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Sample records for activated phase slips

  1. Thermally activated phase slips in superfluid spin transport in magnetic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study thermally activated phase slips in superfluid spin transport in easy-plane magnetic wires within the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, which runs parallel to the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory for thermal resistances in superconducting wires. To that end, we start by obtaining the exact solutions for free-energy minima and saddle points. We provide an analytical expression for the phase-slip rate in the zero spin-current limit, which involves a detailed analysis of spin fluctuations at the extrema of the free energy. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which thermal phase slips can be inferred by measuring nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  2. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  3. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  4. Phase slips in oscillatory hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  5. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production.

  6. Cycle slipping in phase synchronization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Lin

    2007-02-01

    Cycle slipping is a characteristically nonlinear phenomenon in phase synchronization systems, which is highly dependent of the initial state of the system. Slipping a cycle means that the phase error is increased to such an extent that the generator to be synchronized slips one complete cycle with respect to the input phase. In this Letter, a linear matrix inequality (LMI) based approach is proposed and the estimation of the number of cycles which slips a solution of the system is obtained by solving a quasi-convex optimization problem of LMI. Applications to phase locked loops demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach.

  7. Thermally activated phase slips from metastable states in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Ivana; Lollo, Anthony; Harris, Jack

    In equilibrium, a flux-biased superconducting ring at low temperature can occupy any of several metastable states. The particular state that the ring occupies depends on the history of the applied flux, as different states are separated from each other by flux-dependent energy barriers. There is a critical value of the applied flux at which a given barrier goes to zero, the state becomes unstable, and the system transition into another state. In recent experiments performed on arrays of rings we showed that this transition occurs close to the critical flux predicted by Ginzburg-Landau theory. Here, we will describe experiments in which we have extended these measurements to an individual ring in order to study the thermal activation of the ring over a barrier that has been tuned close to zero. We measure the statistics of transitions as function of temperature and ramp rate.

  8. Phase-field slip-line theory of plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freddi, Francesco; Royer-Carfagni, Gianni

    2016-09-01

    A variational approach to determine the deformation of an ideally plastic substance is proposed by solving a sequence of energy minimization problems under proper conditions to account for the irreversible character of plasticity. The flow is driven by the local transformation of elastic strain energy into plastic work on slip surfaces, once that a certain energetic barrier for slip activation has been overcome. The distinction of the elastic strain energy into spherical and deviatoric parts is used to incorporate in the model the idea of von Mises plasticity and isochoric plastic strain. This is a "phase field model" because the matching condition at the slip interfaces is substituted by the evolution of an auxiliary phase field that, similar to a damage field, is unitary on the elastic phase and null on the yielded phase. The slip lines diffuse in bands, whose width depends upon a material length-scale parameter. Numerical experiments on representative problems in plane strain give solutions with noteworthy similarities with the results from classical slip-line field theory, but the proposed model is much richer because, accounting for elastic deformations, it can describe the formation of slip bands at the local level, which can nucleate, propagate, widen and diffuse by varying the boundary conditions. In particular, the solution for a long pipe under internal pressure is very different from the one obtainable from the classical macroscopic theory of plasticity. For this case, the location of the plastic bands may be an insight to explain the premature failures that are sometimes encountered during the manufacturing process. This practical example enhances the importance of this new theory based on the mathematical sciences.

  9. Momentum compaction and phase slip factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

  10. Phase-slip-induced dissipation in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system.

    PubMed

    McKay, D; White, M; Pasienski, M; DeMarco, B

    2008-05-01

    Phase-slips control dissipation in many bosonic systems, determining the critical velocity of superfluid helium and the generation of resistance in thin superconducting wires. Technological interest has been largely motivated by applications involving nanoscale superconducting circuit elements, such as standards based on quantum phase-slip junctions. Although phase slips caused by thermal fluctuations at high temperatures are well understood, controversy remains over the role of phase slips in small-scale superconductors--in solids, problems such as uncontrolled noise sources and disorder complicate their study and application. Here we show that phase slips can lead to dissipation in a clean and well-characterized Bose-Hubbard system, by experimentally studying the transport of ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. In contrast to previous work, we explore a low-velocity regime described by the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model that is unaffected by instabilities, and we measure the effect of temperature on the dissipation strength. The damping rate of atomic motion (the analogue of electrical resistance in a solid) in the confining parabolic potential is well fitted by a model that includes finite damping at zero temperature. The low-temperature behaviour is consistent with the theory of quantum tunnelling of phase slips, whereas at higher temperatures a crossover consistent with a transition to thermal activation of phase slips is evident. Motion-induced features reminiscent of vortices and vortex rings associated with phase slips are also observed in time-of-flight imaging. These results clarify the role of phase slips in superfluid systems. They may also be of relevance in understanding the source of metallic phases observed in thin films, or serve as a test bed for theories of bosonic dissipation based upon variants of the Bose-Hubbard model. PMID:18451857

  11. Phase-slip-induced dissipation in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system.

    PubMed

    McKay, D; White, M; Pasienski, M; DeMarco, B

    2008-05-01

    Phase-slips control dissipation in many bosonic systems, determining the critical velocity of superfluid helium and the generation of resistance in thin superconducting wires. Technological interest has been largely motivated by applications involving nanoscale superconducting circuit elements, such as standards based on quantum phase-slip junctions. Although phase slips caused by thermal fluctuations at high temperatures are well understood, controversy remains over the role of phase slips in small-scale superconductors--in solids, problems such as uncontrolled noise sources and disorder complicate their study and application. Here we show that phase slips can lead to dissipation in a clean and well-characterized Bose-Hubbard system, by experimentally studying the transport of ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. In contrast to previous work, we explore a low-velocity regime described by the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model that is unaffected by instabilities, and we measure the effect of temperature on the dissipation strength. The damping rate of atomic motion (the analogue of electrical resistance in a solid) in the confining parabolic potential is well fitted by a model that includes finite damping at zero temperature. The low-temperature behaviour is consistent with the theory of quantum tunnelling of phase slips, whereas at higher temperatures a crossover consistent with a transition to thermal activation of phase slips is evident. Motion-induced features reminiscent of vortices and vortex rings associated with phase slips are also observed in time-of-flight imaging. These results clarify the role of phase slips in superfluid systems. They may also be of relevance in understanding the source of metallic phases observed in thin films, or serve as a test bed for theories of bosonic dissipation based upon variants of the Bose-Hubbard model.

  12. Measurement of Quantum Phase-Slips in Josephson Junction Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, Wiebke

    2011-03-01

    Quantum phase-slip dynamics in Josephson junction chains could provide the basis for the realization of a new type of topologically protected qubit or for the implementation of a new current standard. I will present measurements of the effect of quantum phase-slips on the ground state of a Josephson junction chain. We can tune in situ the strength of the phase-slips. These phase-slips are the result of fluctuations induced by the finite charging energy of each junction in the chain. Our measurements demonstrate that a Josephson junction chain under phase bias constraint behaves in a collective way. I will also show evidence of coherent phase-slip interference, the so called Aharonov-Casher effect. This phenomenon is the dual of the well known Aharonov-Bohm interference. In collaboration with I.M. Pop, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble, France; I. Protopopov, L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kosygin str. 2, Moscow 119334, Russia and Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany; and F. Lecocq, Z. Peng, B. Pannetier, O. Buisson, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier. European STREP MIDAS, ANR QUANTJO.

  13. Quantum Nucleation of Phase Slips in 1-d Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arovas, Daniel

    1998-03-01

    The rate for quantum nucleation of phase slips past an impurity in a one-dimensional superfluid is computed. Real time evolution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that there is a critical velocity vc below which solutions are time-independent [1,2]; this is the regime of quantum phase slip nucleation. We start with the Gross-Pitaevskii model in the presence of an impurity potential, and derive the Euclidean action for a space-time vortex-antivortex pair, which describes a phase slip event. The action is computed as a function of the superfluid velocity v and the impurity potential width and depth.l [1] V. Hakim, Phys. Rev. E 55, 2835 (1997).l [1] J. A. Freire, D. P. Arovas, and H. Levine, Phys. Rev. Lett (in press, 1997).l

  14. Slip sense inversion on active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan and its implications for Cenozoic tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2004-05-01

    Analyses of deflected river channels, offset of basement rocks, and fault rock structures reveal that slip sense inversion occurred on major active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan such as the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones and the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Along the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones, small-size rivers cutting shallowly mountain slopes and Quaternary terraces have been deflected sinistrally, whereas large-size rivers which deeply incised into the Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains show no systematically sinistral offset or complicated hairpin-shaped deflection. When the sinistral offsets accumulated on the small-size rivers are restored, the large-size rivers show residual dextral deflections. This dextral offset sense is consistent with that recorded in the pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. S-C fabrics of fault gouge and breccia zone developed in the active fault zones show sinistral shear sense compatible with earthquake focal mechanisms, whereas those of the foliated cataclasite indicate a dextral shear sense. These observations show that the sinistral strike-slip shear fabrics were overprinted on dextral ones which formed during a previous deformation phase. Similar topographic and geologic features are observed along the MTL in the central-eastern part of the Kii Peninsula. Based on these geomorphological and geological data, we infer that the slip sense inversion occurred in the period between the late Tertiary and mid-Quaternary period. This strike-slip inversion might result from the plate rearrangement consequent to the mid-Miocene Japan Sea opening event. This multidisciplinary study gives insight into how active strike-slip fault might evolves with time.

  15. Topological Effects on Quantum Phase Slips in Superfluid Spin Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigate effects of quantum fluctuations on superfluid spin transport through easy-plane quantum antiferromagnetic spin chains in the large-spin limit. Quantum fluctuations result in the decaying spin supercurrent by unwinding the magnetic order parameter within the easy plane, which is referred to as phase slips. We show that the topological term in the nonlinear sigma model for the spin chains qualitatively differentiates the decaying rate of the spin supercurrent between the integer versus half-odd-integer spin chains. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which the dependence of the decaying rate on constituent spins can be verified by measuring the nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  16. Effect of Water on High Pressure Olivine Slip Systems Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J.; Chen, J.; Raterron, P. C.; Holyoke, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    Seismologic studies of the Earth's shallow (Z<220 km) upper mantle have observed seismic anisotropy parallel to the direction of plate movement and have related this observation to alignment of olivine [100] due to shearing related to convection. These observations have been reinforced by field-based and experimental investigations which observe evidence that [100] slip is dominant at low pressures and water contents. However, direct evidence of the dominant slip system in the deep upper mantle (Z>220 km) is limited to a few studies of xenoliths which have LPOs consistent with [001] slip. Experimental studies of dry single crystals and polycrystals indicate that [001] slip becomes dominant at pressures > 8 GPa. However, water contents in the mantle are significant (~1000 H/106 Si) and we do not know how the slip systems of olivine are affected by higher water contents at high pressures. In order to investigate the effect of pressure on slip systems activities in olivine deformed in wet conditions, deformation experiments were carried out on single crystals, at pressure ranging from 4 to 8 GPa and temperature between 1373 and 1473 K in the Deformation-DIA apparatus (D-DIA) of the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (NY, USA). Specimen were deformed in uniaxial compression along [110]c, [011]c and [101]c crystallographic directions, promoting the activation of, respectively, [100](010), [001](010) slip systems, and simultaneously [100](001) and [001](100) slip systems. Talc sleeves about the annulus of the single crystals were used as source of water during deformation. In addition, run products investigation using a micro-focused IR beam at the U2 beamline enables accurate mapping of the water content across the deformed single crystals using FTIR spectroscopy, while specimen deformation microstructures were investigated by TEM. We observe a slip-system transition in wet specimen occurring at lower pressure than that observed by Raterron et al. (2007) in dry specimens. For

  17. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D'Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips.

  18. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D'Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  19. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D’Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  20. Quantum Phase Slips in 6 mm Long Niobium Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Liu, Xin; Chan, M H W

    2016-02-10

    Transport measurements were made to study the superconducting transition of four 6 mm long niobium nanowires with different cross-sectional dimensions. A low-temperature residual resistance tail measured with an excitation current of 5 nA is found in the thinnest wire down to 50 mK or 7.7% of Tc of Nb. The functional form of the residual resistance is consistent with quantum phase slip (QPS) processes. Resistance measured at high bias excitation current switches among many discrete values that are well below the normal state resistance. These discrete resistance values as a function of temperature fall into several parallel curves all showing QPS-like decay in the low temperature limit similar to that found at low current. The coexistence of QPS-like resistance tails and resistance jumps found in the same wire unifies results from previous experiments where these two distinct sets of evidence for QPS are exclusive of each other. PMID:26788964

  1. Relaxation in crystal plasticity with three active slip systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Dolzmann, Georg

    2016-09-01

    We study a variational model for finite crystal plasticity in the limit of rigid elasticity. We focus on the case of three distinct slip systems whose slip directions lie in one plane and are rotated by 120° with respect to each other, with linear self-hardening and infinite latent hardening, in the sense that each material point has to deform in single slip. Under these conditions, plastic deformation is accompanied by the formation of fine-scale structures, in which activity along the different slip systems localizes in different areas. The quasiconvex envelope of the energy density, which describes the macroscopic material behavior, is determined in a regime from small up to intermediate strains, and upper and lower bounds are provided for large strains. Finally sufficient conditions are given under which the lamination convex envelope of an extended-valued energy density is an upper bound for its quasiconvex envelope.

  2. Tailoring phase slip events through magnetic doping in superconductor-ferromagnet composite films

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Ambika; Jha, Rajveer; Sahoo, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between superconductivity (SC) and ferromagnetism (FM) when embedded together has attracted unprecedented research interest due to very rare coexistence of these two phenomena. The focus has been mainly put into the proximity induced effects like, coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity, higher critical current, triplet superconductivity etc. However, very little attention has been paid experimentally to the role of magnetic constituent on triggering phase slip processes in the composite films (CFs). We demonstrate that less than 1 at.% of magnetic contribution in the CFs can initiate phase slip events efficiently. Due to advanced state-of-the-art fabrication techniques, phase slip based studies have been concentrated mainly on superconducting nanostructures. Here, we employ wide mesoscopic NbGd based CFs to study the phase slip processes. Low temperature current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of CFs show stair-like features originated through phase slip events and are absent in pure SC films. Depending on the bias current and temperature, distinct regions, dominated by Abrikosov type vortex-antivortex (v-av) pairs and phase slip events, are observed. The results presented here open a new way to study the phase slip mechanism, its interaction with v-av pairs in two dimensions and hence can be useful for future photonic and metrological applications. PMID:26304594

  3. Dynamics of phase slips in systems with time-periodic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Punit; Knobloch, Edgar; Beaume, Cédric

    2015-12-01

    The Adler equation with time-periodic frequency modulation is studied. A series of resonances between the period of the frequency modulation and the time scale for the generation of a phase slip is identified. The resulting parameter space structure is determined using a combination of numerical continuation, time simulations, and asymptotic methods. Regions with an integer number of phase slips per period are separated by regions with noninteger numbers of phase slips and include canard trajectories that drift along unstable equilibria. Both high- and low-frequency modulation is considered. An adiabatic description of the low-frequency modulation regime is found to be accurate over a large range of modulation periods.

  4. Rankine-Hugoniot analysis of two-phase flow with inter-phase slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. R.; Lear, W. E.; Sherif, S. A.

    This paper is one in a series of papers considering different characteristics of two-phase flow. The previous analyses were conducted to determine the momentum flux and the nozzle design for a two-phase supersonic cleanser, where the focus of this paper is on the general gas dynamic relationships of the two-phase mixture across a normal shock wave. Historically, normal shock analyses have provided closed form solutions for the downstream state in terms of the upstream state for perfect gases, i.e. the Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. This analysis examines the effect of the mass injection ratio and the inter-phase slip for a homogeneous, two-phase mixture by applying a control volume approach from the state immediately preceding the shock wave to the state immediately after the shock wave where the liquid phase has not had time to react, and from the state immediately after the shock wave to a state where the gas and liquid phases have had sufficient time to become re-equilibrated. The results show that the downstream Mach number decreases while the ratios of pressure, density, and temperature increase for increases in the mass injection ratio. The same trend is also shown for increases in the slip parameter. Whereas the previous analyses applied mainly to the characteristics of the industrial cleanser mentioned before, this analysis has far reaching implications ranging from two-phase particulate flow in solid rocket motors to sand blasting applications.

  5. Relationship between hamstring activation rate and heel contact velocity: Factors influencing age-related slip-induced falls

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Kim, Sukwon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether a decreased hamstring activation rate among the elderly is responsible for a higher horizontal heel contact velocity and increased likelihood of slip-induced falls compared to their younger counterparts. Twenty-eight subjects from two age groups (14 young and 14 old) walked across a linear walking track with embedded force platforms while wearing a fall arresting harness attached to an overhead arresting rig for safety. In order to obtain realistic unexpected slip-induced fall data, a soapy vinyl floor surface was hidden from the subjects and unexpectedly introduced. Synchronized kinematics, kinetic and electromyography (EMG) analyses during the heel contact phase of the gait cycle while walking over slippery and non-slippery floor surfaces were examined in the study. Normalized EMG data were examined in terms of hamstring activation rate and evaluated with heel contact velocity and friction demand characteristic (as measured by peak required coefficient of friction (RCOF)) on the dry vinyl floor surface. Furthermore, slip parameters (i.e. slip distances and slipping velocity) were assessed on the soapy vinyl floor surface. The results indicated that younger adults’ hamstring activation rate was higher than older adults, whereas younger adults’ heel contact velocity was not different from older adults. These results suggested that heel contact velocity in younger adults was sufficiently reduced before the heel contact phase of the gait cycle. This could be due to the outcome of higher hamstring activation rate in younger adults in comparison to older adults. However, lower friction demand (peak RCOF), shorter slip distances, slower peak sliding heel velocity and more falls among older adults suggested that the slip initiation characteristics were not the only factors contributing to slip-induced falls among the elderly. PMID:16112575

  6. Dynamics of phase slips in systems with time-periodic modulation.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Punit; Knobloch, Edgar; Beaume, Cédric

    2015-12-01

    The Adler equation with time-periodic frequency modulation is studied. A series of resonances between the period of the frequency modulation and the time scale for the generation of a phase slip is identified. The resulting parameter space structure is determined using a combination of numerical continuation, time simulations, and asymptotic methods. Regions with an integer number of phase slips per period are separated by regions with noninteger numbers of phase slips and include canard trajectories that drift along unstable equilibria. Both high- and low-frequency modulation is considered. An adiabatic description of the low-frequency modulation regime is found to be accurate over a large range of modulation periods. PMID:26764781

  7. Phase-Slip Avalanches in the Superflow of {sup 4}He through Arrays of Nanosize Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pekker, David; Barankov, Roman; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2007-04-27

    In response to recent experiments by the Berkeley group, we construct a model of superflow through an array of nanosize apertures that incorporates two basic ingredients: (1) disorder associated with each aperture having its own random critical velocity, and (2) effective interaperture coupling, mediated through the bulk superfluid. As the disorder becomes weak there is a transition from a regime where phase slips are largely independent to a regime where interactions lead to system-wide avalanches of phase slips. We explore the flow dynamics in both regimes, and make connections to the experiments.

  8. High-transparency, self-standable gel-SLIPS fabricated by a facile nanoscale phase separation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Issei; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-02-12

    Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) that were both highly transparent and free-standing (self-standability) were fabricated by an extremely simple process using non-solvent-induced phase separation (NIPS) of a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)/di-n-butyl phthalate solution. We call these "Gel-SLIPS" because the porous PVDF-HFP film fabricated using the NIPS process has been used as a gel electrolyte in a lithium-ion battery. In previous reports, SLIPS fabrication required complex processes, high annealing temperatures, and drying. Gel-SLIPS can be fabricated from the adjusted solution and the lubricant at room temperature and pressure in 5 min by squeegee, cast, or dip methods. NIPS is based on a quick phase separation process in situ, and reduction of the surface energy is not required because of the considerable fluorine in PVDF-HFP. Moreover, because of the flexible nanonetwork structure of PVDF-HFP, Gel-SLIPS exhibited self-standability and high transmittance (>87% at 600 nm). Gel-SLIPS is thus highly versatile in terms of the fabrication process and film characteristics. PMID:24377307

  9. Simplified formula for mean cycle-slip time of phase-locked loops with steady-state phase error.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Previous work shows that the mean time from lock to a slipped cycle of a phase-locked loop is given by a certain double integral. Accurate numerical evaluation of this formula for the second-order loop is extremely vexing because the difference between exponentially large quantities is involved. The presented article demonstrates a method in which a much-reduced precision program can be used to obtain the mean first-cycle slip time for a loop of arbitrary degree tracking at a specified SNR and steady-state phase error. It also presents a simple approximate formula that is asymptotically tight at higher loop SNR.

  10. Contact line motion in confined liquid-gas systems: Slip versus phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2010-11-01

    In two-phase flows, the interface intervening between the two fluid phases intersects the solid wall at the contact line. A classical problem in continuum fluid mechanics is the incompatibility between the moving contact line and the no-slip boundary condition, as the latter leads to a nonintegrable stress singularity. Recently, various diffuse-interface models have been proposed to explain the contact line motion using mechanisms missing from the sharp-interface treatments in fluid mechanics. In one-component two-phase (liquid-gas) systems, the contact line can move through the mass transport across the interface while in two-component (binary) fluids, the contact line can move through diffusive transport across the interface. While these mechanisms alone suffice to remove the stress singularity, the role of fluid slip at solid surface needs to be taken into account as well. In this paper, we apply the diffuse-interface modeling to the study of contact line motion in one-component liquid-gas systems, with the fluid slip fully taken into account. The dynamic van der Waals theory has been presented for one-component fluids, capable of describing the two-phase hydrodynamics involving the liquid-gas transition [A. Onuki, Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)]. This theory assumes the local equilibrium condition at the solid surface for density and also the no-slip boundary condition for velocity. We use its hydrodynamic equations to describe the continuum hydrodynamics in the bulk region and derive the more general boundary conditions by introducing additional dissipative processes at the fluid-solid interface. The positive definiteness of entropy production rate is the guiding principle of our derivation. Numerical simulations based on a finite-difference algorithm have been carried out to investigate the dynamic effects of the newly derived boundary conditions, showing that the contact line can move through both phase transition and slip, with their relative contributions

  11. Contact line motion in confined liquid-gas systems: Slip versus phase transition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2010-11-28

    In two-phase flows, the interface intervening between the two fluid phases intersects the solid wall at the contact line. A classical problem in continuum fluid mechanics is the incompatibility between the moving contact line and the no-slip boundary condition, as the latter leads to a nonintegrable stress singularity. Recently, various diffuse-interface models have been proposed to explain the contact line motion using mechanisms missing from the sharp-interface treatments in fluid mechanics. In one-component two-phase (liquid-gas) systems, the contact line can move through the mass transport across the interface while in two-component (binary) fluids, the contact line can move through diffusive transport across the interface. While these mechanisms alone suffice to remove the stress singularity, the role of fluid slip at solid surface needs to be taken into account as well. In this paper, we apply the diffuse-interface modeling to the study of contact line motion in one-component liquid-gas systems, with the fluid slip fully taken into account. The dynamic van der Waals theory has been presented for one-component fluids, capable of describing the two-phase hydrodynamics involving the liquid-gas transition [A. Onuki, Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)]. This theory assumes the local equilibrium condition at the solid surface for density and also the no-slip boundary condition for velocity. We use its hydrodynamic equations to describe the continuum hydrodynamics in the bulk region and derive the more general boundary conditions by introducing additional dissipative processes at the fluid-solid interface. The positive definiteness of entropy production rate is the guiding principle of our derivation. Numerical simulations based on a finite-difference algorithm have been carried out to investigate the dynamic effects of the newly derived boundary conditions, showing that the contact line can move through both phase transition and slip, with their relative contributions

  12. In situ spatial mapping of Gouy phase slip with terahertz generation in two-color field.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chao; Lü, Zhihui; Huang, Yindong; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Wenbo; Zhang, Dongwen; Zhao, Zengxiu; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-05-30

    We establish a one-to-one mapping between the local phase slip and the spatial position near the focus by scanning a thin jet along the propagation direction of laser beams. The measurement shows that the optimal phase of terahertz can be utilized to characterize in situ the spatially dependent relative phase of the two-color field. We also investigate the role of the Gouy phase shift on terahertz generation from two-color laser-induced plasma. The result is of critical importance for phase-dependent applications of two-color laser-field, including high-order harmonic and terahertz generation.

  13. Double phase slips and bound defect pairs in parametrically driven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Riecke, H.; Granzow, G.D.

    1997-12-31

    Spatio-temporal chaos in parametrically driven waves is investigated in one and two dimensions using numerical simulations of Ginzburg-Landau equations. A regime is identified in which in one dimension the dynamics are due to double phase slips. In very small systems they are found to arise through a Hopf bifurcation off a mixed mode. In large systems they can lead to a state of localized spatio-temporal chaos, which can be understood within the framework of phase dynamics. In two dimensions the double phase slips are replaced by bound defect pairs. Our simulations indicate the possibility of an unbinding transition of these pairs, which is associated with a transition from ordered to disordered defect chaos.

  14. Phase slips and dissipation of Alfvenic intermediate shocks and solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Laveder, D.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.

    2012-09-15

    The time evolution of a rotational discontinuity, characterized by a change of the magnetic-field direction by an angle {Delta}{theta} such that {pi}<|{Delta}{theta}|<2{pi} and no amplitude variation, is considered in the framework of asymptotic models that, through reductive perturbative expansions, isolate the dynamics of parallel or quasi-parallel Alfven waves. In the presence of viscous and Ohmic dissipation, and for a zero or sufficiently weak dispersion (originating from the Hall effect), an intermediate shock rapidly forms, steepens and undergoes reconnection through a quasi gradient collapse, leading to a reduction of |{Delta}{theta}| by an amount of 2{pi}, which can be viewed as the breaking of a topological constraint. Afterwards, as |{Delta}{theta}|<{pi}, the intermediate shock broadens and slowly dissipates. In the case of a phase jump |{Delta}{theta}|>3{pi}, which corresponds to a wave train limited on both sides by uniform fields, a sequence of such reconnection processes takes place. Differently, in the presence of a strong enough dispersion, the rotational discontinuity evolves, depending on the sign of {Delta}{theta}, to a dark or bright soliton displaying a 2{pi} phase variation. The latter is then eliminated, directly by reconnection in the case of a dark soliton, or through a more complex process involving a quasi amplitude collapse in that of a bright soliton. Afterwards, the resulting structure is progressively damped. For a prescribed initial rotational discontinuity, both quasi gradient and amplitude collapses lead to a sizeable energy decay that in the collisional regime is independent of the diffusion coefficient {eta} but requires a time scaling like 1/{eta}. In the non-collisional regime where dissipation originates from Landau resonance, the amount of dissipated energy during the event is independent of the plasma {beta}, but the process becomes slower for smaller {beta}.

  15. Cycle Slips Detection in Quad-Frequency Mode: Galileo's Contribution to an Efficient Approach under High Ionospheric Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Vyvere, Laura; Warnant, René

    2016-04-01

    Cycle slips detection has always been a key issue in phase measurements accuracy, thus impacting positioning precision. Since Galileo is the first constellation to offer four carrier frequencies available in Open Service, we were able to develop an innovative detection algorithm, especially promising in harsh environment like high ionospheric activity. This improves previous dual and triple-frequency methods, whose efficiency was somehow limited in tricky situations, like ionospheric events or particular configurations. In our algorithm, two types of testing quantities were used: triple-frequency Simsky combination and dual-frequency Geometry-Free combination, each one being associated to a suitable detection algorithm. Simsky combination allows to detect almost every configuration, except for cycle slips of the same magnitude, appearing simultaneously on all carriers. Geometry-Free combination is only used to detect this particular case, since it suffers from quick variation of ionospheric delay. Together - through the choice of the most efficient combination alternatives - they enable the detection of any cycle slips configuration. This is now made possible thanks to the availability of data from Galileo's four carriers. The quad-frequency algorithm has been tested on Galileo observations from both GMSD (Japan) and NKLG (Gabon) stations. On the first ones, cycle slips were artificially inserted in order to simulate particular cases and test algorithm robustness. NKLG raw data were used to assess algorithm behaviour for cases met in the equatorial area. Enhanced with a suitable cycle slip correction method and a real-time feature, our algorithm could directly be integrated into the software receiver, enabling the supply of continuous and corrected data to the user. In conclusion, this first quad-frequency cycle slips detection algorithm is obviously a step forward and every Galileo user will indeed be able to benefit from a highly better-quality positioning. With

  16. Thermal and quantum phase slips in niobium-nitride nanowires based on suspended carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohei; Moriyama, Satoshi; Morita, Yoshifumi; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Takagi, Tasuku; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Miki, Norihisa; Tanabe, Takasumi; Maki, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting nanowires have attracted considerable attention due to their unique quantum-mechanical properties, as well as their potential as next-generation quantum nanodevices, such as single-photon detectors, phase-slip (PS) qubits, and other hybrid structures. In this study, we present the results of one-dimensional (1D) superconductivity in nanowires fabricated by coating suspended carbon nanotubes with a superconducting thin niobium nitride (NbN) film. In the resistance-temperature characteristic curves, hallmarks of 1D superconductivity with PS events are observed with unconventional negative magnetoresistance. We also confirm that a crossover occurs between thermal and quantum PSs as the temperature is lowered.

  17. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    DOE PAGES

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  18. Prediction of performance of two-phase flow nozzle and liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) generator for no slip condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, G.; Back, L.

    1992-01-01

    Two-phase LMMHD energy conversion systems have potentially significant advantages over conventional systems such as higher thermal efficiency and substantial simplicity with lower capital and maintenance costs. Maintenance of low velocity slip is of importance for achieving high generator efficiency. A bubbly flow pattern ensures very low velocity slip. The full governing equations have been written out, and a computer prediction code has been developed to analyze performance of a two-phase flow LMMHD generator and nozzle under conditions of no slip. Three different shapes of a LMMHD generator have been investigated. Electrical power outputs are in the 20 kW range. Generator efficiency exceeds 71 percent at an average void fraction of about 70 percent. This is an appreciable performance for a short generator without insulating vanes for minimizing electrical losses in the end regions.

  19. Interaction between slip events, erosion and sedimentation along an active strike-slip fault: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatton, M.; Malavieille, J.; Dominguez, S.; Manighetti, I.; Romano, C.; Beauprêtre, S.; Garembois, S.; Larroque, C.

    2012-04-01

    Recovering information on past (i.e., last 102-104 yrs) large earthquakes on faults is a challenge. The classical approach -especially used on strike-slip faults- consists in searching morphological markers such as river channels, streams, alluvial fans, ridges or terrace risers, etc, that would be offset by the fault, and measure these offsets by reconstructing the original position and shape of the markers. Combined with the dating of the offset markers, this morphotectonic paleoseismological approach may provide information on the slips and ages of the most recent earthquakes on the fault under study. Yet, the approach is complex as it depends on the recognition of unambiguous paired markers on either side of the fault. And our capability to recognize similar markers on either side of a fault in turn greatly depends on the 'evolution' that these markers may have sustained subsequently to their very first slip disruption. Did the repeating earthquake slip events modify their surface appearance? Did their morphology and position (ex: burying, destruction, modification, etc) evolve with the sedimentation and erosion that might have occurred during the fault history? Etc. These questions have rarely been approached for they are difficult to address in natural settings. And as we are unable to answer them in the natural cases that we study, the slip reconstructions that we provide are generally uncertain as they are likely based on an incomplete or biased record of the past fault slips. Therefore, the objective of our work is to contribute to better understand and document the nature and 'evolution' of the morphological markers that are commonly used in morphotectonic and paleoseismological analyses, especially along strike-slip faults. We approach these questions experimentally. We have developed an original experimental set-up made to simulate repeated slip events on a strike-slip fault placed in a wet environment sustaining sedimentation and erosion. The fault

  20. Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics due to quantum tunneling of phase slips in superconducting Nb nanowire networks

    SciTech Connect

    Trezza, M.; Cirillo, C.; Sabatino, P.; Carapella, G.; Attanasio, C.; Prischepa, S. L.

    2013-12-16

    We report on the transport properties of an array of N∼30 interconnected Nb nanowires, grown by sputtering on robust porous Si substrates. The analyzed system exhibits a broad resistive transition in zero magnetic field, H, and highly nonlinear V(I) characteristics as a function of H, which can be both consistently described by quantum tunneling of phase slips.

  1. Viscous roots of active seismogenic faults revealed by geologic slip rate variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, P. A.; Scholz, C. H.; Roberts, G.; Faure Walker, J.; Steer, P.

    2013-12-01

    Viscous flow at depth contributes to elastic strain accumulation along seismogenic faults during both post-seismic and inter-seismic phases of the earthquake cycle. Evaluating the importance of this contribution is hampered by uncertainties regarding (i) the extent to which viscous deformation occurs in shear zones or by distributed flow within the crust and/or upper mantle, and (ii) the value of the exponent, n, in the flow law that relates strain rate to applied stress. Geodetic data, rock deformation experiments, and field observations of exhumed (inactive) faults provide strong evidence for non-linear viscous flow but may not fully capture the long term, in situ behaviour of active fault zones. Here we demonstrate that strain rates derived from Holocene offsets on seismogenic normal faults in the actively uplifting and extending central and southern Italian Apennines may be used to address this issue. The measured strain rates, averaged over a time scale of 104 years, exhibit a well-defined power-law dependence on topographic elevation with a power-law exponent ≈ 3.0 (2.7 - 3.4 at 95% CI; 2.3 - 4.0 at 99% CI). Contemporary seismicity indicates that the upper crust in this area is at the threshold for frictional failure within an extensional stress field and therefore differential stress is directly proportional to elevation. Our data thus imply a relationship between strain rate and stress that is consistent with non-linear viscous flow, with n ≈ 3, but because the measurements are derived from slip along major crustal faults they do not represent deformation of a continuum. We know that, down-dip of the seismogenic part of active faults, cataclasis, hydrous alteration, and shear heating all contribute to grain size reduction and material weakening. These processes initiate localisation at the frictional-viscous transition and the development of mylonitic shear zones within the viscous regime. Furthermore, in quartzo-feldspathic crust, mylonites form a

  2. Phase transformation and nanometric flow cause extreme weakening during fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. W., II; Shi, F.; Bozhilov, K.; Xia, G.; Reches, Z.

    2015-06-01

    Earthquake instability requires fault weakening during slip. The mechanism of this weakening is central to understanding earthquake sliding and, in many cases, has been attributed to fluids. It is also unclear why major faults such as the San Andreas Fault do not exhibit significant thermal anomalies due to shear heating during sliding and whether or not fault rocks that have been melted--pseudotachylytes--are rare. High-speed friction experiments on a wide variety of rock types have shown that they all exhibit extreme weakening and that the sliding surface is nanometric and contains phases not present at the start. Here we use electron microscopy to examine these two key observations in high-speed friction experiments and compare them with high-pressure faulting experiments. We show that phase transformations occur in both cases and that they are associated with profound weakening. However, fluid is not necessary for such weakening; the nanometric fault filling is inherently weak at seismic sliding rates and it flows by grain boundary sliding. These observations suggest that pseudotachylytes are rare in nature because shear-heating-induced endothermic reactions in fault zones prevent temperature rise to melting. Microstructures preserved in the Punchbowl Fault, an ancestral branch of the San Andreas Fault, suggest similar processes during natural faulting and offer an explanation for the lack of a thermal aureole around major faults.

  3. Quantum and thermal phase slips in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) ultrathin crystalline nanowire: application to single photon detection.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Cécile; Pannetier, Bernard; Villegier, Jean-Claude; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2012-07-11

    We present low-temperature electronic transport properties of superconducting nanowires obtained by nanolithography of 4-nm-thick niobium nitride (NbN) films epitaxially grown on sapphire substrate. Below 6 K, clear evidence of phase slippages is observed in the transport measurements. Upon lowering the temperature, we observe the signatures of a crossover between a thermal and a quantum behavior in the phase slip regimes. We find that phase slips are stable even at the lowest temperatures and that no hotspot is formed. The photoresponse of these nanowires is measured as a function of the light irradiation wavelength and temperature and exhibits a behavior comparable with previous results obtained on thicker films.

  4. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  5. Velocity-dependent frictional behavior and slip magnitude of a fault affected by fluid injection activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpi, L.; Rinaldi, A. P.; Spiers, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid injection is performed or planned for various activities, such as CO2 sequestration, gas storage, waste water disposal, and engineered geothermal system. Static stress and pressure perturbation due to the fluid injection may cause different scale earthquake phenomena, from instrumental recorded micro-seismicity to triggering of human-felt events. With this study we present a sensitivity analysis of the slip magnitude for the fluid injection in a reservoir-like structure. The reservoir, confined within impervious rock units, is composed by a porous rock mass laterally bounded by a fault. The fault is hydraulically connected to the fluid hosting unit. The numerical analysis is based on fully explicit sequential coupling between a multiphase fluid flow and a hydromechanical finite element calculation code. When the system conditions approaches failure, the simulation is performed in a fully dynamic mode. The coupling allows simulating change in permeability due to stress/strain change, as well as the slip on the fault due to overpressure and associated stress changes. Interface elements have been used to include the constitutive law characterizing the frictional behaviour of the fault. The change in friction with different slip velocities has been derived from laboratory results. Velocity- and strain-dependent frictional behavior of different patches of the fault influence the system evolution, resulting in larger or smaller slip length for the same injected volume.

  6. Distinct Nucleation and Propagation Phases of Northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C.; Creager, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    Northern Cascadia episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events appear to have distinct nucleation and propagation phases. We find that there is a roughly linear increase in tremor amplitude over the first ~5 days of each ETS event. We observe a corresponding linear increase in the areal distribution of tremor. These episodes typically initiate down dip, and after approximately 5 days have organized and migrated to fill the up-dip/down-dip width of the tremorgenic zone. After this time, tremor amplitudes vary wildly, modulated by tidal stresses, as the tremor propagates along strike in one or both directions at roughly 8 km/day, continuing for 4-5 weeks. Inter-ETS tremor swarms can begin similarly to ETS events, but do not reach the maximum area and amplitude of ETS events, and instead die away in less than 5-10 days. Since the increase in tremor amplitude during the nucleation phase is proportional to the increase in tremoring area, the source amplitude per unit area is approximately constant, indicating a constant radiated energy rate per unit area associated with tremor. In order to estimate tremor amplitude we use three-component seismograms from temporary deployments and permanent stations (Array of Arrays, CAFE, PNSN, TA) to estimate the amplitude of tremor bursts at the source location, using a method similar to Maeda and Obara (JGR, 2009). Source amplitude, or radiated energy rate, is proportional to the root-mean square of band limited (1.5-5.5 Hz) ground velocity for each 5-minute window. Station ground velocities and tremor locations, determined by a waveform envelope cross-correlation method (Wech and Creager, GRL, 2008), are inverted to obtain source amplitude and station statics, taking into account geometrical spreading and attenuation. The result is a catalog of source amplitudes for each of 40,000 tremor locations in northern Cascadia from 2006 to 2011.

  7. Slip Rates of Main Active Fault Zones Through Turkey Inferred From GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Aktug, B.; Dogru, A.; Tasci, L.; Acar, M.; Emre, O.; Yilmaz, O.; Turgut, B.; Halicioglu, K.; Sabuncu, A.; Bal, O.; Eraslan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Active Fault Map of Turkey was revised and published by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in 2012. This map reveals that there are about 500 faults can generate earthquakes.In order to understand the earthquake potential of these faults, it is needed to determine the slip rates. Although many regional and local studies were performed in the past, the slip rates of the active faults in Turkey have not been determined. In this study, the block modelling, which is the most common method to produce slip rates, will be done. GPS velocities required for block modeling is being compiled from the published studies and the raw data provided then velocity field is combined. To form a homogeneous velocity field, different stochastic models will be used and the optimal velocity field will be achieved. In literature, GPS site velocities, which are computed for different purposes and published, are combined globally and this combined velocity field are used in the analysis of strain accumulation. It is also aimed to develop optimal stochastic models to combine the velocity data. Real time, survey mode and published GPS observations is being combined in this study. We also perform new GPS observations. Furthermore, micro blocks and main fault zones from Active Fault Map Turkey will be determined and homogeneous velocity field will be used to infer slip rates of these active faults. Here, we present the result of first year of the study. This study is being supported by THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF TURKEY (TUBITAK)-CAYDAG with grant no. 113Y430.

  8. Vortex-induced phase slip dissipation in a torioidal Bose-Einstein condensate flowing through a barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Lee A

    2009-01-01

    We study the phase slips superfluid dissipation mechanism with a BEC flowing through a repulsive barrier inside a torus. The barrier is adiabatically raised across the annulus while the condensate is flowing with a finite quantized angular momentum. We found that, at a critical height, a vortex reaches the barrier moving radially from the inner region to eventually circulate along the annulus. At a slightly higher barrier, an anti-vortex also enters into the annulus from the outward region. The vortex and anti-vortex decrease the total angular momentum by leaving behind their respective paths a 2{pi} phase slip. When they collide or orbit along the same loop, the condensate suffers a global 2{pi} phase slip and the total angular momentum decreases by one quantum. The analysis is based on numerical simulations of the dynamical Gross-Pitaevskii equation both in two- and three-dimensions, the latter with the experimental parameters of the torus trap recently created at the NIST institute.

  9. Preventing Slips and Falls through Leisure-Time Physical Activity: Findings from a Study of Limited-Service Restaurants

    PubMed Central

    Caban-Martinez, Alberto J.; Courtney, Theodore K.; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Lombardi, David A.; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brennan, Melanye J.; Perry, Melissa J.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Verma, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective Physical activity has been shown to be beneficial at improving health in some medical conditions and in preventing injury. Epidemiologic studies suggest that physical activity is one factor associated with a decreased risk for slips and falls in the older (≥65 years) adult population. While the risk of slips and falls is generally lower in younger than in older adults; little is known of the relative contribution of physical activity in preventing slips and falls in younger adults. We examined whether engagement in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) was protective of slips and falls among a younger/middle-aged (≤50 years old) working population. Methods 475 workers from 36 limited-service restaurants in six states in the U.S. were recruited to participate in a prospective cohort study of workplace slipping. Information on LTPA was collected at the time of enrollment. Participants reported their slip experience and work hours weekly for up to 12 weeks. We investigated the association between the rate of slipping and the rate of major slipping (i.e., slips that resulted in a fall and/or injury) and LTPA for workers 50 years of age and younger (n = 433, range 18–50 years old) using a multivariable negative binomial generalized estimating equation model. Results The rate of major slips among workers who engaged in moderate (Adjusted Rate Ratio (RR)  = 0.65; 95% Confidence Interval (CI)  =  [0.18–2.44]) and vigorous (RR = 0.64; 95%CI  =  [0.18–2.26]) LTPA, while non-significant, were approximately one-third lower than the rate of major slips among less active workers. Conclusion While not statistically significant, the results suggest a potential association between engagement in moderate and vigorous LTPA and the rate of major slips in younger adults. Additional studies that examine the role of occupational and non-occupational physical activity on the risk of slips, trips and falls among younger and middle aged

  10. Atomistically determined phase-field modeling of dislocation dissociation, stacking fault formation, dislocation slip, and reactions in fcc systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Mianroodi, Jaber; Svendsen, Bob

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the current work is the development of a phase field model for dislocation dissociation, slip and stacking fault formation in single crystals amenable to determination via atomistic or ab initio methods in the spirit of computational material design. The current approach is based in particular on periodic microelasticity (Wang and Jin, 2001; Bulatov and Cai, 2006; Wang and Li, 2010) to model the strongly non-local elastic interaction of dislocation lines via their (residual) strain fields. These strain fields depend in turn on phase fields which are used to parameterize the energy stored in dislocation lines and stacking faults. This energy storage is modeled here with the help of the "interface" energy concept and model of Cahn and Hilliard (1958) (see also Allen and Cahn, 1979; Wang and Li, 2010). In particular, the "homogeneous" part of this energy is related to the "rigid" (i.e., purely translational) part of the displacement of atoms across the slip plane, while the "gradient" part accounts for energy storage in those regions near the slip plane where atomic displacements deviate from being rigid, e.g., in the dislocation core. Via the attendant global energy scaling, the interface energy model facilitates an atomistic determination of the entire phase field energy as an optimal approximation of the (exact) atomistic energy; no adjustable parameters remain. For simplicity, an interatomic potential and molecular statics are employed for this purpose here; alternatively, ab initio (i.e., DFT-based) methods can be used. To illustrate the current approach, it is applied to determine the phase field free energy for fcc aluminum and copper. The identified models are then applied to modeling of dislocation dissociation, stacking fault formation, glide and dislocation reactions in these materials. As well, the tensile loading of a dislocation loop is considered. In the process, the current thermodynamic picture is compared with the classical mechanical

  11. Dislocation microstructures and strain-gradient plasticity with one active slip plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Garroni, Adriana; Müller, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We study dislocation networks in the plane using the vectorial phase-field model introduced by Ortiz and coworkers, in the limit of small lattice spacing. We show that, in a scaling regime where the total length of the dislocations is large, the phase field model reduces to a simpler model of the strain-gradient type. The limiting model contains a term describing the three-dimensional elastic energy and a strain-gradient term describing the energy of the geometrically necessary dislocations, characterized by the tangential gradient of the slip. The energy density appearing in the strain-gradient term is determined by the solution of a cell problem, which depends on the line tension energy of dislocations. In the case of cubic crystals with isotropic elasticity our model shows that complex microstructures may form in which dislocations with different Burgers vector and orientation react with each other to reduce the total self-energy.

  12. Relative tectonic activity assessment along the East Anatolian strike-slip fault, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Abdelrahman

    2016-04-01

    The East Anatolian transform fault is a morphologically distinct and seismically active left-lateral strike-slip fault that extends for ~ 500 km from Karlıova to the Maraş defining the boundary between the Anatolian Block and Syrian Foreland. Deformed landforms along the East Anatolian fault provide important insights into the nature of landscape development within an intra-continental strike-slip fault system. Geomorphic analysis of the East Anatolian fault using geomorphic indices including mountain front sinuosity, stream length-gradient index, drainage density, hypsometric integral, and the valley-width to valley height ratio helped differentiate the faulting into segments of differing degrees of the tectonic and geomorphic activity. Watershed maps for the East Anatolian fault showing the relative relief, incision, and maturity of basins along the fault zone help define segments of the higher seismic risk and help evaluate the regional seismic hazard. The results of the geomorphic indices show a high degree of activity, reveal each segment along the fault is active and represent a higher seismic hazard along the entire fault.

  13. Architectural evolution of the Nojima fault and identification of the activated slip layer by Kobe earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidemi; Omura, Kentaro; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Kenta; Murakami, Masaki; Shimada, Koji

    2007-07-01

    Evolutionary history of Nojima Fault zone is clarified by comprehensive examinations of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical characterizations on a fault zone in deep-drilled core penetrating the Nojima Fault. On the basis of the results, we reconstruct a whole depth profile of the architecture of the Nojima Fault and identify the primal slip layer activated by 1995 Kobe earthquake. The deepest part (8- to 12-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of thin slip layers of pseudotachylite (5 to 10 mm thick each, 10 cm in total). Middle depth (4- to 8-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of fault core (6 to 10 m thick), surrounded by thick (100 m thick) damage zone, characterized by zeolite precipitation. The shallow part of the fault zone (1- to 4-km depth) is composed of distributed narrow shear zones, which are characterized by combination of thin (0.5 cm thick each, 10 cm in total) ultracataclasite layers at the core of shear zones, surrounded by thicker (1 to 3 m thick) damage zones associated with carbonate precipitation. An extremely thin ultracataclasite layer (7 mm thick), activated by the 1995 Kobe earthquake, is clearly identified from numerous past slip layers, overprinting one of the shear zones, as evidenced by conspicuous geological and geophysical anomalies. The Nojima Fault zone was 10 to 100 times thicker at middle depth than that of shallower and deeper depths. The thickening would be explained as a combination of physical and chemical effects as follows. (1) Thickening of "fault core" at middle depth would be attributed to normal stress dependence on thickness of the shear zone and (2) an extreme thickening of "damage zone" in middle depth of the crust would result from the weakening of the fault zone due to super hydrostatic fluid pressure at middle depths. The high fluid pressure would result from faster sealing with low-temperature carbonate at the shallower fault zone.

  14. Role of futC slipped strand mispairing in Helicobacter pylori Lewisy phase variation

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Colbert, Marie-Teresa C.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The O antigen of the Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide is composed of repeating units of fucosylated Lewis (Le) antigens. The α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase (futC) of H. pylori, which catalyzes the conversion of Lex to Ley by addition of fucose, is subject to slipped-strand mispairing involving a homonucleotide (poly-C) tract. To explore the distribution of Le phenotypes within H. pylori cells grown in vitro, 379 single colonies of strain J166 were examined for Le expression. Two major populations with reciprocal Lex/Ley phenotypes were identified. Phenotypes correlated with futC frame status, suggesting that strain J166 represents a mixed population with respect to futC poly-C tract length, which was confirmed by a translational reporter. After hundreds of generations in vitro, phenotypes did not change significantly, indicating that the observed J166 Le diversity reflects the founding population. Since slipped-strand mispairing in the futC poly-C tract was postulated to explain the Ley phenotypic change observed in J166 derivative strain 98-169 isolated 10 months after rhesus monkey challenge, in trans complementation with in-frame futC was performed. Ley synthesis was restored and Lex expression was reciprocally lowered. From these studies, we confirmed the principal role of futC slipped-strand mispairing in Le antigenic variation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18024122

  15. The Friction Evolution of Siliceous Rocks during High-Velocity Slip By Thermal Activated Transition from Powder Lubrication and Rolling to Gouge Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental analyses of the frictional strength of siliceous rocks (granite, tonalite, and diorite) sheared in a rotary apparatus in the velocity range of 0.002-1 m/s (0.3-7.1 MPa, 0.002 - 1 m/s, total slip up to 60 m) revealed that: (1) During long slip-distances (tens of m) at low to moderate velocity (< 5 cm/s) the friction coefficient evolves with a weakening-strengthening-weakening path (Fig. 1a); and (2) The dependence of the friction coefficient on the slip-velocity is non-monotonous with weakening-strengthening-weakening sections (Fig. 1b) (Reches & Lockner, 2010). In a typical run with granite (Fig. 1a), the friction coefficient dropped from a static value of 0.86 to a steady value of 0.35 after 2.5 m of slip, followed by a sharp increase to 0.5±0.1 after ~7 m that was maintained for the next 10 m. Then, the friction started to increase again at 17 m to 0.78 at ~20 m, and finally dropped rapidly to 0.4. The first weakening stage (< 2.5m) is associated with formation of cohesive gouge flakes made of mixture of partially hydrated and recrystallized fine-grained gouge (20-50 nm). The top of these flakes displayed cylindrical rolls, 1 micron in diameter, oriented normal to slip, and the macroscopic weakening correlates with the presence of abundant rolls. SEM analysis of fault surfaces at the second weakening stage (> 17m) revealed abundant melt features such as stretched melt drops, melt coating of solid grains and abundant voids in the melt matrix, contrasting with the total melt in high velocity experiments. These friction-distance curves in our granite experiments (e.g., Fig. 1a) bears a similar path of gabbro friction curve at high velocity (Hirose and Shimamoto 2005). We propose that this non-monotonous friction evolution can be explained as a phase transition from initial pulverization of the brittle stage (low velocity, low normal stress, small slip distance), that leads to powder lubrication by powder rolling, to partial-to-full melting of the

  16. Precursory Seismic Activity Surrounding the High-Slip Patches of the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Hiratsuka, S.; Mori, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The 11 March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on the megathrust along the western margin of the Pacific Ocean where the Pacific plate is being subducted beneath the island of Honshu, Japan. The slip near the Japan Trench was estimated to be enormous; it averaged about 40 m over the upper 100 km of the megathrust and peaked at 60-80 m close to the trench (Lay et al., 2011; Ozawa et al., 2012; Iinuma et al., 2012). Nearly a thousand years are required to accumulate such a large slip for the convergence rate of 8-9 cm/yr along this plate boundary zone. Two days before the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, foreshock activity (largest event M7.3) occurred north of the main-shock epicenter. The epicentral area of the foreshock activity is similar to a M7.0 earthquake in 1981 (Shao et al., 2011). The question arises, why did the 1981 event not trigger a great earthquake? A time difference of 30 years is negligible in comparison with the long time required for the slip deficit of more than 40 m. In order to address this question, we investigated the seismic activity prior to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake using the earthquake catalogue compiled by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) since 1923. For the purpose of the present study, we independently determined the slip distribution of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, using the coseismic displacements derived from the GEONET GPS stations on land (Ozawa et al., 2011) and those from the offshore GPS stations and ocean-bottom water pressure gauges (Sato et al., 2011; Iinuma et al., 2012). The slip distribution is characterized by two high-slip ( 20m) patches separated by a zone of relatively low slip. The peak of the northern high-slip patch is located near the trench while the peak of the southern high-slip patches are situated about 40 km southeast of the main-shock epicenter, about 70 km away from the trench. Combined with the analyses of main-shock rupture process by Ide et al. (2011) and Shao et al. (2011), it is estimated that the

  17. Further Investigation into the Seismic Nucleation Phase of Large Earthquakes with a Focus on Strike-Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, E.; Ji, C.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic motion of an earthquake begins abruptly, but is often initiated by a small interval of weak motion called the seismic nucleation phase (SNP), first named by Ellsworth and Beroza (1995). In their study, Ellsworth and Beroza (1995, 1996) concluded that the SNP was detectable in near-source records of all of the 41 M 1 to M 8 earthquakes they investigated, with the SNP accounting for ~0.5% of the total moment and lasting ~1/6 of the total duration. Concentrating on large earthquakes, Ji et al (2010) investigated the SNP of 19 M 8.0 earthquakes since 1994 using a new approach applied to teleseismic broadband data. They found that ~50% of the earthquakes had a detectable SNP. Burkhart and Ji (2011) found that, in 68 M 7.5 to M 8.0 since 1994, the SNP is clearly detectable in 31 events, with 27 events showing no nucleation phase and 10 having too much noise or not enough stations to tell. After making modifications to the stacking code allowing for more specific station choice, these earthquakes have all been re-examined, and a consistent finding is that strike-slip earthquakes are more likely to exhibit a clear SNP than normal or thrust earthquakes. Continuing to investigate these events, this study finds further conclusive evidence that large shallow, continental, and strike-slip earthquakes show a clear SNP. We find that 11 of the 15 strike-slip earthquakes investigated show a clear SNP, with three having none (including the 2002 Mw 7.8 Denali Fault earthquake, which initiated as a thrust subevent), and one with not enough stations to perform stacking.

  18. Three Temperature Regimes in Superconducting Photon Detectors: Quantum, Thermal and Multiple Phase-Slips as Generators of Dark Counts

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew; Semenov, Alexander; Korneev, Alexander; Korneeva, Yulia; Gol’tsman, Gregory; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    We perform measurements of the switching current distributions of three w ≈ 120 nm wide, 4 nm thick NbN superconducting strips which are used for single-photon detectors. These strips are much wider than the diameter of the vortex cores, so they are classified as quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). We discover evidence of macroscopic quantum tunneling by observing the saturation of the standard deviation of the switching distributions at temperatures around 2 K. We analyze our results using the Kurkijärvi-Garg model and find that the escape temperature also saturates at low temperatures, confirming that at sufficiently low temperatures, macroscopic quantum tunneling is possible in quasi-2D strips and can contribute to dark counts observed in single photon detectors. At the highest temperatures the system enters a multiple phase-slip regime. In this range single phase-slips are unable to produce dark counts and the fluctuations in the switching current are reduced. PMID:25988591

  19. NbSi nanowire quantum phase-slip circuits: dc supercurrent blockade, microwave measurements, and thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. H.; Fenton, J. C.; Hongisto, T. T.; Giblin, S. P.; Zorin, A. B.; Warburton, P. A.

    2013-04-01

    We present a detailed report of microwave irradiation of ultranarrow superconducting nanowires. In our nanofabricated circuits containing a superconducting NbSi nanowire, a dc blockade of current flow was observed at low temperatures below a critical voltage Vc, a strong indicator of the existence of quantum phase-slip (QPS) in the nanowire. We describe the results of applying microwaves to these samples, using a range of frequencies and both continuous-wave and pulsed drive, in order to search for dual Shapiro steps which would constitute an unambiguous demonstration of quantum phase-slip. We observed no steps, and our subsequent thermal analysis suggests that the electron temperature in the series CrO resistors was significantly elevated above the substrate temperature, resulting in sufficient Johnson noise to wash out the steps. To understand the system and inform future work, we have constructed a numerical model of the dynamics of the circuit for dc and ac bias (both continuous-wave and pulsed drive signals) in the presence of Johnson noise. Using this model, we outline important design considerations for device and measurement parameters which should be used in any future experiment to enable the observation of dual Shapiro steps at experimentally accessible temperatures and, thus, lead to the development of a QPS-based quantum current standard.

  20. Geometry, kinematics and slip rate along the Mosha active fault, Central Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, J.-F.; Pics Geological Team

    2003-04-01

    The Mosha fault is one of the major active fault in Central Alborz as shown by its strong historical seismicity and its clear morphological signature. Situated at the vicinity of Tehran city, this ~150 km long ~N100°E trending fault represents an important potential seismic source that threatens the Iranian metropolis. In the framework of an Iranian-French joint research program (PICS) devoted to seismic hazard assessment in the Tehran region, we undertook a morphotectonic (determination of the cumulative displacements and the ages of offset morphologic markers) and paleoseismic (determination of the ages and magnitudes of ancient events) study along the Mosha fault. Our objectives are the estimation of the long-term slip rate (Upper Pleistocene-Holocene) and the mean recurrence interval of earthquakes along the different segments of the fault. Our investigations within the Tar Lake valley, along the eastern part of the fault potentially the site of the 1665 (VII, 6.5) historical earthquake - allows us to calculate a preliminary 2 ± 0.1 mm/yr minimum left lateral slip rate. If we assume a characteristic coseismic average displacement comprised between 0.35 m (Mw 6.5) and 1.2 m (Mw 7.1) calculated from Wells &Coppersmith’s functions (1994) and taking the moment magnitudes attributed to the 1665 and 1830 earthquakes (e.g. Berberian &Yeats, 2001) the mean maximum recurrence intervals along this segment of the Mosha fault are comprised between 160 and 620 yrs.

  1. Earthquake cycle associated with active strike slip faults in central Panamá

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Bennett; Spinler, Joshua C.; Compton, Kathleen; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Gath, Eldon

    2013-04-01

    The rigidity of the Panamá Isthmus is currently under debate, with important implications for seismic hazards to the Panamá Canal and Panamá City. Whereas Panamá has traditionally been described as a non-deforming microplate caught between a number of larger tectonic plates, new paleoseismic data collected at a limited number of trench sites in association with the ongoing expansion of the Panamá Canal may challenge the validity of the rigid microplate hypothesis. Crustal velocities from a new, ~100 km aperture, 5-station continuous GPS network constructed across the Rio Gatún, Limón, and Pedro Miguel fault zones confirm that these fault zones are active, forming a system of faults that traverse central Panamá in close proximity to the Panamá Canal and Panamá City. However, the slip rates inferred from these new geodetic data are lower than the geologic rates when using an elastic halfspace model. Differences among previous geodetic investigations, which concluded that Panamá is rigid, and the geological slip rate estimates are explained by earthquake cycle effects associated with long recurrence intervals relative to lower crust and upper mantle Maxwell relaxation times. Late in the earthquake cycle the geodetic strain field is broadly distributed, giving the false appearance of low seismic hazards.

