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Sample records for activated potassium channels

  1. Calcium Activation of Mougeotia Potassium Channels 1

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Roger R.; Serlin, Bruce S.; Schauf, Charles L.; Stockton, Marsha E.

    1990-01-01

    Phytochrome mediates chloroplast movement in the alga Mougeotia, possibly via changes in cytosolic calcium. It is known to regulate a calcium-activated potassium channel in the algal plasma membrane. As part of a characterization of the potassium channel, we examined the properties of calcium activation. The calcium ionophore A23187 activates the channel at external [Ca2+] as low as 20 micromolar. However, external [Ca2+] is not required for activation of the channel by photoactivated phytochrome. Furthermore, when an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores, 8-(diethylamino)-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, hydrochloride (TMB-8), is present, red light no longer stimulates channel activity. We conclude that phytochrome activates the plasma membrane potassium channel by releasing calcium from intracellular calcium vesicles; the elevated cytosolic calcium then stimulates channel activity by an unknown mechanism. In the presence of TMB-8, red light does induce chloroplast rotation; thus, potassium channel activation may not be coupled to chloroplast rotation. PMID:16667356

  2. Active dendrites, potassium channels and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Christie, Brian R; Frick, Andreas; Gray, Richard; Hoffman, Dax A; Schexnayder, Lalania K; Watanabe, Shigeo; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2003-01-01

    The dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus express numerous types of voltage-gated ion channel, but the distributions or densities of many of these channels are very non-uniform. Sodium channels in the dendrites are responsible for action potential (AP) propagation from the axon into the dendrites (back-propagation); calcium channels are responsible for local changes in dendritic calcium concentrations following back-propagating APs and synaptic potentials; and potassium channels help regulate overall dendritic excitability. Several lines of evidence are presented here to suggest that back-propagating APs, when coincident with excitatory synaptic input, can lead to the induction of either long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). The induction of LTD or LTP is correlated with the magnitude of the rise in intracellular calcium. When brief bursts of synaptic potentials are paired with postsynaptic APs in a theta-burst pairing paradigm, the induction of LTP is dependent on the invasion of the AP into the dendritic tree. The amplitude of the AP in the dendrites is dependent, in part, on the activity of a transient, A-type potassium channel that is expressed at high density in the dendrites and correlates with the induction of the LTP. Furthermore, during the expression phase of the LTP, there are local changes in dendritic excitability that may result from modulation of the functioning of this transient potassium channel. The results support the view that the active properties of dendrites play important roles in synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity of these neurons. PMID:12740112

  3. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  4. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  5. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  6. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F; Weiger, Thomas M

    2015-08-17

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences.

  7. A large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela; Matkovic, Karolina; Szewczyk, Adam; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2009-11-11

    In the present study, we describe the existence of a novel potassium channel in the plant [potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber] mitochondrial inner membrane. We found that substances known to modulate large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel activity influenced the bioenergetics of potato tuber mitochondria. In isolated mitochondria, Ca2+ and NS1619 {1,3-dihydro-1-[2-hydroxy-5-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-ben-zimidazole-2-one; a potassium channel opener} were found to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane potential and to stimulate resting respiration. These effects were blocked by iberiotoxin (a potassium channel inhibitor) in a potassium-dependent manner. Additionally, the electrophysiological properties of the large-conductance potassium channel present in the potato tuber inner mitochondrial membrane are described in a reconstituted system, using planar lipid bilayers. After incorporation in 50/450 mM KCl gradient solutions, we recorded large-conductance potassium channel activity with conductance from 502+/-15 to 615+/-12 pS. The probability of channel opening was increased by Ca2+ and reduced by iberiotoxin. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against the mammalian plasma-membrane large-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ channel identified a pore-forming alpha subunit and an auxiliary beta2 subunit of the channel in potato tuber mitochondrial inner membrane. These results suggest that a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel similar to that of mammalian mitochondria is present in potato tuber mitochondria.

  8. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  9. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  10. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  11. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits calcium-activated potassium channels in rat pituitary tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shipston, M J; Armstrong, D L

    1996-01-01

    1. The regulation of large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-dependent potassium (BK) channels by protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated in clonal rat anterior pituitary cells (GH4C1), which were voltage clamped at -40 mV in a physiological potassium gradient through amphotericin-perforated patches. 2. Maximal activation of PKC by 100 nM phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PdBu) almost completely inhibited the voltage-activated outward current through BK channels. In contrast PdBu had no significant effect on the residual outward current after block of BK channels with 2 mM TEA or 30 nM charybdotoxin. In single-channel recordings from cell-attached patches, PdBu reduced the open probability of BK channels more than eightfold with no significant effect on mean open lifetime or unitary conductance. 3. The effects of PdBu on BK channels were not mimicked by the 4 alpha-isomer, which does not activate PKC, and were blocked almost completely by 25 microM chelerythrine, a specific, noncompetitive PKC inhibitor. 4. PdBu had no significant effect on the amplitude of the pharmacologically isolated, high voltage-activated calcium current. 5. Inhibition of BK channel activity by PKC provides the first molecular mechanism linking hormonal activation of phospholipase C to sustained excitability in pituitary cells. PMID:8799890

  12. Collateral response to activation of potassium channels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lamping, K G

    1998-04-01

    Activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels is involved in the coronary vascular response to decreases in perfusion pressure and ischemia. Since activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in collateral vessels may be important in determining flow to collateral-dependent myocardium, the ability of collaterals to respond to activation of the channel was tested. In the beating heart of dogs, we compared responses of non-collaterals less than 100 microns in diameter to collaterals of similar size using computer-controlled stroboscopic epi-illumination of the left ventricle coupled to a microscope-video system. Aprikalim, a selective activator of ATP-sensitive K+ channels (0.1-10 microM) produced similar dose-dependent dilation of non-collaterals and collaterals. Relaxation was decreased by inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels with glibenclamide, but not by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with nitro-L-arginine. Bradykinin (10-100 microM) produced similar dilation of non-collaterals and collaterals which was decreased by nitro-L-arginine but not glibenclamide. Thus, in microvascular collaterals, relaxation to both nitric oxide and activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels is similar to non-collaterals.

  13. Block of a Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, L S

    2005-04-01

    The primary target for cocaine is believed to be monoamine transporters because of cocaine's high-affinity binding that prevents re-uptake of released neurotransmitter. However, direct interaction with ion channels has been shown to be important for certain pharmacological/toxicological effects of cocaine. Here I show that cocaine selectively blocks a calcium-dependent K(+) channel in hippocampal neurons grown in culture (IC(50)=approximately 30 microM). Single-channel recordings show that in the presence of cocaine, the channel openings are interrupted with brief closures (flicker block). As the concentration of cocaine is increased the open-time is reduced, whereas the duration of brief closures is independent of concentration. The association and dissociation rate constants of cocaine for the neuronal Ca(2+)-activated K(+ )channels are 261+/-37 microM: (-1)s(-1) and 11451+/-1467 s(-1). The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(B)) for cocaine, determined from single-channel parameters, is 43 microM. The lack of voltage dependence of block suggests that cocaine probably binds to a site at the mouth of the pore. Block of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels by cocaine may be involved in functions that include broadening of the action potential, which would facilitate transmitter release, enhancement of smooth muscle contraction particularly in blood vessels, and modulation of repetitive neuronal firing by altering the repolarization and afterhyperpolarization phases of the action potential.

  14. Allosteric coupling of the inner activation gate to the outer pore of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian J; Fedida, David; Accili, Eric A

    2013-10-23

    In potassium channels, functional coupling of the inner and outer pore gates may result from energetic interactions between residues and conformational rearrangements that occur along a structural path between them. Here, we show that conservative mutations of a residue near the inner activation gate of the Shaker potassium channel (I470) modify the rate of C-type inactivation at the outer pore, pointing to this residue as part of a pathway that couples inner gate opening to changes in outer pore structure and reduction of ion flow. Because they remain equally sensitive to rises in extracellular potassium, altered inactivation rates of the mutant channels are not secondary to modified binding of potassium to the outer pore. Conservative mutations of I470 also influence the interaction of the Shaker N-terminus with the inner gate, which separately affects the outer pore.

  15. Allosteric coupling of the inner activation gate to the outer pore of a potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christian J.; Fedida, David; Accili, Eric A.

    2013-10-01

    In potassium channels, functional coupling of the inner and outer pore gates may result from energetic interactions between residues and conformational rearrangements that occur along a structural path between them. Here, we show that conservative mutations of a residue near the inner activation gate of the Shaker potassium channel (I470) modify the rate of C-type inactivation at the outer pore, pointing to this residue as part of a pathway that couples inner gate opening to changes in outer pore structure and reduction of ion flow. Because they remain equally sensitive to rises in extracellular potassium, altered inactivation rates of the mutant channels are not secondary to modified binding of potassium to the outer pore. Conservative mutations of I470 also influence the interaction of the Shaker N-terminus with the inner gate, which separately affects the outer pore.

  16. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2–5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators. PMID:26333338

  17. The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0463 TITLE: The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function...Diet and Potassium Channel Function 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0463 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Geoffrey Murphy 5d. PROJECT...regulates neuronal excitability by influencing potassium channel activity via the auxiliary potassium channel subunit Kvβ2. To test this hypothesis we

  18. Potassium channels and their evolving gates.

    PubMed

    Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    1994-09-08

    Potassium channels allow potassium ions to flow across the membrane and play a key role in maintaining membrane potential. Recent research has begun to reveal how these channels transport potassium in preference to other ions, how their activity is controlled, and how they are related to other channels.

  19. Cross talk between activation and slow inactivation gates of Shaker potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Panyi, Gyorgy; Deutsch, Carol

    2006-11-01

    This study addresses the energetic coupling between the activation and slow inactivation gates of Shaker potassium channels. To track the status of the activation gate in inactivated channels that are nonconducting, we used two functional assays: the accessibility of a cysteine residue engineered into the protein lining the pore cavity (V474C) and the liberation by depolarization of a Cs(+) ion trapped behind the closed activation gate. We determined that the rate of activation gate movement depends on the state of the inactivation gate. A closed inactivation gate favors faster opening and slower closing of the activation gate. We also show that hyperpolarization closes the activation gate long before a channel recovers from inactivation. Because activation and slow inactivation are ubiquitous gating processes in potassium channels, the cross talk between them is likely to be a fundamental factor in controlling ion flux across membranes.

  20. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neuronal Activity via Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lei Ray; Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons. PMID:24236040

  1. Fragile X mental retardation protein controls gating of the sodium-activated potassium channel Slack

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maile R.; Kronengold, Jack; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Chen, Yi; Strumbos, John G.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2010-01-01

    In humans, absence of Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein, results in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. Here we report through biochemical and electrophysiological studies that FMRP binds the C-terminus of the Slack sodium-activated potassium channel to activate the channel. The findings suggest that Slack activity may provide a link between patterns of neuronal firing and changes in protein translation. PMID:20512134

  2. Zinc pyrithione-mediated activation of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels rescues epileptogenic mutants.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiaojie; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Min

    2007-05-01

    KCNQ potassium channels are activated by changes in transmembrane voltage and play an important role in controlling electrical excitability. Human mutations of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 potassium channel genes result in reduction or loss of channel activity and cause benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNCs). Thus, small molecules capable of augmenting KCNQ currents are essential both for understanding the mechanism of channel activity and for developing therapeutics. We performed a high-throughput screen in search for agonistic compounds potentiating KCNQ potassium channels. Here we report identification of a new opener, zinc pyrithione (1), which activates both recombinant and native KCNQ M currents. Interactions with the channel protein cause an increase of single-channel open probability that could fully account for the overall conductance increase. Separate point mutations have been identified that either shift the concentration dependence or affect potentiation efficacy, thereby providing evidence for residues influencing ligand binding and downstream events. Furthermore, zinc pyrithione is capable of rescuing the mutant channels causal to BFNCs.

  3. Coupling of activation and inactivation gate in a K+-channel: potassium and ligand sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ader, Christian; Schneider, Robert; Hornig, Sönke; Velisetty, Phanindra; Vardanyan, Vitya; Giller, Karin; Ohmert, Iris; Becker, Stefan; Pongs, Olaf; Baldus, Marc

    2009-09-16

    Potassium (K(+))-channel gating is choreographed by a complex interplay between external stimuli, K(+) concentration and lipidic environment. We combined solid-state NMR and electrophysiological experiments on a chimeric KcsA-Kv1.3 channel to delineate K(+), pH and blocker effects on channel structure and function in a membrane setting. Our data show that pH-induced activation is correlated with protonation of glutamate residues at or near the activation gate. Moreover, K(+) and channel blockers distinctly affect the open probability of both the inactivation gate comprising the selectivity filter of the channel and the activation gate. The results indicate that the two gates are coupled and that effects of the permeant K(+) ion on the inactivation gate modulate activation-gate opening. Our data suggest a mechanism for controlling coordinated and sequential opening and closing of activation and inactivation gates in the K(+)-channel pore.

  4. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Secure Axonal Spike Propagation.

    PubMed

    Gründemann, Jan; Clark, Beverley A

    2015-09-22

    Functional connectivity between brain regions relies on long-range signaling by myelinated axons. This is secured by saltatory action potential propagation that depends fundamentally on sodium channel availability at nodes of Ranvier. Although various potassium channel types have been anatomically localized to myelinated axons in the brain, direct evidence for their functional recruitment in maintaining node excitability is scarce. Cerebellar Purkinje cells provide continuous input to their targets in the cerebellar nuclei, reliably transmitting axonal spikes over a wide range of rates, requiring a constantly available pool of nodal sodium channels. We show that the recruitment of calcium-activated potassium channels (IK, K(Ca)3.1) by local, activity-dependent calcium (Ca(2+)) influx at nodes of Ranvier via a T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) current provides a powerful mechanism that likely opposes depolarizing block at the nodes and is thus pivotal to securing continuous axonal spike propagation in spontaneously firing Purkinje cells.

  5. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Secure Axonal Spike Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Gründemann, Jan; Clark, Beverley A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional connectivity between brain regions relies on long-range signaling by myelinated axons. This is secured by saltatory action potential propagation that depends fundamentally on sodium channel availability at nodes of Ranvier. Although various potassium channel types have been anatomically localized to myelinated axons in the brain, direct evidence for their functional recruitment in maintaining node excitability is scarce. Cerebellar Purkinje cells provide continuous input to their targets in the cerebellar nuclei, reliably transmitting axonal spikes over a wide range of rates, requiring a constantly available pool of nodal sodium channels. We show that the recruitment of calcium-activated potassium channels (IK, KCa3.1) by local, activity-dependent calcium (Ca2+) influx at nodes of Ranvier via a T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ current provides a powerful mechanism that likely opposes depolarizing block at the nodes and is thus pivotal to securing continuous axonal spike propagation in spontaneously firing Purkinje cells. PMID:26344775

  6. Voltage-dependent potassium channels in activated rat microglia.

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, W; Gebicke-Haerter, P J; Illes, P

    1994-01-01

    equimolar concentration of Cs+, and the extracellular application of tetraethylammonium and quinine inhibited both currents. 7. An increase of extracellular Ca2+ from 2 to 20 mM resulted in outwardly rectifying K+ channels activating at more positive potentials. Omission of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium had the opposite effect. When the intracellular free Ca2+ was increased from 0.01 to 1 microM, the outward current amplitudes were depressed. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 had a similar effect. 8. LPS-treated microglial cells possess inwardly and outwardly rectifying K+ channels. The physiological and pharmacological characteristics of these two channel populations are markedly different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7514664

  7. Glucose deprivation activates diversity of potassium channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Myrian; García, Esperanza; Onetti, Carlos G

    2006-05-01

    1. Glucose is one of the most important substrates for generating metabolic energy required for the maintenance of cellular functions. Glucose-mediated changes in neuronal firing pattern have been observed in the central nervous system of mammals. K(+) channels directly regulated by intracellular ATP have been postulated as a linkage between cellular energetic metabolism and excitability; the functional roles ascribed to these channels include glucose-sensing to regulate energy homeostasis and neuroprotection under energy depletion conditions. The hippocampus is highly sensitive to metabolic insults and is the brain region most sensitive to ischemic damage. Because the identity of metabolically regulated potassium channels present in hippocampal neurons is obscure, we decided to study the biophysical properties of glucose-sensitive potassium channels in hippocampal neurons. 2. The dependence of membrane potential and the sensitivity of potassium channels to glucose and ATP in rat hippocampal neurons were studied in cell-attached and excised inside-out membrane patches. 3. We found that under hypoglycemic conditions, at least three types of potassium channels were activated; their unitary conductance values were 37, 147, and 241 pS in symmetrical K(+), and they were sensitive to ATP. For K(+) channels with unitary conductance of 37 and 241, when the membrane potential was depolarized the longer closed time constant diminished and this produced an increase in the open-state probability; nevertheless, the 147-pS channels were not voltage-dependent. 4. We propose that neuronal glucose-sensitive K(+) channels in rat hippocampus include subtypes of ATP-sensitive channels with a potential role in neuroprotection during short-term or prolonged metabolic stress.

  8. Role of Calcium-activated Potassium Channels in Atrial Fibrillation Pathophysiology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Diness, Jonas G.; Bentzen, Bo H.; Sørensen, Ulrik S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (SK) channels are relative newcomers within the field of cardiac electrophysiology. In recent years, an increased focus has been given to these channels because they might constitute a relatively atrial-selective target. This review will give a general introduction to SK channels followed by their proposed function in the heart under normal and pathophysiological conditions. It is revealed how antiarrhythmic effects can be obtained by SK channel inhibition in a number of species in situations of atrial fibrillation. On the contrary, the beneficial effects of SK channel inhibition in situations of heart failure are questionable and still needs investigation. The understanding of cardiac SK channels is rapidly increasing these years, and it is hoped that this will clarify whether SK channel inhibition has potential as a new anti–atrial fibrillation principle. PMID:25830485

  9. Differential distribution of the sodium-activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Sandra; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    The sodium-activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high-conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093-2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Differential distribution of the sodium‐activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hans‐Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sodium‐activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high‐conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093–2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587966

  11. Syntheses and biological activities of potent potassium channel openers derived from (+/-)-2-oxo-1-pyridin-3-yl-cyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide: new potassium channel openers.

    PubMed

    Brown, T J; Chapman, R F; Mason, J S; Palfreyman, M N; Vicker, N; Walsh, R J

    1993-05-28

    The syntheses and biological activities of (+/-)-2-(cyanomethylene)-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexanecarbothioic++ + acid methylamide (6) and trans-(+/-)-2-(cyanomethyl)-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide (14) derived from (+/-)-2-oxo-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide (4) are reported. Compounds were tested for antagonism of potassium-induced contraction of de-endothelialized rat aorta. The effects of modification of 6 and 14 on in vitro K(+)-channel opening activity are presented. These new series of potassium channel openers so derived are best exemplified by (+/-)-2-[2-(phenylsulfanyl)ethylidene]-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexan ecarbothioic acid methylamide (13d, RP 66266) and trans-(+/-)-2-[2-[(phenylsulfonyl)amino]ethyl]-1-pyridin-3- ylcyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide (25a, RP 66784), which have IC90 values of 3 and 0.3 nM, respectively. The potency of the most active compounds indicates a possible interaction at an extra binding site. The compounds described herein are potential antihypertensive and antianginal agents.

  12. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency.

  13. Molecular heterogeneity of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in canine intracardiac ganglia.

    PubMed

    Selga, Elisabet; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Moreno-Asso, Alba; Anderson, Seth; Thomas, Kristen; Desai, Mayurika; Brugada, Ramon; Pérez, Guillermo J; Scornik, Fabiana S

    2013-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are widely expressed in the nervous system. We have recently shown that principal neurons from canine intracardiac ganglia (ICG) express a paxilline- and TEA-sensitive BK current, which increases neuronal excitability. In the present work, we further explore the molecular constituents of the BK current in canine ICG. We found that the β1 and β4 regulatory subunits are expressed in ICG. Single channel voltage-dependence at different calcium concentrations suggested that association of the BKα with a particular β subunit was not enough to explain the channel activity in this tissue. Indeed, we detected the presence of several splice variants of the BKα subunit. In conclusion, BK channels in canine ICG may result from the arrangement of different BKα splice variants, plus accessory β subunits. The particular combinations expressed in canine IC neurons likely rule the excitatory role of BK current in this tissue.

  14. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  15. Calcium uptake in rat liver mitochondria accompanied by activation of ATP-dependent potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Akopova, O V; Nosar, V I; Mankovskaya, I N; Sagach, V F

    2008-10-01

    The influence of potassium ions on calcium uptake in rat liver mitochondria is studied. It is shown that an increase in K+ and Ca2+ concentrations in the incubation medium leads to a decrease in calcium uptake in mitochondria together with a simultaneous increase in potassium uptake due to the potential-dependent transport of K+ in the mitochondrial matrix. Both effects are more pronounced in the presence of an ATP-dependent K+-channel (K+(ATP)-channel) opener, diazoxide (Dz). Activation of the K+(ATP)-channel by Dz alters the functional state of mitochondria and leads to an increase in the respiration rate in state 2 and a decrease in the oxygen uptake and the rate of ATP synthesis in state 3. The effect of Dz on oxygen consumption in state 3 is mimicked by valinomycin, but it is opposite to that of the classical protonophore uncoupler CCCP. It is concluded that the potential-dependent uptake of potassium is closely coupled to calcium transport and is an important parameter of energy coupling responsible for complex changes in oxygen consumption and Ca2+-transport properties of mitochondria.

