binding Activity of Escherichia coli: a Determinant of Attachment and Ingestion of the Bacteria by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shavit, Zvi; Goldman, Rachel; Ofek, Itzhak; Sharon, Nathan; Mirelman, David

    1980-01-01

    Recently, it was suggested that a mannose-specific lectin on the bacterial cell surface is responsible for the recognition by phagocytic cells of certain nonopsonized Escherichia coli strains. In this study we assessed the interaction of two strains of E. coli at different phases of growth with a monolayer of mouse peritoneal macrophages and developed a direct method with [14C]mannan to quantitate the bacterial mannose-binding activity. Normal-sized bacteria were obtained from logarithmic and stationary phases of growth. Nonseptated filamentous cells were formed by growing the organisms in the presence of cephalexin or at a restrictive temperature. Attachment to macrophages of all bacterial forms was inhibited by methyl α-d-mannoside and mannan but not by other sugars tested. The attachment of stationary phase and filamentous bacteria to macrophages, as well as their mannose-binding activity, was similar, whereas in the exponential-phase bacteria they were markedly reduced. The results show a linear relation between the two parameters (R = 0.98, P < 0.001). The internalization of the filamentous cells attached to macrophages during 45 min of incubation was much less efficient (20%) compared to that of exponential-phase, stationary-phase, or antibody-coated filamentous bacteria (90%). The results indicate that the mannose-binding activity of E. coli determines the recognition of the organisms by phagocytes. They further suggest that administration of β-lactam antibiotics may impair elimination of certain pathogenic bacteria by inducing the formation of filaments which are inefficiently internalized by the host's phagocytic cells. PMID:7011977

  3. Comparative in vitro antimicrobial activity of vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin and ceftobiprole in four different peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    Tobudic, S; Poeppl, W; Kratzer, C; Vychytil, A; Burgmann, H

    2012-07-01

    Peritoneal dialysis used in the treatment of patients with end-stage renal failure is often complicated by peritonitis. Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis is severe, particularly if caused by a methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA). Intraperitoneal administration of drugs for treatment of peritonitis is preferable to intravenous or oral routes because of the resulting higher local antibiotic concentrations. However, peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) have a bacteriostatic effect, which may compromise the efficacy of antibiotics. The bactericidal efficacy of vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin and ceftobiprole was studied in the PDFs Dianeal PD4® (glucose 1.36%), Physioneal 40® (glucose 1.36%), Extraneal® (7.5% icodextrin), and Nutrineal PD4® (1.1% amino acid) using time-kill curves. To simulate in vivo conditions, human serum albumin was added at a final concentration of 2 g/l. All four PDFs had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of the MRSA test isolate. All antibiotics showed less activity in PDFs compared to control broth. Vancomycin and teicoplanin achieved the greatest reduction in bacterial numbers in the amino-acid containing PDF Nutrineal PD4®. Daptomycin showed its highest activity in Extraneal® and better overall efficacy than the other tested antibiotics. Ceftobiprole showed no killing activities in any of the four PDFs. Based on these in vitro data we conclude that the choice of PDFs for intraperitoneal administration is not trivial and could be crucial for therapy outcome.

  4. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and

  5. Activity of drug-loaded tumor-penetrating microparticles in peritoneal pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ze; Tsai, Max; Wang, Jie; Cole, David J; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2014-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy confers significant survival benefits in cancer patients. However, several problems, including local toxicity and ineffectiveness against bulky tumors, have prohibited it from becoming a standard of care. We have developed drug-loaded, polymeric tumor-penetrating microparticles (TPM) to address these problems. Initial studies showed that TPM provides tumor-selective delivery and is effective against ovarian SKOV3 tumors of relatively small size (<50 mg). The present study evaluated whether the TPM activity extends to other tumor types that are more bulky and have different morphologies and disease presentation. We evaluated TPM in mice bearing two IP human pancreatic tumors with different growth characteristics and morphologies (rapidly growing, large and porous Hs766T vs. slowly growing, smaller and densely packed MiaPaCa2), and at different disease stage (early stage with smaller tumors vs. late stage with larger tumors plus peritoneal carcinomatosis). Comparison of treatments with TPM or paclitaxel in Cremophor micelles, at equi-toxic doses, shows, in all tumor types: (a) higher paclitaxel levels in tumors (up to 55-fold) for TPM, (b) greater efficacy for TPM, including significantly longer survival and higher cure rate, and (c) a single dose of TPM was equally efficacious as multiple doses of paclitaxel/Cremophor. The results indicate tumor targeting property and superior antitumor activity of paclitaxel-loaded TPM are generalizable to small and large peritoneal tumors, with or without accompanying carcinomatosis.

  6. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  7. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  8. beta-Naphthoflavone protects from peritonitis by reducing TNF-alpha-induced endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Yao; Liou, Je-Wen; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Peng, Shih-Yi; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Wei-Cheng; Huang, Zheng-Kai; Jiang, Shinn-Jong

    2015-12-01

    β-Naphthoflavone (β-NF), a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, has been shown to possess anti-oxidative properties. We investigated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory potential of β-NF in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Pretreatment with β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species, translocation of p67(phox), and TNF-α-induced monocyte binding and transmigration. In addition, β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. The mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were reduced by β-NF, as was the infiltration of white blood cells, in a peritonitis model. The inhibition of adhesion molecules was associated with suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and Akt, and suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38. The translocation of Egr-1, a downstream transcription factor involved in the MEK-ERK signaling pathway, was suppressed by β-NF treatment. Our findings show that β-NF inhibits TNF-α-induced NF-kB and ERK1/2 activation and ROS generation, thereby suppressing the expression of adhesion molecules. This results in reduced adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes in vitro and prevents the infiltration of leukocytes in a peritonitis model. Our findings also suggest that β-NF might prevent TNF-α-induced inflammation.

  9. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent the development of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. Modulation of macrophage secretory activities.

    PubMed

    Renier, G; Skamene, E; DeSanctis, J; Radzioch, D

    1993-10-01

    We examined the effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids on the development of the atherogenic process in mice and on the macrophage ability to secrete several effector molecules that may be involved in the atherogenic process. The secretion of inflammatory proteins such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and the production of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), nitrogen oxide (NO2), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were evaluated in peritoneal macrophages isolated from atherosclerosis-susceptible C57BL/6J mice. The mice were assigned at random to three experimental groups: the first group was fed a semi-defined control diet (control diet); the second group was maintained on the control diet supplemented with 10% menhaden oil (menhaden diet); and the third group received the control diet supplemented with 10% palm oil plus 2% cholesterol (saturated fat diet). Macrophages derived from mice fed the menhaden diet showed a suppression of their basal TNF-alpha mRNA expression and production. They also presented a dramatically decreased ability to express TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNAs in response to exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared with the macrophages from the control group. LPL mRNA and protein expression were downregulated after 6 and 15 weeks of menhaden-diet feeding. Significantly higher NO2 production in response to interferon gamma was found, both after 6 and 15 weeks of diet feeding, in the menhaden group compared with the control group. In addition, prostaglandin production and macrophage tumoricidal activity in response to LPS were decreased in this group compared with the control group. Macrophages derived from the saturated fat group did not show any significant alterations in TNF-alpha, LPL, NO2, or PGE2 secretion compared with controls. Interestingly, we observed a progressive increase of the LPS-induced IL-1 beta gene expression and secretion among macrophages harvested from mice receiving

  10. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  11. New insights into the multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function.

    PubMed

    Ginhoux, Florent; Schultze, Joachim L; Murray, Peter J; Ochando, Jordi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have protective roles in immunity to pathogens, tissue development, homeostasis and repair following damage. Maladaptive immunity and inflammation provoke changes in macrophage function that are causative of disease. Despite a historical wealth of knowledge about macrophages, recent advances have revealed unknown aspects of their development and function. Following development, macrophages are activated by diverse signals. Such tissue microenvironmental signals together with epigenetic changes influence macrophage development, activation and functional diversity, with consequences in disease and homeostasis. We discuss here how recent discoveries in these areas have led to a multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function. In connection with this, we also discuss how technical advances facilitate a new roadmap for the isolation and analysis of macrophages at high resolution.

  12. Characterization of tumor binding by the IC-21 macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E K; Latham, P S; Shah, E M; Hasday, J D

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the SV40-transformed murine macrophage cell line IC-21 is a suitable model to study the selective high avidity binding of tumor cells by subpopulations of activated macrophages. IC-21 macrophages bound P815, RBL5, and EL-4 murine tumor cells with high avidity, as measured by the inverted centrifugation method. Tumor binding by IC-21 macrophages was competitively inhibited by crude membrane vesicles prepared from tumor cells but not by cell membranes prepared from nontransformed splenic leukocytes, suggesting that this process was mediated by tumor-specific binding sites. IC-21 macrophages and primary cultures of pyran copolymer-elicited peritoneal macrophages demonstrated similar tumor binding avidity, kinetics, saturability, and metabolic requirements for optimal high avidity tumor binding. However, compared with primary cultures of pyran copolymer-elicited peritoneal macrophages, IC-21 macrophages bound 4-fold more tumor cells and were more homogeneous for tumor binding capability. Finally, one third of maximal tumor cell binding by IC-21 macrophages was completed within 5 min of contact with tumor, suggesting that IC-21 macrophages constitutively expressed some high avidity tumor binding sites. Their stable and homogeneous capability for binding tumor cells and their ease of growth make the IC-21 macrophage cell line a potentially valuable model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for selective high avidity tumor binding by subpopulations of activated macrophages. PMID:2164442

  13. Search for potent modulators of cytokine production by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A A; Abidov, M T; Kovalevskaya, E O; Kalyuzhin, O V

    2004-09-01

    We compared the effects of Tamerit, Polyoxidony, and Licopid on spontaneous and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor by mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. The test preparations were equally potent in stimulating nonactivated cells. Licopid produced a costimulatory effect on macrophages primed with endotoxin. Tamerit in different doses suppressed cytokine production by cells. Polyoxidony in low doses activated, but in high doses suppressed this process. PMID:15665918

  14. Imbalanced Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Activations in Response to Candida albicans in a Murine Model of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Venturini, James; Fraga-Silva, Thais Fernanda Campos; Marchetti, Camila Martins; Mimura, Luiza Ayumi Nishiyama; Conti, Bruno José; Golim, Márjorie de Assis; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio; de Arruda, Maria Sueli Parreira

    2016-07-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species are responsible for high morbidity and mortality, and diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important underlying disease in candidemia episodes. Although DM patients show an enhanced proinflammatory profile, they are highly susceptible to mycobacterial and mycotic infections. Attempting to understand this paradox, we investigated if imbalanced macrophage and dendritic cell (DC) activations could be associated to high incidence and/or severity of Candida albicans infection in the hypoinsulinemia-hyperglycemia (HH) milieu. HH alloxan-induced mice were infected with C. albicans and peritoneal aderent phagocytes were co-cultured with or without lipopolyssaccharide or heat-killed C. albicans, and the production of cytotoxic metabolites, cytokines, and chemokines was evaluated. We also evaluated the surface expression of MHC-II and CD86 in splenic DCs. Our findings showed that both uninfected and C. albicans-infected HH mice showed less production of CCL2 and reduced expression of CD86 by peritoneal phagocytes and splenic DCs, respectively.

  15. GM-CSF Promotes Macrophage Alternative Activation after Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Larry; Marlier, Arnaud; Lee, Yashang; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Cantley, Lloyd G.