  2. Tectonics and Quaternary sequence development of basins along the active Vienna Basin strike-slip fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, B.; Lomax, J.; Meurers, B.; Smit, J.; Preusser, F.; Decker, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Vienna Basin strike-slip fault is a continent scale active fault extending over a distance of some 300 km from the Eastern Alps through the Vienna Basin into the Western Carpathians. Sinistral movement causes the formation of several tight Pleistocene strike-slip basins within the older Miocene Vienna Basin. These sub-basins not only have a high relevance for groundwater exploitation but their fault activities depict serious seismic hazards. Basins are filled with fluvial sediments from the Danube and, closer to the Alpine front, with thick alluvial fan deposits. However, knowledge on the stratigraphy and tectonics is sparse and rather limited to the Miocene part of the Vienna Basin as it hosts giant hydrocarbon fields. This study tackles two major questions: (i) What is the effect of Quaternary climatic oscillations and subsidence on the sequence development of the alluvial fans and (ii) what is the deformation style of these basins? To answer (i) we present a series of new OSL ages and biotic data from both, surface and cores, to better constrain the timing of fan activity, fan abandonment but also to constrain the onset of Pleistocene basin formation. For (ii) we utilize information from unparalleled geophysical and geological data. Specifically we utilize industrial Bouguer gravity's derivatives to highlight shallow structures and to compensate for the lag of fault trace information. The integration of geological and geophysical data highlights textbook-like models of strike-slip basins, with typical features like Riedel shears with intervening relay ramps, en-echelon sidewall faults and a cross-basin fault zone delimiting opposite depocenters. The infill reflects a distinct cyclicity with thick sequences of coarse sediments deposited during colder periods and thin sequences of paleosol and flood sediments deposited during warmer periods. Ages indicate main activity around the short peak glacial periods and basin formation starting c. 300 ka ago. The

  3. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  4. Experimental Deformation of Olivine Single Crystal at Mantle P and T: Pressure Effect on Olivine Dislocation Slip-System Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Girard, J.; Chen, J.; Amiguet, E.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropies observed in the upper mantle are interpreted from lattice preferred orientations (LPO) produced experimentally in olivine, which depends on the dominant dislocation slip systems. At low pressure P<3 GPa, mantle temperature (T) and in dry conditions, olivine [100] dislocation slip dominates the less active [001] slip. This tends to align crystal fast velocity [100] axis with the principal shear direction. Yet recent high-pressure deformation experiments (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Min., 92, 1436; Raterron et al., 2008, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.07.026) show that [001](010) slip system dominates [100](010) system in the (P,T) range of the deep upper mantle. This may promote a shear-parallel slow-velocity [001] axis and may explain the seismic-velocity attenuation observed at depth >200 km (Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). In order to further constrain the effect of P on olivine slip system activities, which is classically quantified by the activation volume V* in power creep laws, deformation experiments were carried out in poor water condition, at P>5 GPa and T=1400°C, on pure forsterite (Fo100) and San Carlos olivine crystals, using the Deformation-DIA apparatus at the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY). Ten crystals were oriented in order to active either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) plane, or both [100](001) and [001](100) systems together. Constant applied stress σ <300 MPa and specimen strain rates were monitored in situ using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively, for a total of 27 investigated steady state conditions. The obtained rheological data were compared with data previously obtained in comparable T and σ conditions, but at room P, by Darot and Gueguen (1981, JGR, 86, 6219) for Fo100 and by Bai et al. (1991, JGR, 96, 2441) for San Carlos olivine. This new set of data confirms previous deformation data

  5. Active faulting induced by the slip partitioning in the Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Frédérique; Feuillet, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    AGUADOMAR marine cruise data acquired 11 years ago allowed us to identified and map two main sets of active faults within the Lesser Antilles arc (Feuillet et al., 2002; 2004). The faults belonging to the first set, such as Morne-Piton in Guadeloupe, bound up to 100km-long and 50km-wide arc-perpendicular graben or half graben that disrupt the fore-arc reef platforms. The faults of the second set form right-stepping en echelon arrays, accommodating left-lateral slip along the inner, volcanic islands. The two fault systems form a sinistral horsetail east of the tip of the left-lateral Puerto Rico fault zone that takes up the trench-parallel component of convergence between the North-American and Caribbean plates west of the Anegada passage. In other words, they together accommodate large-scale slip partitioning along the northeastern arc, consistent with recent GPS measurements (Lopez et al., 2006). These intraplate faults are responsible for a part of the shallow seismicity in the arc and have produce damaging historical earthquakes. Two magnitude 6.3 events occurred in the last 25 years along the inner en echelon faults, the last one on November 21 2004 in Les Saintes in the Guadeloupe archipelago. To better constrain the seismic hazard related to the inner arc faults and image the ruptures and effects on the seafloor of Les Saintes 2004 earthquake, we acquired new marine data between 23 February and 25 March 2009 aboard the French R/V le Suroît during the GWADASEIS cruise. We present here the data (high-resolution 72 channel and very high-resolution chirp 3.5 khz seismic reflection profiles, EM300 multibeam bathymetry, Küllenberg coring and SAR imagery) and the first results. We identified, mapped and characterized in detail several normal to oblique fault systems between Martinique and Saba. They offset the seafloor by several hundred meters and crosscut all active volcanoes, among them Nevis Peak, Soufriere Hills, Soufriere de Guadeloupe and Montagne Pel

  6. Quantum phase slips in superconducting Nb nanowire networks deposited on self-assembled Si templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, C.; Trezza, M.; Chiarella, F.; Vecchione, A.; Bondarenko, V. P.; Prischepa, S. L.; Attanasio, C.

    2012-10-01

    Robust porous silicon substrates were employed for generating interconnected networks of superconducting ultrathin Nb nanowires. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to investigate the morphology of the samples, which constitute of polycrystalline single wires with grain size of about 10 nm. The samples exhibit nonzero resistance over a broad temperature range below the critical temperature, fingerprint of phase slippage processes. The transport data are satisfactory reproduced by models describing both thermal and quantum fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter in thin homogeneous superconducting wires.

  7. Active normal faulting during the 1997 seismic sequence in Colfiorito, Umbria: Did slip propagate to the surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildon, Zoë K.; Roberts, Gerald P.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Wedmore, Luke N. J.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.

    2016-10-01

    In order to determine whether slip during an earthquake on the 26th September 1997 propagated to the surface, structural data have been collected along a bedrock fault scarp in Umbria, Italy. These collected data are used to investigate the relationship between the throw associated with a debated surface rupture (observed as a pale unweathered stripe at the base of the bedrock fault scarp) and the strike, dip and slip-vector. Previous studies have suggested that the surface rupture was produced either by primary surface slip or secondary compaction of hangingwall sediments. Some authors favour the latter because sparse surface fault dip measurements do not match nodal plane dips at depth. It is demonstrated herein that the strike, dip and height of the surface rupture, represented by a pale unweathered stripe at the base of the bedrock scarp, shows a systematic relationship with respect to the geometry and kinematics of faulting in the bedrock. The strike and dip co-vary and the throw is greatest where the strike is oblique to the slip-vector azimuth where the highest dip values are recorded. This implies that the throw values vary to accommodate spatial variation in the strike and dip of the fault across fault plane corrugations, a feature that is predicted by theory describing conservation of strain along faults, but not by compaction. Furthermore, published earthquake locations and reported fault dips are consistent with the analysed surface scarps when natural variation for surface dips and uncertainty for nodal plane dips at depth are taken into account. This implies that the fresh stripe is indeed a primary coseismic surface rupture whose slip is connected to the seismogenic fault at depth. We discuss how this knowledge of the locations and geometry of the active faults can be used as an input for seismic hazard assessment.

  8. Active flexural-slip faulting: A study from the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Chen, Jie; Thompson, Jessica A.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    The flexural-slip fault (FSF), a type of secondary fault generated by bed-parallel slip, occurs commonly and plays an important role in accommodating fold growth. Although the kinematics and mechanics of FSFs are well studied, relatively few field observations or geometric models explore its geomorphic expression. In the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China, suites of well-preserved FSF scarps displace fluvial terraces in the Mingyaole and Wulagen folds. Integrating interpretations of Google Earth images, detailed geologic and geomorphic mapping, and differential GPS measurements of terrace surfaces, we summarize geomorphic features that typify these faults and create kinematic models of active flexural-slip faulting. Our study indicates the following: (i) FSF scarps commonly occur near synclinal hinges, irrespective of whether (a) the dip direction of beds on either side of the hinge is unidirectional or in opposite directions, (b) the hinge is migrating or fixed, or (c) the hinge shape is narrow and angular or wide and curved. (ii) Active FSFs are likely to produce higher scarps on steeper beds, whereas lower or no topographic scarps typify gentler beds. (iii) Tilt angles of the terrace surface displaced above FSFs progressively decrease farther away from the hinge, with abrupt changes in slope coinciding with FSF scarps; the changes in tilt angle and scarp height have a predictable geometric relationship. (iv) Active FSFs can accommodate a significant fraction of total slip and play a significant role in folding deformation. (v) Active FSFs may be used to assess seismic hazards associated with active folds and associated blind thrusts.

  9. Fabrication of Activated Rice Husk Charcoal by Slip Casting as a Hybrid Material for Water Filter Aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuaprakone, T.; Wongphaet, N.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-04-01

    Activated charcoal has been widely used as an odor absorbent in household and water purification industry. Filtration equipment for drinking water generally consists of four parts, which are microporous membrane (porous alumina ceramic or diatomite, or porous polymer), odor absorbent (activated carbon), hard water treatment (ion exchange resin), and UV irradiation. Ceramic filter aid is usually prepared by slip casting of alumina or diatomite. The membrane offers high flux, high porosity and maximum pore size does not exceed 0.3 μm. This study investigated the fabrication of hybrid activated charcoal tube for water filtration and odor absorption by slip casting. The suitable rice husk charcoal and water ratio was 48 to 52 wt% by weight with 1.5wt% (by dry basis) of CMC binder. The green rice husk charcoal bodies were dried and fired between 700-900 °C in reduction atmosphere. The resulting prepared slip in high speed porcelain pot for 60 min and sintered at 700 °C for 1 h showed the highest specific surface area as 174.95 m2/g. The characterizations of microstructure and pore size distribution as a function of particle size were investigated.

  10. Slip Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombes, S. D.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the process of developing the Science Lessons from Industrial Processes (SLIP) kits by 16 British science teachers. The content, applicability, and components of these kits (based upon local industries) are also included. (HM)

  11. Preceding seismic activity and slow slip events in the source area of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Yoshida, Keisuke

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake ruptured a large area of the megathrust east of NE Japan. The earthquake's magnitude was 9.0, substantially larger than predicted. It is important to know what occurred in the source area prior to this great megathrust earthquake to improve understanding of the nucleation processes of large earthquakes and risk assessments in subduction zones. Seafloor observation data revealed the existence of two extremely large slip patches: one just updip of the mainshock hypocenter and the other 80-100 km to the north near the trench axis. For 70-90 years before 2003, M > 6 events and slips of M > c. 7 events on the megathrust occurred in the areas surrounding these two large slip patches. Seismic activity had increased since at least 2003 in the downdip portion of the source area of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. In addition, long-term accelerated slow slip occurred in this downdip portion of the source area in the decades before the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. About 1 month before the earthquake, a slow slip event (SSE) took place at relatively shallow depths between the two large slip patches, accompanied by foreshock activity. Both the slow slip and foreshocks propagated from north to south toward the southern large slip patch. Two days before the earthquake, an M 7.3 foreshock and an associated postseismic slip began at relatively deep depths in the megathrust between the two large slip patches. In addition, a slow slip type event seems to have occurred approximately half a day after the M 7.3 foreshock near the mainshock hypocenter. This slow slip event and the foreshock activity again propagated from north to south toward the mainshock hypocenter. These long- and short-term preceding seismic and aseismic slip gradually reduced the interplate coupling, increased shear stresses at the two large slip patches (i.e., two strong asperity patches), and finally led to the rupture of the great Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

  12. Analysis of slip activity and heterogeneous deformation in tension and tension-creep of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt %) using in-situ SEM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Boehlert, C. J.; Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    The deformation behavior of a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt %) near-α alloy was investigated during in-situ deformation inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile experiments were performed at 296 K and 728 K (≈0.4 T m), while tensile-creep experiments were performed at 728 K and 763 K. Active deformation systems were identified using electron backscattered diffraction-based slip trace analysis. Both basal and prismatic slip systems were active during the tensile experiments. Basal slip was observed for grains clustered around high Schmid factor orientations, while prismatic slip exhibited less dependence on the crystallographic orientation. The tension-creep experiments revealed less slip but more development of grain boundary ledges than in the higher strain rate tensile experiments. Some of the grain boundary ledges evolved into grain boundary cracks, and grain boundaries oriented nearly perpendicular to the tensile axis formed ledges earlier in the deformation process. Grain boundaries with high misorientations also tended to form ledges earlier than those with lower misorientations. Most of the grain boundary cracks formed in association with grains displaying hard orientations, where the c-axis was nearly perpendicular to the tensile direction. For the tension-creep experiments, pronounced basal slip was observed in the lower-stress creep regime and the activity of prismatic slip increased with increasing creep stress and temperature.

  13. Sulfamerazine: Understanding the Influence of Slip Planes in the Polymorphic Phase Transformation through X-Ray Crystallographic Studies and ab Initio Lattice Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pallipurath, Anuradha R; Skelton, Jonathan M; Warren, Mark R; Kamali, Naghmeh; McArdle, Patrick; Erxleben, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the polymorphism exhibited by organic active-pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), in particular the relationships between crystal structure and the thermodynamics of polymorph stability, is vital for the production of more stable drugs and better therapeutics, and for the economics of the pharmaceutical industry in general. In this article, we report a detailed study of the structure-property relationships among the polymorphs of the model API, Sulfamerazine. Detailed experimental characterization using synchrotron radiation is complemented by computational modeling of the lattice dynamics and mechanical properties, in order to study the origin of differences in millability and to investigate the thermodynamics of the phase equilibria. Good agreement is observed between the simulated phonon spectra and mid-infrared and Raman spectra. The presence of slip planes, which are found to give rise to low-frequency lattice vibrations, explains the higher millability of Form I compared to Form II. Energy/volume curves for the three polymorphs, together with the temperature dependence of the thermodynamic free energy computed from the phonon frequencies, explains why Form II converts to Form I at high temperature, whereas Form III is a rare polymorph that is difficult to isolate. The combined experimental and theoretical approach employed here should be generally applicable to the study of other systems that exhibit polymorphism.

  14. Activated Very Low Frequency Earthquakes By the Slow Slip Events in the Ryukyu Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Sunagawa, N.

    2014-12-01

    The Ryukyu Trench (RT), where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting, has had no known thrust earthquakes with a Mw>8.0 in the last 300 years. However, the rupture source of the 1771 tsunami has been proposed as an Mw > 8.0 earthquake in the south RT. Based on the dating of tsunami boulders, it has been estimated that large tsunamis occur at intervals of 150-400 years in the south Ryukyu arc (RA) (Araoka et al., 2013), although they have not occurred for several thousand years in the central and northern Ryukyu areas (Goto et al., 2014). To address the discrepancy between recent low moment releases by earthquakes and occurrence of paleo-tsunamis in the RT, we focus on the long-term activity of the very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs), which are good indicators of the stress release in the shallow plate interface. VLFEs have been detected along the RT (Ando et al., 2012), which occur on the plate interface or at the accretionary prism. We used broadband data from the F-net of NIED along the RT and from the IRIS network. We applied two filters to all the raw broadband seismograms: a 0.02-0.05 Hz band-pass filter and a 1 Hz high-pass filter. After identification of the low-frequency events from the band-pass-filtered seismograms, the local and teleseismic events were removed. Then we picked the arrival time of the maximum amplitude of the surface wave of the VLFEs and determined the epicenters. VLFEs occurred on the RA side within 100 km from the trench axis along the RT. Distribution of the 6670 VLFEs from 2002 to 2013 could be divided to several clusters. Principal large clusters were located at 27.1°-29.0°N, 25.5°-26.6°N, and 122.1°-122.4°E (YA). We found that the VLFEs of the YA are modulated by repeating slow slip events (SSEs) which occur beneath south RA. The activity of the VLFEs increased to two times of its ordinary rate in 15 days after the onset of the SSEs. Activation of the VLFEs could be generated by low stress change of 0.02-20 kPa increase in

  15. Refining the shallow slip deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Milliner, Christopher W. D.; Dolan, James F.; Hollingsworth, James; Leprince, Sebastien; Ayoub, Francois

    2016-03-01

    Geodetic slip inversions for three major (Mw > 7) strike-slip earthquakes (1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah) show a 15-60 per cent reduction in slip near the surface (depth < 2 km) relative to the slip at deeper depths (4-6 km). This significant difference between surface coseismic slip and slip at depth has been termed the shallow slip deficit (SSD). The large magnitude of this deficit has been an enigma since it cannot be explained by shallow creep during the interseismic period or by triggered slip from nearby earthquakes. One potential explanation for the SSD is that the previous geodetic inversions lack data coverage close to surface rupture such that the shallow portions of the slip models are poorly resolved and generally underestimated. In this study, we improve the static coseismic slip inversion for these three earthquakes, especially at shallow depths, by: (1) including data capturing the near-fault deformation from optical imagery and SAR azimuth offsets; (2) refining the interferometric synthetic aperture radar processing with non-boxcar phase filtering, model-dependent range corrections, more complete phase unwrapping by SNAPHU (Statistical Non-linear Approach for Phase Unwrapping) assuming a maximum discontinuity and an on-fault correlation mask; (3) using more detailed, geologically constrained fault geometries and (4) incorporating additional campaign global positioning system (GPS) data. The refined slip models result in much smaller SSDs of 3-19 per cent. We suspect that the remaining minor SSD for these earthquakes likely reflects a combination of our elastic model's inability to fully account for near-surface deformation, which will render our estimates of shallow slip minima, and potentially small amounts of interseismic fault creep or triggered slip, which could `make up' a small percentages of the coseismic SSD during the interseismic period. Our results indicate that it is imperative that slip inversions include

  16. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  17. Speckled-like Pattern in the Germinal Center (SLIP-GC), a Nuclear GTPase Expressed in Activation-induced Deaminase-expressing Lymphomas and Germinal Center B Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Kathleen; Brar, Sukhdev; Ray, Madhumita; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Bolland, Silvia; Verkoczy, Laurent; Diaz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    We identified a novel GTPase, SLIP-GC, with expression limited to a few tissues, in particular germinal center B cells. It lacks homology to any known proteins, indicating that it may belong to a novel family of GTPases. SLIP-GC is expressed in germinal center B cells and in lymphomas derived from germinal center B cells such as large diffuse B cell lymphomas. In cell lines, SLIP-GC is expressed in lymphomas that express activation-induced deaminase (AID) and that likely undergo somatic hypermutation. SLIP-GC is a nuclear protein, and it localizes to replication factories. Reduction of SLIP-GC levels in the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Raji and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines resulted in an increase in DNA breaks and apoptosis that was AID-dependent, as simultaneous reduction of AID abrogated the deleterious effects of SLIP-GC reduction. These results strongly suggest that SLIP-GC is a replication-related protein in germinal center B cells whose reduction is toxic to cells through an AID-dependent mechanism. PMID:19734146

  18. Global distribution of GPS losses of phase lock and total electron content slips during the 2005 May 15 and the 2003 November 20 magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasyukevich, Yuriy; Astafeva, Elvira; Givetev, Ilya; Maksikov, Aleksey

    2015-12-01

    Using data of worldwide network of GPS receivers we investigated losses of GPS phase lock (LoL) during two strong magnetic storms. At fundamental L1 frequency, LoL density is found to increase up to 0.25 % and at L2 frequency the increase is up to 3 %. This is several times as much compared with the background level. During the 2003 November 20 magnetic storm, the number of total electron content (TEC) slips exceeded the background level ~50 times. During superstorms, the most number of GPS LoL is observed at low and high latitudes. At the same time, the area of numerous TEC slips correspond to auroral oval boundaries.

  19. Block-like motion of Tibetan Plateau: Evidences from active faults , GPS velocities and recent earthquake slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Cheng, J.

    2012-12-01

    continuous models have been proposed to explain GPS observations in many active regions. Here we first describe a division of active blocks in the Tibetan plateau and its adjacent regions in detail from recently published and unpublished maps showing distribution of active faults, discuss basic features of boundary faults around the blocks, block-like motions and their interior deformation patterns in the Quaternary. Then we examine present-day vectors and mechanical parameters of the active blocks both from the GPS observations and recent earthquake slips. All these analyses demonstrate that the block-like motion prevail in the Tibetan Plateau.

  20. A slow-slipping active fold and thrust system at the SE corner of the Atacama basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Shyu, J. H.; González, G.

    2009-12-01

    The western South American offshore is one of the major active convergent plate boundaries in the world, where the Nazca plate is subducting northeastward beneath the South American plate at a rate of about 84 mm/yr. Despite of this rapid plate convergence, the forearc region of western Andes does not seem to undergo large deformation at present. In order to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of active forearc deformation related to the plate convergence, we investigated tectono-geomorphic features in the area of Tilocalar, near the SE margin of the Atacama Basin in northern Chile, where active structures have been previously identified. To map topographic features produced by active structures, we used a combination of several remote-sensing data sets, including digital elevation models (DEM) made from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM), as well as higher resolution ASTER and QuickBird satellite images. Detailed geomorphic surveys using real time kinematic (RTK) GPS are carried out in the field to obtain high-resolution topographic profiles across these features. We also performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of deformed volcanic rocks in order to determine the long-term slip rates of the active structures. The hyper-aridity of the Atacama Basin results in extremely low erosion and sedimentation rates in the area. As a result, the present relief of land surface is mostly produced by neotectonic activity, and can be used as deformation marker. In the Tilocalar area, several N-S trending ridges are present. These ridges, generally several tens of meters high, are likely formed by asymmetric anticlines or monoclines with steep forelimbs facing east, and these folds are likely fault-propagation folds produced by underlying thrust faults. We suggest that these faults merge at depth to become a major active thrust system. From 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, we found that the surface ignimbrites mostly deposited in latest Pliocene (2.3~4.3 Ma). If the structures have been

  1. Slip transfer and dislocation nucleation processes in multiphase ordered Ni-Fe-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A.; Bibala

    1999-04-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) alloys with the nominal composition Ni-30 at. pct Fe-20 at. pct Al having eutectic microstructures were used to study slip transfer across interphase boundaries and dislocation nucleation at the interfacial steps. The slip transfer from the ductile second phase, {gamma}(fcc) containing ordered {gamma}{prime}(L1{sub 2}) precipitates, to the ordered {beta}(B2) phase and the generation of dislocations at the interface steps were interpreted using the mechanisms proposed for similar processes involving grain boundaries in polycrystalline single-phase materials. The criteria for predicting the slip systems activated as a result of slip transfer across grain boundaries were found to be applicable for interphase boundaries in the multiphase ordered Ni-Fe-Al alloys. The potential of tailoring the microstructures and interfaces to promote slip transfer and thereby enhance the intrinsic ductility of dislocation-density-limited intermetallic alloys is discussed.

  2. The Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault, Woodlark Rift: Spatial and Temporal Slip Distributions, and Rider Block Abandonment Chronology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, S. M.; Little, T.; Norton, K. P.; Mizera, M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Low-angle normal faults (LANFs) have induced debate due to their apparent non-Andersonian behavior and lack of significant seismicity associated with slip. Dipping ~21°, the Mai'iu Fault, Woodlark Rift is an active, rapidly slipping LANF located at the transition between continental extension and seafloor spreading. Based on campaign GPS data [Wallace et al., 2014] the Mai'iu Fault is thought to slip at 7-9 mm/yr, accommodating a large fraction of total basinal extension, although it is uncertain whether slip is seismic or aseismic. Surface geomorphology indicates that the fault scarp is not significantly eroded despite high rainfall and ~3000 m relief. We have obtained 15 rock samples (~5 m spacing) from the lowermost Mai'iu Fault scarp in order to determine Holocene slip rate and style over the last ~10 kyr using cosmogenic 10Be in quartz. This slip direction-parallel profile in exposed bedrock is supported by a suite of soil samples for 10Be analysis, which extend our temporal coverage. We model exposure age data in terms of slip rate and style by identification of discontinuities within the profile. Of particular interest is whether slip is seismic or aseismic. In addition we analyze the structure of conglomeratic strata and abandoned, back-rotated rider blocks in the Mai'iu Fault hanging wall, which record Quaternary splay faulting and tilting in response to sustained LANF slip. 20 quartz pebble samples were obtained from hanging wall conglomerates for the purpose of calculating cosmogenic burial (26Al/10Be) ages. These constrain the chronology of Quaternary hanging wall deformation. High-angle (~50°) faulting competes with LANF slip at <2 km depths, with high-angle faults cutting the main LANF and exposing footwall metabasalt up to 2 km north of the Mai'iu Fault. Past splay faulting is recorded in the progressive back-tilting and folding of the Gwoira rider block in a ~2 km deep depression in the corrugated Mai'iu fault plane. Our results provide new

  3. Slip-rate Estimation of Active Fault by Luminescence Dating on Deformed River Terraces at Tsaotun, Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chen, W.; Lee, C.

    2003-12-01

    This study carried out luminescence ages of the deformed terraces located at Tsaotun in central Taiwan. These terraces are considered as a result of crustal deformation caused by recent activity of the Chelungpu fault, 1999 surface rupture. Since this active fault runs through urban area, it is urgently needed to figure out its neotectonic behavior, including slip-rate and recurrence interval. Based on new ages, we also discuss the terrace correlation and its related structures. The study terraces are all strath terraces with only a few meters of veneered fluvial deposits on top. Due to the strong stream-power, nearly all the outcrops are dominated by fluvial cobbles, which is worst condition to preserve the syndepositional carbonaceous materials. Alternatively, optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating uses sandy quartz as the material and even has longer dating upper limit (up to several hundreds of years). Fortunately, sandy layer are found intercalated within the fluvial cobbles in studying terraces. We adopted the Single-Aliquot Regenerative (SAR) dose protocol on large aliquots of 90-150μ m quartz, which were cleaned using HCL, H2O2 and HF in the usual way. In case of incomplete bleaching during quick deposition, the OSL/TL ratio was adopted to approach the true De. Dosimetry is derived by ICP-MS and XRF analyses. For ascertainment of the initial bleaching of fluvial sediment, the modern samples collected in river bed of Wuhsi were also measured. Based on the results of modern samples, we believe that the residuals are inevitable in younger sediments, especially along the upper stream. On the contrary, the samples older than 10 kyr are little influenced due to the larger age error than the younger ones. The OSL age of the terrace samples in the hanging wall is dated ca. 13 kyr, which has been corrected for poorly-bleaching problem. Comparing to the ages collected down hole in the footwalls, we found out vertical displacements of ca. 67 and 37 m, has been

  4. Olivine Slip-system Activity at High Pressure: Implications for Upper-Mantle Rheology and Seismic Anisotropy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, P.; Castelnau, O.; Geenen, T.; Merkel, S.

    2013-12-01

    The past decade abounded in technical developments allowing the investigation of materials rheology at high pressure (P > 3 GPa) [1]. This had a significant impact on our understanding of olivine rheology in the Earth asthenosphere, where P is in the range 3 - 13 GPa. A dislocation slip-system transition induced by pressure has been documented in dry Fe-bearing olivine [2]; it induces changes in olivine aggregate lattice preferred orientation (LPO) [3,4], which may explain the seismic velocity anisotropy attenuation observed at depths > 200 km in the upper mantle [5]. Deformation experiments carried out on olivine single crystals at high pressure allowed quantifying the effect of P on individual slip system activities [6]. Integration of these data, together with data on lattice friction arising from computational models (e.g., [7]), into analytical or mean-field numerical models for aggregate plasticity gave insight on the viscosity and LPO of olivine aggregates deformed at geological conditions in the dislocation creep regime [8,9]. We will review these recent findings and their implications for upper mantle rheology and seismic anisotropy. [1] Raterron & Merkel, 2009, J. Sync. Rad., 16, 748 ; [2] Raterron et al., 2009, PEPI, 172, 74 ; [3] Jung et al., 2009, Nature Geoscience, 2, 73 ; [4] Ohuchi et al., 2011, EPSL, 304, 55 ; [5] Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731 ; [6] Raterron et al., 2012, PEPI, 200-201, 105 ; [7] Durinck et al., 2007, EJM, 19, 631 ; [8] Castelnau et al., 2010, C.R. Physique, 11, 304 ; [9] Raterron et al., 2011, PEPI, 188, 26

  5. Active faulting within a megacity: the geometry and slip rate of the Pardisan thrust in central Tehran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebian, M.; Copley, A. C.; Fattahi, M.; Ghoraishi, M.; Jackson, J. A.; Nazari, H.; Sloan, R. A.; Walker, R. T.

    2016-09-01

    Tehran, the capital city of Iran with a population of over 12 million, is one of the largest urban centres within the seismically active Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. Although several historic earthquakes have affected Tehran, their relation to individual faults is ambiguous for most. This ambiguity is partly due to a lack of knowledge about the locations, geometries, and seismic potential of structures that have been obscured by dramatic urban growth over the past three decades, and which have covered most of the young geomorphic markers and natural exposures. Here we use aerial photographs from 1956, combined with an ˜1 m DEM derived from stereo Pleiades satellite imagery, to investigate the geomorphology of a growing anticline above a thrust fault - the Pardisan thrust - within central Tehran. The topography across the ridge is consistent with a steep ramp extending from close to the surface to a depth of ˜2 km, where it presumably connects with a shallow-dipping detachment. No primary fault is visible at the surface, and it is possible that the faulting dissipates in the near surface as distributed shearing. We use optically-stimulated luminescence to date remnants of uplifted and warped alluvial deposits that are offset vertically across the Pardisan fault, providing minimum uplift and slip-rates of at least 1 mm/yr. Our study shows that the faults within the Tehran urban region have relatively rapid rates of slip, are important in the regional tectonics, and have a great impact on earthquake hazard assessment of the city and surrounding region.

  6. Imaging the spatiotemporal evolution of a slow slip event near the Boso Peninsula, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, J.; Kato, A.; Obara, K.; Miura, S.; Kato, T.

    2015-12-01

    Continuous GPS measurements have identified numerous slow slip events (SSEs), but our knowledge of the spatiotemporal evolution of SSEs remains limited. For example, the detailed spatiotemporal correlation between slow slip and its associated seismic activity has not been well resolved, and we have limited knowledge of SSE nucleation. Thus, elucidating the detailed spatiotemporal evolution of SSEs may help constrain the physics of SSEs and their associated seismic activity. In this study, we use a modified version of the Network Inversion Filter (NIF) to investigate the detailed spatiotemporal evolution of SSEs including the nucleation and spatiotemporal correlations with seismicity. We focus on a SSE that occurred near the Boso Peninsula, in central Japan, from December 2013 to January 2014. We apply the modified NIF to GPS time series to estimate the spatiotemporal evolution of daily cumulative slip and slip rate on the subducting Philippine Sea plate. We find that the evolution of the SSE and its associated seismicity is divided into two distinct phases. Slip initially accelerated slowly with low slip rates, low propagation speeds, and no accompanying seismicity during the early phase, and then accelerated more rapidly with higher slip rates, a higher propagation speed, and local earthquake swarm activity during the later phase. The seismicity was highly correlated in space and time with slip rate, suggesting that the swarm activity was triggered by stress loading due to the slow slip. The transition from the slow to faster phase shares some similarities with the nucleation of megathrust earthquakes inferred from foreshock activities, suggesting that SSEs may provide insights into the nucleation of large earthquakes.

  7. Analysis of Slip Activity and Deformation Modes in Tension and Tension-Creep Tests of Cast Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (Wt Pct) at Elevated Temperatures Using In Situ SEM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Boehlert, Carl J.; Wang, Qudong; Yin, Dongdi; Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-05-01

    The tension and tension-creep deformation behavior at elevated temperatures of a cast Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (wt pct, GW103) alloy was investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 598 K (200 °C to 325 °C). The active slip systems were identified using an EBSD-based slip trace analysis methodology. The results showed that for all of the tests, basal slip was the most likely system to be activated, and non-basal slip was activated to some extent depending on the temperature. No twinning was observed. For the tension tests, non-basal slip consisted of ~35 pct of the deformation modes at low temperatures (473 K and 523 K (200 °C and 250 °C)), while non-basal slip accounted for 12 and 7 pct of the deformation modes at high temperatures (573 K and 598 K (300 °C and 325 °C)), respectively. For the tension-creep tests, non-basal slip accounted for 31 pct of the total slip systems at low temperatures, while this value decreased to 10 to 16 pct at high temperatures. For a given temperature, the relative activity for prismatic slip in the tension-creep tests was slightly greater than that for the tension tests, while the activity for pyramidal slip was lower. Slip-transfer in neighboring grains was observed for the low-temperature tests. Intergranular cracking was the main cracking mode, while some intragranular cracks were observed for the tension-creep tests at high temperature and low stress. Grain boundary ledges were prevalently observed for both the tension and tension-creep tests at high temperatures, which suggests that besides dislocation slip, grain boundary sliding also contributed to the deformation.

  8. A phase-field approach to no-slip boundary conditions in dissipative particle dynamics and other particle models for fluid flow in geometrically complex confined systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2009-06-21

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an effective mesoscopic particle model with a lower computational cost than molecular dynamics because of the soft potentials that it employs. However, the soft potential is not strong enough to prevent the DPD particles that are used to represent the fluid from penetrating solid boundaries represented by stationary DPD particles. A phase-field variable, phi(x,t), is used to indicate the phase at point x and time t, with a smooth transition from -1 (phase 1) to +1 (phase 2) across the interface. We describe an efficient implementation of no-slip boundary conditions in DPD models that combines solid-liquid particle-particle interactions with reflection at a sharp boundary located with subgrid scale accuracy using the phase field. This approach can be used for arbitrarily complex flow geometries and other similar particle models (such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics), and the validity of the model is demonstrated by DPD simulations of flow in confined systems with various geometries.

  9. The role of latent and active failures in workplace slips, trips and falls: an information processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim

    2009-03-01

    The vast majority of the published workplace slips, trips and falls (STF) literature is exceedingly narrow in its focus and often ignores wider systems issues in workplace STF aetiology. There is little recognition within the published literature of the importance of latent failures or the upstream organisational and cultural contexts within which workplace STF occur. This is unfortunate, as a systems approach to workplace STF analysis, that is inclusive of latent design and work organisation factors that often shape worker behaviour patterns related to STF risk (e.g. rushing, risk taking), is fundamental to the development of effective prevention measures. The aims of this paper are to provide an understanding of workplace STF causation that is cognisant of the potential role of both active and latent failures in STF causation. The paper presents an ergonomics model for workplace STF analysis that highlights information processing in STF aetiology, the STF incident process and the interaction between latent and active failures in STF causation. The paper draws upon ergonomics research conducted in a range of occupational contexts to illustrate the key features of the model as it applies to workplace STF. Implications of the model for analysis and prevention of STF are discussed. PMID:18501330

  10. The role of latent and active failures in workplace slips, trips and falls: an information processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim

    2009-03-01

    The vast majority of the published workplace slips, trips and falls (STF) literature is exceedingly narrow in its focus and often ignores wider systems issues in workplace STF aetiology. There is little recognition within the published literature of the importance of latent failures or the upstream organisational and cultural contexts within which workplace STF occur. This is unfortunate, as a systems approach to workplace STF analysis, that is inclusive of latent design and work organisation factors that often shape worker behaviour patterns related to STF risk (e.g. rushing, risk taking), is fundamental to the development of effective prevention measures. The aims of this paper are to provide an understanding of workplace STF causation that is cognisant of the potential role of both active and latent failures in STF causation. The paper presents an ergonomics model for workplace STF analysis that highlights information processing in STF aetiology, the STF incident process and the interaction between latent and active failures in STF causation. The paper draws upon ergonomics research conducted in a range of occupational contexts to illustrate the key features of the model as it applies to workplace STF. Implications of the model for analysis and prevention of STF are discussed.

  11. Small repeating earthquake activity, interplate quasi-static slip, and interplate coupling in the Hyuga-nada, southwestern Japan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yusuke; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Goto, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Small repeating earthquake (RE) analysis is a useful method for estimating interplate quasi-static slip, which is a good indicator of interplate coupling. We detected 170 continual-type interplate RE groups and then estimated the spatial variation in quasi-static slip in the Hyuga-nada over the past 17 years. The RE activity in this region has different characteristics compared with that in the northeast Japan subduction zone, presumably reflecting differences in the subduction properties. Our results revealed that interplate coupling spatially changes along the trench-axis and dip-direction—a phenomenon that cannot be resolved by land-based Global Positioning System (GPS) analysis. By comparing seismicity, the low-slip-rate areas correspond with the location of hypocenters and asperities for large- and moderate-sized interplate earthquakes, suggesting strong interplate coupling at these sites. These results indicate that the slip rate distribution estimated from RE activity is reliable and useful for assessing the potential of future large earthquakes.

  12. Small repeating earthquakes activity and interplate quasi-static slips in the Hyuga-nada, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Y.; Shimizu, H.; Goto, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Hyuga-nada region, a high-angle subduction zone belong the Kyushu-Ryukyu arc, is one of the most seismically active area in Japan and earthquakes with magnitude from 6.5 to 7.5 usually occur at dozens of years interval. In this region, the Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) subducts northwestward beneath the Eurasian Plate (EU) at a rate of about 5cm/year [Seno et al. (1993)]. We detected small repeating earthquakes in and around the Hyuga-nada using waveform similarity based on Igarashi et al. (2003). We used about 20,000 earthquakes which occurred in and around the Hyuga-nada and magnitude range is more than 2.0 detected by SEVO, Kyushu University from 1994 to 2008. We identified about 1,000 small repeating earthquakes, and they were compiled 390 groups. Most of small repeating earthquakes occur near the plate boundary between the PHS and the EU. They do not distribute in large moment-release areas of large earthquakes, but they distribute in those areas surrounding them; these characteristics are also found in NE Japan [e.g. Igarashi et al. (2003); Uchida et al. (2003)]. We selected 145 groups of small repeating earthquakes occurring in the plate boundary based on focal mechanism analysis. Almost all of them distribute the southern side from 32.5N, which suggests that an interplate coupling is probably changing near 32.5N. This result is consistent with present study of interplate coupling in and around Hyuga-nada using a geodetic data by GPS observation [e.g., Nishimura et al. (1999)]. We also estimated interplate quasi-static slip rate distribution in the Hyuga-nada using small repeating earthquakes. The result shows that the slip rate of shallow side of plate boundary is relatively larger than deep side of that in the area of 31.3~32N. In the deep side, the Hyuga-nada earthquakes (Mw6.7) occurred in Dec. 1996. It suggests that the interplate coupling of deep side is stronger than that of shallow side. Acknowledgments: In this study, we have used the data of

  13. Faults paragenesis and paleostress state in the zone of actively propagating continental strike-slip on the example of North Khangai fault (Northern Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankov, Vladimir; Parfeevets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Sublatitudinal North Khangai fault extends from Ubsunuur basin to the eastern part of the Selenga corridor trough 800 km. It is the northern boundary of the massive Mongolian block and limits of the Baikal rift system structures propagation in the south (Logatchev, 2003). Late Cenozoic and present-day fault activity are expressed in the left-lateral displacements of a different order of river valleys and high seismicity. We have carried out studies of the kinematics of active faults and palaeostresses reconstruction in the zone of the dynamic influence of North Khangai fault, the width of which varies along the strike and can exceeds 100 km. The result shows that the fault zone has a longitudinal and a transverse zoning. Longitudinal zonation presented gradual change from west to east regions of compression and transpression regimes (Khan-Khukhey ridge) to strike-slip regime (Bolnay ridge) and strike-slip and transtensive regimes (west of Selenga corridor). Strike-slip zones are represented by linearly concentrated rupture deformations. In contrast, near the termination of the fault the cluster fault deformation formed. Here, from north to south, there are radical changes in the palaeostress state. In the north-western sector (east of Selenga corridor) strike-slip faults, strike-slip faults with normal components and normal faults are dominated. For this sector the stress tensors of extensive, transtension and strike-slip regimes are typical. South-western sector is separated from the north-eastern one by massive Buren Nuruu ridge within which the active faults are not identified. In the south-western sector between the Orkhon and Tola rivers the cluster of NW thrusts and N-S strike-slip faults with reverse component are discovered. The faults are perfectly expressed by NW and N-S scarps in the relief. The most structures dip to the east and north-east. Holocene fault activity is demonstrated by the hanging river valleys and horizontal displacements with amplitudes

  14. Slip compensation at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    to those of the main traces. In contrast, when the L/W < 2, the vertical slip is either increased or decreased as the horizontal slip is decreased, depending on the maturity of the linking zone. Thus, we argue that slip patterns at linking damage zones may be controlled by the LW-ratio of linking damage zones and hence structural maturities of the segmented fault systems. In conclusion, slip patterns at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures are various depending on the maturity of linkage zones and/or the rupture propagation direction. Therefore, the consideration of slip compensation as well as damage structures along surface ruptures must be very useful to understand fault evolution and, hence, to assess seismic hazards around active fault systems.

  15. Walker Lake, Nevada: sedimentation in an active, strike-slip related basin

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Roberts, M.T.

    1984-04-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, is in an active fault-controlled basin related to the right-lateral, northwest-trending Walker Lane Shear Zone on the western side of the Basin and Range province. The lake occurs in a half graben bounded on its west side by a high-angle normal fault zone along the Wassuk Range front. This fault zone may merge to the north into the Walker Lane fault system, which forms the northeast boundary of the basin. To the south of Walker Lake, the Wassuk front fault merges with an east-northeast trending left-lateral fault. The Walker Lake basin is interpreted to be a pull-apart basin formed within the triangular zone bounded by the Wassuk front, the Walker Lane, and left-lateral faults. The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km/sup 2/ (3800 mi/sup 2/) in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system that drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake. Walker Lake trends north-northwest and is 27.4 km (17 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide with water depths exceeding 30 m (100 ft). Lake Lahontan (Wisconsinian) shorelines ring Walker Lake and suggest water depths of 150 m (500 ft) above the present lake level. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and gentle, areally more extensive fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). The Walker River delta enters the lake from the north and is a major sediment point source for the basin. Older dissected shoreline, alluvial fan, Gilbert delta, and beach ridge deposits were built largely of coarse-grained, locally derived materials. Stromatolites, oncolites, and tufas formed along the shorelines, whereas mud and organic sediments accumulated in the lake on the west side of the basin. Extensive submerged sand flats and local sand dunes occur on the east side of the basin.

  16. Active strike-slip faulting history inferred from offsets of topographic features and basement rocks: a case study of the Arima Takatsuki Tectonic Line, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2002-01-01

    Geological, geomorphological and geophysical data have been used to determine the total displacement, slip rates and age of formation of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) in southwest Japan. The ATTL is an ENE-WSW-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone that extends for about 60 km from northwest of the Rokko Mountains to southwest of the Kyoto Basin. The ATTL marks a distinct topographic boundary between mountainous regions and basin regions. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as systematically-deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps, are recognized along the ATTL. The Quaternary drainage system shows progressive displacement along the fault traces: the greater the magnitude of stream channel, the larger the amount of offset. The maximum dextral deflection of stream channels is 600-700 m. The field data and detailed topographic analyses, however, show that pre-Neogene basement rocks on both sides of the ATTL are displaced by about 16-18 km dextrally and pre-Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains are also offset 16-17 km in dextral along the ATTL. This suggests that the ATTL formed in the period between the development of the pre-Mio-Pliocene peneplains and deflection of the Quaternary stream channels. The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence presented in this study indicates that (1) the ATTL formed after the mid-Miocene, (2) the ATTL has moved as a dextral strike-slip fault with minor vertical component since its formation to late Holocene and (3) the ATTL is presently active with dextral slip rates of 1-3 mm/year and a vertical component of >0.3 mm/year. The formation of the ATTL was probably related to the opening of the Japan Sea, which is the dominant tectonic event around Japan since mid-Miocene. The case study of the ATTL provides insight into understanding the tectonic history and relationship between tectonic landforms and structures in active strike-slip faults.

  17. Late Quaternary Activity and Seismogenic Potential of the Gonave Microplate: Plantain Garden Strike-Slip Fault Zone of Eastern Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.; King, W.; Demets, C.; Wiggins-Grandison, M.; Benford, B.

    2008-12-01

    At the longitude of Jamaica, Caribbean (Carib)-North America (Noam) plate motion of 19 ± 2 mm/a is carried by two parallel, left-lateral strike-slip faults, the Oriente fault zone, immediately south of Cuba, and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ), which lies 100-150 km further south. It has been postulated that the lithosphere between these faults constitutes an independent Gonave microplate that has formed in response to the ongoing collision between the leading edge of Carib in Hispaniola and the Bahama carbonate platform. GPS measurements in Jamaica and Hispanola is supportive of the microplate hypothesis and indicates that roughly half of Carib-Noam plate motion (8-14 mm/a) is carried by the EPGFZ of southern Hispaniola and eastern Jamaica. This study applies geomorphic and paleoseismic methods as a direct test of the activity and amount of microplate motion carried on the Plantain Garden fault segment of eastern Hispaniola and how this motion is distributed across a large restraining bend that has formed the island of Jamaica since the late Miocene. The EPFZ curves gently to the northeast and forming a steep mountain front to the Blue Mountains restraining bend with elevations up to 2200 m. Geomorphic fault-related features along the mountain front fault zone include left-laterally deflected rivers and streams, but no small scale features indicative of Holocene activity. River and stream deflections range from 0.1 to 0.5 km. We identified and trenched the most active trace of the mountain front fault at the Morant River where the fault is characterized by a 1.5-m-wide sub-vertical fault zone juxtaposing sheared alluvium and fault Cretaceous basement rocks This section is overlain by a 6-m-thick fluvial terrace. Trenching in the unfaulted terrace immediately overlying the fault trace revealed radiocarbon and OSL ages ranging from 20 to 21 ka that are consistent with a prominent unfaulted alluvial fan along the projection of this fault 1.5 km to

  18. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  19. DHS Phase III activities underway.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Activities and improvements in the third round of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) are described for the first year of the five year DHS-III project during 1992-97. Underway are data quality assessments, identification of data needs, development of a new core questionnaire and modules, and fieldwork survey implementation. Data quality studies are conducted on respondent age, age at first marriage, birth history, knowledge and use of contraception, and health of children aged under 5 years. An analysis of reinterview subsamples for Pakistan and Nigeria will test reliability of data. Emerging data needs for the decade are identified through consultations with data users in the population and health fields. A variety of organizational representatives and recognized experts provide valuable inputs on questionnaire content and module topics. This article also reveals that a shorter questionnaire length will be considered. There will be new questionnaire topics on reliance on breast feeding for contraception, induced abortion and complications, and quality of care. Reductions are made in little used data and retrospective data longer than 3-5 years preceding the survey date. Revisions are made in the Interviewer's and Supervisor's Manuals, the Service Availability Questionnaire, the Male/Husbands Questionnaire, and fifteen modules. Fieldwork is either in progress of completion in Ghana, Kenya, the Philippines, and Turkey. Bangladesh and Bolivia are scheduled for 1993. In 1994 surveys will be administered in Burundi, Central African Republic, Cote d'Ivoire, Guatemala, Haiti, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Mali, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. PMID:12287320

  20. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  1. Active Strike-Slip Faulting in the Inner Continental Borderland, Southern California: Results From New High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J. E.; Ryan, H. F.; Sliter, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The inner Continental Borderland offshore of southern California accommodates about 7 mm/yr of slip between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly half of this total has previously been thought to be taken up on the Palos Verdes (PV) and Coronado Bank (CB) fault zones, which have been modeled as a single, continuous fault zone in recent seismic hazard assessments for southern California. Although these faults lie roughly on strike with each other, a connection between these faults has not been clearly demonstrated. Newly acquired high-resolution seismic reflection data indicate that the PV fault terminates southwest of Lasuen Knoll in a horsetail splay that becomes progressively buried to the south. The lack of a connection between the PV and CB fault zones implies that a significant amount of slip must be taken up elsewhere in the inner Continental Borderland. Two other significant offshore faults, the San Diego Trough (SDT) and San Pedro Basin (SPB) fault zones, lie about 10-15 km southwest of and sub parallel to the trace of the PV and CB faults. The SDT fault zone extends from south of the Mexican border near Punta Santo Tomas for about 150 km northward to near Crespi Knoll. The SPB fault zone extends northward from off Santa Catalina Island to near Point Dume. The new seismic reflection data reveal a previously unmapped but apparently active fault zone along strike and in the area between the known strands of the SDT and the SPB fault zones. This newly recognized fault links the SDT and SPB faults, forming a continuous, active fault zone that extends about 250 km along the inner Continental Borderland. Although there are no slip rate data available for this fault zone, its overall length, continuity, and active character suggest that a significant portion of the plate motion that occurs offshore is accommodated along the SDT-SPB fault zone, which may pose a more significant seismic hazard than previously recognized.

  2. Reconsidering Fault Slip Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J. S.; Wech, A.; Creager, K. C.; Obara, K.; Agnew, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The scaling of fault slip events given by the relationship between the scalar moment M0, and duration T, potentially provides key constraints on the underlying physics controlling slip. Many studies have suggested that measurements of M0 and T are related as M0=KfT3 for 'fast' slip events (earthquakes) and M0=KsT for 'slow' slip events, in which Kf and Ks are proportionality constants, although some studies have inferred intermediate relations. Here 'slow' and 'fast' refer to slip front propagation velocities, either so slow that seismic radiation is too small or long period to be measurable or fast enough that dynamic processes may be important for the slip process and measurable seismic waves radiate. Numerous models have been proposed to explain the differing M0-T scaling relations. We show that a single, simple dislocation model of slip events within a bounded slip zone may explain nearly all M0-T observations. Rather than different scaling for fast and slow populations, we suggest that within each population the scaling changes from M0 proportional to T3 to T when the slipping area reaches the slip zone boundaries and transitions from unbounded, 2-dimensional to bounded, 1-dimensional growth. This transition has not been apparent previously for slow events because data have sampled only the bounded regime and may be obscured for earthquakes when observations from multiple tectonic regions are combined. We have attempted to sample the expected transition between bounded and unbounded regimes for the slow slip population, measuring tremor cluster parameters from catalogs for Japan and Cascadia and using them as proxies for small slow slip event characteristics. For fast events we employed published earthquake slip models. Observations corroborate our hypothesis, but highlight observational difficulties. We find that M0-T observations for both slow and fast slip events, spanning 12 orders of magnitude in M0, are consistent with a single model based on dislocation

  3. Dynamical Stability of Slip-stacking Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-04

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  4. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  5. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  6. SLIPPING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION TRIGGERING A SOLAR ERUPTION OF A TRIANGLE-SHAPED FLAG FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-08-10

    We report the first simultaneous activities of the slipping motion of flare loops and a slipping eruption of a flux rope in 131 Å and 94 Å channels on 2014 February 2. The east hook-like flare ribbon propagated with a slipping motion at a speed of about 50 km s{sup –1}, which lasted about 40 minutes and extended by more than 100 Mm, but the west flare ribbon moved in the opposite direction with a speed of 30 km s{sup –1}. At the later phase of flare activity, there was a well developed ''bi-fan'' system of flare loops. The east footpoints of the flux rope showed an apparent slipping motion along the hook of the ribbon. Simultaneously, the fine structures of the flux rope rose up rapidly at a speed of 130 km s{sup –1}, much faster than that of the whole flux rope. We infer that the east footpoints of the flux rope are successively heated by a slipping magnetic reconnection during the flare, which results in the apparent slippage of the flux rope. The slipping motion delineates a ''triangle-shaped flag surface'' of the flux rope, implying that the topology of a flux rope is more complex than anticipated.

  7. Is slow slip in Cascadia tidally modulated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Rubin, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Several studies have shown that the seismic tremor in episodic tremor and slip is tidally modulated, suggesting a strong sensitivity to the rather small tidal stresses. We address whether the slip is also tidally modulated by examining data from six borehole strainmeters in northwest Washington and southern Vancouver Island. We use the processed data provided by Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), which is resampled to 5-minute intervals. However, we recompute empirical corrections for tides, a long-term linear trend, and barometric pressure in the 50 days surrounding each slow slip event. We then fit sinusoids at the tidal periods to the processed data as proxies for the tidally modulated component of slip, along with a linear trend as a proxy for the net strain in the slow slip. The data are too noisy to allow detection any tidal modulation using only a single event and station. We therefore simultaneously fit data from multiple stations and from three slow slip events since 2007. This assumes that the phase of the tides at the slipping regions detected by all stations is the same and that the phase of the fault response to the tidal stress is constant. Combining the stations and events both reduces the noise at the tidal periods and creates a longer time series, which allows us to separate energy at the different tidal frequencies. We find significant tidal signals at the 12.4 and 25.8-hour periods which differ from zero at the 1.5 to 2-sigma level. Errors are estimated by bootstrapping the slow slip strain and by considering the tidal signal at times before the slow slip event. The 12.4 and 25.8-hour sinusoids have amplitudes of 23 (10-40 at 2-sigma) and 15 (0-30 at 2-sigma) percent of the maximum amplitude that does not allow the slow slip strain signal to change sign, where the mean strain rate is estimated from the linear trends fit to the slow slip data. In terms of slip rate, the sinusoids at each period could then modulate the slip rate 23 and 15 percent

  8. Slip-mediated dewetting of polymer microdroplets

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Joshua D.; Chan, Tak Shing; Maurer, Simon; Salez, Thomas; Benzaquen, Michael; Raphaël, Elie; Brinkmann, Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Classical hydrodynamic models predict that infinite work is required to move a three-phase contact line, defined here as the line where a liquid/vapor interface intersects a solid surface. Assuming a slip boundary condition, in which the liquid slides against the solid, such an unphysical prediction is avoided. In this article, we present the results of experiments in which a contact line moves and where slip is a dominating and controllable factor. Spherical cap-shaped polystyrene microdroplets, with nonequilibrium contact angle, are placed on solid self-assembled monolayer coatings from which they dewet. The relaxation is monitored using in situ atomic force microscopy. We find that slip has a strong influence on the droplet evolutions, both on the transient nonspherical shapes and contact line dynamics. The observations are in agreement with scaling analysis and boundary element numerical integration of the governing Stokes equations, including a Navier slip boundary condition. PMID:26787903

  9. Spatial and temporal relationships between slip, tectonic tremor, and triggered earthquakes during the 2010-2011 SSE sequence in the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Beavan, R. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Bannister, S. C.; Wech, A.; Segall, P.

    2012-12-01

    To study the complex, multi-phase 2010-2011 slow slip event (SSE) sequence in the Hikurangi subduction zone (Wallace et al., JGR, in review), we apply the Network Inversion Filter (Segall and Matthews, JGR, 1997) to almost 2 years of daily GPS solutions provided by GeoNet. The filter produces a daily time history of slip and slip-rate on the plate interface, which we compare to earthquake and tremor locations. A few hours of seismic data near an actively slipping region were analyzed using a method based on that of Wech and Creager, JGR, 2008, adapted for New Zealand, and tremor epicenters were detected. Unlike slow slip and tremor in Cascadia (Bartlow et al, GRL, 2011), the tremor in Hikurangi is not co-located with regions of high slip-rate, instead occurring in an adjacent region where the shear stress is increased on the plate interface. The GeoNet catalog of earthquakes near or on the plate interface during this time period indicates that slow-slip occurs in areas of light seismicity, with a band of heavy seismicity outlining a probable locked region between up-dip and down-dip slow slip regions. At least one earthquake swarm adjacent to a slow slip event is above background seismicity rates at a statistically significant level, and may therefore have been triggered by the SSE.

  10. Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta; Wilson, J. David; Okubo, Paul G.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Segall, Paul; Brooks, Benjamin; Foster, James; Wolfe, Cecily; Syracuse, Ellen; Thurbe, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Early in the morning of 1 February 2010 (UTC; early afternoon 31 January 2010 local time), continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt instruments detected a slow slip event (SSE) on the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The SSE lasted at least 36 hours and resulted in a maximum of about 3 centimeters of seaward displacement. About 10 hours after the start of the slip, a flurry of small earthquakes began (Figure 1) in an area of the south flank recognized as having been seismically active during past SSEs [Wolfe et al., 2007], suggesting that the February earthquakes were triggered by stress associated with slip [Segall et al., 2006].

  11. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  12. Fusion by earthquake fault friction: Stick or slip?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, Yuri; Khazan, Yakov

    2005-12-01

    Field observations of pseudotachylites and experimental studies of high-speed friction indicate that melting on a slipping interface may significantly affect the magnitude of shear stresses resisting slip. We investigate the effects of rock melting on the dynamic friction using theoretical models of shear heating that couple heat transfer, thermodynamics of phase transitions, and fluid mechanics. Results of laboratory experiments conducted at high (order of m/s) slip velocities but low (order of MPa) normal stresses suggest that the onset of frictional melting may give rise to substantial increases in the effective fault strength, presumably due to viscous effects. However, extrapolation of the modeling results to in situ conditions suggests that the efficiency of viscous braking is significantly reduced under high normal and shear stresses. When transient increases in the dynamic fault strength due to fusion are not sufficient to inhibit slip, decreases in the effective melt viscosity due to shear heating and melting of clasts drastically decrease the dynamic friction, resulting in a nearly complete stress drop ("thermal runaway"). The amount of energy dissipation associated with the formation of pseudotachylites is governed by the temperature dependence of melt viscosity and the average clast size in the fault gouge prior to melting. Clasts from a coarse-grained gouge have lower chances of survival in a pseudotachylite due to a higher likelihood of nonequilibrium overheating. The maximum temperature and energy dissipation attainable on the fault surface are ultimately limited by either the rock solidus (via viscous braking, and slip arrest) or liquidus (via thermal runaway and vanishing resistance to sliding). Our modeling results indicate that the thermally activated fault strengthening and rupture arrest are unlikely to occur in most mafic protoliths but might be relevant for quartz-rich rocks, especially at shallow (<5-7 km) depths where the driving shear

  13. Imaging transient slip events in southwest Japan using reanalyzed Japanese GEONET GPS time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Japanese continuous GPS network (GEONET) with ~1450 stations provide a unique opportunity to study ongoing subduction zone dynamics, and crustal deformation at various spatiotemporal scales. Recently we completed a reanalysis of GPS position time series for the entire GEONET from 1996 to 2012 using JPL GIPSY/OASIS-II based GPS Network Processor [Owen et al., 2006] and raw data provided by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) and Caltech. We use the JPL precise GPS orbits reestimated from the present through 1996 [Desai et al., 2011], troposphere global mapping function, and single receiver phase ambiguity resolution strategy [Bertiger et al., 2010] in the analysis. The resultant GPS time series solution shows improved repeatability and consistency over the ~16 yrs span, in comparison with 1996-2006 GPS position estimates used in our previous analysis [Liu et al., 2010a,b]. We apply a time-series analysis framework to estimate bias, offsets caused by instrument changes, earthquakes and other unknown sources, linear trends, seasonal variations, post-seismic deformation and other transient signals. The principal component analysis method is used to estimate the common mode error across the network [Dong et al. 2006]. We construct an interplate fault geometry from a composite plate boundary model [Wang et al. 2004] and apply a Kalman filter based network inversion method to image the spatiotemporal slip variation of slip transient events on the plate interface. The highly precise GPS time series enables the detectability of much smaller transient signals and start to reveal previously unobserved features of slow slip events. For example, the application to 2009-2011 Bungo Channel slow slip event shows it has a complex slip history with the major event initiating in late 2009 beneath the northeast corner of the region and migrating southwestward and updip. At ~2010.75 there is activation of a smaller slip subevent to the east of main slip region

  14. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  15. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls. PMID:26406065

  16. Determination of Ti-6242 α and β slip properties using micro-pillar test and computational crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Jun, Tea-Sung; Britton, T. Benjamin; Dunne, Fionn P. E.