  16. Fear conditioning suppresses large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in lateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Zhang, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, L; Yamamoto, R; Sugai, T; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that depression-like behavior is accompanied with suppression of the large-conductance calcium activated potassium (BK) channel in cingulate cortex pyramidal cells. To test whether BK channels are also involved in fear conditioning, we studied neuronal properties of amygdala principal cells in fear conditioned mice. After behavior, we made brain slices containing the amygdala, the structure critically relevant to fear memory. The resting membrane potential in lateral amygdala (LA) neurons obtained from fear conditioned mice (FC group) was more depolarized than in neurons from naïve controls. The frequencies of spikes evoked by current injections were higher in neurons from FC mice, demonstrating that excitability of LA neurons was elevated by fear conditioning. The depolarization in neurons from FC mice was shown to depend on BK channels by using the BK channel blocker charybdotoxin. Suppression of BK channels in LA neurons from the FC group was further confirmed on the basis of the spike width, since BK channels affect the descending phase of spikes. Spikes were broader in the FC group than those in the naïve control in a manner dependent on BK channels. Consistently, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decreased expression of BK channel mRNA. The present findings suggest that emotional disorder manifested in the forms of fear conditioning is accompanied with BK channel suppression in the amygdala, the brain structure critical to this emotional disorder.

  17. Dendrotoxins: structure-activity relationships and effects on potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A L; Robertson, B

    2004-12-01

    Dendrotoxins are small proteins isolated from mamba (Dendroaspis) snakes. The original dendrotoxin was found in venom of the Eastern green mamba, Dendroaspis angusticeps, and related proteins were subsequently found in other mamba venoms. The dendrotoxins contain 57-60 amino acid residues cross-linked by three disulphide bridges, and they are homologous to Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors, such as aprotinin (BPTI). The dendrotoxins have little or no anti-protease activity, but they block particular subtypes of voltage-dependent potassium channels of the Kv1 subfamily in neurones. Alpha-dendrotoxin from green mamba Dendroaspis angusticeps and toxin I from the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis block cloned Kv1.1, Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 channels in the low nanomolar range; toxin K, also from the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis, preferentially blocks Kv1.1 channels and is active at picomolar concentrations. Structural modifications and mutations to dendrotoxins have helped to define the molecular recognition properties of different types of K+ channels, although more work is needed to characterise the chemical features of the toxins that underlie their selectivity and potency at particular subtypes of channels. Dendrotoxins have been useful markers of subtypes of K+ channels in vivo, and dendrotoxins have become widely used as probes for studying the function of K+ channels in physiology and pathophysiology. With some pathological conditions being associated with voltage-gated K+ channels, analogues of dendrotoxins might have therapeutic potential.

  18. Ethanol Affects Network Activity in Cultured Rat Hippocampus: Mediation by Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Korkotian, Eduard; Bombela, Tatyana; Odegova, Tatiana; Zubov, Petr; Segal, Menahem

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ethanol on neuronal network activity were studied in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. Exposure to low (0.25–0.5%) ethanol concentrations caused an increase in synchronized network spikes, and a decrease in the duration of individual spikes. Ethanol also caused an increase in rate of miniature spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Higher concentrations of ethanol eliminated network spikes. These effects were reversible upon wash. The effects of the high, but not the low ethanol were blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. The enhancing action of low ethanol was blocked by apamin, an SK potassium channel antagonist, and mimicked by 1-EBIO, an SK channel opener. It is proposed that in cultured hippocampal networks low concentration of ethanol is associated with SK channel activity, rather than the GABAergic receptor. PMID:24260098

  19. Activation and inactivation of homomeric KvLQT1 potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, M; Magrassi, R; Wollnik, B; Conti, F

    1998-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel protein KvLQT1 (Wang et al., 1996. Nature Genet. 12:17-23) is believed to underlie the delayed rectifier potassium current of cardiac muscle together with the small membrane protein minK (also named IsK) as an essential auxiliary subunit (Barhanin et al., 1996. Nature. 384:78-80; Sanguinetti et al., 1996. Nature. 384:80-83) Using the Xenopus oocyte expression system, we analyzed in detail the gating characteristics of homomeric KvLQT1 channels and of heteromeric KvLQT1/minK channels using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings. Activation of homomeric KvLQT1 at positive voltages is accompanied by an inactivation process that is revealed by a transient increase in conductance after membrane repolarization to negative values. We studied the recovery from inactivation and the deactivation of the channels during tail repolarizations at -120 mV after conditioning pulses of variable amplitude and duration. Most measurements were made in high extracellular potassium to increase the size of inward tail currents. However, experiments in normal low-potassium solutions showed that, in contrast to classical C-type inactivation, the inactivation of KvLQT1 is independent of extracellular potassium. At +40 mV inactivation develops with a delay of 100 ms. At the same potential, the activation estimated from the amplitude of the late exponential decay of the tail currents follows a less sigmoidal time course, with a late time constant of 300 ms. Inactivation of KvLQT1 is not complete, even at the most positive voltages. The delayed, voltage-dependent onset and the incompleteness of inactivation suggest a sequential gating scheme containing at least two open states and ending with an inactivating step that is voltage independent. In coexpression experiments of KvLQT1 with minK, inactivation seems to be largely absent, although biphasic tails are also observed that could be related to similar phenomena. PMID:9675180

  20. Single-channel properties of BK-type calcium-activated potassium channels at a cholinergic presynaptic nerve terminal

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Ping; Schlichter, Lyanne C; Stanley, Elis F

    1999-01-01

    A high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK KCa) was characterized at a cholinergic presynaptic nerve terminal using the calyx synapse isolated from the chick ciliary ganglion.The channel had a conductance of 210 pS in a 150 mM:150 mM K+ gradient, was highly selective for K+ over Na+, and was sensitive to block by external charybdotoxin or tetraethylammonium (TEA) and by internal Ba2+. At +60 mV it was activated by cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i with a Kd of ≈0.5 μM and a Hill coefficient of ≈2.0. At 10 μM [Ca2+]i the channel was 50 % activated (V½) at -8.0 mV with a voltage dependence (Boltzmann slope-factor) of 32.7 mV. The V½ values hyperpolarized with an increase in [Ca2+]i while the slope factors decreased. There were no overt differences in conductance or [Ca2+]i sensitivity between BK channels from the transmitter release face and the non-release face.Open and closed times were fitted by two and three exponentials, respectively. The slow time constants were strongly affected by both [Ca2+]i and membrane potential changes.In cell-attached patch recordings BK channel opening was enhanced by a prepulse permissive for calcium influx through the patch, suggesting that the channel can be activated by calcium ion influx through neighbouring calcium channels.The properties of the presynaptic BK channel are well suited for rapid activation during the presynaptic depolarization and Ca2+ influx that are associated with transmitter release. This channel may play an important role in terminating release by rapid repolarization of the action potential. PMID:10420003

  1. Calcium activated potassium channel expression during human iPS cell-derived neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Linta, Leonhard; Boeckers, Tobias M; Kleger, Alexander; Liebau, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The family of calcium activated potassium channels of low and intermediate conductance, known as SK channels, consists of four members (SK1-4). These channels are widely expressed throughout the organism and involved in various cellular processes, such as the afterhyperpolarization in excitable cells but also in differentiation processes of various tissues. To date, the role of SK channels in developmental processes has been merely a marginal focus of investigation, although it is well accepted that cell differentiation and maturation affect the expression patterns of certain ion channels. Recently, several studies from our laboratory delineated the influence of SK channel expression and their respective activity on cytoskeletal reorganization in neural and pluripotent stem cells and regulation of cell fate determination toward the cardiac lineage in human and mouse pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we have now analyzed SK channel expression patterns and distribution at various stages of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurogenesis particularly focusing on undifferentiated iPS cells, neural progenitors and mature neurons. All family members could be detected starting at the iPS cell level and were differentially expressed during the subsequent maturation process. Intriguingly, we found obvious discrepancies between mRNA and protein expression pointing toward a complex regulatory mechanism. Inhibition of SK channels with either apamin or clotrimazol did not have any significant effects on the speed or amount of neurogenesis in vitro. The abundance and specific regulation of SK channel expression during iPS cell differentiation indicates distinct roles of these ion channels not only for the cardiac but also for neuronal cell differentiation and in vitro neurogenesis.

  2. The sodium-activated potassium channel Slack is required for optimal cognitive flexibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Bausch, Anne E; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Kcnt1 encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual development. In particular, recent findings have shown that human Slack mutations produce very severe intellectual disability and that Slack channels interact directly with the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a protein that when missing or mutated results in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and autism in humans. We have now analyzed a recently developed Kcnt1 null mouse model in several behavioral tasks to assess which aspects of memory and learning are dependent on Slack. We demonstrate that Slack deficiency results in mildly altered general locomotor activity, but normal working memory, reference memory, as well as cerebellar control of motor functions. In contrast, we find that Slack channels are required for cognitive flexibility, including reversal learning processes and the ability to adapt quickly to unfamiliar situations and environments. Our data reveal that hippocampal-dependent spatial learning capabilities require the proper function of Slack channels.

  3. The sodium-activated potassium channel Slack is required for optimal cognitive flexibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2015-01-01

    Kcnt1 encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual development. In particular, recent findings have shown that human Slack mutations produce very severe intellectual disability and that Slack channels interact directly with the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a protein that when missing or mutated results in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and autism in humans. We have now analyzed a recently developed Kcnt1 null mouse model in several behavioral tasks to assess which aspects of memory and learning are dependent on Slack. We demonstrate that Slack deficiency results in mildly altered general locomotor activity, but normal working memory, reference memory, as well as cerebellar control of motor functions. In contrast, we find that Slack channels are required for cognitive flexibility, including reversal learning processes and the ability to adapt quickly to unfamiliar situations and environments. Our data reveal that hippocampal-dependent spatial learning capabilities require the proper function of Slack channels. PMID:26077685

  4. Large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in secretory neurons.

    PubMed

    Lara, J; Acevedo, J J; Onetti, C G

    1999-09-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK) are believed to underlie interburst intervals and contribute to the control of hormone release in several secretory cells. In crustacean neurosecretory cells, Ca2+ entry associated with electrical activity could act as a modulator of membrane K+ conductance. Therefore we studied the contribution of BK channels to the macroscopic outward current in the X-organ of crayfish, and their participation in electrophysiological activity, as well as their sensitivity toward intracellular Ca2+, ATP, and voltage, by using the patch-clamp technique. The BK channels had a conductance of 223 pS and rectified inwardly in symmetrical K+. These channels were highly selective to K+ ions; potassium permeability (PK) value was 2.3 x 10(-13) cm(3) s(-1). The BK channels were sensitive to internal Ca2+ concentration, voltage dependent, and activated by intracellular MgATP. Voltage sensitivity (k) was approximately 13 mV, and the half-activation membrane potentials depended on the internal Ca2+ concentration. Calcium ions (0.3-3 microM) applied to the internal membrane surface caused an enhancement of the channel activity. This activation of BK channels by internal calcium had a KD(0) of 0.22 microM and was probably due to the binding of only one or two Ca2+ ions to the channel. Addition of MgATP (0.01-3 mM) to the internal solution increased steady state-open probability. The dissociation constant for MgATP (KD) was 119 microM, and the Hill coefficient (h) was 0.6, according to the Hill analysis. Ca2+-activated K+ currents recorded from whole cells were suppressed by either adding Cd2+ (0.4 mM) or removing Ca2+ ions from the external solution. TEA (1 mM) or charybdotoxin (100 nM) blocked these currents. Our results showed that both BK and K(ATP) channels are present in the same cell. Even when BK and K(ATP) channels were voltage dependent and modulated by internal Ca2+ and ATP, the profile of sensitivity was quite different for each kind

  5. sigma Receptor activation blocks potassium channels and depresses neuroexcitability in rat intracardiac neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongling; Cuevas, Javier

    2005-06-01

    The sigma receptors have been implicated in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, and sigma-1 receptor transcripts have been found in parasympathetic intracardiac neurons. However, the cellular function of sigma-1 receptors in these cells remains to be determined. Effects of sigma receptor activation on voltage-activated K(+) channels and action potential firing were studied in isolated intracardiac neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques. Activation of sigma receptors reversibly blocked delayed outwardly rectifying potassium channels, large conductance Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels, and the M-current with maximal inhibition >80%. The inhibition of K(+) channels by sigma ligands was dose-dependent, and the rank order potency of (+)-pentazocine > ibogaine > 1,3-di-O-tolyguanidin (DTG) suggests that the effect is mediated by sigma-1 receptor activation. Preincubation of neurons with the irreversible sigma receptor antagonist metaphit blocked DTG-induced inhibition of K(+) channels, confirming that the effect is mediated by sigma receptor activation. Although bath application of sigma ligands depolarized intracardiac neurons, the number of action potentials fired by the cells in response to depolarizing current pulses was decreased in the presence of these drugs. Neither dialysis of the neurons nor application of intracellular 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) trilithium salt inhibited the effect of sigma receptors on K(+) channels, which suggests that the signal transduction pathway does not involve a diffusible cytosolic second messenger or a G protein. Together, these data suggest that sigma-1 receptors are directly coupled to K(+) channels in intracardiac neurons. Furthermore, activation of sigma-1 receptors depresses the excitability of intracardiac neurons and is thus likely to block parasympathetic input to the heart.

  6. Involvement of a membrane potassium channel in heparan sulphate-induced activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Dong; Fan, Li; Tian, Fu-Zhou; Fan, Kai-Hua; Yu, Bo-Tao; Jin, Wei-Hua; Tan, Yong-Hong; Cheng, Long

    2014-03-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) -mediated systemic inflammatory response syndrome accompanied by multiple organ failure, is one of the most common causes of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Recent reports have revealed that heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, a component of extracellular matrices, potentiates the activation of intracellular pro-inflammatory responses via TLR4, contributing to the aggravation of acute pancreatitis. However, little is known about the participants in the HS/TLR4-mediated inflammatory cascades. Our previous work provided a clue that a membrane potassium channel (MaxiK) is responsible for HS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, in this report we attempted to reveal the roles of MaxiK in the activation of macrophages stimulated by HS. Our results showed that incubation of RAW264.7 cells with HS up-regulated MaxiK and TLR4 expression levels. HS could also activate MaxiK channels to promote the efflux of potassium ions from cells, as measured by the elevated activity of caspase-1, whereas this was significantly abolished by treatment with paxilline, a specific blocker of the MaxiK channel. Moreover, it was found that paxilline substantially inhibited HS-induced activation of several different transcription factors in macrophages, including nuclear factor-κB, p38 and interferon regulatory factor-3, followed by decreased production of tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-β. Taken together, our investigation provides evidence that the HS/TLR4-mediated intracellular inflammatory cascade depends on the activation of MaxiK, which may offer an important opportunity for a new approach in therapeutic strategies of severe acute pancreatitis.

  7. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation.

  8. Potassium channels control the interaction between active dendritic integration compartments in layer 5 cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Mark T.; Xu, Ning-Long; Magee, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Active dendritic synaptic integration enhances the computational power of neurons. Such nonlinear processing generates an object-localization signal in the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5B cortical pyramidal neurons during sensory-motor behaviour. Here we employ electrophysiological and optical approaches in brain-slices and behaving animals to investigate how excitatory synaptic input to this distal dendritic compartment influences neuronal output. We find that active dendritic integration throughout the apical dendritic tuft is highly compartmentalized by voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels. A high-density of both transient and sustained KV channels was observed in all apical dendritic compartments. These channels potently regulated the interaction between apical dendritic tuft, trunk, and axo-somatic integration zones to control neuronal output in vitro as well as the engagement of dendritic nonlinear processing in vivo during sensory-motor behaviour. Thus, KV channels dynamically tune the interaction between active dendritic integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons to shape behaviourally relevant neuronal computations. PMID:23931999

  9. Large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium channel in mitochondria of endothelial EA.hy926 cells.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Piotr; Koziel, Agnieszka; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, we describe the existence of a large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium (BKCa) channel in the mitochondria of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. A single-channel current was recorded from endothelial mitoplasts (i.e., inner mitochondrial membrane) using the patch-clamp technique in the mitoplast-attached mode. A potassium-selective current was recorded with a mean conductance equal to 270 ± 10 pS in a symmetrical 150/150 mM KCl isotonic solution. The channel activity, which was determined as the open probability, increased with the addition of calcium ions and the potassium channel opener NS1619. Conversely, the activity of the channel was irreversibly blocked by paxilline and iberiotoxin, BKCa channel inhibitors. The open-state probability was found to be voltage dependent. The substances known to modulate BKCa channel activity influenced the bioenergetics of mitochondria isolated from human endothelial EA.hy926 cells. In isolated mitochondria, 100 μM Ca²⁺, 10 μM NS1619, and 0.5 μM NS11021 depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential and stimulated nonphosphorylating respiration. These effects were blocked by iberiotoxin and paxilline in a potassium-dependent manner. Under phosphorylating conditions, NS1619-induced, iberiotoxin-sensitive uncoupling diverted energy from ATP synthesis during the phosphorylating respiration of the endothelial mitochondria. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against proteins of the plasma membrane BKCa channel identified a pore-forming α-subunit and an auxiliary β₂-subunit of the channel in the endothelial mitochondrial inner membrane. In conclusion, we show for the first time that the inner mitochondrial membrane in human endothelial EA.hy926 cells contains a large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channel with properties similar to those of the surface membrane BKCa channel.

  10. Downregulation of Purkinje Cell Activity by Modulators of Small Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels In Rat Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Karelina, T. V.; Stepanenko, Yu. D.; Abushik, P. A.; Sibarov, D. A.; Antonov, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) are widely expressed in CNS tissues. Their functions, however, have not been well studied. Participation of SK channels in Purkinje cell (PC) pacemaker activity has been studied predominantly in vitro. Here we studied for the first time the effects of SK channel activation by NS309 or CyPPA on the PC simple spike frequency in vivo in adult (3 – 6 months) and aged (22 – 28 months) rats using extracellular microelectrode recordings. Both pharmacological agents caused a statistically significant decrease in the PC simple spike frequency. The maximum value of the decrease in the simple spike frequency did not depend on age, whereas a statistically significant inhibition of the spike frequency was achieved faster in aged animals than in adult ones. In experiments on cultured neurons PCs were identified by the expression of calbindin as the PC-specific marker. Registration of transmembrane currents in cerebellar neurons revealed the direct action of NS309 and CyPPA on the SK channels of PC consisted in the enhancement of outward potassium currents and action potential after-hyperpolarization. Thus, SK channel activators can compensate for age-related changes of the autorhythmic functions of the cerebellum. PMID:28050270

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum potassium-hydrogen exchanger and small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel activities are essential for ER calcium uptake in neurons and cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuum, Malle; Veksler, Vladimir; Liiv, Joanna; Ventura-Clapier, Renee; Kaasik, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Calcium pumping into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen is thought to be coupled to a countertransport of protons through sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) and the members of the ClC family of chloride channels. However, pH in the ER lumen remains neutral, which suggests a mechanism responsible for proton re-entry. We studied whether cation-proton exchangers could act as routes for such a re-entry. ER Ca(2+) uptake was measured in permeabilized immortalized hypothalamic neurons, primary rat cortical neurons and mouse cardiac fibers. Replacement of K(+) in the uptake solution with Na(+) or tetraethylammonium led to a strong inhibition of Ca(2+) uptake in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, inhibitors of the potassium-proton exchanger (quinine or propranolol) but not of the sodium-proton exchanger reduced ER Ca(2+) uptake by 56-82%. Externally added nigericin, a potassium-proton exchanger, attenuated the inhibitory effect of propranolol. Inhibitors of small conductance calcium-sensitive K(+) (SK(Ca)) channels (UCL 1684, dequalinium) blocked the uptake of Ca(2+) by the ER in all preparations by 48-94%, whereas inhibitors of other K(+) channels (IK(Ca), BK(Ca) and K(ATP)) had no effect. Fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis revealed the presence of both SK(Ca) channels and the potassium-proton exchanger leucine zipper-EF-hand-containing transmembrane protein 1 (LETM1) in ER in situ and in the purified ER fraction. The data obtained demonstrate that SK(Ca) channels and LETM1 reside in the ER membrane and that their activity is essential for ER Ca(2+) uptake.

  12. Distribution of High-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Rat Vestibular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Felix E.; Savin, David; Luu, Cindy; Sultemeier, David R.; Hoffman, Larry F.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are important regulators of neuronal excitability. BK channels seem to be crucial for frequency tuning in nonmammalian vestibular and auditory hair cells. However, there are a paucity of data concerning BK expression in mammalian vestibular hair cells. We therefore investigated the localization of BK channels in mammalian vestibular hair cells, specifically in rat vestibular neuroepithelia. We find that only a subset of hair cells in the utricle and the crista ampullaris express BK channels. BK-positive hair cells are located mainly in the medial striolar region of the utricle, where they constitute at most 12% of hair cells, and in the central zone of the horizontal crista. A majority of BK-positive hair cells are encapsulated by a calretinin-positive calyx defining them as type I cells. The remainder are either type I cells encapsulated by a calretinin-negative calyx or type II hair cells. Surprisingly, the number of BK-positive hair cells in the utricle peaks in juvenile rats and declines in early adulthood. BK channels were not found in vestibular afferent dendrites or somata. Our data indicate that BK channel expression in the mammalian vestibular system differs from the expression pattern in the mammalian auditory and the nonmammalian vestibular system. The molecular diversity of vestibular hair cells indicates a functional diversity that has not yet been fully characterized. The predominance of BK-positive hair cells within the medial striola of juvenile animals suggests that they contribute to a scheme of highly lateralized coding of linear head movements during late development. PMID:19731297

  13. The ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate fungicide Mancozeb activates voltage-gated KCNQ2 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhu, Jin; Kong, Qingya; Jiang, Baifeng; Wan, Xia; Yue, Jinfeng; Li, Min; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jian; Gao, Zhaobing

    2013-06-07

    Mancozeb (manganese/zinc ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate) is an organometallic fungicide that has been associated with human neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. In a high-throughput screen for modulators of KCNQ2 channel, a fundamental player modulating neuronal excitability, Mancozeb, was found to significantly potentiate KCNQ2 activity. Mancozeb was validated electrophysiologically as a KCNQ2 activator with an EC50 value of 0.92±0.23μM. Further examination showed that manganese but not zinc ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate is the active component for the positive modulation effects. In addition, the compounds are effective when the metal ions are substituted by iron but lack potentiation activity when the metal ions are substituted by sodium, signifying the importance of the metal ion. However, the iron (Fe(3+)) alone, organic ligands alone or the mixture of iron with the organic ligand did not show any potentiation effect, suggesting as the active ingredient is a specific complex rather than two separate additive or synergistic components. Our study suggests that potentiation on KCNQ2 potassium channels might be the possible mechanism of Mancozeb toxicity in the nervous system.