    2015-01-01

    After kidney ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, monocytes home to the kidney and differentiate into activated macrophages. Whereas proinflammatory macrophages contribute to the initial kidney damage, an alternatively activated phenotype can promote normal renal repair. The microenvironment of the kidney during the repair phase mediates the transition of macrophage activation from a proinflammatory to a reparative phenotype. In this study, we show that macrophages isolated from murine kidneys during the tubular repair phase after I/R exhibit an alternative activation gene profile that differs from the canonical alternative activation induced by IL-4–stimulated STAT6 signaling. This unique activation profile can be reproduced in vitro by stimulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages with conditioned media from serum-starved mouse proximal tubule cells. Secreted tubular factors were found to activate macrophage STAT3 and STAT5 but not STAT6, leading to induction of the unique alternative activation pattern. Using STAT3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages and pharmacologic inhibition of STAT5, we found that tubular cell-mediated macrophage alternative activation is regulated by STAT5 activation. Both in vitro and after renal I/R, tubular cells expressed GM-CSF, a known STAT5 activator, and this pathway was required for in vitro alternative activation of macrophages by tubular cells. Furthermore, administration of a neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF after renal I/R attenuated kidney macrophage alternative activation and suppressed tubular proliferation. Taken together, these data show that tubular cells can instruct macrophage activation by secreting GM-CSF, leading to a unique macrophage reparative phenotype that supports tubular proliferation after sterile ischemic injury. PMID:25388222

  16. Macrophage Activation Redirects Yersinia-Infected Host Cell Death from Apoptosis to Caspase-1-Dependent Pyroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergsbaken, Tessa; Cookson, Brad T

    2007-01-01

    Infection of macrophages by Yersinia species results in YopJ-dependent apoptosis, and naïve macrophages are highly susceptible to this form of cell death. Previous studies have demonstrated that macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prior to infection are resistant to YopJ-dependent cell death; we found this simultaneously renders macrophages susceptible to killing by YopJ− Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb). YopJ− Yptb-induced macrophage death was dependent on caspase-1 activation, resulting in rapid permeability to small molecules, followed by membrane breakdown and DNA damage, and accompanied by cleavage and release of proinflammatory interleukin-18. Induction of caspase-1-dependent death, or pyroptosis, required the bacterial type III translocon but none of its known translocated proteins. Wild-type Yptb infection also triggered pyroptosis: YopJ-dependent activation of proapoptotic caspase-3 was significantly delayed in activated macrophages and resulted in caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis. The transition to susceptibility was not limited to LPS activation; it was also seen in macrophages activated with other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and intact nonviable bacteria. Yptb infection triggered macrophage activation and activation of caspase-1 in vivo. Y. pestis infection of activated macrophages also stimulated caspase-1 activation. These results indicate that host signaling triggered by TLR and other activating ligands during the course of Yersinia infection redirects both the mechanism of host cell death and the downstream consequences of death by shifting from noninflammatory apoptosis to inflammatory pyroptosis. PMID:17983266

  17. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Nadhia H. C.; Ferrari, Raquel A. M.; Silva, Daniela F. T.; Nunes, Fabio D.; Bussadori, Sandra K.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle. PMID:25076002

  18. Differences in the kinetics of activation of protein kinases and extracellular signal-related protein kinase 1 in colony-stimulating factor 1-stimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworowski, A; Christy, E; Yusoff, P; Byrne, R; Hamilton, J A

    1996-01-01

    To determine the relevance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity to macrophage proliferation, we measured the stimulation of myelin basic protein (MBP) kinase and extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) activity in a macrophage cell line (BAC1.2F5), bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) and resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM). By using an 'ingel' MBP kinase assay the activities of renaturable MBP kinases were detected, including several with molecular masses similar to those of ERK-1 and ERK-2. These represented a minor fraction of total activity and were not activated to an appreciable extent by colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). By using a sensitive and specific immune-complex kinase assay, activation of ERK-1 by CSF-1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was demonstrated. Two kinetically distinct pathways of ERK-1 activation by CSF-1 were resolved, with peak activations occurring at 5 and 15 min. The kinetics and degree of activation were similar in BMM, BAC1.2F5 cells and RPM. LPS activated ERK-1 with a single peak at 10-15 min, corresponding to the later peak of activation by CSF-1. Thus there was no strict correlation between ERK activation and macrophage proliferation. PMID:9003393

  19. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  20. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  1. Rosiglitazone, a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR)-γ Agonist, Attenuates Inflammation Via NF-κB Inhibition in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Fang; Zou, Xun-Liang; Wu, Jun; Yu, Xue-Qing; Yang, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritonitis rat model. LPS was intraperitoneally injected into rats to establish peritonitis model. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were assigned to normal saline (the solvent of LPS), LPS, rosiglitazone plus LPS, and rosiglitazone alone. A simple peritoneal equilibrium test was performed with 20 ml 4.25 % peritoneal dialysis fluid. We measured the leukocyte count in dialysate and ultrafiltration volume. Peritoneal membrane histochemical staining was performed, and peritoneal thickness was assessed. CD40 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA (ICAM-1 mRNA) levels in rat visceral peritoneum were detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. IL-6 in rat peritoneal dialysis effluent was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα was analyzed by Western blot. LPS administration resulted in increased peritoneal thickness and decreased ultrafiltration volume. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased peritoneal thickness. In addition to CD40 and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, the IL-6, p-p65, and p-IκBα protein expressions were enhanced in LPS-administered animals. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased ICAM-1 mRNA upregulation, secretion of IL-6 protein, and phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα without decreasing CD40 mRNA expression. Rosiglitazone has a protective effect in peritonitis, simultaneously decreasing NF-κB phosphorylation, suggesting that NF-κB signaling pathway mediated peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS. PPAR-γ might be considered a potential therapeutic target against peritonitis.

  2. Host and Bacterial Factors Involved in the Innate Ability of Mouse Macrophages To Eliminate Internalized Unopsonized Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Terri S.; Havell, Edward A.; Horton, John R.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to better understand genetic and cellular factors that influence innate immunity, we examined host and bacterial factors involved in the nonopsonic phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli K-12 by mouse macrophages. Unelicited (resident) peritoneal macrophages from five different mouse strains, BALB/c, C57BL/6, CD-1, C3H/HeJ, and C3H/HeN, were employed. Additional macrophage populations were obtained from CD-1 mice (bone marrow-derived macrophages). Also, for BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, peritoneal macrophages elicited with either thioglycolate or proteose peptone, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and macrophage-like cell lines derived from the two strains were employed. Two E. coli K-12 strains that differed specifically in their abilities to produce type 1 pili containing the adhesive protein FimH were examined. The parameters used to assess macrophage bacteriocidal activity were (i) the killing of internalized (gentamicin-protected) E. coli during the approximately 4-h assay and (ii) the initial rate at which internalized E. coli were eliminated. Data on these parameters allowed the following conclusions: (i) unelicited or proteose peptone-elicited peritoneal macrophages were significantly better at eliminating internalized bacteria than thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages, or macrophage cell lines; (ii) the host genetic background had no significant effect upon the ability of unelicited peritoneal macrophages to kill E. coli (even though the mouse strains differ widely in their in vivo susceptibilities to bacterial infection); and (iii) the FimH phenotype had no significant effect upon E. coli survival once the bacterium was inside a macrophage. Additionally, there was no correlation between the bacteriocidal effectiveness of a macrophage population and the number of bacteria bound per macrophage. However, macrophage populations that were the least bacteriocidal tended to bind higher ratios of FimH+ to Fim

  3. Macrophages migrate in an activation-dependent manner to chemokines involved in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In neuroinflammatory diseases, macrophages can play a dual role in the process of tissue damage, depending on their activation status (M1 / M2). M1 macrophages are considered to exert damaging effects to neurons, whereas M2 macrophages are reported to aid regeneration and repair of neurons. Their migration within the central nervous system may be of critical importance in the final outcome of neurodegeneration in neuroinflammatory diseases e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). To provide insight into this process, we examined the migratory capacity of human monocyte-derived M1 and M2 polarised macrophages towards chemoattractants, relevant for neuroinflammatory diseases like MS. Methods Primary cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evoke proinflammatory (M1) activation or IL-4 to evoke anti-inflammatory (M2) activation. In a TAXIScan assay, migration of M0, M1 and M2 towards chemoattractants was measured and quantified. Furthermore the adhesion capacity and the expression levels of integrins as well as chemokine receptors of M0, M1 and M2 were assessed. Alterations in cell morphology were analysed using fluorescent labelling of the cytoskeleton. Results Significant differences were observed between M1 and M2 macrophages in the migration towards chemoattractants. We show that M2 macrophages migrated over longer distances towards CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL12 and C1q compared to non-activated (M0) and M1 macrophages. No differences were observed in the adhesion of M0, M1 and M2 macrophages to multiple matrix components, nor in the expression of integrins and chemokine receptors. Significant changes were observed in the cytoskeleton organization upon stimulation with CCL2, M0, M1 and M2 macrophages adopt a spherical morphology and the cytoskeleton is rapidly rearranged. M0 and M2 macrophages are able to form filopodia, whereas M1 macrophages only adapt a spherical morphology. Conclusions

  4. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  5. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  6. STAT1 Signaling within Macrophages Is Required for Antifungal Activity against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Hole, Camaron R.; Wozniak, Karen L.; Olszewski, Michal A.; Mueller, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO. PMID:26351277

  7. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed Central

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-01-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  8. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-08-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  9. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 vs control group). Paeoniflorin could decrease the cell populations at S phases (paeoniflorin 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and increase the cell populations at G0-G1 phases of Lewis lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and reduce the numbers of M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages induced by IL-4 (paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 vs Control group). Paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P < 0.01 vs control group). These results suggest that paeoniflorin could reduce

  10. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 vs control group). Paeoniflorin could decrease the cell populations at S phases (paeoniflorin 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and increase the cell populations at G0-G1 phases of Lewis lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and reduce the numbers of M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages induced by IL-4 (paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 vs Control group). Paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P < 0.01 vs control group). These results suggest that paeoniflorin could reduce

  11. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects.

  12. Non-covalent pomegranate (Punica granatum) hydrolyzable tannin-protein complexes modulate antigen uptake, processing and presentation by a T-cell hybridoma line co-cultured with murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Haas, Linda; Vestling, Martha; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2016-12-01

    In this work we characterize the interaction of pomegranate hydrolyzable tannins (HT) with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of non-covalent tannin-protein complexes on macrophage endocytosis, processing and presentation of antigen. We isolated HT from pomegranate and complex to HEL, the resulting non-covalent tannin-protein complex was characterized by gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS. Finally, cell culture studies and confocal microscopy imaging were conducted on the non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes to evaluate its effect on macrophage antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T-cell hybridomas. Our results indicate that non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes modulate uptake, processing and antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL alone, whereas a non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL complex had already reached maximum IL-2 expression. Pomegranate HT may increase rate of endocytose of HEL and subsequent expression of IL-2 by the T-cell hybridomas. PMID:27406472

  13. Low-power laser irradiation enhance macrophage phagocytic capacity through Src activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Phagocytosis and subsequent degradation of pathogens by macrophages play a pivotal role in host innate immunity in mammals. Laser irradiation has been found to produce photobiological effects with evidence of interference with organic functions. In this study, we focused our attention on the effects of He-Ne laser on the phagocytic activity of macrophages, the regulation mechanism of phagocytosis was also discussed. Our results indicated that Low-power laser irradiation can enhance the phagocytosis of macrophage through activation of Src.

  14. The generation of macrophages with anti-inflammatory activity in the absence of STAT6 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Bryan D.; Chandrasekaran, Prabha; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Dalby, Elizabeth; Suresh, Rahul; Sarkar, Arup; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Mosser, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages readily change their phenotype in response to exogenous stimuli. In this work, macrophages were stimulated under a variety of experimental conditions, and phenotypic alterations were correlated with changes in gene expression. We identified 3 transcriptionally related populations of macrophages with immunoregulatory activity. They were generated by stimulating cells with TLR ligands in the presence of 3 different "reprogramming" signals: high-density ICs, PGE2, or Ado. All 3 of these cell populations produced high levels of transcripts for IL-10 and growth and angiogenic factors. They also secreted reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12. All 3 macrophage phenotypes could partially rescue mice from lethal endotoxemia, and therefore, we consider each to have anti-inflammatory activity. This ability to regulate innate-immune responses occurred equally well in macrophages from STAT6-deficient mice. The lack of STAT6 did not affect the ability of macrophages to change cytokine production reciprocally or to rescue mice from lethal endotoxemia. Furthermore, treatment of macrophages with IL-4 failed to induce similar phenotypic or transcriptional alterations. This work demonstrates that there are multiple ways to generate macrophages with immunoregulatory activity. These anti-inflammatory macrophages are transcriptionally and functionally related to each other and are quite distinct from macrophages treated with IL-4. PMID:26048978

  15. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  16. Macrophage-oriented cytotoxic activity of novel triterpene saponins extracted from roots of Securidaca inappendiculata.

    PubMed

    Yui, S; Ubukata, K; Hodono, K; Kitahara, M; Mimaki, Y; Kuroda, M; Sashida, Y; Yamazaki, M

    2001-10-01

    It is recognized that macrophages in peripheral tissues often proliferate under pathological conditions such as tumors, inflammation and atherosclerosis. Because the growth state of macrophages is believed to be a factor regulating the pathological process of the diseases, substances that regulate macrophage growth or survival may be useful for disease control. In this paper, we identified the activity inhibiting macrophage growth in a hot water extract of roots of Securidaca inappendiculata. The extract markedly inhibited macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF/CSF-1)-induced growth of macrophages, whereas it exerted a less potent effect on growth of Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated thymocytes or M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow cells. The inhibition of macrophage growth was caused by a cytotoxic effect rather than a cytostatic effect. Cell death was due to the induction of apoptosis, as judged by staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated d-UTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). The cytotoxic activity seemed to be specific to peripheral macrophages; it showed a weak effect on the growth and survival of tumor cell lines including a macrophage-like cell line, J-774.1. Moreover, the saponin fraction induced apoptotic cell death of macrophages only when they were stimulated by M-CSF; it did not affect the viability of macrophages cultured without M-CSF or with granulocyte/macrophage-CSF. We determined the structures of the two active triterpene saponin compounds in the fraction, named securioside A and securioside B having a 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic group which is essential for the cell death-inducing activity. They are believed to be the primary compounds of new drugs for the treatment of pathological states in which macrophage proliferation occurs. PMID:11606030

  17. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  18. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    PubMed Central

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-01-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus. PMID:6286497