    2016-10-01

    The properties and behaviour of an α-β colony Ti-6242 alloy have been investigated at 20 °C utilising coupled micro-pillar stress relaxation tests and computational crystal plasticity. The β-phase slip strength and intrinsic slip system strain rate sensitivity have been determined, and the β-phase shown to have stronger rate sensitivity than that for the α phase. Close agreement of experimental observations and crystal plasticity predictions of micro-pillar elastic-plastic response, stress relaxation, slip activation in both α and β-phases, and strain localisation within the α-β pillars with differing test strain rate, β morphology, and crystal orientations is achieved, supporting the validity of the properties extracted. The β-lath thickness is found to affect slip transfer across the α-β-α colony, but not to significantly change the nature of the slip localisation when compared to pure α-phase pillars with the same crystallographic orientation. These results are considered in relation to rate-dependent deformation, such as dwell fatigue, in complex multiphase titanium alloys.

  17. Strain Wave during the Transient Process of Fault Unstable Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Liu, L.

    2011-12-01

    The "stick-slip" model was proposed as an important mechanism for shallow-focus earthquakes. The study on the transient process of fault unstable slip failure is helpful for understanding the earthquake preparatory process, the mechanism of energy released, the precursor and after shake effect. Double shear frictional experiments are conducted for simulating "stick-slip" phenomenon, and a specially designed multi-channel super dynamic strain field observation system is employed to acquire dada continuously with the sample rate of 3,400 samples/second. The rock deformation process can be recorded in detail, especially in the moment of unstable slip (The unstable slip duration is less than two second in experiments). The strain results from super dynamic strain field observation system show that multi-frequency components and tremendous amplitude fluctuation are included in strain signals along the fault. There are three clear phases during the unstable slip progress: pre-slip (phase I), high-frequency strain vibration (phase II) and strain regulating to stop (phase III). Each phase has its own characteristics on duration, strain rate, frequency, amplitude and energy release. There are strong fluctuations in duration of approximately 70ms in phase II. The frequency and maximum amplitude are 300-400Hz and 150~300μɛ respectively. Main strain energy release takes place at phase II, less than one-tenth of the total slip time, so that the whole course of dislocation or stress drop would not be taken as earthquake simply at least in laboratory. The phase characteristic of the strain wave is probably its inherent attribute of unstable slip process and independent of dynamical loading conditions. The elastic rebound phenomena, considered as one classic earthquake generation model, can be observed clearly by analyzing the rotation of the principal strain axis with strain variation. The rotated angle ranges from 5° to 15° typically. The value and location of precursor slip

  18. Mechanical Evolution and Dynamics of Decollement Slip in Contractional Systems: Correlating Macro- and Micro-Scale Processes in Particle Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based numerical simulations allow detailed investigations of small-scale processes and mechanisms associated with fault initiation and slip, which emerge naturally in such models. This study investigates the evolving mechanical conditions and associated micro-mechanisms during transient slip on a weak decollement propagating beneath a growing contractional wedge (e.g., accretionary prism, fold and thrust belt). The models serve as analogs of the seismic cycle, although lacking full earthquake dynamics. Nonetheless, the mechanical evolution of both decollement and upper plate can be monitored, and correlated with the particle-scale physical and contact properties, providing insights into changes that accompany such stick-slip behavior. In this study, particle assemblages consolidated under gravity and bonded to impart cohesion, are pushed at a constant velocity above a weak, unbonded decollement surface. Forward propagation of decollement slip occurs in discrete pulses, modulated by heterogeneous stress conditions (e.g., roughness, contact bridging) along the fault. Passage of decollement slip resets the stress along this horizon, producing distinct patterns: shear stress is enhanced in front of the slipped decollement due to local contact bridging and fault locking; shear stress minima occur immediately above the tip, denoting local stress release and contact reorganization following slip; more mature portions of the fault exhibit intermediate shear stress, reflecting more stable contact force distributions and magnitudes. This pattern of shear stress pre-conditions the decollement for future slip events, which must overcome the high stresses at the fault tip. Long-term slip along the basal decollement induces upper plate contraction. When upper plate stresses reach critical strength conditions, new thrust faults break through the upper plate, relieving stresses and accommodating horizontal shortening. Decollement activity retreats back to the newly formed

  19. Local void and slip model used in BODYFIT-2PE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Kim, J.H.; Lellouche, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    A local void and slip model has been proposed for a two-phase flow without the need of fitting any empirical parameters. This model is based on the assumption that all bubbles have reached their terminal rise velocities in the two-phase region. This simple model seems to provide reasonable calculational results when compared with the experimental data and other void and slip models. It provides a means to account for the void and slip of a two-phase flow on a local basis. This is particularly suitable for a fine mesh thermal-hydraulic computer program such as BODYFIT-2PE.

  20. A Novel Algorithm for Cycle Slip Detection and Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, U.; Arikan, F.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate and reliable estimation of ionospheric parameters are very important for correct functioning of communication, navigation and positioning satellite systems. In recent years, dual-frequency GPS receivers are widely used for estimation of Total Electron Content (TEC), which is defined as the line integral of the electron density along a ray path. Since both electron density and TEC are functions of solar, geomagnetic, gravitational and seismic activity, any disturbance along the ray path can be detected using GPS receiver observables. It is observed that, with the development of recent sophisticated receivers, disruptions due to the receiver antenna, hardware or outside obstructions are minimized. Most of the observed sudden disturbances are signal phase lock losses due to ionosphere. These sudden phase shifts are named as cycle slips and if not corrected, they may lead to positioning errors or incorrect TEC estimates. There are many methods in the literature that deal with cycle slips and their repairs, yet these methods are not matured to detect all kinds of cycle slips. Most algorithms require double differencing, and/or complicated Kalman Filters, Wavelet transforms, Neural Network models, and integration of external INS systems. In this study, we propose a fast and efficient algorithm for identifying the cycle slips on individual observables, classifying them for future investigations and finally repairing them for more accurate and reliable TEC estimates. The algorithm traces the pseudorange and phase observables and computes the geometry free combinations of L4 and P4. The sudden disturbances on L1, L2, P1, C1 and P2 are classified and noted for further use. Most of the cases, the disruptions are on phase observables, yet for a few occasions, a sudden disturbance is also observed on pseudorange observables. The algorithm, then, checks the epoch section where P4 exists continually. When a disruption on L1 or L2 occurs, it becomes evident on L4. When P4

  1. Lower extremity corrective reactions to slip events.

    PubMed

    Cham, R; Redfern, M S

    2001-11-01

    A significant number of injuries in the workplace is attributed to slips and falls. Biomechanical responses to actual slip events determine whether the outcome of a slip will be recovery or a fall. The goal of this study was to examine lower extremity joint moments and postural adjustments for experimental evidence of corrective strategies evoked during slipping in an attempt to prevent falling. Sixteen subjects walked onto a possibly oily vinyl tile floor, while ground reaction forces and body motion were recorded at 350 Hz. The onset of corrective reactions by the body in an attempt to recover from slips became evident at about 25% of stance and continued until about 45% into stance, i.e. on average between 190 and 350 ms after heel contact. These reactions included increased flexion moment at the knee and extensor activity at the hip. The ankle, on the other hand, acted as a passive joint (no net moment) during fall trials. Joint kinematics showed increased knee flexion and forward rotation of the shank in an attempt to bring the foot back towards the body. Once again, the ankle kinematics appeared to play a less dominant role (compared to the knee) in recovery attempts. This study indicates that humans generate corrective reactions to slips that are different than previously reported responses to standing perturbations translating the supporting surface. PMID:11672718

  2. Subgrain boundaries and slip systems in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    . Subgrain boundaries with higher misorientation angles relate to variable slip systems, showing tilt, twist or mixed mode character. Many of those slip systems have a low Schmid factor. O-grains rarely show subgrain boundaries that can directly be related to rhomb or rhomb-slip. Most common subgrain boundaries are tilt {a}[c]-boundaries, tilt {a}-boundaries or mixed mode boundaries, hence deformation is interpreted to occur mostly by combined {m} and (c)-slip rather than rhomb slip. Based on the homogeneous microstructure without a low temperature overprint, it is inferred that deformation took place in a rather narrow temperature range. Grains deform homogeneously, independent on their orientation with different slip systems involved. A temperature effect on the activity of individual slip system is not recognizable. Suitably oriented (c) and {m} slip systems seem to result in lattice bending rather than abundant subgrain boundaries. Subgrain boundaries related to other slip systems contribute to subgrain rotation and subsequent recrystallization but not essentially to stretching of grains and rather ensure strain compatibility. The observations indicate that many prominent subgrain boundaries might not relate to the main strain producing slip system and grain orientation does not necessarily prescribe the involved slip systems.

  3. Truss Slip Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Truss slip joint has few parts, strong, and assembled and disassembled easily. Designed to carry axial loads as large as 100,000 lb and to accommodate slight initial axial-displacement and angular misalignments. Joint assembled or disassembled by astronaut in space suit or, on Earth, by technician in heavy protective clothing; simple enough to be operable by robot. Modified to accommodate welding.

  4. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  5. Active limited-angle tomographic phase microscope.

    PubMed

    Kus, Arkadiusz; Krauze, Wojciech; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an active, holographic tomography system, working with limited angle of projections, realized by optical-only, diffraction-based beam steering. The system created for this purpose is a Mach–Zehnder interferometer modified to serve as a digital holographic microscope with a high numerical aperture illumination module and a spatial light modulator (SLM). Such a solution is fast and robust. Apart from providing an elegant solution to viewing angle shifting, it also adds new capabilities of the holographic microscope system. SLM, being an active optical element, allows wavefront correction in order to improve measurement accuracy. Integrated phase data captured with different illumination scenarios within a highly limited angular range are processed by a new tomographic reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed sensing technique: total variation minimization, which is applied here to reconstruct nonpiecewise constant samples. Finally, the accuracy of full measurement and the proposed processing path is tested for a calibrated three-dimensional micro-object as well as a biological object--C2C12 myoblast cell.

  6. Interfacial water at hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces: slip, viscosity, and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Sendner, Christian; Horinek, Dominik; Bocquet, Lyderic; Netz, Roland R

    2009-09-15

    The dynamics and structure of water at hydrophobic and hydrophilic diamond surfaces is examined via non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics simulations. For hydrophobic surfaces under shearing conditions, the general hydrodynamic boundary condition involves a finite surface slip. The value of the slip length depends sensitively on the surface water interaction strength and the surface roughness; heuristic scaling relations between slip length, contact angle, and depletion layer thickness are proposed. Inert gas in the aqueous phase exhibits pronounced surface activity but only mildly increases the slip length. On polar hydrophilic surfaces, in contrast, slip is absent, but the water viscosity is found to be increased within a thin surface layer. The viscosity and the thickness of this surface layer depend on the density of polar surface groups. The dynamics of single water molecules in the surface layer exhibits a similar distinction: on hydrophobic surfaces the dynamics is purely diffusive, while close to a hydrophilic surface transient binding or trapping of water molecules over times of the order of hundreds of picoseconds occurs. We also discuss in detail the effect of the Lennard-Jones cutoff length on the interfacial properties.

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of plasticity (slip) evolution in notched single crystal superalloy specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Shadab

    Single crystal nickel base superalloys (SCNBS) are being used increasingly for high temperature turbine blade and vane applications in aircraft and rocket engines. As a first step toward developing a mechanistically based fatigue life prediction system for SCNBS components, an understanding of the evolution of plasticity in regions of stress concentration, under the action of triaxial stresses, is necessary. A detailed numerical and experimental investigation of the evolution of plasticity and slip sector boundaries near notches in SCNBS double-notched tensile specimens was conducted. The evolution of plasticity in the vicinity of notches in three specimens with a <100> loading orientation, and having their notches parallel to one of the <010>, <110> and <310> directions (secondary orientation), were studied. A three dimensional (3D) linear elastic anisotropic finite element model of the specimens was developed using ANSYS. Ni-base superalloys which deform by the shearing of the gamma' precipitate, were selected for the experimental study to insure that slip bands followed the slip planes, similar to single-phase materials. The tensile testing of the notched specimens was carried out using a 1125 Instron system, and optical microscopy was utilized to observe the slip bands on the surface of the specimens near notches. The experimental tests were conducted at room temperature to limit the plastic deformation to {111} planes, similar to FCC metals. In this study, we demonstrate that a 3D linear elastic anisotropic finite element model is able to predict the activated slip planes and sector boundaries accurately on the surface of the specimens. The experimental and numerical results suggest that the dominant slip planes activated at low load levels persist even at high load levels, and the activation of other slip bands within a domain is initially inhibited. Results reveal that slip sector boundaries have complex curved shapes, rather than straight sector boundaries

  8. Actively evolving microplate formation by oblique collision and sideways motion along strike-slip faults: An example from the northeastern Caribbean plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taylor, F. W.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Ku, Teh-Lung

    1995-06-01

    The pattern of folding, faulting, and late Quaternary coral-reef uplift rates in western and central Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) suggest that the elongate Gonave microplate, a 190,000-km 2 area of the northeastern Caribbean plate, is in the process of shearing off the Caribbean plate and accreting to the North American plate. Late Cenozoic transpression between the southeastern Bahama Platform and the Caribbean plate in Hispaniola has inhibited the eastward motion of the northeastern corner of the plate. Transpression is manifested in western and central Hispaniola by the formation of regional scale folds that correspond to present-day, anticlinal topographic mountain chains continuous with offshore anticlinal ridges. Areas of most rapid Quaternary uplift determined from onland coral reefs 125 ka and younger, coincide with the axial traces of these folds. Offshore data suggest recent folding and faulting of the seafloor. Onshore reef data do not conclusively require late Quaternary folding, but demonstrate that tectonic uplift rates of the axial areas of the anticlines decrease from the Northwest Peninsula of Haiti (0.37 mm/yr) to to the central part of the coast of western Haiti (0.19 mm/yr) to the south-central part of western Haiti (0 mm/yr). Formation of the 1200-km-long Enriquillo-Plantain Garden-Walton fault zone as a 'bypass' strike-slip fault has isolated the southern edge of the Gonave microplate and is allowing continued, unimpeded eastward motion of a smaller Caribbean plate past the zone of late Neogene convergence and Quaternary uplift of coral reefs in Hispaniola. Offshore seismic reflection data from the Jamaica Passage, the marine strait separating Jamaica and Haiti, show that the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone forms a narrow but deep, active fault-bounded trough beneath the passage. The active fault is continuous with active faults mapped onshore in western Haiti and eastern Jamaica; the bathymetric deep is present because the

  9. New evidence for active deformation off the Annaba region (easternmost Algerian margin): Estimates of Quaternary shortening and slip rates from folding analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherroubi, A.; Deverchere, J.; Yelles, A.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.; Domzig, A.; Graindorge, D.; Bracene, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Gaullier, V.

    2007-12-01

    From the first marine investigations off the region of Annaba (easternmost part of Algeria) made after the MARADJA2 survey in November 2005, a set of large active faults and folds was discovered near the foot of the margin. This active thrust system resumes a previous passive margin and creates growth strata deposition on the backlimbs of large Quaternary folds, resulting in the development of perched basins at the foot of the margin since less than 1 Ma. The system forms a set of overlapping fault segments verging towards the Algerian basin. From the seismic line analysis (high-resolution and Chirp data), and using sedimentation rates obtained from coring and extrapolated, a shortening rate of about 0.9 mm/yr is estimated. If we consider a single fault dipping at about 45° (hypothesized from the Boumerdès 2003 rupture zone), a fault slip rate of about 1.3 mm/yr can be postulated. Considering recent kinematic studies, this fault-related fold system could accommodate a significant part of the present-day submarine shortening rate between the European and African plates, predicted by Stich et al. (2006) to be 1.5 mm/yr from GPS modelling. This faulting is apparently active at a faster rate than the similar faulting observed at the foot of the margin NW of Algiers. This system of faults off Annaba represents a major threat for the region. Indeed, the location of this system changes drastically the seismic hazard assessment of the region, since no large historical earthquake is reported there since 3 centuries at least.

  10. Is frictional healing slip-dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Rubin, A. M.; Ryan, K. L.; Riviere, J. V.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional re-strengthening of bare rock surfaces at very low stresses and near zero slip rate, as observed in the laboratory, is traditionally interpreted as showing support for purely time-dependent healing as embodied in the Aging law. However, while slide-hold-slide experiments on bare surfaces do show an apparent (purely) time-dependent increase in the static friction upon reslide, we show that the stress minima attained during the preceding holds show a strong slip-dependence which contradict the Aging law. A velocity strengthening Slip law explains such data much better. We also show that, large velocity step decreases, which drive the system far below steady state just like long holds, clearly support the slip-dependent response of the Slip law over the time-dependent healing contained in the Aging law. But, while time-dependent healing has an intuitive physical picture in terms of growth of the 'real contact area' with time, it is more difficult to ascribe one to slip-dependent healing. Here, we explore the possibility that the slip-dependence arises out of an interplay between contact `quality' and `quantity' at the scale of the asperity contacts. First, to further study the slip-dependence of healing, we carry out large velocity step decreases and sequences of long slide-hold-slides on both bare rock and gouge. Secondly, to probe the micro-mechanical origins of healing, we complement our mechanical data with amplitudes and travel time data of ultrasonic P- and S- waves transmitted across the sliding interface. While ultrasonic P-wave transmissivity has been used as a proxy for 'real contact area' in friction experiments by Nagata et al. (2012, 2014) before, the simultaneous use of P- and S-phases in our experiments is designed specifically to probe contact rheology. Initial results show strong correlations between changes in friction, transmitted wave amplitudes and travel times in response to changes in slip rate. We also observe important differences

  11. Constraining Paleoearthquake Slip Distributions with Coral Microatolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; nic Bhloscaidh, M.; Murphy, S.

    2014-12-01

    Key to understanding the threat posed by large megathrust earthquakes is identifying where the potential for these destructive events exists. Studying extended sequences of earthquakes, Slip Deficit and Stress Evolution modelling techniques may hold the key to locating areas of concern. However, as well as using recent instrumentally constrained slip distributions they require the production of high resolution source models for pre-instrumental events. One place we can attempt this longer term modelling is along the Sunda Trench with its record of large megathrust earthquakes dating back centuries. Coral microatolls populating the intertidal areas of the Sumatran Forearc act as long-term geodetic recorders of tectonic activity. Repeated cycles of stress accumulation and release alter relative sea levels around these islands. Growth of corals, controlled by the level of the lowest tide, exploit interseismic rises in sea level. In turn, they experience die-offs when coseismic drops in sea level lead to subaerially exposure. Examination of coral stratigraphy reveals a history of displacements from which information of past earthquakes can be inferred. We have developed a Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator (GASE) to rapidly produce high resolution slip distributions from coral displacement data. GASE recombines information held in populations of randomly generated slip distributions, to create superior models, satisfying observed displacements. Non-unique solutions require multiple iterations of the algorithm, producing a suite of models from which an ensemble slip distribution is drawn. Systematic testing of the algorithm demonstrates its ability to reliably estimate both known synthetic and instrumentally constrained slip distributions based on surface displacements. We will present high-resolution source models satisfying published displacement data for a number recent and paleoearthquakes along the Sunda trench, including the great 1797 and 1833 events.

  12. Detection of precursory slips on a fault by the quiescence and activation of seismicity relative to the ETAS model and by the anomalous trend of the geodetic time series of distances between GPS stations around the fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.

    2006-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the detection of precursory slip on a rupturing fault, supported by both seismic and geodetic records. Basically, the detection relies on the principle that, assuming precursory slip on the rupturing fault, the seismic activity around the fault should be enhanced or reduced in the zones where increment of the Coulomb failure stress (CFS) is positive or negative, respectively. However, any occurring event also affects the stress changes in neighboring regions, which can trigger further aftershock clusters. Whereas such stress transfers are too difficult to be computed precisely, due to the unknown complex fault system, the ordinary short-term occurrence rate of earthquakes in a region is easily predicted using the ETAS model of triggering seismicity; and any anomalous seismic activity, such as quiescence and activation, can be quantified by identifying a significant deviation from the predicted rate. Such anomalies are revealed to have occurred during several years leading up to the 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake of M6.8, central Honshu, and also the 2005 Western Fukuoka-Ken-Oki Earthquake of M7.0, Kyushu, Japan. Quiescence and activation in the regions coincided with negative and positive increments of the CFS, respectively, and were probably transferred from possible aseismic slips on the focal fault plane. Such slips are further supported by transient crustal movement around the source preceding the rupture. Time series records of the baseline distances between the permanent GPS stations deviated from the predicted trends, with the deviations consistent with the coseismic horizontal displacements of the stations due to these earthquakes. References Ogata, Y. (2006) Report of the Coordinating Committee for Earthquake Prediction, 76 (to appear, in Japanese).

  13. Subduction zone structures and slip behavior in megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Nakanishi, A.; Nakamura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake, tsunami and geodetic data show that co-seismic slips of a large megathrust earthquakes do not uniformly propagate along a plate boundary. For example, a clear segmentation of slip zones of magnitude-8 class megathrust earthquakes are well recognized in the Nankai Trough. Moreover, a lateral variation of the slips are revealed even in one segment. In the Japan Trench, the most characteristic slip behavior of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake is an extremely large slip reaching to the trench axis, but geodetic, tsunami or teleseismic show the slip was heterogeneous near the trench. In order to examine whether those complex slip distributions are attributed by any distinct structural factor, we have been carried out active-source seismic surveys in the subduction seismogenic. In the Nankai Trough, large-scale subducted seamounts, ridges and doming structure intruded in an overriding accretion wedge are imaged. Comparing co-seismic slip distribution of the 1944 Tonankai and the 1946 Nankai earthquakes with the seismic images, we concluded that those structures are key factors to control the slip distributions. In the central part of the Japan Trench area, we fund a rough basement geometry is overprinted on the horst-and-graben structure. Those complex geometry of basement cause a strong lateral variation of the thickness of subducting pelagic/hemi-pelagic sediment. Many geological studies suggest that properties of the plate-boundary sediment attribute the large slip near the trench. We therefore plan to acquire additional high-resolution seismic data in the entire Japan Trench in order to examine a role of incoming sediment on the large slip to the trench axis. In this presentation we present an overview of the structural factors controlling slips in megathrust earthquakes, including new data acquired in the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench.

  14. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  15. Geodetic And Seismic Signatures of Episodic Tremor And Slip Beneath Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragert, H.; Rogers, G.; Wang, K.

    2004-05-01

    Slip events with an average duration of about 10 days and effective total slip displacements of several centimetres have been detected on the deeper (25 to 45 km) part of the northern Cascadia subduction zone plate interface by a network of continuously recording Global Positioning System (GPS) sites. The slip events occur down-dip from the currently locked, seismogenic portion of the plate interface, and, for the geographic region around Victoria, British Columbia, repeat at 13 to 16 month intervals. These episodes of slip are accompanied by distinct, low frequency, non-earthquake tremors, similar to those reported in the forearc region of southern Japan, prompting the naming of this phenomenon as Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS). The tremor-like seismic signals have now been identified beneath most of Vancouver Island. For northern Vancouver Island, where plate convergence is at a much slower rate, return periods of about 14 months were also observed for significant (duration exceeding 7 days) tremor sequences, but about 6 months out of phase with southern Vancouver Island. Slip associated with northern island tremors has not been resolved clearly enough to allow modeling because of sparse GPS coverage, but 3 to 4 mm surface displacements coincident with the most recent tremors were observed at two newer GPS stations located on the northwest coast of Vancouver Island. The total amount of tremor activity, and by inference slip activity, appears to be the same in northern and southern Vancouver Island and therefore independent of plate convergence rate. ETS activity is observed to migrate along the strike of the subduction zone at speeds of 5 to 15 km/day and this migration does not appear to be impeded by the Nootka Fault Zone that marks the change in subduction rates. It is strongly suspected that the youth of the subducting plate and the release of fluids from slab dehydration are key factors contributing to the episodic, semi-brittle behaviour of the ETS zone. It

  16. Stick-Slip Friction of PDMS Surfaces for Bioinspired Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Xue, Longjian; Pham, Jonathan T; Iturri, Jagoba; Del Campo, Aránzazu

    2016-03-15

    Friction plays an important role in the adhesion of many climbing organisms, such as the gecko. During the shearing between two surfaces, periodic stick-slip behavior is often observed and may be critical to the adhesion of gecko setae and gecko-inspired adhesives. Here, we investigate the influence of short oligomers and pendent chains on the stick-slip friction of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a commonly used material for bioinspired adhesives. Three different stick-slip patterns were observed on these surfaces (flat or microstructured) depending on the presence or absence of oligomers and their ability to diffuse out of the material. After washing samples to remove any untethered oligomeric chains, or after oxygen plasma treatment to convert the surface to a thin layer of silica, we decouple the contributions of stiffness, oligomers, and pendant chains to the stick-slip behavior. The stick phase is mainly controlled by the stiffness while the amount of untethered oligomers and pendant chains available at the contact interface defines the slip phase. A large amount of oligomers and pendant chains resulted in a large slip time, dominating the period of stick-slip motion. PMID:26903477

  17. Universal behavior in ideal slip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The slip energies and stresses are computed for defect-free crystals of Ni, Cu, Ag, and Al using the many-atom approach. A simple analytical expression for the slip energies is obtained, leading to a universal form for slip, with the energy scaled by the surface energy and displacement scaled by the lattice constant. Maximum stresses are found to be somewhat larger than but comparable with experimentally determined maximum whisker strengths.

  18. Effects of Tidal Modulation in Heterogeneous Models of Slow Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, R. M.; Rempel, A. W.; Thomas, A.

    2014-12-01

    Since their discovery, numerous models have been put forward to explain the occurance of slow slip and associated tremor. These models invoke a wide array of causal mechanisms and are all successful in reproducing the first-order behavior of slow-slip events. Discriminating amongst the various proposed models requires looking at second-order effects of slow slip and tremor. Here, we consider the effects of tidal modulation on slow slip in subduction zones. A great deal of observational evidence has established that slow-slip and associated tremor are modulated by the small stress perturbations associated with tides and teleseismic events. Recent modeling studies that have examined the influence of tidal stresses (<10 kPa) have focused either on the effects of tidally induced changes in shear stress, or on changes in shear and normal stress that coincide. However, along the Cascadia margin, the relative phase of the tidally induced fault-normal and shear stresses depends on position along the plate boundary fault, and can vary from being in phase, to completely out of phase. We report on the predictions of models designed to examine the sensitivity of slow-slip in subduction zones to the phase shift γ between tidally induced normal and shear stress perturbations. We consider both simple spring-slider and 1-D elastodynamic models that are designed to mimic the effects of geologic heterogeneity by allowing for variations in the rate-and-state frictional parameters. For a given slow-slip event, spring-slider results indicate that the phase lag γv between the peak slip rate and the tidally induced shear stress perturbation depends on both the phase shift γ, and the perturbation amplitude. Models parameterized for Cascadia are capable of producing phase lags γv within the range (15◦ to 30◦) of those reported by Royer et al. (JGR, 2014). Additionally, our models predict that the correlation between tidally induced shear stress perturbations and resultant slip also

  19. Slip flow in graphene nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, Peter J.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic boundary condition for simple nanofluidic systems such as argon and methane flowing in graphene nanochannels using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD) in conjunction with our recently proposed method [J. S. Hansen, B. D. Todd, and P. J. Daivis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 016313 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.016313]. We first calculate the fluid-graphene interfacial friction coefficient, from which we can predict the slip length and the average velocity of the first fluid layer close to the wall (referred to as the slip velocity). Using direct nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) we then calculate the slip length and slip velocity from the streaming velocity profiles in Poiseuille and Couette flows. The slip lengths and slip velocities from the NEMD simulations are found to be in excellent agreement with our EMD predictions. Our EMD method therefore enables one to directly calculate this intrinsic friction coefficient between fluid and solid and the slip length for a given fluid and solid, which is otherwise tedious to calculate using direct NEMD simulations at low pressure gradients or shear rates. The advantages of the EMD method over the NEMD method to calculate the slip lengths/flow rates for nanofluidic systems are discussed, and we finally examine the dynamic behaviour of slip due to an externally applied field and shear rate.

  20. Detectability of slow slip beneath the seismogenic zone of strike-slip faults using borehole tiltmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chery, J.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades, geodetic tools like C-GPS allowed the detection of slow slip events associated with transient motion below the seismogenic zone. This new class of fault motion lead us to revise the standard version of the seismic cycle simply including coseismic, postseismic and interseismic phases. Most of these discoveries occurred on subduction margins in various places like Japan, Cascadia, Chile and Indonesia. By contrast, GPS and strainmeters have provided little evidence of slow slip beneath the seismogenic zone of large continental faults like the San Andreas fault or the North Anatolian fault. Because the detectability of such motions is mostly tributary from instrumental precision, we examine the theoretical capability of tiltmeter arrays for detecting horizontal motion of a buried vertical fault. We define the slipping part of the strike-slip fault like a buried rectangular patch submitted to horizontal motion. This motion provides horizontal and vertical surface deformation as a function of both patch geometry (length, width, depth) and motion amplitude. Using a dislocation buried at 15km depth, we compute the maximum motion and tilt as a function of seismic moment. Assuming yields of detectability of 1mm for GPS horizontal motion and 10 nrad for a tiltmeter, we show that small slip events could be better detected using high resolution and stability tiltmeters. We then examine how tiltmeters arrays could be used for such a purpose. In particular, we discuss how to deal with usual problems often plaguing tiltmeters data like instrumental drift, borehole coupling and hydrological strain.

  1. 29 CFR 96.52 - Pre-resolution phase activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... respects with the report submission requirements of 29 CFR part 99. Failure to submit a complete audit... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pre-resolution phase activities. 96.52 Section 96.52 Labor... Resolution § 96.52 Pre-resolution phase activities. (a) Submission of reports. Recipients and...

  2. Active phase locking of thirty fiber channels using multilevel phase dithering method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhimeng; Tang, Xuan; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Cangli; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dayong; Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Tunan; Han, Mei

    2016-03-01

    An active phase locking of a large-scale fiber array with thirty channels has been demonstrated experimentally. In the experiment, the first group of thirty phase controllers is used to compensate the phase noises between the elements and the second group of thirty phase modulators is used to impose additional phase disturbances to mimic the phase noises in the high power fiber amplifiers. A multi-level phase dithering algorithm using dual-level rectangular-wave phase modulation and time division multiplexing can achieve the same phase control as single/multi-frequency dithering technique, but without coherent demodulation circuit. The phase locking efficiency of 30 fiber channels is achieved about 98.68%, 97.82%, and 96.50% with no additional phase distortion, modulated phase distortion I (±1 rad), and phase distortion II (±2 rad), corresponding to the phase error of λ/54, λ/43, and λ/34 rms. The contrast of the coherent combined beam profile is about 89%. Experimental results reveal that the multi-level phase dithering technique has great potential in scaling to a large number of laser beams. PMID:27036760

  3. Rock mechanics. Superplastic nanofibrous slip zones control seismogenic fault friction.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Berend A; Plümper, Oliver; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Spiers, Christopher J

    2014-12-12

    Understanding the internal mechanisms controlling fault friction is crucial for understanding seismogenic slip on active faults. Displacement in such fault zones is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirrorlike) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nanogranular fault rock. We show that mirror-slip surfaces developed in experimentally simulated calcite faults consist of aligned nanogranular chains or fibers that are ductile at room conditions. These microstructures and associated frictional data suggest a fault-slip mechanism resembling classical Ashby-Verrall superplasticity, capable of producing unstable fault slip. Diffusive mass transfer in nanocrystalline calcite gouge is shown to be fast enough for this mechanism to control seismogenesis in limestone terrains. With nanogranular fault surfaces becoming increasingly recognized in crustal faults, the proposed mechanism may be generally relevant to crustal seismogenesis.

  4. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  5. Basic Chad Arabic: The Active Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Absi, Samir Abu; Sinaud, Andre

    This third volume in the course on Chad Arabic emphasizes the active development of speaking skills in the target language. The active participation of the student requires imitation and induction of linguistic structures to a large extent. Some 45 units present grammatical material on gender, parts of speech, and verbs. Each unit contains a…

  6. Consequences of abnormal CDK activity in S phase.

    PubMed

    Anda, Silje; Rothe, Christiane; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beáta

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin Dependent Kinases (CDKs) are important regulators of DNA replication. In this work we have investigated the consequences of increasing or decreasing the CDK activity in S phase. To this end we identified S-phase regulators of the fission yeast CDK, Cdc2, and used appropriate mutants to modulate Cdc2 activity. In fission yeast Mik1 has been thought to be the main regulator of Cdc2 activity in S phase. However, we find that Wee1 has a major function in S phase and thus we used wee1 mutants to investigate the consequences of increased Cdc2 activity. These wee1 mutants display increased replication stress and, particularly in the absence of the S-phase checkpoint, accumulate DNA damage. Notably, more cells incorporate EdU in a wee1(-) strain as compared to wildtype, suggesting altered regulation of DNA replication. In addition, a higher number of cells contain chromatin-bound Cdc45, an indicator of active replication forks. In addition, we found that Cdc25 is required to activate Cdc2 in S phase and used a cdc25 mutant to explore a situation where Cdc2 activity is reduced. Interestingly, a cdc25 mutant has a higher tolerance for replication stress than wild-type cells, suggesting that reduced CDK activity in S phase confers resistance to at least some forms of replication stress. PMID:26918805

  7. Promoter activity dynamics in the lag phase of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lag phase is a period of time with no growth that occurs when stationary phase bacteria are transferred to a fresh medium. Bacteria in lag phase seem inert: their biomass does not increase. The low number of cells and low metabolic activity make it difficult to study this phase. As a consequence, it has not been studied as thoroughly as other bacterial growth phases. However, lag phase has important implications for bacterial infections and food safety. We asked which, if any, genes are expressed in the lag phase of Escherichia coli, and what is their dynamic expression pattern. Results We developed an assay based on imaging flow cytometry of fluorescent reporter cells that overcomes the challenges inherent in studying lag phase. We distinguish between lag1 phase- in which there is no biomass growth, and lag2 phase- in which there is biomass growth but no cell division. We find that in lag1 phase, most promoters are not active, except for the enzymes that utilize the specific carbon source in the medium. These genes show promoter activities that increase exponentially with time, despite the fact that the cells do not measurably increase in size. An oxidative stress promoter, katG, is also active. When cells enter lag2 and begin to grow in size, they switch to a full growth program of promoter activity including ribosomal and metabolic genes. Conclusions The observed exponential increase in enzymes for the specific carbon source followed by an abrupt switch to production of general growth genes is a solution of an optimal control model, known as bang-bang control. The present approach contributes to the understanding of lag phase, the least studied of bacterial growth phases. PMID:24378036

  8. Active Nematics Are Intrinsically Phase Separated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shradha; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2006-09-01

    Two-dimensional nonequilibrium nematic steady states, as found in agitated granular-rod monolayers or films of orientable amoeboid cells, were predicted [Europhys. Lett. 62, 196 (2003)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2003-00346-7] to have giant number fluctuations, with the standard deviation proportional to the mean. We show numerically that the steady state of such systems is macroscopically phase separated, yet dominated by fluctuations, as in the Das-Barma model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1602 (2000)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.85.1602]. We suggest experimental tests of our findings in granular and living-cell systems.

  9. Active longitudes, nonaxisymmetric dynamos and phase mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Moss, D.; Sokoloff, D.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the problem of solar active longitudes from the viewpoint of dynamo theory. We start from a recent observational analysis of the problem undertaken by Berdyugina & Usoskin (2003, A&A, 405, 1121) and Usoskin et al. (2005, A&A, 441, 347) who demonstrated from a study of sunspot data that solar active longitudes rotate differentially, with a small but significant asynchrony between northern and southern hemispheres. We suggest two concepts by which the underlying magnetic structure could lead to the observed phenomenology - the true differential rotation of a nonaxisymmetric magnetic structure and a stroboscopic effect. In the latter case, a solid body rotation of nonaxisymmetric magnetic structure is illuminated by an activity wave propagating from middle latitudes to the solar equator, and so mimics a differential rotation. We then discuss several mechanisms which could in principle lead to the excitation of active longitudes. In particular, we consider dynamo excitation of nonaxisymmetric magnetic modes, nonaxisymmetric structures as a manifestation of a relic magnetic field in the solar core, nonaxisymmetric solar hydrodynamics and nonlinear instabilities that lack axial symmetry. We conclude that these mechanisms all provide ways to explain the phenomenology, provided the stroboscopic interpretation is accepted. Of course, a quantitative explanation in the framework of any scenario requires ultimately a detailed numerical simulation. The interpretation of the available observations as a true differential rotation appears to provide a much more severe challenge for theorists. We are unable to suggest a plausible mechanism of this kind; however we can not exclude in principle such an explanation. We relate the phenomenon of solar active longitudes to the information available concerning stellar active longitudes, and also consider evidence from other tracers of solar activity.

  10. Refining the Magnitude of the Shallow Slip Deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Milliner, C. W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic inversions for slip versus depth for several major (Mw > 7) strike-slip earthquakes (e.g. 1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine, 2010 El_Mayor-Cucapah) show a 10% to 40% reduction in slip near surface (depth < 2 km) compared to the slip at deeper depths (5 to 8 km). This has been called the shallow slip deficit (SSD). The large magnitude of this deficit has been an enigma since it cannot be explained by shallow creep during the interseismic period or by triggered slip from nearby earthquakes. One potential explanation for the SSD is that the previous geodetic inversions used incomplete data that do not go close to fault so the shallow portions of the slip models were poorly resolved and generally underestimated. In this study we improve the geodetic inversion, especially at shallow depth by: 1) refining the InSAR processing with non-boxcar phase filtering, model-dependent range corrections, more complete phase unwrapping by SNAPHU using a correlation mask and allowing a phase discontinuity along the rupture; 2) including near-fault offset data from optical imagery and SAR azimuth offsets; 3) using more detailed fault geometry; 4) and using additional campaign GPS data. With these improved observations, the slip inversion has significantly increased resolution at shallow depth. For the Landers rupture the SSD is reduced from 45% to 16%. Similarly for the Hector Mine rupture the SSD is reduced from 15% to 5%. We are assembling all the relevant co-seismic data for the El Major-Cucapah earthquake and will report the inversion result with its SSD at the meeting.

  11. A phase field dislocation dynamics model for a bicrystal interface system: An investigation into dislocation slip transmission across cube-on-cube interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Koslowski, M.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a phase field dislocation dynamics formulation designed to treat a system comprised of two materials differing in moduli and lattice parameters that meet at a common interface. We apply the model to calculate the critical stress τcrit required to transmit a perfect dislocation across the bimaterial interface with a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. The calculation of τcrit accounts for the effects of: 1) the lattice mismatch (misfit or coherency stresses), 2) the elastic moduli mismatch (Koehler forces or image stresses), and 3) the formation of the residual dislocation in the interface. Our results show that the value of τcrit associated with the transmission of a dislocation from material 1 to material 2 is not the same as that from material 2 to material 1. Dislocation transmission from the material with the lower shear modulus and larger lattice parameter tends to be easier than the reverse and this apparent asymmetry in τcrit generally increases with increases in either lattice or moduli mismatch or both. In efforts to clarify the roles of lattice and moduli mismatch, we construct an analytical model for τcrit based on the formation energy of the residual dislocation. We show that path dependence in this energetic barrier can explain the asymmetry seen in the calculated τcrit values.

  12. A phase field dislocation dynamics model for a bicrystal interface system: An investigation into dislocation slip transmission across cube-on-cube interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Y.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Koslowski, M.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a phase field dislocation dynamics formulation designed to treat a system comprised of two materials differing in moduli and lattice parameters that meet at a common interface. We apply the model to calculate the critical stress τcrit required to transmit a perfect dislocation across the bimaterial interface with a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. The calculation of τcrit accounts for the effects of: 1) the lattice mismatch (misfit or coherency stresses), 2) the elastic moduli mismatch (Koehler forces or image stresses), and 3) the formation of the residual dislocation in the interface. Our results show that themore » value of τcrit associated with the transmission of a dislocation from material 1 to material 2 is not the same as that from material 2 to material 1. Dislocation transmission from the material with the lower shear modulus and larger lattice parameter tends to be easier than the reverse and this apparent asymmetry in τcrit generally increases with increases in either lattice or moduli mismatch or both. In efforts to clarify the roles of lattice and moduli mismatch, we construct an analytical model for τcrit based on the formation energy of the residual dislocation. We show that path dependence in this energetic barrier can explain the asymmetry seen in the calculated τcrit values.« less

  13. Biomechanical response to ladder slipping events: Effects of hand placement.

    PubMed

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Campbell-Kyureghyan, Naira H; Beschorner, Kurt E

    2015-11-01

    Ladder falling accidents are a significant, growing and severe occupational hazard. The factors that contribute to falls from ladders and specifically those that influence the motor response from ladder falls are not well understood. The aims of this research were to determine the effects of hand placement (rung versus rail) on muscle activation onset and peak activity timing in response to slipping on a ladder and to sequence the timing of events following slip initiation. Fifteen unexpected slips from 11 experienced ladder climbers were induced with a freely spinning rung under the foot, while subjects were randomly assigned to a rung versus rail hand grasping strategy. EMG onset time and peak activity time from five bilateral muscles (semitendinosis, vastus lateralis, triceps, biceps and anterior deltoid) were analyzed. Results indicated that significantly slower muscle activation onset and peak response times occurred during rail hand placement, suggesting that grasping ladder rungs may be preferable for improving the speed of the motor response. The triceps muscle activated and reached peak activity earlier in the slip indicating that subjects may initially extend their arms prior to generating hand forces. The study also revealed that slips tended to occur around the time that a foot and hand were in motion and there were just two points of contact (one hand and the slipping foot).

  14. Texture and pyramidal slip in Ti, Zr and their alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pochettino, A.A.; Gannio, N. ); Edwards, C.V. ); Penelle, R. )

    1992-12-15

    Zirconium, titanium and their alloys have a high anisotropic plastic behavior. One way to show this behavior is to analyze the evolution of the Lankford coefficient (R ([alpha]), values of which are obtained from tensile tests along different directions in the sheet plane). The variation of R([alpha]) can be explained from the crystallographic texture and the active deformation mechanisms. Microstructural observations show that prismatic slip is the most active deformation mode in these materials, but no dimensional change in the [lt][bar c][gt] direction of grains is possible by the activation of the (10[bar 1]0) [lt] 1[bar 2]10[gt] slip alone; so deformation along [0001] has to be accommodated either by (10[bar 1]o) [lt]1[bar 2]13[gt] (or [lt][bar c] + [bar a][gt]) pyramidal slip or by twinning. Many transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have shown evidence for [lt][bar c] + [bar a][gt] slip activity, and some authors have reported slip on (1[bar 1]01) planes in Ti alloys. The purpose of this paper is to contribute with another analysis of pyramidal slip activity in hcp textured materials, such as Ti and Zr alloys, and of the hardening mechanisms for this deformation mode. This analysis is performed both in a direct way, by means of TEM observations of deformed samples, and in an indirect way, by different mechanical tests.

  15. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  16. Water accumulation below Europa's strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousova, K.; Tobie, G.; Soucek, O.; Choblet, G.; Cadek, O.

    2015-10-01

    The onset of melting below Europa's recently active strike-slip faults and the gravitational/thermal stability of partially molten ice are investigated by solving the equations for a two-phase compressible mixture of water ice and liquid water in 2D geometry. As a first step, the relative motion between ice and water is neglected, i.e. the meltwater is transported by the flowing ice. Our preliminary results suggest that for sufficiently large shear heating rate of˜2×10-4W m-3 melting can occur at depths as shallow as˜3km below Europa's surface. Moreover, the reservoirs of partially molten ice with˜5-10% of liquid water can remain within the cold lid for a few hundreds of kiloyears if the underlying ice is sufficiently cold (vis-cous) and free of fractures.

  17. Blood Flow, Slip, and Viscometry

    PubMed Central

    Nubar, Yves

    1971-01-01

    The viscosity of blood, measured by the usual viscometers in which slip is not considered, is found to be flow dependent, varying markedly with shear rate, pressure gradient, and vessel diameter in the lower ranges of these factors. The study postulates, on grounds thought reasonable, that slip may be present in blood flow, as a function of the nature of the wall surfaces, shear stress at the wall, and relative cell volume (RCV) adjacent to the wall. It presumes that blood possesses a specific, flow-independent viscosity, and determines theoretically the viscosity indications of viscometers if blood slipped in the instruments. The study shows that if the slip function is of a certain plausible form, these viscosity indications would exhibit a flow dependence of much the same pattern as the actual indications supplied by the usual viscometers. The slip postulate permits, therefore, an interpretation of the “anomalous” flow behavior of blood, dispensing with the prevailing assumption of an ad hoc variability of its viscosity with flow factors. To the extent that viscometric data for blood may be representative of other non-newtonian fluids, the slip postulate may be applicable to these fluids. PMID:5573368

  18. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  19. Bilateral Limb Phase Relationship and Its Potential to Alter Muscle Activity Phasing During Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    López-Ortiz, Citlali; Walter, Charles B.; Brown, David A.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that the sensorimotor state of one limb can influence another limb and therefore bilateral somatosensory inputs make an important contribution to interlimb coordination patterns. However, the relative contribution of interlimb pathways for modifying muscle activation patterns in terms of phasing is less clear. Here we studied adaptation of muscle activity phasing to the relative angular positions of limbs using a split-crank ergometer, where the cranks could be decoupled to allow different spatial angular position relationships. Twenty neurologically healthy individuals performed the specified pedaling tasks at different relative angular positions while surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded bilaterally from eight lower extremity muscles. During each experiment, the relative angular crank positions were altered by increasing or decreasing their difference by randomly ordered increments of 30° over the complete cycle [0° (in phase pedaling); 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180° (standard pedaling); and 210, 240, 270, 300, and 330° out of phase pedaling]. We found that manipulating the relative angular positions of limbs in a pedaling task caused muscle activity phasing changes that were either delayed or advanced, dependent on the relative spatial position of the two cranks and this relationship is well-explained by a sine curve. Further, we observed that the magnitude of phasing changes in biarticular muscles (like rectus femoris) was significantly greater than those of uniarticular muscles (like vastus medialis). These results are important because they provide new evidence that muscle phasing can be systematically influenced by interlimb pathways. PMID:19741107

  20. Surface mobility and slip of polybutadiene melts in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Geoffrey M.; Denn, Morton M.; Bell, Alexis T.; Mays, Jimmy W.; Hong, Kunlun; Iatrou, Hermis

    2000-05-01

    Surface mobility and wall slip of entangled polybutadiene melts were studied with attenuated-total-reflectance infrared spectroscopy at stresses characteristic of the sharkskin, spurt, and melt-fracture regimes. Small-scale slip, accompanied by an apparent decrease in transverse mobility, occurs in the sharkskin regime, but at a stress above the visual onset of sharkskin in capillary viscometry. Simulations cannot distinguish between a cohesive mechanism and a lubrication mechanism that might follow from a stress-induced phase transition, but an adhesive failure seems to be excluded. The near-surface length scale is of the order of four to six times the equilibrium root-mean-square end-to-end distance, and the estimated slip velocity is insensitive to molecular weight. Strong slip occurs in the spurt regime, either at the wall or within one radius of gyration. Substantial apparent slip occurs with a fluorocarbon surface, but the mechanism does not appear to be an adhesive failure; there seems to be a substantial decrease in the friction coefficient of chains over a distance of order 300 nm or more from the fluorocarbon surface, and the transverse chain mobility in this region appears to be enhanced rather than retarded. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the influence of the wall extends farther into the sheared melt than would be expected from the chain dimensions, except in the case of strong slip. (c) 2000 Society of Rheology.

  1. Geomorphic analysis of the Sierra Cabrera, an active pop-up in the constriction domain of conjugate strike-slip faults: the Palomares and Polopos fault zones (eastern Betics, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaconia, F.; Booth-Rea, G.; Martínez-Martínez, J. M.; Pérez-Peña, V.; Azañón, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Segments of the Quaternary sinistral Carboneras and Palomares fault zones, striking NE-SW and NNE-SSW, respectively, terminate in the Sierra Cabrera antiform together with the conjugate dextral WNW-ESE striking Polopos fault zone. In the constriction domain between these fault zones a pop-up structure occurs formed by the North and the South Cabrera reverse faults that bound the northern and the southern hillslopes, respectively. In order to test the Quaternary activity and relief control of these fault zones, here we present new qualitative and quantitative geomorphic analyses for the Sierra Cabrera using the following indices: mountain-front sinuosity, valley floor width-to-height ratio, drainage basin asymmetry factor, basin hypsometric curve and integral, and the SLk index. These analyses were performed with the aid of several maps such as the SLk and the minimum bulk erosion map. Qualitative observations carried out on the drainage network highlight the existence of a Late Miocene fold-related drainage network and a following late Miocene to Plio-Quaternary fault-related one. Integrating the mountain-front sinuosity and the valley floor width-to-height ratio for each mountain front we estimated the uplift rates associated to each of them. Fault-related mountain-fronts with a N50-60°E strike have reverse kinematics and uplift rates larger than 0.5 m ky-1 (e.g. North and South Cabrera reverse faults), whereas those with N20-30°E and N90-100°E strikes show oblique strike-slip kinematics and show lower uplift rates, between 0.05 and 0.5 m ky-1 (e.g. the Palomares and the Polopos fault segments). Furthermore, these faults produce knickpoints, complex basin hypsometric curves, high SLk anomalies and highly eroded basins above the fault traces. The estimated uplift rates are larger than those obtained from other authors for strike-slip faults in the eastern Betics that range between 0.1 and 0.05 m ky-1 (e.g. Palomares and southern Carboneras strike-slip fault

  2. Foreshocks during the nucleation of stick-slip instability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Kilgore, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on laboratory experiments which investigate interactions between aseismic slip, stress changes, and seismicity on a critically stressed fault during the nucleation of stick-slip instability. We monitor quasi-static and dynamic changes in local shear stress and fault slip with arrays of gages deployed along a simulated strike-slip fault (2 m long and 0.4 m deep) in a saw cut sample of Sierra White granite. With 14 piezoelectric sensors, we simultaneously monitor seismic signals produced during the nucleation phase and subsequent dynamic rupture. We observe localized aseismic fault slip in an approximately meter-sized zone in the center of the fault, while the ends of the fault remain locked. Clusters of high-frequency foreshocks (Mw ~ −6.5 to −5.0) can occur in this slowly slipping zone 5–50 ms prior to the initiation of dynamic rupture; their occurrence appears to be dependent on the rate at which local shear stress is applied to the fault. The meter-sized nucleation zone is generally consistent with theoretical estimates, but source radii of the foreshocks (2 to 70 mm) are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the theoretical minimum length scale over which earthquake nucleation can occur. We propose that frictional stability and the transition between seismic and aseismic slip are modulated by local stressing rate and that fault sections, which would typically slip aseismically, may radiate seismic waves if they are rapidly stressed. Fault behavior of this type may provide physical insight into the mechanics of foreshocks, tremor, repeating earthquake sequences, and a minimum earthquake source dimension.

  3. Geomorphic analysis of the Sierra Cabrera, an active pop-up in the constrictional domain of conjugate strike-slip faults: The Palomares and Polopos fault zones (eastern Betics, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaconia, Flavio; Booth-Rea, G.; Martínez-Martínez, J. M.; Azañón, J. M.; Pérez-Peña, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    The NNE-SSW sinistral Palomares and the conjugate dextral WNW-ESE striking Polopos fault zones terminate in the Sierra Cabrera antiform. In order to test the Quaternary activity and topographic relief control in the termination of these fault zones, here we present new qualitative and quantitative geomorphic analyses supported by a new structural map of the region. The main mountain fronts of the Cabrera antiform are formed by the North and South Cabrera reverse faults that merge laterally into the Palomares and Polopos faults, respectively. These faults produce knickpoints, stream deflections, complex basin hypsometric curves, high SLk anomalies and highly eroded basins in their proximity. Furthermore, the drainage network shows an S-shaped pattern reflecting progressive anticlockwise rotation related to the sinistral Palomares fault zone. The estimated uplift rates determined by the integration between mountain front sinuosity index and valley floor width to height ratio are larger than those obtained for strike-slip faults in the eastern Betics. These larger uplift rates with our geomorphic and structural dataset indicate that the topographic relief of the Sierra Cabrera antiform is controlled by reverse faults that form a pop-up structure in the constrictional domain between the larger Palomares-Polopos conjugate strike-slip faults. Existing GPS geodetic data suggest that the North and South Cabrera reverse faults probably accommodate a large part of Africa-Iberia convergence in the region.

  4. Comparison of Geodetic and Late Pleistocene Slip Rates for the Southern Dead Sea Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. J.; Gomez, F.; Abu Rajab, J. S.; Al-Tarazi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Comparisons of short-term (geodetic) and Late Quaternary slip rates have been used to assess time-variable fault kinematics along various active faults, globally. Differences between such types slip rates may have implications for crustal rheology and/or temporal variations in plate motion. This research aims to compare the geodetically-derived slip rates with slip rates based on Late Pleistocene landforms along the southern Dead Sea fault system (DSFS). The DSFS is an active, left-lateral transform that accommodates differential movement between the Arabian and Sinai plates. A number of slip rates have been previously reported ranging from 2 to 6mm/yr. However, comparison of various slip rates requires ensuring that associated uncertainties are assessed using a standard. New GPS velocities from Jordan are combined with other available GPS data, and are used to model slip rates using elastic block models. Resulting slip rates are 4.3 to 5.3 mm/yr with fault locking depths of 8 - 15 km. Late Pleistocene rates are assessed from published observations, as well as new data. New mapping of offset alluvial fans in the southern Wadi Araba was facilitated by multi-spectral imagery and high-resolution digital elevation model. These fans correlate with regional aggradation events, with the resulting Late Pleistocene slip rates ranging from 4.2 to 5.1 mm/yr. Statistically, the geodetic and neotectonic slip rates are identical. Additionally, a 3-dimensional slip vector for the last earthquake in the northern Wadi Araba is constructed using close-range photogrammetry of a faulted Byzantine aqueduct that indicates both horizontal and vertical displacements. Previous studies suggested characteristic earthquake slip, so slip rates and this slip vector provide a means of assessing mean EQ recurrence interval, as well as the role of earthquakes in constructing the long-term topography along this part of the transform.

  5. EMG and Kinematic Responses to Unexpected Slips After Slip Training in Virtual Reality

    PubMed Central

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to design a virtual reality (VR) training to induce perturbation in older adults similar to a slip and examine the effect of the training on kinematic and muscular responses in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were involved in a laboratory study and randomly assigned to two groups (virtual reality training and control). Both groups went through three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on slippery surface. The training group experienced twelve simulated slips using a visual perturbation induced by tilting a virtual reality scene while walking on the treadmill and the control group completed normal walking during the training session. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results demonstrated the proactive adjustments such as increased trunk flexion at heel contact after training. Reactive adjustments included reduced time to peak activations of knee flexors, reduced knee coactivation, reduced time to trunk flexion, and reduced trunk angular velocity after training. In conclusion, the study findings indicate that the VR training was able to generate a perturbation in older adults that evoked recovery reactions and such motor skill can be transferred to the actual slip trials. PMID:25296401

  6. GPS Cycle Slip Detection Considering Satellite Geometry Based on TDCP/INS Integrated Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younsil; Song, Junesol; Kee, Changdon; Park, Byungwoon

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a means of carrier phase cycle slip detection for an inertial-aided global positioning system (GPS), which is based on consideration of the satellite geometry. An integrated navigation solution incorporating a tightly coupled time differenced carrier phase (TDCP) and inertial navigation system (INS) is used to detect cycle slips. Cycle-slips are detected by comparing the satellite-difference (SD) and time-difference (TD) carrier phase measurements obtained from the GPS satellites with the range estimated by the integrated navigation solution. Additionally the satellite geometry information effectively improves the range estimation performance without a hardware upgrade. And the covariance obtained from the TDCP/INS filter is used to compute the threshold for determining cycle slip occurrence. A simulation and the results of a vehicle-based experiment verify the cycle slip detection performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26437412

  7. GPS Cycle Slip Detection Considering Satellite Geometry Based on TDCP/INS Integrated Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younsil; Song, Junesol; Kee, Changdon; Park, Byungwoon

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a means of carrier phase cycle slip detection for an inertial-aided global positioning system (GPS), which is based on consideration of the satellite geometry. An integrated navigation solution incorporating a tightly coupled time differenced carrier phase (TDCP) and inertial navigation system (INS) is used to detect cycle slips. Cycle-slips are detected by comparing the satellite-difference (SD) and time-difference (TD) carrier phase measurements obtained from the GPS satellites with the range estimated by the integrated navigation solution. Additionally the satellite geometry information effectively improves the range estimation performance without a hardware upgrade. And the covariance obtained from the TDCP/INS filter is used to compute the threshold for determining cycle slip occurrence. A simulation and the results of a vehicle-based experiment verify the cycle slip detection performance of the proposed algorithm.

  8. GPS Cycle Slip Detection Considering Satellite Geometry Based on TDCP/INS Integrated Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younsil; Song, Junesol; Kee, Changdon; Park, Byungwoon

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a means of carrier phase cycle slip detection for an inertial-aided global positioning system (GPS), which is based on consideration of the satellite geometry. An integrated navigation solution incorporating a tightly coupled time differenced carrier phase (TDCP) and inertial navigation system (INS) is used to detect cycle slips. Cycle-slips are detected by comparing the satellite-difference (SD) and time-difference (TD) carrier phase measurements obtained from the GPS satellites with the range estimated by the integrated navigation solution. Additionally the satellite geometry information effectively improves the range estimation performance without a hardware upgrade. And the covariance obtained from the TDCP/INS filter is used to compute the threshold for determining cycle slip occurrence. A simulation and the results of a vehicle-based experiment verify the cycle slip detection performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26437412

  9. Modeling stick-slip-separation dynamics in a bimodal standing wave ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Yao, Zhiyuan; Lv, Qibao; Liu, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasonic motor (USM) is an electromechanical coupling system with ultrasonic vibration, which is driven by the frictional contact force between the stator (vibrating body) and the rotor/slider (driven body). Stick-slip motion can occur at the contact interface when USM is operating, which may affect the performance of the motor. This paper develops a physically-based model to investigate the complex stick-slip-separation dynamics in a bimodal standing wave ultrasonic motor. The model includes both friction nonlinearity and intermittent separation nonlinearity of the system. Utilizing Hamilton's principle and assumed mode method, the dynamic equations of the stator are deduced. Based on the dynamics of the stator and the slider, sticking force during the stick phase is derived, which is used to examine the stick-to-slip transition. Furthermore, the stick-slip-separation kinematics is analyzed by establishing analytical criteria that predict the transition between stick, slip and separation of the interface. Stick-slip-separation motion is observed in the resulting model, and numerical simulations are performed to study the influence of parameters on the range of possible motions. Results show that stick-slip motion can occur with greater preload and smaller voltage amplitude. Furthermore, a dimensionless parameter is proposed to predict the occurrence of stick-slip versus slip-separation motions, and its role in designing ultrasonic motors is discussed. It is shown that slip-separation motion is favorable for the slider velocity.

  10. Slip velocity of large neutrally buoyant particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellani, G.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss possible definitions for a stochastic slip velocity that describes the relative motion between large particles and a turbulent flow. This definition is necessary because the slip velocity used in the standard drag model fails when particle size falls within the inertial subrange of ambient turbulence. We propose two definitions, selected in part due to their simplicity: they do not require filtration of the fluid phase velocity field, nor do they require the construction of conditional averages on particle locations. A key benefit of this simplicity is that the stochastic slip velocity proposed here can be calculated equally well for laboratory, field and numerical experiments. The stochastic slip velocity allows the definition of a Reynolds number that should indicate whether large particles in turbulent flow behave (a) as passive tracers; (b) as a linear filter of the velocity field; or (c) as a nonlinear filter to the velocity field. We calculate the value of stochastic slip for ellipsoidal and spherical particles (the size of the Taylor microscale) measured in laboratory homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The resulting Reynolds number is significantly higher than 1 for both particle shapes, and velocity statistics show that particle motion is a complex nonlinear function of the fluid velocity. We further investigate the nonlinear relationship by comparing the probability distribution of fluctuating velocities for particle and fluid phases.