  14. DPPX potassium channel antibody

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, William Oliver; Lennon, Vanda A.; Komorowski, Lars; Probst, Christian; Clardy, Stacey Lynn; Aksamit, Allen J.; Appendino, Juan Pablo; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Matsumoto, Joseph Y.; Pittock, Sean J.; Sandroni, Paola; Tippmann-Peikert, Maja; Wirrell, Elaine C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the detection frequency and clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein-6 (DPPX), a regulatory subunit of neuronal Kv4.2 potassium channels. Methods: Specimens from 20 patients evaluated on a service basis by tissue-based immunofluorescence yielded a synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with DPPX-IgG (serum, 20; CSF, all 7 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay confirmed DPPX specificity in all specimens. Sixty-nine patients with stiff-person syndrome and related disorders were also evaluated by DPPX-IgG cell-based assay. Results: Of 20 seropositive patients, 12 were men; median symptom onset age was 53 years (range, 13–75). Symptom onset was insidious in 15 and subacute in 5. Twelve patients reported prodromal weight loss. Neurologic disorders were multifocal. All had one or more brain or brainstem manifestations: amnesia (16), delirium (8), psychosis (4), depression (4), seizures (2), and brainstem disorders (15; eye movement disturbances [8], ataxia [7], dysphagia [6], dysarthria [4], respiratory failure [3]). Nine patients reported sleep disturbance. Manifestations of central hyperexcitability included myoclonus (8), exaggerated startle (6), diffuse rigidity (6), and hyperreflexia (6). Dysautonomia involved the gastrointestinal tract (9; diarrhea [6], gastroparesis, and constipation [3]), bladder (7), cardiac conduction system (3), and thermoregulation (1). Two patients had B-cell neoplasms: gastrointestinal lymphoma (1), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (1). Substantial neurologic improvements followed immunotherapy in 7 of 11 patients with available treatment data. DPPX-IgG was not detected in any of the stiff-person syndrome patients. Conclusions: DPPX-IgG is a biomarker for an immunotherapy-responsive multifocal neurologic disorder of the central and autonomic nervous systems. PMID:25320100

  15. CNTF-Treated Astrocyte Conditioned Medium Enhances Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Activity in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-08-01

    Seizure activity is linked to astrocyte activation as well as dysfunctional cortical neuron excitability produced from changes in calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) can be used to investigate the peripheral effects of activated astrocytes upon cortical neurons. However, CNTF-ACM's effect upon KCa channel activity in cultured cortical neurons has not yet been investigated. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat cortical neurons to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon charybdotoxin-sensitive large-conductance KCa (BK) channel currents and apamin-sensitive small-conductance KCa (SK) channel current. Biotinylation and RT-PCR were applied to assess CNTF-ACM's effects upon the protein and mRNA expression, respectively, of the SK channel subunits SK2 and SK3 and the BK channel subunits BKα1 and BKβ3. An anti-fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) monoclonal neutralizing antibody was used to assess the effects of the FGF-2 component of CNTF-ACM. CNTF-ACM significantly increased KCa channel current density, which was predominantly attributable to gains in BK channel activity (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM produced a significant increase in BKα1 and BKβ3 expression (p < 0.05) but had no significant effect upon SK2 or SK3 expression (p > 0.05). Blocking FGF-2 produced significant reductions in KCa channel current density (p > 0.05) as well as BKα1 and BKβ3 expression in CNTF-ACM-treated neurons (p > 0.05). CNTF-ACM significantly enhances BK channel activity in rat cortical neurons and that FGF-2 is partially responsible for these effects. CNTF-induced astrocyte activation results in secretion of neuroactive factors which may affect neuronal excitability and resultant seizure activity in mammalian cortical neurons.

  16. Activation of potassium channels in erythrocytes of marine teleost Scorpaena porcus.

    PubMed

    Silkin, Y A; Silkina, E N; Sherstobitov, A O; Gusev, G P

    2001-01-01

    To assess the possibility of stimulating Ca2+-activated K+ channels, marine fish erythrocytes were incubated at 20-22 degrees C in saline containing a Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor (orthovanadate), a Ca2+ ionophore (A23187), propranolol or Pb2+. Incubation of the cells for up to 2 h under control conditions or in the presence of 5 mM NH4VO3 and 1 mM Ca2+ did not affect the intracellular K+ and Na+ concentrations. About 50% cellular K+ was lost from erythrocytes incubated in the presence of 0.01 mM A23187, 1 mM EGTA and 0.4-1.0 mM Ca2+. There was a significant loss of cellular K+ after the addition of 0.05-0.2 mM propranolol to the incubation medium. The stimulatory effect of propranolol on the K+ efflux was independent of external Ca2+. Blockers of Ca2+ transport, verapamil and Co2+, caused only a small decrease in the K+ loss induced by propranolol. The treatment of erythrocytes with 1-2 microM Pb2+ led to a minor K+ loss, but at a Pb2+ concentration of 20-50 microM, about 70% cellular K+ was lost. The K+ efflux induced by propranolol or Pb2+ was completely blocked by 1 mM quinine. The induced K+ loss from the erythrocytes was accompanied by a slight increase in the intracellular Na+ concentration. These data indicate the possibility of inducing Ca2+- and Pb2+-activated potassium channels in erythrocytes of S. porcus. A distinctive feature of the cells is a high sensitivity to propranolol, which activates K+ channels in the absence of external Ca2+.

  17. Sodium-activated potassium channels are functionally coupled to persistent sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Hage, Travis A; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2012-02-22

    We report a novel coupled system of sodium-activated potassium currents (I(KNa)) and persistent sodium currents (I(NaP)), the components of which are widely distributed throughout the brain. Its existence and importance has not been previously recognized. Although I(KNa) was known to exist in many cell types, the source of Na(+) which activates I(KNa) remained a mystery. We now show in single membrane patches generated from the somas of rat neurons that sodium influx through I(NaP) is sufficient for activation of K(Na) channels, without substantial contribution from the transient sodium current or bulk [Na(+)](i). I(NaP) was found to be active at cell membrane resting potentials, a finding that may explain why I(KNa) can be evoked from negative holding potentials. These results show an unanticipated role for I(NaP) in activating a negative feedback system countering the excitable effects I(NaP); the interrelatedness of I(NaP) and I(KNa) suggests new ways neurons can tune their excitability.

  18. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  19. Magnolol and honokiol regulate the calcium-activated potassium channels signaling pathway in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanli; Han, Xuefeng; Tang, Shaoxun; Xiao, Wenjun; Tan, Zhiliang; Zhou, Chuanshe; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinghe

    2015-05-15

    To explore the regulatory mechanisms of magnolol and honokiol on calcium-activated potassium channels signaling pathway in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-induced diarrhea mice, the concentrations of serum chloride ion (Cl(-)), sodium ion (Na(+)), potassium ion (K(+)) and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) were measured. Additionally, the mRNA expressions of calmodulin 1 (CaM), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha subunit (CaMKIIα) and beta subunit (CaMKIIβ), ryanodine receptor 1, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 receptors), protein kinases C (PKC), potassium intermediate/small conductance calcium-activated channels (SK) and potassium large conductance calcium-activated channels(BK)were determined. A diarrhea mouse model was established using ETEC suspensions (3.29×10(9)CFU/ml) at a dosage of 0.02ml/g live body weight (BW). Magnolol or honokiol was intragastrically administered at dosages of 100 (M100 or H100), 300 (M300 or H300) and 500 (M500 or H500) mg/kg BW according to a 3×3 factorial arrangement. Magnolol and honokiol increased the Cl(-) and K(+) concentrations, further, upregulated the CaM, BKα1 and BKβ3 mRNA levels but downregulated the IP3 receptors 1, PKC, SK1, SK2, SK3, SK4 and BKβ4 mRNA expressions. Magnolol and honokiol did not alter the CaMKIIα, CaMKIIβ, ryanodine receptor 1, IP3 receptor 2, IP3 receptor 3, BKβ1 and BKβ2 mRNA expressions. These results clarify that magnolol and honokiol, acting through Ca(2+) channel blockade, inhibit the activation of IP3 receptor 1 to regulate the IP3-Ca(2+) store release, activate CaM to inhibit SK channels, and effectively suppress PKC kinases to promote BKα1 and BKβ3 channels opening and BKβ4 channel closing, which modulates the intestinal ion secretion.

  20. Genetic Control of Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ahmad S; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 80 genes in the human genome code for pore-forming subunits of potassium (K(+)) channels. Rare variants (mutations) in K(+) channel-encoding genes may cause heritable arrhythmia syndromes. Not all rare variants in K(+) channel-encoding genes are necessarily disease-causing mutations. Common variants in K(+) channel-encoding genes are increasingly recognized as modifiers of phenotype in heritable arrhythmia syndromes and in the general population. Although difficult, distinguishing pathogenic variants from benign variants is of utmost importance to avoid false designations of genetic variants as disease-causing mutations.

  1. Identification of ether à go-go and calcium-activated potassium channels in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R; Schönherr, R; Gavrilova-Ruch, O; Wohlrab, W; Heinemann, S H

    1999-09-15

    Ion channels and intracellular Ca2+ are thought to be involved in cell proliferation and may play a role in tumor development. We therefore characterized Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channels in the human melanoma cell lines IGR1, IPC298, and IGR39 using electrophysiological and molecular biological methods. All cell lines expressed outwardly rectifying K+ channels. Rapidly activating delayed rectifier channels were detected in IGR39 cells. The activation kinetics of voltage-gated K+ channels in IRG1 and IPC298 cells displayed characteristics of ether à go-go (eag) channels as they were much slower and depended both on the holding potential and on extracellular Mg2+. In addition, they could be blocked by physiological concentrations of intracellular Ca2+. In accordance with these electrophysiological results, analysis of mRNA revealed the expression of a gene coding for h-eag1 channels in IGR1 and IPC298 cells, but not in IGR39 cells. At elevated Ca2+ concentrations various types of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels with single-channel characteristics similar to IK and SK channels were detected in IGR1 cells. The whole-cell Ca(2+)-activated K+ currents were not voltage dependent, insensitive for 100 nm apamin and 200 microm d-tubocurarine, but were blocked by charybdotoxin (100 nm) and clotrimazole (50 nm). Analysis of mRNA revealed the expression of hSK1, hSK2, and hIK channels in IGR1 cells.

  2. Molecular Information of charybdotoxin blockade in the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Su; Yi, Hong; Liu, Hui; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin

    2009-07-01

    The scorpion toxin, charybdotoxin (ChTX), is the first identified peptide inhibitor for the large-conductance Ca2+ and voltage-dependent K+ (BK) channel, and the chemical information of the interaction between ChTX and BK channel remains unclear today. Using combined computational methods, we obtained a ChTX-BK complex structure model, which correlated well with the mutagenesis data. In this complex, ChTX mainly used its beta-sheet domains to associate the BK channel with a conserved pore-blocking Lys27. Another crucial Tyr36 residue of ChTX lied over the loop connecting selectivity filter and S6 helix of BK channel, forming a hydrogen bond with Gly291 of BK channel. Besides, the unique turret region of BK channel was found to be far away from bound ChTX, which could explain the fact that many BK channel blockers show less selectivity over Kv channels. Together, all these information is helpful to reveal the diverse interactions between scorpion toxins and potassium channels and can accelerate the molecular engineering of specific inhibitor design.

  3. A cyclic model for bimodal activation of calcium activated potassium channels in radish vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Carpaneto, A

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the mathematical framework of a cyclic model proposed for describing the transition between a fast and a slow mode (fast-slow effect) induced by the application of step membrane potentials to ion channels from radish vacuoles. A voltage stimulation pulse with frequency in the range of 2 Hz or higher increased the activation time (slow mode) of the recorded currents. When the frequency of the stimulation pattern was restored to 0.1 Hz the activation time decreased twofold (fast mode). This experimental result cannot be explained by classical kinetic theory. The model, based on a simple extension of the Hodgkin and Huxley chain, describes the whole current experimental data and provides hints on the structural conformation of ion channels.

  4. Potassium channels in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Chabot, Sophie; Antigny, Fabrice; Perros, Frédéric; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with various origins. All forms of PAH share a common pulmonary arteriopathy characterised by vasoconstriction, remodelling of the pre-capillary pulmonary vessel wall, and in situ thrombosis. Although the pathogenesis of PAH is recognised as a complex and multifactorial process, there is growing evidence that potassium channels dysfunction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of PAH. Besides regulating many physiological functions, reduced potassium channels expression and/or activity have significant effects on PAH establishment and progression. This review describes the molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of potassium channel modulation. Special emphasis is placed on KCNA5 (Kv1.5) and KCNK3 (TASK1), which are considered to play a central role in determining pulmonary vascular tone and may represent attractive therapeutic targets in the treatment of PAH.

  5. Changes of expression of stretch-activated potassium channel TREK-1 mRNA and protein in hypertrophic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Longxian; Su, Fengcheng; Ripen, Nsenga; Fan, Hong; Huang, Kai; Wang, Min; Peng, Hongyu; Mei, Chunli; Zhao, Fang; Liao, Yuhua

    2006-01-01

    The expression of stretch-activated potassium channel TREK-1 mRNA and protein of hypertrophic myocardium was measured. Using a model of hypertrophy induced by coarctation of abdominal aorta in male Wistar rats, the expression of TREK-1 mRNA and protein was detected by using semi-quantitative RT PCR and Western blot respectively. At 4th and 8th week after constriction of the abdominal aorta, rats developed significant left ventricular hypertrophy. As compared to sham-operated group, stretch-activated potassium channel TREK-1 mRNA was strongly expressed and protein was up-regulated in operation groups (P < 0.05). It was concluded that the expression of TREK-1 was up-regulated in hypertrophic myocardium induced by chronic pressure overload in Wistar rats.

  6. Calcium ions open a selectivity filter gate during activation of the MthK potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Posson, David J; Rusinova, Radda; Andersen, Olaf S; Nimigean, Crina M

    2015-09-23

    Ion channel opening and closing are fundamental to cellular signalling and homeostasis. Gates that control K(+) channel activity were found both at an intracellular pore constriction and within the selectivity filter near the extracellular side but the specific location of the gate that opens Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels has remained elusive. Using the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum homologue (MthK) and a stopped-flow fluorometric assay for fast channel activation, we show that intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers bind to closed MthK channels. Since the blockers are known to bind inside a central channel cavity, past the intracellular entryway, the gate must be within the selectivity filter. Furthermore, the blockers access the closed channel slower than the open channel, suggesting that the intracellular entryway narrows upon pore closure, without preventing access of either the blockers or the smaller K(+). Thus, Ca(2+)-dependent gating in MthK occurs at the selectivity filter with coupled movement of the intracellular helices.

  7. Calcium ions open a selectivity filter gate during activation of the MthK potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posson, David J.; Rusinova, Radda; Andersen, Olaf S.; Nimigean, Crina M.

    2015-09-01

    Ion channel opening and closing are fundamental to cellular signalling and homeostasis. Gates that control K+ channel activity were found both at an intracellular pore constriction and within the selectivity filter near the extracellular side but the specific location of the gate that opens Ca2+-activated K+ channels has remained elusive. Using the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum homologue (MthK) and a stopped-flow fluorometric assay for fast channel activation, we show that intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers bind to closed MthK channels. Since the blockers are known to bind inside a central channel cavity, past the intracellular entryway, the gate must be within the selectivity filter. Furthermore, the blockers access the closed channel slower than the open channel, suggesting that the intracellular entryway narrows upon pore closure, without preventing access of either the blockers or the smaller K+. Thus, Ca2+-dependent gating in MthK occurs at the selectivity filter with coupled movement of the intracellular helices.

  8. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Hoffman, Dax A; Magee, Jeffrey C; Poolos, Nicholas P; Watanabe, Shigeo; Colbert, Costa M; Migliore, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 μm of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 μm from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials. PMID:10811726

  9. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  10. Regional expression of the anesthetic-activated potassium channel TRESK in the rat nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, SieHyeon; Liu, Jia; Sabbadini, Marta; Au, Paul; Xie, Guo-xi; Yost, C. Spencer

    2009-01-01

    The two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels contribute to background (leak) potassium currents maintaining the resting membrane potential to play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability. As such they may contribute to nociception and the mechanism of action of volatile anesthetics. In the present study, we examined the protein expression pattern of the K2P channel TRESK in the rat central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) by immunohistochemistry. The regional distribution expression pattern of TRESK has both similarities and significant differences from that of other K2P channels expressed in the CNS. TRESK expression is broadly found in the brain, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). TRESK expression is highest in important CNS structures, such as specific cortical layers, periaqueductal gray (PAG), granule cell layer of the cerebellum, and dorsal horn of the spinal cord. TRESK expression is also high in small and medium sized DRG neurons. These results provide an anatomic basis for identifying functional roles of TRESK in the rat nervous system. PMID:19716403

  11. External copper inhibits the activity of the large-conductance calcium- and voltage-sensitive potassium channel from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morera, F J; Wolff, D; Vergara, C

    2003-03-01

    We have characterized the effect of external copper on the gating properties of the large-conductance calcium- and voltage-sensitive potassium channel from skeletal muscle, incorporated into artificial bilayers. The effect of Cu2+ was evaluated as changes in the gating kinetic properties of the channel after the addition of this ion. We found that, from concentrations of 20 microM and up, copper induced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in channel open probability. The inhibition of channel activity by Cu2+ could not be reversed by washing or by addition of the copper chelator, bathocuproinedisulfonic acid. However, channel activity was appreciably restored by the sulfhydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol. The effect of copper was specific since other transition metal divalent cations such as Ni2+, Zn2+ or Cd2+ did not affect BK(Ca) channel activity in the same concentration range. These results suggest that external Cu2+-induced inhibition of channel activity was due to direct or indirect oxidation of key amino-acid sulfhydryl groups that might have a role in channel gating.

  12. Calcium-activated potassium channels in cultured human endothelial cells are not directly modulated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Haburcák, M; Wei, L; Viana, F; Prenen, J; Droogmans, G; Nilius, B

    1997-04-01

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to directly activated large conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels (BKCa) [Bolotina V.M., Najibi S., Palacino J.J., Pagano P.J., Cohen R.A. Nitric oxide directly activates calcium-dependent potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle. Nature 1994; 368: 850-853]. The nitric oxide (NO) donor S-nitrosocysteine (SNOC) was used to evaluate a possible direct modulation of BKCa by NO in EAhy926 (EA cells), a cultured human umbilical vein derived endothelial cell line, using the whole-cell, cell-attached and inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp technique, together with simultaneous amperometric measurement of NO and the concentration of free intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i. BKCa channels with a large conductance of approximately 190 pS, voltage-dependent activation and a reversal potential close to -80 mV have been identified in EA cells. Exposure of EA cells in the experimental chamber to 1 mM SNOC delivered approximately 5 microM NO, as recorded by an amperometric probe in situ. SNOC produced a modest increases in [Ca2+]i that was insufficient to activate BKCa channels. NO alone neither activated BKCa channels directly nor modulated preactivated BKCa channels in EA cells. These results do not support a direct modulatory effect of NO on large conductance BKCa channels in cultured endothelial cells.

  13. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in purkinje cell plasma membranes are clustered at sites of hypolemmal microdomains.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Walter A; Ferraguti, Francesco; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kasugai, Yu; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Laake, Petter; Sexton, Joseph A; Ruth, Peter; Wietzorrek, Georg; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Storm, Johan F; Ottersen, Ole Petter

    2009-07-10

    Calcium-activated potassium channels have been shown to be critically involved in neuronal function, but an elucidation of their detailed roles awaits identification of the microdomains where they are located. This study was undertaken to unravel the precise subcellular distribution of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (called BK, KCa1.1, or Slo1) in the somatodendritic compartment of cerebellar Purkinje cells by means of postembedding immunogold cytochemistry and SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling (SDS-FRL). We found BK channels to be unevenly distributed over the Purkinje cell plasma membrane. At distal dendritic compartments, BK channels were scattered over the plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines but absent from postsynaptic densities. At the soma and proximal dendrites, BK channels formed two distinct pools. One pool was scattered over the plasma membrane, whereas the other pool was clustered in plasma membrane domains overlying subsurface cisterns. The labeling density ratio of clustered to scattered channels was about 60:1, established in SDS-FRL. Subsurface cisterns, also called hypolemmal cisterns, are subcompartments of the endoplasmic reticulum likely representing calciosomes that unload and refill Ca2+ independently. Purkinje cell subsurface cisterns are enriched in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors that mediate the effects of several neurotransmitters, hormones, and growth factors by releasing Ca2+ into the cytosol, generating local Ca2+ sparks. Such increases in cytosolic [Ca2+] may be sufficient for BK channel activation. Clustered BK channels in the plasma membrane may thus participate in building a functional unit (plasmerosome) with the underlying calciosome that contributes significantly to local signaling in Purkinje cells.

  14. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory.