  19. CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophils, alternative macrophage activation, and type 2 cytokine expression in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bolus, W. Reid; Gutierrez, Dario A.; Kennedy, Arion J.; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation during obesity is mediated by immune cells and closely correlates with systemic insulin resistance. In lean AT, eosinophils are present in low but significant numbers and capable of promoting alternative macrophage activation in an IL-4/IL-13-dependent manner. In WT mice, obesity causes the proportion of AT eosinophils to decline, concomitant with inflammation and classical activation of AT macrophages. In this study, we show that CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophil accumulation in AT. Furthermore, in contrast to WT mice, the increase in eosinophils in CCR2−/− AT is sustained and even amplified during obesity. Interestingly, a significant portion of eosinophils is found in CLSs in AT of obese CCR2−/− mice, which is the first time eosinophils have been shown to localize to these inflammatory hot spots. CCR2−/− bone marrow precursors displayed increased expression of various key eosinophil genes during in vitro differentiation to eosinophils, suggesting a potentially altered eosinophil phenotype in the absence of CCR2. In addition, the proportion of eosinophils in AT positively correlated with local expression of Il5, a potent eosinophil stimulator. The increase in eosinophils in CCR2−/− mice was detected in all white fat pads analyzed and in the peritoneal cavity but not in bone marrow, blood, spleen, or liver. In AT of CCR2−/− mice, an increased eosinophil number positively correlated with M2-like macrophages, expression of the Treg marker Foxp3, and type 2 cytokines, Il4, Il5, and Il13. This is the first study to link CCR2 function with regulation of AT eosinophil accumulation. PMID:25934927

  20. Na+ -K+ pump activity in rat peritoneal mast cells: inhibition by extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, T.; Johansen, T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Pure populations of rat peritoneal mast cells were used to study cellular potassium uptake. The radioactive potassium analogue, 86rubidium, was used as a tracer for potassium for measurements of the activity of the cellular potassium uptake process. 2. The ouabain-sensitive and the ouabain-resistant potassium (86rubidium) uptake of mast cells incubated in the presence of calcium, 1 mmol l-1, were very low, 52 and 147 pmol per 10(6) cells min-1. 3. Calcium-deprivation of the cells uncovered a large capacity ouabain-sensitive potassium (86rubidium) uptake mechanism. The activity of the uptake mechanism was decreased by reintroduction of calcium into the cell suspension, and it was dependent on cellular energy metabolism, temperature and pH. 4. The potassium (86rubidium) uptake of mast cells incubated in a calcium-free medium occurs through an active and ouabain-sensitive mechanism that has the nature of an enzyme, and it is mediated by the Na+ -K+ pump located in the plasma membrane. It is demonstrated that the activity of the Na+ -K+ pump mechanism is inhibited by low concentrations of extracellular calcium (0.1-1.2 mmol l-1). The possibility is discussed that calcium-deprivation may increase the pump activity by increasing the permeability of the plasma membrane for Na+. PMID:2743077

  1. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury. PMID:25650776

  2. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  3. Microbiological aspects of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    von Graevenitz, A; Amsterdam, D

    1992-01-01

    The process of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis has provided a useful, relatively inexpensive, and safe alternative for patients with end-stage renal disease. Infectious peritonitis, however, has limited a more widespread acceptance of this technique. The definition of peritonitis in this patient population is not universally accepted and does not always include the laboratory support of a positive culture (or Gram stain). In part, the omission of clinical microbiological findings stems from the lack of sensitivity of earlier microbiological efforts. Peritonitis results from decreased host phagocytic efficiency with depressed phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity of peritoneal macrophages. During episodes of peritonitis, fluid movement is reversed, away from the lymphatics and peritoneal membrane and toward the cavity. As a result, bloodstream infections are rare. Most peritonitis episodes are caused by bacteria. Coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most frequently isolated organisms, usually originating from the skin flora, but a wide array of microbial species have been documented as agents of peritonitis. Clinical microbiology laboratories need to be cognizant of the diverse agents so that appropriate primary media can be used. The quantity of dialysate fluid that is prepared for culture is critical and should constitute at least 10 ml. The sensitivity of the cultural approach depends on the volume of dialysate, its pretreatment (lysis or centrifugation), the media used, and the mode of incubation. The low concentration of microorganisms in dialysate fluids accounts for negative Gram stain results. Prevention of infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients is associated with the socioeconomic status of the patient, advances in equipment (catheter) technology, and, probably least important, the application of prophylactic antimicrobial agents. PMID:1735094

  4. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide activates iron regulatory factor in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Drapier, J C; Hirling, H; Wietzerbin, J; Kaldy, P; Kühn, L C

    1993-09-01

    Biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine modulates activity of iron-dependent enzymes, including mitochondrial acontiase, an [Fe-S] protein. We examined the effect of NO on the activity of iron regulatory factor (IRF), a cytoplasmic protein which modulates both ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability by binding to specific mRNA sequences called iron responsive elements (IREs). Murine macrophages were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide to induce NO synthase activity and cultured in the presence or absence of NG-substituted analogues of L-arginine which served as selective inhibitors of NO synthesis. Measurement of the nitrite concentration in the culture medium was taken as an index of NO production. Mitochondria-free cytosols were then prepared and aconitase activity as well as IRE binding activity and induction of IRE binding activity were correlated and depended on NO synthesis after IFN-gamma and/or LPS stimulation. Authentic NO gas as well as the NO-generating compound 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) also conversely modulated aconitase and IRE binding activities of purified recombinant IRF. These results provide evidence that endogenously produced NO may modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in iron homeostasis and support the hypothesis that the [Fe-S] cluster of IRF mediates iron-dependent regulation. PMID:7504626

  5. In Vitro Study of Cytophysiological Characteristics of Multinuclear Macrophages from Intact and BCG-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Il'in, D A; Arkhipov, S A; Shkurupy, V A

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal macrophages were isolated from intact and BCG-infected BALB/c mice and explanted in vitro. Multinuclear macrophages formed in these cultures differed by the number of nuclei, expression of apoptosis inductors and regulators (TNF-α, p53 protein, caspase 3, and Bcl-2 protein), and cytophysiological characteristics (phagocytic activity, ROS generation, and antimycobacterial properties). Our results indicate that the formation of multinuclear macrophages is accompanied by induction of apoptosis (p53 signaling pathway) and appearance of multinuclear macrophage-derived cells characterized by high phagocytic and antimycobacterial activity. PMID:27021088

  6. Alteration of some cellular function in amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa transfected macrophages: a time dependent approach

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; KarMahapatra, Santanu; Das, Sabyasachi; Roy, Somenath

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the free radical generation and antioxidant enzymes status in murine peritoneal macrophage during in vitro amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ARPA) treatment with different time interval. Methods Peritoneal macrophages were treated with 1×108 CFU/mL ARPA cell suspension in vitro for different time interval (1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h) and super oxide anion generation, NO generation, reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were analyzed. Results Super oxide anion generation and NO generation got peak at 12 h, indicating maximal free radical generation through activation of NADPH oxidase in murine peritoneal macrophages during ARPA transfection. Reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing time of ARPA transfection. All the changes in peritoneal macrophages after 12 h in vitro ARPA transfection had significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusions From this study, it may be summarized that in vitro ARPA infection not only generates excess free radical but also affects the antioxidant system and glutathione cycle in murine peritoneal macrophage. PMID:23569818

  7. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Yukiyo; Hashitani, Susumu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  8. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    TOYOHARA, YUKIYO; HASHITANI, SUSUMU; KISHIMOTO, HIROMITSU; NOGUCHI, KAZUMA; YAMAMOTO, NOBUTO; URADE, MASAHIRO

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  9. [Impact of abdominal cavity open EHF irradiation on activity of adhesive process in peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V V; Ivanova, Iu V; Gamidov, A N; Andreeshchev, S A

    2015-01-01

    In experiment on 45 rats a purulent peritonitis was simulated. There was established, that on background of a standard therapy for peritonitis application of abdominal cavity open irradiation of extreme high frequency (EHF) have promoted rapid stabilization of the lipid metabolism indices and the blood coagulation system, the reduction of intensity of lipids peroxidal oxidation processes and severity of systemic inflammatory reaction. Under the influence of complex treatment the severity of adhesive process was reduced in 5.4 times, comparing with such in animals, to whom a standard treatment was conducted only. The revealed pathogenetic aspects of the adhesions formation witnesses the expediency to add EHF irradiation to complex therapy of peritonitis.

  10. Enhancement of CD4+ T-cell-dependent interleukin-2 production in vitro by murine alveolar macrophages: the role of leukotriene B4.

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, J; Grabowska, A; Bryniarski, K; Chain, B M

    1997-01-01

    Local tissue macrophages are known to play a key role in regulation of adaptive immune responses, often by inhibition of T-cell activation and proliferation. In this study, we compare the influence of alveolar and peritoneal macrophages on T-cell-dependent interleukin-2 (IL-2) release. Alveolar macrophages, in contrast to peritoneal macrophages, enhance IL-2 release. Assay of a panel of potential macrophage-derived mediators indicated that activated alveolar macrophages stimulated greater release of IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and, especially, leukotriene B4 (> 100 times) than activated peritoneal macrophages. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by alveolar macrophages further enhanced the production of IL-2, while inhibition of leukotriene synthesis abolished the enhancement. The addition of exogenous prostaglandin E2 inhibited IL-2 release, while exogenous leukotriene B4 enhanced IL-2 release. When added simultaneously, the two compounds antagonized each other's activity. In conclusion, this study confirms that alveolar macrophages enhance IL-2 secretion, and suggests that this enhancement may be due at least in part to the very high rates of production of leukotriene B4. The overall influence of macrophage populations on T cells in vivo will reflect the complex balance between the multiple mediators produced within the local tissue microenvironment. PMID:9301525

  11. A transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression controls macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Anup; Bose, Mainak; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2013-11-01

    In mammalian macrophages, the expression of a number of cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Upon macrophage activation, proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs are translated, although the expression of miRNAs targeting these mRNAs remains largely unaltered. We show that there is a transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression during the early phase of the inflammatory response in macrophages, which leads to the protection of cytokine mRNAs from miRNA-mediated repression. This derepression occurs through Ago2 phosphorylation, which results in its impaired binding to miRNAs and to the corresponding target mRNAs. Macrophages expressing a mutant, non-phosphorylatable AGO2--which remains bound to miRNAs during macrophage activation--have a weakened inflammatory response and fail to prevent parasite invasion. These findings highlight the relevance of the transient relief of miRNA repression for macrophage function.

  12. Bactericidal Activity of Human Macrophages: Analysis of Factors Influencing the Killing of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Martin J.

    1970-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of listericidal activity of human macrophages grown from blood monocytes. Phagocytosis of Listeria monocytogenes was inhibited by a glycolytic poison (NaF) but was unaffected by anaerobic conditions, cyanide, or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). Killing by macrophages was slower than that by neutrophils, and Listeria phagocytized by macrophages began to synthesize deoxyribonucleic acid within 3 hr of the time of ingestion. Differentiated macrophages ingested and killed more organisms per cell than newly isolated monocytes. Maximal killing of Listeria required oxygen but was unaffected by cyanide or DNP. Macrophages isolated from patients with chronic intracellular infection (leprosy, tuberculosis, fungal diseases) and from patients with active Hodgkin's disease were more bactericidal than macrophages from normal subjects. Images PMID:16557814

  13. Reducing Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis Rate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Anupkumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis is an important negative risk of peritoneal dialysis. Peritonitis results when organisms enter the normally sterile peritoneal space, and the peritoneal immune system is unable to prevent the proliferation of the organisms. Methods The process of reducing the rate of peritonitis includes identification of the need for reducing peritonitis, identification of the cause of the high peritonitis rate through root cause analysis, and intervention. Results Interventions vary depending upon the type of organism causing peritonitis. Nonenterococcal gram-positive peritonitis and Pseudomonas peritonitis are related to contamination and are potentially preventable; enteric peritonitis is difficult to prevent. Conclusion The rate of peritonitis can be reduced through a strong continuous quality improvement team because the majority of peritonitis episodes can be prevented. PMID:25249805

  14. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  15. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, Francois; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  16. Macrophages block insulin action in adipocytes by altering expression of signaling and glucose transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N; Deyoung, Stephanie M; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Obesity leads to a proinflammatory state with immune responses that include infiltration of adipose tissue with macrophages. These macrophages are believed to alter insulin sensitivity in adipocytes, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect have not been characterized. We have explored the interaction between macrophages and adipocytes in the context of both indirect and direct coculture. Macrophage-secreted factors blocked insulin action in adipocytes via downregulation of GLUT4 and IRS-1, leading to a decrease in Akt phosphorylation and impaired insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. GLUT1 was upregulated with a concomitant increase in basal glucose uptake. These changes recapitulate those seen in adipose tissue from insulin-resistant humans and animal models. TNF-alpha-neutralizing antibodies partially reversed the insulin resistance produced by macrophage-conditioned media. Peritoneal macrophages and macrophage-enriched stromal vascular cells from adipose tissue also attenuated responsiveness to insulin in a manner correlating with inflammatory cytokine secretion. Adipose tissue macrophages from obese mice have an F4/80(+)CD11b(+)CD68(+)CD14(-) phenotype and form long cellular extensions in culture. Peritoneal macrophages take on similar characteristics in direct coculture with adipocytes and induce proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that macrophage activation state is influenced by contact with adipocytes. Thus both indirect/secreted and direct/cell contact-mediated factors derived from macrophages influence insulin sensitivity in adipocytes.