  11. A latchable thermally activated phase change actuator for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex microfluidic systems often require a high number of individually controllable active components like valves and pumps. In this paper we present the development and optimization of a latchable thermally controlled phase change actuator which uses a solid/liquid phase transition of a phase change medium and the displacement of the liquid phase change medium to change and stabilize the two states of the actuator. Because the phase change is triggered by heat produced with ohmic resistors the used control signal is an electrical signal. In contrast to pneumatically activated membrane valves this concept allows the individual control of several dozen actuators with only two external pressure lines. Within this paper we show the general working principle of the actuator and demonstrate its general function and the scalability of the concept at an example of four actuators. Additionally we present the complete results of our studies to optimize the response behavior of the actuator - the influence of the heating power as well as the used phase change medium on melting and solidifying times.

  12. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  13. Connecting heterogeneous single slip to diffraction peak evolution in high-energy monochromatic X-ray experiments.

    PubMed

    Pagan, Darren C; Miller, Matthew P

    2014-06-01

    A forward modeling diffraction framework is introduced and employed to identify slip system activity in high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) experiments. In the framework, diffraction simulations are conducted on virtual mosaic crystals with orientation gradients consistent with Nye's model of heterogeneous single slip. Simulated diffraction peaks are then compared against experimental measurements to identify slip system activity. Simulation results compared against diffraction data measured in situ from a silicon single-crystal specimen plastically deformed under single-slip conditions indicate that slip system activity can be identified during HEDM experiments.

  14. Comments on the slip factor and the relation Delta phi = -h Delta theta

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The definition of the slip factor can be obtained from the phase equation. However, a derivation using the relation {Delta}{phi} = -h{Delta}{theta} leads to a different slip-factor definition. This apparent paradox is examined in detail and resolved. Here {Delta}{phi} is the rf phase difference and {Delta}{theta} is the azimuthal phase difference around the accelerator ring between an off-momentum particle and the synchronous particle, while h is the rf harmonic.

  15. Does Nanoparticle Activity Depend upon Size and Crystal Phase?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingkun; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison; Gelein, Robert; Mercer, Pamela; Biswas, Pratim

    2010-01-01

    A method to investigate the dependence of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g. size, surface area and crystal phase) on their oxidant generating capacity is proposed and demonstrated for TiO2 nanoparticles. Gas phase synthesis methods that allow for strict control of size and crystal phase were used to prepare TiO2 nanoparticles. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacity of these particles was then measured. The size dependent ROS activity was established using TiO2 nanoparticles of 9 different sizes (4 – 195 nm) but the same crystal phase. For a fixed total surface area, an S-shaped curve for ROS generation per unit surface area was observed as a function of particle size. The highest ROS activity per unit area was observed for 30 nm particles, and observed to be constant above 30 nm. There was a decrease in activity per unit area as size decreased from 30 nm to 10 nm; and again constant for particles smaller than 10 nm. The correlation between crystal phase and oxidant capacity was established using TiO2 nanoparticles of 11 different crystal phase combinations but similar size. The ability of different crystal phases of TiO2 nanoparticles to generate ROS was highest for amorphous, followed by anatase, and then anatase/rutile mixtures, and lowest for rutile samples. Based on evaluation of the entire dataset, important dose metrics for ROS generation are established. Their implications of these ROS studies on biological and toxicological studies using nanomaterials are discussed. PMID:20827377

  16. Freestyle Writing: A Three-Phase Expressive Writing Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macciomei, Nancy R.

    1992-01-01

    A teacher describes use of a three-phase freestyle writing activity to encourage students with disabilities to develop independent expressive written language. Students develop their skills by writing for brief periods, first whatever comes to mind, then a self-selected topic, and subsequently a teacher-selected topic. (DB)

  17. Modelling Paleoearthquake Slip Distributions using a Gentic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Anthony; Simão, Nuno; McCloskey, John; Nalbant, Suleyman; Murphy, Shane; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic

    2013-04-01

    Along the Sunda trench, the annual growth rings of coral microatolls store long term records of tectonic deformation. Spread over large areas of an active megathrust fault, they offer the possibility of high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of paleo-earthquakes. These data are complex with spatial and temporal variations in uncertainty. Rather than assuming that any one model will uniquely fit the data, Monte Carlo Slip Estimation (MCSE) modelling produces a catalogue of possible models for each event. From each earthquake's catalogue, a model is selected and a possible history of slip along the fault reconstructed. By generating multiple histories, then finding the average slip during each earthquake, a probabilistic history of slip along the fault can be generated and areas that may have a large slip deficit identified. However, the MCSE technique requires the production of many hundreds of billions of models to yield the few models that fit the observed coral data. In an attempt to accelerate this process, we have designed a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The GA uses evolutionary operators to recombine the information held by a population of possible slip models to produce a set of new models, based on how well they reproduce a set of coral deformation data. Repeated iterations of the algorithm produce populations of improved models, each generation better satisfying the coral data. Preliminary results have shown the GA to be capable of recovering synthetically generated slip distributions based their displacements of sets of corals faster than the MCSE technique. The results of the systematic testing of the GA technique and its performance using both synthetic and observed coral displacement data will be presented.

  18. Whillans Ice Plain Stick Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Concern about future sea level rise motivates the study of fast flowing ice. The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is notable for decelerating from previously fast motion during the instrumental record. Since most ice flux in Antarctica occurs through ice streams, understanding the conditions that cause ice stream stagnation is of basic importance in understanding the continent's contribution to future sea level rise. Although recent progress has been made in understanding the relationship between basal conditions and ice stream motion, direct observation of the temporal variation in subglacial conditions during ice stream stagnation has remained elusive. The Whillans Ice Plain flows to the sea mostly by way of stick-slip motion. We present numerical simulations of this stick-slip motion that capture the inertial dynamics, seismic waves, and the evolution of sliding with rate- and state-dependent basal friction. Large scale stick-slip behavior is tidally modulated and encompasses the entire WIP. Sliding initiates within one of several locked regions and then propagates outward with low average rupture velocity (~ 200 m/s). Sliding accelerates over a period of 200 s attain values as large as 65 m/d. From Newton's second law, this acceleration is ~ T / (rho H) for average shear stress drop T, ice thickness H, and ice density rho. This implies a 3 Pa stress drop that must be reconciled with the final stress drop of 300 Pa inferred from the total slip and fault dimensions. A possible explanation of this apparent discrepancy is that deceleration of the ice is associated with a substantial decrease in traction within rate-strengthening regions of the bed. During these large-scale sliding events, m-scale patches at the bed produce rapid (20 Hz) stick-slip motion. Each small event occurs over ~ 1/100 s, produces ~ 40 microns of slip, and gives rise to a spectacular form of seismic tremor. Variation between successive tremor episodes allows us

  19. Slip-stacking Dynamics for High-Power Proton Beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey Scott

    2015-12-01

    Slip-stacking is a particle accelerator configuration used to store two particle beams with different momenta in the same ring. The two beams are longitudinally focused by two radiofrequency (RF) cavities with a small frequency difference between them. Each beam is synchronized to one RF cavity and perturbed by the other RF cavity. Fermilab uses slip-stacking in the Recycler so as to double the power of the 120 GeV proton beam in the Main Injector. This dissertation investigates the dynamics of slip-stacking beams analytically, numerically and experimentally. In the analytic analysis, I find the general trajectory of stable slip-stacking particles and identify the slip-stacking parametric resonances. In the numerical analysis, I characterize the stable phase-space area and model the particle losses. In particular, I evaluate the impact of upgrading the Fermilab Booster cycle-rate from 15 Hz to 20 Hz as part of the Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II). The experimental analysis is used to verify my approach to simulating slip-stacking loss. I design a study for measuring losses from the longitudinal single-particle dynamics of slip-stacking as a function of RF cavity voltage and RF frequency separation. I further propose the installation of a harmonic RF cavity and study the dynamics of this novel slip-stacking configuration. I show the harmonic RF cavity cancels out parametric resonances in slip-stacking, reduces emittance growth during slip-stacking, and dramatically enhances the stable phase-space area. The harmonic cavity is expected to reduce slip-stacking losses to far exceed PIP-II requirements. These results raise the possibility of extending slip-stacking beyond the PIP-II era.

  20. Analysis of boundary slip in a flow with an oscillating wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John; Mohseni, Kamran

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study slip at the fluid-solid boundary in an unsteady flow based on the Stokes’ second problem. An increase in slip is observed in comparison to the steady flow for shear rates below the critical shear rate of the corresponding steady flow. This increased slip is attributed to fluid inertial forces not represented in a steady flow. An unsteady mathematical model for slip is established, which estimates the increment in slip at the boundary. The model shows that slip is also dependent on acceleration in addition to the shear rate of fluid at the wall. By writing acceleration in terms of shear rate, it is shown that slip at the wall in unsteady flows is governed by the gradient of shear rate and shear rate of the fluid. Nondimensionalizing the model gives a time dependent yet universal curve, independent of wall-fluid properties, which can be used to find the slip boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface based on the information of shear rate, gradient of shear rate of the fluid, and the instant of time during the cycle. A governing nondimensional number, defined as the ratio of phase speed to speed of sound, is identified to help in explaining the mechanism responsible for the transition of slip boundary condition from finite to a perfect slip and determining when this would occur. Phase lag in fluid velocity relative to wall is observed. The lag increases with decreasing time period of wall oscillation and increasing wall hydrophobicity. The phenomenon of hysteresis is seen when looking into the variation of slip velocity as a function of wall velocity and slip velocity as a function of fluid shear rate. The cause for hysteresis is attributed to the unsteady inertial forces of the fluid. The rate of heat generated by viscous shear is compared for an unsteady Stokes’ second problem and simple Couette flow and is shown to be higher for the unsteady flow.

  1. Slip-stacking dynamics for high-power proton beams at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey

    Slip-stacking is a particle accelerator configuration used to store two particle beams with different momenta in the same ring. The two beams are longitudinally focused by two radiofrequency (RF) cavities with a small frequency difference between them. Each beam is synchronized to one RF cavity and perturbed by the other RF cavity. Fermilab uses slip-stacking in the Recycler as to double the power of the 120 GeV proton beam in the Main Injector. This dissertation investigates the dynamics of slip-stacking beams analytically, numerically and experimentally. In the analytic analysis, I find the general trajectory of stable slip-stacking particles and identify the slip-stacking parametric resonances. In the numerical analysis, I characterize the stable phase-space area and model the particle losses. In particular, I evaluate the impact of upgrading the Fermilab Booster cycle-rate from 15 Hz to 20 Hz as part of the Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II). The experimental analysis is used to verify my approach to simulating slip-stacking loss. I design a study for measuring losses from the longitudinal single-particle dynamics of slip-stacking as a function of RF cavity voltage and RF frequency separation. I further propose the installation of a harmonic RF cavity and study the dynamics of this novel slip-stacking configuration. I show the harmonic RF cavity cancels out parametric resonances in slip-stacking, reduces emittance growth during slip-stacking, and dramatically enhances the stable phase-space area. The harmonic cavity is expected to reduce slip-stacking losses to far exceed PIP-II requirements. These results raise the possibility of extending slip-stacking beyond the PIP-II era.

  2. On the transient behavior of frictional melt during seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; Mosca, P.; Giberti, G.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2010-10-01

    In a recent work on the problem of sliding surfaces under the presence of frictional melt (applying in particular to earthquake fault dynamics), we derived from first principles an expression for the steady state friction compatible with experimental observations. Building on the expressions of heat and mass balance obtained in the above study for this particular case of Stefan problem (phase transition with a migrating boundary), we propose here an extension providing a full time-dependent solution (including the weakening transient after pervasive melting has started, the effect of eventual steps in velocity, and the final decelerating phase). A system of coupled equations is derived and solved numerically. The resulting transient friction and wear evolution yield a satisfactory fit (1) with experiments performed under variable sliding velocities (0.9-2 m s-1) and different normal stresses (0.5-20 MPa) for various rock types and (2) with estimates of slip weakening obtained from observations on ancient seismogenic faults that host pseudotachylite (solidified melt). The model allows us to extrapolate the experimentally observed frictional behavior to large normal stresses representative of the seismogenic Earth crust (up to 200 MPa), high slip rates (up to 9 m s-1), and cases where melt extrusion is negligible. Though weakening distance and peak stress vary widely, the net breakdown energy appears to be essentially independent of either slip velocity or normal stress. In addition, the response to earthquakelike slip can be simulated, showing a rapid friction recovery when slip rate drops. We discuss the properties of energy dissipation, transient duration, velocity weakening, restrengthening in the decelerating final slip phase, and the implications for earthquake source dynamics.

  3. Slip zone structure and processes in seismogenic carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, R. J.; De Paola, N.

    2011-12-01

    High velocity rotary shear experiments performed at seismic slip velocities (>1 m/s) have shown that experimental faults are weak; with increasing displacement, friction coefficient values decrease from Byerlee's values (μ = 0.6-0.85) to values of ~0.1. In carbonate rocks, experimental studies have shown that fault lubrication is due to the operation of multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms (e.g., flash heating, thermal pressurization, nanoparticle lubrication), which are thermally activated due to the frictional heat generated along localized slip surfaces during rapid slip. This study has set out to investigate whether evidence for the operation of these weakening mechanisms can be found in naturally occurring carbonate fault zones. Field studies were carried out on the active Gubbio fault zone (1984, Mw = 5.6) in the northern Apennines of Italy. Jurassic-Oligocene carbonates in the footwall are heavily deformed within a fault core of ~15 m thickness, which contains a number of very well exposed, highly localized principal slip surfaces (PSSs). Fault rocks are predominantly breccias and foliated cataclasites. Microstructural analyses of the PSSs reveal that slip is localized within very narrow principal slip zones (PSZs), ranging from 10-85 μm in thickness, with sub-millimetre scale asperities. PSZs are composed of very fine-grained, orange-brown ultracataclasite gouge containing a high proportion of nano-sized particles. The ultracataclasite commonly displays a foliated texture and sub-micron scale zones of extreme shear localization. A broader slip zone, up to 1.5 mm wide and containing multiple slip surfaces, is associated with the most evolved PSSs; it is located on the opposite side of the PSS to the PSZ. Here, the host rock material is heavily fractured, abraded and altered, sometimes with an ultracataclasite matrix. The surrounding wall rock often appears to have a porous texture, and calcite crystals within the slip zone have altered rims with lobate

  4. Slow-Slip Propagation Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. M.; Ampuero, J.

    2007-12-01

    Combined seismic and geodetic data from subduction zones and the Salton Trough have revealed slow slip events with reasonably well-defined propagation speeds. This in turn is suggestive of a more-or-less well- defined front separating nearly locked regions outside the slipping zone from interior regions that slide much more rapidly. Such crack-like nucleation fronts arise naturally in models of rate-and-state friction for lab-like values of a/b, where a and b are the coefficients of the velocity- and state-dependence of the frictional strength (with the surface being velocity-neutral for a/b=1). If the propagating front has a quasi-steady shape, the propagation and slip speeds are kinematically tied via the local slip gradient. Given a sufficiently sharp front, the slip gradient is given dimensionally by Δτp- r/μ', where Δτp-r is the peak-to-residual stress drop at the front and μ' the effective elastic shear modulus. Rate-and-state simulations indicate that Δτp-r is given reasonably accurately by bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc), where σ is the effective normal stress, Vmax is the maximum slip speed behind the propagating front, θi is the the value of "state" ahead of the propagating front, and Dc is the characteristic slip distance for state evolution. Except for a coefficient of order unity, Δτp-r is independent of the evolution law. This leads to Vprop/Vmax ~μ'/[bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc)]. For slip speeds a few orders of magnitude above background, \\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc) can with reasonable accuracy be assigned some representative value (~4-5, for example). Subduction zone transients propagate on the order of 10 km/day or 10-1 m/s. Geodetic data constrain the average slip speed to be a few times smaller than 1 cm/day or 10-7 m/s. However, numerical models indicate that the maximum slip speed at the front may be several times larger than the average, over a length scale that is probably too small to resolve geodetically, so a representative value of Vprop/Vmax may be ~106

  5. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  6. Assessing the Updip Spatial Offset of Tremor and Slip during ETS Events in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, R. D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the updip spatial overlap of tremor and slip during recent episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in Cascadia using a combination of forward and inverse models constrained by GPS, strainmeter, and tremor observations. Results from major ETS events in northern Cascadia suggest that, although there is significant spatial overlap, slow slip tends to extend further updip than tremor. ETS activity is thought to be dependent on a range of parameters, such as variable fluid pressures, temperature dependent physical properties, and facies changes. A spatial offset would indicant that tremor and slip are reflective of different physical conditions. While a clear offset of tremor and slip has been observed in multiple other subduction zones, a similar offset in Cascadia has remained difficult to constrain. Here we seek to establish whether the updip spatial offset is real in Cascadia and to quantify its extent. To complement GPS observations in Cascadia, we incorporate high fidelity strainmeter observations into inversions and sensitivity tests of iterative forward models. Tremor distributions are used as a proxy for slip and incorporated into slip models where parameters affecting the distribution and magnitude of slip are allowed to vary. These slip models are used to forward predict surface displacements and strains, which are then compared to the geodetic observations and inferred slip based on geodetic inversions. Results indicate that, while the tremor-derived slip distributions do a good job predicting the broad-scale surface deformation, the best-fit models have slip updip of the peak tremor activity. The fine-scale relationship of tremor and slip appears to vary on an event-by-event basis, where areas of high tremor density do not always correlate with increased surface displacements and vice-versa.

  7. Gamma power is phase-locked to posterior alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Daria; Hermes, Dora; Jensen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations in various frequency bands have been reported in numerous studies in both humans and animals. While it is obvious that these oscillations play an important role in cognitive processing, it remains unclear how oscillations in various frequency bands interact. In this study we have investigated phase to power locking in MEG activity of healthy human subjects at rest with their eyes closed. To examine cross-frequency coupling, we have computed coherence between the time course of the power in a given frequency band and the signal itself within every channel. The time-course of the power was calculated using a sliding tapered time window followed by a Fourier transform. Our findings show that high-frequency gamma power (30-70 Hz) is phase-locked to alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) in the ongoing MEG signals. The topography of the coupling was similar to the topography of the alpha power and was strongest over occipital areas. Interestingly, gamma activity per se was not evident in the power spectra and only became detectable when studied in relation to the alpha phase. Intracranial data from an epileptic subject confirmed these findings albeit there was slowing in both the alpha and gamma band. A tentative explanation for this phenomenon is that the visual system is inhibited during most of the alpha cycle whereas a burst of gamma activity at a specific alpha phase (e.g. at troughs) reflects a window of excitability. PMID:19098986

  8. Study of fault slip modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adushkin, V. V.; Kocharyan, G. G.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the data of the laboratory experiments on studying the regularities of gradual transition from the stick-slip behavior to aseismic creeping on the interblock boundary. The experiments show that small variations in the material composition in the principal slip zones of the faults may cause a significant change in the fraction of seismic energy radiated during the dynamic unloading of the adjacent segment of the rock mass. The experiments simulate interblock sliding regimes with the values of the scaled kinetic energy differing by a few orders of magnitude and relatively small distinctions in the strength of the contacts and in the amplitude of the released shear stresses. The results of the experiments show that the slip mode and the fraction of the deformation energy that goes into the seismic radiation are determined by the ratio of two parameters—the stiffness of the fault and the stiffness of the enclosing rock mass. An important implication of the study for solving the engineering tasks is that for bringing a stressed segment of a fault or a crack into a slip mode with low-intensity radiation of seismic energy, the anthropogenic impact should be aimed at diminishing the stiffness of the fault zone rather than at releasing the excessive stresses.

  9. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  10. Wall slip in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léger, L.; Hervet, H.; Massey, G.; Durliat, E.

    1997-09-01

    We present a review of the recent characterizations of the flow behaviour of high-molecular-weight polymer melts, with special emphasis on situations in which slip at the wall appears. These characterizations are based on direct measurements of the local velocity of the fluid, in the immediate vicinity of the solid wall, through near-field velocimetry techniques. The results demonstrate the importance of polymer molecules anchored on the solid surface, either by strong adsorption or by chemical grafting, and entangled with the bulk polymer, to produce a strong friction at low shear rates and to lead to a shear rate threshold above which strong slip at the wall and low friction develop. The evolution of the shear rate threshold and of the flow characteristics (the length of the extrapolation of the velocity profile to zero, the critical slip velocity for the onset of strong slip, ...) with the molecular parameters of the system (the molecular weights of the bulk and surface chains, and the surface density of anchored chains) is analysed and compared with the predictions of recent theoretical models.

  11. Episodic Tremor and Slip along the Oaxaca segment of the Middle America Subduction Zone and Comparisons to Cascadia and Nankai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlanser, K. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Hinojosa, H. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Diaz-Molina, O.; Demets, C.

    2009-12-01

    Convergent plate boundaries generate great earthquakes when tectonic stresses accumulate on the plate interface. Down-dip from the seismogenic zone where increasing temperatures, pressure and dehydration affect frictional behavior, episodic tremor and slip (ETS) has been shown to occur in the transitional zone. The Oaxaca subduction zone is an ideal area for detailed ETS studies as rapid convergent rates, shallow subduction, and short trench-to-coast distances bring the seismogenic and transition zones of the plate interface up to 250 km inland. Previously analyzed slow slip events occur over large areas in southern Mexico, and may even extend up-dip into the seismogenic zone, potentially playing a role in future megathrust earthquakes. A seismic deployment of 7 broadband seismometers dispersed along the Oaxaca segment provides the means to examine non-volcanic tremor (NVT) signals in detail. In this study, we establish that NVT occurs frequently in the Oaxaca region based on waxing and waning of seismic energy correlated across neighboring stations, appropriate relative time moveouts, and spectrograms demonstrating the narrow frequency band. We then analyze NVT envelope waveforms with a semi-automated process for identifying prominent energy bursts, and analyst-refined relative arrival times are inverted for source locations. Prominent NVT episodes that lasted several days to a week were prevalent during the 15 months analyzed for this study. Source locations determined for 18 prominent episodes indicate that tremor recurs every 2-3 months on average in a given region, but at different times in the eastern and western ends of our network. Locations determined by examining tremor activity on a daily basis during a 5 month time period that covers before, during, and after a slow slip event reveals that less prominent tremor tends to be focused during slow slip in an area just northeast of the slow slip. Overall, NVT burst locations primarily occur between the 40

  12. Slip rate and tremor genesis in Cascadia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wech, Aaron G.; Bartlow, Noel M.

    2014-01-01

    At many plate boundaries, conditions in the transition zone between seismogenic and stable slip produce slow earthquakes. In the Cascadia subduction zone, these events are consistently observed as slow, aseismic slip on the plate interface accompanied by persistent tectonic tremor. However, not all slow slip at other plate boundaries coincides spatially and temporally with tremor, leaving the physics of tremor genesis poorly understood. Here we analyze seismic, geodetic, and strainmeter data in Cascadia to observe for the first time a large, tremor-generating slow earthquake change from tremor-genic to silent and back again. The tremor falls silent at reduced slip speeds when the migrating slip front pauses as it loads the stronger adjacent fault segment to failure. The finding suggests that rheology and slip-speed-regulated stressing rate control tremor genesis, and the same section of fault can slip both with and without detectable tremor, limiting tremor's use as a proxy for slip.

  13. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form τss = σn1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress σn, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for σn in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with σn, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  14. How Orogen-scale Exhumed Strike-slip Faults Initiate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Neubauer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Orogen-scale strike-slip faults present one the most important geodynamic processes affecting the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. In specific subtypes, faulting is virtually initiated along hot-to-cool boundaries, e.g. at such of hot granite intrusions or metamorphic core complexes to cool country rocks. Such fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust and are stacked within each other ("telescoping"). Exhumation of rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such strike-slip faults implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion. The hot-to-cool thermal structure across the fault zone significantly influences the physical fault rock properties. One major question is how and where a major strike-slip initiates and further development. Here, we propose a model in which major continental exhumed strike-slip faults potentially evolve along rheologically weak zones such as plutons or margins of metamorphic complexes. As an example, we propose a model for the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, SE Asia, which initiated along the edge of a plutonic belt and evolved in response to India-Asia collision with four tectonic phases.

  15. Characterizing the Relationship of Tremor and Slip during Recent ETS Events in Northern Cascadia using Strainmeters, GPS, and Tremor Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, R. D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between slip and tremor during multiple recent slow slip events in northern Cascadia. While the relationship of geodetically detectable slow slip and nonvolcanic tremor appears to be broadly coincident, the exact spatial and temporal characteristics remain unclear at a finer scale. Typical GPS derived slip distributions tend to be spatially and temporally smoothed and offset slightly updip of tremor distributions. These discrepancies may be real, or they may be a consequence of the resolution of GPS data or an artifact of the inversion methodology. Borehole strainmeters provide additional independent geodetic constraints for characterizing slip, provide greater temporal resolution, and greater precision than GPS. However, various non-tectonic artifacts and other sources of error have limited the number of usable stations and made deriving reliable information from strainmeters during slip events difficult. We utilize strainmeters with low levels of noise and minimal observable artifacts to constrain forward models and to provide additional independent observations in joint geodetic inversions with GPS data. A series of slip distributions are derived by inverting strainmeter and GPS data using the Kalman-filter-based Extended Network Inversion Filter. To compare the tremor distributions to the geodetically derived slip we also construct slip distributions using tremor occurrences as a proxy for localized slip on the plate interface. The magnitude of slip per tremor occurrence is then scaled to best match the observed surface displacements. Separate slip distributions informed by GPS and tremor are then used to predict strain time series. The comparisons between strain predictions and observations produce mixed results. This may indicate that that tremor and slip are not always coincident. This is particularly evident during the Aug. 2010 event, where the peak GPS-derived slip is located in a region with decreased tremor activity

  16. Therapeutic inhibition of the early phase of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anja; Ramwadhdoebé, Tamara H; Nauta, Alma J; Hack, C Erik; Daha, Mohamed R

    2002-09-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity against invading pathogens. However, undesired activation of complement is involved in inflammation and associated tissue damage in a number of pathological conditions, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, autoimmune diseases, and rejection of allo- and xenografts. During recent years, various therapeutically active complement inhibitors have been developed. In vivo studies using these inhibitors underscored the value of complement inhibition in the prevention of tissue damage. The currently available complement inhibitors mainly target the effector phase of the complement system that is common to all three activation pathways. Such a complete block of complement activation breaks the innate anti-microbial barrier, thereby increasing the risk for infection. Therefore, the development of potent complement inhibitors that interfere in the recognition phase of a specific complement activation pathway will generate important novel possibilities for treatment. The present review is focused on molecules that are able to inhibit the function of C1q and MBL, the recognition units of the classical pathway and the lectin pathway of complement, respectively. The potential value of these molecules for the development of therapeutically active complement inhibitors is discussed.

  17. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  18. A Ku band 5 bit MEMS phase shifter for active electronically steerable phased array applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anesh K.; Gautam, Ashu K.; Farinelli, Paola; Dutta, Asudeb; Singh, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    The design, fabrication and measurement of a 5 bit Ku band MEMS phase shifter in different configurations, i.e. a coplanar waveguide and microstrip, are presented in this work. The development architecture is based on the hybrid approach of switched and loaded line topologies. All the switches are monolithically manufactured on a 200 µm high resistivity silicon substrate using 4 inch diameter wafers. The first three bits (180°, 90° and 45°) are realized using switched microstrip lines and series ohmic MEMS switches whereas the fourth and fifth bits (22.5° and 11.25°) consist of microstrip line sections loaded by shunt ohmic MEMS devices. Individual bits are fabricated and evaluated for performance and the monolithic device is a 5 bit Ku band (16-18 GHz) phase shifter with very low average insertion loss of the order of 3.3 dB and a return loss better than 15 dB over the 32 states with a chip area of 44 mm2. A total phase shift of 348.75° with phase accuracy within 3° is achieved over all of the states. The performance of individual bits has been optimized in order to achieve an integrated performance so that they can be implemented into active electronically steerable antennas for phased array applications.

  19. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  20. Slipping properties of ceramic tiles / Quantification of slip resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terjek, Anita

    2013-12-01

    Regarding the research and application of ceramic tiles there is a great importance of defining precisely the interaction and friction between surfaces. Measuring slip resistance of floor coverings is a complex problem; slipperiness is always interpreted relatively. In the lack of a consistent and clear EU standard, it is practical to use more method in combination. It is necessary to examine the structure of materials in order to get adequate correlation. That is why measuring techniques of surface roughness, an important contributor to slip resistance and cleaning, is fundamental in the research. By comparing the obtained test results, relationship between individual methods of analysis and values may be determined and based on these information recommendations shall be prepared concerning the selection and application of tiles.

  1. Effective heterogeneity controlling premonitory slip on laboratory faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Glaser, S.; Parker, J.

    2015-12-01

    solitary wave', Phys. Rev. E 85, 026111. Fukuda, J., A. Kato, K. Obara, S. Miura & T. Kato (2014), 'Imaging of the early acceleration phase of the 2013-2014 Boso slow slip event', Geophysical Research Letters 41(21), 7493-7500.

  2. Hot, Fast Faults: Evidence for High-Temperature Slip on Exhumed Faults, and Insights into Seismic Slip Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. P.; Ault, A. K.; Janecke, S. U.; Prante, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Microstructural and geochemical techniques combined with prior observations of naturally occurring faults provide insights into slip rates and slip dimensions of seismicity. We review four indicators for high coseismic paleotemperatures in brittle to semi-brittle faults from a wide range of tectonic settings with mm to km of slip. Thin, high-gloss, Fe-rich slip surfaces indicate high-temperature slip occurred on mm- to m-scales. Elliptical and circular zones of concentric iridescence indicate localized sites of elevated temperature that may be caused by heating at asperity contacts. The surface iridescence is associated with changes in Fe oxidation states detected by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Minimum temperature increases of 300 °C above ambient are supported by geochemical arguments and up to 800 °C are supported by analogs to high-speed friction experiments in steels and ceramics firing in reduced conditions. The presence of clay-rich foliated fault-related rocks, and the presence of nm- to mm-thick clay coatings indicate that syn-kinematic endothermic reactions occur at a range of scales. We suggest these features reflect temperature increases of ≥100-200 °C for activation energy required to drive the clay alteration is sourced from seismic energy and Schleicher-van der Pluijm-type slip surfaces to record instantaneous slip. Dense, low porosity planar porcelainite zones mm- to cm-thick along fault surfaces are the result of sintering of quartz-clay-feldspar mixtures and indicate T≥1000 °C localized along the surfaces, the result of post-slip cooling. Highly indurated, ultrafine fault-related rocks often consists of comminuted grains, vein fragments, and neocrystallized grains that represent retrograde cooling or alteration after peak heating. These observations and those of other recent workers indicate that many naturally occurring exhumed faults record elevated temperatures. In many cases, careful observations can delineate fault slip

  3. DEM simulation of growth normal fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang; Nien, Wie-Tung; Chan, Pei-Chen

    2014-05-01

    Slip of the fault can cause deformation of shallower soil layers and lead to the destruction of infrastructures. Shanchiao fault on the west side of the Taipei basin is categorized. The activities of Shanchiao fault will cause the quaternary sediments underneath the Taipei basin to become deformed. This will cause damage to structures, traffic construction, and utility lines within the area. It is determined from data of geological drilling and dating, Shanchiao fault has growth fault. In experiment, a sand box model was built with non-cohesive sand soil to simulate the existence of growth fault in Shanchiao Fault and forecast the effect on scope of shear band development and ground differential deformation. The results of the experiment showed that when a normal fault containing growth fault, at the offset of base rock the shear band will develop upward along with the weak side of shear band of the original topped soil layer, and this shear band will develop to surface much faster than that of single top layer. The offset ratio (basement slip / lower top soil thickness) required is only about 1/3 of that of single cover soil layer. In this research, it is tried to conduct numerical simulation of sand box experiment with a Discrete Element Method program, PFC2D, to simulate the upper covering sand layer shear band development pace and scope of normal growth fault slip. Results of simulation indicated, it is very close to the outcome of sand box experiment. It can be extended to application in water pipeline project design around fault zone in the future. Keywords: Taipei Basin, Shanchiao fault, growth fault, PFC2D

  4. Phase separation of biphasic mixture of active Janus colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Han, Ming; Luijten, Erik; Granick, Steve

    2014-03-01

    Recently there is a surge of interest in the phase behavior of active matter in which building blocks display self-propelling motion. Although much has been known from theory and simulation, experimental examples are very rare. Specifically, the epitomic problem of a binary mixture of active matter defies any experiment or theory so far. Here we present an experimental realization of binary mixture of particles, which only acquires activity when they collisionally interact with the opposite kind. We used a system in which the only difference in the two particles is the phase in their cyclic motion, precluding any artifact due to difference in interparticle potential. We observe phenomena strikingly similar to spinodal decomposition of molecular system, in addition to new features due to the nonequilibrium nature of the system. We derived a general, effective Flory-Huggins theory for spinodal decomposition of bicomponent active system, and rationalized the 1/3 power law growth of the domain size in regions where thermodynamic analogy is valid. The system also presents a plethora of nonequilibrium phenomena such as critical fluctuation, lane formation, and dynamic absorbing state in different parameter space.

  5. Determining the causes of fault slip rate variability for Northern Apennine thrusts on intermediate timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderson, K. L.; Anastasio, D. J.; Pazzaglia, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Documenting fault slip rate variability on intermediate (10^4-10^5 yr) timescales is crucial for understanding the process-linkages of short-term (10^1-10^3 yr) and long-term (10^6 yr) patterns of deformation; however, the lack of long records of fault slip with 10^4-10^5 yr resolution presents a major barrier to understanding the underlying process responsible for slip rate variability at those timescales. Taking advantage of spectacular, continuous exposure of growth strata, we document 10^4-10^5 yr resolution records of unsteady fault slip for the past 3.0 myr for three unconnected, shallow blind thrust anticlines growing along the Northern Apennine mountain front, Italy. Fault slip rates for these thrusts were determined from progressive restorations of marine and continental growth strata deposited on the anticlinal limbs. These restorations were supported by subsurface corre-lations of the measured growth sections in order to constrain the fold geometries and kin-ematics. Magnetostratigraphy, cyclostratigraphy, cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) burial dating, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) burial dating provided the high-resolution age models for the growth sections. Slip histories determined from our pro-gressive restorations indicate that all three of the thrust faults exhibited high-frequency slip rate variability. This variability is typically manifest by longer periods of decelerated fault slip punctuated by shorter periods of accelerated fault slip, typically lasting between 80-200 kyr. During times when slip rates were slow, growth strata geometries show ac-celerated slip was accommodated by more foreland structures, suggesting slip partitioning at 10^4-10^5 yr timescales. This high frequency variability is superimposed on a low frequency slip rate variability manifest by an overall deceleration in slip on the shallow thrusts since 3.0 myr. Major decelerations in slip rates were coincident with the activation of thick-skinned thrusting in the

  6. Collective versus hub activation of epidemic phases on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Silvio C.; Sander, Renan S.; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    We consider a general criterion to discern the nature of the threshold in epidemic models on scale-free (SF) networks. Comparing the epidemic lifespan of the nodes with largest degrees with the infection time between them, we propose a general dual scenario, in which the epidemic transition is either ruled by a hub activation process, leading to a null threshold in the thermodynamic limit, or given by a collective activation process, corresponding to a standard phase transition with a finite threshold. We validate the proposed criterion applying it to different epidemic models, with waning immunity or heterogeneous infection rates in both synthetic and real SF networks. In particular, a waning immunity, irrespective of its strength, leads to collective activation with finite threshold in scale-free networks with large degree exponent, at odds with canonical theoretical approaches.

  7. Back analysis of fault-slip in burst prone environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainoki, Atsushi; Mitri, Hani S.

    2016-11-01

    In deep underground mines, stress re-distribution induced by mining activities could cause fault-slip. Seismic waves arising from fault-slip occasionally induce rock ejection when hitting the boundary of mine openings, and as a result, severe damage could be inflicted. In general, it is difficult to estimate fault-slip-induced ground motion in the vicinity of mine openings because of the complexity of the dynamic response of faults and the presence of geological structures. In this paper, a case study is conducted for a Canadian underground mine, herein called "Mine-A", which is known for its seismic activities. Using a microseismic database collected from the mine, a back analysis of fault-slip is carried out with mine-wide 3-dimensional numerical modeling. A back analysis is conducted to estimate the physical and mechanical properties of the causative fracture or shear zones. One large seismic event has been selected for the back analysis to detect a fault-slip related seismic event. In the back analysis, the shear zone properties are estimated with respect to moment magnitude of the seismic event and peak particle velocity (PPV) recorded by a strong ground motion sensor. The estimated properties are then validated through comparison with peak ground acceleration recorded by accelerometers. Lastly, ground motion in active mining areas is estimated by conducting dynamic analysis with the estimated values. The present study implies that it would be possible to estimate the magnitude of seismic events that might occur in the near future by applying the estimated properties to the numerical model. Although the case study is conducted for a specific mine, the developed methodology can be equally applied to other mines suffering from fault-slip related seismic events.

  8. Multi-asperity models of slow slip and tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, Jean Paul; Luo, Yingdi; Lengline, Olivier; Inbal, Asaf

    2016-04-01

    Field observations of exhumed faults indicate that fault zones can comprise mixtures of materials with different dominant deformation mechanisms, including contrasts in strength, frictional stability and hydrothermal transport properties. Computational modeling helps quantify the potential effects of fault zone heterogeneity on fault slip styles from seismic to aseismic slip, including slow slip and tremor phenomena, foreshocks sequences and swarms, high- and low-frequency radiation during large earthquakes. We will summarize results of ongoing modeling studies of slow slip and tremor in which fault zone structure comprises a collection of frictionally unstable patches capable of seismic slip (tremorgenic asperities) embedded in a frictionally stable matrix hosting aseismic transient slips. Such models are consistent with the current view that tremors result from repeated shear failure of multiple asperities as Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs). The collective behavior of asperities embedded in creeping faults generate a rich spectrum of tremor migration patterns, as observed in natural faults, whose seismicity rate, recurrence time and migration speed can be mechanically related to the underlying transient slow slip rate. Tremor activity and slow slip also responds to periodic loadings induced by tides or surface waves, and models relate tremor tidal sensitivity to frictional properties, fluid pressure and creep rate. The overall behavior of a heterogeneous fault is affected by structural parameters, such as the ratio of stable to unstable materials, but also by time-dependent variables, such as pore pressure and loading rate. Some behaviors are well predicted by homogenization theory based on spatially-averaged frictional properties, but others are somewhat unexpected, such as seismic slip behavior found in asperities that are much smaller than their nucleation size. Two end-member regimes are obtained in rate-and-state models with velocity-weakening asperities

  9. Flexible slip near the largest step-over along the North Anatolian fault system, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, H.; Kurcer, A.; Özalp, S.; Emre, O.

    2010-12-01

    Repeatability of surface slip distribution through earthquake cycles is basis to evaluate size and timing of future large earthquakes generated by active fault systems. In order to reveal surface slip history associated with paleoearthquakes on the North Anatolian fault system (NAFS), we have extensively performed 3D trenching survey on the 1942 Erbaa-Niksar earthquake (M 7.0) ruptures, to simultaneously reconstruct timing and surface slip associated with past large earthquakes. At Ayvaz site on the 1942 rupture, our 3D trench survey preliminary indicated that the penultimate earthquake, which can be correlated with the great Anatolian earthquake (M ~8.0) in 1668 AD, recorded larger surface slip of 6.0-8.0 m in comparison with the 1942 slip of 2.5 m. This result supports historical documents telling that the 1668 event ruptured for >600 km long on the central-eastern NAFS and it likely jumped across the 11-km-wide step-over that is the largest along the NAFS. In order to confirm this flexible slip history according to the magnitude of large earthquakes, we re-excavated 3D trenches to reconstruct longer slip history at the same site. The results are summarized as follows; 1) at the site, high-resolution alluvium exposed on the trench walls records six paleoearthquakes including the 1942 and 1668 events during the last ~2500 years, 2) we reconstructed five discrete slips during the individual events, 3) the amounts of paleo-slips are classified into two categories; the 1942-type smaller slips and the 1668-type larger slips. Thus, the repeatability of surface slip during large earthquakes is not constant like the assumption of the characteristic earthquake model, however, the amounts do not randomly vary from event to event on the assumption of the Gutenberg-Richter model.

  10. Slip length measurement of confined air flow on three smooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunlu; Bhushan, Bharat; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2013-04-01

    An experimental measurement of the slip length of air flow close to three different solid surfaces is presented. The substrate was driven by a nanopositioner moving toward an oscillating glass sphere glued to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. A large separation distance was used to get more effective data. The slip length value was obtained by analyzing the amplitude and phase data of the cantilever. The measurements show that the slip length does not depend on the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever. Because of the small difference among the slip lengths of the three surfaces, a simplified analysis method was used. The results show that on glass, graphite, and mica surfaces the slip lengths are 98, 234, and 110 nm, respectively.

  11. Stick-slip instabilities in sheared granular flow: The role of friction and acoustic vibrations.

    PubMed

    Lieou, Charles K C; Elbanna, Ahmed E; Langer, J S; Carlson, J M

    2015-08-01

    We propose a theory of shear flow in dense granular materials. A key ingredient of the theory is an effective temperature that determines how the material responds to external driving forces such as shear stresses and vibrations. We show that, within our model, friction between grains produces stick-slip behavior at intermediate shear rates, even if the material is rate strengthening at larger rates. In addition, externally generated acoustic vibrations alter the stick-slip amplitude, or suppress stick-slip altogether, depending on the pressure and shear rate. We construct a phase diagram that indicates the parameter regimes for which stick-slip occurs in the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations of a fixed amplitude and frequency. These results connect the microscopic physics to macroscopic dynamics and thus produce useful information about a variety of granular phenomena, including rupture and slip along earthquake faults, the remote triggering of instabilities, and the control of friction in material processing.

  12. A complex systems analysis of stick-slip dynamics of a laboratory fault.

    PubMed

    Walker, David M; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Small, Michael; Behringer, Robert P; Tse, Chi K

    2014-03-01

    We study the stick-slip behavior of a granular bed of photoelastic disks sheared by a rough slider pulled along the surface. Time series of a proxy for granular friction are examined using complex systems methods to characterize the observed stick-slip dynamics of this laboratory fault. Nonlinear surrogate time series methods show that the stick-slip behavior appears more complex than a periodic dynamics description. Phase space embedding methods show that the dynamics can be locally captured within a four to six dimensional subspace. These slider time series also provide an experimental test for recent complex network methods. Phase space networks, constructed by connecting nearby phase space points, proved useful in capturing the key features of the dynamics. In particular, network communities could be associated to slip events and the ranking of small network subgraphs exhibited a heretofore unreported ordering.

  13. Using a genetic algorithm to estimate the details of earthquake slip distributions from point surface displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; Nic Bhloscaidh, M.

    2016-03-01

    Examining fault activity over several earthquake cycles is necessary for long-term modeling of the fault strain budget and stress state. While this requires knowledge of coseismic slip distributions for successive earthquakes along the fault, these exist only for the most recent events. However, overlying the Sunda Trench, sparsely distributed coral microatolls are sensitive to tectonically induced changes in relative sea levels and provide a century-spanning paleogeodetic and paleoseismic record. Here we present a new technique called the Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator to constrain slip distributions from observed surface deformations of corals. We identify a suite of models consistent with the observations, and from them we compute an ensemble estimate of the causative slip. We systematically test our technique using synthetic data. Applying the technique to observed coral displacements for the 2005 Nias-Simeulue earthquake and 2007 Mentawai sequence, we reproduce key features of slip present in previously published inversions such as the magnitude and location of slip asperities. From the displacement data available for the 1797 and 1833 Mentawai earthquakes, we present slip estimates reproducing observed displacements. The areas of highest modeled slip in the paleoearthquake are nonoverlapping, and our solutions appear to tile the plate interface, complementing one another. This observation is supported by the complex rupture pattern of the 2007 Mentawai sequence, underlining the need to examine earthquake occurrence through long-term strain budget and stress modeling. Although developed to estimate earthquake slip, the technique is readily adaptable for a wider range of applications.

  14. Frictional slip of granite at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    To measure the strength, sliding behavior, and friction constitutive properties of faults at hydrothermal conditions, laboratory granite faults containing a layer of granite powder (simulated gouge) were slid. The mechanical results define two regimes. The first regime includes dry granite up to at least 845?? and wet granite below 250??C. In this regime the coefficient of friction is high (?? = 0.7 to 0.8) and depends only modestly on temperature, slip rate, and PH2O. The second regime includes wet granite above ~350??C. In this regime friction decreases considerably with increasing temperature (temperature weakening) and with decreasing slip rate (velocity strengthening). These regimes correspond well to those identified in sliding tests on ultrafine quartz. The results highlight the importance of fluid-assisted deformation processes active in faults at depth and the need for laboratory studies on the roles of additional factors such as fluid chemistry, large displacements, higher concentrations of phyllosilicates, and time-dependent fault healing. -from Authors

  15. Phase 1 immobilized low-activity waste operational source term

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A.

    1998-03-06

    This report presents an engineering analysis of the Phase 1 privatization feeds to establish an operational source term for storage and disposal of immobilized low-activity waste packages at the Hanford Site. The source term information is needed to establish a preliminary estimate of the numbers of remote-handled and contact-handled waste packages. A discussion of the uncertainties and their impact on the source term and waste package distribution is also presented. It should be noted that this study is concerned with operational impacts only. Source terms used for accident scenarios would differ due to alpha and beta radiation which were not significant in this study.

  16. Offset of Latest Pleistocene Shoreface Reveals Slip Rate on the Hosgri Strike-Slip Fault, Offshore Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Hartwell, S. R.; Dartnell, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri-San Gregorio dextral strike-slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore region for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by a ~265-m-wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a relict sand spit that formed during a period of relatively slower sea-level rise (Younger Dryas stadial) in the latest Pleistocene. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault-bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography similar to modern geomorphology along coastal segments of the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6 ± 0.9 mm/yr. Because the Hosgri fault locally includes an active western strand, and regionally converges with several other faults, this slip rate should be considered a minimum for the Hosgri fault in central California and should not be applied for the entire Hosgri-San Gregorio fault system. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike-slip fault budget and is the most active strike-slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high-resolution bathymetry in earthquake-hazard characterization of active offshore faults.

  17. Active Phase and Amplitude Fluctuations of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Klindt, Gary S.; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Jülicher, Frank; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2014-07-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats periodically, driven by the oscillatory dynamics of molecular motors, to propel cells and pump fluids. Small but perceivable fluctuations in the beat of individual flagella have physiological implications for synchronization in collections of flagella as well as for hydrodynamic interactions between flagellated swimmers. Here, we characterize phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar bending waves using shape mode analysis and limit-cycle reconstruction. We report a quality factor of flagellar oscillations Q =38.0±16.7 (mean±s.e.). Our analysis shows that flagellar fluctuations are dominantly of active origin. Using a minimal model of collective motor oscillations, we demonstrate how the stochastic dynamics of individual motors can give rise to active small-number fluctuations in motor-cytoskeleton systems.

  18. Active phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar beating.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Klindt, Gary S; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H; Jülicher, Frank; Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2014-07-25

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats periodically, driven by the oscillatory dynamics of molecular motors, to propel cells and pump fluids. Small but perceivable fluctuations in the beat of individual flagella have physiological implications for synchronization in collections of flagella as well as for hydrodynamic interactions between flagellated swimmers. Here, we characterize phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar bending waves using shape mode analysis and limit-cycle reconstruction. We report a quality factor of flagellar oscillations Q = 38.0 ± 16.7 (mean ± s.e.). Our analysis shows that flagellar fluctuations are dominantly of active origin. Using a minimal model of collective motor oscillations, we demonstrate how the stochastic dynamics of individual motors can give rise to active small-number fluctuations in motor-cytoskeleton systems.

  19. Feedback-induced phase transitions in active heterogeneous conductors.

    PubMed

    Ocko, Samuel A; Mahadevan, L

    2015-04-01

    An active conducting medium is one where the resistance (conductance) of the medium is modified by the current (flow) and in turn modifies the flow, so that the classical linear laws relating current and resistance, e.g., Ohm's law or Darcy's law, are modified over time as the system itself evolves. We consider a minimal model for this feedback coupling in terms of two parameters that characterize the way in which addition or removal of matter follows a simple local (or nonlocal) feedback rule corresponding to either flow-seeking or flow-avoiding behavior. Using numerical simulations and a continuum mean field theory, we show that flow-avoiding feedback causes an initially uniform system to become strongly heterogeneous via a tunneling (channel-building) phase separation; flow-seeking feedback leads to an immuring (wall-building) phase separation. Our results provide a qualitative explanation for the patterning of active conducting media in natural systems, while suggesting ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems.

  20. Nonlinear active materials: an illustration of controllable phase matchability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongcheng; Gautier, Romain; Donakowski, Martin D; Tran, T Thao; Edwards, Bryce W; Nino, Juan C; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Liu, Zhengtang; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R

    2013-08-14

    For a crystal to exhibit nonlinear optical (NLO) activity such as second-harmonic generation (SHG), it must belong to a noncentrosymmetric (NCS) space group. Moreover, for these nonlinear optical (NLO) materials to be suitable for practical uses, the synthesized crystals should be phase-matchable (PM). Previous synthetic research into SHG-active crystals has centered on (i) how to create NCS compounds and/or (ii) how to obtain NCS compounds with high SHG efficiencies. With these tactics, one can synthesize a material with a high SHG efficiency, but the material could be unusable if the material was nonphase-matchable (non-PM). To probe the origin of phase matchability of NCS structures, we present two new chemically similar hybrid compounds within one composition space: (I) [Hdpa]2NbOF5·2H2O and (II) HdpaNbOF4 (dpa = 2,2'-dipyridylamine). Both compounds are NCS and chemically similar, but (I) is non-PM while (II) is PM. Our results indicate--consistent with organic crystallography--the arrangement of the organic molecule within hybrid materials dictates whether the material is PM or non-PM.

  1. Feedback-Induced Phase Transitions in Active Heterogeneous Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Samuel A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-04-01

    An active conducting medium is one where the resistance (conductance) of the medium is modified by the current (flow) and in turn modifies the flow, so that the classical linear laws relating current and resistance, e.g., Ohm's law or Darcy's law, are modified over time as the system itself evolves. We consider a minimal model for this feedback coupling in terms of two parameters that characterize the way in which addition or removal of matter follows a simple local (or nonlocal) feedback rule corresponding to either flow-seeking or flow-avoiding behavior. Using numerical simulations and a continuum mean field theory, we show that flow-avoiding feedback causes an initially uniform system to become strongly heterogeneous via a tunneling (channel-building) phase separation; flow-seeking feedback leads to an immuring (wall-building) phase separation. Our results provide a qualitative explanation for the patterning of active conducting media in natural systems, while suggesting ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems.

  2. Texture development and slip systems in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, L.; Wenk, H.-R.

    2016-09-01

    Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O are the most abundant phases in the lower mantle and localized regions of the D″ layer just above the core mantle boundary. Seismic anisotropy is observed near subduction zones at the top of the lower mantle and in the D″ region. One source of anisotropy is dislocation glide and associated texture (crystallographic preferred orientation) development. Thus, in order to interpret seismic anisotropy, it is important to understand texture development and slip system activities in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates. Here we report on in situ texture development in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates deformed in the diamond anvil cell up to 61 GPa. When bridgmanite is synthesized from enstatite, it exhibits a strong (4.2 m.r.d.) 001 transformation texture due to a structural relationship with the precursor enstatite phase. When bridgmanite + ferropericlase are synthesized from olivine or ringwoodite, bridgmanite exhibits a relatively weak 100 transformation texture (1.2 and 1.6 m.r.d., respectively). This is likely due to minimization of elastic strain energy as a result of Young's modulus anisotropy. In bridgmanite, 001 deformation textures are observed at pressures <55 GPa. The 001 texture is likely due to slip on (001) planes in the [100], [010] and < {110} rangle directions. Stress relaxation by laser annealing to 1500-1600 K does not result in a change in this texture type. However, at pressures >55 GPa a change in texture to a 100 maximum is observed, consistent with slip on the (100) plane. Ferropericlase, when deformed with bridgmanite, does not develop a coherent texture. This is likely due to strain heterogeneity within the softer ferropericlase grains. Thus, it is plausible that ferropericlase is not a significant source of anisotropy in the lower mantle.

  3. Process for slip casting textured tubular structures

    DOEpatents

    Steinlage, Greg A.; Trumble, Kevin P.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

  4. Multicycle slip distribution along a laboratory fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chi-Yu, King

    1991-01-01

    Slip distribution along a laboratory fault, which consists of eight spring-connected blocks that are elastically driven to slide on a frictional surface, has been examined for a "long' sequence of slip events to test the applicability of some conceptual models. The distributions of large slip events are found to be quite variable and do not fit the uniform slip or characteristic earthquake models. The rupture initiation points are usually not near the corresponding maximum slip points, in contrast to observations by Thatcher (1990) and by Fukao and Kikuchi (1987) that earthquake hypocenters are commonly near corresponding regions of maximum slip in the fault planes. The results suggest that earthquake prediction monitoring efforts should not be limited to a small region near an asperity but should be spread out to cover the entire fault segment in a seismic gap in order to detect the condition of simultaneous strain buildup. -from Author

  5. Label-Free Direct Visual Analysis of Hydrolytic Enzyme Activity Using Aqueous Two-Phase System Droplet Phase Transitions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dextran hydrolysis-mediated conversion of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-dextran (DEX) aqueous two-phase system droplets to a single phase was used to directly visualize Dextranase activity. DEX droplets were formed either by manual micropipetting or within a continuous PEG phase by computer controlled actuation of an orifice connecting rounded channels formed by backside diffused light lithography. The time required for the two-phase to one-phase transition was dependent on the Dextranase concentration, pH of the medium, and temperature. The apparent Michaelis constants for Dextranase were estimated based on previously reported catalytic constants, the binodal polymer concentration curves for PEG-DEX phase transition for each temperature, and pH condition. The combination of a microfluidic droplet system and phase transition observation provides a new method for label-free direct measurement of enzyme activity. PMID:24654925

  6. Reduced Aftershock Productivity in Regions with Known Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G.; Mina, A.; Richardson, E.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced aftershock activity has been observed in areas with high rates of aseismic slip, such as transform fault zones and some subduction zones. Fault conditions that could explain both of these observations include a low effective normal stress regime and/or a high temperature, semi-brittle/plastic rheology. To further investigate the possible connection between areas of aseismic slip and reduced aftershock productivity, we compared the mainshock-aftershock sequences in subduction zones where aseismic slip transients have been observed to those of adjacent (along-strike) regions where no slow slip events have been detected. Using the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) catalog, we counted aftershocks that occurred within 100 km and 14 days of 112 M>=5.0 slab earthquake mainshocks from January 1980 - July 2013, including 90 since January 2000, inside observed regions of detected slow slip: south central Alaska, Cascadia, the Nicoya Peninsula (Costa Rica), Guerrero (Mexico), and the North Island of New Zealand. We also compiled aftershock counts from 97 mainshocks from areas adjacent to each of these regions using the same criteria and over the same time interval. Preliminary analysis of these two datasets shows an aftershock triggering exponent (alpha in the ETAS model) of approximately 0.8, consistent with previous studies of aftershocks in a variety of tectonic settings. Aftershock productivity for both datasets is less than that of continental earthquakes. Contrasting the two datasets, aftershock productivity inside slow slip regions is lower than in adjacent areas along the same subduction zone and is comparable to that of mid-ocean ridge transform faults.

  7. Learning to predict slip for ground robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Matthies, Larry; Helmick, Daniel; Sibley, Gabe; Perona, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we predict the amount of slip an exploration rover would experience using stereo imagery by learning from previous examples of traversing similar terrain. To do that, the information of terrain appearance and geometry regarding some location is correlated to the slip measured by the rover while this location is being traversed. This relationship is learned from previous experience, so slip can be predicted later at a distance from visual information only.

  8. Bulk metallic glasses deform via slip avalanches.

    PubMed

    Antonaglia, James; Wright, Wendelin J; Gu, Xiaojun; Byer, Rachel R; Hufnagel, Todd C; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T; Dahmen, Karin A

    2014-04-18

    For the first time in metallic glasses, we extract both the exponents and scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics, and dynamics of slip events during slow deformation, according to a simple mean field model. We model the slips as avalanches of rearrangements of atoms in coupled shear transformation zones (STZs). Using high temporal resolution measurements, we find the predicted, different statistics and dynamics for small and large slips thereby excluding self-organized criticality. The agreement between model and data across numerous independent measures provides evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

  9. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  10. Development of a liquid metal slip ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    A liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism was designed and a model tested. This was a follow-up of previous efforts for the development of a gallium liquid metal slip ring in which the major problem was the formation and ejection of debris. A number of slip ring design approaches were studied. The probe design concept was fully implemented with detail drawings and a model was successfully tested for dielectric strength, shock vibration, acceleration and operation. The conclusions are that a gallium liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism is feasible and that the problem of debris formation and ejection has been successfully solved.

  11. Theoretical study on the impact of slip flow on chromatographic performance.

    PubMed

    Smits, Wim; Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2014-10-31

    We used numerical simulations to investigate the recent observation that slip flow chromatography can obtain reduced plate heights as low as 0.032. The simulations were carried out for a 2D pillar array and a 3D face centred cubic particle stacking. We found that slip flow can only affect the mobile phase mass transfer contribution, which reduces the minimal total plate height by no more than 0.02 reduced plate height units for totally porous particles. Slip flow by itself can thus not fully explain the observed extremely low plate height values and further research is necessary to understand these results. PMID:25262031

  12. Predicting the probability of slip in gait: methodology and distribution study.

    PubMed

    Gragg, Jared; Yang, James

    2016-01-01

    The likelihood of a slip is related to the available and required friction for a certain activity, here gait. Classical slip and fall analysis presumed that a walking surface was safe if the difference between the mean available and required friction coefficients exceeded a certain threshold. Previous research was dedicated to reformulating the classical slip and fall theory to include the stochastic variation of the available and required friction when predicting the probability of slip in gait. However, when predicting the probability of a slip, previous researchers have either ignored the variation in the required friction or assumed the available and required friction to be normally distributed. Also, there are no published results that actually give the probability of slip for various combinations of required and available frictions. This study proposes a modification to the equation for predicting the probability of slip, reducing the previous equation from a double-integral to a more convenient single-integral form. Also, a simple numerical integration technique is provided to predict the probability of slip in gait: the trapezoidal method. The effect of the random variable distributions on the probability of slip is also studied. It is shown that both the required and available friction distributions cannot automatically be assumed as being normally distributed. The proposed methods allow for any combination of distributions for the available and required friction, and numerical results are compared to analytical solutions for an error analysis. The trapezoidal method is shown to be highly accurate and efficient. The probability of slip is also shown to be sensitive to the input distributions of the required and available friction. Lastly, a critical value for the probability of slip is proposed based on the number of steps taken by an average person in a single day.

  13. Active retrodirective arrays for SPS beam pointing. [phase conjugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-01-01

    The basic requirement of the SPS beam pointing system is that it deliver a certain amount of S-band (lambda = 12.5 cm) power to a 9.6 km diameter receiving rectenna on the ground. The power is transmitted from a 1.0 km diameter antenna array on the SPS, which is, for a rectenna at about plus or minus 40 deg. latitude, some 37.5x10 to the 6th power km distant. At the present time ARA's appear to be the best bet to realize this very stringent beam pointing requirement. An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam towards the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the "conjugate" of that received by the element. Phase conjugate circuits and pointing errors in ARA's are described. Results obtained using a 2-element X-band ARA and an 8-element S-band ARA are included.