  15. The antipsychotic drug loxapine is an opener of the sodium-activated potassium channel slack (Slo2.2).

    PubMed

    Biton, B; Sethuramanujam, S; Picchione, Kelly E; Bhattacharjee, A; Khessibi, N; Chesney, F; Lanneau, C; Curet, O; Avenet, P

    2012-03-01

    Sodium-activated potassium (K(Na)) channels have been suggested to set the resting potential, to modulate slow after-hyperpolarizations, and to control bursting behavior or spike frequency adaptation (Trends Neurosci 28:422-428, 2005). One of the genes that encodes K(Na) channels is called Slack (Kcnt1, Slo2.2). Studies found that Slack channels were highly expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons and modulated their firing frequency (J Neurosci 30:14165-14172, 2010). Therefore, Slack channel openers are of significant interest as putative analgesic drugs. We screened the library of pharmacologically active compounds with recombinant human Slack channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, by using rubidium efflux measurements with atomic absorption spectrometry. Riluzole at 500 μM was used as a reference agonist. The antipsychotic drug loxapine and the anthelmintic drug niclosamide were both found to activate Slack channels, which was confirmed by using manual patch-clamp analyses (EC(50) = 4.4 μM and EC(50) = 2.9 μM, respectively). Psychotropic drugs structurally related to loxapine were also evaluated in patch-clamp experiments, but none was found to be as active as loxapine. Loxapine properties were confirmed at the single-channel level with recombinant rat Slack channels. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, loxapine was found to behave as an opener of native K(Na) channels and to increase the rheobase of action potential. This study identifies new K(Na) channel pharmacological tools, which will be useful for further Slack channel investigations.

  16. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-09-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K(+) channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K(+) channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist.

  17. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-01-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K+ channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K+ channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist. PMID:20566661

  18. Developmental mapping of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel expression in the rat nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gymnopoulos, Marco; Cingolani, Lorenzo A; Pedarzani, Paola; Stocker, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Early electrical activity and calcium influx regulate crucial aspects of neuronal development. Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels regulate action potential firing and shape calcium influx through feedback regulation in mature neurons. These functions, observed in the adult nervous system, make them ideal candidates to regulate activity- and calcium-dependent processes in neurodevelopment. However, to date little is known about the onset of expression and regions expressing SK channel subunits in the embryonic and postnatal development of the central nervous system (CNS). To allow studies on the contribution of SK channels to different phases of development of single neurons and networks, we have performed a detailed in situ hybridization mapping study, providing comprehensive distribution profiles of all three SK subunits (SK1, SK2, and SK3) in the rat CNS during embryonic and postnatal development. SK channel transcripts are expressed at early stages of prenatal CNS development. The three SK channel subunits display different developmental expression gradients in distinct CNS regions, with time points of expression and up- or downregulation that can be associated with a range of diverse developmental events. Their early expression in embryonic development suggests an involvement of SK channels in the regulation of developmental processes. Additionally, this study shows how the postnatal ontogenetic patterns lead to the adult expression map for each SK channel subunit and how their coexpression in the same regions or neurons varies throughout development.

  19. No independent, but an interactive, role of calcium-activated potassium channels in human cutaneous active vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Vienna E; Fujii, Naoto; Minson, Christopher T

    2013-11-01

    In human cutaneous microvasculature, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) account for a large portion of vasodilation associated with local stimuli. Thus we sought to determine the role of EDHFs in active vasodilation (AVD) to passive heating in two protocols. Whole body heating was achieved using water-perfused suits (core temperature increase of 0.8-1.0°C), and skin blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry. In the first protocol, four sites were perfused continuously via microdialysis with: 1) control; 2) tetraethylammonium (TEA) to block calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels, and thus the actions of EDHFs; 3) N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase (NOS); and 4) TEA + l-NAME (n = 8). Data are presented as percent maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). TEA had no effect on AVD (CVC during heated plateau: control 57.4 ± 4.9% vs. TEA 63.2 ± 5.2%, P = 0.27), indicating EDHFs are not obligatory. l-NAME attenuated plateau CVC to 33.7 ± 5.4% (P < 0.01 vs. control); while TEA + l-NAME augmented plateau CVC compared with l-NAME alone (49.7 ± 5.3%, P = 0.02). From these data, it appears combined blockade of EDHFs and NOS necessitates dilation through other means, possibly through inward rectifier (KIR) and/or ATP-sensitive (KATP) potassium channels. To test this second hypothesis, we measured AVD at the following sites (n = 8): 1) control, 2) l-NAME, 3) l-NAME + TEA, and 4) l-NAME + TEA + barium chloride (BaCl2; KIR and KATP blocker). The addition of BaCl2 to l-NAME + TEA reduced plateau CVC to 32.7 ± 6.6% (P = 0.02 vs. l-NAME + TEA), which did not differ from the l-NAME site. These data combined demonstrate a complex interplay between vasodilatory pathways, with cross-talk between NO, KCa channels, and KIR and/or KATP channels.

  20. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes suppress potassium channel activities in PC12 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haifei; Bai, Juan; Meng, Jie; Hao, Wei; Xu, Haiyan; Cao, Ji-Min

    2009-07-01

    The advancement in nanotechnology has produced technological and conceptual breakthroughs but the effects nanomaterials have on organisms at the cellular level are poorly understood. Here we report that carboxyl-terminated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) act as antagonists of three types of potassium channels as assessed by whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology on undifferentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our results showed that carboxyl-terminated MWCNTs suppress the current densities of Ito, IK and IK1 in a time-dependent and irreversible manner. The suppressions were most distinct 24 h after incubation with MWCNTs. However, MWCNTs did not significantly change the expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or intracellular free calcium and also did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in PC12 cells. These results suggest that oxidative stress was not involved in the MWCNTs suppression of Ito, IK and IK1 current densities. Nonetheless, the suppression of potassium currents by MWCNTs will impact on electrical signaling of excitable cells such as neurons and muscles.

  1. Mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel activity and hypoxic preconditioning are independent of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunit in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wojtovich, Andrew P.; DiStefano, Peter; Sherman, Teresa; Brookes, Paul S.; Nehrke, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HP) is an evolutionarily-conserved mechanism that protects an organism against stress. The mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel (mKATP) plays an essential role in the protective signaling, but remains molecularly undefined. Several lines of evidence suggest that mKATP may arise from an inward rectifying K+ channel (Kir). The genetic model organism C. elegans exhibits HP and displays mKATP activity. Here, we investigate the tissue expression profile of the three C. elegans Kir genes and demonstrate that mutant strains where the irk genes have been deleted either individually or in combination can be protected by HP and exhibit robust mKATP channel activity in purified mitochondria. These data suggest that the mKATP in C. elegans does not arise from a Kir derived channel. PMID:22281198

  2. Mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel activity and hypoxic preconditioning are independent of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunit in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wojtovich, Andrew P; DiStefano, Peter; Sherman, Teresa; Brookes, Paul S; Nehrke, Keith

    2012-02-17

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HP) is an evolutionarily-conserved mechanism that protects an organism against stress. The mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (mK(ATP)) plays an essential role in the protective signaling, but remains molecularly undefined. Several lines of evidence suggest that mK(ATP) may arise from an inward rectifying K(+) channel (Kir). The genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits HP and displays mK(ATP) activity. Here, we investigate the tissue expression profile of the three C. elegans Kir genes and demonstrate that mutant strains where the irk genes have been deleted either individually or in combination can be protected by HP and exhibit robust mK(ATP) channel activity in purified mitochondria. These data suggest that the mK(ATP) in C. elegans does not arise from a Kir derived channel.

  3. A highly polarized excitable cell separates sodium channels from sodium-activated potassium channels by more than a millimeter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin E.; Markham, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioelectrical properties and resulting metabolic demands of electrogenic cells are determined by their morphology and the subcellular localization of ion channels. The electric organ cells (electrocytes) of the electric fish Eigenmannia virescens generate action potentials (APs) with Na+ currents >10 μA and repolarize the AP with Na+-activated K+ (KNa) channels. To better understand the role of morphology and ion channel localization in determining the metabolic cost of electrocyte APs, we used two-photon three-dimensional imaging to determine the fine cellular morphology and immunohistochemistry to localize the electrocytes' ion channels, ionotropic receptors, and Na+-K+-ATPases. We found that electrocytes are highly polarized cells ∼1.5 mm in anterior-posterior length and ∼0.6 mm in diameter, containing ∼30,000 nuclei along the cell periphery. The cell's innervated posterior region is deeply invaginated and vascularized with complex ultrastructural features, whereas the anterior region is relatively smooth. Cholinergic receptors and Na+ channels are restricted to the innervated posterior region, whereas inward rectifier K+ channels and the KNa channels that terminate the electrocyte AP are localized to the anterior region, separated by >1 mm from the only sources of Na+ influx. In other systems, submicrometer spatial coupling of Na+ and KNa channels is necessary for KNa channel activation. However, our computational simulations showed that KNa channels at a great distance from Na+ influx can still terminate the AP, suggesting that KNa channels can be activated by distant sources of Na+ influx and overturning a long-standing assumption that AP-generating ion channels are restricted to the electrocyte's posterior face. PMID:25925327

  4. Acute stress induces down-regulation of large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in the lateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-yan; Liu, Shui-bing; Cui, Guang-Bin; Ma, Lan; Feng, Bin; Xing, Jiang-hao; Yang, Qi; Li, Xiao-qiang; Wu, Yu-mei; Xiong, Li-ze; Zhang, Weiqi; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BKCa) are highly expressed in the lateral amygdala (LA), which is closely involved in assigning stress disorders, but data on their role in the neuronal circuits of stress disorders are limited. In the present study, a significant reduction in BKCa channel expression in the amygdala of mice accompanied anxiety-like behaviour induced by acute stress. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from LA neurons of the anxious animals revealed a pronounced reduction in the fast after-hyperpolarization (fAHP) of action potentials mediated by BKCa channels that led to hyperexcitability of the LA neurons. Activation of BKCa channels in the LA reversed stress-induced anxiety-like behaviour after stress. Furthermore, down-regulated BKCa channels notably increased the evoked NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the thalamo-LA synapses. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that restraint stress-induced anxiety-like behaviour could at least partly be explained by alterations in the functional BKCa channels in the LA. PMID:22199169

  5. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-09-15

    1. Cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells adhering to the cell body of neurones in situ within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The underlying neurone was under current or voltage-clamp control. 2. Neuronal firing induced a delayed (20-30 s) persistent (3-4 min) increase in the opening probability of glial K+ channels. The channels were also activated by perfusing the ganglion with a depolarizing high-K+ saline, except when the underlying neurone was prevented from depolarizing under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Two K(+)-selective channels were detected in the glial membrane. The channel responding to neuronal firing was present in 95% of the patches (n = 393). It had a unitary conductance of 56 pS, a Na+ :K+ permeability ratio < 0.02 and displayed slight inward rectification in symmetrical [K+] conditions. It was sensitive to TEA, Ba2+ and Cs+. The following results refer to this channel as studied in the cell-attached configuration. 4. The glial K+ channel was activated by bath application of the membrane-permeant cyclic AMP derivatives 8-bromo-cAMP and dibutyryl-cAMP, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the diesterase inhibitors IBMX, theophylline and caffeine. It was insensitive to cyclic GMP activators and to conditions that might alter the intracellular [Ca2+] (ionomycin, low-Ca2+ saline and Ca2+ channel blockers). 5. The forskolin-induced changes in channel behaviour (open and closed time distributions, burst duration, short and long gaps within bursts) could be accounted for by a four-state model (3 closed states, 1 open state) by simply changing one of the six rate parameters. 6. The present results suggest that the signal sent by an active neurone to satellite glial cells is confined to the glial cells round that neurone. The effect of this signal on the class of glial K+ channels studied can be mimicked by an increase in glial cAMP concentration. The subsequent delayed opening

  6. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed Central

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-01-01

    1. Cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells adhering to the cell body of neurones in situ within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The underlying neurone was under current or voltage-clamp control. 2. Neuronal firing induced a delayed (20-30 s) persistent (3-4 min) increase in the opening probability of glial K+ channels. The channels were also activated by perfusing the ganglion with a depolarizing high-K+ saline, except when the underlying neurone was prevented from depolarizing under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Two K(+)-selective channels were detected in the glial membrane. The channel responding to neuronal firing was present in 95% of the patches (n = 393). It had a unitary conductance of 56 pS, a Na+ :K+ permeability ratio < 0.02 and displayed slight inward rectification in symmetrical [K+] conditions. It was sensitive to TEA, Ba2+ and Cs+. The following results refer to this channel as studied in the cell-attached configuration. 4. The glial K+ channel was activated by bath application of the membrane-permeant cyclic AMP derivatives 8-bromo-cAMP and dibutyryl-cAMP, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the diesterase inhibitors IBMX, theophylline and caffeine. It was insensitive to cyclic GMP activators and to conditions that might alter the intracellular [Ca2+] (ionomycin, low-Ca2+ saline and Ca2+ channel blockers). 5. The forskolin-induced changes in channel behaviour (open and closed time distributions, burst duration, short and long gaps within bursts) could be accounted for by a four-state model (3 closed states, 1 open state) by simply changing one of the six rate parameters. 6. The present results suggest that the signal sent by an active neurone to satellite glial cells is confined to the glial cells round that neurone. The effect of this signal on the class of glial K+ channels studied can be mimicked by an increase in glial cAMP concentration. The subsequent delayed opening

  7. Endoxifen, the active metabolite of tamoxifen, inhibits cloned hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Lee, Keon Jin; Lee, Hong Joon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Choi, Jin-Sung; Lee, Eun Hui; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-04-05

    The effects of tamoxifen, and its active metabolite endoxifen (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen), on hERG currents stably expressed in HEK cells were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and an immunoblot assay. Tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited hERG tail currents at -50mV in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 1.2 and 1.6μM, respectively. The steady-state activation curve of the hERG currents was shifted to the hyperpolarizing direction in the presence of endoxifen. The voltage-dependent inhibition of hERG currents by endoxifen increased steeply in the voltage range of channel activation. The inhibition by endoxifen displayed a shallow voltage dependence (δ=0.18) in the full activation voltage range. A fast application of endoxifen induced a reversible block of hERG tail currents during repolarization in a concentration-dependent manner, which suggested an interaction with the open state of the channel. Endoxifen also decreased the hERG current elicited by a 5s depolarizing pulse to +60mV to inactivate the hERG currents, suggesting an interaction with the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channels. Tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited the hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner with endoxifen being more potent than tamoxifen. These results indicated that tamoxifen and endoxifen inhibited the hERG current by direct channel blockage and by the disruption of channel trafficking to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner. A therapeutic concentration of endoxifen inhibited the hERG current by preferentially interacting with the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channel.

  8. CNS Schwann cells display oligodendrocyte precursor-like potassium channel activation and antigenic expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Kristel; Imbschweiler, Ilka; Ulrich, Reiner; Kovermann, Peter; Fahlke, Christoph; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärnter, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2014-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injury triggers production of myelinating Schwann cells from endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs). These CNS Schwann cells may be attractive candidates for novel therapeutic strategies aiming to promote endogenous CNS repair. However, CNS Schwann cells have been so far mainly characterized in situ regarding morphology and marker expression, and it has remained enigmatic whether they display functional properties distinct from peripheral nervous system (PNS) Schwann cells. Potassium channels (K+) have been implicated in progenitor and glial cell proliferation after injury and may, therefore, represent a suitable pharmacological target. In the present study, we focused on the function and expression of voltage-gated K+ channels Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits in purified adult canine CNS and PNS Schwann cell cultures using electrophysiology and microarray analysis and characterized their antigenic phenotype. We show here that K+ channels differed significantly in both cell types. While CNS Schwann cells displayed prominent K D-mediated K+ currents, PNS Schwann cells elicited K(D-) and K(A-type) K+ currents. Inhibition of K+ currents by TEA and Ba2+ was more effective in CNS Schwann cells. These functional differences were not paralleled by differential mRNA expression of Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits. However, O4/A2B5 and GFAP expressions were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in CNS than in PNS Schwann cells. Taken together, this is the first evidence that CNS Schwann cells display specific properties not shared by their peripheral counterpart. Both Kv currents and increased O4/A2B5 expression were reminiscent of OLPs suggesting that CNS Schwann cells retain OLP features during maturation.

  9. Redox-sensitive extracellular gates formed by auxiliary beta subunits of calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xu-Hui; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2003-06-01

    An important step to understanding ion channels is identifying the structural components that act as the gates to ion movement. Here we describe a new channel gating mechanism, produced by the beta3 auxiliary subunits of Ca2+-activated, large-conductance BK-type K+ channels when expressed with their pore-forming alpha subunits. BK beta subunits have a cysteine-rich extracellular segment connecting two transmembrane segments, with small cytosolic N and C termini. The extracellular segments of the beta3 subunits form gates to block ion permeation, providing a mechanism by which current can be rapidly diminished upon cellular repolarization. Furthermore, this gating mechanism is abolished by reduction of extracellular disulfide linkages, suggesting that endogenous mechanisms may regulate this gating behavior. The results indicate that auxiliary beta subunits of BK channels reside sufficiently close to the ion permeation pathway defined by the alpha subunits to influence or block access of small molecules to the permeation pathway.

  10. Sea Anemone Toxins Affecting Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochot, Sylvie; Lazdunski, Michel

    The great diversity of K+ channels and their wide distribution in many tissues are associated with important functions in cardiac and neuronal excitability that are now better understood thanks to the discovery of animal toxins. During the past few decades, sea anemones have provided a variety of toxins acting on voltage-sensitive sodium and, more recently, potassium channels. Currently there are three major structural groups of sea anemone K+ channel (SAK) toxins that have been characterized. Radioligand binding and electrophysiological experiments revealed that each group contains peptides displaying selective activities for different subfamilies of K+ channels. Short (35-37 amino acids) peptides in the group I display pore blocking effects on Kv1 channels. Molecular interactions of SAK-I toxins, important for activity and binding on Kv1 channels, implicate a spot of three conserved amino acid residues (Ser, Lys, Tyr) surrounded by other less conserved residues. Long (58-59 amino acids) SAK-II peptides display both enzymatic and K+ channel inhibitory activities. Medium size (42-43 amino acid) SAK-III peptides are gating modifiers which interact either with cardiac HERG or Kv3 channels by altering their voltage-dependent properties. SAK-III toxins bind to the S3C region in the outer vestibule of Kv channels. Sea anemones have proven to be a rich source of pharmacological tools, and some of the SAK toxins are now useful drugs for the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  11. SUMO modification of cell surface Kv2.1 potassium channels regulates the activity of rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Dowdell, Evan J.; Dementieva, Irina S.; Marks, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv2.1 potassium channels are important in the brain for determining activity-dependent excitability. Small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOs) regulate function through reversible, enzyme-mediated conjugation to target lysine(s). Here, sumoylation of Kv2.1 in hippocampal neurons is shown to regulate firing by shifting the half-maximal activation voltage (V1/2) of channels up to 35 mV. Native SUMO and Kv2.1 are shown to interact within and outside channel clusters at the neuronal surface. Studies of single, heterologously expressed Kv2.1 channels show that only K470 is sumoylated. The channels have four subunits, but no more than two non-adjacent subunits carry SUMO concurrently. SUMO on one site shifts V1/2 by 15 mV, whereas sumoylation of two sites produces a full response. Thus, the SUMO pathway regulates neuronal excitability via Kv2.1 in a direct and graded manner. PMID:21518833

  12. Mitochondrial large-conductance potassium channel from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Michal; Kicinska, Anna; Szewczyk, Adam; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we describe the existence of a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channel in the mitochondria of Dictyostelium discoideum. A single-channel current was recorded in a reconstituted system, using planar lipid bilayers. The large-conductance potassium channel activity of 258±12 pS was recorded in a 50/150 mM KCl gradient solution. The probability of channel opening (the channel activity) was increased by calcium ions and NS1619 (potassium channel opener) and reduced by iberiotoxin (BKCa channel inhibitor). The substances known to modulate BKCa channel activity influenced the bioenergetics of D. discoideum mitochondria. In isolated mitochondria, NS1619 and NS11021 stimulated non-phosphorylating respiration and depolarized membrane potential, indicating the channel activation. These effects were blocked by iberiotoxin and paxilline. Moreover, the activation of the channel resulted in attenuation of superoxide formation, but its inhibition had the opposite effect. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against mammalian BKCa channel subunits detected a pore-forming α subunit and auxiliary β subunits of the channel in D. discoideum mitochondria. In conclusion, we show for the first time that mitochondria of D. discoideum, a unicellular ameboid protozoon that facultatively forms multicellular structures, contain a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel with electrophysiological, biochemical and molecular properties similar to those of the channels previously described in mammalian and plant mitochondria.

  13. Intermediate-Conductance-Ca2-Activated K Channel Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel (IKCa1) is Upregulated and Promotes Cell Proliferation in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Zhan, Ping; Nie, Dan; Fan, Lingye; Lin, Hairui; Gao, Lanyang; Mao, Xiguang

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating data point to intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (IKCa1) as a key player in controlling cell cycle progression and proliferation of human cancer cells. However, the role that IKCa1 plays in the growth of human cervical cancer cells is largely unexplored. Material/Methods In this study, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemical staining, and RT-PCR were first used for IKCa1protein and gene expression assays in cervical cancer tissues and HeLa cells. Then, IKCa1 channel blocker and siRNA were employed to inhibit the functionality of IKCa1 and downregulate gene expression in HeLa cells, respectively. After these treatments, we examined the level of cell proliferation by MTT method and measured IKCa1 currents by conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique. Cell apoptosis was assessed using the Annexin V-FITC/Propidium Iodide (PI) double-staining apoptosis detection kit. Results We demonstrated that IKCa1 mRNA and protein are preferentially expressed in cervical cancer tissues and HeLa cells. We also showed that the IKCa1 channel blocker, clotrimazole, and IKCa1 channel siRNA can be used to suppress cervical cancer cell proliferation and decrease IKCa1 channel current. IKCa1 downregulation by specific siRNAs induced a significant increase in the proportion of apoptotic cells in HeLa cells. Conclusions IKCa1 is overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues, and IKCa1 upregulation in cervical cancer cell linea enhances cell proliferation, partly by reducing the proportion of apoptotic cells. PMID:28280257

  14. Hysteresis of KcsA potassium channel's activation- deactivation gating is caused by structural changes at the channel's selectivity filter.