  17. Arctigenin ameliorates inflammation in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway and polarizing M1 macrophages to M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hyam, Supriya R; Lee, In-Ah; Gu, Wan; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Jang, Se-Eun; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-05-15

    Seeds of Arctium lappa, containing arctigenin and its glycoside arctiin as main constituents, have been used as a diuretic, anti-inflammatory and detoxifying agent in Chinese traditional medicine. In our preliminary study, arctigenin inhibited IKKβ and NF-κB activation in peptidoglycan (PGN)- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritoneal macrophages. To understand the anti-inflammatory effect of arctigenin, we investigated its anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages and on LPS-induced systemic inflammation as well as 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice. Arctigenin inhibited LPS-increased IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α expression in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages, but increased LPS-reduced IL-10 and CD204 expression. Arctigenin inhibited LPS-induced PI3K, AKT and IKKβ phosphorylation, but did not suppress LPS-induced IRAK-1 phosphorylation. However, arctigenin did not inhibit NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated PI3K siRNA-treated peritoneal macrophages. Arctigenin suppressed the binding of p-PI3K antibody and the nucleus translocation of NF-κB p65 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. Arctigenin suppressed blood IL-1β and TNF-α level in mice systemically inflamed by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Arctigenin also inhibited colon shortening, macroscopic scores and myeloperoxidase activity in TNBS-induced colitic mice. Arctigenin inhibited TNBS-induced IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 expression, as well as PI3K, AKT and IKKβ phosphorylation and NF-κB activation in mice, but increased IL-10 and CD204 expression. However, it did not affect IRAK-1 phosphorylation. Based on these findings, arctigenin may ameliorate inflammatory diseases, such as colitis, by inhibiting PI3K and polarizing M1 macrophages to M2-like macrophages.

  18. Arctigenin ameliorates inflammation in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway and polarizing M1 macrophages to M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hyam, Supriya R; Lee, In-Ah; Gu, Wan; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Jang, Se-Eun; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-05-15

    Seeds of Arctium lappa, containing arctigenin and its glycoside arctiin as main constituents, have been used as a diuretic, anti-inflammatory and detoxifying agent in Chinese traditional medicine. In our preliminary study, arctigenin inhibited IKKβ and NF-κB activation in peptidoglycan (PGN)- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritoneal macrophages. To understand the anti-inflammatory effect of arctigenin, we investigated its anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages and on LPS-induced systemic inflammation as well as 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice. Arctigenin inhibited LPS-increased IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α expression in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages, but increased LPS-reduced IL-10 and CD204 expression. Arctigenin inhibited LPS-induced PI3K, AKT and IKKβ phosphorylation, but did not suppress LPS-induced IRAK-1 phosphorylation. However, arctigenin did not inhibit NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated PI3K siRNA-treated peritoneal macrophages. Arctigenin suppressed the binding of p-PI3K antibody and the nucleus translocation of NF-κB p65 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. Arctigenin suppressed blood IL-1β and TNF-α level in mice systemically inflamed by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Arctigenin also inhibited colon shortening, macroscopic scores and myeloperoxidase activity in TNBS-induced colitic mice. Arctigenin inhibited TNBS-induced IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 expression, as well as PI3K, AKT and IKKβ phosphorylation and NF-κB activation in mice, but increased IL-10 and CD204 expression. However, it did not affect IRAK-1 phosphorylation. Based on these findings, arctigenin may ameliorate inflammatory diseases, such as colitis, by inhibiting PI3K and polarizing M1 macrophages to M2-like macrophages. PMID:23375938

  19. An efferocytosis-induced, IL-4-dependent macrophage-iNKT cell circuit suppresses sterile inflammation and is defective in murine CGD.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Melody Yue; Pham, Duy; Bagaitkar, Juhi; Liu, Jianyun; Otero, Karel; Shan, Ming; Wynn, Thomas A; Brombacher, Frank; Brutkiewicz, Randy R; Kaplan, Mark H; Dinauer, Mary C

    2013-04-25

    Efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages following tissue injury is fundamental to the resolution of inflammation and initiation of tissue repair. Using a sterile peritonitis model in mice, we identified interleukin (IL)-4-producing efferocytosing macrophages in the peritoneum that activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to produce cytokines including IL-4, IL-13, and interferon-γ. Importantly, IL-4 from macrophages contributes to alternative activation of peritoneal exudate macrophages and augments type 2 cytokine production from NKT cells to suppress inflammation. The increased peritonitis in mice deficient in IL-4, NKT cells, or IL-4Rα expression on myeloid cells suggested that each is a key component for resolution of sterile inflammation. The reduced NAD phosphate oxidase is also critical for this model, because in mice with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) that lack oxidase subunits, activation of iNKT cells by X-CGD peritoneal exudate macrophages was impaired during sterile peritonitis, resulting in enhanced and prolonged inflammation in these mice. Therefore, efferocytosis-induced IL-4 production and activation of IL-4-producing iNKT cells by macrophages are immunomodulatory events in an innate immune circuit required to resolve sterile inflammation and promote tissue repair.

  20. Critical illness induces alternative activation of M2 macrophages in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We recently reported macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue of critically ill patients. Classically activated macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue is a known feature of obesity, where it is linked with increasing insulin resistance. However, the characteristics of adipose tissue macrophage accumulation in critical illness remain unknown. Methods We studied macrophage markers with immunostaining and gene expression in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue from healthy control subjects (n = 20) and non-surviving prolonged critically ill patients (n = 61). For comparison, also subcutaneous in vivo adipose tissue biopsies were studied from 15 prolonged critically ill patients. Results Subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue biopsies from non-surviving prolonged critically ill patients displayed a large increase in macrophage staining. This staining corresponded with elevated gene expression of "alternatively activated" M2 macrophage markers arginase-1, IL-10 and CD163 and low levels of the "classically activated" M1 macrophage markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS). Immunostaining for CD163 confirmed positive M2 macrophage staining in both visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from critically ill patients. Surprisingly, circulating levels and tissue gene expression of the alternative M2 activators IL-4 and IL-13 were low and not different from controls. In contrast, adipose tissue protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor required for M2 differentiation and acting downstream of IL-4, was markedly elevated in illness. In subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies from surviving critically ill patients, we could confirm positive macrophage staining with CD68 and CD163. We also could confirm elevated arginase-1 gene expression and elevated PPARγ protein levels. Conclusions Unlike obesity, critical illness evokes adipose tissue

  1. Macrophage activity and histopathology of the lymphohematopoietic organs in male Wistar rats orally exposed to single or mixed pesticides.

    PubMed

    De Camargo, Marcela Rodrigues; Barbisan, Luís Fernando; Martinez, Meire França; Da Silva Franchi, Carla Adriene; De Camargo, João Lauro Viana; Spinardi-Barbisan, Ana Lúcia Tozzi

    2013-01-01

    The noxious effects of low or effective dose exposure to single or mixed pesticides on macrophage activity and the lymphohematopoietic organs were investigated. Male Wistar rats were orally exposed to dichlorvos, dicofol, endosulfan, dieldrin and permethrin, either as single or combined mixtures during a 28-day study containing eight groups: one group received a semipurified diet (non-treated); two groups received a semipurified diet containing low dose mixture (dieldrin 0.025 mg/kg, endosulfan, 0.6 mg/kg, dicofol 0.22 mg/kg, dichlorvos 0.23 mg/kg, permethrin 5 mg/kg) or an effective dose mixture (dichlorvos 2.3 mg/kg, dicofol 2.5 mg/kg, endosulfan 2.9 mg/kg, dieldrin 0.05 mg/kg and permethrin 25.0 mg/kg), respectively; the other five groups received a semipurified diet containing each single pesticide in effective doses. At sacrifice, the thymus, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, Payer's patches and bone marrow were removed for histological analysis. Peritoneal macrophages were obtained to determine the phagocytosis and spreading indexes and tumoral necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO) and H₂O₂ production. Exposure to pesticide mixtures did not alter the percentage of macrophage phagocytosis and spreading, TNF-α production or the NO and H₂O₂ release when compared to the non-treated group. Neither was there any apparent evidence that a pesticide mixture at low or effective doses altered the histological structure of the lymphohematopoietic organs. The findings indicate that short-term treatment with pesticide mixtures did not induce an apparent immunotoxic effect in male Wistar rats.

  2. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H.; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the “pro-tumourigenic” effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation. Macrophages promote “pro-tumourigenic” cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the “pro-tumourigenic” characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  3. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  4. Effects of endogenous antidiuretic hormone (ADH) on macrophage phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Repollet, E.; Opava-Stitzer, S.; Tiffany, S.; Schwartz, A.

    1983-07-01

    Although several studies have indicated that antidiuretic hormone (ADH) enhances the phagocytic function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in shock syndromes, it remains unknown what influence ADH exerts upon the individual phagocytic components of this system. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effects of endogenous ADH on the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophage cells. As a phagocytic stimuli, fluorescent methacrylate microbeads were injected intraperitoneally into Brattleboro (ADH deficient) and normal Long Evans rats in the presence and absence of exogenous ADH. Peritoneal cells were harvested 19-22 hr after the administration of the microbeads and the percent phagocytosis was determined in macrophage cells using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Our results indicate that the percentage of peritoneal macrophages ingesting the fluorescent methacrylate microbeads was significantly reduced in the absence of ADH (Brattleboro rats: 5.4 +/- 0.6% versus Long Evans rats: 16.8 +/- 2.3%; p less than 0.001). In addition, our data demonstrate that exogenous administration of ADH significantly enhanced macrophage phagocytosis in Brattleboro (14.7 +/- 2.2%) and normal Long Evans (49.6 +/- 4.5%) rats. These data suggest, for the first time, that endogenous ADH might play a modulatory role in the phagocytic activity of a specific component of the RES, namely, the macrophage cell.

  5. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  6. Macrophage Infiltration and Alternative Activation during Wound Healing Promote MEK1-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christine; Telerman, Stephanie B; Reimer, Andreas S; Sequeira, Ines; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Arwert, Esther N; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-02-15

    Macrophages are essential for the progression and maintenance of many cancers, but their role during the earliest stages of tumor formation is unclear. To test this, we used a previously described transgenic mouse model of wound-induced skin tumorigenesis, in which expression of constitutively active MEK1 in differentiating epidermal cells results in chronic inflammation (InvEE mice). Upon wounding, the number of epidermal and dermal monocytes and macrophages increased in wild-type and InvEE skin, but the increase was greater, more rapid, and more sustained in InvEE skin. Macrophage ablation reduced tumor incidence. Furthermore, bioluminescent imaging in live mice to monitor macrophage flux at wound sites revealed that macrophage accumulation was predictive of tumor formation; wounds with the greatest number of macrophages at day 5 went on to develop tumors. Gene expression profiling of flow-sorted monocytes, macrophages, and T cells from InvEE and wild-type skin showed that as wound healing progressed, InvEE macrophages altered their phenotype. Throughout wound healing and after wound closure, InvEE macrophages demonstrated sustained upregulation of several markers implicated in alternative macrophage activation including arginase-1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor (CD206). Notably, inhibition of ARG1 activity significantly reduced tumor formation and epidermal proliferation in vivo, whereas addition of L-arginase to cultured keratinocytes stimulated proliferation. We conclude that macrophages play a key role in early, inflammation-mediated skin tumorigenesis, with mechanistic evidence suggesting that ARG1 secretion drives tumor development by stimulating epidermal cell proliferation. These findings highlight the importance of cancer immunotherapies aiming to polarize tumor-associated macrophages toward an antitumor phenotype. PMID:26754935

  7. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of Dasyphyllum brasiliensis (Asteraceae) on acute peritonitis induced by beta-glucan from Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Castelucci, Simone; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Ambrosio, Sérgio Ricardo; Arakawa, Nilton Syogo; de Lira, Simone Possedente; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2007-05-30

    The tea prepared from leaves and thorns of Dasyphyllum brasiliensis (Asteraceae) is used in the traditional medicine in Brazil for the treatment of oral and oropharyngeal diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of this plant. The aqueous crude extract (ACE), the methanol-water (MeOH-H(2)O) fraction obtained by solvent partition and its fractionation products were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activities on acute peritonitis induced by beta-glucan from the cell walls of Histoplasma capsulatum. The antiedematogenic activity was also tested using the carrageenan-induced paw edema assay in mice. Oral administration of 100 and 300mg/kg of the ACE in mice caused a significant reduction of neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment in the acute peritonitis assay. In addition, ACE at 300mg/kg inhibited the number of mononuclear cells recruitment. The MeOH-H(2)O fraction and its fractionation products (all at 100mg/kg) also presented anti-inflammatory activities, confirmed by the inhibition of cells recruited to the peritoneal cavity. ACE at 100mg/kg did not show any significant reduction of the edema in the mice paw injected with carrageenan. These data together suggest that Dasyphyllum brasiliensis presents significant anti-inflammatory activity, thus supporting the popular use of the tea in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  9. Prostaglandins from Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α/Cyclooxygenase-1 Pathway and Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases Regulate Gene Expression in Candida albicans-infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Jayaraja, Sabarirajan; Suram, Saritha; Murphy, Robert C; Leslie, Christina C

    2016-03-25

    In Candida albicans-infected resident peritoneal macrophages, activation of group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2(cPLA2α) by calcium- and mitogen-activated protein kinases triggers the rapid production of prostaglandins I2 and E2 through cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and regulates gene expression by increasing cAMP. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages, expression ofI l10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2 was lower, and expression ofTnfα was higher, than in wild type macrophages. Expression was reconstituted with 8-bromo-cAMP, the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP, and agonists for prostaglandin receptors IP, EP2, and EP4 in infected but not uninfected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(+/+)macrophages, COX-2 expression was blocked by IP, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both prostaglandin I2 and E2 Activation of ERKs and p38, but not JNKs, by C. albicansacted synergistically with prostaglandins to induce expression of Il10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2. Tnfα expression required activation of ERKs and p38 but was suppressed by cAMP. Results using cAMP analogues that activate PKA or Epacs suggested that cAMP regulates gene expression through PKA. However, phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), the cAMP-regulated transcription factor involved inIl10,Nr4a2,Ptgs2, andTnfα expression, was not mediated by cAMP/PKA because it was similar inC. albicans-infected wild type and cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. CREB phosphorylation was blocked by p38 inhibitors and induced by the p38 activator anisomycin but not by the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP. Therefore, MAPK activation inC. albicans-infected macrophages plays a dual role by promoting the cPLA2α/prostaglandin/cAMP/PKA pathway and CREB phosphorylation that coordinately regulate immediate early gene expression.