  14. Nonuniform seismic slip rates along the Middle America Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Karen C.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1981-06-01

    Revised estimates of seismic slip rates along the Middle America Trench are lower on the average than plate convergence rates but match them locally (for example, Oaxaca). Along the Cocos-North American plate boundary this can be explained by nonuniformities in slip at points of aseismic ridge or fracture zone subduction. For at least 81 yr (and possibly several hundred years), no major (Ms ≥ 7.5) shallow earthquake is known to have occurred near the Orozco Fracture Zone and Tehuantepec Ridge areas. Compared with the average recurrence periods for large earthquakes (33 ± 8 yr since 1898 and 35 ± 24 yr between 1542 and 1979), this suggests that either a large (M ≥ 8.4) event may be anticipated at such locations, or that these are points of aseismic subduction. Large coastal terraces and evidence suggesting tectonic uplift are found onshore near the Orozco Fracture zone. The larger discrepancy between plate convergence and seismic slip rates along the Cocos-Carribbean plate boundary is more likely due to decoupling and downbending of the subducted plate. We used the limited statistical evidence available to characterize both spatial and temporal deficiencies in recent seismic slip. The observations appear consistent with a possible forthcoming episode of more intense seismic activity. Based on a series of comparisons with carefully delineated aftershock zones, we conclude that the zones of anomalous seismic activity can be identified by a systematic, automated analysis of the worldwide earthquake catalog (mb ≥ 4).

  15. Airborne Antenna System for Minimum-Cycle-Slip GPS Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) antenna and associated apparatus for keeping the antenna aimed upward has been developed for use aboard a remote-sensing-survey airplane. The purpose served by the system is to enable minimum- cycle-slip reception of GPS signals used in precise computation of the trajectory of the airplane, without having to restrict the airplane to maneuvers that increase the flight time needed to perform a survey. Cycle slip signifies loss of continuous track of the phase of a signal. Minimum-cycle-slip reception is desirable because maintaining constant track of the phase of the carrier signal from each available GPS satellite is necessary for surveying to centimeter or subcentimeter precision. Even a loss of signal for as short a time as a nanosecond can cause cycle slip. Cycle slips degrade the quality and precision of survey data acquired during a flight. The two principal causes of cycle slip are weakness of signals and multipath propagation. Heretofore, it has been standard practice to mount a GPS antenna rigidly on top of an airplane, and the radiation pattern of the antenna is typically hemispherical, so that all GPS satellites above the horizon are viewed by the antenna during level flight. When the airplane must be banked for a turn or other maneuver, the reception hemisphere becomes correspondingly tilted; hence, the antenna no longer views satellites that may still be above the Earth horizon but are now below the equatorial plane of the tilted reception hemisphere. Moreover, part of the reception hemisphere (typically, on the inside of a turn) becomes pointed toward ground, with a consequent increase in received noise and, therefore, degradation of GPS measurements. To minimize the likelihood of loss of signal and cycle slip, bank angles of remote-sensing survey airplanes have generally been limited to 10 or less, resulting in skidding or slipping uncoordinated turns. An airplane must be banked in order to make

  16. Kilauea slow slip events: Identification, source inversions, and relation to seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Brown, E. K.; Segall, P.; Miklius, A.

    2009-06-01

    Several slow slip events beneath the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, have been inferred from transient displacements in daily GPS positions. To search for smaller events that may be close to the noise level in the GPS time series, we compare displacement fields on Kilauea's south flank with displacement patterns in previously identified slow slip events. Matching displacement patterns are found for several new candidate events, although displacements are much smaller than previously identified events. One of the candidates, 29 May 2000, is coincident with a microearthquake swarm, as are all of the previously identified slow slip events. The microearthquakes follow the onset of slow slip, implying that they are triggered by stress changes during slip. The new slow slip event brings the total number of events on Kilauea, between 1997 and 2007, to eight, the smallest having MW = 5.3, and the largest having MW = 6.0. While the recurrence time between the four largest events is 2.11 ± 0.01 years, the repeat time for all eight events is 0.9 ± 0.6 years. We invert for the fault geometry and distribution of slip during the slow slip events. The optimal source depths of 5 km, assuming uniform slip dislocations in an elastic half-space, are considerably shallower than the accompanying swarm earthquakes (6.5-8.5 km), which would place the earthquakes in a zone of decreased Coulomb stress. Inversions including the effects of topography and layered elastic structure in the forward models favor depths comparable to microearthquake depths, such that the earthquakes are located in a region of increased Coulomb stress. We also invert for time-dependent fault slip directly from the 30 s GPS phase observations, constraining the source to the optimal uniform slip geometry. On the basis of these inversions, the larger events last between 1.5-2.2 days. The data are unable to resolve migration of slip along the fault. The temporal pattern of accompanying microearthquakes is

  17. Dextral strike-slip tectonism and arc processes in the Sierra Nevada and Idaho batholiths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, B.; Byerly, A.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Vervoort, J. D.; Kelso, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Both the Sierra Nevada (CA) and Idaho batholiths display clear evidence for magmatism simultaneous with dextral strike-slip movement during the Cretaceous. There is, however, a significant difference between both the style and the timing of the deformation and magmatism in these two magmatic arcs. The Sierra Nevada displays dextral strike-slip tectonism active from 92-80 Ma, as evidenced by a series of dextral shear zones associated with the axis of active magmatism. The concept of the plutons intruding en echelon pull-apart structures in a dextral system has been supported by the recognition of widespread, syn-tectonic shear zones along the axis of the arc. Further, a modern analog can be found in El Salvador, where dextral translation of the forearc has resulted in en echelon dextral shearing in a magmatic arc dominated by arc-perpendicular normal faulting. In contrast, dextral tectonism in Idaho both starts (~103 Ma) and ceases earlier (~90 Ma) than strike-slip motion in the Sierra Nevada batholith. Further, the deformation is better developed, as recorded by the ~5 km thick, dextral transpressional western Idaho shear zone (WISZ). The WISZ deformation affects I-type magmas that are not typically considered part of the Idaho batholith. The main phase of the 85-70 Ma, peraluminous Idaho batholith (Atlanta lobe) only contains local evidence for dextral shearing, such as the NS-oriented Johnson Creek-Profile Gap shear zone. The reasons for this along-strike variation in deformation for Cretaceous magmatic arcs in North America may relate to the collisional and translation histories of offshore terranes.

  18. Slipping on pedestrian surfaces: methods for measuring and evaluating the slip resistance.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Christoph; Windhövel, Ulrich; Mewes, Detlef; Ceylan, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Tripping, slipping and falling accidents are among the types of accident with a high incidence. This article describes the requirements concerning slip resistance, as well as the state of the art of slip resistance measurement standards in the European Community and the USA. The article also describes how risk assessment can be performed in the field. PMID:26414511

  19. Magnetic observations during the recent declining phase of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.

    Changes in the heliospheric magnetic field during the recent declining phase in solar activity are reviewed and compared with observations during past sunspot cycles. The study is based principally on data obtained by IMP-8 and Ulysses. The field magnitude is found to have increased during the declining phase until it reached a maximum value of 11.5nT in approximately 1991.5, approximately two years after sunspot maximum. The field of the sun's south pole became negative after a reversal in early 1990. The sector structure disappeared at Ulysses in April 1993 when the latitude of the spacecraft was -30 deg revealing a low inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. A large outburst of solar activity in March 1991 caused four Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and numerious shocks at the location of Ulysses. Following a delay of more than a year, a series of recurrent high speed streams and Corotating Interaction Regions commenced in July 1992 which were observed by IMP-8, Ulysses and Voyager 2. In all these respects, the behavior of the magnetic field mimics that seen in the two earlier sunspot cycles. The comprehensive data set suggests a correlation between the absolute value of B and sunspot number. The major solar cycle variations in the radial component (and magnitude) of the field have been successfully reproduced by a recent model consisting of a tilted solar dipole, whose strength and tilt undergo characteristic changes over the sunspot cycle, and the heliospheric current sheet. The large outbursts of activity in mid-1972, mid-1982 and the first quarter of 1991 may represent a characteristic last 'gasp' of solar activity before the sun evolves to a different state. The recurrent high speed streams in 1973, 1984 and 1992 accompany the developemnt of large asymetrical polar coronal holes and the growth in intensity of the polar cap fields. After they endure for about one year, the polar coronal holes recede and the high speed streams are replaced by weaker

  20. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  1. Ice Sheet Stratigraphy Can Constrain Basal Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Creyts, T. T.; Buck, W. R.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Basal slip is an important component of ice sheet mass flux and dynamics. Basal slip varies over time due to variations in basal temperature, water pressure, and sediment cover. All of these factors can create coherent patterns of basal slip that migrate over time. Our knowledge of the spatial variability in basal slip comes from inversions of driving stress, ice thickness, and surface velocity, but these inversions contain no information about temporal variability. We do not know if the patterns in slip revealed by those inversions move over time. While englacial stratigraphy has classically been used to constrain surface accumulation and geothermal flux, it is also sensitive to horizontal gradients in basal slip. Here we show that englacial stratigraphy can constrain the velocity of basal slip patterns. Englacial stratigraphy responds strongly to patterns of basal slip that move downstream over time close to the ice sheet velocity. In previous work, we used a thermomechanical model to discover that thermally controlled slip patterns migrate downstream and create stratigraphic structures, but we were unable to directly control the pattern velocity, as that arose naturally out of the model physics. Here, we use a kinematic flowline model that allows us to directly control pattern velocity, and thus is applicable to a wide variety of slip mechanisms in addition to basal temperature. We find that the largest and most intricate stratigraphic structures develop when the pattern moves at the column-average ice velocity. Patterns that move slower than the column-average ice velocity produce overturned stratigraphy in the lower part of the ice sheet, while patterns moving at the column-average eventually cause the entire ice sheet to overturn if they persist long enough. Based on these forward models, we develop an interpretive guide for deducing moving patterns in basal slip from ice sheet internal layers. Ice sheet internal stratigraphy represents a potentially vast

  2. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  3. Multi-phase inversion tectonics related to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault activity, Zagros Mountains, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazem Shiroodi, Sadjad; Ghafoori, Mohammad; Faghih, Ali; Ghanadian, Mostafa; Lashkaripour, Gholamreza; Hafezi Moghadas, Naser

    2015-11-01

    Distinctive characteristics of inverted structures make them important criteria for the identification of certain structural styles of folded belts. The interpretation of 3D seismic reflection and well data sheds new light on the structural evolution and age of inverted structures associated to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault within the Persian Gulf Basin and northeastern margin of Afro-Arabian plate. Analysis of thickness variations of growth strata using "T-Z plot" (thickness versus throw plot) method revealed the kinematics of the fault. Obtained results show that the fault has experienced a multi-phase evolutionary history over six different extension and compression deformation events (i.e. positive and negative inversion) between 252.2 and 11.62 Ma. This cyclic activity of the growth fault was resulted from alteration of sedimentary processes during continuous fault slip. The structural development of the study area both during positive and negative inversion geometry styles was ultimately controlled by the relative motion between the Afro-Arabian and Central-Iranian plates.

  4. Spatial variations in late Quaternary slip rates along the Doruneh Fault System (Central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbod, Yassaman; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Bellier, Olivier; Abbassi, Mohammad Reza; Braucher, Régis; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourlès, Didier; Hessami, Khaled

    2016-02-01

    The Doruneh Fault System (DFS) is one of the major active strike-slip faults in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. Despite its geological activity, no large (M ≥ 6.5) historical or instrumental earthquakes have been recorded along it. To date, the rate and distribution of slip, as well as the seismic behavior of the DFS, have been unknown. We reconstructed 67 geomorphic offsets recorded by three successive alluvial abandonment surfaces (Q1, Q2, and Q3) displaced along the western (WFZ) and central (CFZ) fault zones. The determined ages of ~12, ~36, and ~120 ka, using in situ-produced 10Be and 36Cl cosmogenic nuclides for theses surfaces, allowed to estimate three sets of individual left-lateral slip rates and consequently to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of slip along the CFZ and WFZ. The slip rates averaged over time intervals of ~36 and ~120 ka reveal variable slip rates along length but similar slip rates at a point with a maximum rate of ~8.2 mm/yr. During the Holocene, however, the fault slip behavior appears more complex, with a maximum rate of ~5.3 mm/yr. The CFZ is divided into two ~4 km apart segments, with symmetrical slip distributions relative to a persistent boundary, which has not been ruptured over the last ~12 ka. The maximum length of seismic fault segments varies from 70 to 100 km, which could produce earthquakes with a magnitude of Mw 7.2-7.4. This emphasizes the necessity of segmentation models for long strike-slip faults that may not necessarily rupture along their whole length during a single earthquake.

  5. Inverse Slip Accompanying Twinning and Detwinning during Cyclic Loading of Magnesium Single Crystal

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Qin; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Yanyao

    2013-01-01

    In situ , observation of twinning and detwinning in magnesium single crystals during tension-compression cyclic loading was made using optical microscopy. A quantitative analysis of plastic strain indicates that twinning and detwinning experience two stages, low and high work hardening de-twinning, and pure re-twinning and fresh twinning combined with retwinning. Slip is always activated. For the first time, inverse slip accompanying with pure retwinning and high work hardening detwinning was experimentally identified, which provides insights in better understanding of the activity of twining, detwinning, and slips.

  6. Unified slip boundary condition for fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John; Mohseni, Kamran

    2016-08-01

    Determining the correct matching boundary condition is fundamental to our understanding of several everyday problems. Despite over a century of scientific work, existing velocity boundary conditions are unable to consistently explain and capture the complete physics associated with certain common but complex problems, such as moving contact lines and corner flows. The widely used Maxwell and Navier slip boundary conditions make an implicit assumption that velocity varies only in the wall normal direction. This makes their boundary condition inapplicable in the vicinity of contact lines and corner points, where velocity gradient exists both in the wall normal and wall tangential directions. In this paper, by identifying this implicit assumption we are able to extend Maxwell's slip model. Here, we present a generalized velocity boundary condition that shows that slip velocity is a function of not only the shear rate but also the linear strain rate. In addition, we present a universal relation for slip length, which shows that, for a general flow, slip length is a function of the principal strain rate. The universal relation for slip length along with the generalized velocity boundary condition provides a unified slip boundary condition to model a wide range of steady Newtonian fluid flows. We validate the unified slip boundary for simple Newtonian liquids by using molecular dynamics simulations and studying both the moving contact line and corner flow problems. PMID:27627398

  7. Unified slip boundary condition for fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John; Mohseni, Kamran

    2016-08-01

    Determining the correct matching boundary condition is fundamental to our understanding of several everyday problems. Despite over a century of scientific work, existing velocity boundary conditions are unable to consistently explain and capture the complete physics associated with certain common but complex problems, such as moving contact lines and corner flows. The widely used Maxwell and Navier slip boundary conditions make an implicit assumption that velocity varies only in the wall normal direction. This makes their boundary condition inapplicable in the vicinity of contact lines and corner points, where velocity gradient exists both in the wall normal and wall tangential directions. In this paper, by identifying this implicit assumption we are able to extend Maxwell's slip model. Here, we present a generalized velocity boundary condition that shows that slip velocity is a function of not only the shear rate but also the linear strain rate. In addition, we present a universal relation for slip length, which shows that, for a general flow, slip length is a function of the principal strain rate. The universal relation for slip length along with the generalized velocity boundary condition provides a unified slip boundary condition to model a wide range of steady Newtonian fluid flows. We validate the unified slip boundary for simple Newtonian liquids by using molecular dynamics simulations and studying both the moving contact line and corner flow problems.

  8. Jelly Quakes - Characteristics of periodic slip events in an analog model of strike slip seismotectonics using ballistic gelatin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Michael; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    Large lithospheric strike-slip faults, such as the San-Andreas Fault, North-Anatolian Fault, or the Tancheng-Lujiang Faultzone, are major sources of seismic hazard. The interplay of complex 3D-geometry and displacement style along the fault, coupled with a varying rheological layering makes it very difficult to model these faults on all relevant timescales. Here we present a novel experimental approach to model intra- and interplate strike-slip faults using a physical/ analog model. We model earthquakes as a stick-slip process, following a rate-and-state frictional law, with glass beads as granular material within a molded fault zone. Crustal elasticity is introduced by using ballistic gelatin (30 w%, pig skin) as analog material. Furthermore, the low-strength and viscous deep crust below 15 km depth, is modeled using a viscoelastic silicone oil (PDMS-G30M). The layered model crust floats on sugar syrup and is compressed in pure shear vice configuration. We monitor the compressive force along with surface kinematics from optical image correlation. The fault is oriented at 45° to the compression direction imposing ideal strike-slip kinematics onto it. After an initial loading phase the model shows periodic slip events occurring alongside with creep on the fault. Using digital image correlation, surface displacement maps are obtained which are similar to those of natural earthquakes. Coseismic displacement along strike is showing a similar bell-shaped distribution as for natural faults. Furthermore, the recurrence intervals and stress drops are scalable to the natural prototype. The modeling results are combined with numerical rate-and-state models using physical parameters from the experiment. This enables us to explore a wide range of parameters and to draw connections between the parameters that control the behavior of seismic and aseismic fault systems.

  9. [Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we summarize work on Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows. The work was primarily performed by post-doc Hue Hu, and partially by grad students Lei Li and Danish Chopra. The work includes studies on droplet evaporation and its effects on temperature and velocity fields in an evaporating droplet, new 3-D microscopic particle image velocimetry and direct visualization on wall slip in a surfactant solution. With the exception of the slip measurements, these projects were those proposed in the grant application. Instead of slip flow, the original grant proposed imaging electro-osmotic flows. However, shortly after the grant was issued, the PI became aware of work on electro-osmotic flows by the group of Saville in Princeton that was similar to that proposed, and we therefore elected to carry out work on imaging slip flows rather than electro-osmotic flows.

  10. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  11. Phase segregation in a system of active dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnella, Giuseppe; Lamura, Antonio; Suma, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A systems of self-propelled dumbbells interacting by a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson potential is considered. At sufficiently low temperatures the system phase separates into a dense phase and a gas-like phase. The kinetics of the cluster formation and the growth law for the average cluster size are analyzed.

  12. Stick-slip at soft adhesive interfaces mediated by slow frictional waves.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-28

    Stick-slip is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from squealing automobile brakes to earthquakes. At soft adhesive interfaces, this instability has long been attributed to Schallamach waves, which are a type of slow frictional wave. We use a contact configuration capable of isolating single wave events, coupled with high speed in situ imaging, to demonstrate the existence of two new stick-slip modes. It is shown that these modes also correspond to the passage of slow waves-separation pulse and slip pulse-with distinct nucleation and propagation characteristics. The slip pulse, characterized by a sharp stress front, propagates in the same direction as the Schallamach wave. In contrast, the separation pulse, involving local interface detachment and resembling a tensile neck, travels in exactly the opposite direction. A change in the stick-slip mode from the separation to the slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Taken together, the three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in low-velocity sliding. The detailed observations enable us to present a phase diagram delineating the domains of occurrence of these waves. We suggest a direct analogy between the observed slow frictional waves and well known muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied organisms. Our work answers basic questions about adhesive mechanisms of frictional instabilities in natural and engineered systems, with broader implications for slow surface wave phenomena.

  13. Stick-slip at soft adhesive interfaces mediated by slow frictional waves.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-28

    Stick-slip is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from squealing automobile brakes to earthquakes. At soft adhesive interfaces, this instability has long been attributed to Schallamach waves, which are a type of slow frictional wave. We use a contact configuration capable of isolating single wave events, coupled with high speed in situ imaging, to demonstrate the existence of two new stick-slip modes. It is shown that these modes also correspond to the passage of slow waves-separation pulse and slip pulse-with distinct nucleation and propagation characteristics. The slip pulse, characterized by a sharp stress front, propagates in the same direction as the Schallamach wave. In contrast, the separation pulse, involving local interface detachment and resembling a tensile neck, travels in exactly the opposite direction. A change in the stick-slip mode from the separation to the slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Taken together, the three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in low-velocity sliding. The detailed observations enable us to present a phase diagram delineating the domains of occurrence of these waves. We suggest a direct analogy between the observed slow frictional waves and well known muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied organisms. Our work answers basic questions about adhesive mechanisms of frictional instabilities in natural and engineered systems, with broader implications for slow surface wave phenomena. PMID:27118236

  14. Electro-optical hybrid slip ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, En

    2005-11-01

    The slip ring is a rotary electrical interface, collector, swivel or rotary joint. It is a physical system that can perform continuous data transfer and data exchange between a stationary and a rotating structure. A slip ring is generally used to transfer data or power from an unrestrained, continuously rotating electro-mechanical system in real-time, thereby simplifying operations and eliminating damage-prone wires dangling from moving joints. Slip rings are widely used for testing, evaluating, developing and improving various technical equipment and facilities with rotating parts. They are widely used in industry, especially in manufacturing industries employing turbo machinery, as in aviation, shipbuilding, aerospace, defense, and in precise facilities having rotating parts such as medical Computerized Tomography (CT) and MRI scanners and so forth. Therefore, any improvement in slip ring technology can impact large markets. Research and development in this field will have broad prospects long into the future. The goal in developing the current slip ring technology is to improve and increase the reliability, stability, anti-interference, and high data fidelity between rotating and stationary structures. Up to now, there have been numerous approaches used for signal and data transfer utilizing a slip ring such as metal contacts, wires, radio transmission, and even liquid media. However, all suffer from drawbacks such as data transfer speed limitations, reliability, stability, electro-magnetic interference and durability. The purpose of the current research is to break through these basic limitations using an optical solution, thereby improving performance in current slip ring applications. This dissertation introduces a novel Electro-Optical Hybrid Slip Ring technology, which makes "through the air" digital-optical communication between stationary and rotating systems a reality with high data transfer speed, better reliability and low interference susceptibility

  15. Introduction to special section on phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the special section on the "phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor" by highlighting key results of the studies published in it. Many of the results indicate that seismic and aseismic manifestations of slow slip reflect transient shear displacements on the plate interface, with the outstanding exception of northern Cascadia where tremor sources have been located on and above the plate interface (differing models of the plate interface there also need to be reconciled). Slow slip phenomena appear to result from propagating deformation that may develop with persistent gaps and segment boundaries. Results add to evidence that when tectonic deformation is relaxed via slow slip, most relaxation occurs aseismically but with seismic signals providing higher-resolution proxies for the aseismic slip. Instead of two distinct slip modes as suggested previously, lines between "fast" and "slow" slip more appropriately may be described as blurry zones. Results reported also show that slow slip sources do not coincide with a specific temperature or metamorphic reaction. Their associations with zones of high conductivity and low shear to compressional wave velocity ratios corroborate source models involving pore fluid pressure buildup and release. These models and spatial anticorrelations between earthquake and tremor activity also corroborate a linkage between slow slip and frictional properties transitional between steady state and stick-slip. Finally, this special section highlights the benefits of global and multidisciplinary studies, which demonstrate that slow phenomena are not confined to beneath the locked zone but exist in many settings.

  16. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  17. Effects of fluids on frictional strength, slip stability and porosity of gouge-filled faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, Christopher James

    2013-04-01

    This contribution considers what we know about the frictional and transport properties of active faults from observations on natural fault rocks and from experiments, and how microphysical modelling is gradually leading to a mechanistic basis for predicting Rate and State dependent Friction (RSF) under conditions where fluids are chemically active. Microstructural studies on natural fault rocks deformed under mid and upper crustal conditions, including those recovered from drilling projects such as SAFOD, frequently show evidence for i) fluid-related reactions forming an anastomosing phyllosilicate network, ii) pressure solution and cataclasis of clast phases, and iii) dilatation and cementation of fractures, cracks and pores. Moreover, decades of friction experiments on simulated granitic, gabroic, quartz and more recently calcite and phyllosilicate-quartz gouges, at elevated temperatures, have shown that the presence of an aqueous pore fluid, or even water vapour, drastically changes the frictional behaviour of these materials. This has long been recognised to point to fluid-assisted deformation mechanisms, such as stress corrosion cracking or pressure solution, as playing a role in determining frictional behaviour. Indeed, recent low velocity friction experiments on evaporite and quartz gouges, with varying amounts of phyllosilicate, show that fluid-assisted deformation of the evaporite or quartz clast phases are a requirement for strongly velocity-weakening slip capable of causing stick-slip fault behaviour. Other fluids, such as supercritical carbon dioxide, have little effect on the frictional behaviour of either dry or wet gouges, with the exception of smectite rich gouges. An important trend emerging from all gouges containing quartz, and tested at hydrothermal conditions and sliding velocities below 100 micrometer/s, is a transition from velocity strengthening at low temperatures, to velocity weakening at intermediate temperatures, and back to velocity

  18. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  19. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  20. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  1. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  2. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  3. Strike-slip structural styles and petroleum system evolution, northeast Sakhalin Island

    SciTech Connect

    Meisling, K.E.; Wagner, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    The primary petroleum system of northeast Sakhalin Island and adjacent shelfal areas is comprised of a system of Late Miocene to Quaternary faulted transpressional anticlines that trap oil and gas in Early Miocene to Pliocene deltaic reservoirs sourced from Late Oligocene to Early Miocene diatomaceous shales. Existing production has been limited to onshore anticlines, and offshore structural trends remain undeveloped, despite several discoveries. The regional tectonic evolution of Sakhalin Island can be divided into five major phases: (1) Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene subduction, (2) Middle-Eocene collision and uplift, (3) Late Eocene to Early Oligocene oblique rifting, (4) Late Oligocene to Middle Miocene thermal subsidence, and (5) Late Miocene to Quaternary transpression and inversion. Oil-prone source rocks were deposited during rapid post-rift thermal subsidence of transtensional rift basins and adjacent highs, which provided an ideal sediment-starved setting for source rock accumulation. Reservoir facies were supplied by prograding post-rift Miocene deltaics of the paleo-Amur river, which built a shelf across the thermally subsiding basin and intrabasin highs. Traps were formed when the basin was later inverted during Late Miocene to Pleistocene transpression, which reactivated both Paleogene normal faults and structural trends of the Mesozoic accretionary prism to create a broad zone of distributed shear. Strike-slip structural styles are evidenced by linear, en echelon alignments of doubly-plunging anticlines characterized by numerous small-displacement, transverse normal faults. Strike slip on individual structures is relatively small, however, based on a lack of thorough going faults. Strike-slip structures on Sakhalin Island are considered active, in light of the earthquake of May 27, 1995 (M=7.6) and uplift of Pleistocene marine terraces.

  4. Strike-slip structural styles and petroleum system evolution, northeast Sakhalin Island

    SciTech Connect

    Meisling, K.E.; Wagner, J.B. )

    1996-01-01

    The primary petroleum system of northeast Sakhalin Island and adjacent shelfal areas is comprised of a system of Late Miocene to Quaternary faulted transpressional anticlines that trap oil and gas in Early Miocene to Pliocene deltaic reservoirs sourced from Late Oligocene to Early Miocene diatomaceous shales. Existing production has been limited to onshore anticlines, and offshore structural trends remain undeveloped, despite several discoveries. The regional tectonic evolution of Sakhalin Island can be divided into five major phases: (1) Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene subduction, (2) Middle-Eocene collision and uplift, (3) Late Eocene to Early Oligocene oblique rifting, (4) Late Oligocene to Middle Miocene thermal subsidence, and (5) Late Miocene to Quaternary transpression and inversion. Oil-prone source rocks were deposited during rapid post-rift thermal subsidence of transtensional rift basins and adjacent highs, which provided an ideal sediment-starved setting for source rock accumulation. Reservoir facies were supplied by prograding post-rift Miocene deltaics of the paleo-Amur river, which built a shelf across the thermally subsiding basin and intrabasin highs. Traps were formed when the basin was later inverted during Late Miocene to Pleistocene transpression, which reactivated both Paleogene normal faults and structural trends of the Mesozoic accretionary prism to create a broad zone of distributed shear. Strike-slip structural styles are evidenced by linear, en echelon alignments of doubly-plunging anticlines characterized by numerous small-displacement, transverse normal faults. Strike slip on individual structures is relatively small, however, based on a lack of thorough going faults. Strike-slip structures on Sakhalin Island are considered active, in light of the earthquake of May 27, 1995 (M=7.6) and uplift of Pleistocene marine terraces.

  5. Phase diversity and polarization augmented techniques for active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Peter M.

    A firm understanding of the space environment is necessary to defend US access to space-based systems. Conventional imaging systems have been developed to gather information on space-based objects, but they are incapable of imaging objects in the earth's shadow. In order close this gap in imaging-system coverage, an active-illumination based approach must be used. To facilitate this, a multi-frame active phase diversity imaging (APDI) algorithm is derived and demonstrated for the statistics of coherent light. In addition to conventional focal-plane and diversity-plane data, a statistical description for the pupil plane intensity distribution is formed and included in the derivation. The algorithm is implemented and characterized using a Monte Carlo approach. Analysis shows that the algorithm is robust, that the effect of system configuration on optimal algorithm parameters is minimal, that the algorithm is insensitive to detection noise for SNR ≥ 7, and that it performs well for SNRs as low as 2. Furthermore, it's shown that introduction of pupil-plane data on average results in a 60% better image reconstruction from dynamically aberrated data than is obtained using only focal-plane and diversity-plane data. Both an Expectation-Maximization algorithm and a lensless-APDI approach are presented for generating imagery directly from pupil-plane polarization measurements. Shortfalls of these methods and areas worthy of further consideration are identified. The use of pupil-plane polarization state measurements in place of pupil-plane intensity measurements in the APDI algorithm is explored. A framework for including polarization measurements into the APDI algorithm is demonstrated, and an initial statistical model and results are presented. Under the developed implementation, introduction of the polarization data doesn't result in better performance. Areas that may result in better reconstructions are discussed.

  6. Using a hybrid Monte Carlo/Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator to produce high resolution models of paleoearthquakes from geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.; Simao, N.; Murphy, S.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Steacy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying fault sections where slip deficits have accumulated may provide a means for understanding sequences of large megathrust earthquakes. Stress accumulated during the interseismic period on locked sections of an active fault is stored as potential slip. Where this potential slip remains unreleased during earthquakes, a slip deficit can be said to have accrued. Analysis of the spatial distribution of slip during antecedent events along the fault will show where the locked plate has spent its stored slip and indicate where the potential for large events remains. The location of recent earthquakes and their distribution of slip can be estimated instrumentally. To develop the idea of long-term slip-deficit modelling it is necessary to constrain the size and distribution of slip for pre-instrumental events dating back hundreds of years covering more than one ';seismic cycle'. This requires the exploitation of proxy sources of data. Coral microatolls, growing in the intertidal zone of the outer island arc of the Sunda trench, present the possibility of producing high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of pre-instrumental earthquakes. Their growth is influenced by tectonic flexing of the continental plate beneath them allows them to act as long term geodetic recorders. However, the sparse distribution of data available using coral geodesy results in a under determined problem with non-unique solutions. Instead of producing one definite model satisfying the observed corals displacements, a Monte Carlo Slip Estimator based on a Genetic Algorithm (MCSE-GA) accelerating the rate of convergence is used to identify a suite of models consistent with the data. Successive iterations of the MCSE-GA sample different displacements at each coral location, from within the spread of associated uncertainties, producing a catalog of models from the full range of possibilities. The suite of best slip distributions are weighted according to their fitness and stacked to

  7. Dynamic Mechanochemistry of Seismic Slip -Nano Spherules Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Song, Y.; Ma, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Chelungpu fault, which was activated during 1999Chi-Chi Earthquake, had been drilled (Hole A, B and C) to recover the earthquake slip zone materials. We present here the results of nano-scale observations for identified slip zone materials (Ma, Tanaka et al., 2006) by using HR-TEM and TXM technique. Minimum size of grains observed under HR-TEM is 3 nm. The grain size distribution for grains larger than 100 nm in diameter follows the fractal law and grain shape is highly irregular. Grains smaller than100 nm show some specific characteristics, that is, smaller the grains, more the spherical shapes and more equi-granular. Thus, the grains smaller than 100 nm are no longer described by fractal distribution model. By SAD and EDX analysis under HR-TEM, the nano spherules are mainly composed of crystallized quartz associated with minor amounts of carbonates and amorphous materials. Results of observations lead following three conclusions, (1) nano spherules are not generated just by fracturing based on their shapes and grain size distributions. (2) nano spherules would compose viscous materials enveloping larger fractured grains from SEM observations. (3) Mica clay minerals and feldspars are disappeared in ultra-fine grained layer. This implies that chemical process of dissolution - elements dissipation - SiO2 precipitation occurred associated with mechanical fracturing. Therefore nano spherules would be generated through mechano-chemical process during co-seismic slip. Dynamic shear strength drop by rapid slip experimentsare and formation of gelled materials are recently reported. Large differences of ultra-fine products between previous reports and our observations are existence of nano spherules and their crystallinity. If the nano- spherules are generated during seismic slip, dynamic weakening would be expected because mode of friction turns into rolling friction by huge amounts of equigranular and spherical grains. This may be alternative explanations for dynamic

  8. Physicochemical analysis of slip flow phenomena in liquids under nanoscale confinement.

    PubMed

    Babu, Jeetu S; Uday, Swathi; Sekhar, Suneeth; Sathian, Sarith P

    2015-10-01

    Eyring theory employs the statistical mechanical theory of absolute reaction rates to analyse the transport mechanisms in fluids. A physicochemical methodology combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Eyring theory of reaction rates is proposed for investigating the liquid slip on a solid wall in the nanoscale domain. The method involves the determination of activation energy required for the flow process directly from the MD trajectory information and then calculate the important transport properties of the confined fluid from the activation energy. In order to demonstrate the universal applicability of the proposed methodology in nanofluidics, the slip flow behavior of argon, water and ionic liquid confined in various nanostructures has been investigated. The slip length is found to be size dependent in all the cases. The novelty of this method is that the variations in slip length are explained on the basis of molecular interactions and the subsequent changes in the activation energy. PMID:26490250

  9. Thenature of marbled Terra Sigillata slips: a combined mu XRF and mu XRD investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Yoanna; Sciau, Philippe; Goudeau, Philippe; Tamura, Nobumichi; Webb, Sam; Mehta, Apurva

    2009-01-31

    In addition to the red terra sigillata production, the largest Gallic workshop (La Graufesenque) made a special type of terra sigillata, called 'marbled' by the archaeologists. Produced exclusively on this site, this pottery is characterized by a surface finish made of a mixture of yellow and red slips. Because the two slips are intimately mixed, it is difficult to obtain the precise composition of one of the two constituents without contamination by the other. In order to obtain very precise correlation at the appropriate scale between the color aspect and the element and mineralogical phase distributions in the slip, combined electron microprobe, x-ray micro spectroscopies and micro diffraction on cross sectional samples were performed. The aim is to discover how potters were able to produce this unique type of terra sigillata and especially this slip showing an intense yellow color. Results show that the yellow component of marbled sigillata was made from a titanium-rich clay preparation. The color is related to the formation of a pseudobrookite (TiFe2O5) phase in the yellow part of the slip, the main characteristics of that structure being considered nowadays as essential for the fabrication of stable yellow ceramic pigments. Its physical properties such as high refractive indices and a melting point higher than that of most silicates widely used as ceramic colorants are indeed determinant for this kind of applications. Finally, the red parts have a similar composition (elementary and mineralogical) to the one of standard red slip.

  10. Multicycle slip distribution along a laboratory fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Chi-Yu

    1991-08-01

    Slip distribution along a laboratory fault, which consists of eight spring-connected blocks that are elastically driven to slide on a frictional surface, has been examined for a "long" sequence of slip events to test the applicability of some conceptual models proposed recently in the literature. The distributions of large slip events are found to be quite variable and do not fit the uniform slip or characteristic earthquake models. The rupture initiation points are usually not near the corresponding maximum slip points, in contrast to observations by Thatcher (1990) and by Fukao and Kikuchi (1987) that earthquake hypocenters are commonly near corresponding regions of maximum slip in the fault planes. This contrast may suggest that either the present observations or theirs are not representative or the teleseismically determined hypocenters may not always be true rupture initiation points as usually assumed. Large slip events are also found to be a stress-roughening process. They are triggered by some small events after the stresses have been adjusted by some earlier small-to-moderate events to be near the critical levels at most locations along the fault. This suggests that earthquake prediction monitoring efforts should not be limited to a small region near an asperity but should be spread out to cover the entire fault segment in a seismic gap in order to detect the condition of simultaneous strain buildup.

  11. Plans for the next phase of CORDEX activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Filippo; Gutowski, William

    2016-04-01

    Ensembles of Regional Climate Model (RCM) projections have been completed under the protocol of the first phase of the COordinated Regional Downscaling EXperiment (CORDEX, Giorgi et al. 2009) over most CORDEX domains. As a result of these activities a number of scientific issues have emerged, which provide the basis for discussion of the next phase of the CORDEX program. Among such issues are a clearer identification and quantification of the added value of the use of RCMs, the development and use of a new generation of very high resolution (<10 km), convection permitting RCMs, the coordination across development efforts of coupled Regional Earth System Models (RESMs), a more detailed and process-based analysis of RCM simulations, the effects of regional forcings (e.g. land use change and aerosols) and a better integration of empirical/statistical downscaling within the CORDEX framework. A large inhomogeneity was also noted across different CORDEX regional efforts, with some domains (e.g. EURO-CORDEX, AFRICA-CORDEX and MED-CORDEX) being covered by large ensembles and others by much more sparse experiment matrices. This has limited the use of CORDEX results in international programs such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Two avenues are being discussed in order to address these issues. The first is to produce a homogeneous set of higher resolution projections (10-20 km) across all or most CORDEX domains using a core set of RCMs downscaling a core set of GCMs. The second is to develop and implement a set of "Flagship Pilot Studies (FPSs)" over sub-regions of interest aimed at addressing specific scientific questions (e.g. added value and convection-permitting simulations, intercomparison of different downscaling approaches, land-use and aerosol effects). In this presentation we will describe the status of the discussion and plans for these new CORDEX initiatives, which will be likely finalized at the upcoming third Pan-CORDEX conference (ICRC

  12. From frictional fingers to stick slip bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandnes, Bjørnar; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Flekkøy, Eirik; Eriksen, Jon

    2014-05-01

    Gas intrusion into wet porous/deformable/granular media occurs in a wide range of natural and engineered settings. Examples include hydrocarbon recovery, carbon dioxide geo-sequestration, gas venting in sediments and volcanic eruptions. In the case where the intruding gas is able to displace particles and grains, local changes in granular packing fraction govern the evolution of flow paths, resulting in complex pattern formation of the displacement flow. Here we investigate flow patterning as a compressed gas displaces a granular mixture confined in the narrow gap of a Hele-Shaw cell. We find a surprising variety of different pattern formation dynamics, and present a unified phase diagram of the flow morphologies we observe. This talk will focus on one particular transition the system undergoes: from frictional fingers to stick slip bubbles. We show that the frictional fluid flow patterns depend on granular mass loading and system elasticity, analogous to the behaviour of the well-known spring-block sliding friction problem.

  13. Episodic slow slip process in a non-planar fault model constrained by non-volcanic tremor locations along Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are observed in the circum-Pacific subduction zones and exhibit a wide diversity of source parameters (including equivalent moment, duration and recurrence interval). Gao et al [2012] compiled source parameters of SSEs around the world and revealed their empirical scaling relations distinct from those of regular earthquakes. However, the nature of this diversity is unclear. Previous 3-D numerical simulations in a simplified plate model have reproduced the along-strike segmentation of episodic SSEs in Cascadia margin and their source scaling relations in the framework of rate- and state- friction law [Liu, 2014]. But the planar fault model is inefficient to investigate the effect of the fault geometry on the source characteristics of SSEs in a specific subduction zone. In this study, we adopt a non-planar Cascadia subduction fault geometry constrained by relocated seismicity [McCrory et al. 2012] in the rate-state friction model. We have reproduced episodic SSEs beneath Vancouver Island and Washington arising every ~1.5 year with a maximum cumulative slip of ~2.5 cm. We find three phases characteristic in cumulative moment rate and slip rate in each episode. These three phases, defined as nucleation, fast-spreading and healing, lasting for ~160, ~60 and ~140 days, respectively. Both the nucleation and healing phases are beneath GPS detection threshold but the nucleation phase is spatially correlated with the small tremor activities arising deeper than episodic tremor and slip (ETS). To further investigate the diversity of SSEs in Cascadia, we introduce the recent 6-year tremor locations in Cascadia (http://pnsn.org/tremor) to constrain the near-lithostatic pore pressure distribution at the SSE depths in an 800km-long Cascadia fault model. Additionally, we set a step change of effective normal stress in SSE region from 1.5 MPa in Vancouver Island and Washington to 2.0 MPa in Oregon. The results show that the modeled SSEs exhibit distinct slip

  14. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Polito, Vanessa; Janvier, Miho; Mulay, Sargam M.; Karlický, Marian; Aulanier, Guillaume; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dzifčáková, Elena; Mason, Helen E.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the occurrence of slipping magnetic reconnection, chromospheric evaporation, and coronal loop dynamics in the 2014 September 10 X-class flare. Slipping reconnection is found to be present throughout the flare from its early phase. Flare loops are seen to slip in opposite directions toward both ends of the ribbons. Velocities of 20–40 km s‑1 are found within time windows where the slipping is well resolved. The warm coronal loops exhibit expanding and contracting motions that are interpreted as displacements due to the growing flux rope that subsequently erupts. This flux rope existed and erupted before the onset of apparent coronal implosion. This indicates that the energy release proceeds by slipping reconnection and not via coronal implosion. The slipping reconnection leads to changes in the geometry of the observed structures at the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit position, from flare loop top to the footpoints in the ribbons. This results in variations of the observed velocities of chromospheric evaporation in the early flare phase. Finally, it is found that the precursor signatures, including localized EUV brightenings as well as nonthermal X-ray emission, are signatures of the flare itself, progressing from the early phase toward the impulsive phase, with the tether-cutting being provided by the slipping reconnection. The dynamics of both the flare and outlying coronal loops is found to be consistent with the predictions of the standard solar flare model in three dimensions.

  15. Maximum slip in earthquake fault zones, apparent stress, and stick-slip friction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum slip, observed or inferred, for a small patch within the larger fault zone of an earthquake is a remarkably well-constrained function of the seismic moment. A large set of maximum slips, mostly derived from slip models of major earthquakes, indicate that this parameter increases according to the cube root of the seismic moment. Consistent with this finding, neither the average slip rate for the patches of maximum slip nor the apparent stresses of earthquakes show any systematic dependence on seismic moment. Maximum average slip rates are several meters per second independent of moment and, for earthquakes in continental crustal settings, the apparent stress is limited to about 10 MPa. Results from stick-slip friction experiments in the laboratory, combined with information about the state of stress in the crust, can be used to predict, quite closely, the maximum slips and maximum average slip rates within the fault zones of major earthquakes as well as their apparent stresses. These findings suggest that stick-slip friction events observed in the laboratory and earthquakes in continental settings, even with large magnitudes, have similar rupture mechanisms.

  16. Effective slip-length tensor for a flow over weakly slipping stripes.

    PubMed

    Asmolov, Evgeny S; Zhou, Jiajia; Schmid, Friederike; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2013-08-01

    We discuss the flow past a flat heterogeneous solid surface decorated by slipping stripes. The spatially varying slip length, b(y), is assumed to be small compared to the scale of the heterogeneities, L, but finite. For such weakly slipping surfaces, earlier analyses have predicted that the effective slip length is simply given by the surface-averaged slip length, which implies that the effective slip-length tensor becomes isotropic. Here we show that a different scenario is expected if the local slip length has steplike jumps at the edges of slipping heterogeneities. In this case, the next-to-leading term in an expansion of the effective slip-length tensor in powers of max[b(y)/L] becomes comparable to the leading-order term, but anisotropic, even at very small b(y)/L. This leads to an anisotropy of the effective slip and to its significant reduction compared to the surface-averaged value. The asymptotic formulas are tested by numerical solutions and are in agreement with results of dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

  17. Coseismic and Early Post-Seismic Slip Distributions of the 2012 Emilia (Northern Italy) Seismic Sequence: New Insights in the Faults Activation and Resulting Stress Changes on Adjacent Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheloni, D.; Giuliani, R.; D'Agostino, N.; Mattone, M.; Bonano, M.; Fornaro, G.; Lanari, R.; Reale, D.

    2015-12-01

    The 2012 Emilia sequence (main shocks Mw 6.1 May 20 and Mw 5.9 May 29) ruptured two thrust segments of a ~E-W trending fault system of the buried Ferrara Arc, along a portion of the compressional system of the Apennines that had remained silent during past centuries. Here we use the rupture geometry constrained by the aftershocks and new geodetic data (levelling, InSAR and GPS measurements) to estimate an improved coseismic slip distribution of the two main events. In addition, we use post-seismic displacements, described and analyzed here for the first time, to infer a brand new post-seismic slip distribution of the May 29 event in terms of afterslip on the same coseismic plane. In particular, in this study we use a catalog of precisely relocated aftershocks to explore the different proposed geometries of the proposed thrust segments that have been published so far and estimate the coseismic and post-seismic slip distributions of the ruptured planes responsible for the two main seismic events from a joint inversion of the geodetic data.Joint inversion results revealed that the two earthquakes ruptured two distinct planar thrust faults, characterized by single main coseismic patches located around the centre of the rupture planes, in agreement with the seismological and geological information pointing out the Ferrara and the Mirandola thrust faults, as the causative structures of the May 20 and May 29 main shocks respectively.The preferred post-seismic slip distribution related to the 29 May event, yielded to a main patch of afterslip (equivalent to a Mw 5.6 event) located westward and up-dip of the main coseismic patch, suggesting that afterslip was triggered at the edges of the coseismic asperity. We then use these co- and post-seismic slip distribution models to calculate the stress changes on adjacent fault.

  18. Microstructural and phase evolution in metakaolin geopolymers with different activators and added aluminosilicate fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Madhuchhanda; Dana, Kausik; Das, Sukhen

    2015-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the microstructural and phase evolution of alkali activated metakaolin products with different activators and added aluminosilicate filler phases. The added filler phases have different reactivity to the alkali activated metakaolin system. Microstructural evolution in the alkali activated products has been investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Variation in strength development in alkali activated metakaolin products was followed by compressive strength measurement test. Microstructural study shows that in case of metakaolin with NaOH activator crystalline sodalite formed in all the product samples irrespective of the added filler phases. The microstructure of these NaOH activated products investigated by FESEM showed crystalline and inhomogeneous morphology. Mixed activator containing both NaOH and sodium silicate in a fixed mass ratio formed predominantly amorphous phase. Microstructure of these samples showed more homogeneity than that of NaOH activated metakaolin products. The study further shows that addition of α-Al2O3 powder, non reactive phase to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount increased crystalline phase in the matrix. α-Al2O3 powder addition increased the compressive strength of the product samples for both the activator compositions. Added phase of colloidal silica, reactive to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount was found to increase amorphous nature of the matrix. Addition of colloidal silica influenced the compressive strength property differently with different activator compositions.

  19. Friction of water slipping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming D; Shen, Luming; Sheridan, John; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Chen, Chao; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-03-01

    Liquid slip is essential in nanofluidic systems, as shrinking channel size leads to a dramatic increase in flow resistance and thus high-energy consumption for driving nonslip flow. Using large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water flowing in carbon nanotubes (CNT's), we show that the relationship between the CNT wall-water interfacial friction stress and slip velocity follows a transition-state-theory-based inverse hyperbolic sine function, which remains universally valid regardless of wetting properties, CNT chiralities, and CNT sizes, and holds for all slip velocities from 0 to 1400 m/s. The finding could benefit the research in desalination and other chemical purification techniques.

  20. Electrostatic precursors to granular slip events

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Kim, Nam H.; Thyagu, N. Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that electrical signals are produced by material failure, for example during crack formation of crystals and glasses, or stick-slip motion of liquid mercury on glass. We describe here new experiments revealing that slip events in cohesive powders also produce electrical signals, and remarkably these signals can appear significantly in advance of slip events. We have confirmed this effect in two different experimental systems and using two common powdered materials, and in a third experiment we have demonstrated that similar voltage signals are produced by crack-like defects in several powdered materials. PMID:22689956

  1. Slip Development and Instability on a Heterogeneously Loaded Fault with Power-Law Slip-Weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. R.; Uenishi, K.

    2002-12-01

    We consider slip initiation and rupture instability on planar faults that follow a non-linear slip-weakening relation and are subjected to a locally peaked loading stress, the level of which changes quasi-statically in time. For the case in which strength weakens linearly with slip, Uenishi and Rice [2002] (http://esag.harvard.edu/uenishi/research/nl/nl.html) have shown there exists a universal length of the slipping region at instability, independent of any length scales entering into the description of the shape of the loading stress distribution. Here we study slip development and its (in)stability for a power-law slip-weakening relation, giving fault strength as τ = τ p - Aδn where τ p is the peak strength at which slip initiates, δ is the slip, and A is a constant. Such a form with n ≈ 0.2-0.4 has been inferred, for slips from 1 to 500 mm, as an interpretation of seismological observations on the scaling of radiated energy with slip [Abercrombie and Rice, EOS, 2001; SCEC, 2002]. It is also consistent with laboratory experiments involving large rotary shear [Chambon et al., GRL, 2002]. We first employed an energy approach to give a Rayleigh-Ritz approximation for the dependence of slipping length and maximum slip on the level and shape of the loading stress distribution. That was done for a loading stress distribution τ p + Rt - κ x2 / 2 where x is distance along the fault, κ is a constant, and Rt is the stress change from that for which the peak in the loading stress distribution equals the strength τ p. Results show there is no longer a universal nucleation length, independent of κ , when n != 1, and that qualitative features of the slip development are significantly controlled by n. We also obtained full numerical solutions for the slip development. Remarkably, predictions of the simple energy approach are in reasonable quantitative agreement with them and give all qualitative features correctly. Principal results are as follows: If n > 2/3, the

  2. Slipped epiphyses in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Mehls, O; Ritz, E; Krempien, B; Gilli, G; Link, K; Willich, E; Schärer, K

    1975-01-01

    Clinical, biochemical, roentgenological, and histological features of slipped epiphyses (epiphysiolysis) in 11 out of 112 children with renal osteodystrophy have been analysed. Characteristic age-related patterns of involvement of different epiphyses are described. Quantitative measurements of iliac bone histology, serum parathyroid hormone levels, and clinical history show the presence of more advanced osteitis fibrosa in children with epiphysiolysis than in those without. A good correlation was found between serum parathormone levels and osteoclastic resorption, endosteal fibrosis as well as osteoid. Histological studies show that the radiolucent zone between the epiphyseal ossification centre and the metaphysis in x-rays is not caused by accumulation of cartilage and chondro-osteoid (as usually found in vitamin D deficiency rickets) but by the accumulation of woven bone and/or fibrous tissue. The response to vitamin D therapy in most cases was good. Parathyroidectomy was required in only one case. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. p549-b FIG. 3. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIG. 6. FIG. 7. PMID:1167068

  3. Modeling of Slow Slip Events at the Hikurangi Subduction Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Beavan, R. J.; Lohman, R. B.; Ellis, S. M.; Marson-Pidgeon, K.; Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.; Reyners, M.; Henrys, S. A.; Bell, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) occur along nearly the entire Hikurangi subduction margin adjacent to the North Island, New Zealand. Long duration (1-2 years), deep (40- 60 km depth), large events (equivalent to Mw ~7.0) occur at the southern Hikurangi margin, while shallow (10-15 km depth), short (1-2 weeks), smaller events (equivalent to Mw ~6.5) occur at the northern and central Hikurangi margin. A recently-initiated shallow event (Castle Point) lies further to the south than previous shallow events and appears to be rupturing a portion of the plate interface that was previously thought to be locked. Since 2000, three major slow slip events have been identified at the southern Hikurangi margin; the 2003 Kapiti SSE, the 2004/2005 Manawatu SSE, and the 2007/2008 Kapiti SSE (which ended in early 2009). A repeat of the 2004/2005 Manawatu event is presently underway. In some cases, these SSEs may have triggered moderate seismicity within the subducting Pacific plate (e.g., Reyners and Bannister, 2007). To date, all of the inferred slip distributions for the SSEs have been obtained using elastic half-space dislocation models. Numerous recent studies of coseismic displacement fields have shown that variations in elastic properties and surface topography can influence the predicted deformation. In our initial work, we used a finite element model to evaluate the influence of material property variations on the predicted surface deformation field. Elastic properties were assigned based on a seismic velocity model, and slip distributions inferred from an elastic half-space model were applied. When compared to the elastic half- space model, we found that the heterogeneous models generally predict larger amounts of surface deformation, indicating that the half-space models may be overestimating the amount of slip. As the next phase in our study, we are using finite element models that include material property variations and topography to generate Green's functions for use in an

  4. Slip distribution, strain accumulation and aseismic slip on the Chaman Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Chaman fault system is a transcurrent fault system developed due to the oblique convergence of the India and Eurasia plates in the western boundary of the India plate. To evaluate the contemporary rates of strain accumulation along and across the Chaman Fault system, we use 2003-2011 Envisat SAR imagery and InSAR time-series methods to obtain a ground velocity field in radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction. We correct the InSAR data for different sources of systematic biases including the phase unwrapping errors, local oscillator drift, topographic residuals and stratified tropospheric delay and evaluate the uncertainty due to the residual delay using time-series of MODIS observations of precipitable water vapor. The InSAR velocity field and modeling demonstrates the distribution of deformation across the Chaman fault system. In the central Chaman fault system, the InSAR velocity shows clear strain localization on the Chaman and Ghazaband faults and modeling suggests a total slip rate of ~24 mm/yr distributed on the two faults with rates of 8 and 16 mm/yr, respectively corresponding to the 80% of the total ~3 cm/yr plate motion between India and Eurasia at these latitudes and consistent with the kinematic models which have predicted a slip rate of ~17-24 mm/yr for the Chaman Fault. In the northern Chaman fault system (north of 30.5N), ~6 mm/yr of the relative plate motion is accommodated across Chaman fault. North of 30.5 N where the topographic expression of the Ghazaband fault vanishes, its slip does not transfer to the Chaman fault but rather distributes among different faults in the Kirthar range and Sulaiman lobe. Observed surface creep on the southern Chaman fault between Nushki and north of City of Chaman, indicates that the fault is partially locked, consistent with the recorded M<7 earthquakes in last century on this segment. The Chaman fault between north of the City of Chaman to North of Kabul, does not show an increase in the rate of strain

  5. Time-Dependent characteristics of Slow Slip Events beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, N. K.; Liu, Z.; Malservisi, R.; Dixon, T. H.; Jiang, Y.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Protti, M.

    2015-12-01

    active during the 2007, 2009 and 2012 SSEs, suggesting a possible change in slip behavior following the 2012 earthquake although not in recurrence interval.

  6. Slip-stacking Dynamics and the 20 Hz Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly doubles the proton intensity. The Proton Improvement Plan II intensity upgrades require a reduction in slip-stacking losses by approximately a factor of 2. We study the single-particle dynamics that determine the stability of slip-stacking particles. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We show the particle loss as a function of time. We calculate the injection efficiency as a function of longitudinal emittance and aspect-ratio. We demonstrate that the losses from RF single particle dynamics can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on beam parameters) by upgrading the Fermilab Booster from a 15-Hz cycle-rate to a 20-Hz cycle-rate. We recommend a change in injection scheme to eliminate the need for a greater momentum aperture in the Fermilab Recycler.

  7. Distribution of strike-slip faults on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppa, Gregory; Greenberg, Richard; Tufts, B. Randall; Geissler, Paul; Phillips, Cynthia; Milazzo, Moses

    2000-09-01

    Study of four different regions on Europa imaged by the Galileo spacecraft during its first 15 orbits has revealed 117 strike-slip faults. Europa appears to form preferentially right-lateral faults in the southern hemisphere and left-lateral faults in the northern hemisphere. This observation is consistent with a model where diurnal tides due to orbital eccentricity drive strike-slip motion through a process of ``walking,'' in which faults open and close out of phase with alternating right-and left-lateral shear. Lineaments that record both left-and right-lateral motion (e.g., Agave Linea) may record the accommodation of compression in nearby chaotic zones. Nearly all identified strike-slip faults were associated with double ridges or bands, and few were detected along ridgeless cracks. Thus the depth of cracks without ridges does not appear to have penetrated to the low-viscosity decoupling layer, required for diurnal displacement, but cracks that have developed ridges do extend down to such a level. This result supports a model for ridge formation that requires cracks to penetrate to a decoupling layer, such as a liquid water ocean.

  8. Basal slip and texture development in calcite: new results from torsion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D. J.; Wenk, H.-R.; Gomez-Barreiro, J.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G.

    2008-06-09

    The deformation behavior of calcite has been of longstanding interest. Through experiments on single crystals, deformation mechanisms were established such as mechanical twinning on e = {l_brace}{bar 1}018{r_brace} <40{bar 4}1> in the positive sense and slip on r = {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace} <20{bar 2}{bar 1}> and f = {l_brace}{bar 1}012{r_brace} <0{bar 2}2{bar 1}> both in the negative sense. More recently it was observed that at higher temperatures f{l_brace}{bar 1}012{r_brace} <10{bar 1}1> slip in both senses becomes active and, based on slip line analysis, it was suggested that e(0001) <11{bar 2}0> slip may occur. So far there had been no direct evidence for basal slip, which is the dominant system in dolomite. With new torsion experiments on calcite single crystals at 900 K and transmission electron microscopy, this study identifies (0001) <11{bar 2}0> slip unambiguously by direct imaging of dislocations and diffraction contrast analysis. Including this slip system in polycrystal plasticity simulations, enigmatic texture patterns observed in compression and torsion of calcite rocks at high temperature can now be explained, resolving a long-standing puzzle.

  9. Activated carbons obtained from sewage sludge by chemical activation: gas-phase environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Boualem, T; Debab, A; Martínez de Yuso, A; Izquierdo, M T

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption capacity for toluene and SO2 of low cost activated carbons prepared from sewage sludge by chemical activation at different impregnation ratios. Samples were characterized by proximate and ultimate analyses, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy and N2 adsorption. Because of the low carbon content of the raw material, the development of porosity in the activated carbons was mainly of a mesoporous nature, with surface areas lower than 300 m(2)/g. The study of gas-phase applications for activated carbons from sewage sludge was carried out using both an organic and an inorganic compound in order to screen for possible applications. Toluene adsorption capacity at saturation was around 280 mg/g, which is a good level of performance given the high ash content of the activated carbons. However, dynamic experiments at low toluene concentration presented diffusion problems resulting from low porosity development. SO2 adsorption capacity is associated with average micropore size, which can be controlled by the impregnation ratio used to prepare the activated carbons.

  10. Coseismic slip distribution of the 1946 Nankai earthquake and aseismic slips caused by the earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanioka, Yuichiro; Satake, Kenji

    2001-04-01

    Coseismic slip distribution on the fault plane of the 1946 Nankai earthquake ( M w 8.3) was estimated from inversion of tsunami waveforms. The following three improvements from the previous study (Satake, 1993) were made. (1) Larger number of smaller subfaults is used; (2) the subfaults fit better to the slab geometry; and (3) more detailed bathymetry data are used. The inversion result shows that the agreement between observed and synthetic waveforms is greatly improved from the previous study. In the western half of the source region off Shikoku, a large slip of about 6 m occurred near the down-dip end of the locked zone. The slip on the up-dip or shallow part was very small, indicating a weak seismic coupling in that region. In the eastern half of the source region off Kii peninsula, a large slip of about 3 m extended over the entire locked zone. Large slips on the splay faults in the upper plate estimated from geodetic data (Sagiya and Thatcher, 1999) were not required to explain the tsunami waveforms, suggesting that the large slips were aseismic. Two slip distributions on the down-dip end of the plate interface, one from geodetic data and the other from tsunami waveforms, agree well except for slip beneath Cape Muroto in Shikoku. This suggests that aseismic slip also occurred on the plate interface beneath Cape Muroto.