    PubMed

    Tilegenova, Cholpon; Cortes, D Marien; Cuello, Luis G

    2017-03-21

    Mode-shift or hysteresis has been reported in ion channels. Voltage-shift for gating currents is well documented for voltage-gated cation channels (VGCC), and it is considered a voltage-sensing domain's (VSD) intrinsic property. However, uncoupling the Shaker K(+) channel's pore domain (PD) from the VSD prevented the mode-shift of the gating currents. Consequently, it was proposed that an open-state stabilization of the PD imposes a mechanical load on the VSD, which causes its mode-shift. Furthermore, the mode-shift displayed by hyperpolarization-gated cation channels is likely caused by structural changes at the channel's PD similar to those underlying C-type inactivation. To demonstrate that the PD of VGCC undergoes hysteresis, it is imperative to study its gating process in the absence of the VSD. A back-door strategy is to use KcsA (a K(+) channel from the bacteria Streptomyces lividans) as a surrogate because it lacks a VSD and exhibits an activation coupled to C-type inactivation. By directly measuring KcsA's activation gate opening and closing in conditions that promote or halt C-type inactivation, we have found (i) that KcsA undergoes mode-shift of gating when having K(+) as the permeant ion; (ii) that Cs(+) or Rb(+), known to halt C-inactivation, prevented mode-shift of gating; and (iii) that, in the total absence of C-type inactivation, KcsA's mode-shift was prevented. Finally, our results demonstrate that an allosteric communication causes KcsA's activation gate to "remember" the conformation of the selectivity filter, and hence KcsA requires a different amount of energy for opening than for closing.

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of the Sodium-activated Potassium Channel SLICK (KCNT2) Promoter by Nuclear Factor-κB*

    PubMed Central

    Tomasello, Danielle L.; Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M.; Dietz, David M.; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2015-01-01

    Although recent studies have shown the sodium-activated potassium channel SLACK (KCNT1) can contribute to neuronal excitability, there remains little information on the physiological role of the closely related SLICK (KCNT2) channel. Activation of SLICK channels may be important during pathological states such as ischemia, in which an increase in intracellular sodium and chloride can perturb membrane potential and ion homeostasis. We have identified two NFκB-binding sites within the promoter region of the human SLICK (KCNT2) and orthologous rat Slick (Kcnt2) genes, suggesting that conditions in which NFκB transcriptional activity is elevated promote expression of this channel. NFκB binding to the rat Slick promoter was confirmed in vivo by ChIP analyses, and NFκB was found differentially bound to the two sites. We verified NFκB transcriptional regulation of SLICK/Slick by mutational analyses and studying gene expression by luciferase assay in P19 cells, where NFκB is constitutively active. For the rat gene, activation of the Slick promoter was found to be additive in single NFκB mutations and synergistic in double mutations. Unexpectedly, for the human gene, NFκB exhibited cooperativity in activating the SLICK promoter. The human SLICK promoter constructs were then tested under hypoxic conditions in PC-12 cells, where NFκB is not active. Only under hypoxic conditions could luciferase activity be detected; the double NFκB mutant construct failed to exhibit activity. Transcriptional regulation of Slick by NFκB was verified in primary neurons. The Slick transcript decreased 24 h after NFκB inhibition. Our data show SLICK expression is predominantly under the control of NFκB. Because neuronal NFκB activation occurs during stressful stimuli such as hypoxia and injury, our findings suggest that SLICK is a neuroprotective gene. PMID:26100633

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of the Sodium-activated Potassium Channel SLICK (KCNT2) Promoter by Nuclear Factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Danielle L; Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M; Dietz, David M; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2015-07-24

    Although recent studies have shown the sodium-activated potassium channel SLACK (KCNT1) can contribute to neuronal excitability, there remains little information on the physiological role of the closely related SLICK (KCNT2) channel. Activation of SLICK channels may be important during pathological states such as ischemia, in which an increase in intracellular sodium and chloride can perturb membrane potential and ion homeostasis. We have identified two NFκB-binding sites within the promoter region of the human SLICK (KCNT2) and orthologous rat Slick (Kcnt2) genes, suggesting that conditions in which NFκB transcriptional activity is elevated promote expression of this channel. NFκB binding to the rat Slick promoter was confirmed in vivo by ChIP analyses, and NFκB was found differentially bound to the two sites. We verified NFκB transcriptional regulation of SLICK/Slick by mutational analyses and studying gene expression by luciferase assay in P19 cells, where NFκB is constitutively active. For the rat gene, activation of the Slick promoter was found to be additive in single NFκB mutations and synergistic in double mutations. Unexpectedly, for the human gene, NFκB exhibited cooperativity in activating the SLICK promoter. The human SLICK promoter constructs were then tested under hypoxic conditions in PC-12 cells, where NFκB is not active. Only under hypoxic conditions could luciferase activity be detected; the double NFκB mutant construct failed to exhibit activity. Transcriptional regulation of Slick by NFκB was verified in primary neurons. The Slick transcript decreased 24 h after NFκB inhibition. Our data show SLICK expression is predominantly under the control of NFκB. Because neuronal NFκB activation occurs during stressful stimuli such as hypoxia and injury, our findings suggest that SLICK is a neuroprotective gene.

  17. Integrin-mediated neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells depends on the activation of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Ba2+ and Cs+. By moving patched cells in contact with FN-coated beads, it was shown that KIR channel activation was responsible for the FN-mediated hyperpolarization of Vrest. Treatment with Pertuxis toxin (PTX) abolished this hyperpolarization and neurite outgrowth, indicating that a G protein is interposed between integrins and KIR channels and that the activation of these channels is required for neuritogenesis. In fact, the block of KIR channels by Cs+ abolished both hyperpolarization and neurite outgrowth, provided that the cation was supplied during the first two hours after N1 cell contact with FN.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8354696

  18. Pharmacology of cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui-Rong; Dong, Ming-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac K(+) channels are cardiomyocyte membrane proteins that regulate K(+) ion flow across the cell membrane on the electrochemical gradient and determine the resting membrane potential and the cardiac action potential morphology and duration. Several K(+) channels have been well studied in the human heart. They include the transient outward K(+) current I(to1), the ultra-rapidly activating delayed rectifier current I(Kur), the rapidly and slowly activating delayed rectifier currents I(Kr) and I(Ks), the inward rectifier K(+) current I(K1), and ligand-gated K(+) channels, including adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) current (I(KATP)) and acetylcholine-activated current (I(KACh)). Regional differences of K(+) channel expression contribute to the variable morphologies and durations of cardiac action potentials from sinus node and atrial to ventricular myocytes, and different ventricular layers from endocardium and midmyocardium to epicardium. They also show different responses to endogenous regulators and/or pharmacological agents. K(+) channels are well-known targets for developing novel anti-arrhythmic drugs that can effectively prevent/inhibit cardiac arrhythmias. Especially, atrial-specific K(+) channel currents (I(Kur) and I(KACh)) are the targets for developing atrial-selective anti-atrial fibrillation drugs, which has been greatly progressed in recent years. This chapter concentrates on recent advances in intracellular signaling regulation and pharmacology of cardiac K(+) channels under physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  19. Pharmacology of cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Gómez, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Carmen; Delpón, Eva

    2004-04-01

    Cardiac K+ channels are membrane-spanning proteins that allow the passive movement of K+ ions across the cell membrane along its electrochemical gradient. They regulate the resting membrane potential, the frequency of pacemaker cells and the shape and duration of the cardiac action potential. Additionally, they have been recognized as potential targets for the actions of neurotransmitters and hormones and class III antiarrhythmic drugs that prolong the action potential duration (APD) and refractoriness and have been found effective to prevent/suppress cardiac arrhythmias. In the human heart, K+ channels include voltage-gated channels, such as the rapidly activating and inactivating transient outward current (Ito1), the ultrarapid (IKur), rapid (IKr) and slow (IKs) components of the delayed rectifier current and the inward rectifier current (IK1), the ligand-gated channels, including the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive (IKATP) and the acetylcholine-activated (IKAch) currents and the leak channels. Changes in the expression of K+ channels explain the regional variations in the morphology and duration of the cardiac action potential among different cardiac regions and are influenced by heart rate, intracellular signalling pathways, drugs and cardiovascular disorders. A progressive number of cardiac and noncardiac drugs block cardiac K+ channels and can cause a marked prolongation of the action potential duration (i.e. an acquired long QT syndrome, LQTS) and a distinct polymorphic ventricular tachycardia termed torsades de pointes. In addition, mutations in the genes encoding IKr (KCNH2/KCNE2) and IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1) channels have been identified in some types of the congenital long QT syndrome. This review concentrates on the function, molecular determinants, regulation and, particularly, on the mechanism of action of drugs modulating the K+ channels present in the sarcolemma of human cardiac myocytes that contribute to the different phases of the cardiac action

  20. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N.; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K+) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K+ channel modulating agents demonstrated that K+ channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K+ channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K+ channels (K2P) were identified as the K+ channel family mediating BUNV K+ channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease. PMID:26677217

  1. Regulation of intrinsic excitability in hippocampal neurons by activity-dependent modulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Durga P.; Misonou, Hiroaki; Pan, Sheng-Jun; Held, Joshua E.; Surmeier, D. James; Trimmer, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Kv2.1 is the prominent somatodendritic sustained or delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel in mammalian central neurons, and is a target for activity-dependent modulation via calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation. Using hanatoxin-mediated block of Kv2.1 we show that, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, glutamate stimulation leads to significant hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation gating properties of the Kv2.1-component of delayed rectifier K+ (IK) currents. In computer models of hippocampal neurons, these glutamate-stimulated shifts in the gating of the Kv2.1-component of IK lead to a dramatic suppression of action potential firing frequency. Current-clamp experiments in cultured rat hippocampal neurons showed glutamate-stimulation induced a similar suppression of neuronal firing frequency. Membrane depolarization also resulted in similar hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent gating properties of neuronal IK currents, and suppression of neuronal firing. The glutamate-induced effects on neuronal firing were eliminated by hanatoxin, but not by dendrotoxin-K, a blocker of Kv1.1-containing channels. These studies together demonstrate a specific contribution of modulation of Kv2.1 channels in the activity-dependent regulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability. PMID:19276663

  2. Biophysical characterization of KV3.1 potassium channel activating compounds.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Bahar; von Schoubye, Nadia Lybøl; Sheykhzade, Majid; Bastlund, Jesper Frank; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-07-05

    The effect of two positive modulators, RE1 and EX15, on the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv3.1 was investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on HEK293 cells expressing Kv3.1a. RE1 and EX15 increased the Kv3.1 currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 4.5 and 1.3µM, respectively. However, high compound concentrations caused an inhibition of the Kv3.1 current. The compound-induced activation of Kv3.1 channels showed a profound hyperpolarized shift in activation kinetics. 30µM RE1 shifted V1/2 from 5.63±0.31mV to -9.71±1.00mV and 10µM EX15 induced a shift from 10.77±0.32mV to -15.11±1.57mV. The activation time constant (Tauact) was reduced for both RE1 and EX15, with RE1 being the fastest activator. The deactivation time constant (Taudeact) was also markedly reduced for both RE1 and EX15, with EX15 inducing the most prominent effect. Furthermore, subjected to depolarizing pulses at 30Hz, both compounds were showing a use-dependent effect resulting in a reduction of the compound-mediated effect. However, during these conditions, RE1- and EX15-modified current amplitudes still exceeded the control condition amplitudes by up to 200%. In summary, the present study introduces the first detailed biophysical characterization of two new Kv3.1 channel modifying compounds with different modulating properties.

  3. Chronic fluoxetine treatment increases NO bioavailability and calcium-sensitive potassium channels activation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Camila A; Ferreira, Nathanne S; Mestriner, Fabiola L; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Evora, Paulo R B; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Carneiro, Fernando S; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-10-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), has effects beyond its antidepressant properties, altering, e.g., mechanisms involved in blood pressure and vasomotor tone control. Although many studies have addressed the acute impact of fluoxetine on the cardiovascular system, there is a paucity of information on the chronic vascular effects of this SSRI. We tested the hypothesis that chronic fluoxetine treatment enhances the vascular reactivity to vasodilator stimuli by increasing nitric oxide (NO) signaling and activation of potassium (K+) channels. Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (I) vehicle (water for 21 days) or (II) chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day in the drinking water for 21 days). Fluoxetine treatment increased endothelium-dependent and independent vasorelaxation (analyzed by mesenteric resistance arteries reactivity) as well as constitutive NO synthase (NOS) activity, phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine1177 and NO production, determined by western blot and fluorescence. On the other hand, fluoxetine treatment did not alter vascular expression of neuronal and inducible NOS or guanylyl cyclase (GC). Arteries from fluoxetine-treated rats exhibited increased relaxation to pinacidil. Increased acetylcholine vasorelaxation was abolished by a calcium-activated K+ channel (KCa) blocker, but not by an inhibitor of KATP channels. On the other hand, vascular responses to Bay 41-2272 and 8-bromo-cGMP were similar between the groups. In conclusion, chronic fluoxetine treatment increases endothelium-dependent and independent relaxation of mesenteric resistance arteries by mechanisms that involve increased eNOS activity, NO generation, and KCa channels activation. These effects may contribute to the cardiovascular effects associated with chronic fluoxetine treatment.

  4. Calcium-activated potassium channels in isolated presynaptic nerve terminals from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Bartschat, D K; Blaustein, M P

    1985-01-01

    86Rb efflux was examined in isolated presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from rat brain in a study designed to assess K permeability (PK) changes sensitive to alterations in internal Ca activity. Rb efflux from 86Rb-loaded synaptosomes into nominally Ca-free physiological saline (PSS) containing 5 mM-K was about 0.3-0.4%/s. Raising extracellular K concentration [( K]o), to depolarize the synaptosomes, stimulated the 86Rb efflux. Addition of Ca to the 5 mM-K PSS had no effect, but Ca did further stimulate 86Rb efflux into K-rich solutions. The effect of Ca was graded, with apparent half-maximal activation, KA approximately equal to 0.5 mM-Ca. These data fit the view that, during depolarization, Ca enters the terminals through voltage-regulated Ca channels, and that the rise in intracellular Ca concentration opens certain (Ca-activated) K channels. The Ca-dependent stimulation of 86Rb efflux was greatest during the initial seconds of incubation (component CT), and then declined to a much lower rate (component CS). Much of this change in rate could be attributed to inactivation of voltage-regulated Ca channels and reduced entry of Ca. The Ca-dependent increase in 86Rb efflux was completely inhibited by 100 microM-La. In the presence of Ca, but not in its absence, the Ca ionophore A23187 stimulated 86Rb efflux both in 5 and 100 mM-K PSS. The effect in 100 mM-K was quantitatively greater, perhaps because of the increased outward driving force on Rb in depolarized synaptosomes. When synaptosomes were suspended in media containing the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye, DiS-C3-(5) (1,1'-dipentyl-2,2'-thiocarbocyanine), the addition of Ca+ A23187 decreased the fluorescence intensity (= synaptosome hyperpolarization) when the media contained 5 mM-K but not 100 mM-K. This implies that in the presence of Ca + A23187, PK was increased, and the membrane potential moved closer to the K equilibrium potential, EK. Quinine sulphate, a blocker of Ca-activated K channels

  5. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 and chloride channel modulate chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced migration of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-07-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in nonexcitable cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we examined the role of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) and chloride channel (CLC3) in lymphatic chemokine-induced migration of DCs. The amplitude and kinetics of chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Ca(2+) influx were associated with chemokine receptor 7 expression levels, extracellular-free Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and independent of extracellular K(+). Chemokines (CCL19 and CCL21) and KCa3.1 activator (1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one) induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K(+) efflux, which was blocked by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward calcium release-activated calcium channel. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl(-) in the medium, and low dose of 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca(2+) influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and CLC3 are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca(2+) influx, and cell volume.

  6. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  7. Mechanisms underlying the cardiac pacemaker: the role of SK4 calcium-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, David; Khun, Shiraz Haron; Bueno, Hanna; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The proper expression and function of the cardiac pacemaker is a critical feature of heart physiology. The sinoatrial node (SAN) in human right atrium generates an electrical stimulation approximately 70 times per minute, which propagates from a conductive network to the myocardium leading to chamber contractions during the systoles. Although the SAN and other nodal conductive structures were identified more than a century ago, the mechanisms involved in the generation of cardiac automaticity remain highly debated. In this short review, we survey the current data related to the development of the human cardiac conduction system and the various mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie the pacemaker activity. We also present the human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system, which is used as a model for studying the pacemaker. Finally, we describe our latest characterization of the previously unrecognized role of the SK4 Ca2+-activated K+ channel conductance in pacemaker cells. By exquisitely balancing the inward currents during the diastolic depolarization, the SK4 channels appear to play a crucial role in human cardiac automaticity. PMID:26725737

  8. Mechanisms underlying the cardiac pacemaker: the role of SK4 calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, David; Khun, Shiraz Haron; Bueno, Hanna; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The proper expression and function of the cardiac pacemaker is a critical feature of heart physiology. The sinoatrial node (SAN) in human right atrium generates an electrical stimulation approximately 70 times per minute, which propagates from a conductive network to the myocardium leading to chamber contractions during the systoles. Although the SAN and other nodal conductive structures were identified more than a century ago, the mechanisms involved in the generation of cardiac automaticity remain highly debated. In this short review, we survey the current data related to the development of the human cardiac conduction system and the various mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie the pacemaker activity. We also present the human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system, which is used as a model for studying the pacemaker. Finally, we describe our latest characterization of the previously unrecognized role of the SK4 Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel conductance in pacemaker cells. By exquisitely balancing the inward currents during the diastolic depolarization, the SK4 channels appear to play a crucial role in human cardiac automaticity.

  9. The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is an important modulator of hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Sevelsted Møller, Linda; Fialla, Annette Dam; Schierwagen, Robert; Biagini, Matteo; Liedtke, Christian; Laleman, Wim; Klein, Sabine; Reul, Winfried; Koch Hansen, Lars; Rabjerg, Maj; Singh, Vikrant; Surra, Joaquin; Osada, Jesus; Reinehr, Roland; de Muckadell, Ove B Schaffalitzky; Köhler, Ralf; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-06-29

    The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 controls different cellular processes such as proliferation and volume homeostasis. We investigated the role of KCa3.1 in experimental and human liver fibrosis. KCa3.1 gene expression was investigated in healthy and injured human and rodent liver. Effect of genetic depletion and pharmacological inhibition of KCa3.1 was evaluated in mice during carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic fibrogenesis. Transcription, protein expression and localisation of KCa3.1 was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Hemodynamic effects of KCa3.1 inhibition were investigated in bile duct-ligated and carbon tetrachloride intoxicated rats. In vitro experiments were performed in rat hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes. KCa3.1 expression was increased in rodent and human liver fibrosis and was predominantly observed in the hepatocytes. Inhibition of KCa3.1 aggravated liver fibrosis during carbon tetrachloride challenge but did not change hemodynamic parameters in portal hypertensive rats. In vitro, KCa3.1 inhibition leads to increased hepatocyte apoptosis and DNA damage, whereas proliferation of hepatic stellate cells was stimulated by KCa3.1 inhibition. Our data identifies KCa3.1 channels as important modulators in hepatocellular homeostasis. In contrast to previous studies in vitro and other tissues this channel appears to be anti-fibrotic and protective during liver injury.

  10. The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is an important modulator of hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Sevelsted Møller, Linda; Fialla, Annette Dam; Schierwagen, Robert; Biagini, Matteo; Liedtke, Christian; Laleman, Wim; Klein, Sabine; Reul, Winfried; Koch Hansen, Lars; Rabjerg, Maj; Singh, Vikrant; Surra, Joaquin; Osada, Jesus; Reinehr, Roland; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Köhler, Ralf; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 controls different cellular processes such as proliferation and volume homeostasis. We investigated the role of KCa3.1 in experimental and human liver fibrosis. KCa3.1 gene expression was investigated in healthy and injured human and rodent liver. Effect of genetic depletion and pharmacological inhibition of KCa3.1 was evaluated in mice during carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic fibrogenesis. Transcription, protein expression and localisation of KCa3.1 was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Hemodynamic effects of KCa3.1 inhibition were investigated in bile duct-ligated and carbon tetrachloride intoxicated rats. In vitro experiments were performed in rat hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes. KCa3.1 expression was increased in rodent and human liver fibrosis and was predominantly observed in the hepatocytes. Inhibition of KCa3.1 aggravated liver fibrosis during carbon tetrachloride challenge but did not change hemodynamic parameters in portal hypertensive rats. In vitro, KCa3.1 inhibition leads to increased hepatocyte apoptosis and DNA damage, whereas proliferation of hepatic stellate cells was stimulated by KCa3.1 inhibition. Our data identifies KCa3.1 channels as important modulators in hepatocellular homeostasis. In contrast to previous studies in vitro and other tissues this channel appears to be anti-fibrotic and protective during liver injury. PMID:27354175

  11. Optogenetic techniques for the study of native potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Levitz, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic tools were originally designed to target specific neurons for remote control of their activity by light and have largely been built around opsin-based channels and pumps. These naturally photosensitive opsins are microbial in origin and are unable to mimic the properties of native neuronal receptors and channels. Over the last 8 years, photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs) have enabled fast and reversible control of mammalian ion channels, allowing optical control of neuronal activity. One such PTL, maleimide-azobenzene-quaternary ammonium (MAQ), contains a maleimide (M) to tether the molecule to a genetically engineered cysteine, a photoisomerizable azobenzene (A) linker and a pore-blocking quaternary ammonium group (Q). MAQ was originally used to photocontrol SPARK, an engineered light-gated potassium channel derived from Shaker. Potassium channel photoblock by MAQ has recently been extended to a diverse set of mammalian potassium channels including channels in the voltage-gated and K2P families. Photoswitchable potassium channels, which maintain native properties, pave the way for the optical control of specific aspects of neuronal function and for high precision probing of a specific channel's physiological functions. To extend optical control to natively expressed channels, without overexpression, one possibility is to develop a knock-in mouse in which the wild-type channel gene is replaced by its light-gated version. Alternatively, the recently developed photoswitchable conditional subunit technique provides photocontrol of the channel of interest by molecular replacement of wild-type complexes. Finally, photochromic ligands also allow photocontrol of potassium channels without genetic manipulation using soluble compounds. In this review we discuss different techniques for optical control of native potassium channels and their associated advantages and disadvantages.