  10. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  11. Chemotactic activity from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils. Lack of identity with N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-napthyl esterase.

    PubMed

    Tsung, P K; Showell, H J; Kegeles, S W; Becker, E L

    1976-08-12

    The chemotactic and N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-naphthyl esterase activities of rabbit peritoneal neutrophils are separable from each other by both DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. Partially purified esterase obtained from DEAE-cellulose chromatography had molecular weight of 70 000. However, the partially purified fraction contained chemotactic activities with major activity in molecular weight of 28000 and minor activities in the molecular weights of 45000, 21900, 14500 and 10500. Esterase activity is inhibited by 10(-7) M p-nitrophenylethyl-5-chloropentylphosphonate but chemotactic activity is not.

  12. Cell Motility Is Decreased in Macrophages Activated by Cancer Cell-Conditioned Medium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ahreum; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Lee, Jae-Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immune responses to various foreign antigens. Many products from primary tumors influence the activation and transmigration of macrophages. Here, we investigated a migration of macrophages stimulated with cancer cell culture-conditioned medium (CM). Macrophage activation by treatment with CM of B16F10 cells were judged by the increase in protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). The location where macrophages were at 4 h-incubation with control medium or CM was different from where they were at 5 h-incubation in culture dish. Percentage of superimposed macrophages at every 1 h interval was gradually increased by CM treatment as compared to control. Total coverage of migrated track expressed in coordinates was smaller and total distance of migration was shorter in CM-treated macrophages than that in control. Rac1 activity in CM-treated macrophages was also decreased as compared to that in control. When macrophages were treated with CM in the presence of dexamethasone (Dex), an increase in COX2 protein levels, and a decrease in Rac1 activity and total coverage of migration were reversed. In the meanwhile, biphasic changes were detected by Dex treatment in section distance of migration at each time interval, which was more decreased at early time and then increased at later time. Taken together, data demonstrate that macrophage motility could be reduced in accordance with activation in response to cancer cell products. It suggests that macrophage motility could be a novel marker to monitor cancer-associated inflammatory diseases and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24404340

  13. Immunologic Effects Of Peritoneal Photodynamic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, David H.; Haddad, Sandra; Jolles, Christopher J.; King, Vernon J.; Ott, Mark J.; Robertson, Bekkie; Straight, Richard C.

    1989-06-01

    One of the side effects of peritoneal photodynamic treatment (PDT) of mice is a systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CH) responses. Treatment with either laser alone or the photosensitizer, Photofrin II (PFII), alone does not cause suppression of CH responses. Immunosuppression of CH responses is an active process that is adoptively transferable using viable cells, but not serum, from PDT-treated mice. The induction of adoptively transferable suppressor cells in PDT-treated mice requires exposure to an antigenic stimulus, yet the suppressor cells are antigen non-specific in their function. T cell function in PDT-treated mice, as measured by the ability of splenic lymphoid cells to generate allogeneic cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, is comparable to that detected in normal mice. However, the ability of spleen cells from PDT-treated mice to act as stimulators in a mixed lymhocyte reaction is dramatically impaired, suggesting that the major cell type affected by peritoneal PDT is of the macrophage lineage. Support for this concept is provided by experiments in which spleen cells from PDT-treated mice were chromatographically separated into populations of T cells, B cells and macrophages prior to adoptive transfer into naive recipients. The results indicate that the cell type mediating adoptively transferable suppression of CH responsiveness is of the macrophage lineage. Analysis of hematologic parameters revealed that induction of suppression by PDT-treatment was associated with a marked neutrophilia and lymphocytosis, and was also accompanied by a 5-fold increase in concentration of the acute phase protein, Serum Amyloid P. Finally, attempts to ameliorate PDT-induced immunosuppression by pharmacologic intervention have proved successful using implants of pellets that release indomethacin at a rate of 1.25µg/day. Thus, the data suggest that PDT-treatment induces macrophages to produce factors (e.g., prostaglandins) that are known to be potently

  14. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in β-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPARγ ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis.

  15. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  16. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  17. Regulation of Macrophage Motility by the Water Channel Aquaporin-1: Crucial Role of M0/M2 Phenotype Switch

    PubMed Central

    Tyteca, Donatienne; Nishino, Tomoya; Debaix, Huguette; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N'Kuli, Francisca; Hoffmann, Delia; Cnops, Yvette; Rabolli, Virginie; van Loo, Geert; Beyaert, Rudi; Huaux, François; Devuyst, Olivier; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) promotes migration of many cell types. Although AQP1 is expressed in macrophages, its potential role in macrophage motility, particularly in relation with phenotype polarization, remains unknown. We here addressed these issues in peritoneal macrophages isolated from AQP1-deficient mice, either undifferentiated (M0) or stimulated with LPS to orientate towards pro-inflammatory phenotype (classical macrophage activation; M1). In non-stimulated macrophages, ablation of AQP1 (like inhibition by HgCl2) increased by 2–3 fold spontaneous migration in a Src/PI3K/Rac-dependent manner. This correlated with cell elongation and formation of lamellipodia/ruffles, resulting in membrane lipid and F4/80 recruitment to the leading edge. This indicated that AQP1 normally suppresses migration of resting macrophages, as opposed to other cell types. Resting Aqp1-/- macrophages exhibited CD206 redistribution into ruffles and increased arginase activity like IL4/IL13 (alternative macrophage activation; M2), indicating a M0-M2 shift. In contrast, upon M1 orientation by LPS in vitro or peritoneal inflammation in vivo, migration of Aqp1-/- macrophages was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that AQP1 oppositely regulates macrophage migration, depending on stimulation or not by LPS, and that macrophage phenotypic and migratory changes may be regulated independently of external cues. PMID:25719758

  18. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1β (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NFκB pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  19. Human macrophage activation. Modulation of mannosyl, fucosyl receptor activity in vitro by lymphokines, gamma and alpha interferons, and dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Mokoena, T; Gordon, S

    1985-01-01

    We describe a sensitive assay to measure immune activation of human macrophages in cell culture. Freshly isolated blood monocytes from normal subjects lack the ability to endocytose and degrade mannosyl-terminated glycoconjugates via specific receptors, but acquired this activity after cultivation in autologous serum for approximately 3 d. Addition of specific antigen, purified protein derivative, or T cell mitogens to mononuclear cells prevented the appearance of macrophage mannosyl receptor activity and lymphokine, gamma-, and alpha-interferons selectively down-regulated receptor activity in monocyte-macrophage targets. The effects of antigen challenge and gamma-interferon on mannosyl receptors can be prevented by 10(-8) M dexamethasone. Dexamethasone also inhibited release of another macrophage activation marker, plasminogen activator, which was increased by both gamma- and alpha-interferons. These studies show that activation of human macrophages is regulated by opposing actions of lymphokines and glucocorticoids. PMID:2579101

  20. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology.

    PubMed

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  2. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  3. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  4. Macrophage activation and its role in repair and pathology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Zhang, Bei

    2015-09-01

    The injured spinal cord does not heal properly. In contrast, tissue repair and functional recovery occur after skin or muscle injuries. The reason for this dichotomy in wound repair is unclear but inflammation, and specifically macrophage activation, likely plays a key role. Macrophages have the ability to promote the repair of injured tissue by regulating transitions through different phase of the healing response. In the current review we compare and contrast the healing and inflammatory responses between spinal cord injuries and tissues that undergo complete wound resolution. Through this comparison, we identify key macrophage phenotypes that are inaptly triggered or absent after spinal cord injury and discuss spinal cord stimuli that contribute to this maladaptive response. Sequential activation of classic, pro-inflammatory, M1 macrophages and alternatively activated, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages occurs during normal healing and facilitates transitions through the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of repair. In contrast, in the injured spinal cord, pro-inflammatory macrophages potentiate a prolonged inflammatory phase and remodeling is not properly initiated. The desynchronized macrophage activation after spinal cord injury is reminiscent of the inflammation present in chronic, non-healing wounds. By refining the role macrophages play in spinal cord injury repair we bring to light important areas for future neuroinflammation and neurotrauma research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury.

  5. Houttuynia cordata Thunb. volatile oil exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and inhibited nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Fan, Ting; Zhang, Yanmin; Fan, Te; Zhou, Ping; Niu, Xiaofeng; He, Langchong

    2013-11-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HC) is a medicinal herb that generally used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating allergic inflammation. The present study investigated the inhibitory effect of the volatile oil from HC Thunb. on animal models of inflammation and the production of inflammatory mediators in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, xylene-induced mouse ear edema, formaldehyde-induced paw edema and carrageenan-induced mice paw edema were significantly decreased by HC volatile oil. HC volatile oil showed pronounced inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) E2 and malondialdehyde production in the edematous exudates. In vitro exposure of mouse resident peritoneal macrophages to 1, 10, 100 and 1000 µg/mL of HC volatile oil significantly suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated production of NO and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to HC volatile oil had no effect on cell viability and systemic toxicity. Furthermore, HC volatile oil inhibited the production of NO and TNF-α by down-regulating LPS-stimulated iNOS and TNF-α mRNA expression. Western blot analysis showed that HC volatile oil attenuated LPS-stimulated synthesis of iNOS and TNF-α protein in the macrophages, in parallel. These findings add a novel aspect to the biological profile of HC and clarify its anti-inflammatory mechanism. PMID:23280586

  6. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4– and IL-13–stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Binger, Katrina J.; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A.; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D.; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N.

    2015-01-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt–induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  7. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4- and IL-13-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N

    2015-11-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt-induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis.

  8. Plutonium behavior after pulmonary administration according to solubility properties, and consequences on alveolar macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Van der Meeren, Anne; Gremy, Olivier; Renault, Daniel; Miroux, Amandine; Bruel, Sylvie; Griffiths, Nina; Tourdes, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The physico-chemical form in which plutonium enters the body influences the lung distribution and the transfer rate from lungs to blood. In the present study, we evaluated the early lung damage and macrophage activation after pulmonary contamination of plutonium of various preparation modes which produce different solubility and distribution patterns. Whatever the solubility properties of the contaminant, macrophages represent a major retention compartment in lungs, with 42 to 67% of the activity from broncho-alveolar lavages being associated with macrophages 14 days post-contamination. Lung changes were observed 2 and 6 weeks post-contamination, showing inflammatory lesions and accumulation of activated macrophages (CD68 positive) in plutonium-contaminated rats, although no increased proliferation of pneumocytes II (TTF-1 positive cells) was found. In addition, acid phosphatase activity in macrophages from contaminated rats was enhanced 2 weeks post-contamination as compared to sham groups, as well as inflammatory mediator levels (TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1) in macrophage culture supernatants. Correlating with the decrease in activity remaining in macrophages after plutonium contamination, inflammatory mediator production returned to basal levels 6 weeks post-exposure. The production of chemokines by macrophages was evaluated after contamination with Pu of increasing solubility. No correlation was found between the solubility properties of Pu and the activation level of macrophages. In summary, our data indicate that, despite the higher solubility of plutonium citrate or nitrate as compared to preformed colloids or oxides, macrophages remain the main lung target after plutonium contamination and may participate in the early pulmonary damage.

  9. Peritonitis - secondary

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure. Tests may include: Blood culture Blood chemistry, including pancreatic enzymes Complete blood count Liver and kidney function tests X-rays or CT scan Peritoneal fluid culture Urinalysis

  10. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  11. Morphine Modulates Interleukin-4- or Breast Cancer Cell-induced Pro-metastatic Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment play a key role in the control of invasiveness, metastasis and angiogenesis. Macrophages display a range of activation states in specific pathological contexts and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages can promote tumour aggressiveness. Opioids are able to modulate tumour growth and metastasis. We tested whether morphine modulates the activation of macrophages induced by (i) interleukin-4 (IL-4), the prototypical M2 polarization-inducing cytokine, or (ii) coculture with breast cancer cells. We showed that IL-4 causes increased MMP-9 production and expression of the alternative activation markers arginase-1 and MRC-1. Morphine prevented IL-4-induced increase in MMP-9 in a naloxone- and methylnaltrexone-reversible fashion. Morphine also prevented IL-4-elicited alternative activation of RAW264.7 macrophages. Expression of MMP-9 and arginase-1 were increased when RAW264.7 were subjected to paracrine activation by 4T1 cells, and this effect was prevented by morphine via an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism. Morphine further decreased 4T1 breast cancer cell invasion elicited by co-culture with RAW264.7. Reduction of MMP-9 expression and alternative activation of macrophages by morphine was confirmed using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that morphine may modulate tumour aggressiveness by regulating macrophage protease production and M2 polarization within the tumour microenvironment.