  11. Flexible slip history on the 1942 Erbaa-Niksar earthquake rupture along the North Anatolian fault system, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hisao; Kurçer, Akın.; Özalp, Selim; Emre, Ömer

    2010-05-01

    Repeatability of surface slip distribution through earthquake cycles is basis to evaluate size and timing of future large earthquakes generated by active fault systems. In order to reveal surface slip history associated with paleoearthquakes on the North Anatolian fault system (NAFS), we have extensively performed 3D trenching survey on the 1942 Erbaa-Niksar earthquake (M 7.0) ruptures, to simultaneously reconstruct timing and surface slip associated with past large earthquakes. At Ayvaz site on the 1942 rupture, our 3D trench survey preliminary indicated that the penultimate earthquake, which can be correlated with the great Anatolian earthquake (M ~8.0) in 1668 AD, recorded larger surface slip of 6.0-8.0 m in comparison with the 1942 slip of 2.5 m. This result paeloseismologically supports historical documents telling that the 1668 event ruptured for >600 km long on the central-eastern NAFS. In order to confirm this flexible slip history according to the magnitude of large earthquakes, we re-excavated 3D trenches to reconstruct longer slip history at the same site. The results are summarized as follows; 1) at the site, high-resolution alluvium exposed on the trench walls records six paleoearthquakes including the 1942 event during the last ~2500 years, 2) we reconstructed five discrete slips during the individual events, 3) the amounts of paleo-slips are classified into two categories, the 1942-type smaller slips and the 1668-type larger slips. Thus, the repeatability of surface slip during large earthquakes is not constant like the assumption of the characteristic earthquake model, however, the amounts do not randomly vary from event to event on the assumption of the Gutenberg-Richter model.

  12. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array. [microwave transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  13. The Hills are Alive: Dynamic Ridges and Valleys in a Strike-Slip Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Strike-slip fault zones have long been known for characteristic landforms such as offset and deflected rivers, linear strike-parallel valleys, and shutter ridges. Despite their common presence, questions remain about the mechanics of how these landforms arise or how their form varies as a function of slip rate, geomorphic process, or material properties. We know even less about what happens far from the fault, in drainage basin headwaters, as a result of strike-slip motion. Here we explore the effects of horizontal fault slip rate, bedrock erodibility, and hillslope diffusivity on river catchments that drain across an active strike-slip fault using the CHILD landscape evolution model. Model calculations demonstrate that lateral fault motion induces a permanent state of landscape disequilibrium brought about by fault offset-generated river lengthening alternating with abrupt shortening due to stream capture. This cycle of shifting drainage patterns and base level change continues until fault motion ceases thus creating a perpetual state of transience unique to strike-slip systems. Our models also make the surprising prediction that, in some cases, hillslope ridges oriented perpendicular to the fault migrate laterally in conjunction with fault motion. Ridge migration happens when slip rate is slow enough and/or diffusion and river incision are fast enough that the hillslopes can respond to the disequilibrium brought about by strike-slip motion. In models with faster slip rates, stronger rocks or less-diffusive hillslopes, ridge mobility is limited or arrested despite the fact that the process of river lengthening and capture continues. Fast-slip cases also develop prominent steep fault-facing hillslope facets proximal to the fault valley and along-strike topographic profiles with reduced local relief between ridges and valleys. Our results demonstrate the dynamic nature of strike-slip landscapes that vary systematically with a ratio of bedrock erodibility (K) and

  14. A search in strainmeter data for slow slip associated with triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, E.F.; Gomberg, J.

    2009-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that, as in subduction zones, slow slip facilitates triggered and ambient tremor in the transform boundary setting of California. Our study builds on the study of Peng et al. (2009) of triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California during time intervals surrounding 31, potentially triggering, M ≥ 7.5 teleseismic earthquakes; waves from 10 of these triggered tremor and 29 occurred in periods of ambient tremor activity. We look for transient slow slip during 3-month windows that include 11 of these triggering and nontriggering teleseisms, using continuous strain data recorded on two borehole Gladwin tensor strainmeters (GTSM) located within the distribution of tremor epicenters. We model the GTSM data assuming only tidal and “drift” signals are present and find no detectable slow slip, either ongoing when the teleseismic waves passed or triggered by them. We infer a conservative detection threshold of about 5 nanostrain for abrupt changes and about twice this for slowly evolving signals. This could be lowered slightly by adding analyses of other data types, modeled slow slip signals, and GTSM data calibration. Detection of slow slip also depends on the slipping fault's location and size, which we describe in terms of equivalent earthquake moment magnitude, M. In the best case of the GTSM above a very shallow slipping fault, detectable slip events must exceed M~2, and if the slow slip is beneath the seismogenic zone (below ~15 km depth), even M~5 events are likely to remain hidden.

  15. A search in strainmeter data for slow slip associated with triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Emily F.; Gomberg, Joan

    2009-12-01

    We test the hypothesis that, as in subduction zones, slow slip facilitates triggered and ambient tremor in the transform boundary setting of California. Our study builds on the study of Peng et al. (2009) of triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California during time intervals surrounding 31, potentially triggering, M ≥ 7.5 teleseismic earthquakes; waves from 10 of these triggered tremor and 29 occurred in periods of ambient tremor activity. We look for transient slow slip during 3-month windows that include 11 of these triggering and nontriggering teleseisms, using continuous strain data recorded on two borehole Gladwin tensor strainmeters (GTSM) located within the distribution of tremor epicenters. We model the GTSM data assuming only tidal and "drift" signals are present and find no detectable slow slip, either ongoing when the teleseismic waves passed or triggered by them. We infer a conservative detection threshold of about 5 nanostrain for abrupt changes and about twice this for slowly evolving signals. This could be lowered slightly by adding analyses of other data types, modeled slow slip signals, and GTSM data calibration. Detection of slow slip also depends on the slipping fault's location and size, which we describe in terms of equivalent earthquake moment magnitude, M. In the best case of the GTSM above a very shallow slipping fault, detectable slip events must exceed M˜2, and if the slow slip is beneath the seismogenic zone (below ˜15 km depth), even M˜5 events are likely to remain hidden.

  16. Slip Effects on Peristaltic Transport of a Particle-Fluid Suspension in a Planar Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Mohammed H.; Eldesoky, Islam M.; Maher, Bilal M.; Abumandour, Ramzy M.

    2015-01-01

    Peristaltic pumping induced by a sinusoidal traveling wave in the walls of a two-dimensional channel filled with a viscous incompressible fluid mixed with rigid spherical particles is investigated theoretically taking the slip effect on the wall into account. A perturbation solution is obtained which satisfies the momentum equations for the case in which amplitude ratio (wave amplitude/channel half width) is small. The analysis has been carried out by duly accounting for the nonlinear convective acceleration terms and the slip condition for the fluid part on the wavy wall. The governing equations are developed up to the second order of the amplitude ratio. The zeroth-order terms yield the Poiseuille flow and the first-order terms give the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. The results show that the slip conditions have significant effect within certain range of concentration. The phenomenon of reflux (the mean flow reversal) is discussed under slip conditions. It is found that the critical reflux pressure is lower for the particle-fluid suspension than for the particle-free fluid and is affected by slip condition. A motivation of the present analysis has been the hope that such theory of two-phase flow process under slip condition is very useful in understanding the role of peristaltic muscular contraction in transporting biofluid behaving like a particle-fluid mixture. Also the theory is important to the engineering applications of pumping solid-fluid mixture by peristalsis. PMID:27019591

  17. Phase advancement and nucleus-specific timing of thalamocortical activity during slow cortical oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Slézia, Andrea; Hangya, Balázs; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2011-01-01

    The exact timing of cortical afferent activity is instrumental for the correct coding and retrieval of internal and external stimuli. Thalamocortical inputs represent the most significant subcortical pathway to the cortex, but the precise timing and temporal variability of thalamocortical activity is not known. To examine this question, we studied the phase of thalamic action potentials relative to cortical oscillations and established correlations among phase, the nuclear location of the thalamocortical neurons and the frequency of cortical activity. The phase of thalamic action potentials depended on the exact frequency of the slow cortical oscillation both on long (minutes) and short (single wave) time scales. Faster waves were accompanied by phase advancement in both cases. Thalamocortical neurons located in different nuclei fired at significantly different phases of the slow waves but were active at similar phase of spindle oscillations. Different thalamic nuclei displayed distinct burst patterns. Bursts with higher number of action potentials displayed progressive phase advancement in a nucleus-specific manner. Thalamic neurons located along nuclear borders were characterized by mixed burst and phase properties. Our data demonstrate that the temporal relationship between cortical and thalamic activity is not fixed but displays dynamic changes during oscillatory activity. The timing depends on the precise location and exact activity of thalamocortical cells and the ongoing cortical network pattern. This variability of thalamic output and its coupling to cortical activity can enable thalamocortical neurons to actively participate in the coding and retrieval of complex cortical signals. PMID:21228169

  18. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Knuth, Matthew W; Kaproth, Bryan M; Carpenter, Brett; Guyer, Robert A; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves; Daub, Eric G; Marone, Chris

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  19. The geometries and development of late orogenic strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. W.; Peacock, D. C. P.

    2003-04-01

    Strike-slip faults are commonly the final phase of contraction in orogenic belts, occurring when the folds have locked-up and the thrusts have become too steep for further displacement to occur. Where the maximum stress axis (sigma1) is perpendicular to the orogenic belt (i.e. pure shear), the strike-slip faults are conjugate and represent strike-perpendicular shortening and necessary strike-parallel extension. An example of such behaviour occurs in the steeply dipping Silurian sandstones and shales in Kirkcudbrightshire, in the Southern Uplands of Scotland. If sigma1 is at ~ 70°; to the strike of the orogenic belt, the conjugate strike-slip faults become asymmetric. One set of strike-slip faults occurs at a high angle to the strike of bedding, and the conjugate set has a ramp-flat trajectory across steeply dipping beds. An example of this behaviour occurs in the steeply dipping Silurian turbidites at Ardglass, in the Longford-Down terrane of Northern Ireland. If sigma1 is at a lower angle to the orogenic belt (i.e. transpression), one set of strike-slip faults tends to dominate. In some cases, the dominant strike-slip fault set is parallel to the strike of the orogenic belt, the Caledonian-age Great Glen Fault of Scotland being such an example. In other cases, block rotation occurs on the set of strike-slip faults that are at a high angle to the orogenic belt, as in the Variscan Orogenic Belt of SW England. An annulus model is presented to illustrate the variations in geometries of late-orogenic strike-slip faults from pure shear to transpression.

  20. Activity of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase in the mouse uterus during the estrous cycle, throughout the preimplantation phase of pregnancy, and throughout the luteal phase of pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, C

    1995-05-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent autacoid produced by the embryo and the endometrium during early pregnancy. Its actions in vivo are dependent upon its half-life, which in turn is largely governed by its metabolism. PAF:acetylhydrolase is a major metabolic enzyme for PAF and is widespread in body tissues and fluids. This study was an examination of the activity of this enzyme in the uterus (uterine luminal fluids and endometrial scrapings) of mice in the periovulatory period, throughout the preimplantation phase of pregnancy, and throughout the luteal phase of pseudopregnancy. PAF:acetylhydrolase activity was found in uterine washings and endometrial tissue; it was dependent upon incubation time and protein concentration and was destroyed by boiling. The activity was not affected by cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) and was not inhibited by bromophenacyl bromide, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor. The specific and total activity changed dramatically throughout the reproductive cycle. Total tissue activity did not change significantly during the follicular phase. On the day after ovulation, tissue activity was lower in naturally mated mice and was maintained at this level until Day 4; there was no difference in this value between pregnant and pseudopregnant animals. On days 5 and 6 of pseudopregnancy the total tissue activity increased, reaching a peak on Day 6 of 4609 pmol acetate released.min-1, approximately 780% higher than the value obtained on Day 4. Activity then decreased so that by Day 8 it was not different from preovulatory levels. For uterine luminal fluids, total activity significantly decreased during the follicular phase. This continued throughout the preimplatation phase with minimum activity being reached on Days 3 and 4 (7.68 pmol acetate.min-1 on Day 4 pseudopregnancy).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Late Pleistocene and Holocene slip rate of the Northern Wadi Araba fault, Dead Sea Transform, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Tina M.; Zhang, Hongwei; Atallah, Mohammad; Harrison, Bruce J.

    The Wadi Araba Valley is a morphotectonic depression along part of theDead Sea Transform (DST) plate boundary that separates the Arabian plateon the east from the Sinai subplate on the west. The Wadi Araba fault(WAF) is the main strike-slip faults one of between the Gulf of Aqaba and the E-Wtrending Khunayzira (Amatzayahu) fault that bounds the southern end ofthe Dead Sea. Just south of the Dead Sea, the WAF cuts across severalgenerations of alluvial fans that formed on tributaries to the Wadi Dahalafter the regression of Late Pleistocene Lake Lisan ca. 15 ka. Geomorphicand stratigraphic evidence of active faulting, including left-laterally offsetstream channels and alluvial-fan surfaces, yielded fault slip-rate data for thenorthern segment of WAF. Typical cumulative displacements of 54 m,39 m, and 22.5 m of stream channels and alluvial-fan surfaces acrossthe fault were measured from detailed geologic and topographic mapping.The 54 m offset of the oldest alluvial-fan surface (Q f1 ) occurredafter the final lowering of Lake Lisan (16-15 ka) and before 11 ka yieldinga slip-rate range of 3.4 mm/yr to 4.9 mm/yr. Based on radiocarbonages of charcoal and landsnail shell samples from the buried Q f2 alluvial-fan deposits exposed in trenches excavated across the fault, the39 m and 22.5 m offsets occurred after 9 ka and 5.8 ka, respectively. These data yield a slip-rate range between 3.9 mm/yr and 6.0 mm/yr.The small variability in these slip-rate estimates for different time periodssuggests that the northern Wadi Araba fault has maintained a relativelyconstant slip rate in the past 15 ka. We calculate an average slip rate of 4.7± 1.3 mm/yr since 15 ka based on the three separate displacementsand age estimates. Five separate offsets of 3 m were measured from gullybends and the offset of small fault-scarp alluvial fans. These displacementdata suggest a coseismic slip of 3 m in the last earthquake, or acumulative slip of 3 m in the past few earthquakes. A maximum slip of3 m

  2. Origin and structure of major orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    The formation of major exhumed strike-slip faults represents one of the most important dynamic processes affecting the evolution of the Earth's lithosphere and surface. Detailed models of the potential initiation and properties and architecture of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults and how these relate to exhumation are rare. In this study, we deal with key properties controlling the development of major exhumed strike-slip fault systems, which are equivalent to the deep crustal sections of active across fault zones. We also propose two dominant processes for the initiation of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults: (1) pluton-controlled and (2) metamorphic core complex-controlled strike-slip faults. In these tectonic settings, the initiation of faults occurs by rheological weakening along hot-to-cool contacts and guides the overall displacement and ultimate exhumation. These processes result in a specific thermal and structural architecture of such faults. These types of strike-slip dominated fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust during various stages of faulting. The high variety of distinctive fault rocks is a potential evidence for recognition of these types of strike-slip faults. Exhumation of mylonitic rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such reverse oblique-slip strike-slip faults, implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion during exhumation. Some orogen-scale strike-slip faults nucleate and initiate along rheologically weak zones, e.g. at granite intrusions, zones of low-strength minerals, thermally weakened crust due to ascending fluids, and lateral borders of hot metamorphic core complexes. A further mechanism is the juxtaposition of mechanically strong mantle lithosphere to hot asthenosphere in continental transform faults (e.g., San

  3. Slow earthquakes, preseismic velocity changes, and the origin of slow frictional stick-slip.

    PubMed

    Kaproth, Bryan M; Marone, C

    2013-09-13

    Earthquakes normally occur as frictional stick-slip instabilities, resulting in catastrophic failure and seismic rupture. Tectonic faults also fail in slow earthquakes with rupture durations of months or more, yet their origin is poorly understood. Here, we present laboratory observations of repetitive, slow stick-slip in serpentinite fault zones and mechanical evidence for their origin. We document a transition from unstable to stable frictional behavior with increasing slip velocity, providing a mechanism to limit the speed of slow earthquakes. We also document reduction of P-wave speed within the active shear zone before stick-slip events. If similar mechanisms operate in nature, our results suggest that higher-resolution studies of elastic properties in tectonic fault zones may aid in the search for reliable earthquake precursors.

  4. Modeling yarn slip in woven fabric at the continuum level: Simulations of ballistic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ethan M.; King, Michael J.; Socrate, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Woven fabric is used in a wide variety of military and commercial products—both in neat form and as the reinforcement phase of composites. In many applications, yarn slip, the relative sliding of the yarns composing the weave, is an important mode of deformation or failure. Yarn slip can significantly change the energy absorption capacity and yarn density of the fabric and also cause yarns to unravel from the weave. Virtually all existing models for woven fabric that allow yarn slip are discrete in nature. They simulate every yarn in the weave and are therefore computationally expensive and difficult to integrate with other material models. A promising alternative to discrete models is the mesostructure-based continuum technique. With this technique, homogenized continuum properties are determined from a deforming analytic model of the fabric mesostructure at each material point. Yarn-level mechanisms of deformation are thus captured without the computational cost of simulating every yarn in the fabric. However, existing mesostructure-based continuum models treat the yarns as pinned together at the cross-over points of the weave, and an operative model that allows yarn slip has not been published. Here, we introduce a mesostructure-based continuum model that permits yarn slip and use the model to simulate the ballistic impact of woven fabric. In our approach, the weave is the continuum substrate on which the model is anchored, and slip of the yarns occurs relative to the weave continuum. The cross-over points of the weave act as the material points of the continuum, and the evolution of the local weave mesostructure at each point of the continuum is represented by state variables. At the same time, slip velocity fields simulate the slip of each yarn family relative to the weave continuum and therefore control the evolution of the yarn pitch. We found that simulating yarn slip significantly improves finite element predictions of the ballistic impact of a Kevlar

  5. The influence of footwear sole hardness on slip characteristics and slip-induced falls in young adults.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Ju; Powers, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    Theoretically, a shoe that provides less friction could result in a greater slip distance and foot slipping velocity, thereby increasing the likelihood of falling. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sole hardness on the probability of slip-induced falls. Forty young adults were randomized into a hard or a soft sole shoe group, and tested under both nonslippery and slippery floor conditions using a motion analysis system. The proportions of fall events in the hard- and soft-soled shoe groups were not statistically different. No differences were observed between shoe groups for average slip distance, peak and average heel velocity, and center of mass slipping velocity. A strong association was found between slip distance and the fall probability. Our results demonstrate that the probability of a slip-induced fall was not influenced by shoe hardness. Once a slip is induced, slip distance was the primary predictor of a slip-induced fall.

  6. Kids' Slips: What Young Children's Slips of the Tongue Reveal about Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Jeri J.

    2005-01-01

    The study of speech errors, or "slips of the tongue," is a time-honored methodology which serves as a window to the representation and processing of language and has proven to be the most reliable source of data for building theories of speech production planning. However, until "Kids' Slips," there has never been a corpus of such errors from…

  7. Digital slip frequency generator and method for determining the desired slip frequency

    DOEpatents

    Klein, Frederick F.

    1989-01-01

    The output frequency of an electric power generator is kept constant with variable rotor speed by automatic adjustment of the excitation slip frequency. The invention features a digital slip frequency generator which provides sine and cosine waveforms from a look-up table, which are combined with real and reactive power output of the power generator.

  8. An aseismic slip transient on the North Anatolian Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, Baptiste; Jolivet, Romain; Simons, Mark; Lasserre, Cécile; Riel, Bryan; Milillo, Pietro; ćakir, Ziyadin; Renard, François

    2016-04-01

    Constellations of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites with short repeat time acquisitions allow exploration of active faults behavior with unprecedented temporal resolution. Along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in Turkey, an 80 km long section has been creeping at least since the 1944, Mw 7.3 earthquake near Ismetpasa, with a current Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)-derived average creep rate of 8 ± 3 mm/yr (i.e., a third of the NAF long-term slip rate). We use a dense set of SAR images acquired by the COSMO-SkyMed constellation to quantify the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of creep over 1 year. We identify a major burst of aseismic slip spanning 31 days with a maximum slip of 2 cm, between the surface and 4 km depth. This result shows that fault creep along this section of the NAF does not occur at a steady rate as previously thought, highlighting a need to revise our understanding of the underlying fault mechanics.

  9. Creep versus Earthquake Slip: New insights from rock magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y.-M.; Aubourg, C.; Song, S.-R.; Lee, T.-Q.; Song, Y.-F.

    2012-04-01

    Pseudotachylyte is generally believed as the best evidence of high-friction heating during earthquake. However, in clay-rich derived gouge, the temperature elevation is limited to large-scale endothermic dehydration reaction (Brantut et al., 2011). In such a context where melting is likely, it has been suggested that the characterization of neoformed mineral may be a diagnostic clue to distinguish between creep process and earthquake slip zone. Here we show evidence of neoformed magnetic mineral in the active Chelungpu fault gouge that hosts the Chi-Chi slip zone (Taiwan, Mw 7.6, 1999). Thanks to boreholes of Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Program and the recovery of fresh gouge, we get new evidence of neoformed magnetic minerals. Both rock magnetic investigation and transmission X-ray microscope image show the occurrence of neoformed 5 µm goethite (α-FeOOH) within the Chi-Chi 16 cm thick gouge. Goethite forms post-seismically from the cooling of >350°C fluids. In addition to goethite, we detect occurrence of neoformed pyrrhotite (Fe7S8). The pyrrhotite forms at the expense of pyrite, in response to elevation of temperature >500°C. Within the mm-thick Chi-Chi principal slip zone, we do not detect evidence of goethite, nor pyrrhotite. Instead, we detect magnetite (Fe3O4). We suggest that a part of magnetite formed during friction-induced temperature elevation. We propose a simple model of evolution between goethite and magnetite within the entire gouge. If confirmed elsewhere, the recognition of the assemblage of iron oxide (magnetite), iron hydroxide (goethite) and iron sulfide (pyrrhotite) is possibly a diagnostic evidence of earthquake slip rather than creep process.

  10. Inversion for slip distribution for the 2012 Costa Rica earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, K. A.; Hesse, M. A.; Stadler, G.

    2014-12-01

    On 5 September 2012, a major megathrust earthquake (Mw=7.6) ruptured the plate interface beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. This event was centered 12 km offshore of the central Nicoya coast, at a depth of 18 km. The maximum slip exceeded 2 meters, and the rupture spread outward along the plate interface to encompass 3000 km2 of the Nicoya seismogenic zone. More than 1700 aftershocks were recorded within the first 5 days. These aftershocks outlined two distinct rupture patches; one centered on the central coast and the other beneath the southern tip of the peninsula. We formulate a Bayesian inverse problem to infer the coseismic slip on the fault plane based on instantaneous surface displacements and changes in well heads in order to image the remaining "locked" patch that has been inferred previously. We compute the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate of the posterior slip distribution on the fault, and use a local Gaussian approximation around the MAP point to characterize the uncertainty. The elastic deformation is computed using a finite element method that allows for the spatial variation of elastic properties that has been observed in the crust overlying the seismogenic zone. We solve the optimization problem using gradients obtained from adjoints. The linearity of the inverse problem allows for the efficient solution of the optimal experimental design problem for the placement of the GPS stations to monitor the remaining locked patch. In the future, the results obtained here will provide the initial condition for a time-dependent poroelastic model for fault slip and fluid migration due to overpressure caused by a megathrust earthquake. This will provide constraints on the crustal permeability structure in a tectonically active region.

  11. Fault zone roughness controls slip stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbord, Christopher; Nielsen, Stefan; De Paola, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Fault roughness is an important control factor in the mechanical behaviour of fault zones, in particular the frictional slip stability and subsequent earthquake nucleation. Despite this, there is little experimental quantification as to the effects of varying roughness upon rate- and state-dependant friction (RSF). Utilising a triaxial deformation apparatus and a novel adaptation of the direct shear methodology to simulate initially bare faults in Westerly Granite, we performed a series of velocity step frictional sliding experiments. Initial root mean square roughnesses (Sq) was varied in the range 6x10-7 - 2.4x10-5 m. We also investigated the effects upon slip stability of normal stress variation in the range σn = 30 - 200 MPa, and slip velocity between 0.1 - 10 μm s-1. A transition from stable sliding to unstable slip (manifested by stick-slip and slow slip events) was observed, depending on the parameter combination, thus covering the full spectrum of fault slip behaviours. At low normal stress (σn = 30MPa) smooth faults (Sq< 1x10-6 m) are conditional unstable (stress drops on slow slip events upon velocity increase), with strongly velocity weakening friction. When normal stress is increased to intermediate values (σn = 100 - 150 MPa), smooth faults (Sq< 1x10-6 m) are fully unstable and generate seismic stick-slip behaviour. However at higher normal stress (σn = 200 MPa) a transition from unstable to stable sliding is observed for smooth faults, which is not expected using RSF stability criteria. At all conditions sliding is stable for rough faults (Sq> 1x10-6 m). We find that instability can develop when the ratio of fault to critical stiffness kf kc > 10, or, alternatively, even when a - b > 0 at σn = 150MPa, suggesting that bare surfaces may not strictly obey the R+S stability condition. Additionally we present white light interferometry and SEM analysis of experimentally deformed samples which provide information about the distribution and physical

  12. Investigation on the key parameters of slip weakening law in dynamic rupture simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Chen, X.

    2008-12-01

    How the crack propagates on the fault plane when an earthquake happens is a fundamental problem in earthquake studies. To understand the dynamics of a spontaneously propagating crack various constitutive laws for friction, e.g., slip weakening, slip rate weakening, effective temperature and rate-and-state laws, which define the relationship between the instantaneous stress and slip (or slip rate) on the fault have been widely used in various rupture simulations. One crucial aspect of the variety of rupture models is to to quantify how the main parameters characterizing a certain law affect the rupture process. We chose the slip weakening law and then massively computed a large suite of dynamic rupture simulations on a rectangular fault embedded in 3-D isotropic homogeneous medium. The simulations included hundreds of different sets of parameters varying Dc, the critical slip weakening distance and Te the initial stress. All are spatially constant except in a rectangular asperity, where the rupture is triggered. With the same parameter set we used several different discretizations to avoid the numerical effects. Computationally we use the boundary integral method. We have also given definitions of rupture status: non-growth rupture, growth rupture, subshear rupture and supershear rupture. With all of the simulations we construct a phase-diagram on which different rupture states locate in different parameter-set zones (phase boundary lines with errors less than 0.1%) We find that (1) In the areas with smaller Dc, phase boundary lines seems to fit the ones Madariaga (1998) predicted using non- dimensionalized parameter κ, but not for the whole phase line. (2) When Dc reaches a particular size, none of the ruptures will propagate regardless of the value of the initial stress on the fault. (3) Some transitional states may occur where a rupture propagates only 2-4 times the initial asperity size and then stops spontaneously.

  13. Activity induced phase separation in particles and (bio)polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, Alexander

    It was recently shown that the non-equilibrium steady state of the mixture of two types of particles exposed to two different thermostats can phase separate (A.Y.Grosberg, J.-F.Joanny, PRE, v. 91, 032118, 2015). similar result is valid also in the case when particles in question are monomers of two different polymer chains, or blocks of a co-polymer. We discuss the implications of these results for the physics of chromatin.

  14. Slip in viscous contact-line movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lengerich, Henrik; Steen, Paul; Breuer, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The typical continuum fluid dynamics formulation cannot be used to model the spreading of a liquid on a solid because a stress singularity prevents contact-line motion. It is well known that this situation can be remedied by introducing a slip. We perform Stokes-flow simulations with slip and compare these with experiments. In the experiment, liquid (squalane) is forced through two parallel sapphire plates (roughness 0.6nm), and the meniscus shape and its speed are measured. The slip-length for this liquid/solid pair has been measured previously in an independent experiment absent of contact lines (T. Schmatko et. al. PRL 94, 244501). The same geometry is used in a boundary integral method simulation, accurate to within a few molecular diameters in the vicinity of the contact-line. The slip-length in the simulations can be varied such that the meniscus shape matches the experiment. Preliminary results suggest this slip-length is an order of magnitude lower than that reported by Schmatko. Now at the University of Minnesota TC

  15. Breddin's Graph For Fault and Slip Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, B.

    A simple plot of rake versus strike of fault and slip or earthquake focal mechanism data provides insight into the stress regime that caused slippage on these faults provided one of the principal stress direction is near vertical. By overlaying an abacus on this plot, one can evaluate both the orientation of the horizontal principal stress directions and the stress tensor aspect ratio, (s1-s2)/(s1-s3), where s1, s2, s3 are the principal stress magnitudes ranked in decreasing order. The underlying geometrical properties are that the slip data that are near strike-slip, and that are mainly found on steeply dipping planes, constrain the horizontal principal stress directions whereas the slip data that are near dip-slip and that occur on shallow dipping planes striking away from the principal stress directions constrain the stress tensor aspect ratio. This abacus is an extension of the Breddin's abacus used to analyze two dimensional deformation in structural geology and it is used in a similar fashion. Its application to synthetic and natural monophase data show both its usefulness and limitation. It is not intended to replace stress inversion techniques because of limiting assumptions, but it is expected to provide insight into the complexity of natural data set from a simple viewpoint.

  16. Evidence for slip partitioning and bimodal slip behavior on a single fault: Surface slip characteristics of the 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Briggs, R. W.; Reitman, N. G.; Gold, R. D.; Hayes, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    Deformation is commonly accommodated by strain partitioning on multiple, independent strike-slip and dip-slip faults in continental settings of oblique plate convergence. As a corollary, individual faults tend to exhibit one sense of slip - normal, reverse, or strike-slip - until whole-scale changes in boundary conditions reactivate preexisting faults in a new deformation regime. In this study, we show that a single continental fault may instead partition oblique strain by alternatively slipping in a strike-slip or a dip-slip sense during independent fault slip events. We use 0.5 m resolution optical imagery and sub-pixel correlation analysis of the 200 + km 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake to document co-seismic surface slip characteristics and Quaternary tectonic geomorphology along the causative Hoshab fault. We find that the 2013 earthquake, which involved a ∼6:1 strike-slip to dip-slip ratio, ruptured a structurally segmented fault. Quaternary geomorphic indicators of gross fault-zone morphology reveal both reverse-slip and strike-slip deformation in the rupture area of the 2013 earthquake that varies systematically along fault strike despite nearly pure strike-slip motion in 2013. Observations of along-strike variations in range front relief and geomorphic offsets suggest that the Hoshab fault accommodates a substantial reverse component of fault slip in the Quaternary, especially along the southern section of the 2013 rupture. We surmise that Quaternary bimodal slip along the Hoshab fault is promoted by a combination of the arcuate geometry of the Hoshab fault, the frictional weakness of the Makran accretionary prism, and time variable loading conditions from adjacent earthquakes and plate interactions.

  17. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  18. Wall Slip of Semi-Solid A356 in Couette Rheometers

    SciTech Connect

    Harboe, S.; Modigell, M.

    2011-05-04

    Wall slip of suspensions in a couette rheometer is caused by segregation of a thin layer of liquid phase adjacent to the rheometer cylinder and cup, respectively. This causes the bulk phase to slide along the walls, which means that the fluid flow velocities respective to the walls are not zero. This affects the evaluation of the rheological properties and results in apparent flow curves. Despite of the importance of understanding and controlling segregation effects, little research has been done on this subject area. Indeed in industrial casting, the die filling behaviour, and therefore the product quality, may depend on the segregation phenomena. The wall slip occurring while investigating the semi-solid aluminium alloy A356 in a couette rheometer was investigated in the present work, employing the Kiljanski method. The goal of the present work was to obtain a true flow curve of the material, eliminating the effects of wall slip. Employing the method of Kiljanski, the wall slip velocity was calculated and subtracted from the apparent velocity of the alloy. Hence, the true shear rate in the medium and the true flow curve were estimated. The wall slip effect is assumed to be negligible in a couette system with a grooved rotational rod. This assumption was set to test by comparing the flow curve calculated from a system with grooved rotational rod with the flow curve calculated with the Kiljanski method. Both methods result in identical flow curves which can be assumed to be the physically correct one.

  19. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.-F.; Braucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Prentice, C.; Mahan, S.; McGill, S.; Chauvet, A.; Marco, S.; Todbileg, M.; Demberel, S.; Bourles, D.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans-particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region-allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is ~1 mm yr-1 along the WIB and EIB segments and ~0.5 mm yr-1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78-7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of ~2500-5200 yr for past

  20. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans—particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region—allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is∼1 mm yr–1 along the WIB and EIB segments and∼0.5 mm yr–1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78–7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of∼2500

  1. Dating upper plate normal fault slip events in Late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. A.; Binnie, S.; Gonzalez, G.; Cortés, J.

    2011-12-01

    In order to understand how subduction earthquakes along the Nazca-South America plate boundary affect upper plate faults in the coastal forearc of northern Chile, we are developing the first detailed paleoseismological study to characterize the Late Quaternary activity of the Mejillones and Salar del Carmen faults, located around 40 km north and 15 km east of Antofagasta, respectively. There is currently a lack of basic palaeo-seismological data on these and other upper plate faults, such as long term slip rates, amount of slip per event, palaeo-earthquake magnitude and recurrence intervals. This lack of knowledge impedes understanding of how large subduction earthquakes, occurring at depths of around 50 km in this region, relate to upper plate seismicity and deformation. We have used OSL dating of fault-related sediments, and cosmogenic-ray nuclide dating of terrace surfaces, to constrain slips rates over the last 45 ka. Several trenches were excavated across both faults in order to expose and log the most recent fault-related sediments. In the hanging wall of these normal faults, vertically stacked colluvial wedges and hillslope deposits are the product of discrete slip events and post-slip fault scarp degradation. Multiple trenches along each fault permit the spatial variability in slip amount and fault-related sedimentation to be investigated. Long-term slip rates have been measured using cosmogenic-ray nuclide exposure dating of the alluvial terraces offset by the Mejillones Fault. OSL dating of the fault-related sediments in the trenches has been used to compare the ages of individual slip events on both faults, and the age of events recorded along the trace of each fault. The application of both cosmogenic-ray nuclide and OSL methods in this type of setting (hyper-arid with low erosion rates, yet tectonically active) is non-trivial, due to cosmogenic inheritance accumulated in cobbles on the terrace surfaces, low sensitivity of the quartz for OSL dating, and

  2. Oscillatory activity, phase differences, and phase resetting in the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Yaara; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Yarom, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    The generation of temporal patterns is one of the most fascinating functions of the brain. Unlike the response to external stimuli temporal patterns are generated within the system and recalled for a specific use. To generate temporal patterns one needs a timing machine, a "master clock" that determines the temporal framework within which temporal patterns can be generated and implemented. Here we present the concept that in this putative "master clock" phase and frequency interact to generate temporal patterns. We define the requirements for a neuronal "master clock" to be both reliable and versatile. We introduce this concept within the inferior olive nucleus which at least by some scientists is regarded as the source of timing for cerebellar function. We review the basic properties of the subthreshold oscillation recorded from olivary neurons, analyze the phase relationships between neurons and demonstrate that the phase and onset of oscillation is tightly controlled by synaptic input. These properties endowed the olivary nucleus with the ability to act as a "master clock."

  3. Fault Zone Drainage, Heating and Melting During Earthquake Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Rice, J. R.; Jacques, L. M.

    2003-12-01

    soon eliminated (Jacques and Rice, 2002). Then all of the fault-normal stress is supported by pressure in a slurry fluid which, when the normal stress exceeds the least principal stress, can inject into the bordering damage zone. Remaining dissipation in fault slip is dominated by fluid lubrication between the still-solid gouge particles rather than inter-particle friction. The slurry viscosity is thermally activated and reduces dramatically with increasing temperature and decreasing solids fraction. We quantify these effects approximately, and compare our predictions to records of slip behavior as preserved in pseudotachylytes (e.g. Otsuki et al., 2003).

  4. Vaginal cone use in passive and active phases in patients with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Ribeiro, Ricardo Muniz; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Abrão, Maurício Simões; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate vaginal cone therapy in two phases, passive and active, in women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, São Paulo University, Brazil. Twenty-four women with a clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence were treated with vaginal cones in a passive phase (without voluntary contractions of the pelvic floor) and an active phase (with voluntary contractions), each of which lasted three months. Clinical complaints, a functional evaluation of the pelvic floor, a pad test, and bladder neck mobility were analyzed before and after each phase. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients completed the treatment. The reduction in absolute risk with the pad test was 0.38 (p<0.034) at the end of the passive phase and 0.67 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk with the pelvic floor evaluation was 0.62 (p<0.0001) at the end of the passive phase and 0.77 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk of bladder neck mobility was 0.38 (p<0.0089) at the end of the passive phase and 0.52 (p<0.0005) at the end of the active phase. Complete reversal of symptomatology was observed in 12 (57.1%) patients, and satisfaction was expressed by 19 (90.4%). CONCLUSION: Using vaginal cones in the passive phase, as other researchers did, was effective. Inclusion of the active phase led to additional improvement in all of the study parameters evaluated in women with stress urinary incontinence. Randomized studies are needed, however, to confirm these results. PMID:21789381

  5. Quake clamps down on slow slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Bartlow, Noel; Hamling, Ian; Fry, Bill

    2014-12-01

    Using continuous GPS (cGPS) data from the Hikurangi subduction zone in New Zealand, we show for the first time that stress changes induced by a local earthquake can arrest an ongoing slow slip event (SSE). The cGPS data show that the slip rate in the northern portion of the 2013/2014 Kapiti SSE decreased abruptly following a nearby intraslab earthquake. We suggest that deceleration of the Kapiti SSE in early 2014 occurred due to a tenfold increase in the normal stress relative to shear stress in the SSE source, induced by the nearby Mw 6.3 earthquake, consistent with expectations of rate and state friction. Our observation of an abrupt halting/slowing of the SSE in response to stress changes imposed by a local earthquake has implications for the strength of fault zones hosting SSEs and supports the premise that static stress changes are an important ingredient in triggering (or delaying) fault slip.

  6. Aseismic Slip Events along the Southern San Andreas Fault System Captured by Radar Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P

    2001-10-01

    A seismic slip is observed along several faults in the Salton Sea and southernmost Landers rupture zone regions using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data spanning different time periods between 1992 and 1997. In the southernmost Landers rupture zone, projecting south from the Pinto Mountain Fault, sharp discontinuities in the interferometric phase are observed along the sub-parallel Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak Faults beginning three months after the Landers earthquake and is interpreted to be post-Landers after-slip. Abrupt phase offsets are also seen along the two southernmost contiguous 11 km Durmid Hill and North Shore segments of the San Andreas Fault with an abrupt termination of slip near the northern end of the North Shore Segment. A sharp phase offset is seen across 20 km of the 30 km-long Superstition Hills Fault before phase decorrelation in the Imperial Valley along the southern 10 km of the fault prevents coherent imaging by InSAR. A time series of deformation interferograms suggest most of this slip occurred between 1993 and 1995 and none of it occurred between 1992 and 1993. A phase offset is also seen along a 5 km central segment of the Coyote Creek fault that forms a wedge with an adjoining northeast-southwest trending conjugate fault. Most of the slip observed on the southern San Andreas and Superstition Hills Faults occurred between 1993 and 1995--no slip is observed in the 92-93 interferograms. These slip events, especially the Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak events, are inferred to be related to stress redistribution from the June, 1992 M{sub w} = 7.3 Landers earthquake. Best-fit elastic models of the San Andreas and Superstition Hills slip events suggest source mechanisms with seismic moments over three orders of magnitude larger than a maximum possible summation of seismic moments from all seismicity along each fault segment during the entire 4.8-year time interval spanned by the InSAR data. Aseismic moment releases of this

  7. Phenomenological model of propagation of the elastic waves in a fluid-saturated porous solid with nonzero boundary slip velocity.

    PubMed

    Tsiklauri, David

    2002-09-01

    It is known that a boundary slip velocity starts to play an important role when the length scale over which the fluid velocity changes approaches the slip length, i.e., when the fluid is highly confined, for example, fluid flow through porous rock or blood vessel capillaries. Zhu and Granick [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 096105 (2001)] have recently experimentally established the existence of a boundary slip in a Newtonian liquid. They reported typical values of the slip length of the order of few micrometers. In this light, the effect of introduction of the boundary slip into the theory of propagation of elastic waves in a fluid-saturated porous medium formulated by Biot [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 28, 179-191 (1956)] is investigated. Namely, the effect of introduction of boundary slip upon the function F(kappa) that measures the deviation from Poiseuille flow friction as a function of frequency parameter kappa is studied. By postulating phenomenological dependence of the slip velocity upon frequency, notable deviations in the domain of intermediate frequencies in the behavior of F(kappa) are introduced with the incorporation of the boundary slip into the model. It is known that F(kappa) crucially enters Biot's equations, which describe dynamics of fluid-saturated porous solid. Thus, consequences of the nonzero boundary slip by calculating the phase velocities and attenuation coefficients of both rotational and dilatational waves with the variation of frequency are investigated. The new model should allow one to fit the experimental seismic data in circumstances when Biot's theory fails, as the introduction of phenomenological dependence of the slip velocity upon frequency, which is based on robust physical arguments, adds an additional degree of freedom to the model. In fact, it predicts higher than the Biot's theory values of attenuation coefficients of the both rotational and dilatational waves in the intermediate frequency domain, which is in qualitative agreement with the

  8. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach.

    PubMed

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ε,δ)-expansion scheme is employed, where ε is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4/3.

  9. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V.; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu.

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ɛ ,δ ) -expansion scheme is employed, where ɛ is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4 /3 .

  10. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach.

    PubMed

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ε,δ)-expansion scheme is employed, where ε is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4/3. PMID:26871026

  11. Geodetic slip-rates from block-modeling of a dense GPS velocity field in Italy: comparison with geological slip-rates and seismic moment release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpelloni, E.; Anderlini, L.; Mastrolembo, B.; Cavaliere, A.; Baldi, P.; Belardinelli, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The growing number of continuously operating GPS stations in Italy highlights local scale details of the velocity gradients across active seismogenic faults. The regional scale pattern of the velocity strain-rate field has been already constrained by several authors, adopting different algorithms of interpolation of sparse velocities and showing consistency with seismotectonics data. Nevertheless an estimate of the geodetic slip-rates from kinematically consistent elastic models is still missing. In this work we use velocities from >1000 cGPS stations, obtained from the analysis of position time-series realized in the IGS08 reference-frame. Raw data have been analyzed with the GAMIT/GLOBK software, and regional solutions from 60 sub-networks have been combined with global solutions from SOPAC. We use a principal component analysis (PCA) technique to estimate the pattern of spatially correlated common mode error (CME) at the Euro-Mediterranean scale. Filtering of the CME from raw time-series significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio and provides smaller velocity uncertainties. We estimate the velocity uncertainties adopting a flicker+white noise error model, resulting from the spectral-index analysis of residual time-series. We use an elastic block-modeling approach to model interseismic fault slip-rates while accounting for rotations of crustal blocks and micro-plates in the study area. We use available catalogues of active faults to define the fault geometries, parameterized as uniformly slipping rectangular fault planes. The model provides a good fit to the horizontal velocities and fault kinematics that are largely consistent with other geological and seismotectonics information, despite the known structural complexity of the Italian region. We compare the geodetically estimated fault-slip rates with available databases of geologically determined slip-rates, and found a general agreement in both the kinematics and slip-rates values, considering the large

  12. The mechanics of stick-slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Physical mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the occurrence of stick-slip motion during frictional sliding have been examined in the light of results obtained from experiments with rocks and brittle minerals. An instability caused by sudden brittle fracture of locked regions on surfaces in contact is the most likely explanation for stick-slip during dry frictional sliding of brittle rocks at room temperature. Areas requiring further study and the uncertainties in applying the results of laboratory experiments to earthquake studies are emphasized. ?? 1970.

  13. Slip length measurement of gas flow.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas. PMID:27505860

  14. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments. PMID:18063789

  15. Slip length measurement of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  16. Slip length measurement of gas flow.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  17. Slipping processes in residual badlands reliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Hernández, Jose Luis; Yepes, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    We define slips as structures developed by more or less saturated colloidal suspension that slide down the walls of residual reliefs found in badlands. These suspensions seem to originate in the soils crowning gully reliefs and also from rainwater dripping onto the walls of poorly cemented sediments such as siltstone. We call this process slipping and the resulting morphologies represent a group of minor badlands forms, often linked to piping and fluting. Slipping occurs according to the following sequence of forms: 1. Mud droplets. These are irregular linear structures caused by mud droplets sliding down sub-vertical walls. The droplet is usually found at the end of a small channel. These morphologies represent the course of the sliding droplets that become fossilized and not the impact of the droplets on the sediment. 2. Slips sensu stricto. These are uninterrupted surface structures covering sub-vertical walls to a greater or lesser extent. The thickness of this type of covering varies from a few millimetres to 5cm. The inner structure of the slips consists of small laminas (» 100mm) and on the exterior they often present drip channels. A special case of these forms is butterfly structures, which appear in isolation, with repetitive patterns and the appearance of a winged insect stuck to the wall. 3. Pseudo-stalactites. These are free-standing conical regrowths with some similarity to stalactites in a karst cave. They occur when slips grow to over 5cm thick. The growth of these forms is similar to that of slips, with external superposition of fine, concentric layers with no central pore. A variety of these pseudo-stalactites are nodulous stalactites whose genesis is unknown. In this context, we should mention the existence of occasional stalagmites. In other cases, curtains of pseudo-stalactites can be found where these patterns are repeated finely. A more evolved stage of this form is the coalescence of pseudo-stalactites, representing a massive advance of

  18. Neotectonics of a subduction/strike-slip transition: the northeastern Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, M.A.; McCann, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Septentrional fault system in the northeastern Dominican Republic marks the zone where the North American-Carribean plate boundary is evolving from subduction to strike-slip motion, and where terranes appear to be forming and migrating laterally in a subduction complex/forearc region. On the Island of Hispaniola, slip vectors are oblique to the strike of the Puerto Rico trench, and oblique subduction thrusts the upper plate over normal seafloor. The offshore geology and seismicity of the northern Caribbean suggest that uplift, broad crustal warping, thrusting, and strike-slip faulting (ie. collisional tectonics) should be present in the northern part of the Dominican Republic. The high topography (>1000m), high levels of seismicity, and large earthquakes support the hypothesis of contemporary deformation in Hispaniola. In this region, the subduction regime dies out toward the west, and deformation is transferred to onshore, oblique-slip faults. As this change in tectonic style has occurred in Neogene to Recent times, we are investigating the modern evolution of a plate boundary. We have already documented: (1) the presence of a strike-slip faulting in the northeastern Dominican Republic; (2) an anomalous push-up structure; and (3) a region of numerous splay faults. In conclusion, recent seismicity suggest a wide zone of deformation and variations in interplate motions near Hispaniola. This island lies at the western limit of active underthrusting and at the eastern limit of onshore faulting, i.e., at an important transition from a subduction to strike-slip regime.

  19. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c+a⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c+a⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} plane "slither" in the {011[over ¯]1} plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} and {011[over ¯]1} slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} planes. PMID:27314728

  20. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {2 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 2 } plane "slither" in the {01 1 ¯1 } plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } and {01 1 ¯1 } slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } planes.

  1. Episodic slow slip events and seaward flank motion at Mt. Etna volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo

    2016-09-01

    Episodic aseismic slip events have recently been detected at a variety of tectonic and volcanic environments, sparking the curiosity of seismic and geodetic communities. Here, a sequence of 7 slow slip events occurring at Mt. Etna since mid-2009 has been analyzed. Observed displacement fields evidence that the sequence involves two contiguous sectors of the unstable eastern flank, delimited by the Timpe faults. The tectonic control played by these faults can also be recognized on the long-term (2003-2015) velocity field. Elastic modelling of the long-term velocity field infers a sub-horizontal plane slightly dipping eastward and located within the sedimentary basement at shallow depth. Slip distribution models for each slow-slip event highlight how the largest slip values were centred on the SE edge of the sub-horizontal plane during 4 events and on the NE edge during the remaining 3 ones. The recognized events do not appear correlated with volcanic activity, although there is a possible correlation between slow-slip events and inflating episodes of the volcano.

  2. Bond slip detection of steel plate and concrete beams using smart aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Feng; Kong, Qingzhao; Li, Mo; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing; Fan, Feng

    2015-11-01

    The newly emerged steel plate concrete (SC), benefited from a composite effect of steel and concrete materials, has been applied to shield building and internal structures of AP1000 nuclear power plants. The detection of bond-slip between steel plate and concrete is of great importance to provide early warnings of steel plate and concrete debonding and to ensure the safety of SC structures. In this paper, an active sensing approach using smart aggregates (SAs) is developed to detect the initiation and to monitor the development of bond-slip. A SA, designed by sandwiching a fragile piezoceramic patch between protection materials, can be utilized as both actuator and sensor by taking advantage of the piezoelectricity of piezoceramic material. Two SC beams with distinct shear reinforcement ratios ≤ft({ρ }t\\right) were experimentally investigated. Based on the wavelet packet decomposition of the received signals from SAs, the initiation of bond-slip is detected, and the development of bond-slip is quantitatively monitored to better understand the structural performance of SC beams, including the stiffness and capacity. The bond-slip severities of the two SC beams are compared to study the improvement of bond-slip condition rendered by providing more shear reinforcement.

  3. Asymmetric alluvial fans along strike-slip faults: A potential slip-rate record?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of asymmetric alluvial fan morphology along strike-slip faults. From analysis of high-resolution topographic data, we find that asymmetric alluvial fans are common along several strike-slip faults in the western United States. Affected fans are steeper in the direction of translation of the sediment source, often resulting in stream deflections counter to that expected from the sense of fault slip (e.g. left deflected streams along dextral faults). We hypothesize that fan asymmetry results from lateral translation of the sediment source relative to the depocenter. This relative motion changes the accommodation space in such a way that one side of the alluvial fan continuously progrades while the other is gradually abandoned. Therefore, lateral translation results in radial asymmetry of slopes about the fan apex. As a first approximation, we model this asymmetry as a result of diffusive sediment transport down fan. From this analysis, we predict that the degree of asymmetry of the alluvial fan is controlled by the ratio of sediment flux to fault slip rate. Qualitatively, more rapidly slipping faults should host more highly asymmetric fans; conversely, high sediment flux will obscure asymmetry. By measuring the sediment flux, through catchment-average concentration of cosmogenic isotopes or other means, we show that it is theoretically possible to quantify strike-slip fault slip-rates and alluvial-fan sediment transport rates using alluvial fan morphometry.

  4. Slip development and instability on a nonuniformly loaded interface with power-law slip-weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, James R.; Uenishi, Koji

    2003-03-01

    We study rupture instability on a planar interface subjected to a locally peaked stress that increases quasi-statically in time. The interface follows a nonlinear slip-weakening relation where the strength drop is proportional to (slip)^n. Such a form with n 0.2-0.4 has been inferred from seismological observations on the scaling of radiated energy with slip (Abercrombie and Rice, 2001, 2002) and similarly abrupt strength drops are found at slips greater than sub-mm range in experiments involving large rotary shear (Chambon et al., 2002; Tullis and Goldsby, 2002). We use a simple Rayleigh-Ritz method and also full numerical simulations. Results show there is no longer a universal nucleation length when n ne 1 and qualitative features of the slip development are controlled by n. If n < 2/3, instability occurs as soon as the peaked value of the loading reaches the strength. This is a prediction based on the power law starting at (slip) = 0^+ whereas the observational results correspond to slips beyond the sub-mm range.

  5. Slip rates across the sinistral slip fault system of the Shan Plateau, northern SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Sieh, K.; Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Weldon, R. J.; Feng, L.; Chan, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The sinistral-slip fault system of the Shan Plateau, arcing around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis and extending > 700 km from northwest to southeast, poses a high seismic hazard in northern SE Asia. Knowing slip rates and earthquake recurrence intervals of these faults is key to better quantification of that hazard. However, estimates of slip rates along the fault system remain poorly constrained. Here we report a preliminary estimate of the slip rate across the fault system from available campaign GPS velocities. We projected the horizontal GPS velocity vectors relative to the Sunda block reference frame perpendicular to the general strike (~ 240°) of the sinistral faults. The velocity profile shows a gradient of ~ 9 mm/yr over a distance of ~ 550 km that crosses 8 faults, from the Dayingjiang fault in the northwest to the Mengxing fault in the southeast. This suggests the average slip rate across each fault in the system is ~ 1 mm/yr. The 9 mm/yr of GPS velocity gradient across the fault system, however, is only half of the long-term rates determined from offsets of major rivers, ridges and plutons. These geological determinations suffer, however, from poor dating constraints. The discrepancy between the geodetic and geological analyses highlights the need of reliable constraints on slip rates along each of the faults. We have begun field work aimed at determining the slip rate of one of these, the Jinghong fault.

  6. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  7. Activity mediated phase separation: Can we understand phase behavior of the nonequilibrium problem from an equilibrium approach?

    PubMed

    Trefz, Benjamin; Das, Subir K; Egorov, Sergei A; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-04-14

    We present results for structure and dynamics of mixtures of active and passive particles, from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and integral equation theory (IET) calculations, for a physically motivated model. The perfectly passive limit of the model corresponds to the phase-separating Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures in which, for the present study, the colloids are made self-propelling by introducing activity in accordance with the well known Vicsek model. Such activity facilitates phase separation further, as confirmed by our MD simulations and IET calculations. Depending upon the composition of active and passive particles, the diffusive motion of the active species can only be realized at large time scales. Despite this, we have been able to construct an equilibrium approach to obtain the structural properties of such inherently out-of-equilibrium systems. In this method, effective inter-particle potentials were constructed via IET by taking structural inputs from the MD simulations of the active system. These potentials in turn were used in passive MD simulations, results from which are observed to be in fair agreement with the original ones. PMID:27083747

  8. Activity mediated phase separation: Can we understand phase behavior of the nonequilibrium problem from an equilibrium approach?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefz, Benjamin; Das, Subir K.; Egorov, Sergei A.; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    We present results for structure and dynamics of mixtures of active and passive particles, from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and integral equation theory (IET) calculations, for a physically motivated model. The perfectly passive limit of the model corresponds to the phase-separating Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures in which, for the present study, the colloids are made self-propelling by introducing activity in accordance with the well known Vicsek model. Such activity facilitates phase separation further, as confirmed by our MD simulations and IET calculations. Depending upon the composition of active and passive particles, the diffusive motion of the active species can only be realized at large time scales. Despite this, we have been able to construct an equilibrium approach to obtain the structural properties of such inherently out-of-equilibrium systems. In this method, effective inter-particle potentials were constructed via IET by taking structural inputs from the MD simulations of the active system. These potentials in turn were used in passive MD simulations, results from which are observed to be in fair agreement with the original ones.

  9. Phase Behavior of Active Swimmers in Depletants: Molecular Dynamics and Integral Equation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subir K.; Egorov, Sergei A.; Trefz, Benjamin; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    We study the structure and phase behavior of a binary mixture where one of the components is self-propelling in nature. The interparticle interactions in the system are taken from the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures for which the phase diagram is known. In the current model version, the colloid particles are made active using the Vicsek model for self-propelling particles. The resultant active system is studied by molecular dynamics methods and integral equation theory. Both methods produce results consistent with each other and demonstrate that the Vicsek model-based activity facilitates phase separation, thus, broadening the coexistence region.

  10. Phase behavior of active swimmers in depletants: molecular dynamics and integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Das, Subir K; Egorov, Sergei A; Trefz, Benjamin; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-05-16

    We study the structure and phase behavior of a binary mixture where one of the components is self-propelling in nature. The interparticle interactions in the system are taken from the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures for which the phase diagram is known. In the current model version, the colloid particles are made active using the Vicsek model for self-propelling particles. The resultant active system is studied by molecular dynamics methods and integral equation theory. Both methods produce results consistent with each other and demonstrate that the Vicsek model-based activity facilitates phase separation, thus, broadening the coexistence region. PMID:24877969

  11. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  12. Along strike-slip faults, do fault segments exist and how long are they ? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Y.; Rockwell, T. K.; Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of relay zones and bends along strike-slip faults has long been recognized. The control of such geometrical asperities in initiation and arrest of seismic ruptures has been documented in many cases, suggesting they have a key role in the structure along strike of strike-slip faults. We produced dense slip distribution for two large strike-slip earthquakes, the 2001 Kunlun earthquake and the 1940 Imperial fault earthquake. In the Kunlun case we correlated satellite images acquired before and after the event to obtain a slip distribution of 1 point/km over 300 km. For the Imperial fault earthquake, we used a set of low altitude aerial photos that were flown just after the earthquake. The resolution of the photos is good enough to allow us to measure offsets of hundreds of plow lines along the trace of the rupture. In both cases the amplitude of the slip varies at a scale of several kilometers. In the case of Kunlun, the correlation between slip variations and jogs or side faults branching off the main rupture is straightforward. In the case of the Imperial fault, where long-term morphology is not preserved because of anthropic activities, still the slip distribution corresponds well with the slip patches determined independently by seismologists. These two examples strongly suggest that the segmentation of the fault controls the way seismic ruptures propagate along strike-slip faults. A more systematic exploration of slip maps derived from kinematic inversions of geophysical data shows that beyond variation due to different methodology and data, the lateral size of slip patches derived from such geophysical studies saturates around 20 km, independently of the earthquake magnitude. In parallel, using the available dataset of well documented ground ruptures maps for strike slip earthquakes, we designed an automatic procedure to quantify the minimum number of connected strait lines, approximating fault segment, needed to fit the rupture trace. The

  13. Fault slip during a glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Rebekka; Wu, Patrick; Steffen, Holger; Eaton, Dave

    2013-04-01

    Areas affected by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) generally show uplift after deglaciation. These regions are also characterized by a moderate past and present-day seismicity, at seismic moment release rates that exceed those expected under stable tectonic conditions. Several faults have been found in North America and Europe, which have been activated during or after the last deglaciation. Large-magnitude earthquakes have generated fault offsets of up to 120 m. Due to the recent melting of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, an understanding of the occurrence of these earthquakes is important. With a new finite-element model, we are able to estimate, for the first time, fault slip during a glacial cycle for continental ice sheets. A two-dimensional earth model based on former GIA studies is developed, which is loaded with a hyperbolic ice sheet. The fault is able to move in a stress field consisting of rebound stress, tectonic background stress, and lithostatic stress. The sensitivity of this fault is tested regarding lithospheric and crustal thickness, viscosity structure of upper and lower mantle, ice-sheet thickness and width, and fault parameters including coefficient of friction, depth, angle and location. Fault throws of up to 30 m are obtained using a fault of 45° dipping below the ice sheet centre. The thickness of the crust is one of the major parameters affecting the total fault throw, e.g. higher values for a thinner crust. Most faults start to move close to the end of deglaciation, and movement stops after one thrusting/reverse earthquake. However, certain conditions may also lead to several fault movements after the end of glaciations.