  12. A novel large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel and current in nerve terminals of the rat neurohypophysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Thorn, P; Lemos, J R

    1992-01-01

    1. Nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary were acutely dissociated and identified using a combination of morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. Terminal membrane currents were studied using the 'whole-cell' patch clamp technique and channels were studied using inside-out and outside-out patches. 2. In physiological solutions, but with 7 mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), depolarizing voltage clamp steps from different holding potentials (-90 or -50 mV) elicited a fast, inward current followed by a slow, sustained, outward current. This outward current did not appear to show any steady-state inactivation. 3. The threshold for activation of the outward current was -30 mV and the current-voltage relation was 'bell-shaped'. The amplitude increased with increasingly depolarized potential steps. The outward current reversal potential was measured using tail current analysis and was consistent with that of a potassium current. 4. The sustained potassium current was determined to be dependent on the concentration of intracellular calcium. Extracellular Cd2+ (80 microM), a calcium channel blocker, also reversibly abolished the outward current. 5. The current was delayed in onset and was sustained over the length of a 150 ms-duration depolarizing pulse. The outward current reached a peak plateau and then decayed slowly. The decay was fitted by a single exponential with a time constant of 9.0 +/- 2.2 s. The decay constants did not show a dependence on voltage but rather on intracellular Ca2+. The time course of recovery from this decay was complex with full recovery taking > 190 s. 6. 4-AP (7 mM), dendrotoxin (100 nM), apamin (40-80 nM), and charybdotoxin (10-100 nM) had no effect on the sustained outward current. In contrast Ba2+ (200 microM) and tetraethylammonium inhibited the current, the latter in a dose-dependent manner (apparent concentration giving 50% of maximal inhibition (IC50) = 0.51 mM). 7. The neurohypophysial terminal outward current recorded here

  13. Modulation of Potassium Channel Activity in the Balance of ROS and ATP Production by Durum Wheat Mitochondria—An Amazing Defense Tool Against Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Trono, Daniela; Laus, Maura N.; Soccio, Mario; Alfarano, Michela; Pastore, Donato

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the existence of a mitochondrial potassium channel was firstly demonstrated about 15 years ago in durum wheat as an ATP-dependent potassium channel (PmitoKATP). Since then, both properties of the original PmitoKATP and occurrence of different mitochondrial potassium channels in a number of plant species (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous) and tissues/organs (etiolated and green) have been shown. Here, an overview of the current knowledge is reported; in particular, the issue of PmitoKATP physiological modulation is addressed. Similarities and differences with other potassium channels, as well as possible cross-regulation with other mitochondrial proteins (Plant Uncoupling Protein, Alternative Oxidase, Plant Inner Membrane Anion Channel) are also described. PmitoKATP is inhibited by ATP and activated by superoxide anion, as well as by free fatty acids (FFAs) and acyl-CoAs. Interestingly, channel activation increases electrophoretic potassium uptake across the inner membrane toward the matrix, so collapsing membrane potential (ΔΨ), the main component of the protonmotive force (Δp) in plant mitochondria; moreover, cooperation between PmitoKATP and the K+/H+ antiporter allows a potassium cycle able to dissipate also ΔpH. Interestingly, ΔΨ collapse matches with an active control of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Fully open channel is able to lower superoxide anion up to 35-fold compared to a condition of ATP-inhibited channel. On the other hand, ΔΨ collapse by PmitoKATP was unexpectedly found to not affect ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation. This may probably occur by means of a controlled collapse due to ATP inhibition of PmitoKATP; this brake to the channel activity may allow a loss of the bulk phase Δp, but may preserve a non-classically detectable localized driving force for ATP synthesis. This ability may become crucial under environmental/oxidative stress. In particular, under moderate hyperosmotic stress

  14. Optogenetic techniques for the study of native potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Levitz, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic tools were originally designed to target specific neurons for remote control of their activity by light and have largely been built around opsin-based channels and pumps. These naturally photosensitive opsins are microbial in origin and are unable to mimic the properties of native neuronal receptors and channels. Over the last 8 years, photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs) have enabled fast and reversible control of mammalian ion channels, allowing optical control of neuronal activity. One such PTL, maleimide-azobenzene-quaternary ammonium (MAQ), contains a maleimide (M) to tether the molecule to a genetically engineered cysteine, a photoisomerizable azobenzene (A) linker and a pore-blocking quaternary ammonium group (Q). MAQ was originally used to photocontrol SPARK, an engineered light-gated potassium channel derived from Shaker. Potassium channel photoblock by MAQ has recently been extended to a diverse set of mammalian potassium channels including channels in the voltage-gated and K2P families. Photoswitchable potassium channels, which maintain native properties, pave the way for the optical control of specific aspects of neuronal function and for high precision probing of a specific channel’s physiological functions. To extend optical control to natively expressed channels, without overexpression, one possibility is to develop a knock-in mouse in which the wild-type channel gene is replaced by its light-gated version. Alternatively, the recently developed photoswitchable conditional subunit technique provides photocontrol of the channel of interest by molecular replacement of wild-type complexes. Finally, photochromic ligands also allow photocontrol of potassium channels without genetic manipulation using soluble compounds. In this review we discuss different techniques for optical control of native potassium channels and their associated advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23596388

  15. Structural features important for the biological activity of the potassium channel blocking dendrotoxins.

    PubMed

    Hollecker, M; Marshall, D L; Harvey, A L

    1993-10-01

    1. Dendrotoxins from mamba snake venoms are small proteins that block neuronal K+ channels. In order to investigate structural features associated with their biological activity, partially folded versions of dendrotoxins I and K from black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) were prepared by selectively reducing one or more of their three S-S bonds. 2. The modified toxins were tested for ability to compete with 125I-labelled native toxin I to high affinity binding sites on rat brain synaptosomal membranes and for the ability to increase acetylcholine release in a neuromuscular preparation. 3. Binding affinity increased progressively as the toxins folded to the native conformation and the most biologically active of the modified species were those in which only the disulphide bond between residues 14 and 38 was not formed. These intermediates had native-like conformations as determined by circular dichroism but still had about 5-10 times lower affinity than native toxins. 4. Addition of negatively charged groups to block the free sulthydryls at positions 14 and 38 caused a further, marked loss of activity. 5. The results are consistent with the existence of two important regions in the dendrotoxin molecules. The region containing two of the disulphide bonds (around Cys5-Cys55 and Cys30-Cys51) and much of the secondary structure is essential for the binding affinity of the toxins, while the region around Cys14 and Cys38, equivalent to part of the antiprotease site of the homologous protease inhibitor from bovine pancreas (BPTI), plays an important role in the potency of dendrotoxins.

  16. Potassium ion channels operated by receptor stimulation can be activated simply by raising temperature.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Y; Matsumoto, M; Kudo, A; Sasaki, K

    1991-01-01

    Application of either dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), or histamine (HA) to the identified ganglion cells of Aplysia elicits a K(+)-dependent slow hyperpolarization. When temperature of the bathing solution was raised from 22 to 32 degrees C, these cells were also hyperpolarized with a marked increase in K+ conductance. The warm- and transmitter-induced current responses recorded under voltage clamp were not blocked by either 1 mM Ba2+ or 10 mM TEA. Intracellularly injected guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) depressed both warm- and transmitter-induced K+ responses immediately after the injection. Intracellular application of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) caused a gradual, irreversible increase in K+ conductance of the plasma membrane and occluded both responses. Transmitter-induced response markedly decreased when the temperature was raised from 22 to 32 degrees C, suggesting that the response to transmitter was occluded during the warm-induced response. These results suggested that the G-protein regulating the receptor-operated K+ channels could be activated simply by raising temperature.

  17. Calcium-activated potassium channels in the luminal membrane of Amphiuma diluting segment: voltage-dependent block by intracellular Na+ upon depolarisation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, K; Hunter, M; Giebisch, G

    1990-06-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels in the luminal membrane of Amphiuma diluting segment were studied using the patch-clamp technique in both the cell-attached and inside-out configurations. The open probability (Po) of the channel is sensitive to both membrane potential and cytoplasmic calcium activity; depolarizing potentials and high calcium concentrations leading to an increased Po. In the cell-attached condition, channel openings were observed between pipette potentials of -100 and -240 mV. As the driving force for potassium exit from the cell into the pipette is increased the single channel currents show a biphasic response. First, the currents increase as expected; however, the single channel currents diminish in magnitude at pipette potentials more negative than -120 mV. We propose that this reduction is due to rapid blockade of the potassium channel by intracellular sodium. This proposal is supported by two facts: (a) using inside-out patches it was possible to reduce the single channel currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, similar to that observed in the cell-attached condition, by raising the sodium concentration of the fluid bathing the cytoplasmic face of the patch; (b) pretreatment of tubules with the loop-acting diuretic furosemide (10(-5) M), an agent known to decrease the intracellular sodium activity, caused an attenuation of the reduction in single channel current seen under control conditions. Given the very low Po of the channels at the resting membrane potential and the sensitivity of the channels to intracellular sodium, it is unlikely that blockade of these channels by intracellular sodium would lead to a physiological regulation of the apical K conductance.

  18. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates.

  19. Variants of stretch-activated two-pore potassium channel TREK-1 associated with preterm labor in humans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ying; Singer, Cherie A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2012-10-01

    Spontaneous preterm labor (PTL) is a uniquely human problem that results in preterm delivery of an underdeveloped fetus. The underlying cause remains elusive. The cost to societies in human suffering and treasure is enormous. The stretch-activated two pore potassium channel TREK-1 is up-regulated during gestation to term such that it may maintain uterine quiescence by hyperpolarizing the smooth muscle cell membrane. We have hypothesized that the human TREK-1 channel is involved in myometrial relaxation during pregnancy and that splice variants of the TREK-1 channel expressed in preterm myometrium are associated with preterm delivery by interaction with full-length TREK-1. We detected three wild-type human TREK-1 transcript isoforms in nonpregnant and pregnant human myometrium. Using RT-PCR, we identified five unique TREK-1 splice variants in myometrium from women in PTL. These myometrial TREK-1 variants lack either the pore or the transmembrane domains or both. In transiently transfected HEK293T cells, wild-type TREK-1 was predominantly expressed at the plasma membrane. However, individual splice variants were expressed uniformly throughout the cell. Wild-type TREK-1 was localized at the plasma membrane and cytoplasm close to the plasma membrane when coexpressed with each splice variant. Co-immunoprecipitation of FLAG epitope-tagged TREK-1 and six-His epitope-tagged splice variants using Ni bead columns successfully pulled down wild-type TREK-1. These results suggest that each of four TREK-1 splice variants interacts with full-length wild-type TREK-1 and that in vivo, such interactions may contribute to a PTL phenotype.

  20. Palmitoylation of the β4-Subunit Regulates Surface Expression of Large Conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel Splice Variants*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lie; Bi, Danlei; Tian, Lijun; McClafferty, Heather; Steeb, Franziska; Ruth, Peter; Knaus, Hans Guenther; Shipston, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory β-subunits of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels play an important role in generating functional diversity and control of cell surface expression of the pore forming α-subunits. However, in contrast to α-subunits, the role of reversible post-translational modification of intracellular residues on β-subunit function is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the human β4-subunit is S-acylated (palmitoylated) on a juxtamembrane cysteine residue (Cys-193) in the intracellular C terminus of the regulatory β-subunit. β4-Subunit palmitoylation is important for cell surface expression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit of the β4-subunit alone. Importantly, palmitoylated β4-subunits promote the ER exit and surface expression of the pore-forming α-subunit, whereas β4-subunits that cannot be palmitoylated do not increase ER exit or surface expression of α-subunits. Strikingly, however, this palmitoylation- and β4-dependent enhancement of α-subunit surface expression was only observed in α-subunits that contain a putative trafficking motif (… REVEDEC) at the very C terminus of the α-subunit. Engineering this trafficking motif to other C-terminal α-subunit splice variants results in α-subunits with reduced surface expression that can be rescued by palmitoylated, but not depalmitoylated, β4-subunits. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which palmitoylated β4-subunit controls surface expression of BK channels through masking of a trafficking motif in the C terminus of the α-subunit. As palmitoylation is dynamic, this mechanism would allow precise control of specific splice variants to the cell surface. Our data provide new insights into how complex interplay between the repertoire of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms controls cell surface expression of BK channels. PMID:23504458

  1. Chronic social isolation reduces 5-HT neuronal activity via upregulated SK3 calcium-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sargin, Derya; Oliver, David K; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2016-01-01

    The activity of serotonin (5-HT) neurons is critical for mood regulation. In a mouse model of chronic social isolation, a known risk factor for depressive illness, we show that 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are less responsive to stimulation. Probing the responsible cellular mechanisms pinpoints a disturbance in the expression and function of small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels and reveals an important role for both SK2 and SK3 channels in normal regulation of 5-HT neuronal excitability. Chronic social isolation renders 5-HT neurons insensitive to SK2 blockade, however inhibition of the upregulated SK3 channels restores normal excitability. In vivo, we demonstrate that inhibiting SK channels normalizes chronic social isolation-induced anxiety/depressive-like behaviors. Our experiments reveal a causal link for the first time between SK channel dysregulation and 5-HT neuron activity in a lifelong stress paradigm, suggesting these channels as targets for the development of novel therapies for mood disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21416.001 PMID:27874831

  2. Voltage sensor inactivation in potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bähring, Robert; Barghaan, Jan; Westermeier, Regina; Wollberg, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    In voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels membrane depolarization causes movement of a voltage sensor domain. This conformational change of the protein is transmitted to the pore domain and eventually leads to pore opening. However, the voltage sensor domain may interact with two distinct gates in the pore domain: the activation gate (A-gate), involving the cytoplasmic S6 bundle crossing, and the pore gate (P-gate), located externally in the selectivity filter. How the voltage sensor moves and how tightly it interacts with these two gates on its way to adopt a relaxed conformation when the membrane is depolarized may critically determine the mode of Kv channel inactivation. In certain Kv channels, voltage sensor movement leads to a tight interaction with the P-gate, which may cause conformational changes that render the selectivity filter non-conductive ("P/C-type inactivation"). Other Kv channels may preferably undergo inactivation from pre-open closed-states during voltage sensor movement, because the voltage sensor temporarily uncouples from the A-gate. For this behavior, known as "preferential" closed-state inactivation, we introduce the term "A/C-type inactivation". Mechanistically, P/C- and A/C-type inactivation represent two forms of "voltage sensor inactivation."

  3. [The influence of activation of the ATP-sensitive potassium channels by flocalin on the function of the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Strutyns'kyĭ, R B; Rovenets', R A; Strutyns'ka, N A; Neshcheret, O P; Moĭbenko, O O

    2013-01-01

    In experiments on the anaesthetized dogs the influence of a new fluorine-containing opener of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels flocalin on the cardiohemodynamic of great animals in vivo was studied. Flocalin introduced intravenously in doses 0.01 - 1.5 mgs/kg. It is shown that it reduces in dose-dependent manner a system arterial pressure, perfusion pressure in coronary artery and general peripheral resistance of vessels with maximal effects on 56.8 +/- 2.7, 22.4 +/- 4.7 and 47.2% +/- 6.5% accordingly at most dose 1.5 mgs/kg. Flocalin causes development of cardiodepressive reactions in heart, that is exhibited in dose-dependent the decrease of pressure in the left ventricle, speed of growth (dP/dt(max)) and reduction (dP/dt(min)) in it's of pressure with maximal effects on 37.1 +/- 5.1, 51.2 +/- 9.4 and 55.6% +/- 6.9% accordingly at introduction of most dose of flocalin. Diminish of the cardiac out put and heart rate with a maximal effects on 23.1% +/-12.7% and 19.2% +/- 1.7% accordingly at a dose 1.0 mgs/kg was shown. It should be noted that considerable reduction of heart rate and general peripheral resistance of vessels takes place only at the large doses of flocalin - 1 and 1.5 mgs/kg. Thus, it is shown that activation of K(ATP) channels by flocalin causes the dose-dependent decrease of pressure in the system of circulation of blood and contraction activity of myocardium.

  4. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in the regulation of basal and agonist-elevated tones in isolated conduit arteries. Short communication.

    PubMed

    Pataricza, J; Márton, Z; Hegedus, Z; Krassói, Irén; Kun, A; Varró, A; Papp, J Gy

    2004-01-01

    Functional role of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels on the basal and agonist-elevated arterial tones was investigated in isolated rabbit aorta, porcine and canine coronary arteries as well as in human internal mammary artery. The vascular tones enhanced by contractile agents were increased further by preincubation of these conduit blood vessels with selective (charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin) or nonselective (tetraethylammonium) inhibitors of KCa channels. The basal tone (without an agonist) was increased only in the canine coronary artery. The results indicate a feed-back regulatory role of KCa channels counteracting the vasospasm of conduit arteries.

  5. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  6. Arachidonic acid has protective effects on oxygen-glucose deprived astrocytes mediated through enhancement of potassium channel TREK-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Zhang, Guangru; Song, Chunli; Wang, Xuexi; Qian, Weina; Wang, Zhuanling; Liu, Yanan; Gong, Sheng; Zhou, Shuning

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain diseases. The newly discovered potassium channel "TREK-1" is a promising target for therapies against neurodegeneration. Arachidonic acid (AA) is an n-6 PUFA, as well as a potent TREK-1 activator. We previously showed that TREK-1 is expressed at high levels in astrocytes. However, the effect of AA on astrocytes in ischemia remains unknown. Here, we assessed the effects of 3-30μM AA on astrocyte apoptosis, glutamate uptake, and expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and TREK-1 under different conditions. Under normal conditions, 3-30μM AA showed no effect on astrocytic apoptosis or TREK-1 expression, whereas glutamate uptake decreased significantly and its change paralleled the decreased expression of GLT-1. When astrocytes were subjected to 4h of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), 10μM AA markedly alleviated OGD-induced cell death, recovering from 63.50±1.90% to 82.96±4.63% of the control value. AA also rescued the decreased glutamate uptake and increased mRNA, as well as protein levels of GLT-1 and TREK-1. Our results provide new evidence of a protective effect of AA on astrocytes under OGD conditions, suggesting that a low concentration of AA may protect against brain ischemic diseases.

  7. Drug-disease interactions: reduced β-adrenergic and potassium channel antagonist activities of sotalol in the presence of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kulmatycki, Kenneth M; Abouchehade, Kassem; Sattari, Saeed; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2001-01-01

    Inflammation may influence response to pharmacotherapy. We investigated the effect of inflammation on response to sotalol, a β-adrenergic receptor and potassium channel antagonist. Racemic sotalol (40 mg kg−1) was administered to healthy, acutely (interferonα 2a-induced) and chronically (Mycobacterium butyricum-induced adjuvant arthritis) inflamed male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=4 – 6/group). Another group of interferon-treated rats received 3 mg kg−1 of anti-TNF antibody infliximab. Electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded and plasma sotalol concentration monitored for 6 h. The study was repeated in acutely inflamed rats following administration of stereochemically pure individual sotalol enantiomers [40 mg kg−1 S (potassium channel blocker) or 20 mg kg−1 R (β-adrenergic/potassium channel blocker)]. Chronic arthritis was readily evident. Acute arthritis was associated with elevated segmented neutrophils and increased plasma nitrite and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) concentrations. Sotalol affected ECG in all rats. In both inflamed groups, however, response to sotalol in prolongation of QT interval (potassium channel sensitivity) was reduced. The effect of PR interval (β-adrenergic activity) was also reduced following administration of the racemate and R-enantiomer. No significant differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between control and inflamed rats. Infliximab reduced nitrite and TNF concentrations and reversed the effect of acute inflammation on both PR and QT intervals. The reduced electrocardiographic responses to sotalol is likely due to the influence of inflammation on the action of the drug on both β-adrenergic and potassium channel receptors secondary to over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and/or nitric oxide. Our observation may have therapeutic consequences in all conditions where inflammatory mediators are increased. PMID:11350865

  8. Discovery and characterisation of a novel toxin from Dendroaspis angusticeps, named Tx7335, that activates the potassium channel KcsA

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Iván O.; Jin, Tony B.; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T.; Poget, Sébastien F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their central role in essential physiological processes, potassium channels are common targets for animal toxins. These toxins in turn are of great value as tools for studying channel function and as lead compounds for drug development. Here, we used a direct toxin pull-down assay with immobilised KcsA potassium channel to isolate a novel KcsA-binding toxin (called Tx7335) from eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom. Sequencing of the toxin by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry revealed a 63 amino acid residue peptide with 4 disulphide bonds that belongs to the three-finger toxin family, but with a unique modification of its disulphide-bridge scaffold. The toxin induces a dose-dependent increase in both open probabilities and mean open times on KcsA in artificial bilayers. Thus, it unexpectedly behaves as a channel activator rather than an inhibitor. A charybdotoxin-sensitive mutant of KcsA exhibits similar susceptibility to Tx7335 as wild-type, indicating that the binding site for Tx7335 is distinct from that of canonical pore-blocker toxins. Based on the extracellular location of the toxin binding site (far away from the intracellular pH gate), we propose that Tx7335 increases potassium flow through KcsA by allosterically reducing inactivation of the channel. PMID:27044983

  9. Potassium Channels in Neurofbromatosis-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder commonly associated with cognitive impairments, including low IQ, learning ... disabilities , behavioral difficulties, executive dysfunction and language-based deficits. Despite the growing recognition of the importance of SK channels

  10. Selective positive modulator of calcium-activated potassium channels exerts beneficial effects in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Kasumu, Adebimpe W; Hougaard, Charlotte; Rode, Frederik; Jacobsen, Thomas A; Sabatier, Jean Marc; Eriksen, Birgitte L; Strøbæk, Dorte; Liang, Xia; Egorova, Polina; Vorontsova, Dasha; Christophersen, Palle; Rønn, Lars Christian B; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2012-10-26

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion within the Ataxin-2 (Atxn2) protein. Purkinje cells (PC) of the cerebellum fire irregularly and eventually die in SCA2. We show here that the type 2 small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK2) play a key role in control of normal PC activity. Using cerebellar slices from transgenic SCA2 mice we demonstrate that SK channel modulators restore regular pacemaker activity of SCA2 PCs. Furthermore, we also show that oral delivery of a more selective positive modulator of SK2/3 channels (NS13001) alleviates behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of aging SCA2 transgenic mice. We conclude that SK2 channels constitute a therapeutic target for SCA2 treatment and that the developed selective SK2/3 modulator NS13001 holds promise as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of SCA2 and possibly other cerebellar ataxias.