  12. GEC-derived SFRP5 inhibits Wnt5a-induced macrophage chemotaxis and activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenghai; Bu, Xianmin; Wang, Wei; Ma, Tingxian; Ma, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant macrophage infiltration and activation has been implicated in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis. Overexpression of Wnt5a and downregulation of SFRP5, a Wnt5a antagonist, were both observed in gastric cancers recently. This study attempted to explore whether Wnt5a/SFRP5 axis was involved in macrophage chemotaxis and activation. It was found that both Wnt5a transfection and recombinant Wnt5a (rWnt5a) treatment upregulated CCL2 expression in macrophages, involving JNK and NFκB signals. Conditioned medium from Wnt5a-treated macrophages promoted macrophage chemotaxis mainly dependent on CCL2. SFRP5 from gastric epithelial cells (GECs) inhibited Wnt5a-induced CCL2 expression and macrophage chemotaxis. In addition, Wnt5a treatment stimulated macrophages to produce inflammatory cytokines and COX-2/PGE2, which was also suppressed by SFRP5 from GECs. These results demonstrate that Wnt5a induces macrophage chemotaxis and activation, which can be blocked by GEC-derived SFRP5, suggesting that Wnt5a overproduction and SFRP5 deficiency in gastric mucosa may together play an important role in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis.

  13. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Previtera, Michelle L.; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow–derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness–regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p–NF–κB p65, MyD88, and p–IκBα expression as well as p–NF–κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  14. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness-regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p-NF-κB p65, MyD88, and p-IκBα expression as well as p-NF-κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  15. Cathepsin Activity-Based Probes and Inhibitor for Preclinical Atherosclerosis Imaging and Macrophage Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elrahman, Ihab; Kosuge, Hisanori; Wises Sadan, Tommy; Ben-Nun, Yael; Meir, Karen; Rubinstein, Chen; Bogyo, Matthew; McConnell, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, mainly due to an increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis characterized by inflammatory plaques. Plaques with high levels of macrophage infiltration are considered “vulnerable” while those that do not have significant inflammation are considered stable; cathepsin protease activity is highly elevated in macrophages of vulnerable plaques and contributes to plaque instability. Establishing novel tools for non-invasive molecular imaging of macrophages in plaques could aid in preclinical studies and evaluation of therapeutics. Furthermore, compounds that reduce the macrophage content within plaques should ultimately impact care for this disease. Methods We have applied quenched fluorescent cathepsin activity-based probes (ABPs) to a murine atherosclerosis model and evaluated their use for in vivo imaging using fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT), as well as ex vivo fluorescence imaging and fluorescent microscopy. Additionally, freshly dissected human carotid plaques were treated with our potent cathepsin inhibitor and macrophage apoptosis was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy. Results We demonstrate that our ABPs accurately detect murine atherosclerotic plaques non-invasively, identifying cathepsin activity within plaque macrophages. In addition, our cathepsin inhibitor selectively induced cell apoptosis of 55%±10% of the macrophage within excised human atherosclerotic plaques. Conclusions Cathepsin ABPs present a rapid diagnostic tool for macrophage detection in atherosclerotic plaque. Our inhibitor confirms cathepsin-targeting as a promising approach to treat atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. PMID:27532109

  16. Pharmacological Inhibition of Gal-3 in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Their Capacity to Promote Alternative Activation of Macrophages in Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Simovic Markovic, Bojana; Nikolic, Aleksandar; Gazdic, Marina; Nurkovic, Jasmin; Djordjevic, Irena; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Lukic, Miodrag L.; Volarevic, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduces the severity of dextran sulphate sodium- (DSS-) induced colitis. MSCs are able to secrete Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a protein known to affect proliferation, adhesion, and migration of immune cells. We investigate whether newly synthetized inhibitor of Gal-3 (Davanat) will affect production of Gal-3 in MSCs and enhance their potential to attenuate DSS-induced colitis. Pharmacological inhibition of Gal-3 in MSCs enhances their capacity to promote alternative activation of peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Injection of MSCs cultured in the presence of Davanat increased concentration of IL-10 in sera of DSS-treated animals and markedly enhanced presence of alternatively activated and IL-10 producing macrophages in the colons of DSS-treated mice. Pharmacological inhibition of Gal-3 in MSCs significantly attenuates concentration of Gal-3 in sera of DSS-treated animals, indicating that MSCs produce Gal-3 in this disease. In conclusion, our findings indicate that Davanat could be used for improvement of MSC-mediated polarization towards immunosuppressive M2 phenotype of macrophages. PMID:27057168

  17. Pterins inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; van Overveld, F. J.; Bult, H.; Vermeire, P. A.; Herman, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. The synthesis of nitrite and citrulline from L-arginine by immune-stimulated rat alveolar macrophages and the modulation of this synthesis were studied. 2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP), 6R-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) and L-sepiapterin were potent inhibitors of the recombinant interferon-gamma induced production of nitrogen oxides in intact cultured cells with I50 values for BH4 and L-sepiapterin of approximately 10 microM. They were equally effective in inhibiting the induced production of citrulline. This inhibitory effect was concentration-dependent for all three modulators investigated. 2. The inhibitory effects were not dependent on incubation times of either 24 or 48 h, on the immune-stimulus used (lipopolysaccharide, interferon-gamma), or whether these stimuli were added during or after the induction period. 3. Pterin-6-carboxylic acid (PCA), which cannot be converted into BH4, and methotrexate (MTX), which inhibits dihydrofolatereductase but not de novo biosynthesis of BH4, did not change the production of nitrite. 4. The data indicate that DAHP, an inhibitor of the de novo biosynthesis of the co-factor BH4, blocks the nitric oxide synthase activity in intact cells. Since the pterins BH4 and L-sepiapterin blocked the L-arginine dependent production of nitrite and citrulline, the activity of nitric oxide synthase in phagocytic cells may be regulated by metabolic endproducts of the de novo biosynthesis of BH4. PMID:1281717

  18. The active enhancer network operated by liganded RXR supports angiogenic activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bence; Hah, Nasun; Horvath, Attila; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Poliska, Szilard; Gyuris, Tibor; Keirsse, Jiri; Gysemans, Conny; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Balint, Balint L.; Evans, Ronald M.; Barta, Endre; Nagy, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    RXR signaling is predicted to have a major impact in macrophages, but neither the biological consequence nor the genomic basis of its ligand activation is known. Comprehensive genome-wide studies were carried out to map liganded RXR-mediated transcriptional changes, active binding sites, and cistromic interactions in the context of the macrophage genome architecture. The macrophage RXR cistrome has 5200 genomic binding sites, which are not impacted by ligand. Active enhancers are characterized by PU.1 binding, an increase of enhancer RNA, and P300 recruitment. Using these features, 387 liganded RXR-bound enhancers were linked to 226 genes, which predominantly reside in CTCF/cohesin-limited functional domains. These findings were molecularly validated using chromosome conformation capture (3C) and 3C combined with sequencing (3C-seq), and we show that selected long-range enhancers communicate with promoters via stable or RXR-induced loops and that some of the enhancers interact with each other, forming an interchromosomal network. A set of angiogenic genes, including Vegfa, has liganded RXR-controlled enhancers and provides the macrophage with a novel inducible program. PMID:25030696

  19. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-08-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP‑1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP‑1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12‑myristate 13‑acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co‑localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN‑γ stimulation‑induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  20. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  1. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W; Abraham, Nader G; Schwartzman, Michal L

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2(-/-) mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2(-/-) macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that HO-2-deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2(-/-) cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.

  2. Interferon-γ regulates cellular metabolism and mRNA translation to potentiate macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaodi; Yu, Yingpu; Zhong, Yi; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Hu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hui; Cross, Justin R; Rätsch, Gunnar; Rice, Charles M; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2015-08-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) primes macrophages for enhanced microbial killing and inflammatory activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), but little is known about the regulation of cell metabolism or mRNA translation during this priming. We found that IFN-γ regulated the metabolism and mRNA translation of human macrophages by targeting the kinases mTORC1 and MNK, both of which converge on the selective regulator of translation initiation eIF4E. Physiological downregulation of mTORC1 by IFN-γ was associated with autophagy and translational suppression of repressors of inflammation such as HES1. Genome-wide ribosome profiling in TLR2-stimulated macrophages showed that IFN-γ selectively modulated the macrophage translatome to promote inflammation, further reprogram metabolic pathways and modulate protein synthesis. These results show that IFN-γ-mediated metabolic reprogramming and translational regulation are key components of classical inflammatory macrophage activation.

  3. Alternative activation deprives macrophages of a coordinated defense program to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Antje; Seiler, Peter; Stein, Maik; Bandermann, Silke; Hahnke, Karin; Mollenkopf, Hans; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2006-03-01

    A potent Th1 immune response is critical to the control of tuberculosis. The impact of an additive Th2 response on the course of disease has so far been insufficiently characterized, despite increased morbidity after co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Th2-eliciting helminths and possible involvement of Th2 polarization in reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Here, we describe the gene expression profile of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages alternatively activated by IL-4 in response to infection with M. tuberculosis. Comparison of transcriptional profiles of infected IL-4- and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages revealed delayed and partially diminished responses to intracellular bacteria in alternatively activated macrophages, characterized by reduced exposure to nitrosative stress and increased iron availability, respectively. Alternative activation of host macrophages correlated with elevated expression of the M. tuberculosis iron storage protein bacterioferritin as well as reduced expression of the mycobactin synthesis genes mbtI and mbtJ. The extracellular matrix-remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 was induced in alternatively activated macrophages in vitro, and MMP-12-expressing macrophages were abundant at late, but not early, stages of tuberculosis in murine lungs. Our findings emphasize that alternative activation deprives macrophages of control mechanisms that limit mycobacterial growth in vivo, thus supporting intracellular persistence of M. tuberculosis. PMID:16479545

  4. The monoclonal antibody ER-BMDM1 recognizes a macrophage and dendritic cell differentiation antigen with aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Leenen, P J; Melis, M; Kraal, G; Hoogeveen, A T; Van Ewijk, W

    1992-06-01

    Here we describe the reactivity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) ER-BMDM1, directed against a 160-kDa cell membrane-associated antigen (Ag) with amino-peptidase activity. The aminopeptidase recognized by ER-BMDM1 is present on various mouse macrophage (M phi) and dendritic cell (DC) subpopulations as well as on microvillous epithelia. Analysis of ER-BMDM1 Ag expression in in vitro models of M phi maturation revealed that the Ag is expressed at increasing levels upon maturation of M phi. In vivo, high level expression of the ER-BMDM1 Ag occurs after the monocytic stage of maturation, since bone marrow cells and peripheral blood monocytes are essentially ER-BMDM1 negative. Analysis of isolated-resident and elicited M phi populations showed that ER-BMDM1 recognizes a specific subpopulation of mature M phi: only some resident peritoneal and alveolar M phi are ER-BMDM1 positive, whereas virtually all thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal exudate M phi bind the mAb. In lymphoid organs, a subpopulation of M phi is recognized as well as interdigitating cells (IDC) located in T cell areas. Phenotypic analysis of isolated DC--the in vitro equivalents of IDC--from spleen and lymph nodes confirmed that the majority of this important antigen-presenting cell population expresses the ER-BMDM1 aminopeptidase. The molecular characteristics of the ER-BMDM1 Ag suggest that it may represent the mouse homolog of human CD13.

  5. Dysfunctional CFTR alters the bactericidal activity of human macrophages against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Del Porto, Paola; Cifani, Noemi; Guarnieri, Simone; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Mariggiò, Maria A; Spadaro, Francesca; Guglietta, Silvia; Anile, Marco; Venuta, Federico; Quattrucci, Serena; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the lung, as a consequence of persistent bacterial infections by several opportunistic pathogens represents the main cause of mortality and morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Mechanisms leading to increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in CF are not completely known, although the involvement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in microbicidal functions of macrophages is emerging. Tissue macrophages differentiate in situ from infiltrating monocytes, additionally, mature macrophages from different tissues, although having a number of common activities, exhibit variation in some molecular and cellular functions. In order to highlight possible intrinsic macrophage defects due to CFTR dysfunction, we have focused our attention on in vitro differentiated macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes. Here we report on the contribution of CFTR in the bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa of monocyte derived human macrophages. At first, by real time PCR, immunofluorescence and patch clamp recordings we demonstrated that CFTR is expressed and is mainly localized to surface plasma membranes of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) where it acts as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel. Next, we evaluated the bactericidal activity of P. aeruginosa infected macrophages from healthy donors and CF patients by antibiotic protection assays. Our results demonstrate that control and CF macrophages do not differ in the phagocytic activity when infected with P. aeruginosa. Rather, although a reduction of intracellular live bacteria was detected in both non-CF and CF cells, the percentage of surviving bacteria was significantly higher in CF cells. These findings further support the role of CFTR in the fundamental functions of innate immune cells including eradication of bacterial infections by macrophages.