  14. Strong near-trench locking and its temporal change in the rupture area of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake estimated from cumulative slip and slip vectors of interplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake is characterized by large near-trench slip that excited disastrous Tsunami. It is of great importance to estimate the coupling state near the trench to understand temporal evolution of interplate coupling near the earthquake source as well as for the assessment of tsunami risk along the trench. However, the coupling states at the near trench areas far from the land are usually not well constrained. The cumulative offset of small repeating earthquakes reflects the in situ slip history on a fault and the slip vectors of interplate earthquakes reflect heterogeneous distribution of coupling on the plate boundary. In this study, we use the repeating earthquake and slip vector data to estimate spatio-temporal change in slip and coupling in and around the source area of the Tohoku-oki earthquake near the Japan trench. The repeating earthquake data for 27 years before the Tohoku-oki earthquake show absence of repeating earthquake groups in the large-coseismic-slip area and low and variable slip rates in the moderate-coseismic-slip region surrounding the large-slip. The absence of repeaters itself could have been explained by both models with very weak coupling and very strong coupling. However, the rotation of slip vectors of interplate earthquakes at the deeper extension of the large-coseismic-slip suggest the plate boundary was locked in the near-trench area before the earthquake, which is consistent with the estimation by Hasegawa et al. (2012) based on stress tensor analysis of the upper plate events near the trench axis. The repeating earthquake data, on the other hand, show small but distinct increases in the slip rate in the 3-5 years before the earthquake near the area of large coseismic slip suggesting preseismic unfastening of the locked area in the last stage of the earthquake cycle. After the Tohoku-oki earthquake, repeating earthquakes activity in the main rupture area disappeared almost completely and slip vectors of

  15. Support for the slip hypothesis from whisker-related tactile perception of rats in a noisy environment

    PubMed Central

    Waiblinger, Christian; Brugger, Dominik; Whitmire, Clarissa J.; Stanley, Garrett B.; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Rodents use active whisker movements to explore their environment. The “slip hypothesis” of whisker-related tactile perception entails that short-lived kinematic events (abrupt whisker movements, called “slips”, due to bioelastic whisker properties that occur during active touch of textures) carry the decisive texture information. Supporting this hypothesis, previous studies have shown that slip amplitude and frequency occur in a texture-dependent way. Further, experiments employing passive pulsatile whisker deflections revealed that perceptual performance based on pulse kinematics (i.e., signatures that resemble slips) is far superior to the one based on time-integrated variables like frequency and intensity. So far, pulsatile stimuli were employed in a noise free environment. However, the realistic scenario involves background noise (e.g., evoked by rubbing across the texture). Therefore, if slips are used for tactile perception, the tactile neuronal system would need to differentiate slip-evoked spikes from those evoked by noise. To test the animals under these more realistic conditions, we presented passive whisker-deflections to head-fixed trained rats, consisting of “slip-like” events (waveforms mimicking slips occurring with touch of real textures) embedded into background noise. Varying the (i) shapes (ramp or pulse); (ii) kinematics (amplitude, velocity, etc.); and (iii) the probabilities of occurrence of slip-like events, we observed that rats could readily detect slip-like events of different shapes against noisy background. Psychophysical curves revealed that the difference of slip event and noise amplitude determined perception, while increased probability of occurrence (frequency) had barely any effect. These results strongly support the notion that encoding of kinematics dominantly determines whisker-related tactile perception while the computation of frequency or intensity plays a minor role. PMID:26528148

  16. Digital active material processing platform effort (DAMPER), SBIR phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Applied Technology Associates, Inc., (ATA) has demonstrated that inertial actuation can be employed effectively in digital, active vibration isolation systems. Inertial actuation involves the use of momentum exchange to produce corrective forces which act directly on the payload being actively isolated. In a typical active vibration isolation system, accelerometers are used to measure the inertial motion of the payload. The signals from the accelerometers are then used to calculate the corrective forces required to counteract, or 'cancel out' the payload motion. Active vibration isolation is common technology, but the use of inertial actuation in such systems is novel, and is the focus of the DAMPER project. A May 1991 report was completed which documented the successful demonstration of inertial actuation, employed in the control of vibration in a single axis. In the 1 degree-of-freedom (1DOF) experiment a set of air bearing rails was used to suspend the payload, simulating a microgravity environment in a single horizontal axis. Digital Signal Processor (DSP) technology was used to calculate in real time, the control law between the accelerometer signals and the inertial actuators. The data obtained from this experiment verified that as much as 20 dB of rejection could be realized by this type of system. A discussion is included of recent tests performed in which vibrations were actively controlled in three axes simultaneously. In the three degree-of-freedom (3DOF) system, the air bearings were designed in such a way that the payload is free to rotate about the azimuth axis, as well as translate in the two horizontal directions. The actuator developed for the DAMPER project has applications beyond payload isolation, including structural damping and source vibration isolation. This report includes a brief discussion of these applications, as well as a commercialization plan for the actuator.

  17. Soil solid-phase controls lead activity in soil solution.

    PubMed

    Badawy, S H; Helal, M I D; Chaudri, A M; Lawlor, K; McGrath, S P

    2002-01-01

    Lead pollution of the environment is synonymous with civilization. It has no known biological function, and is naturally present in soil, but its presence in food crops is deemed undesirable. The concern regarding Pb is mostly due to chronic human and animal health effects, rather then phytotoxicity. However, not much is known about the chemistry and speciation of Pb in soils. We determined the activity of Pb2+, in near neutral and alkaline soils, representative of alluvial, desertic and calcareous soils of Egypt, using the competitive chelation method. Lead activity ranged from 10(-6.73) to 10(-4.83) M, and was negatively correlated with soil and soil solution pH (R2 = -0.92, P < 0.01 and R2 = -0.89, P < 0.01, respectively). It could be predicted in soil solution from the equation: log(Pb2+) = 9.9 - 2pH. A solubility diagram for the various Pb minerals found in soil was constructed using published thermodynamic data obtained from the literature, and our measured Pb2+ activities compared with this information. The measured Pb2+ activities were undersaturated with regard to the solubility of PbSiO3 in equilibrium with SiO2 (soil). However, they were supersaturated with regard to the solubilities of the Pb carbonate minerals PbCO3 (cerussite) and Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and hydroxide Pb(OH)2. They were also supersaturated with regard to the solubilities of the Pb phosphate minerals Pb3(PO4)2, Pb5(PO4)3OH, and Pb4O(PO4)2 in equilibrium with tricalcium phosphate and CaCO3. The activity of Pb2+ was not regulated by any mineral of known solubility in our soils, but possibly by a mixture of Pb carbonate and phosphate minerals.

  18. Active phase-nulling of the self-mixing phase in a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Dean, P; Keeley, J; Valavanis, A; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Taimre, T; Alhathlool, R; Li, L H; Indjin, D; Rakić, A D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate an active phase-nulling scheme for terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) under optical feedback, by active electronic feedback control of the emission frequency. Using this scheme, the frequency tuning rate of a THz QCL is characterized, with significantly reduced experimental complexity compared to alternative approaches. Furthermore, we demonstrate real-time displacement sensing of targets, overcoming the resolution limits imposed by quantization in previously implemented fringe-counting methods. Our approach is readily applicable to high-frequency vibrometry and surface profiling of targets, as well as frequency-stabilization schemes for THz QCLs.

  19. New Quaternary slip-rate estimates for the central Garlock fault in SE California - Evidence for large transient slip-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittase, W. M.; Walker, D.; Kirby, E.; McDonald, E.

    2009-12-01

    Significant short-term fluctuations in a mature fault’s slip rate are enigmatic. Work over the last decade in southern California has demonstrated this behavior on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in the LA basin and the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) (e.g., Peltzer, Oskin and Dolan). We report here new slip-rate data for the central Garlock fault in the Pilot Knob Valley area that suggests that it also shows an irregular late Quaternary slip-rate history. An abandoned drainage containing an estimated 3-4 k.y. debris flow is faulted against a 47-m-long shutter ridge (UTM 481630E, 3935170N), implying a 11.8 - 15.6 mm/yr slip rate. Well-preserved bar-and-swale morphology on the surface of the debris flow abuts the shutter ridge perpendicularly, indicating that the debris flow predates slip. Surface clasts have only incipient development of varnish and rubification. A 140-cm-deep hand-dug trench displays incipient Av- and Bw-horizon soil development typical of late-Holocene alluvial deposits in the Mojave Desert. A silt lens in the deposit was sampled ~200 m upstream and has been submitted for OSL dating. Terrestrial-based LiDAR scanning will be performed to map the site’s surface morphology at mm-scale resolution. Two possible implications of this data are (1) that the GF now acts as a conjugate to the SAF and that faster slip on the GF is correlated with fast slip on the Big Bend section of the SAF and on faults within the LA basin, while the ECSZ is quiescent; or (2) that the GF is near the end of its current earthquake cycle. Faster slip on the GF in the past 3-4 k.y., coupled with a more active SAF and a quieter ECSZ, may help explain how the GF can cut across the ECSZ without itself being cut by the ECSZ. In addition, the lack of resolvable sinistral shear across the GF in the geodetic record suggests that either the GF has come out of its transient high slip-rate period, or conversely, it is near the end of its earthquake cycle.

  20. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  1. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  2. General Electric ATS program technical review: Phase 2 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, T.; Smith, D.

    1995-10-01

    In response to the industrial and utility objectives specified for the ATS, the GE Power Generation ATS Phase 2 Program consisted of a dual approach. These were (1) development of an Industrial ATS (aircraft engine based) led by GE Aircraft Engines, and (2) development of a Utility ATS which was already underway at GEPG. Both programs required the identification and resolution of critical technical issues. Both systems were studied in Tasks 3-7, and both have resulted in designs that meet all ATS goals. The Industrial ATS as defined (130 MW) did not meet projected market power size requirements, and emphasis has remained on the Utility ATS development. The design and testing effort has been focused on the MS7001H combined cycle gas turbine, as the next product evolution in GE Power Generation`s product line. Common technology derived from the ATS Program is also being incorporated into the 50 Hz version of the ATS utility machine designated as the MS9001H.

  3. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  5. PRODUCTION OF SLIP CAST CALCIA HOLLOWWARE

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

    1963-12-31

    A method for producing slip cast calcia hollow ware in which a dense calcia grain is suspended in isobutyl acetate or a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and o-xylene is presented. A minor amount of triethanolamine and oleic acid is added to the suspension vehicle as viscosity adjusting agents and the suspension is cast in a plaster mold, dried, and fired. (AEC)

  6. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G P

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems. PMID:26986407

  7. Oblique slip in Laramide foreland arches

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, E.A.; Selvig, B.; Molzer, P. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Don Wise was one of the first structural geologists to recognize the complex, four-dimensional (space and time) nature of basement-involved faulting in the Rocky Mountain foreland. His focus on both small scale kinematic indicators and regional tectonic hypotheses has provided a launching point for many Rocky Mountain geologists. The implications of the anastomosing patterns of Laramide foreland arches on models of regional stress and strain have provoked considerable debate. Hypotheses range from those invoking multiple stages of lateral compression from different directions to single-stage models necessitating a component of strike-slip motion in east-west and north-south arches. These hypotheses were tested using slickenline analysis of minor faulting in structures with different orientations. In Wyoming, structures paralleling the dominant northwest structural trend have slickenlines in the NE-SW vertical plane, consistent with shortening and compression in this direction. The east-west Owl Creek and Casper Mountain structures also have NE-SW trending slickenlines, indicating slip oblique to these arches. In Colorado, minor faults in the north-south margin of the northeastern Front Range also indicate oblique slip, with shortening in the NE-SW quadrant. The actual trend of the slickenlines is more easterly, however, suggesting a change of slip trajectory with latitude, not time, possibly in response to identation by the Colorado Plateau.

  8. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  9. Slip Dynamics in Small Scale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Robert; Derlet, Peter; Greer, Julia; Volkert, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Classical work showed that dislocation velocities are strongly dependent on applied stress. Numerous experiments have validated this for individual or groups of dislocations in macroscopic crystals by using imaging techniques combined with either mechanical data or time resolved topological data. Developments in small scale mechanical testing allow to correlate the intermittency of collective dislocation motion with the mechanical response. Discrete forward surges in displacement can be related to dislocation avalanches, which are triggered by the evolving dislocation sub-structure. We study the spatiotemporal characteristics of intermittent plastic flow in quasi-statically sheared single crystalline Au crystals with diameters between 300 nm and 10000 nm, whose displacement bursts were recorded at several kHz (Scripta Mater. 2013, 69, 586; Small, available online). Both the crystallographic slip magnitude, as well as the velocity of the slip events are exhibiting power-law scaling as. The obtained slip velocity distribution has a cubic decay at high values, and a saturated flat shoulder at lower velocities. No correlation between the slip velocity and the applied stress or plastic strain is found. Further, we present DD-simulations that are supportive of our experimental findings. The simulations suggest that the dynamics of the internal stress fields dominate the evolving dislocation structure leading to velocities that are insensitive to the applied stress - a regime indicative of microplasticity.

  10. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G P

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  11. Experimental investigation on the slip between oil and water in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing-yu; Wu, Ying-xiang; Feng, Fei-fei; Chang, Ying; Li, Dong-hui

    2008-10-15

    This work is devoted to study of the slip phenomenon between phases in water-oil two-phase flow in horizontal pipes. The emphasis is placed on the effects of input fluids flow rates, pipe diameter and viscosities of oil phase on the slip. Experiments were conducted to measure the holdup in two horizontal pipes with 0.05 m diameter and 0.025 m diameter, respectively, using two different viscosities of white oil and tap water as liquid phases. Results showed that the ratios of in situ oil to water velocity at the pipe of small diameter are higher than those at the pipe of big diameter when having same input flow rates. At low input water flow rate, there is a large deviation on the holdup between two flow systems with different oil viscosities and the deviation becomes gradually smaller with further increased input water flow rate. (author)

  12. Non-equilibrium Phase Transitions: Activated Random Walks at Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, M.; Rolla, L. T.; Sidoravicius, V.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present rigorous results on the critical behavior of the Activated Random Walk model. We conjecture that on a general class of graphs, including , and under general initial conditions, the system at the critical point does not reach an absorbing state. We prove this for the case where the sleep rate is infinite. Moreover, for the one-dimensional asymmetric system, we identify the scaling limit of the flow through the origin at criticality. The case remains largely open, with the exception of the one-dimensional totally-asymmetric case, for which it is known that there is no fixation at criticality.

  13. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-06-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like `supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation.

  14. Experimental Slip Events as Possible Proxies for Fault Patch Slip During Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The slip and strength histories of a fault patch during an earthquake are experimentally simulated with a high-speed rotary apparatus. The experimental fault comprises two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. Our conceptual model assumes that slip on a fault patch is initiated by the stress increase associated with the passage of an earthquake front, and that this slip is facilitated by dissipation of potential energy stored in the surrounding crust. To simulate this process in the laboratory, we first store kinetic energy by spinning up a 225 kg flywheel that is adjacent to, but not connected to, the locked fault. Then, the flywheel is engaged to the lower fault block via a fast-acting (<0.03 s) clutch, and the drive motor is turned off. This loading procedure produces slip behavior that has many similarities to the slip envisioned to occur along an earthquake patch. (1) In both cases, a finite energy is available to drive slip. (2) The initial dynamic stress rise leading to fault slip is rapid (<< 1 s). (3) Slip history is controlled by spontaneous interaction between fault strength and the stored energy. (4) Radiated seismic energy is probably a small fraction of the energy budget. We refer to our experiments as 'Earthquake-Like-Slip-Event' or ELSE. Direct measurements of slip-velocity, normal and shear stresses, fault-normal displacement, and temperature are recorded at 5 kHz sampling. We present synthesis of 43 ELSE runs with Sierra White granite, and 15 with Kasota dolomite. Samples were axially loaded up to 7 MPa, potential energy up to 25 MJ/m^2, and slip-velocity up to ~1.0 m/s; they produced slip-distances up to 5.55 m, and fault-normal displacement from -300 microns (closure) to 160 microns (dilation). The main ELSE observations and inferences are: (1) In most experiments, the strength drops significantly (~50-70%) during the early slip stage, and this weakening is associated with intense fault wear and

  15. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    PubMed Central

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like ‘supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation. PMID:27278687

  16. Viscous Moment, Mechanism of Slow Slip, and Subduction Megathrust Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.

    2015-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) represent transient slip velocities slower than earthquakes but faster than steady, average plate motion. SSEs repeating at the same location have characteristic slip magnitude and duration. Contrary to earthquakes, however, average slip relates to neither duration nor area. Variations in duration, slip, and slip rate can instead be tied to variations in effective viscosity, calculated from a viscous definition of moment. In this paradigm, the observation that deep slow slip events are slower and longer, implies a higher effective viscosity than in shallower, colder SSEs. Observed variations in effective viscosity and slip rate can be interpreted in terms of differences in driving stress and shear zone width, and likely arise in anastomosing shear zones containing a heterogeneous mixture of materials.

  17. Development of compact slip detection sensor using dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-young; Hwang, Do-Yeon; Kim, Baek-chul; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a resistance tactile sensor that can detect a slip on the surface of sensor structure. The presented sensor device has fingerprint-like structures that are similar with the role of the humans finger print. The resistance slip sensor that the novel developed uses acrylo-nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) as a dielectric substrate and graphene as an electrode material. We can measure the slip as the structure of sensor makes a deformation and it changes the resistance through forming a new conductive route. To manufacture our sensor, we developed a new imprint process. By using this process, we can produce sensor with micro unit structure. To verify effectiveness of the proposed slip detection, experiment using prototype of resistance slip sensor is conducted with an algorithm to detect slip and slip is successfully detected. We will discuss the slip detection properties.

  18. Distributed Slip Model for Simulating Virtual Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani-Kadmiel, S.; Tsesarsky, M.; Gvirtzman, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We develop a physics based, generic finite fault source, which we call the Distributed Slip Model (DSM) for simulating large virtual earthquakes. This task is a necessary step towards ground motion prediction in earthquake-prone areas with limited instrumental coverage. A reliable ground motion prediction based on virtual earthquakes must account for site, path, and source effects. Assessment of site effect mainly depends on near-surface material properties which are relatively well constrained, using geotechnical site data and borehole measurements. Assessment of path effect depends on the deeper geological structure, which is also typically known to an acceptable resolution. Contrarily to these two effects, which remain constant for a given area of interest, the earthquake rupture process and geometry varies from one earthquake to the other. In this study we focus on a finite fault source representation which is both generic and physics-based, for simulating large earthquakes where limited knowledge is available. Thirteen geometric and kinematic parameters are used to describe the smooth "pseudo-Gaussian" slip distribution, such that slip decays from a point of peak slip within an elliptical rupture patch to zero at the borders of the patch. Radiation pattern and spectral charectaristics of our DSM are compared to those of commonly used finite fault models, i.e., the classical Haskell's Model (HM) and the modified HM with Radial Rupture Propagation (HM-RRP) and the Point Source Model (PSM). Ground motion prediction based on our DSM benefits from the symmetry of the PSM and the directivity of the HM while overcoming inadequacy for modeling large earthquakes of the former and the non-physical uniform slip of the latter.

  19. Critical Stresses for Twinning, Slip, and Transformation in Ti-Based Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, A.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of Nb and Ta contents on the (i) critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) for the β - α″ transformation, (ii) the CRSS for austenite slip, and (iii) the CRSS for twin nucleation in martensite ( α″ phase) that govern shape memory and superelasticity in Ti-based alloys. The critical stresses for slip and twinning are achieved with a modified Peierls Nabarro formalism utilizing generalized stacking fault energy and the generalized planar fault energy (GPFE), respectively, obtained from first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. During the calculation of the twinning stress, we show the importance of the shuffling process in stabilizing and lowering the GPFE curve. Similarly, the transformation stress is obtained with heterogeneous martensite nucleation mechanism incorporating the energy barriers associated with the transformation process. Here, we point to the role of dislocations in the shuffling process during the early stage of transformation. We show that the increase of Ta content raises the CRSS more effectively for the case of slip compared to twinning or transformation. The slip stress and twin stress magnitudes increase with an increase in the unstable fault energy ( {γ_{{us}} } ) and unstable twinning fault energy ( {γ_{{ut}} } ), respectively. In summary, as the Ta composition increases, the difference between martensite/austenite slip resistance and the transformation/twinning stress widens showing the efficacy of Ta alloying additions.

  20. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  1. Brain activation and lexical learning: the impact of learning phase and word type.

    PubMed

    Raboyeau, G; Marcotte, K; Adrover-Roig, D; Ansaldo, A I

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated the neural correlates of second-language lexical acquisition in terms of learning phase and word type. Ten French-speaking participants learned 80 Spanish words-40 cognates, 40 non-cognates-by means of a computer program. The learning process included the early learning phase, which comprised 5 days, and the consolidation phase, which lasted 2 weeks. After each phase, participants performed an overt naming task during an er-fMRI scan. Naming accuracy was better for cognates during the early learning phase only. However, cognates were named faster than non-cognates during both phases. The early learning phase was characterized by activations in the left iFG and Broca's area, which were associated with effortful lexical retrieval and phonological processing, respectively. Further, the activation in the left ACC and DLPFC suggested that monitoring may be involved during the early phases of lexical learning. During the consolidation phase, the activation in the left premotor cortex, the right supramarginal gyrus and the cerebellum indicated that articulatory planning may contribute to the consolidation of second-language phonetic representations. No dissociation between word type and learning phase could be supported. However, a Fisher r-to-z test showed that successful cognate retrieval was associated with activations in Broca's area, which could reflect the adaptation of known L1 phonological sequences. Moreover, successful retrieval of non-cognates was associated with activity in the anterior-medial left fusiform and right posterior cingulate cortices, suggesting that their successful retrieval may rely upon the access to semantic and lexical information, and even on the greater likelihood of errors.

  2. Oscillatory electro-osmotic flow through a slit channel with slipping stripes on walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Henry C. W.; Ng, Chiu-On

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model is presented in this paper for time-oscillating electro-osmotic flow through a plane channel bounded by two parallel plates, which are patterned with periodic stripes of distinct hydrodynamic slippage and wall potential. The flow is driven by oscillatory pressure gradient and electric field of the same frequency in the axial direction. Flows that are longitudinal or transverse to the stripes are investigated. Based on the Debye-Hückel approximation, and assuming Stokes flow, the electric potential and the velocity fields are found by the methods of eigenfunction expansion and point collocation. The phenomenological coefficients of the Onsager relations for the fluid and current fluxes are deduced as functions of the channel height, the area fraction of wall with slippage, the intrinsic slip length, the Debye parameter, the zeta potentials and the oscillation parameter. Considering several kinds of wall patterns, we extend the theoretical limits in the steady-flow regime to the oscillatory-flow regime. For a uniformly charged wall, the effective slip length obtained from the hydrodynamic problem can still be used directly in the electro-osmotic flow as if the wall were uniformly slipping. When the slipping stripes are perfectly slipping but uncharged, the presence of such stripes will always have a decreasing effect on the streaming conductance, unlike the steady case in which it gives no net effect on the flow in the limit of a very thin double layer. Furthermore, we confirm the presence of a threshold frequency, beyond which the flow will diminish significantly. The slipping fraction of the wall will always introduce a phase lag to the response and lower the threshold frequency. Increasing the wall potential in the presence of slippage can appreciably increase the streaming conductance and the phase lag.

  3. Episodic Tremor and Slip in the Cascadia Subduction Zone: A Story of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragert, H.

    2003-12-01

    migration velocity of slip for the GPS-determined Cascadia slip events, to the depth and migration velocity of the Japanese tremors triggered the search for seismic signatures for the Cascadia slip events. An examination of seismic records from 1996 to 2002 for sites on Vancouver Is. revealed that what had previously been deemed surface noise was signal from seismic tremors that accompanied slip events. The Cascadia tremors were found to be similar in character to the Japanese deep tremors. In addition, their source region was found to coincide with, or directly overlie, the region of the subducting slab interface where transient slip occurs. The close correlation of tremors with slip coined the naming of the phenomenon as Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS). The physical processes which give rise to this dynamic behavior on the deeper plate interface are not yet well understood. To date, only the Nankai and Cascadia subduction zones have been observed to share aspects of this behavior, suggesting that this phenomenon may be restricted to young subduction zones. The release of fluids, contact with a hydrated mantle wedge, and episodic changes in shear strength or mechanical coupling may all play a part in governing this behavior. Possible connections of ETS with the development of "E-zone" reflector bands, basal erosion, and pulsating metamorphism await further research. In the context of seismic hazard, the ETS zone may mark the down-dip limit of coseismic rupture of the next megathrust earthquake. Also, since it is conceivable for a slip event to trigger a large subduction thrust earthquake, the onset of ETS activity could identify times of higher probability for the occurrence of megathrust earthquakes.

  4. Geometry and late Pleistocene slip rates of the Liangdang-Jiangluo fault in the western Qinling mountains, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-jun, Zheng; Xing-wang, Liu; Jing-xing, Yu; Dao-yang, Yuan; Pei-zhen, Zhang; Wei-peng, Ge; Jian-zhang, Pang; Bai-yun, Liu

    2016-09-01

    Two groups of faults striking in different direction (NWW-trending and NEE-trending) within the western Qinling mountains play important roles in the tectonic deformation and the transference slip along the east end of the east Kunlun fault. We investigated the fault geometry and kinematics properties in the area. Based on the displacements of landforms and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques, the late Pleistocene slip rates along the Liangdang-Jiangluo fault were determined to be 0.43 ± 0.13 mm/a (thrust) and 0.71 ± 0.18 mm/a (left-lateral strike-slip). We also investigated some other faults, and obtained characteristically low slip rates. These slip rates are consistent with decadal GPS observations. Despite previous studies that point to a systematic decrease in the left-lateral slip rates from > 10 mm/a to < 2 mm/a along the eastern end of the Kunlun fault, there has been relatively little discussion about the role of the faults, that lie between the east Kunlun and west Qinling faults in accommodating the regional tectonic deformation. From the activity, geometry, and kinematics of the regional faults in the western Qinling Mountains, we concluded that the main driving force that arises from the NE-thrusting and strike slip along the east Kunlun fault dominated the deformation in the area. Our results suggest that the < 2 mm/a slip rate at the tip of the east Kunlun fault is absorbed by low slip rate faults, crustal shortening, basin formation and mountain uplift in the western Qinling mountains, and the slip is not transferred to the west Qinling fault or further north.

  5. Simple models for intermittent deformation and slip avalanches: from crystals to granular materials and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, K.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Uhl, J.

    2011-12-01

    Slowly sheared solid or densely packed granular materials often deform in an intermittent way with slip avalanches. The distribution of sizes follows often a power law over a broad range of sizes. In these cases, universal (i.e. detail-independent) scaling behavior governs the statistics of the slip-avalanches. Under some conditions, there are also "characteristic" statistics associated with enhanced occurrence of system-size events, and long-term mode switching between power law and characteristic behavior. These dynamic regimes can be understood with basic micromechanical model for deformation of solids with only two tuning parameter: weakening and dissipation of elastic stress transfer. For granular materials the packing fraction plays the role of the dissipation parameter and it sets the size of the largest slip avalanche. The model can reproduce observed stress-strain curves, power spectra of acoustic emissions, statistics of slip avalanches, and geometrical properties of slip, with a continuous phase transition from brittle to ductile behavior. Exact universal predictions for the power law exponents of the avalanche size distributions, durations, power spectra of acoustic emissions, and scaling functions are extracted using an analytical mean field theory and renormalization group tools. For granular materials a dynamic phase diagram with solid-like behavior and large slip avalanches at large packing fractions, and fluid-like behavior at lower packing fractions is obtained. The results agree with recent experimental observations and simulations of the statistics of dislocation dynamics in sheared crystals such as ice [1], slip avalanches in sheared granular materials [2], and avalanches in magnetic and fault systems [3,4]. [1] K. A. Dahmen, Y. Ben-Zion, and J.T. Uhl, "A micromechanical model for deformation in solids with universal predictions for stress strain curves and slip avalanches", Physical Review Letters 102, 175501/1-4 (2009). [2] K. A. Dahmen, Y

  6. Provenance of alluvial fan deposits to constrain the mid-term offsets along a strike-slip active fault: the Elsinore fault in the Coyote Mountains, Imperial Valley, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, Eulalia; Stepancikova, Petra; Rockwell, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The lateral variation in rates along a fault and its constancy along time is a matter of discussion. To give light to this discussion, short, mid and long term offset distribution along a fault is needed. Many studies analyze the short-term offset distribution along a strike-slip fault that can be obtained by the analysis of offset features imprinted in the morphology of the near-fault area. We present an example on how to obtain the mid- to long-term offset values based on the composition of alluvial fans that are offset by the fault. The study area is on the southern tip of the Elsinore fault, which controls the mountain front of the Coyote Mountains (California). The Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault is part of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system, extending 250 km from the Los Angeles Basin southeastward into the Gulf of California, in Mexico. The slip-rate on the southern Elsinore fault is believed to be moderate based on recent InSAR observations, although a recent study near Fossil Canyon (southern Coyote Mountains) suggests a rate in the range of 1-2 mm/yr. For this study we processed the airborne LiDAR dataset (EarthScope Southern & Eastern California, SoCal) to map short to mid-term alluvial offsets. We reprocessed the point clouds to produce DEMs with 0.5m and 0.25m grids and we varied the insolation angles to illuminate the various fault strands and the offset features. We identified numerous offset features, such as rills, channel bars, channel walls, alluvial fans, beheaded channels and small erosional basins that varied in displacement from 1 to 350 m. For the mid- to long-term offsets of the alluvial fans we benefited from the diverse petrological composition of their sources. Moreover, we recognized that older alluvium, which is offset by greater amounts, is in some cases buried beneath younger alluvial fan deposits and separated by buried soils. To determine the source canyon of various alluvial elements, we quantified the clast assemblage of each source

  7. The variations of long time period slow slip events along the Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Y. T.; Heki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are a type of slow earthquakes that can be observed with Global Positioning System (GPS) networks in the world. Those events are detected on intensely coupled plate boundaries such as Cascadia subduction zone (Dragert et al., 2001), western North America, Mexico (Kostoglodov et al., 2003), Alaska (Ohta et al., 2007) and Tokai and Boso areas (Ozawa et al., 2002, 2003), central Japan and are considered to have relations to large subduction thrust earthquakes. However, in southwestern Ryukyu trench where most of researchers believe that it should be a decoupled plate boundary, SSEs recur regularly and are located at a patch that is as deep as 20 to 40 km (Heki and Kataoka, 2008). For comprehending the characteristics and time variations of SSEs in this area, the GEONET GPS data of 16 years are used in this study. During 1997 to 2014, more than thirty SSEs are identified near Hateruma Island, Ryukyu. The average recurrence interval is calculated to be 6.3 months and release seismic moment is Mw 6.6 on average. However, the values of recurrence interval are not invariable. From 1997 to 2002, interval period of SSEs is 7.5 months, but during 2002 to 2008, the interval period decreases suddenly to 5.5 months. After 2008, the value restores to 7.2 months again. Furthermore, the slip amount of SSEs in this area varies with time. From 1997 to 2002, the slip is 9.5 cm/year; and during 2002 to 2008, the value slightly increases to 10.5 cm/year. However, in 2008 to 2013, the slip drops to 6.6 cm/year, but accord to the trend of cumulative slip, the slip value would increase in 2014. Considering these data, we find the slip values increase conspicuously in 2002 and 2013. Coincidentally, one Mw 7.1 thrust earthquake occurred in 2002 and earthquake swarm activity started in the Okinawa trough approximately 50km north of the SSE patch. In 2013, another earthquake swarm activity occurred in nearly the same area as the 2002 activity. This suggests that the

  8. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  9. Phase conjugation method and apparatus for an active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.; Chernoff, R. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array wherein a reference array element is used to generate a phase reference which is replicated at succeeding elements of the array. Each element of the array is associated with a phase regeneration circuit and the phase conjugation circuitry of an adjacent element. In one implementation, the phase reference circuit operates on the input signal at the reference element, a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) output signal and the input pilot signal at the next array element received from a transmission line. By proper filtering and mixing, a phase component may be produced to which the VCO may be locked to produce the phase conjugate of the pilot signal at the next array element plus a transmission line delay. In another implementation, particularly suited for large arrays in space, two different input pilot frequencies are employed.

  10. Downscaling of slip distribution for strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Oya, S.; Kuzuha, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We intend to develop a downscaling model to enhance the earthquake slip distribution resolution. Slip distributions have been obtained by other researchers using various inversion methods. As a downscaling model, we are discussing fractal models that include mono-fractal models (fractional Brownian motion, fBm; fractional Lévy motion, fLm) and multi-fractal models as candidates. Log - log-linearity of k (wave number) versus E (k) (power spectrum) is the necessary condition for fractality: the slip distribution is expected to satisfy log - log-linearity described above if we can apply fractal model to a slip distribution as a downscaling model. Therefore, we conducted spectrum analyses using slip distributions of 11 earthquakes as explained below. 1) Spectrum analyses using one-dimensional slip distributions (strike direction) were conducted. 2) Averaging of some results of power spectrum (dip direction) was conducted. Results show that, from the viewpoint of log - log-linearity, applying a fractal model to slip distributions can be inferred as valid. We adopt the filtering method after Lavallée (2008) to generate fBm/ fLm. In that method, generated white noises (random numbers) are filtered using a power law type filter (log - log-linearity of the spectrum). Lavallée (2008) described that Lévy white noise that generates fLm is more appropriate than the Gaussian white noise which generates fBm. In addition, if the 'alpha' parameter of the Lévy law, which governs the degree of attenuation of tails of the probability distribution, is 2.0, then the Lévy distribution is equivalent to the Gauss distribution. We analyzed slip distributions of 11 earthquakes: the Tohoku earthquake (Wei et al., 2011), Haiti earthquake (Sladen, 2010), Simeulue earthquake (Sladen, 2008), eastern Sichuan earthquake (Sladen, 2008), Peru earthquake (Konca, 2007), Tocopilla earthquake (Sladen, 2007), Kuril earthquake (Sladen, 2007), Benkulu earthquake (Konca, 2007), and southern Java

  11. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy’s law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  12. Effects of slip, slip rate, and shear heating on the friction of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Tullis, T.E.; Weeks, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of fault slip is sensitive to the way in which frictional strength responds to changes in slip rate and in particular to the effective velocity dependence of steady state friction ????ss/?? ln V. This quantity can vary substantially with displacement, temperature and slip rate. To investigate the physical basis for this behavior and the possible influence of shear heating, we slid initially bare granite surfaces in unconfined rotary shear to displacements of hundreds of millimeters at normal stresses, ??n, of 10 and 25 MPa and at room temperature. We imposed step changes in slip rate within the range 10-2 to 103.5 ??m/s and also monitored frictional heating with thermistors embedded in the granite. The transient response of ?? to slip rate steps was fit to a rate- and state-dependent friction law using two state variables to estimate the values of several parameters in the constitutive law. The first 20 mm of slip shows rising friction and falling ????ss/?? ln V; further slip shows roughly constant friction, ????ss/?? ln V and parameter values, suggesting that a steady state condition is reached on the fault surface. At V ??? 10 ??m/s, ????ss/?? ln V = -0.004 ?? 0.001. At higher rates the response is sensitive to normal stress: At ??n = 25 MPa granite shows a transition to effective velocity strengthening (????ss/?? ln V = 0.008 ?? 0.004) at the highest slip rates tested. At 10 MPa granite shows a less dramatic change to ????ss/?? ln V ??? 0 at the highest rates. The maximum temperature measured in the granite is ???60??C at 25 MPa and 103.5 ??m/s. Temperatures are in general agreement with a numerical model of heat conduction which assumes spatially homogeneous frictional heating over the sliding surface. The simplest interpretation of our measurements of ????ss/?? ln V is that the granite is inherently veocity weakening (?????ss/??? In V 0 mimics velocity strengthening. These results have implications for the frictional behavior of faults during

  13. 'Shooting at the sun god Apollo': the Apollonian-Dionysian balance of the TimeSlips Storytelling Project.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R

    2013-09-01

    In The Birth of Tragedy, Friedrich Nietzsche celebrated the dueling forces of reason and emotion as personified by the ancient Greek gods Apollo and Dionysus. A subtle Apollonian-Dionysian balance can be observed in TimeSlips, a group-based creative storytelling activity developed in the 1990s and increasingly used in dementia care settings worldwide. This article explains how the Apollonion-Dionysian aspects of TimeSlips are beneficial not only for persons with dementia, but also for their carers. Narrative data from medical students at Penn State College of Medicine who participated in TimeSlips at a local retirement community are shared.

  14. Mechanisms controlling the cyclic saturation stress and the critical cross-slip annihilation distance in copper single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauš, Petr; Kratochvíl, Jan; Beneš, Michal

    2014-02-01

    The proposed model is inspired by Brown's suggestion that the saturation stress in cycling is controlled by the stress required to separate two screw dislocations of opposite signs, which are just on the point of mutual annihilation by cross-slip. Cross-slip is treated as the deterministic, stress-activated process governed by the line tension, the applied stress and the interaction force between dislocations. The extension of the dislocation cores is neglected. The saturation stress and the critical cross-slip annihilation distance predicted simultaneously by the model agree with the available experimental data.

  15. 'Shooting at the sun god Apollo': the Apollonian-Dionysian balance of the TimeSlips Storytelling Project.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R

    2013-09-01

    In The Birth of Tragedy, Friedrich Nietzsche celebrated the dueling forces of reason and emotion as personified by the ancient Greek gods Apollo and Dionysus. A subtle Apollonian-Dionysian balance can be observed in TimeSlips, a group-based creative storytelling activity developed in the 1990s and increasingly used in dementia care settings worldwide. This article explains how the Apollonion-Dionysian aspects of TimeSlips are beneficial not only for persons with dementia, but also for their carers. Narrative data from medical students at Penn State College of Medicine who participated in TimeSlips at a local retirement community are shared. PMID:23722245

  16. Variability in AIRS CO2 during active and break phases of Indian summer monsoon.

    PubMed

    Revadekar, J V; Ravi Kumar, K; Tiwari, Yogesh K; Valsala, Vinu

    2016-01-15

    Due to human activities, the atmospheric concentration of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) has been rising extensively since the Industrial Revolution. Indian summer monsoon (ISM) has a dominant westerly component from ocean to land with a strong tendency to ascend and hence may have role in CO2 distribution in lower and middle troposphere over Indian sub-continent. A substantial component of ISM variability arises from the fluctuations on the intra-seasonal scale between active and break phases which correspond to strong and weak monsoon circulation. In view of the above, an attempt is made in this study to examine the AIRS/AQUA satellite retrieved CO2 distribution in response to atmospheric circulation with focus on active and break phase. Correlation analysis indicates the increase in AIRS CO2 linked with strong monsoon circulation. Study also reveals that anomalous circulation pattern during active and break phase show resemblance with high and low values of AIRS CO2. Homogeneous monsoon regions of India show substantial increase in CO2 levels during active phase. Hilly regions of India show strong contrast in CO2 and vertical velocity during active and break phases.

  17. EFFECT OF VAPOR-PHASE BIOREACTOR OPERATION ON BIOMASS ACCUMULATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND ACTIVITY. (R826168)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess biomass accumulation and activity loss in vapor-phase bioreactors (VPBs) can lead to unreliable long-term operation. In this study, temporal and spatial variations in biomass accumulation, distribution and activity in VPBs treating toluene-contaminated air were monitored o...

  18. Identification and active disturbance rejection for the JPL Phase B Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Daniel B.; Gibson, J. S.; Li, Wu-Jeng

    1993-09-01

    Active disturbance rejection to minimize optical path length error is illustrated by experimental results from the JPL Phase B Test Bed, which incorporates an interferometric sensor and a controllable trolley mounted on a flexible truss structure. The controller actively isolates the optical instruments from structural vibrations induced by external disturbances consisting of linear combinations of sinusoidal signals.

  19. Geodetic Measurements of Slow Slip and Tremor in Parkfield, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbridge, B. G.; Burgmann, R.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    It has been proposed that large bursts of deep tremor ( >20km depth) near Parkfield, CA are associated with quasi-periodic shear dislocations on the deep extent of the San Andreas Fault. Geodetic studies have shown that slow slip accompanies tremor in several subduction zones [e.g. Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Ide et al 2008]. However, prior to this study deformation associated with tremor in a transform fault environment had not been observed despite the ubiquitous presence of tremor and LFEs [Shelly et al, 2007; Nadeau et al 2005] and targeted attempts to observe this deformation [Smith 2009]. In this study we report geodetic measurements of surface strains associated with large tremor swarms that are inferred to be concurrent with slow-slip events with moment magnitudes exceeding 5 [Guilhem et al 2012]. The strain rates associated with these events are below the detection level of GPS networks, thus in order to observe this deformation we have utilized two long-baseline laser strainmeters (LSM) located in Cholame, CA. In order to overcome a small signal-to noise-ratio in the strainmeter data, we have stacked the strain records associated with more than 50 large tremor-burst events, each approximately 10 days in duration. The average surface strains associated with these events are on the order of several nanometers and correspond to fault slip on the order of 5 millimeters per event (assuming a fault patch extending ~25 km along-strike and ~15km in depth). The measured moment associated with these events is a factor of two smaller than previously proposed based on theoretical estimates [Guilhem et al 2012]. In this study we also explore the deformation associated with a large increase in tremor activity following the August 24, 2014 M6.0 Napa earthquake, the largest observed burst in the Parkfield-Cholame area since the large tremor rate increase associated with the 2004 Parkfield M6 earthquake.

  20. Ambient Tremor Triggered by Long-term Slow Slip Event in Bungo Channel, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, K.; Hirose, H.; Matsuzawa, T.; Tanaka, S.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a stick-slip in the transition zone between locked and stable sliding zones on the plate interface in Southwest Japan and Cascadia. ETS episode with duration of several days usually recurs at interval of several months at each segment. On the other hand, in the Bungo channel region where is the western edge of the ETS zone in SW Japan, tremor activity continued for several months during the long-term slow slip event (SSE) in 2003 and 2010. In this paper, the relationship between long-term SSE and surrounded triggered tremor is discussed. Tremor triggered by the long-term SSE is spatially localized in the narrow width of about 10 km at the shallowest part of the tremor zone, and at the neighboring area just downdip from the source fault of the SSE. The frequency distribution of tremor along the dip direction during the SSE period is consistent with the spatial distribution of total slip estimated for 2010 SSE. Therefore, the slip of the long-term SSE penetrated in the ETS zone may generate tremor. The daily number of the activated tremor is 12-14 during the SSE; however, it is 40-50 for regular ETS episode during the inter-SSE period. On the other hand, slip rates of the long-term SSE and ETS are typically 1 mm/d and 3 mm/d, respectively. Therefore, tremor rate may be controlled by slip rate. After SSEs in 2003 and 2010, tremor activity seems to slightly increase in the east region within 50 km from the triggered tremor area. Such 7-year period variation in tremor activity is observed in only the shallower side of the tremor zone. Moreover, pattern of the long-term variation seems to slightly migrate to east during a few years. We interpret that a tiny transient slip after the long-term SSE slowly propagates between transition and locked zones. Tremor activity at the shallowest part of the tremor zone in the Bungo channel continued longer than that of regular ETS in the late 2006 during the inter-SSE period. Associated tiny GPS

  1. Minimum cycle slip airborne differential carrier phase GPS antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Charles Wayne (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An antenna system is disclosed including a GPS antenna which is driven by an articulator in an opposite direction to aircraft roll. Aircraft roll is sensed by an onboard navigation system and translation module sends a signal to a processor which provides a drive signal to the articulator. As the aircraft rolls in one direction, the antenna is driven oppositely to maintain the vertical orientation of the antenna.

  2. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddon, E. K.; Amos, C. B.; Zielke, O.; Jayko, A. S.; Bürgmann, R.

    2016-06-01

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from ˜1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.3 ± 1.1 m (2σ). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between ˜0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is ˜6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.4 ± 1.5 m, corresponding to a geologic Mw ˜7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.1 ± 2.0 m, 12.8 ± 1.5 m, and 16.6 ± 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between ˜0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1σ) over the late Quaternary.

  3. Slip-trace-induced vicinal step destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupeau, C.; Camara, O.; Drouet, M.; Durinck, J.; Bonneville, J.; Colin, J.; Grilhé, J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold single crystals were deformed by uniaxial compression tests with the help of an experimental apparatus that allows one to characterize in situ, by UHV scanning tunneling microscopy, the evolution of surface structures under stress. It is demonstrated that the slip traces resulting from the emergence of moving dislocations at the free surface highly modify the organization of the vicinal steps. A model based on energetic considerations is proposed and discussed to explain the observed phenomenon.

  4. IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

    1963-12-31

    A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

  5. Inertial aided cycle slip detection and identification for integrated PPP GPS and INS.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuang; Gao, Yang

    2012-10-25

    The recently developed integrated Precise Point Positioning (PPP) GPS/INS system can be useful to many applications, such as UAV navigation systems, land vehicle/machine automation and mobile mapping systems. Since carrier phase measurements are the primary observables in PPP GPS, cycle slips, which often occur due to high dynamics, signal obstructions and low satellite elevation, must be detected and repaired in order to ensure the navigation performance. In this research, a new algorithm of cycle slip detection and identification has been developed. With the aiding from INS, the proposed method jointly uses WL and EWL phase combinations to uniquely determine cycle slips in the L1 and L2 frequencies. To verify the efficiency of the algorithm, both tactical-grade and consumer-grade IMUs are tested by using a real dataset collected from two field tests. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm can efficiently detect and identify the cycle slips and subsequently improve the navigation performance of the integrated system.

  6. New geologic slip rates for the Agua Blanca Fault, northern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, P. O.; Behr, W. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    Within the southern San Andreas transform plate boundary system, relatively little is known regarding active faulting in northern Baja California, Mexico, or offshore along the Inner Continental Borderland. The inner offshore system appears to be fed from the south by the Agua Blanca Fault (ABF), which strikes northwest across the Peninsular Ranges of northern Baja California. Therefore, the geologic slip rate for the ABF also provides a minimum slip rate estimate for the offshore system, which is connected to the north to faults in the Los Angeles region. Previous studies along the ABF determined slip rates of ~4-6 mm/yr (~10% of relative plate motion). However, these rates relied on imprecise age estimates and offset geomorphic features of a type that require these rates to be interpreted as minima, allowing for the possibility that the slip rate for the ABF may be greater. Although seismically quiescent, the surface trace of the ABF clearly reflects Holocene activity, and given its connectivity with the offshore fault system, more quantitative slip rates for the ABF are needed to better understand earthquake hazard for both US and Mexican coastal populations. Using newly acquired airborne LiDAR, we have mapped primary and secondary fault strands along the segmented western 70 km of the ABF. Minimal development has left the geomorphic record of surface slip remarkably well preserved, and we have identified abundant evidence meter to km scale right-lateral displacement, including new Late Quaternary slip rate sites. We verified potential reconstructions at each site during summer 2015 fieldwork, and selected an initial group of three high potential slip rate sites for detailed mapping and geochronologic analyses. Offset landforms, including fluvial terrace risers, alluvial fans, and incised channel fill deposits, record displacements of ~5-80 m, and based on minimal soil development, none appear older than early Holocene. To quantitatively constrain landform ages

  7. Slip length crossover on a graphene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-04-07

    Using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we study the flow of argon fluid above the critical temperature in a planar nanochannel delimited by graphene walls. We observe that, as a function of pressure, the slip length first decreases due to the decreasing mean free path of gas molecules, reaches the minimum value when the pressure is close to the critical pressure, and then increases with further increase in pressure. We demonstrate that the slip length increase at high pressures is due to the fact that the viscosity of fluid increases much faster with pressure than the friction coefficient between the fluid and the graphene. This behavior is clearly exhibited in the case of graphene due to a very smooth potential landscape originating from a very high atomic density of graphene planes. By contrast, on surfaces with lower atomic density, such as an (100) Au surface, the slip length for high fluid pressures is essentially zero, regardless of the nature of interaction between fluid and the solid wall.

  8. Earthquake slip on oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Abercrombie, R E; Ekström, G

    2001-03-01

    Oceanic transform faults are one of the main types of plate boundary, but the manner in which they slip remains poorly understood. Early studies suggested that relatively slow earthquake rupture might be common; moreover, it has been reported that very slow slip precedes some oceanic transform earthquakes, including the 1994 Romanche earthquake. The presence of such detectable precursors would have obvious implications for earthquake prediction. Here we model broadband seismograms of body waves to obtain well-resolved depths and rupture mechanisms for 14 earthquakes on the Romanche and Chain transform faults in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean. We found that earthquakes on the longer Romanche transform are systematically deeper than those on the neighbouring Chain transform. These depths indicate that the maximum depth of brittle failure is at a temperature of approximately 600 degrees C in oceanic lithosphere. We find that the body waves from the Romanche 1994 earthquake can be well modelled with relatively deep slip on a single fault, and we use the mechanism and depth of this earthquake to recalculate its source spectrum. The previously reported slow precursor can be explained as an artefact of uncertainties in the assumed model parameters. PMID:11242043

  9. Earthquake slip on oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Abercrombie, R E; Ekström, G

    2001-03-01

    Oceanic transform faults are one of the main types of plate boundary, but the manner in which they slip remains poorly understood. Early studies suggested that relatively slow earthquake rupture might be common; moreover, it has been reported that very slow slip precedes some oceanic transform earthquakes, including the 1994 Romanche earthquake. The presence of such detectable precursors would have obvious implications for earthquake prediction. Here we model broadband seismograms of body waves to obtain well-resolved depths and rupture mechanisms for 14 earthquakes on the Romanche and Chain transform faults in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean. We found that earthquakes on the longer Romanche transform are systematically deeper than those on the neighbouring Chain transform. These depths indicate that the maximum depth of brittle failure is at a temperature of approximately 600 degrees C in oceanic lithosphere. We find that the body waves from the Romanche 1994 earthquake can be well modelled with relatively deep slip on a single fault, and we use the mechanism and depth of this earthquake to recalculate its source spectrum. The previously reported slow precursor can be explained as an artefact of uncertainties in the assumed model parameters.

  10. Periodic slow slip triggers megathrust zone earthquakes in northeastern Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoki; Iinuma, Takeshi; Nadeau, Robert M; Bürgmann, Roland; Hino, Ryota

    2016-01-29

    Both aseismic and seismic slip accommodate relative motion across partially coupled plate-boundary faults. In northeastern Japan, aseismic slip occurs in the form of decelerating afterslip after large interplate earthquakes and as relatively steady slip on uncoupled areas of the subduction thrust. Here we report on a previously unrecognized quasi-periodic slow-slip behavior that is widespread in the megathrust zone. The repeat intervals of the slow slip range from 1 to 6 years and often coincide with or precede clusters of large [magnitude (M) ≥ 5] earthquakes, including the 2011 M 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake. These results suggest that inherently periodic slow-slip events result in periodic stress perturbations and modulate the occurrence time of larger earthquakes. The periodicity in the slow-slip rate has the potential to help refine time-dependent earthquake forecasts.

  11. Pore sizes and filtration rates from two alumina slips

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.A. . Materials Science Dept.); Kerch, H.; Krueger, S.; Long, G.G. . Ceramics Div.); Keller, J.; Haber, R.A. . Dept. of Ceramics)

    1994-07-01

    The relationship between filtration rate and the resultant green body microstructure was examined for aqueous alumina slips cast at two different deflocculation states. The volume loading of both slips was 40%. Slip viscosities of 500 and 60 mPa[center dot]s were produced by different tetrasodium pyrophosphate additions. The filtration rate of these slips varied by a factor of 2; however, mercury porosimetry results showed the same average pore size for both samples. Single and multiple small-angle neutron scattering results showed the specimen cast with the higher-viscosity slip to possess a bimodal pore size distribution. The body cast with the low-viscosity slip showed unimodal porosity and, consequently, the filtration is attributed to the toroidal region between the packed particles. These results showed that mercury porosimetry does not provide a pore size that predicts filtration behavior of slips with different degrees of dispersion.

  12. Periodic slow slip triggers megathrust zone earthquakes in northeastern Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoki; Iinuma, Takeshi; Nadeau, Robert M; Bürgmann, Roland; Hino, Ryota

    2016-01-29

    Both aseismic and seismic slip accommodate relative motion across partially coupled plate-boundary faults. In northeastern Japan, aseismic slip occurs in the form of decelerating afterslip after large interplate earthquakes and as relatively steady slip on uncoupled areas of the subduction thrust. Here we report on a previously unrecognized quasi-periodic slow-slip behavior that is widespread in the megathrust zone. The repeat intervals of the slow slip range from 1 to 6 years and often coincide with or precede clusters of large [magnitude (M) ≥ 5] earthquakes, including the 2011 M 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake. These results suggest that inherently periodic slow-slip events result in periodic stress perturbations and modulate the occurrence time of larger earthquakes. The periodicity in the slow-slip rate has the potential to help refine time-dependent earthquake forecasts. PMID:26823425

  13. Physiologically motivated multiplex Kuramoto model describes phase diagram of cortical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadilek, Maximilian; Thurner, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    We derive a two-layer multiplex Kuramoto model from Wilson-Cowan type physiological equations that describe neural activity on a network of interconnected cortical regions. This is mathematically possible due to the existence of a unique, stable limit cycle, weak coupling, and inhibitory synaptic time delays. We study the phase diagram of this model numerically as a function of the inter-regional connection strength that is related to cerebral blood flow, and a phase shift parameter that is associated with synaptic GABA concentrations. We find three macroscopic phases of cortical activity: background activity (unsynchronized oscillations), epileptiform activity (highly synchronized oscillations) and resting-state activity (synchronized clusters/chaotic behaviour). Previous network models could hitherto not explain the existence of all three phases. We further observe a shift of the average oscillation frequency towards lower values together with the appearance of coherent slow oscillations at the transition from resting-state to epileptiform activity. This observation is fully in line with experimental data and could explain the influence of GABAergic drugs both on gamma oscillations and epileptic states. Compared to previous models for gamma oscillations and resting-state activity, the multiplex Kuramoto model not only provides a unifying framework, but also has a direct connection to measurable physiological parameters.

  14. River Captures and Erosional Disequilibrium Along Strike-slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, G. Y.; Fayon, A. K.; Perg, L. A.; Paola, C.; Teyssier, C.; Whitney, D. L.; Mota, M.; Moran-Ical, S.

    2005-12-01

    very subdued topography are preserved on the highlands. The capture has been interpreted as the diversion of the former headwaters of a westward flowing river located south of the fault (Rio Selegua) into a northward flowing river located north of the fault (Rio Chixoy), based on drainage pattern and preserved conglomerates. The capture event, the dissection of the landscape, and the uplift of the summit paleosurface are closely related, and likely Miocene in age. Newly discovered conglomerates confirm that the captured basin was drained by the Selegua River before being drained into the Chixoy River. Other newly discovered paleovalleys and conglomerates further document the expansion of the dissected captured watershed at the expense of surrounding catchments. Since the capture event, both the captured stream paleovalley and the subdued topography have been displaced by large normal faults, many of them striking parallel to the Polochic strike-slip fault. Recent faulted sediments on the Polochic Fault trace also display a significant vertical component of slip. The inception of this tectonic activity after the abandonment of the paleovalleys suggests that the faults may have accommodated the isostatic uplift that followed unloading of the captured drainage basin by erosion.

  15. Seismic Slip on an Oblique Detachment Fault at Low Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.; Steely, A. N.; Evans, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    fault when the detachment was active, when it produced voluminous pseudotachylyte during eartquakes, and when the supradetachment basin above it received a large volume of sediment eroded from the pseudotachylyte-bearing parts of the damage zone. To interpret the pseudotachylyte as the product of slip across a detachment when it was dipping at least 45 degrees requires a sequence of events that is so unlikely that we reject it. There must have been seismic slip at low dip angles across the West Salton detachment fault. Our conclusion agrees with prior studies by John and Axen in the Chemehuevi and Whipple metamorphic core complex and increases the published catalogue of detachment faults that sport pseudotachylytes. These data document that low-angle normal faults are seismogenic, and that conditions that allow pseudotachylytes to form may occur at shallow levels in the crust.

  16. Modeling of rock friction 2. Simulation of preseismic slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The constitutive relations developed in the companion paper are used to model detailed observations of preseismic slip and the onset of unstable slip in biaxial laboratory experiments. The simulations employ a deterministic plane strain finite element model to represent the interactions both within the sliding blocks and between the blocks and the loading apparatus. Both experiments and simulations show that preseismic slip is controlled by initial inhomogeneity of shear stress along the sliding surface relative to the frictional strength. As a consequence of the inhomogeneity, stable slip begins at a point on the surface and the area of slip slowly expands as the external loading increases. A previously proposed correlation between accelerating rates of stable slip and growth of the area of slip is supported by the simulations. In the simulations and in the experiments, unstable slip occurs shortly after a propagating slip event traverses the sliding surface and breaks out at the ends of the sample. In the model the breakout of stable slip causes a sudden acceleration of slip rates. Because of velocity dependency of the constitutive relationship for friction, the rapid acceleration of slip causes a decrease in frictional strength. Instability occurs when the frictional strength decreases with displacement at a rate that exceeds the intrinsic unloading characteristics of the sample and test machine. A simple slider-spring model that does not consider preseismic slip appears to approximate the transition adequately from stable sliding to unstable slip as a function of normal stress, machine stiffness, and surface roughness for small samples. However, for large samples and for natural faults the simulations suggest that the simple model may be inaccurate because it does not take into account potentially large preseismic displacements that will alter the friction parameters prior to instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Slip of polydisperse polymers: Molecular weight distribution above and below the plane of slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzevari, Seyed Mostafa; Strandman, Satu; Wood-Adams, Paula Marie

    2015-04-01

    When strong slip occurs during the drag flow of highly entangled polybutadienes (PBD) in a sliding plate rheometer equipped with stainless steel parallel plates, a thin film of polymer debris remains on the substrate after the slip. This debris is assumed to be formed by the disentanglement process that occurs in strong slip at a distance of about one molecular size from the plate. In order to evaluate the composition of the debris we collected it with tetrahydrofuran and subjected it to gel permeation chromatography. It was found that the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the debris is significantly different from that of the bulk. Moreover, in mixtures prepared from long and short PBDs with distinctly different molecular weight distributions, the MWD of the debris was found to be richer in low molecular weight components and leaner in the high molecular weight components compared to the bulk. This information is important since it reveals the compositional difference between the bulk and interfacial layer above and below the plane of slip. The difference in MWD is likely a consequence of the strong slip in which some of long chains are pulled away from the surface-adsorbed chains by the flow leaving a debris lean in the high molecular weight component.

  18. Detailed history of slip along the Sunda mega-thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Nuno; Lindsay, Anthony; Murphy, Shane; McCloskey, John; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic; Nalbant, Suleyman

    2013-04-01

    We undertook a reconstruction of more than 200 years of deformation on the Sunda mega-thrust using the history of vertical displacement recorded in the stratigraphy of coral micro-atolls. This reconstruction gave an unprecedented opportunity to understand the distributions of slip on the recent series of great earthquakes and its relationship with coupling. We have seen with the recent earthquakes that, whilst the slip-coupling relationship may be complex and certainly depends on the pre-stress, the greatest slip generally occurs in areas of high coupling. We have also seen that the spatial distributions of the greatest slip reveals tessellation between earthquakes. Using Monte Carlo techniques, we compare ground deformation produced by different fractal slip distributions with micro-atoll coral data to estimate slip distributions for the 1797 and 1833 historical earthquakes. The resulting slip estimations have a more realistic spatial distribution and provide a better fit to the micro-atoll data than previously published solutions. Preliminary results seem to imply that the 1797 and 1833 ruptures reveal a level of complementarity, where the greatest values of slip tessellate with the greatest slip values observed in the two great earthquakes of 2007 and the earthquake of 2010. In addition, the spatial stacking of all slips from all available earthquake slip distributions reveals a strong correlation with the spatial distribution of the coupling. Discrepancies in the spatial slip-coupling correlation, although strongly influenced by the uncertainties of the slip distributions, and with the 1797 and 1833 earthquakes playing a stronger role, can still be used as a way to pin-point possible areas of slip deficit when compared with the spatial distribution of coupling. This seems to imply that correspondence between the slip probability in 1797 and 1833 and present-day earthquakes slip and coupling appears to show the same basic relationship indicating that the broad

  19. Slow Slip Events on a 760 mm Long Granite Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, G.; Yamashita, F.

    2015-12-01

    We describe slow slip events and dynamic rupture events generated on a newly constructed large-scale biaxial friction apparatus at Cornell University that provide insights into the mechanisms of aseismic and seismic slip. We find that, under nominally similar experimental conditions, the 760 mm long granite sample sometimes slips in dynamic stick-slip events and sometimes relieves accumulated shear stress through slow slip events. To provide insights into this curious behavior and the underlying mechanisms, fault slip and shear stress are each measured at 8 locations along the 760 mm long fault. This allows us to map slow slip fronts and the nucleation and propagation of dynamic fault rupture. The granite sample is also instrumented with an array of piezoelectric sensors that are the laboratory equivalent of a seismic network. When the sample is loaded relatively slowly, at 0.03 MPa/s, slow slip occurs on large sections of the fault and the slow slipping region soon expands to the sample boundary. In this case, stress is released in a slow slip event with peak slip velocities < 2 mm/s. Alternatively, when one end of the sample is loaded rapidly (4 MPa/s), or the sample is allowed to heal in stationary contact for a few minutes, slow slip initiates near the load point and accelerates to slip velocities exceeding 200 mm/s before the slow slipping region expands all the way to the sample boundary. This produces a dynamic slip event (stick-slip). The dynamic slip events radiate seismic waves equivalent to a M = -2.5 earthquake. In contrast, the laboratory-generated slow slip events are predominantly aseismic and produce only bursts of tiny and discrete seismic events (M = -6) reminiscent of swarms of microseismicity. The experiments illustrate how a single fault can slide slowly and aseismically or rapidly and dynamically depending on stress state and loading conditions. We compare the behavior observed on this Cornell apparatus to the behavior of other large

  20. Soft-bed experiments beneath Engabreen, Norway: Regelation, infiltration, basal slip and bed deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Cohen, D.; Moore, P.L.; Jackson, M.; Lappegard, G.; Kohler, J.