  11. Inhibition of vascular calcification by block of intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels with TRAM-34.

    PubMed

    Freise, Christian; Querfeld, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    Vascular calcifications are a hallmark of advanced cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. A key event is the transition of contractile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) into an osteoblast-like phenotype, promoting a coordinated process of vascular remodeling resembling bone mineralization. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa3.1) are expressed in various tissues including VSMC. Aiming for novel therapeutic targets in vascular calcification, we here studied effects of KCa3.1-inhibition on VSMC calcification by the specific KCa3.1 inhibitor TRAM-34. Calcification in the murine VSMC cell line MOVAS-1 and primary rat VSMC was induced by calcification medium (CM) containing elevated levels of PO4(3-) and Ca(2+). Cell signaling, calcification markers, and release of nitric oxide and alkaline phosphatase were assessed by luciferase reporter plasmids, RT-PCR and specific enzymatic assays, respectively. KCa3.1 gene silencing was achieved by siRNA experiments. TRAM-34 at 10nmol/l, decreased CM-induced calcification and induced NO release of VSMC accompanied by decreased TGF-β signaling. The CM-induced mRNA expressions of osterix, osteocalcin, matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP)-2/-9 were reduced by TRAM-34 while osteopontin expression was increased. Further, TRAM-34 attenuated the CM- and TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB and reduced the release of MMP-2/-9 by VSMC. Finally, TRAM-34 abrogated CM-induced apoptosis and KCa3.1 gene silencing protected VSMC from CM-induced onset of calcification. In summary, TRAM-34 interferes with calcification relevant signaling of NF-κB and TGF-β thereby blocking the phenotypic transition/calcification of VSMC. We conclude that the results provide a rationale for further studies regarding a possible therapeutic role of KCa3.1 inhibition by TRAM-34 or other inhibitors in vascular calcification.

  12. Teratogenic potential of almokalant, dofetilide, and d-sotalol: drugs with potassium channel blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Webster, W S; Brown-Woodman, P D; Snow, M D; Danielsson, B R

    1996-03-01

    Drugs with class III antiarrhythmic activity are potential human teratogens because of their ability to cause bradycardia in the embryo during the organogenic period. Three drugs with class III antiarrhythmic activity, almokalant, dofetilide and d-sotalol, were compared in vitro using rat embryo culture. Each of these drugs caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia in 11- or 13-day rat embryos. For each drug the effective concentration was considerably greater than the human therapeutic plasma concentration. The reproductive outcome was also compared in vivo in Sprague-Dawley rats by oral administration of almokalant or dofetilide on single days during the organogenic period. Both drugs caused increased resorptions and the same stage-dependent malformations. Dosing on gestational day (GD) 11 was associated with right-sided oblique cleft lip and short tail, while dosing on day 13 caused digital hypoplasia and/or amputation. Susceptibility to these drugs started on GD 9 when the embryonic heart starts beating and ended on GD 15. The malformations were preceded by hemorrhage; which is consistent with the proposed pathogenesis that the drug-induced bradycardia caused embryonic hypoxia/ischemia. This study indicates that the induction of malformations/embryonic death by class III antiarrhythmic drugs which inhibit Ikr is a class effect secondary to a common pharmacological action on the embryonic heart.

  13. Activation of human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channels by the diphenylurea 1,3-bis-(2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-urea (NS1643).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rie Schultz; Diness, Thomas Goldin; Christ, Torsten; Demnitz, Joachim; Ravens, Ursula; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The cardiac action potential is generated by a concerted action of different ion channels and transporters. Dysfunction of any of these membrane proteins can give rise to cardiac arrhythmias, which is particularly true for the repolarizing potassium channels. We suggest that an increased repolarization current could be a new antiarrhythmic principle, because it possibly would attenuate afterdepolarizations, ischemic leak currents, and reentry phenomena. Repolarization of the cardiac myocytes is crucially dependent on the late rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) conducted by ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG) potassium channels. We have developed the diphenylurea compound 1,3-bis-(2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-urea (NS1643) and tested whether this small organic molecule could increase the activity of human ERG (HERG) channels expressed heterologously. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, NS1643 increased both steady-state and tail current at all voltages tested. The EC(50) value for HERG channel activation was 10.5 microM. These results were reproduced on HERG channels expressed in mammalian human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In guinea pig cardiomyocytes, studied by patch clamp, application of 10 microM NS1643 activated I(Kr) and significantly decreased the action potential duration to 65% of the control values. The effect could be reverted by application of the specific HERG channel inhibitor 4'-[[1-[2-(6-methyl-2-pyridyl)ethyl]-4-piperidinyl]carbonyl]-methanesulfonanilide (E-4031) at 100 nM. Application of NS1643 also resulted in a prolonged postrepolarization refractory time. Finally, cardiomyocytes exposed to NS1643 resisted reactivation by small depolarizing currents mimicking early afterdepolarizations. In conclusion, HERG channel activation by small molecules such as NS1643 increases the repolarization reserve and presents an interesting new antiarrhythmic approach.

  14. A new pH-sensitive rectifying potassium channel in mitochondria from the embryonic rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kajma, Anna; Szewczyk, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Patch-clamp single-channel studies on mitochondria isolated from embryonic rat hippocampus revealed the presence of two different potassium ion channels: a large-conductance (288±4pS) calcium-activated potassium channel and second potassium channel with outwardly rectifying activity under symmetric conditions (150/150mM KCl). At positive voltages, this channel displayed a conductance of 67.84pS and a strong voltage dependence at holding potentials from -80mV to +80mV. The open probability was higher at positive than at negative voltages. Patch-clamp studies at the mitoplast-attached mode showed that the channel was not sensitive to activators and inhibitors of mitochondrial potassium channels but was regulated by pH. Moreover, we demonstrated that the channel activity was not affected by the application of lidocaine, an inhibitor of two-pore domain potassium channels, or by tertiapin, an inhibitor of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. In summary, based on the single-channel recordings, we characterised for the first time mitochondrial pH-sensitive ion channel that is selective for cations, permeable to potassium ions, displays voltage sensitivity and does not correspond to any previously described potassium ion channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012).

  15. Distribution of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) and hyperpolarization-activated (HCN) channels in sensory afferent fibers in the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Buniel, Maria; Glazebrook, Patricia A.; Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Kunze, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    The chemosensory glomus cells of the carotid body (CB) detect changes in O2-tension. Carotid sinus nerve fibers, which originate from peripheral sensory neurons located within the petrosal ganglion, innervate the CB. Release of transmitter from glomus cells activates the sensory afferent fibers to transmit information to the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. The ion channels expressed within the sensory nerve terminals play an essential role in the ability of the terminal to initiate action potentials in response to transmitter-evoked depolarization. However, with a few exceptions, the identity of ion channels expressed in these peripheral nerve fibers is unknown. This study addresses the expression of voltage-gated channels in the sensory fibers with a focus on channels that set the resting membrane potential and regulate discharge patterns. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence confocal microscopy, potassium channel subunits and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated) family members were localized both in petrosal neurons that expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, and the CSN axons within the carotid body. Channels contributing to resting membrane potential including HCN2, responsible in part for Ih current, and the KCNQ2 and KCNQ5 subunits thought to underlie the neuronal “M current” were identified in the sensory neurons and their axons innervating the carotid body. In addition, the results presented here demonstrate expression of several potassium channels that shape the action potential and the frequency of discharge including Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv4.3, KCa (BK). The role of these channels should be considered in interpretation of the fiber discharge in response to perturbation of the carotid body environment. PMID:18668683

  16. Ca(2+)-dependent non-selective cation and potassium channels activated by bradykinin in pig coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, A; Frieden, M; Chabaud, F; Bény, J L

    1996-01-01

    1. Using the cell-attached and inside-out modes of the patch-clamp technique, we studied the Ca(2+)-dependent ionic channels activated by bradykinin in cultured pig coronary artery endothelial cells to further understand electrophysiological events underlying cellular activation. 2. In the cell-attached mode, bradykinin (94 nM) activated two types of Ca(2+)-dependent channels: a high conductance K+ channel (285 pS in high symmetrical K+), whose open state probability was increased by depolarization, and a lower conductance inwardly rectifying non-selective cation channel (44 pS in high symmetrical K+). 3. The 285 pS K+ channel was half-maximally activated by cytosolic Ca2+ levels of 1.6 and 4.5 microM at +10 and -30 mV, respectively. Such local concentrations should be reached in the presence of bradykinin, which induces a mean maximal cytosolic Ca2+ rise of 1.3 microM. 4. The 285 pS K+ channel was inhibited by d-tubocurarine, which acted by reducing the mean open time duration (flickering pattern), finally reducing the channel conductance. 5. Divalent cations such as Ca2+ could flow through the 44 pS non-selective cation channel, with nearly the same permeability (P) as monovalent cations (PK: PNa: PCa = 1:1:0.7). 6. The cation channel appeared to be more sensitive to Ca2+ than the K+ channel, with a half-maximal open probability induced by 0.7 microM Ca2+ on the intracellular side of the membrane. 7. In contrast to the K+ channel, the cation channel mean open time was clearly increased by bradykinin. This effect was delayed compared with the increase in the channel open state probability and was rapidly lost in the inside-out configuration. Caffeine also activated the cation channel but more transiently than bradykinin and without any effect on the open duration. 8. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, the bradykinin-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ was shortened temporally by 52% and reduced in amplitude by 88%, whereas the bradykinin

  17. Magnetic and electric fields across sodium and potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Marília A. G.; Cruz, Frederico A. O.; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We determined the magnetic field around sodium and potassium ionic channels based on a physico-mathematical model that took into account charges in the surface bilayer. For the numerical simulation, we applied the finite element method. Results show that each channel produces its specific and individual response to the ion transport, according to its individual intrinsic properties. The existence of a number of active Na+-channels in a given membrane region seems not to interfere directly in the functioning of K+-channel located among them, and vice-versa.

  18. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction.

  19. BK and Kv3.1 potassium channels control different aspects of deep cerebellar nuclear neurons action potentials and spiking activity.

    PubMed

    Pedroarena, Christine M

    2011-12-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclear neurons (DCNs) display characteristic electrical properties, including spontaneous spiking and the ability to discharge narrow spikes at high frequency. These properties are thought to be relevant to processing inhibitory Purkinje cell input and transferring well-timed signals to cerebellar targets. Yet, the underlying ionic mechanisms are not completely understood. BK and Kv3.1 potassium channels subserve similar functions in spike repolarization and fast firing in many neurons and are both highly expressed in DCNs. Here, their role in the abovementioned spiking characteristics was addressed using whole-cell recordings of large and small putative-glutamatergic DCNs. Selective BK channel block depolarized DCNs of both groups and increased spontaneous firing rate but scarcely affected evoked activity. After adjusting the membrane potential to control levels, the spike waveforms under BK channel block were indistinguishable from control ones, indicating no significant BK channel involvement in spike repolarization. The increased firing rate suggests that lack of DCN-BK channels may have contributed to the ataxic phenotype previously found in BK channel-deficient mice. On the other hand, block of Kv3.1 channels with low doses of 4-aminopyridine (20 μM) hindered spike repolarization and severely depressed evoked fast firing. Therefore, I propose that despite similar characteristics of BK and Kv3.1 channels, they play different roles in DCNs: BK channels control almost exclusively spontaneous firing rate, whereas DCN-Kv3.1 channels dominate the spike repolarization and enable fast firing. Interestingly, after Kv3.1 channel block, BK channels gained a role in spike repolarization, demonstrating how the different function of each of the two channels is determined in part by their co-expression and interplay.

  20. Pharmacodynamics of potassium channel openers in cultured neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Calvin; V Gopal, Kamakshi; Lukas, Thomas J; Gross, Guenter W; Moore, Ernest J

    2014-06-05

    A novel class of drugs - potassium (K(+)) channel openers or activators - has recently been shown to cause anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects by activating hyperpolarizing K(+) currents, and therefore, may show efficacy for treating tinnitus. This study presents measurements of the modulatory effects of four K(+) channel openers on the spontaneous activity and action potential waveforms of neuronal networks. The networks were derived from mouse embryonic auditory cortices and grown on microelectrode arrays. Pentylenetetrazol was used to create hyperactivity states in the neuronal networks as a first approximation for mimicking tinnitus or tinnitus-like activity. We then compared the pharmacodynamics of the four channel activators, retigabine and flupirtine (voltage-gated K(+) channel KV7 activators), NS1619 and isopimaric acid ("big potassium" BK channel activators). The EC50 of retigabine, flupirtine, NS1619, and isopimaric acid were 8.0, 4.0, 5.8, and 7.8µM, respectively. The reduction of hyperactivity compared to the reference activity was significant. The present results highlight the notion of re-purposing the K(+) channel activators for reducing hyperactivity of spontaneously active auditory networks, serving as a platform for these drugs to show efficacy toward target identification, prevention, as well as treatment of tinnitus.

  1. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  2. Lack of effect of potassium channel openers on ATP-modulated potassium channels recorded from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, A. J.; Boden, P. R.; Ashford, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    1. Single neuronal cells were freshly isolated from the ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei (VMHN) of the rat brain. Currents through ATP-modulated and large conductance (160 and 250 pS) calcium-activated potassium channels were recorded by the cell-attached and excised inside-out patch techniques. 2. BRL38227 (lemakalim; 30-90 microM) applied to the superfusing medium produced no change in firing rate of isolated glucose-receptive VMHN neurones in cell-attached recordings. 3. BRL38227, at concentrations of between 30-100 microM applied to the intracellular (cytoplasmic) aspect of inside-out patches, had no effect on the activity of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in the absence of ATP or in the presence of a sub-maximal inhibitory concentration (3 mM) of ATP. Cromakalim, pinacidil, minoxidil sulphate and diazoxide also produced no effect under these conditions. 4. The potassium channel openers (KCO's) were tested on ATP-activated potassium channels recorded from a further subpopulation of VMHN neurones. Application of BRL38227 (up to and including 100 microM) to this channel in inside-out patches either in the absence of ATP or when activated by 5 mM ATP had no effect on channel activity. Identical results were obtained with cromakalim and pinacidil. 5. BRL38227 had no effect on either of the large conductance (250 pS and 160 pS) calcium-activated potassium channels in VMHN neurones. 6. Intracellular recordings were made from glucose-receptive VMHN neurones in rat brain slices. Cromakalim (50 microM) or diazoxide (60 microM) did not alter the firing rate or passive membrane properties of these neurones demonstrated to be sensitive to tolbutamide (0.1 mM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467829

  3. Tarantula toxins interacting with voltage sensors in potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Kenton J.

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-activated ion channels open and close in response to changes in membrane voltage, a process that is crucial for electrical signaling in the nervous system. The venom from many poisonous creatures contains a diverse array of small protein toxins that bind to voltage-activated channels and modify the gating mechanism. Hanatoxin and a growing number of related tarantula toxins have been shown to inhibit activation of voltage-activated potassium (Kv) channels by interacting with their voltage sensing domains. This review summarizes our current understanding of the mechanism by which these toxins alter gating, the location of the toxin receptor within Kv channels and the disposition of this receptor with respect to the lipid membrane. The conservation of tarantula toxin receptors among voltage-activated ion channels will also be discussed. PMID:17097703

  4. Voltage-dependent antagonist/agonist actions of taurine on Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, D; Barbieri, M; Conte Camerino, D

    2001-09-01

    Emerging evidence supports the idea that taurine exerts some of its actions through inhibition of inward rectifier K(+) channels, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, and voltage-dependent K(+) channels. However, to date not much is known about the effects of this sulfonic amino acid on Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca(2+))) channels, which are widely expressed in various tissues, including skeletal muscle. In the present work, the effects of taurine on K(Ca(2+)) channels of rat skeletal muscle fibers were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. The application of the amino acid to the internal side of the excised macropatches induced a dose-dependent decrease in the outward K(Ca(2+)) currents recorded at positive membrane potentials in the presence of 8 to 16 microM concentrations of free Ca(2+) ions in the bath with an IC(50) of 31.9. 10(-3) +/- 1 M (slope factor = 1.2) (n = 11 patches). In contrast, at negative membrane potentials taurine caused an enhancement of the muscular inward K(Ca(2+)) currents with a DE(50) (drug concentration needed to enhance the current by 50%) of 46.7. 10(-3) +/- 2 M (slope factor = 1.3) (n = 9 patches). Single channel analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by changes in the reversal potential of the K(Ca(2+)) channel for K(+) ions with no changes in the gating properties or in the sensitivity of the channel to Ca(2+) ions. Taurine also did not affect the single channel conductance. In conclusion, taurine shows a voltage-dependent dualistic action on K(Ca(2+)) channels, being an inhibitor of the channel at positive membrane potentials and an activator at negative membrane potentials.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of Kcna3-encoding Kv1.3 potassium channel by cereblon contributes to regulation of CD4+ T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Ah; Park, Sang-Heon; Jeong, Sang Phil; Han, Min-Hee; Lee, Cho-Rong; Lee, Kwang Min; Kim, Namhee; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Choi, Murim; Ye, Michael; Jung, Guhung; Lee, Won-Woo; Eom, Soo Hyun; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo

    2016-08-02

    The role of cereblon (CRBN) in T cells is not well understood. We generated mice with a deletion in Crbn and found cereblon to be an important antagonist of T-cell activation. In mice lacking CRBN, CD4(+) T cells show increased activation and IL-2 production on T-cell receptor stimulation, ultimately resulting in increased potassium flux and calcium-mediated signaling. CRBN restricts T-cell activation via epigenetic modification of Kcna3, which encodes the Kv1.3 potassium channel required for robust calcium influx in T cells. CRBN binds directly to conserved DNA elements adjacent to Kcna3 via a previously uncharacterized DNA-binding motif. Consequently, in the absence of CRBN, the expression of Kv1.3 is derepressed, resulting in increased Kv1.3 expression, potassium flux, and CD4(+) T-cell hyperactivation. In addition, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in T-cell-specific Crbn-deficient mice was exacerbated by increased T-cell activation via Kv1.3. Thus, CRBN limits CD4(+) T-cell activation via epigenetic regulation of Kv1.3 expression.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of Kcna3-encoding Kv1.3 potassium channel by cereblon contributes to regulation of CD4+ T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ah; Park, Sang-Heon; Jeong, Sang Phil; Han, Min-Hee; Lee, Cho-Rong; Lee, Kwang Min; Kim, Namhee; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Choi, Murim; Ye, Michael; Jung, Guhung; Lee, Won-Woo; Eom, Soo Hyun; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo

    2016-01-01

    The role of cereblon (CRBN) in T cells is not well understood. We generated mice with a deletion in Crbn and found cereblon to be an important antagonist of T-cell activation. In mice lacking CRBN, CD4+ T cells show increased activation and IL-2 production on T-cell receptor stimulation, ultimately resulting in increased potassium flux and calcium-mediated signaling. CRBN restricts T-cell activation via epigenetic modification of Kcna3, which encodes the Kv1.3 potassium channel required for robust calcium influx in T cells. CRBN binds directly to conserved DNA elements adjacent to Kcna3 via a previously uncharacterized DNA-binding motif. Consequently, in the absence of CRBN, the expression of Kv1.3 is derepressed, resulting in increased Kv1.3 expression, potassium flux, and CD4+ T-cell hyperactivation. In addition, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in T-cell–specific Crbn-deficient mice was exacerbated by increased T-cell activation via Kv1.3. Thus, CRBN limits CD4+ T-cell activation via epigenetic regulation of Kv1.3 expression. PMID:27439875

  7. Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium type 2 channels (SK2, KCa2.2) in human brain.

    PubMed

    Willis, Michael; Trieb, Maria; Leitner, Irmgard; Wietzorrek, Georg; Marksteiner, Josef; Knaus, Hans-Günther

    2017-03-01

    SK2 (KCa2.2) channels are voltage-independent Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels that regulate neuronal excitability in brain regions important for memory formation. In this study, we investigated the distribution and expression of SK2 channels in human brain by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Immunoblot analysis of human brain indicated expression of four distinct SK2 channel isoforms: the standard, the long and two short isoforms. Immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded post-mortem brain sections was performed in the hippocampal formation, amygdala and neocortex. In hippocampus, SK2-like immunoreactivity could be detected in strata oriens and radiatum of area CA1-CA2 and in the molecular layer. In the amygdala, SK2-like immunoreactivity was highest in the basolateral nuclei, while in neocortex, staining was mainly found enriched in layer V. Activation of SK2 channels is thought to regulate neuronal excitability in brain by contributing to the medium afterhyperpolarization. However, SK2 channels are blocked by apamin with a sensitivity that suggests heteromeric channels. The herein first shown expression of SK2 human isoform b in brain could explain the variability of electrophysiological findings observed with SK2 channels.