  6. Glucocorticoid-induced impairment of macrophage antimicrobial activity: mechanisms and dependence on the state of activation.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, A; Schaffner, T

    1987-01-01

    Experimental observations indicate that tissue macrophages deployed in great numbers at critical anatomic sites such as the liver, spleen, and lung are major targets for glucocorticoids compromising natural resistance of the host. Therapeutic concentrations of glucocorticoids appear to prevent destruction of microorganisms ingested by macrophages without interfering with phagocytosis, phagolysosomal fusion, and/or secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates. These findings indicate that at the cellular level the glucocorticoid target should be sought for in the nonoxidative armature of the phagocyte and that nonoxidative killing systems of resident tissue macrophages play an important role in natural resistance to opportunistic pathogens. Glucocorticoids do not prevent lymphokine-induced activation of oxidative killing systems. Thus, lymphokines such as interferon-gamma can restore the microbicidal activity of macrophages functionally impaired by glucocorticoids. Counterbalance of the suppressive effect of glucocorticoids by lymphokines might only be possible, however, for pathogens susceptible to oxidative killing and not for microorganisms that are more resistant to reactive oxygen intermediates such as Aspergillus spores and Nocardia, opportunists that appear to be particularly associated with hypercortisolism.

  7. Salicylate improves macrophage cholesterol homeostasis via activation of Ampk[S

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Morgan D.; Ford, Rebecca J.; McGregor, Chelsea P.; LeBlond, Nicholas D.; Snider, Shayne A.; Stypa, Stephanie A.; Day, Emily A.; Lhoták, Šárka; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Austin, Richard C.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis stems from imbalances in lipid metabolism and leads to maladaptive inflammatory responses. The AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates many aspects of lipid and energy metabolism, although its specific role in controlling macrophage cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We sought to address this question by testing the effects of direct Ampk activators in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ampk β1-deficient (β1−/−) mice. Macrophages from Ampk β1−/− mice had enhanced lipogenic capacity and diminished cholesterol efflux, although cholesterol uptake was unaffected. Direct activation of Ampk β1 via salicylate (the unacetylated form of aspirin) or A-769662 (a small molecule activator), decreased the synthesis of FAs and sterols in WT but not Ampk β1−/− macrophages. In lipid-laden macrophages, Ampk activation decreased cholesterol content (foam cell formation) and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL and apoA-I, effects that occurred in an Ampk β1-dependent manner. Increased cholesterol efflux was also associated with increased gene expression of the ATP binding cassette transporters, Abcg1 and Abca1. Moreover, in vivo reverse cholesterol transport was suppressed in mice that received Ampk β1−/− macrophages compared with the WT control. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting macrophage Ampk with new or existing drugs for the possible reduction in foam cell formation during the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:25773887

  8. Interaction between LPS-induced NO production and IDO activity in mouse peritoneal cells in the presence of activated Valpha14 NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hoshi, Masato; Tanaka, Ryo; Osawa, Yosuke; Yokochi, Takashi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2009-11-13

    In this study, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly increased nitric oxide (NO) production and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in mouse peritoneal cells in the presence of activated Valpha14 natural killer T cells. Moreover, LPS-induced NO production in peritoneal cells from IDO-knockout (KO) mice was more increased than that from wild-type mice. However, there was no significant difference in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein between the wild-type and IDO-KO mice. No significant difference was also observed in the ratio of CD3- and DX5-positive cells and F4/80- and TLR4-positive cells in peritoneal cells between the wild-type and IDO-KO mice. Since the IDO activity was enhanced by an NO inhibitor, NO may be post-translationally consumed by inhibiting the IDO activity. IDO is well known to play an important role in immunosuppression during inflammatory disease. Therefore, the inhibition of IDO by NO may exacerbate inflammation in the peritoneal cavity.

  9. Role of CD11b+ Macrophages in Intraperitoneal Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Aberrant Lymphangiogenesis and Lymphatic Function in the Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Koh, Young-Jun; Jeon, Bong-Hyun; Jang, Cholsoon; Han, Jinah; Kataru, Raghu P.; Schwendener, Reto A.; Kim, Jin-Man; Koh, Gou Young

    2009-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels in the diaphragm are essential for draining peritoneal fluid, but little is known about their pathological changes during inflammation. Here we characterized diaphragmatic lymphatic vessels in a peritonitis model generated by daily i.p. administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. Intraperitoneal LPS increased lymphatic density, branching, sprouts, connections, and network formation in the diaphragm in time- and dose-dependent manners. These changes were reversible on discontinuation of LPS administration. The LPS-induced lymphatic density and remodeling occur mainly through proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells. CD11b+ macrophages were massively accumulated and closely associated with the lymphatic vessels changed by i.p. LPS. Both RT-PCR assays and experiments with vascular endothelial growth factor-C/D blockade and macrophage-depletion indicated that the CD11b+ macrophage-derived lymphangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor-C/D could be major mediators of LPS-induced lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic remodeling through paracrine activity. Functional assays with India ink and fluorescein isothiocyanate-microspheres indicated that impaired peritoneal fluid drainage in diaphragm of LPS-induced peritonitis mice was due to inflammatory fibrosis and massive attachment of CD11b+ macrophages on the peritoneal side of the diaphragmatic lymphatic vessels. These findings reveal that CD11b+ macrophages play an important role in i.p. LPS-induced aberrant lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic dysfunction in the diaphragm. PMID:19762711

  10. Murine Macrophages Secrete Interferon γ upon Combined Stimulation with Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18: A Novel Pathway of Autocrine Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Munder, Markus; Mallo, Moisés; Eichmann, Klaus; Modolell, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ, a key immunoregulatory cytokine, has been thought to be produced solely by activated T cells and natural killer cells. In this study, we show that murine bone marrow– derived macrophages (BMMΦ) secrete large amounts of IFN-γ upon appropriate stimulation. Although interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 alone induce low levels of IFN-γ mRNA transcripts, the combined stimulation of BMMΦ with both cytokines leads to the efficient production of IFN-γ protein. The macrophage-derived IFN-γ is biologically active as shown by induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase as well as upregulation of CD40 in macrophages. Our findings uncover a novel pathway of autocrine macrophage activation by demonstrating that the macrophage is not only a key cell type responding to IFN-γ but also a potent IFN-γ–producing cell. PMID:9625771

  11. Effect of dietary linseed oil on tumoricidal activity and eicosanoid production in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, N E; Chapkin, R S; Erickson, K L

    1994-09-01

    Diets that contain high levels of n-3 fatty acids from fish oil have been shown to significantly effect macrophage cytolytic capacity, tumor necrosis factor alpha production and eicosanoid production. The present study was undertaken to determine whether n-3 fatty acids from vegetable origin [linseed oil (LIN)] would have the same effects on murine macrophage tumoricidal capacity and eicosanoid production as would fish oil. Mice were fed for three weeks diets that contained 10% (wt/wt) of either LIN, which is high in linolenic acid (18:3n-3), menhaden fish oil (MFO), which is high in eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3) acids, or safflower oil (SAF), which is high in linoleic acid (18:2n-6). In vivo- or in vitro-activated macrophages were assessed for select functions. As expected, macrophages from mice fed LIN and MFO produced significantly lower levels of both prostaglandins and leukotriene C4 when compared with macrophages from mice fed SAF. In addition, LIN and MFO macrophages were able to synthesize leuko-triene C5, which could not be produced by macrophages from mice fed SAF. The effects of LIN, however, were not as pronounced as those of MFO. With respect to specific functions, macrophages from mice fed LIN did not have altered cytolytic capacity when compared with macrophages from mice fed SAF and activated in vitro with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone for 24 h or with LPS plus interferon gamma (IFN gamma) for 5 h. Diet did not significantly alter tumoricidal capacity of macrophages activated completely in vivo either.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Autoantibodies against bromelainized mouse erythrocyte: strain distribution of serum idiotype expression and relative peritoneal cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, A; Poncet, P; Bussard, A

    1986-10-15

    Previously, we demonstrated that the naturally occurring mouse autoantibodies directed against bromelainized mouse red blood cells (BrMRBC) comprised a family of structurally related molecules bearing a common idiotypic determinant (CP) based on structural and idiotypic analysis of a series of anti-BrMRBC monoclonal autoantibodies derived from a fusion of peritoneal cells (PerC) with plasmacytomas. In the present studies, we have evaluated the quantitative expression of circulating CP idiotype related to autoantibodies against BrMRBC in relation to specific PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of different strains. The data presented here show no direct relationship between serum CP idiotype expression and PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of all strains tested. However, the circulating CP idiotype content is higher in strains, viz., CBA/J, NZB, C3H, BXSB, and Biozzi high responder (H) mice which exhibit a high perC autoantibody secretory activity against BrMRBC. The strains such as BALB/c, DBA2, SJL/J, CBA/N, and Biozzi low responder (L) express little or no circulating CP idiotype with a corresponding small or no PerC anti-BrMRBC activity. Furthermore, the PerC "auto"-immune phenomenon is markedly expressed in the normal CBA/J strain since these mice show a higher percentage ratio of CP idiotype over serum IgM (2.68%) as well as highest PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity (11,319 +/- 18,029 plaques per million viable cells) compared to other normal and autoimmune strains tested. Nevertheless, the highest circulating serum CP idiotype (49.4 micrograms/ml) is observed in the autoimmune NZB mouse. The immunodeficient CBA/N mice fail to express detectable levels of CP idiotype in their serum. The experiments conducted in genetically selected outbred Biozzi (H and L) strain have revealed remarkable differences in serum CP idiotype expression as well as PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in these two

  13. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein–Barr virus inhibit oral bacteria-induced macrophage activation and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y.-L.; Li, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition caused by periodontal microorganisms. Viruses such as human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) are associated with certain types of periodontal disease, but their roles in promoting the disease are unclear. Because both viruses infect human macrophages, cells which play key roles in the clearance of pathogenic bacteria, it is likely that the viruses alter the functional capacity of macrophages by inhibiting their defense mechanisms against invading pathogens. Methods Macrophages preinfected with HCMV or EBV were evaluated following stimulation by selected oral bacteria. Bacteria-induced macrophage activation was assayed by measuring the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) produced in the media, and phagocytic activity was analysed by a phagocytosis assay with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bacteria. The virus-infected macrophages were also subjected to semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction to measure the expression of toll-like receptor 9, which is involved in the activation of phagocytosis-related pathways. Results Both HCMV and EBV significantly diminished the TNF-α production typically induced by oral bacteria, inhibited the phagocytic activity of macrophages, and downregulated the expression of toll-like receptor 9. Conclusion Infection by HCMV or EBV inhibits the functional ability of macrophages to respond to bacterial challenge, thereby suggesting their pathogenic role in the development of periodontal disease. PMID:19416455

  14. Macrophage activation: role of toll-like receptors, nitric oxide, and nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Billack, Blase

    2006-10-15

    Macrophages play an important role in host-defense and inflammation. In response to an immune challenge, macrophages become activated and produce proinflammatory mediators that contribute to nonspecific immunity. The mediators released by activated macrophages include: superoxide anion; reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitric oxide and peroxynitrite; bioactive lipids; and cytokines. Although essential to the immune response, overproduction of certain macrophage-derived mediators during an immune challenge or inflammatory response can result in tissue injury and cellular death. The present report is focused on understanding some of the molecular mechanisms used by macrophages to produce reactive nitrogen intermediates in response to immunostimulatory agents such as heat shock protein 60 and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The role of Toll-like receptors and transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in the innate immune response is also described. A basic understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for macrophage activation should serve as a foundation for novel drug development aimed at modulating macrophage activity.