    2007-01-01

    To avoid some of the limitations of studying soft-bed processes through boreholes, a prism of simulated till (1.8 m ?? 1.6 m ?? 0.45 m) with extensive instrumentation was constructed in a trough blasted in the rock bed of Engabreen, a temperate glacier in Norway. Tunnels there provide access to the bed beneath 213 m of ice. Pore-water pressure was regulated in the prism by pumping water to it. During experiments lasting 7-12 days, the glacier regelated downward into the prism to depths of 50-80 mm, accreting ice-infiltrated till at rates predicted by theory. During periods of sustained high pore-water pressure (70-100% of overburden), ice commonly slipped over the prism, due to a water layer at the prism surface. Deformation of the prism was activated when this layer thinned to a sub-millimeter thickness. Shear strain in the till was pervasive and decreased with depth. A model of slip by ploughing of ice-infiltrated till across the prism surface accounts for the slip that occurred when effective pressure was sufficiently low or high. Slip at low effective pressures resulted from water-layer thickening that increased non-linearly with decreasing effective pressure. If sufficiently widespread, such slip over soft glacier beds, which involves no viscous deformation resistance, may instigate abrupt increases in glacier velocity.

  1. Radar Determination of Fault Slip and Location in Partially Decorrelated Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Stough, Timothy; Pierce, Marlon; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Faced with the challenge of thousands of frames of radar interferometric images, automated feature extraction promises to spur data understanding and highlight geophysically active land regions for further study. We have developed techniques for automatically determining surface fault slip and location using deformation images from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), which is similar to satellite-based SAR but has more mission flexibility and higher resolution (pixels are approximately 7 m). This radar interferometry provides a highly sensitive method, clearly indicating faults slipping at levels of 10 mm or less. But interferometric images are subject to decorrelation between revisit times, creating spots of bad data in the image. Our method begins with freely available data products from the UAVSAR mission, chiefly unwrapped interferograms, coherence images, and flight metadata. The computer vision techniques we use assume no data gaps or holes; so a preliminary step detects and removes spots of bad data and fills these holes by interpolation and blurring. Detected and partially validated surface fractures from earthquake main shocks, aftershocks, and aseismic-induced slip are shown for faults in California, including El Mayor-Cucapah (M7.2, 2010), the Ocotillo aftershock (M5.7, 2010), and South Napa (M6.0, 2014). Aseismic slip is detected on the San Andreas Fault from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, in regions of highly patterned partial decorrelation. Validation is performed by comparing slip estimates from two interferograms with published ground truth measurements.

  2. Simultaneous teleseismic and geodetic observations of the stick-slip motion of an Antarctic ice stream.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Douglas A; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Winberry, J Paul; King, Matt A

    2008-06-01

    Long-period seismic sources associated with glacier motion have been recently discovered, and an increase in ice flow over the past decade has been suggested on the basis of secular changes in such measurements. Their significance, however, remains uncertain, as a relationship to ice flow has not been confirmed by direct observation. Here we combine long-period surface-wave observations with simultaneous Global Positioning System measurements of ice displacement to study the tidally modulated stick-slip motion of the Whillans Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The seismic origin time corresponds to slip nucleation at a region of the bed of the Whillans Ice Stream that is likely stronger than in surrounding regions and, thus, acts like an 'asperity' in traditional fault models. In addition to the initial pulse, two seismic arrivals occurring 10-23 minutes later represent stopping phases as the slip terminates at the ice stream edge and the grounding line. Seismic amplitude and average rupture velocity are correlated with tidal amplitude for the different slip events during the spring-to-neap tidal cycle. Although the total seismic moment calculated from ice rigidity, slip displacement, and rupture area is equivalent to an earthquake of moment magnitude seven (M(w) 7), seismic amplitudes are modest (M(s) 3.6-4.2), owing to the source duration of 20-30 minutes. Seismic radiation from ice movement is proportional to the derivative of the moment rate function at periods of 25-100 seconds and very long-period radiation is not detected, owing to the source geometry. Long-period seismic waves are thus useful for detecting and studying sudden ice movements but are insensitive to the total amount of slip.

  3. Effects of Fluid Flow on Slip Evolution in a Thermoporoelastic Medium: Implications for Seismic Moment Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Yamashita, T.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a framework associated with the interaction among heat, fluid pressure and inelastic pore creation, and found three nondimensional parameters, Su, Su' and Ta, which are related to the dilatancy effect, fluid flow effect and the upper limit of the dilatancy, respectively. Without fluid flow, they were found to generate two qualitatively different slip behaviors, acceleration case and spontaneous slip cessation case. In particular, the acceleration case shows the initial deceleration and later acceleration approaching the final high-speed slip. Between the deceleration and acceleration phases, we observe a transient state featured by low and approximately constant slip velocity. We employ the fluid flow effect here and give some implications for understanding the temporal evolution of seismic moments. For example, Ide et al. (2007) found that ordinary earthquakes and slow earthquakes have different forms of temporal evolutions of the seismic moments. In addition, Duputel et al. (2013) observed examples showing exceptional moment evolution behavior even among ordinary earthquakes. Yamashita and Suzuki (2011) successfully modeled the former result by introducing slip-induced dilatancy coupled with fluid flow, while the modeling of the latter remains unaccomplished. If we introduce the fluid flow, we observe only the acceleration case and the duration of the transient state is longer than that without the fluid flow. This can be a model for a slow earthquake if we assume a 2-D model, and the seismic moment of such an earthquake evolves in almost a quadratic function in time. On the other hand, for the acceleration case without the fluid flow, the seismic moment evolution is almost a cubic function. Moreover, for the spontaneous slip cessation case, it evolves with a quadratic or linear function. The framework explaining all the behaviors mentioned above has been obtained. Quantitative investigation on the nondimensional parameters will also be done.

  4. Reassessment of the 2001-2002 Aseismic Slow Slip Event in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostoglodov, V.; Franco, S. I.; Singh, S. K.; Larson, K. M.; Lowry, A. R.; Santiago, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    In 2001-2002 a network of continuous GPS stations in Mexico recorded an unexpectedly large aseismic slow event (equivalent Mw ~7.4) in Guerrero and in western Oaxaca. This event lasted more than six months and the area involved in the aseismic motion was initially estimated as ~500x250 km2. The event produced a slow thrust slip of ~13-15 cm on the subduction plate interface below the central part of the State of Guerrero. Elastic dislocation models, which fit the observed data, restrict the width of the slip to 150-200 km along the plate interface. This interface was partially locked before, during the steady state interseismic phase associated with the continental plate compression. Unfortunately the GPS network coverage was not sufficient to resolve an important question: Was the seismogenic part of the plate interface involved in the slow thrust slip? A long term record from a permanent GPS station located on the Popocatepetl volcano, POSW, shows unambiguous displacements corresponding to the aseismic slip events of 1997-1998 and 2001-2002. Recent data analysis of 2001, 2002, and 2003 GPS occupation campaigns on 16 sites in Oaxaca reveals that the 2001-2002 slow aseismic slip may have extended SE along almost the entire Pacific coast of Oaxaca. These observations indicate that the total area affected by the last slow aseismic slip event is greater than ~300x700 km2. Most likely the same area was involved in a previous aseismic event of 1972, which is discovered from the analysis of tide gauge data. Frequently occurring aseismic transients should have an important bearing on the recurrence period of large subduction thrust earthquakes in Mexico.

  5. Preferred locomotor phase of activity of lumbar interneurons during air-stepping in subchronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    AuYong, Nicholas; Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Lemay, Michel A

    2011-03-01

    Spinal locomotor circuits are intrinsically capable of driving a variety of behaviors such as stepping, scratching, and swimming. Based on an observed rostrocaudal wave of activity in the motoneuronal firing during locomotor tasks, the traveling-wave hypothesis proposes that spinal interneuronal firing follows a similar rostrocaudal pattern of activation, suggesting the presence of spatially organized interneuronal modules within the spinal motor system. In this study, we examined if the spatial organization of the lumbar interneuronal activity patterns during locomotor activity in the adult mammalian spinal cord was consistent with a traveling-wave organizational scheme. The activity of spinal interneurons within the lumbar intermediate zone was examined during air-stepping in subchronic spinal cats. The preferred phase of interneuronal activity during a step cycle was determined using circular statistics. We found that the preferred phases of lumbar interneurons from both sides of the cord were evenly distributed over the entire step cycle with no indication of functional groupings. However, when units were subcategorized according to spinal hemicords, the preferred phases of units on each side largely fell around the period of extensor muscle activity on each side. In addition, there was no correlation between the preferred phases of units and their rostrocaudal locations along the spinal cord with preferred phases corresponding to both flexion and extension phases of the step cycle found at every rostrocaudal level of the cord. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that interneurons operate as part of a longitudinally distributed network rather than a rostrocaudally organized traveling-wave network.

  6. Principal Slip Zones in Carbonate: Microstructural Characterization and Implications for the Seismic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven; Billi, Andrea; di Toro, Giulio

    2010-05-01

    Main shocks in central Italy, such as the L'Aquila Mw 6.3 earthquake on 6 April 2009, and associated foreshock and aftershock sequences, often nucleate within, and rupture through, carbonate-bearing rocks within the upper-crust. One way to understand the mechanical behaviour of such rocks during the passage of earthquake ruptures is to study the Principal Slip Zones (PSZs) of exhumed faults. The PSZs are thought to accommodate a majority of displacement during individual earthquake slip events, and potentially contain a rich variety of information about earthquake-related processes and, more generally, deformation mechanisms throughout the seismic cycle. At present, however, there are no reliable microstructural or geochemical indicators of seismic slip in carbonate rocks. We present detailed field and microstructural observations of the PSZs of large-displacement, seismically active normal fault zones in the central Apennines of Italy. The fault zones are exhumed from <3km depth and cut 3-5km thick sequences of platform limestone. Samples were collected from individual PSZs containing polished slip surfaces with both small (centimetres to metres) and large (metres to hundreds of metres) displacements, including the main PSZ that defines the active Quaternary fault scarp. Small displacement slipping zones are characterized by typical cataclastic fabrics, including angular grains cross-cut by brittle fractures, and a gradual decrease in grain-size towards the polished slip surface. In contrast, large-displacement slipping zones always contain a continuous, texturally-distinct layer up to 2-3mm in thickness that lies immediately beneath the polished slip surface. This layer is itself internally zoned; up to 6 distinct zones can be present, each between 200-300µm in thickness, and recognized on the basis of grain-size, colour, and textural variations. In some cases, the zones developed at the expense of one another. 100-200µm-thick, syn-tectonic calcite veins

  7. Active phase and polarization locking of a 1.4 kW fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Goodno, Gregory D; McNaught, Stuart J; Rothenberg, Joshua E; McComb, Timothy S; Thielen, Peter A; Wickham, Michael G; Weber, Mark E

    2010-05-15

    A three-stage Yb-fiber amplifier emitted 1.43 kW of single-mode power when seeded with a 25 GHz linewidth master oscillator (MO). The amplified output was polarization stabilized and phase locked using active heterodyne phase control. A low-power sample of the output beam was coherently combined to a second fiber amplifier with 90% visibility. The measured combining efficiency agreed with estimated decoherence effects from fiber nonlinearity, linewidth, and phase-locking accuracy. This is the highest-power fiber laser that has been coherently locked using any method that allows brightness scaling.

  8. Oscillatory activity and phase-amplitude coupling in the human medial frontal cortex during decision making.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Juergen

    2009-02-01

    Electroencephalogram oscillations recorded both within and over the medial frontal cortex have been linked to a range of cognitive functions, including positive and negative feedback processing. Medial frontal oscillatory characteristics during decision making remain largely unknown. Here, we examined oscillatory activity of the human medial frontal cortex recorded while subjects played a competitive decision-making game. Distinct patterns of power and cross-trial phase coherence in multiple frequency bands were observed during different decision-related processes (e.g., feedback anticipation vs. feedback processing). Decision and feedback processing were accompanied by a broadband increase in cross-trial phase coherence at around 220 msec, and dynamic fluctuations in power. Feedback anticipation was accompanied by a shift in the power spectrum from relatively lower (delta and theta) to higher (alpha and beta) power. Power and cross-trial phase coherence were greater following losses compared to wins in theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands, but were greater following wins compared to losses in the delta band. Finally, we found that oscillation power in alpha and beta frequency bands were synchronized with the phase of delta and theta oscillations ("phase-amplitude coupling"). This synchronization differed between losses and wins, suggesting that phase-amplitude coupling might reflect a mechanism of feedback valence coding in the medial frontal cortex. Our findings link medial frontal oscillations to decision making, with relations among activity in different frequency bands suggesting a phase-utilizing coding of feedback valence information.

  9. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N.; Guo, Q. L.

    2014-05-01

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  10. Ion slip effect on a steady flow through a circular pipe of a dusty conducting Oldroyd 8-constant fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.; Abdeen, M. A. M.; Elbarawy, M. T. M. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a dusty incompressible electrically conducting Oldroyd 8-constant fluid through a circular pipe is examined with considering the ion slip effect. A constant pressure gradient in the axial direction and an external uniform magnetic field in the perpendicular direction are applied. A numerical solution is obtained for the governing nonlinear momentum equations by using finite differences. The effect of the ion slip, the non-Newtonian fluid characteristics, and the particle-phase viscosity on the velocity, volumetric flow rates, and skin friction coefficients of both the fluid and particle phases is reported.

  11. Sporicidal Activity of the KMT reagent in its vapor phase against Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores.

    PubMed

    Kida, Nori; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Taguchi, Fumiaki

    2007-01-01

    In an investigation of the sporicidal activity of the KMT reagent, a vapor phase study was performed using five kinds of carriers contaminated with Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. When 25 ml of the KMT reagent was vaporized in a chamber (capacity; approximately 95 liters), the 2-step heating method (vaporization by a combination of low temperature and high temperature) showed the most effective sporicidal activity in comparison with the 1-step heating method (rapid vaporization). The 2-step heating method appeared to be related to the sporicidal activity of vaporized KMT reagent, i.e., ethanol and iodine, which vaporized mainly when heated at a low temperature such as 55 C, and acidic water, which vaporized mainly when heated at a high temperature such as 300 C. We proposed that the KMT reagent can be used as a new disinfectant not only in the liquid phase but also in the vapor phase in the same way as peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. PMID:17237604

  12. Menstrual cycle phase does not affect sympathetic neural activity in women with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stickford, Abigail SL; VanGundy, Tiffany B; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) are primarily premenopausal women, which may be attributed to female sex hormones. We tested the hypothesis that hormonal fluctuations of the menstrual cycle alter sympathetic neural activity and orthostatic tolerance in POTS women. Ten POTS women were studied during the early follicular (EF) and mid-luteal (ML) phases of the menstrual cycle. Haemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured when supine, during 60 deg upright tilt for 45 min or until presyncope, and during the cold pressor test (CPT) and Valsalva manoeuvres. Blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were higher during rest and tilting in the ML than EF phase; however, heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output were similar between phases. There were no mean ± SD differences in MSNA burst frequency (8 ± 8 EF phase vs. 10 ± 10 bursts min–1 ML phase at rest; 34 ± 15 EF phase vs. 36 ± 16 bursts min–1 ML phase at 5 min tilt), burst incidence or total activity, nor any differences in the cardiovagal and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities between phases under any condition. The incidence of presyncope was also the same between phases. There were no differences in haemodynamic or sympathetic responses to CPT or Valsalva. These results suggest that the menstrual cycle does not affect sympathetic neural activity but modulates blood pressure and vasoconstriction in POTS women during tilting. Thus, factors other than sympathetic neural activity are probably responsible for the symptoms of orthostatic intolerance across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS. Key points Women with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) report fluctuations in orthostatic tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle. The mechanism(s) underlying blood pressure control across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS are unknown. The findings of the present study indicate that the menstrual

  13. Temporal slip rate variability in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Ryan; Kuebler, Simon; Friedrich, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Low strain regions may be characterized by long periods of seismic quiescence, punctuated by periods of clustered earthquake activity. This type of non-periodic recurrence behavior challenges accurate seismic hazard analysis. The Lower Rhine Embayment in the German-Belgium-Netherland border region presents a unique opportunity to characterize the long-term record of faulting to evaluate the periodicity of earthquake occurrence in a low strain region. The Lower Rhine Embayment is covered by a high-resolution record of Quaternary terraces associated with the Rhine and Maas (Meuse) Rivers and their tributaries. These terraces are cut by numerous NW-trending faults and record cumulative displacements that exceed 100 m in numerous locations. In this study, we exploit this rich record of faulted fluvial terraces and find convincing evidence for temporally varying rates of Quaternary fault movement across the Lower Rhine Embayment. First, we document a significant increase in vertical fault slip rates since 700 ka, compared to the average slip rate since the start of the Quaternary using the top and base of the Main Terrace, respectively. Increases in slip rate exceed 500% along many of the faults, including the Swist/Erft, Stockheim, Viersen, Sandgewand, and Kirspenich fault systems. This increase in fault slip rate corresponds to a regional period of increased tectonic uplift of the Rhenish Massif, increased volcanism in Eifel, and incision of the Rhine River. In a second and related analysis, we synthesize terrace offset and age information from the Feldbiss fault system along the western boundary of the Lower Rhine Embayment, which transects a flight of Quaternary terraces associated with the Mass river. This analysis reveals evidence for secular variation in slip rate. In particular, we identify two periods of higher slip rate (800-400 ka and 130-100 ka), where fault slip rate exceeds the longer-term average slip rate of 0.04-0.05 mm/yr by as much as a factor of two

  14. Long-term slip deficit and the forecasting of slip in future earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, John; NicBhloscaidh, Mairead; Simao, Nuno

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade a series of devastating earthquakes have between them killed more than three-quarters of a million people. None of the events were formally forecast and have been repeatedly referred to a seismological 'surprises'. Here we argue that while earthquakes within the wide swath of diffuse deformation comprising the Alpine-Himalayan belt pose a set of particularly difficult set of challenges, earthquakes which are driven by high strain-rates at plate boundaries and which have relatively short nominal recurrence times might be forecast if the data exists to perform long-term slip deficit modelling and stress reconstruction. We show that two instrumentally recorded event on the Sumatran margin in 2007 and 2010 occurred in regions of high slip deficit identified by reconstruction of slip in historical earthquakes in 1797 and 1833 under the Mentawai Islands using more than 200 years of geodetic data recorded in the stratigraphy of coral micro-atolls growing there. In the presentation we will describe the data and a new Bayesian-Monte Carlo slip reconstruction technique. The technique is based on the stochastic forward modelling of many slip distributions each using the same set of elastic Green's functions to estimate, by superposition of contributions from each fault cell, the vertical displacement at the coral locations resulting from each simulated event. Every solution, weighted by its goodness of fit to the data, is added to a stack whose final values contain an estimate of the most likely distribution of slip in the historical earthquakes. Further, we estimate the Kullback-Liebler divergence over the fault area providing a non-arbitrary assessment of the spatial distribution of information gain, identifying regions of low- and high- model confidence. We then model the long-term slip deficit on the megathrust assuming a zero of stress immediately after the 1652 Mentawai Islands earthquake. We use the resulting slip deficit field to compute the entire

  15. Earthquake scaling laws for rupture geometry and slip heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Mai, P. Martin; Goda, Katsuichiro

    2016-04-01

    We analyze an extensive compilation of finite-fault rupture models to investigate earthquake scaling of source geometry and slip heterogeneity to derive new relationships for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. Our dataset comprises 158 earthquakes with a total of 316 rupture models selected from the SRCMOD database (http://equake-rc.info/srcmod). We find that fault-length does not saturate with earthquake magnitude, while fault-width reveals inhibited growth due to the finite seismogenic thickness. For strike-slip earthquakes, fault-length grows more rapidly with increasing magnitude compared to events of other faulting types. Interestingly, our derived relationship falls between the L-model and W-model end-members. In contrast, both reverse and normal dip-slip events are more consistent with self-similar scaling of fault-length. However, fault-width scaling relationships for large strike-slip and normal dip-slip events, occurring on steeply dipping faults (δ~90° for strike-slip faults, and δ~60° for normal faults), deviate from self-similarity. Although reverse dip-slip events in general show self-similar scaling, the restricted growth of down-dip fault extent (with upper limit of ~200 km) can be seen for mega-thrust subduction events (M~9.0). Despite this fact, for a given earthquake magnitude, subduction reverse dip-slip events occupy relatively larger rupture area, compared to shallow crustal events. In addition, we characterize slip heterogeneity in terms of its probability distribution and spatial correlation structure to develop a complete stochastic random-field characterization of earthquake slip. We find that truncated exponential law best describes the probability distribution of slip, with observable scale parameters determined by the average and maximum slip. Applying Box-Cox transformation to slip distributions (to create quasi-normal distributed data) supports cube-root transformation, which also implies distinctive non-Gaussian slip

  16. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A O; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I

    2015-03-05

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials.

  17. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  18. Seismic slip recorded in tourmaline fault mirrors from Elba Island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, C.; Brogi, A.; Liotta, D.; Mugnaioli, E.; Spiess, R.; Dini, A.; Zucchi, M.; Vannuccini, G.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the first example of fault mirrors developed in an unusual protolith, consisting of tourmaline crystals with interstitial goethite. The deformation mechanisms active in the fault zone have been investigated from the outcrop to the nanoscale, aiming to identify possible traces of frictional heating at seismic slip rate, as observed for other fault mirrors in different protoliths. The investigation revealed the superposition of two main deformational stages. The first was dominated by brittle processes and produced a cataclastic/ultracataclastic principal slip zone, a few mm thick; the second was associated with seismic slip and produced a sharp discontinuity (the principal slip surface) within the cataclastic/ultracataclastic zone. The mirror-like coating, a few microns thick, occurs on the principal slip surface, and is characterized by 1) absence of interstitial goethite; 2) occurrence of truncated tourmaline crystals; 3) highly variable grain size, from 200 μm to 200 nm; 4) tourmaline close packing with interlobate grain boundaries, and 5) tourmaline random crystallographic orientation. Micro and nanostructural investigations indicate the occurrence of thermally-activated processes, involving both interstitial goethite and tourmaline. In particular, close to the principal slip surface, goethite is completely decomposed, and produced an amorphous porous material, with local topotactic recrystallization of hematite. Tourmaline clasts are typically characterized by strongly lobate boundaries, indicative of reaction and partial decomposition at grain boundaries. TEM observations revealed the occurrence of tourmaline nanograins, a few tens of nm in size, characterized by rounded shape and fading amorphous boundaries, that cannot be obtained by brittle processes. Lastly, the peculiar interlobate microstructure of the mirror surface is interpreted as the result of grain boundary recrystallization processes taking place by deformation at high

  19. Shallow Slip Localization Along Megathrusts: Investigating the Role of Scaly Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, P.

    2015-12-01

    Scaly fabric is classically interpreted as a low strain-rate structure, resulting from progressive shearing with episodic formation and destruction of oriented and flattened clay layers and aggregates. Scientific Ocean drilling of the Japan Trench in response to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki EQ sampled the active plate-boundary décollement zone in a place of known, large, and very recent displacement. The visual inspection of core material from the plate boundary décollement reveals a clay layer with scaly fabric, cut by a sharp discontinuity that may be the record of co-seismic slip (Chester et al., 2013). This result brought to the need to re-evaluate the role and the characteristics of scaly fabric. Scaly fabric is the typical meso/microstructure marking the location of slip concentration in all the active décollements cored near the trench (i.e. Barbados, Nankai, Costa Rica, Japan Trench) and in analogue fossil examples cropping out onland. Scaly fabric tends to form self-similar patterns, and usually areas with smaller phacoids are interpreted as more deformed. We know that scaliness develops in the early stages of deformation, that the slip surfaces defining the phacoids are sharp and they do not occur randomly, that they grow and coalesce forming a progressively finer anastomosing network, and that eventually the anastomoising slip surfaces are "enhanced" or "cut" by straight slip surfaces. Advances in identifying detailed evolutionary history of slip localization from scaly fabric to discrete surfaces have been paralleled by laboratory experiments. Here we try to summarize direct and indirect information on physical properties of clay layers deformed at shallow depth and, possibly, their links to the seismic cycle. These challenges include future work on the role of scaly fabric on earthquake deformation along faults.

  20. Seismic slip recorded in tourmaline fault mirrors from Elba Island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, C.; Brogi, A.; Liotta, D.; Mugnaioli, E.; Spiess, R.; Dini, A.; Zucchi, M.; Vannuccini, G.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the first example of fault mirrors developed in an unusual protolith, consisting of tourmaline crystals with interstitial goethite. The deformation mechanisms active in the fault zone have been investigated from the outcrop to the nanoscale, aiming to identify possible traces of frictional heating at seismic slip rate, as observed for other fault mirrors in different protoliths. The investigation revealed the superposition of two main deformational stages. The first was dominated by brittle processes and produced a cataclastic/ultracataclastic principal slip zone, a few mm thick; the second was associated with seismic slip and produced a sharp discontinuity (the principal slip surface) within the cataclastic/ultracataclastic zone. The mirror-like coating, a few microns thick, occurs on the principal slip surface, and is characterized by 1) absence of interstitial goethite; 2) occurrence of truncated tourmaline crystals; 3) highly variable grain size, from 200 μm to 200 nm; 4) tourmaline close packing with interlobate grain boundaries, and 5) tourmaline random crystallographic orientation. Micro and nanostructural investigations indicate the occurrence of thermally-activated processes, involving both interstitial goethite and tourmaline. In particular, close to the principal slip surface, goethite is completely decomposed, and produced an amorphous porous material, with local topotactic recrystallization of hematite. Tourmaline clasts are typically characterized by strongly lobate boundaries, indicative of reaction and partial decomposition at grain boundaries. TEM observations revealed the occurrence of tourmaline nanograins, a few tens of nm in size, characterized by rounded shape and fading amorphous boundaries, that cannot be obtained by brittle processes. Lastly, the peculiar interlobate microstructure of the mirror surface is interpreted as the result of grain boundary recrystallization processes taking place by deformation at high

  1. The Rolling with Slipping Experiment in the Virtual Physics Laboratory--Context-Based Teaching Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maidana, Nora L.; da Fonseca, Monaliza; Barros, Suelen F.; Vanin, Vito R.

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Laboratory was created as a complementary educational activity, with the aim of working abstract concepts from an experimental point of view. In this work, the motion of a ring rolling and slipping in front of a grid printed panel was recorded. The frames separated from this video received a time code, and the resulting set of images…

  2. Progressive slippage after pinning for slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Smith, William J; Stanley, Earl A; Bueche, Matthew J; Karol, Lori A; Chambers, Henry G

    2002-01-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed seven cases of progressive slipped capital femoral epiphysis after screw fixation. All seven patients initially presented with chronic symptoms, and five had an acute exacerbation of symptoms with the appearance of an acute-on-chronic slip. Of the other two, one had obvious motion at the proximal femoral physis and the other had increased symptoms but did not have an obvious acute slip radiographically. All underwent percutaneous screw fixation. In four patients a single screw was placed, and in three patients two screws were placed. No patient became symptom-free after surgery. Slip progression was noted on average 5 months after treatment. Radiographs in all patients revealed an increase in slip severity and loss of screw purchase in the femoral neck while fixation in the proximal femoral epiphysis remained secure. One patient had hypothyroidism and another Cushing disease, both diagnosed after the slipped epiphysis. Slips occurring in children with underlying endocrinopathies, and unstable slips in children with a history of antecedent knee or hip pain (commonly called an acute-on-chronic slip) may be susceptible to screw fixation failure. In such patients, close radiographic follow-up, particularly in the presence of continued symptoms, is required to document slip progression and fixation failure as soon as possible.

  3. Major and minor slip-events in frictional stick-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekenis, Georgios; Tatar, Demet; Rubinstein, Shmuel; Weitz, David; Aziz, Michael; Spaepen, Frans

    Several universal phenomena characterize friction that are independent of the materials involved such as the logarithmic aging of the static friction coefficient and the logarithmic velocity weakening of the dynamic friction coefficient. We study dry friction between rough surfaces with programmed statistical profiles. By measuring the displacement field at the frictional interface we observe stick-slip behavior which reveals two kinds of slip: major events that tend to grow large and unbounded and minor events that usually stay small and bounded. Research supported by Harvard MRSEC Program under NSF contracts DMR-0820484, DMR-1420570.

  4. Coseismic slip distribution of the 1923 Kanto earthquake, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Nyst, M.; Nishimura, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2005-01-01

    The slip distribution associated with the 1923 M = 7.9 Kanto, Japan, earthquake is reexamined in light of new data and modeling. We utilize a combination of first-order triangulation, second-order triangulation, and leveling data in order to constrain the coseismic deformation. The second-order triangulation data, which have not been utilized in previous studies of 1923 coseismic deformation, are associated with only slightly smaller errors than the first-order triangulation data and expand the available triangulation data set by about a factor of 10. Interpretation of these data in terms of uniform-slip models in a companion study by Nyst et al. shows that a model involving uniform coseismic slip on two distinct rupture planes explains the data very well and matches or exceeds the fit obtained by previous studies, even one which involved distributed slip. Using the geometry of the Nyst et al. two-plane slip model, we perform inversions of the same geodetic data set for distributed slip. Our preferred model of distributed slip on the Philippine Sea plate interface has a moment magnitude of 7.86. We find slip maxima of ???8-9 m beneath Odawara and ???7-8 m beneath the Miura peninsula, with a roughly 2:1 ratio of strike-slip to dip-slip motion, in agreement with a previous study. However, the Miura slip maximum is imaged as a more broadly extended feature in our study, with the high-slip region continuing from the Miura peninsula to the southern Boso peninsula region. The second-order triangulation data provide good evidence for ???3 m right-lateral strike slip on a 35-km-long splay structure occupying the volume between the upper surface of the descending Philippine Sea plate and the southern Boso peninsula. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Experimental Deformation of San Carlos Olivine Single Crystal at Mantle P and T: Evidences for a Slip-System Transition with increasing P.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, P.; Amiguet, E.; Chen, J.; Li, L.; Weidner, D.; Cordier, P.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropies observed in the shallow upper mantle are interpreted from lattice preferred orientations (LPO) produced experimentally in olivine, which depends on the dominant dislocation slip systems. At low pressure P<3 GPa, mantle temperature (T), and in dry conditions, olivine [100] dislocation slip dominates the less active [001] slip. This tends to align crystal fast velocity [100] axis with the principal shear direction. Yet recent deformation experiments carried out at P>3 GPa (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Min., 92, 1436), as well as a theoretical study based on first-principle calculations (Durinck et al., 2005, PCM, 32, 646), show that, in forsterite, [001] slip may be dominant in the (P,T) range of the deep upper mantle. This would promote a shear-parallel slow-velocity [001] axis and may explain the seismic-velocity attenuation with depth observed at depth >200 km (Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). Although such [100]-slip/[001]-slip transition has previously been attributed to the presence of water (e.g., Jung et al., 2006, Tectonophysics, 421, 1), evidences for shear parallel [001] axis are observed in nature at high P>4 GPa in dry subduction context (Xu et al., Tectonophysics, 421, 111). Whether such pressure-induced slip transition is an important process in the deep upper mantle is still debated in the literature (see, Karato, 2007, Tectonophysics, 429, 287, and Ji et al., 2007, Tectonophysics , 429, 291), and this debate has strong implications for our understanding of upper mantle convective flows. In order to determine the P effect on Fe-bearing olivine [100] and [001] slip activities, deformation experiments were carried out on San Carlos olivine oriented crystals at P>3 GPa and 1100° 2O content < 50 ppm). Two orientations were tested in order to activate either [100](010) or [001](010) slip system alone. Specimens with different orientations were loaded in each cell, thus experiencing

  6. Surface Rupture Segmentation and Slip Distribution of the 14 November 2001 Ms 8.1 Earthquake on the Kunlun Fault, Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, G.; Chen, J.; Chen, Y.; Tian, Q.; Wang, Z.; Shan, X.; Ren, J.; Zhao, R.; Wang, Z.

    2004-12-01

    The 14 November 2001 Ms =8.1 earthquake represent the most recent one of a series of large earthquakes along the Kunlun Fault, a highly active left-lateral strike-slip fault that bound the northern Tibet Plateau. Detailed surface rupture mapping, including 291 surficial left-lateral slip measurements and 111 net vertical slip measurements shows that the surface trace was 426 km long, multisegmented and consists of five major segments: the Taiyanghu, Buka Daban, Kusaihu West, Kusaihu East, and Kunlun Pass fault segments with the maximum left-lateral slip magnitudes 3, 5.7, 6, 6.4, and 4.2 m from west to east respectively, averaging 2.7 m. Two primary characteristics of the surface rupture are the en echelon geometry of the principle faults and the predominance of left-lateral strike slip, with local components of normal and reverse displacements caused by local changes in the fault geometry. Transtensional and transpressional structures were observed within releasing and restraining step-over areas respectively. The vertical slip components on all faults are less than 1 m (with as much as of 5.1 m vertical slip), quite variable and show little systematic behavior. Sinistral surficial slip was quite variable along the main trace of the rupture, however there is fairly regular long-wavelength (tens to hundreds of kilometers) behavior to the east of the Buka Daban Feng. Slips as large as 5~6 meters were observed at 5~6 sites that distributed at different surface rupture segments with the asymmetric shape of the slip profiles, which may be reflective of the direction rupture propagated. In additional, field and satellite images evidence indicates that most of the faults that ruptured in 2001 had had late Quaternary displacement. The variations in surficial slip (at both short and long length scales) which is only near-field slip using tape measures, should be considered minimum values and represent real variations in the amount of brittle slip on visible fractures at

  7. Complicated Recurrence of Slip Events on a Uniform Circular Asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, N.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical simulation of repeated occurrence of slip events on a fault patch (asperity) is conducted to understand the mechanism of irregularity of the events. Seismic and geodetic observations indicate that episodic seismic/aseismic slip events repeatedly occur at almost the same area. For instance, magnitude of about 4.8 earthquakes had repeatedly occurred at intervals of 4.7 to 6.7 years off Kamaishi, northern Honshu, Japan. Quasi-periodic recurrence of episodic aseismic slip events (slow earthquakes) was found at the Nankai subduction zone, southwestern Japan, the Cascadia subduction zone, North America, etc. The recurrence intervals and magnitudes of slip events in each sequence are not constant, but some variability exists. Some researchers suggested that the variation in aseismic slip rate around a patch of slip events causes variation of loading rate. This results in variation of recurrence intervals. In the present study, we focus on irregularity of recurrence of slip events that originates from dynamics of fault slip. A two-dimensional planar fault in an infinite elastic medium is considered. The fault is uniformly shear loaded at a constant rate, and frictional stress acting on the fault is assumed to obey a rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law. A circular patch of radius r with velocity-weakening frictional property is embedded on a fault with velocity-strengthening frictional property elsewhere. A numerical simulation is conducted by varying the characteristic slip distance L of the RSF law. The critical radius rc for occurrence of unstable slip can be defined, and rc is proportional to L. When r >> rc, seismic slip events (earthquakes) repeatedly occur at a constant time interval. When r is a little larger than rc, recurrence of slip events becomes complex. We observe a period-2 cycle of slip events, where large and small events alternately occur. The cycle becomes more complex as r approaches rc and finally aperiodic (chaotic) slip pattern

  8. Earthquake triggering by slow earthquake propagation: the case of the large 2014 slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiguet, M.; Perfettini, H.; Cotte, N.; Gualandi, A.; Kostoglodov, V.; Lhomme, T.; Walpersdorf, A.; Campillo, M.; Valette, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since their discovery nearly two decades ago, the importance of slow slip events (SSEs) in the processes of strain accommodation in subduction zones has been revealed. Nevertheless, the influence of slow aseismic slip on the nucleation of large earthquakes remains unclear. In this study, we focus on the Guerrero region of the Central American subduction zone in Mexico, where large SSEs have been observed since 1998, with a recurrence period of about 4 years, and produce aseismic slip in the Guerrero seismic gap. We investigate the large 2014 SSE (equivalent Mw=7.7), which initiated in early 2014 and lasted until the end of October 2014. During this time period, the 18 April Papanoa earthquake (Mw7.2) occurred on the western limit of the Guerrero gap. We invert the continuous GPS time series using the PCAIM (Principal Component Analysis Inversion Method) to assess the space and time evolution of slip on the subduction. To focus on the aseismic processes, we correct the cGPS time series from the co-seismic offsets. Our results show that the slow slip event initiated in the Guerrero gap region, as already observed during the previous SSEs. The Mw7.2 Papanoa earthquake occurred on the western limit of the region that was slipping aseismically before the earthquake. After the Papanoa earthquake, the aseismic slip rate increases. This geodetic signal consists of both the ongoing SSE and the postseismic (afterslip) response due to the Papanoa earthquake. The majority of the post-earthquake aseismic slip is concentrated downdip from the main earthquake asperity, but significant slip is also observed in the Guerrero gap region. Compared to previous SSEs in that region, the 2014 SSE produced a larger aseismic slip and the maximum slip is located downdip from the main brittle asperity corresponding to the Papanoa earthquake, a region that was not identified as active during the previous SSEs. Since the Mw 7.2 Papanoa earthquake occurred about 2 months after the onset of the

  9. Superficial shoulder muscle co-activations during lifting tasks: Influence of lifting height, weight and phase.

    PubMed

    Blache, Y; Dal Maso, F; Desmoulins, L; Plamondon, A; Begon, M

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the level of co-activation of the superficial shoulder muscles during lifting movement. Boxes containing three different loads (6, 12, and 18 kg) were lifted by fourteen subjects from the waist to shoulder or eye level. The 3D kinematics and electromyograms of the three deltoids, latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major were recorded. A musculoskeletal model was used to determine direction of the moment arm of these muscles. Finally an index of muscle co-activation named the muscle focus was used to evaluate the effects of lifting height, weight lifted and phase (pulling, lifting and dropping phases) on superficial shoulder muscle coactivation. The muscle focus was lower (more co-contraction) during the dropping phase compared to the two other phases (-13%, p<0.001). This was explained by greater muscle activations and by a change in the direction of the muscle moment arm as a function of glenohumeral joint position. Consequently, the function of the shoulder superficial muscles varied with respect to the glenohumeral joint position. To increase the superficial muscle coactivation during the dropping phase may be a solution to increase glenohumeral joint stiffness.

  10. Trimebutine-induced phase III-like activity in infants with intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Boige, N; Cargill, G; Mashako, L; Cezard, J P; Navarro, J

    1987-01-01

    Duodenal manometric recordings were performed in five male children (mean age 11.7 +/- 6.8 months) suffering from severe digestive pathology with clinical findings of dysmotility; they required total parenteral nutrition: one case of enteropathy following intestinal resection for congenital small bowel atresia, and four cases of intestinal pseudoobstruction. The basal 3-h fasting recordings showed complete disorganization of interdigestive activity characterized by an absence of migrating motor complexes and a marked basal hypomotility with motor indices lower than in control subjects. Intravenous trimebutine (3 mg/kg) produced a phase III-like activity 88 +/- 121 s after administration in four cases. The activity lasted 236 +/- 105 s and had a mean frequency of 11.75 +/- 0.86 waves/min. It was propagated aborally in the two patients having two duodenal recording sites. Trimebutine-induced phase III activity was followed by signs of peristalsis in two patients. PMID:3430262

  11. Dramatic activity of mixed-phase TiO2 photocatalyst synthesized by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiquan; Xu, Bolian; Fan, Yining

    2013-02-01

    The mixed-phase TiO2 photocatalysts with different anatase/rutile/brookite ratios and high specific surface area (157-218 m2/g) were prepared by hydrothermal method at 100 °C and the effect of rutile content in TiO2 on the BET surface area, light absorption and separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers was studied and correlated to the photocatalytic activity of TiO2. Rutile content increased from 0% to 100% by increasing the amount of TiCl4 in aqueous phase and the initial pH value of reaction solution played an important role in the phase composition of TiO2. The photocatalytic mechanism of mixed-phase TiO2 was discussed.

  12. Automated co-alignment of coherent fiber laser arrays via active phase-locking.

    PubMed

    Goodno, Gregory D; Weiss, S Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel closed-loop approach for high-precision co-alignment of laser beams in an actively phase-locked, coherently combined fiber laser array. The approach ensures interferometric precision by optically transducing beam-to-beam pointing errors into phase errors on a single detector, which are subsequently nulled by duplication of closed-loop phasing controls. Using this approach, beams from five coherent fiber tips were simultaneously phase-locked and position-locked with sub-micron accuracy. Spatial filtering of the sensed light is shown to extend the control range over multiple beam diameters by recovering spatial coherence despite the lack of far-field beam overlap.

  13. Method for providing slip energy control in permanent magnet electrical machines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-11-14

    An electric machine (40) has a stator (43), a permanent magnet rotor (38) with permanent magnets (39) and a magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) for inducing a slip energy current in secondary coils (47). A dc flux can be produced in the uncluttered rotor when the secondary coils are fed with dc currents. The magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) has magnetic brushes (A, B, C, D) which couple flux in through the rotor (46) to the secondary coils (47c, 47d) without inducing a current in the rotor (46) and without coupling a stator rotational energy component to the secondary coils (47c, 47d). The machine can be operated as a motor or a generator in multi-phase or single-phase embodiments and is applicable to the hybrid electric vehicle. A method of providing a slip energy controller is also disclosed.

  14. Slip systems in MgSiO3 post-perovskite: implications for D'' anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Lee, Kanani K M; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2010-09-24

    Understanding deformation of mineral phases in the lowermost mantle is important for interpreting seismic anisotropy in Earth's interior. Recently, there has been considerable controversy regarding deformation-induced slip in MgSiO(3) post-perovskite. Here, we observe that (001) lattice planes are oriented at high angles to the compression direction immediately after transformation and before deformation. Upon compression from 148 gigapascals (GPa) to 185 GPa, this preferred orientation more than doubles in strength, implying slip on (001) lattice planes. This contrasts with a previous experiment that recorded preferred orientation likely generated during the phase transformation rather than deformation. If we use our results to model deformation and anisotropy development in the D'' region of the lower mantle, shear-wave splitting (characterized by fast horizontally polarized shear waves) is consistent with seismic observations. PMID:20929846

  15. Nucleation of Northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Klaus, A. J.; Wech, A.; Houston, H.; Vidale, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The fascinating propagation behavior of the rupture front during episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in Cascadia and Japan has received a great deal of attention documenting a roughly 8 km/day along-strike propagation, rapid tremor reversals propagating an order of magnitude faster, and tremor streaks aligned with the slip vector propagating two orders of magnitude faster. Thus far, the initiation phase of ETS has received less scrutiny. We find that Northern Cascadia ETS typically initiate near the down-dip end of the tremor-capable zone and propagate up dip during a period of roughly 5 days until they fill the width of the ETS zone. Then they propagate along strike in one or both directions at roughly 8 km/day. During the initiation phase, the area tremoring per day grows systematically, and approximately linearly. During this initiation phase, tremor-source amplitude also grows systematically, before achieving maximum amplitudes, followed by along-strike propagation often with wild variations in amplitude that seem to be strongly influenced by tidal stresses. It appears that the increase in amplitude is due primarily to an increase in source area, such that the source amplitude per unit area is roughly constant. Tremor source amplitude is proportional to the root-mean square of band-limited (1.5 to 5.5 Hz) ground velocity for every 5-minute window and is estimated using a method similar to Maeda and Obara [JGR, 2009]. We use horizontal-component seismograms from the Array of Arrays and CAFE experiments. Tremor locations, calculated using a waveform envelope cross-correlation method [Wech and Creager, GRL, 2008], are used to invert for source amplitude and station statics correcting for geometric spreading and seismic attenuation. It appears that there is a distinct ETS initiation phase with a duration of order five days during which the tremor amplitudes systematically increase and tremor often migrates updip filling the width of the tremor-capable zone. This

  16. Episodic Tremor and Slip: Cycles Within Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Wech, A.; Vidale, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events, each with geodetically determined moment magnitudes in the mid-6 range, repeat about every 15 months under the Olympic Peninsula/southern Vancouver Island region. We have automatically searched for non-volcanic tremor in all 5-minute time windows both during the past five ETS events and during the two inter-ETS periods from February, 2007 through April, 2008 and June 2008 through April 2009. Inter-ETS tremor was detected in 5000 windows, which overlap by 50%, so tremor was seen 2% of the time. The catalog of 5-minute tremor locations cluster in time and space into groups we call tremor swarms, revealing 50 inter-ETS tremor swarms. The number of hours of tremor per swarm ranged from about 1 to 68, totaling 374 hours. The inter-ETS tremor swarms generally locate along the downdip side of the major ETS events, and account for approximately 45% of the time that tremor has been detected during the last two entire ETS cycles. Many of the inter-ETS events are near-carbon copies in duration, spatial extent and propagation direction, as is seen for the larger 15-month-interval events. These 50 inter-ETS swarms plus two major ETS episodes follow a power law relationship such that the number of swarms, N, exceeding duration τ is given by N ˜ τ-0.7. If we assume that seismic moment is proportional to τ as proposed by Ide et al. [Nature, 2007], we find that the tremor swarms follow a standard Gutenberg-Richter logarithmic frequency-magnitude relation, N ˜ 10-bMw, with b = 1.0, which lies in the range for normal earthquake catalogs. Furthermore, the major ETS events fall on the curve defined by the inter-ETS swarms, suggesting that the inter-ETS swarms are just smaller versions of the major 15-month ETS events. Only the largest events coincide with geodetically observed slip, suggesting that current geodetic observations may be missing nearly half of the total slip. Finally, crude estimates of the spatial dimensions of tremor swarms L

  17. Fixed recurrence and slip models better predict earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models 1: repeating earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubinstein, Justin L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Uchida, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of individual events in repeating earthquake sequences in California, Taiwan and Japan is better predicted by a model with fixed inter-event time or fixed slip than it is by the time- and slip-predictable models for earthquake occurrence. Given that repeating earthquakes are highly regular in both inter-event time and seismic moment, the time- and slip-predictable models seem ideally suited to explain their behavior. Taken together with evidence from the companion manuscript that shows similar results for laboratory experiments we conclude that the short-term predictions of the time- and slip-predictable models should be rejected in favor of earthquake models that assume either fixed slip or fixed recurrence interval. This implies that the elastic rebound model underlying the time- and slip-predictable models offers no additional value in describing earthquake behavior in an event-to-event sense, but its value in a long-term sense cannot be determined. These models likely fail because they rely on assumptions that oversimplify the earthquake cycle. We note that the time and slip of these events is predicted quite well by fixed slip and fixed recurrence models, so in some sense they are time- and slip-predictable. While fixed recurrence and slip models better predict repeating earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models, we observe a correlation between slip and the preceding recurrence time for many repeating earthquake sequences in Parkfield, California. This correlation is not found in other regions, and the sequences with the correlative slip-predictable behavior are not distinguishable from nearby earthquake sequences that do not exhibit this behavior.

  18. Active Optical Metasurfaces Based on Defect-Engineered Phase-Transition Materials.

    PubMed

    Rensberg, Jura; Zhang, Shuyan; Zhou, You; McLeod, Alexander S; Schwarz, Christian; Goldflam, Michael; Liu, Mengkun; Kerbusch, Jochen; Nawrodt, Ronny; Ramanathan, Shriram; Basov, D N; Capasso, Federico; Ronning, Carsten; Kats, Mikhail A

    2016-02-10

    Active, widely tunable optical materials have enabled rapid advances in photonics and optoelectronics, especially in the emerging field of meta-devices. Here, we demonstrate that spatially selective defect engineering on the nanometer scale can transform phase-transition materials into optical metasurfaces. Using ion irradiation through nanometer-scale masks, we selectively defect-engineered the insulator-metal transition of vanadium dioxide, a prototypical correlated phase-transition material whose optical properties change dramatically depending on its state. Using this robust technique, we demonstrated several optical metasurfaces, including tunable absorbers with artificially induced phase coexistence and tunable polarizers based on thermally triggered dichroism. Spatially selective nanoscale defect engineering represents a new paradigm for active photonic structures and devices.

  19. Computational selection of nucleic acid biosensors via a slip structure model.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bradley; Hesselberth, Jay R; Ellington, Andrew D

    2007-04-15

    Aptamers have been shown to undergo ligand-dependent conformational changes, and can be joined to ribozymes to create allosteric ribozymes (aptazymes). An anti-flavin (FMN) aptamer joined to the hammerhead ribozyme yielded an aptazyme that underwent small, FMN-dependent displacements in the helix that joined the aptamer and ribozyme. This 'slip structure' model in which alternative sets of base-pairs are formed in the absence and presence of ligand proved amenable to energetic and computational modeling. Initial successes in modeling the activities of known aptazymes led to the in silico selection of new ligand-dependent aptazymes from virtual pools that contained millions of members. Those aptazymes that were predicted to best fit the slip structure model were synthesized and assayed, and the best-designed aptazyme was activated 60-fold by FMN. The slip structure model proved to be generalizable, and could be applied with equal facility to computationally generate aptazymes that proved to be experimentally activated by other ligands (theophylline) or that contained other catalytic cores (hairpin ribozyme). Moreover, the slip structure model could be applied to the prediction of a ligand-dependent aptamer beacon biosensor in which the addition of the protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VegF) led to a 10-fold increase in fluorescent signal.

  20. A diary study of action slips in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Jónsdóttir, María K; Adólfsdóttir, Steinunn; Cortez, Rúna Dögg; Gunnarsdóttir, María; Gústafsdóttir, Agústa Hlín

    2007-12-01

    Memory complaints following minor head injury or whiplash are common and often bear similarity to absent mindedness or action slips (Reason, 1979). We replicated Reason's study by asking 189 healthy volunteers to keep diaries of their action slips for a week. The mean number of slips was 6.4 (SD = 4.9). Perceived stress did not correlate with number of slips but there was a weak positive correlation between action slips and scores on a memory failures questionnaire. Memory diaries may be clinically useful when assessing individuals who worry about cognitive sequelae of minor injuries. Diaries clarify the nature of the complaints and may have therapeutic value by demonstrating that the memory slips are less frequent than estimated by the patients. PMID:17853144

  1. Slip statistics of dislocation avalanches under different loading modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaß, R.; Wraith, M.; Uhl, J. T.; Greer, J. R.; Dahmen, K. A.

    2015-04-01

    Slowly compressed microcrystals deform via intermittent slip events, observed as displacement jumps or stress drops. Experiments often use one of two loading modes: an increasing applied stress (stress driven, soft), or a constant strain rate (strain driven, hard). In this work we experimentally test the influence of the deformation loading conditions on the scaling behavior of slip events. It is found that these common deformation modes strongly affect time series properties, but not the scaling behavior of the slip statistics when analyzed with a mean-field model. With increasing plastic strain, the slip events are found to be smaller and more frequent when strain driven, and the slip-size distributions obtained for both drives collapse onto the same scaling function with the same exponents. The experimental results agree with the predictions of the used mean-field model, linking the slip behavior under different loading modes.

  2. Cascadia tremor polarization evidence for plate interface slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, Aaron G.; Creager, Kenneth C.

    2007-11-01

    New seismic measurements of the repeated phenomenon of Episodic Tremor and Slip in northern Cascadia indicate identical source processes of tremor and slow slip. Predicted polarization directions of upgoing S-waves radiated from shear slip on the plate interface align with the relative motion between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. Seismic observations from small-aperture array data on the Olympic Peninsula of the Cascadia subduction zone show uncharacteristically stable linear particle motion coincident with the passage of tremor sources beneath the array. The azimuth of this horizontal ground motion matches expected polarizations from slip on the plate interface. This finding suggests that Cascadia tremor is shear slip on the plate interface, implying that, as in Japan, geodetically observed slow slip and seismically observed tremor are manifestations of the same phenomenon.

  3. Slip statistics of dislocation avalanches under different loading modes.

    PubMed

    Maass, R; Wraith, M; Uhl, J T; Greer, J R; Dahmen, K A

    2015-04-01

    Slowly compressed microcrystals deform via intermittent slip events, observed as displacement jumps or stress drops. Experiments often use one of two loading modes: an increasing applied stress (stress driven, soft), or a constant strain rate (strain driven, hard). In this work we experimentally test the influence of the deformation loading conditions on the scaling behavior of slip events. It is found that these common deformation modes strongly affect time series properties, but not the scaling behavior of the slip statistics when analyzed with a mean-field model. With increasing plastic strain, the slip events are found to be smaller and more frequent when strain driven, and the slip-size distributions obtained for both drives collapse onto the same scaling function with the same exponents. The experimental results agree with the predictions of the used mean-field model, linking the slip behavior under different loading modes.

  4. Slip statistics of dislocation avalanches under different loading modes.

    PubMed

    Maass, R; Wraith, M; Uhl, J T; Greer, J R; Dahmen, K A

    2015-04-01

    Slowly compressed microcrystals deform via intermittent slip events, observed as displacement jumps or stress drops. Experiments often use one of two loading modes: an increasing applied stress (stress driven, soft), or a constant strain rate (strain driven, hard). In this work we experimentally test the influence of the deformation loading conditions on the scaling behavior of slip events. It is found that these common deformation modes strongly affect time series properties, but not the scaling behavior of the slip statistics when analyzed with a mean-field model. With increasing plastic strain, the slip events are found to be smaller and more frequent when strain driven, and the slip-size distributions obtained for both drives collapse onto the same scaling function with the same exponents. The experimental results agree with the predictions of the used mean-field model, linking the slip behavior under different loading modes. PMID:25974504

  5. Stick-slip instabilities and shear strain localization in amorphous materials.

    PubMed

    Daub, Eric G; Carlson, Jean M

    2009-12-01

    We study the impact of strain localization on the stability of frictional slipping in dense amorphous materials. We model the material using shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, a continuum approximation for plastic deformation in amorphous solids. In the STZ model, the internal state is quantified by an effective disorder temperature, and the effective temperature dynamics capture the spontaneous localization of strain. We study the effect of strain localization on stick-slip instabilities by coupling the STZ model to a noninertial spring slider system. We perform a linear stability analysis to generate a phase diagram that connects the small scale physics of strain localization to the macroscopic stability of sliding. Our calculations determine the values of spring stiffness and driving velocity where steady sliding becomes unstable and we confirm our results through numerical integration. We investigate both homogeneous deformation, where no shear band forms, and localized deformation, where a narrow shear band spontaneously forms and accommodates all of the deformation. Our results show that at a given velocity, strain localization leads to unstable frictional sliding at a much larger spring stiffness compared to homogeneous deformation, and that localized deformation cannot be approximated by a homogeneous model with a narrower material. We also find that strain localization provides a physical mechanism for irregular stick-slip cycles in certain parameter ranges. Our results quantitatively connect the internal physics of deformation in amorphous materials to the larger scale frictional dynamics of stick-slip.

  6. Slipping, sliding and stability: locomotor strategies for overcoming low-friction surfaces.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew J; Higham, Timothy E

    2011-04-15

    Legged terrestrial animals must avoid falling while negotiating unexpected perturbations inherent to their structurally complex environments. Among humans, fatal and nonfatal injuries frequently result from slip-induced falls precipitated by sudden unexpected encounters with low-friction surfaces. Although studies using walking human models have identified some causes of falls and mechanisms underlying slip prevention, it is unclear whether these apply to various locomotor speeds and other species. We used high-speed video and inverse dynamics to investigate the locomotor biomechanics of helmeted guinea fowl traversing slippery surfaces at variable running speeds (1.3-3.6 m s(-1)). Falls were circumvented when limb contact angles exceeded 70 deg, though lower angles were tolerated at faster running speeds (>3.0 m s(-1)). These prerequisites permitted a forward shift of the body's center of mass over the limb's base of support, which kept slip distances below 10 cm (the threshold distance for falls) and maximized the vertical ground reaction forces, thus facilitating limb retraction and the conclusion of the stance phase. These postural control strategies for slip avoidance parallel those in humans, demonstrating the applicability of these strategies across locomotor gaits and the potential for guinea fowl as an insightful model for invasive approaches to understanding limb neuromuscular control on slippery surfaces.

  7. Fostering Students' Creativity through Van Hiele's 5 Phase-Based Tangram Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siew, Nyet Moi; Chong, Chin Lu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Van Hiele's 5 phase-based tangrams activities could help to foster creativity among Grade Three primary school students. Students' creativity was investigated in terms of Torrance's Figural Test of creative thinking: Fluency, Originality, Elaboration, Abstractness of title, and Resistance to a…

  8. Efficiency of an unstable resonator with an active medium containing small-scale phase inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Lobachev, V V; Strakhov, S Yu

    2004-01-31

    Properties of an unstable resonator with small-scale periodic inhomogeneities of the refractive index in an active medium are considered. It is shown that the parameters of output radiation depend on the structure of a phase inhomogeneity. The methods for increasing the resonator efficiency are analysed. (resonators. interferometers)

  9. Upregulation of phase II enzymes through phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Danielle J; Khademi, Shadi; Castle, Christopher J; Irwin, David C; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2013-03-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and enhanced endogenous antioxidants have been proposed as a mechanism for regulating redox balance. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidant enzymes, and activation of Nrf2 has been suggested to be an important step in attenuating oxidative stress associated with CVD. A well-defined combination of five widely studied medicinal plants derived from botanical sources (Bacopa monniera, Silybum marianum (milk thistle), Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Camellia sinensis (green tea), and Curcuma longa (turmeric)) has been shown to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II enzymes through the antioxidant response element. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if treatment of cardiomyocytes with this phytochemical composition, marketed as Protandim, activates Nrf2, induces phase II detoxification enzymes, and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidant-induced apoptosis in a Nrf2-dependent manner. In cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, phytochemical treatment was associated with nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, significant induction of phase II enzymes, and concomitant protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The protection against oxidant stress was abolished when Nrf2 was silenced by shRNA, suggesting that our phytochemical treatment worked through the Nrf2 pathway. Interestingly, phytochemical treatment was found to be a more robust activator of Nrf2 than oxidant treatment, supporting the use of the phytochemicals as a potential treatment to increase antioxidant defenses and protect heart cells against an oxidative challenge.

  10. Final Report on Regional Exchange Activities During the October 1976-February 1977 Planning Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEMREL, Inc., St. Louis, MO.

    This report describes in detail the Central Midwest Regional Educational Laboratory's (CEMREL) activities during the October 1976-February 1977 planning phase of the nationwide R & D Exchange (RDX) program sponsored by the National Institute of Education. Basically, CEMREL's task during the planning period was to develop plans for the creation and…

  11. Geology of the Çaldıran Fault, Eastern Turkey: Age, slip rate and implications on the characteristic slip behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selçuk, Azad Sağlam; Erturaç, M. Korhan; Nomade, Sebastien

    2016-06-01

    The Çaldıran Fault is a strike slip fault with a dextral slip in East Anatolia. The activity on this fault was marked by the November, 24 1976 earthquake (Mw: 7.1) which produced an ~ 50 km long surface rupture and caused 3840 fatalities, which was close to half of the population living along the fault at that time. Together with the North Ta