  15. Crude extract of Polygonum cuspidatum promotes immune responses in leukemic mice through enhancing phagocytosis of macrophage and natural killer cell activities in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Fu-Shin; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lin, Jing-Pin; Yu, Fu-Shun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum cuspidatum is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine used in the treatment of various diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether the crude extract of Polygonum cuspidatum (CEPC) could affect immune responses of murine leukemia cells in vivo. Normal BALB/c mice were i.p. injected with WEHI-3 cells to generate leukemic mice and then were treated orally with CEPC at 0, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg for three weeks. Animals were weighed and blood, liver, spleen samples were collected for further analyses. Results indicated that CEPC did not significantly affect the body and liver weight of animals, but reduced the weight of spleen when compared to control groups. Flow cytometric assay demonstrated that CEPC increased the percentage of CD3- (T-cell marker) and CD19- (B-cell marker) positive cells, but reduced that of CD11b-positive ones (monocytes). However, it did not significantly affect the proportion of Mac-3-positive cells (macrophages), compared to control groups. Results indicated that CEPC promoted phagocytosis by macrophages from blood samples at all examined doses but did not affect that of macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. CEPC also promoted natural killer cell activity of splenocytes at 200 mg/kg of CEPC. CEPC promoted B-cell proliferation at 200 mg/kg treatment when cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides but did not promote T-cell proliferation at three doses of CEPC treatment on concanavalin A stimulation. PMID:25792654

  16. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF−κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:26565726

  17. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  18. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  19. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  20. Macrophage functions in Biozzi mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dockrell, H M; Taverne, J; Lelchuk, R; Depledge, P; Brown, I N; Playfair, J H

    1985-01-01

    The faster degradation of antigen by macrophages in Biozzi low (L) responder mice, compared to Biozzi high (H) responder mice, is thought to be responsible for their lower antibody response. We have measured four functions associated with macrophages to see whether macrophages from L mice were generally more active than those from H mice. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from normal mice were compared with those from groups of mice given Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Propionibacterium acnes. Cells from normal H mice gave a stronger oxidative burst when triggered with phorbol myristate acetate, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells than cells from L mice. Cells from all mice injected with BCG or P. acnes gave a stronger oxidative burst, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells; again, both responses were higher in H mice than in L mice. By contrast, when groups of mice that had received P. acnes were given endotoxin and bled, higher titres of tumour necrosis factor were found in the sera of L mice. Spleen cells from both lines of mice released similar levels of interleukin-1, both spontaneously and in response to lipopolysaccharide. Our results suggest that these various macrophage responses are expressed independently in H and L mice. PMID:3894222

  1. Macrophages sense and kill bacteria through carbon monoxide–dependent inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Barbara; Larsen, Rasmus; Gallo, David; Chin, Beek Yoke; Harris, Clair; Mannam, Praveen; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Lee, Patty J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Flavell, Richard; Soares, Miguel P.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial clearance by eukaryotes relies on complex and coordinated processes that remain poorly understood. The gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) is generated by the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1), which is highly induced in macrophages in response to bacterial infection. HO-1 deficiency results in inadequate pathogen clearance, exaggerated tissue damage, and increased mortality. Here, we determined that macrophage-generated CO promotes ATP production and release by bacteria, which then activates the Nacht, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome, intensifying bacterial killing. Bacterial killing defects in HO-1–deficient murine macrophages were restored by administration of CO. Moreover, increased CO levels enhanced the bacterial clearance capacity of human macrophages and WT murine macrophages. CO-dependent bacterial clearance required the NALP3 inflammasome, as CO did not increase bacterial killing in macrophages isolated from NALP3-deficient or caspase-1–deficient mice. IL-1β cleavage and secretion were impaired in HO-1–deficient macrophages, and CO-dependent processing of IL-1β required the presence of bacteria-derived ATP. We found that bacteria remained viable to generate and release ATP in response to CO. The ATP then bound to macrophage nucleotide P2 receptors, resulting in activation of the NALP3/IL-1β inflammasome to amplify bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that macrophage-derived CO permits efficient and coordinated regulation of the host innate response to invading microbes. PMID:25295542

  2. Pristane-induced granulocyte recruitment promotes phenotypic conversion of macrophages and protects against diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage in Mac-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yiqin; Tsuboi, Naotake; Furuhashi, Kazuhiro; Du, Qiuna; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maeda, Kayaho; Kosugi, Tomoki; Matsuo, Seiichi; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2014-11-15

    Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage (DPH) is an uncommon but critical complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Peritoneal administration of 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (pristane) can recapitulate a lupus-like syndrome in mice, which can develop into DPH within a few weeks, especially in C57BL/6 mice. Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), a leukocyte adhesion molecule, is known to play a role in inflammation by regulating migration of leukocytes into injured tissue. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of Mac-1 in pristane-induced DPH, using Mac-1(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice on a C57BL/6 background. After pristane injection, Mac-1(-/-) mice showed reduced prevalence of DPH and attenuated peritonitis compared with WT mice. Analysis of the peritoneal lavage on days 5 and 10 after pristane treatment revealed increased numbers of eosinophils and alternatively activated macrophages, but decreased numbers of neutrophils and classically activated macrophages in Mac-1(-/-) mice compared with WT. Enhanced production of IL-4 and IL-13, both key mediators of macrophage polarization toward the mannose receptor(+) (MMR(+)) phenotype, was observed in the peritoneal cavity of Mac-1(-/-) mice. Depletion of neutrophils and eosinophils or adoptive transfer of classically activated macrophages resulted in the exacerbation of pristane-mediated DPH in both WT and Mac-1(-/-) mice. Moreover, peritoneal transfer of F4/80(high)MMR(+) alternatively activated macrophages successfully reduced the prevalence of DPH in WT mice. Collectively, Mac-1 promoted acute inflammatory responses in the peritoneal cavity and the lungs by downregulating granulocyte migration and subsequent phenotypic conversion of macrophages in a pristane-induced systemic lupus erythematosus model.

  3. Impairing autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium leads to inflammasome activation and enhanced macrophage-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Chiu, Hsi An Amy; Barba, Miriam Durazo; Mak, Ka Wang; Mack, Matthias; Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decreases in autophagy contribute to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have now studied the interaction between autophagy impaired in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the responses of macrophages. We find that dying RPE cells can activate the macrophage inflammasome and promote angiogenesis. In vitro, inhibiting rotenone-induced autophagy in RPE cells elicits caspase-3 mediated cell death. Co-culture of damaged RPE with macrophages leads to the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and nitrite oxide. Exogenous IL-6 protects the dysfunctional RPE but IL-1β causes enhanced cell death. Furthermore, IL-1β toxicity is more pronounced in dysfunctional RPE cells showing reduced IRAK3 gene expression. Co-culture of macrophages with damaged RPE also elicits elevated levels of pro-angiogenic proteins that promote ex vivo choroidal vessel sprouting. In vivo, impaired autophagy in the eye promotes photoreceptor and RPE degeneration and recruitment of inflammasome-activated macrophages. The degenerative tissue environment drives an enhanced pro-angiogenic response, demonstrated by increased size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions. The contribution of macrophages was confirmed by depletion of CCR2+ monocytes, which attenuates CNV in the presence of RPE degeneration. Our results suggest that the interplay between perturbed RPE homeostasis and activated macrophages influences key features of AMD development. PMID:26847702

  4. Classically and alternatively activated macrophages contribute to tissue remodelling after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Troidl, C; Möllmann, H; Nef, H; Masseli, F; Voss, S; Szardien, S; Willmer, M; Rolf, A; Rixe, J; Troidl, K; Kostin, S; Hamm, C; Elsässer, A

    2009-01-01

    An important goal in cardiology is to minimize myocardial necrosis and to support a discrete but resilient scar formation after myocardial infarction (MI). Macrophages are a type of cells that influence cardiac remodelling during MI. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to investigate their transcriptional profile and to identify the type of activation during scar tissue formation. Ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery was performed in mice. Macrophages were isolated from infarcted tissue using magnetic cell sorting after 5 days. The total RNA of macrophages was subjected to microarray analysis and compared with RNA from MI and LV-control. mRNA abundance of relevant targets was validated by quantitative real-time PCR 2, 5 and 10 days after MI (qRT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry was performed to localize activation type-specific proteins. The genome scan revealed 68 targets predominantly expressed by macrophages after MI. Among these targets, an increased mRNA abundance of genes, involved in both the classically (tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, interleukin 1β) and the alternatively (arginase 1 and 2, mannose receptor C type 1, chitinase 3-like 3) activated phenotype of macrophages, was found 5 days after MI. This observation was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that tumour necrosis factor α, representing the classical activation, is strongly transcribed early after ligature (2 days). It was decreased after 5 and 10 days. Five days after MI, we found a fundamental change towards alternative activation of macrophages with up-regulation of arginase 1. Our results demonstrate that macrophages are differentially activated during different phases of scar tissue formation after MI. During the early inflammatory phase, macrophages are predominantly classically activated, whereas their phenotype changes during the important transition from inflammation to scar tissue formation into an alternatively activated

  5. Macrophage activation syndrome in a newborn infant born to a mother with autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Kim, S H; Kim, H J; Lee, S J; Jeong, D C; Kim, S Y

    2015-02-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a complication of rheumatic disorders characterized by cytopenia, multiple organ dysfunction and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophage. In neonatal lupus erythematosus, MAS is rare but fatal, requiring early diagnosis and treatment for optimal outcome. We report a case of MAS in a neonate born to a mother with autoimmune disease, improved by treatment with steroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and cyclosporine.

  6. Lysophosphatidylcholine perpetuates macrophage polarization toward classically activated phenotype in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofei; Qiu, Chunguang; Zhao, Luosha

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory macrophages are involved in vascular inflammation and serve as the major effector cells in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major phospholipid moiety affixed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and thought to play important roles in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study we described that a bioactive lipid derivative, lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), generated from hydrolysis of the PC moiety of oxidized LDL, promoted and stabilized a strong M1 phenotype in macrophage polarization. Another derivative, 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), did not show the similar biological function. Blockade of G protein coupled receptor, G2A, which mediates the signal transduction of lysoPC, diminished the effects of lysoPC on the macrophage polarization toward M1 phenotype. The results provide insights into the new mechanism on how oxidized LDL participates in tissue inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:24841857

  7. Model-Based Characterization of Inflammatory Gene Expression Patterns of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ehlting, Christian; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Sawodny, Oliver; Häussinger, Dieter; Bode, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are cells with remarkable plasticity. They integrate signals from their microenvironment leading to context-dependent polarization into classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, representing two extremes of a broad spectrum of divergent phenotypes. Thereby, macrophages deliver protective and pro-regenerative signals towards injured tissue but, depending on the eliciting damage, may also be responsible for the generation and aggravation of tissue injury. Although incompletely understood, there is emerging evidence that macrophage polarization is critical for these antagonistic roles. To identify activation-specific expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines that may confer these distinct effects a systems biology approach was applied. A comprehensive literature-based Boolean model was developed to describe the M1 (LPS-activated) and M2 (IL-4/13-activated) polarization types. The model was validated using high-throughput transcript expression data from murine bone marrow derived macrophages. By dynamic modeling of gene expression, the chronology of pathway activation and autocrine signaling was estimated. Our results provide a deepened understanding of the physiological balance leading to M1/M2 activation, indicating the relevance of co-regulatory signals at the level of Akt1 or Akt2 that may be important for directing macrophage polarization. PMID:27464342

  8. Tuberculous peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Udayan; Almusa, Omar; Tung, Ka-wah; Heller, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculous peritonitis is a serious condition with rising prevalence in recent years. It is especially common in those patients with risk factors such as an immunocompromised state, chronic kidney disease, or cirrhosis/liver disease. Spread is typically hematogenous from pulmonary foci. We report on a 34-year-old man who presented with initial complaints of cough, low-grade fevers, abdominal pain, and nausea/vomiting. Chest x-ray showed a cluster of nodular opacities on the right upper lobe, and a CT scan showed diffuse thickening and nodularity of the omentum with prominent mesenteric lymph nodes, consistent with tuberculous peritonitis. PMID:27186257

  9. Chryseobacterium indologenes peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mehdi; Nobakht, Ehsan; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chryseobacterium indologenes is a rare organism that has been reported to cause infections mostly in hospitalised patients with severe underlying diseases. We report the first case of C indologenes peritonitis in a patient on peritoneal dialysis outside of Asia. Our patient with end-stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis grew C indologenes from peritoneal fluid when he presented with abdominal pain and cloudy effluent. The patient responded well to intraperitoneal antibiotic therapy. Tenckhoff catheter did not require removal. This case demonstrates the importance of considering rare causes of peritonitis, such as C indologenes, in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Given the resistance of such organisms to commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotics, antimicrobial susceptibility testing must be assessed as early as possible to assure appropriate antibiotic coverage to avoid untreated peritonitis leading to peritoneal dialysis failure. PMID:23709544

  10. Chryseobacterium indologenes peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Mehdi; Nobakht, Ehsan; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-05-24

    Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chryseobacterium indologenes is a rare organism that has been reported to cause infections mostly in hospitalised patients with severe underlying diseases. We report the first case of C indologenes peritonitis in a patient on peritoneal dialysis outside of Asia. Our patient with end-stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis grew C indologenes from peritoneal fluid when he presented with abdominal pain and cloudy effluent. The patient responded well to intraperitoneal antibiotic therapy. Tenckhoff catheter did not require removal. This case demonstrates the importance of considering rare causes of peritonitis, such as C indologenes, in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Given the resistance of such organisms to commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotics, antimicrobial susceptibility testing must be assessed as early as possible to assure appropriate antibiotic coverage to avoid untreated peritonitis leading to peritoneal dialysis failure.

  11. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9(-/-)) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9-B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies.

  12. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Sang, Ming; Liu, Jin-Biao; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus, is a potent inducer of type Ι interferons in multiple cell systems. In this study, we report that BTV16 treatment of primary human macrophages induced both type I and III IFN expression, resulting in the production of multiple antiviral factors, including myxovirus resistance protein A, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and the IFN-stimulated gene 56. Additionally, BTV-treated macrophages expressed increased HIV restriction factors (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 G/F/H) and CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-β, regulated on activation of normal T cell expressed and secreted), the ligands for HIV entry coreceptor CC chemokine receptor type 5. BTV16 also induced the expression of tetherin, which restricts HIV release from infected cells. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling of macrophages by BTV16 resulted in the induction of several anti-HIV microRNAs (miRNA-28, -29a, -125b, -150, -223, and -382). More importantly, the induction of antiviral responses by BTV resulted in significant suppression of HIV in macrophages. These findings demonstrate the potential of BTV-mediated TLR3 activation in macrophage innate immunity against HIV.

  13. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:27331813

  14. Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP) evokes superoxide anion production by human macrophages of different origin

    PubMed Central

    Brunelleschi, Sandra; Penengo, Lorenza; Lavagno, Luisa; Santoro, Claudio; Colang