  8. Potassium Channels and Human Epileptic Phenotypes: An Updated Overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Chiara; Combi, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels are expressed in almost every cells and are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell membranes. These channels have been implicated in different disorders, in particular in epilepsy. K+ channel diversity depends on the presence in the human genome of a large number of genes either encoding pore-forming or accessory subunits. More than 80 genes encoding the K+ channels were cloned and they represent the largest group of ion channels regulating the electrical activity of cells in different tissues, including the brain. It is therefore not surprising that mutations in these genes lead to K+ channels dysfunctions linked to inherited epilepsy in humans and non-human model animals. This article reviews genetic and molecular progresses in exploring the pathogenesis of different human epilepsies, with special emphasis on the role of K+ channels in monogenic forms. PMID:27064559

  9. Potassium Channels and Human Epileptic Phenotypes: An Updated Overview.

    PubMed

    Villa, Chiara; Combi, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are expressed in almost every cells and are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell membranes. These channels have been implicated in different disorders, in particular in epilepsy. K(+) channel diversity depends on the presence in the human genome of a large number of genes either encoding pore-forming or accessory subunits. More than 80 genes encoding the K(+) channels were cloned and they represent the largest group of ion channels regulating the electrical activity of cells in different tissues, including the brain. It is therefore not surprising that mutations in these genes lead to K(+) channels dysfunctions linked to inherited epilepsy in humans and non-human model animals. This article reviews genetic and molecular progresses in exploring the pathogenesis of different human epilepsies, with special emphasis on the role of K(+) channels in monogenic forms.

  10. Alcohol tolerance in large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels of CNS terminals is intrinsic and includes two components: decreased ethanol potentiation and decreased channel density.

    PubMed

    Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z; Martin, Gilles E; Puig, Sylvie I; Knott, Thomas K; Lemos, Jose R; Treistman, Steven N

    2004-09-22

    Tolerance is an important element of drug addiction and provides a model for understanding neuronal plasticity. The hypothalamic-neurohypophysial system (HNS) is an established preparation in which to study the actions of alcohol. Acute application of alcohol to the rat neurohypophysis potentiates large-conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels (BK), contributing to inhibition of hormone secretion. A cultured HNS explant from adult rat was used to explore the molecular mechanisms of BK tolerance after prolonged alcohol exposure. Ethanol tolerance was intrinsic to the HNS and consisted of: (1) decreased BK potentiation by ethanol, complete within 12 min of exposure, and (2) decreased current density, which was not complete until 24 hr after exposure, indicating that the two components of tolerance represent distinct processes. Single-channel properties were not affected by chronic exposure, suggesting that decreased current density resulted from downregulation of functional channels in the membrane. Indeed, we observed decreased immunolabeling against the BK alpha-subunit on the surface of tolerant terminals. Analysis using confocal microscopy revealed a reduction of BK channel clustering, likely associated with the internalization of the channel.

  11. Nicotine addiction reduces the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels expression in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lan; Wu, Yu-Mei; Guo, Yan-Yan; Yang, Qi; Feng, Bin; Song, Qian; Liu, Shui-Bing; Zhao, Da-Qing; Zhao, Ming-Gao

    2013-06-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa) are widely expressed in the central nervous system and play important roles in neural activities. Nicotine exposure leads to long-lasting changes in behavioral and neuronal plasticity. However, little is known the roles of BKCa in the development of nicotine addiction. In the present study, a significant reduction in BKCa channel expression was found in nucleus accumbens (NAc) from nicotine addiction mice. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from NAc neurons of the addicted animals revealed a pronounced reduction in the fast after-hyperpolarization of action potentials mediated by BKCa channels that led to hyperexcitability of the NAc neurons. Activation of BKCa channels in the NAc reversed drug-seeking behaviors which were detected by conditioned place preference test. Furthermore, knockdown of BKCa channels using short hairpin RNAs significantly increased the drug-seeking behavior. These findings provide direct evidence that alterations of BKCa channels in the NAc play critical roles in the development of nicotine addiction and that modulation of the BKCa channels may be potential therapeutics for drug addiction.

  12. Meclofenamic acid and diclofenac, novel templates of KCNQ2/Q3 potassium channel openers, depress cortical neuron activity and exhibit anticonvulsant properties.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Asher; Degani, Nurit; Nachman, Rachel; Uziyel, Yael; Gibor, Gilad; Shabat, Doron; Attali, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    The voltage-dependent M-type potassium current (M-current) plays a major role in controlling brain excitability by stabilizing the membrane potential and acting as a brake for neuronal firing. The KCNQ2/Q3 heteromeric channel complex was identified as the molecular correlate of the M-current. Furthermore, the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 channel alpha subunits are mutated in families with benign familial neonatal convulsions, a neonatal form of epilepsy. Enhancement of KCNQ2/Q3 potassium currents may provide an important target for antiepileptic drug development. Here, we show that meclofenamic acid (meclofenamate) and diclofenac, two related molecules previously used as anti-inflammatory drugs, act as novel KCNQ2/Q3 channel openers. Extracellular application of meclofenamate (EC(50) = 25 microM) and diclofenac (EC(50) = 2.6 microM) resulted in the activation of KCNQ2/Q3 K(+) currents, heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Both openers activated KCNQ2/Q3 channels by causing a hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage activation curve (-23 and -15 mV, respectively) and by markedly slowing the deactivation kinetics. The effects of the drugs were stronger on KCNQ2 than on KCNQ3 channel alpha subunits. In contrast, they did not enhance KCNQ1 K(+) currents. Both openers increased KCNQ2/Q3 current amplitude at physiologically relevant potentials and led to hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. In cultured cortical neurons, meclofenamate and diclofenac enhanced the M-current and reduced evoked and spontaneous action potentials, whereas in vivo diclofenac exhibited an anticonvulsant activity (ED(50) = 43 mg/kg). These compounds potentially constitute novel drug templates for the treatment of neuronal hyperexcitability including epilepsy, migraine, or neuropathic pain.

  13. Toxicology of potassium channel-directed compounds in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Larson, Nicholas R; Carlier, Paul R; Gross, Aaron D; Islam, Rafique M; Ma, Ming; Sun, Baonan; Totrov, Maxim M; Yadav, Roopali; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    Potential targets for new vector control insecticides are nerve and muscle potassium channels. In this study, the activities of known potassium channel blockers (4-aminopyridine, quinidine, and tetraethylammonium) and the insecticide propoxur were compared to three experimental catechols and several other compounds against Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Experimental catechol 1 was the most toxic experimental compound in all of the mortality assays conducted, but was at least 100-fold and 39-fold less toxic than propoxur against Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae, respectively. Injection treatment and synergist (piperonyl butoxide) bioassays found that catechol toxicity was not unduly impacted by cuticular transport or oxidative metabolism. Electrophysiological studies showed a decrease in amplitude of evoked muscle contractions, along with an increase in twitch duration at concentrations that increased basal muscle tension (mM). High concentration effects on basal muscle tension were matched by complete depolarization of the muscle membrane potential. Effects on muscle physiology and blockage of Kv2.1 potassium channels in patch clamp experiments were generally consistent with in vivo toxicity, except for 4-aminopyridine, which suggest the involvement of other potassium channel subtypes. Extensive melanization of Anopheles larvae, but not Aedes larvae, occurred from exposure to catechol compounds. Interaction with the phenol oxidase system within insects may be the cause of this melanization, but any contribution to toxicity requires further investigation.

  14. Purification, sequence, and model structure of charybdotoxin, a potent selective inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez-Gallego, G; Navia, M A; Reuben, J P; Katz, G M; Kaczorowski, G J; Garcia, M L

    1988-01-01

    Charybdotoxin (ChTX), a protein present in the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus var. hebraeus, has been purified to homogeneity by a combination of ion-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis, and complete amino acid sequence determination of the pure protein reveal that it consists of a single polypeptide chain of 4.3 kDa. Purified ChTX is a potent and selective inhibitor of the approximately 220-pS Ca2+-activated K+ channel present in GH3 anterior pituitary cells and primary bovine aortic smooth muscle cells. The toxin reversibly blocks channel activity by interacting at the external pore of the channel protein with an apparent Kd of 2.1 nM. The primary structure of ChTX is similar to a number of neurotoxins of diverse origin, which suggests that ChTX is a member of a superfamily of proteins that modify ion-channel activities. On the basis of this similarity, the three-dimensional structure of ChTX has been modeled from the known crystal structure of alpha-bungarotoxin. These studies indicate that ChTX is useful as a probe of Ca2+-activated K+-channel function and suggest that the proposed tertiary structure of ChTX may provide insight into the mechanism of channel block. Images PMID:2453055

  15. Calcium-activated potassium channel SK1 is widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and sensory organs of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Cabo, R; Zichichi, R; Viña, E; Guerrera, M C; Vázquez, G; García-Suárez, O; Vega, J A; Germanà, A

    2013-10-25

    Sensory cells contain ion channels involved in the organ-specific transduction mechanisms that convert different types of stimuli into electric energy. Here we focus on small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 1 (SK1) which plays an important role in all excitable cells acting as feedback regulators in after-hyperpolarization. This study was undertaken to analyze the pattern of expression of SK1 in the zebrafish peripheral nervous system and sensory organs using RT-PRC, Westernblot and immunohistochemistry. Expression of SK1 mRNA was observed at all developmental stages analyzed (from 10 to 100 days post fertilization, dpf), and the antibody used identified a protein with a molecular weight of 70kDa, at 100dpf (regarded to be adult). Cell expressing SK1 in adult animals were neurons of dorsal root and cranial nerve sensory ganglia, sympathetic neurons, sensory cells in neuromasts of the lateral line system and taste buds, crypt olfactory neurons and photoreceptors. Present results report for the first time the expression and the distribution of SK1 in the peripheral nervous system and sensory organs of adult zebrafish, and may contribute to set zebrafish as an interesting experimental model for calcium-activated potassium channels research. Moreover these findings are of potential interest because the potential role of SK as targets for the treatment of neurological diseases and sensory disorders.

  16. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels enhances DMT1-mediated iron uptake in SK-N-SH cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xixun; Xu, Huamin; Shi, Limin; Jiang, Zhifeng; Song, Ning; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Iron importer divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) plays a crucial role in the nigal iron accumulation in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Membrane hyperpolarization is one of the factors that could affect its iron transport function. Besides iron, selective activation of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels also contributes to the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD. Interestingly, activation of KATP channels could induce membrane hyperpolarization. Therefore, it is of vital importance to study the effects of activation of KATP channels on DMT1-mediated iron uptake function. In the present study, activation of KATP channels by diazoxide resulted in the hyperpolarization of the membrane potential and increased DMT1-mediated iron uptake in SK-N-SH cells. This led to an increase in intracellular iron levels and a subsequent decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in ROS production. Delayed inactivation of the Fe2+-evoked currents by diazoxide was recorded by patch clamp in HEK293 cells, which demonstrated that diazoxide could prolonged DMT1-facilitated iron transport. While inhibition of KATP channels by glibenclamide could block ferrous iron influx and the subsequent cell damage. Overexpression of Kir6.2/SUR1 resulted in an increase in iron influx and intracellular iron levels, which was markedly increased after diazoxide treatment. PMID:27646472

  17. ATP-dependent potassium channels and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Dianne Heloisa; Alcazar, Larissa Pontes; Arakaki, Priscila Akemi; Martins, Laysa Toschi; Agustini, Bruna Carla; de Moraes Rego, Fabiane Gomes; Frigeri, Henrique Ravanhol

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem, which affects a millions worldwide. Most diabetes cases are classified as type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is highly associated with obesity. Type 2 diabetes is considered a multifactorial disorder, with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to its development. An important issue linked with diabetes development is the failure of the insulin releasing mechanism involving abnormal activity of the ATP-dependent potassium channel, KATP. This channel is a transmembrane protein encoded by the KCNJ11 and ABCC8 genes. Furthermore, polymorphisms in these genes have been linked to type 2 diabetes because of the role of KATP in insulin release. While several genetic variations have been reported to be associated with this disease, the E23K polymorphism is most commonly associated with this pathology, as well as to obesity. Here, we review the molecular genetics of the potassium channel and discusses its most described polymorphisms and their associations with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Regulation of myometrial contraction by ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel via activation of SUR2B and Kir 6.2 in mouse

    PubMed Central

    HONG, Seung Hwa; KYEONG, Kyu-Sang; KIM, Chan Hyung; KIM, Young Chul; CHOI, Woong; YOO, Ra Young; KIM, Hun Sik; PARK, Yeon Jin; JI, Il Woon; JEONG, Eun-Hwan; KIM, Hak Soon; XU, Wen-Xie; LEE, Sang Jin

    2016-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are well characterized in cardiac, pancreatic and many other muscle cells. In the present study, functional expression of the KATP channel was examined in non-pregnant murine longitudinal myometrium. Isometric contraction measurements and Western blot were used. KATP channel openers (KCOs), such as pinacidil, cromakalim, diazoxide and nicorandil, inhibited spontaneous myometrial contractions in a reversible and glibenclamide-sensitive manner. KCOs inhibited oxytocin (OXT)- and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α)-induced phasic contractions in a glibenclamide-sensitive manner. SUR2B and Kir6.2 were detected by Western blot, whereas SUR1, SUR2A and Kir6.1 were not. These results show that pinacidl, cromakalim, diazoxide and nicorandil-sensitive KATP channels exist in murine myometrium, which are composed of SUR2B and Kir6.2. Based on the modulatory effects of the KATP channel on spontaneous contraction, OXT- and PGF2α-induced contractions, KATP channels seem to play an essential role in murine myometrial motility via activation of SUR2B and Kir6.2. PMID:27086859

  19. Diabetes downregulates large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium beta 1 channel subunit in retinal arteriolar smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    McGahon, Mary K; Dash, Durga P; Arora, Aruna; Wall, Noreen; Dawicki, Jennine; Simpson, David A; Scholfield, C Norman; McGeown, J Graham; Curtis, Tim M

    2007-03-16

    Retinal vasoconstriction and reduced retinal blood flow precede the onset of diabetic retinopathy. The pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie increased retinal arteriolar tone during diabetes remain unclear. Normally, local Ca(2+) release events (Ca(2+)-sparks), trigger the activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+)(BK)-channels which hyperpolarize and relax vascular smooth muscle cells, thereby causing vasodilatation. In the present study, we examined BK channel function in retinal vascular smooth muscle cells from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The BK channel inhibitor, Penitrem A, constricted nondiabetic retinal arterioles (pressurized to 70mmHg) by 28%. The BK current evoked by caffeine was dramatically reduced in retinal arterioles from diabetic animals even though caffeine-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) release was unaffected. Spontaneous BK currents were smaller in diabetic cells, but the amplitude of Ca(2+)-sparks was larger. The amplitudes of BK currents elicited by depolarizing voltage steps were similar in control and diabetic arterioles and mRNA expression of the pore-forming BKalpha subunit was unchanged. The Ca(2+)-sensitivity of single BK channels from diabetic retinal vascular smooth muscle cells was markedly reduced. The BKbeta1 subunit confers Ca(2+)-sensitivity to BK channel complexes and both transcript and protein levels for BKbeta1 were appreciably lower in diabetic retinal arterioles. The mean open times and the sensitivity of BK channels to tamoxifen were decreased in diabetic cells, consistent with a downregulation of BKbeta1 subunits. The potency of blockade by Pen A was lower for BK channels from diabetic animals. Thus, changes in the molecular composition of BK channels could account for retinal hypoperfusion in early diabetes, an idea having wider implications for the pathogenesis of diabetic hypertension.

  20. Targeting BK (big potassium) Channels in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    N'Gouemo, Prosper

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Epilepsies are disorders of neuronal excitability characterized by spontaneous and recurrent seizures. Ion channels are critical for regulating neuronal excitability and, therefore, can contribute significantly to epilepsy pathophysiology. In particular, large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels play an important role in seizure etiology. These channels are activated by both membrane depolarization and increased intracellular Ca2+. This unique coupling of Ca2+ signaling to membrane depolarization is important in controlling neuronal hyperexcitability, as outward K+ current through BKCa channels hyperpolarizes neurons. Areas covered This review focuses on BKCa channel structure-function and discusses the role of these channels in epilepsy pathophysiology. Expert opinion Loss-of-function BKCa channels contribute neuronal hyperexcitability that can lead to temporal lobe epilepsy, tonic-clonic seizures and alcohol withdrawal seizures. Similarly, BKCa channel blockade can trigger seizures and status epilepticus. Paradoxically, some mutations in BKCa channel subunit can give rise to the channel gain-of-function that leads to development of idiopathic epilepsy (primarily absence epilepsy). Seizures themselves also enhance BKCa channel currents associated with neuronal hyperexcitability, and blocking BKCa channels suppresses generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Thus, both loss-of-function and gain-of-function BKCa channels might serve as molecular targets for drugs to suppress certain seizure phenotypes including temporal lobe seizures and absence seizures, respectively. PMID:21923633

  1. The influence of hypotonicity on large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shwu-Jiuan; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Hu, Dan-Ning; Chen, Jane-Fane

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of hypotonicity on the activity of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ (BK(Ca)) channels in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE R-50) cells. Effects of hypotonicity on ion currents were investigated with the aid of the patch-clamp technique. A regulatory volume decrease in response to a hypotonic solution (200 mOsm/L) was observed that could be blunted by paxilline. In whole-cell current recordings, a hypotonic solution (200 mOsm/L) reversibly increased the amplitude of K+ outward currents (I(K)). The increase of I(K) could be reversed by iberiotoxin (200 nM), paxilline (1 microM), or tetrandrine (5 microM), but not by glibenclamide (10 microM), disulphonic acid (DIDS) (100 microM), or dequalinium dichloride (10 microM). In RPE R-50 cells pretreated with thapsigargin, aristolochic acid, or pertussis toxin, the increased amplitude of I(K) in response to hypotonicity was unaltered. In cell-attached patches, an increase in BK(Ca)-channel activity was observed during hypotonicity-induced cell swelling. The enhanced channel activity elicited under this condition was mainly mediated by an increase in the number of long-lived openings. These findings support the evidence for the coupling of volume swelling to the functional activity of BK(Ca) channels.

  2. Immunolocalization of hyperpolarization-activated cationic HCN1 and HCN3 channels in the rat nephron: regulation of HCN3 by potassium diets.

    PubMed

    López-González, Zinaeli; Ayala-Aguilera, Cosete; Martinez-Morales, Flavio; Galicia-Cruz, Othir; Salvador-Hernández, Carolina; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Medeiros, Mara; Hernández, Ana Maria; Escobar, Laura I

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cationic and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) comprise four homologous subunits (HCN1-HCN4). HCN channels are found in excitable and non-excitable tissues in mammals. We have previously shown that HCN2 may transport ammonium (NH4 (+)), besides sodium (Na(+)), in the rat distal nephron. In the present work, we identified HCN1 and HCN3 in the proximal tubule (PT) and HCN3 in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) of the rat kidney. Immunoblot assays detected HCN1 (130 kDa) and HCN3 (90 KDa) and their truncated proteins C-terminal HCN1 (93 KDa) and N-terminal HCN3 (65 KDa) in enriched plasma membranes from cortex (CX) and outer medulla (OM), as well as in brush-border membrane vesicles. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed apical localization of HCN1 and HCN3 in the PT. HCN3 was also found at the basolateral membrane of TALH. We evaluated chronic changes in mineral dietary on HCN3 protein abundance. Animals were fed with three different diets: sodium-deficient (SD) diet, potassium-deficient (KD) diet, and high-potassium (HK) diet. Up-regulation of HCN3 was observed in OM by KD and in CX and OM by HK; the opposite effect occurred with the N-terminal truncated HCN3 in CX (KD) and OM (HK). SD diet did not produce any change. Since HCN channels activate with membrane hyperpolarization, our results suggest that HCN channels may play a role in the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, contributing to Na(+), K(+), and acid-base homeostasis in the rat kidney.

  3. The renal TRPV4 channel is essential for adaptation to increased dietary potassium.

    PubMed

    Mamenko, Mykola V; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Tomilin, Viktor N; Zaika, Oleg L; Jensen, V Behrana; O'Neil, Roger G; Pochynyuk, Oleh M

    2017-02-07

    To maintain potassium homeostasis, kidneys exert flow-dependent potassium secretion to facilitate kaliuresis in response to elevated dietary potassium intake. This process involves stimulation of calcium-activated large conductance maxi-K (BK) channels in the distal nephron, namely the connecting tubule and the collecting duct. Recent evidence suggests that the TRPV4 channel is a critical determinant of flow-dependent intracellular calcium elevations in these segments of the renal tubule. Here, we demonstrate that elevated dietary potassium intake (five percent potassium) increases renal TRPV4 mRNA and protein levels in an aldosterone-dependent manner and causes redistribution of the channel to the apical plasma membrane in native collecting duct cells. This, in turn, leads to augmented TRPV4-mediated flow-dependent calcium ion responses in freshly isolated split-opened collecting ducts from mice fed the high potassium diet. Genetic TRPV4 ablation greatly diminished BK channel activity in collecting duct cells pointing to a reduced capacity to excrete potassium. Consistently, elevated potassium intake induced hyperkalemia in TRPV4 knockout mice due to deficient renal potassium excretion. Thus, regulation of TRPV4 activity in the distal nephron by dietary potassium is an indispensable component of whole body potassium balance.

  4. Vietnamese Heterometrus laoticus scorpion venom: evidence for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity and isolation of new polypeptide toxin acting on Kv1.3 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Anh N; Vo, Hoang D M; Vo, Nguyen P; Kudryashova, Kseniya S; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Feofanov, Alexey V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Serebryakova, Marina V; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2014-01-01

    The scorpion Heterometrus laoticus (Scorpionidae) inhabits Indochinese peninsula and is widely distributed in South-West Vietnam. Since no human fatalities caused by H. laoticus stings were reported, no systematic characterization of the venom was earlier done. In this study we report on biological activity of the venom from H. laoticus caught in Vietnamese province An Giang. The venom manifested a very low acute toxicity with LD50 of about 190 mg/kg body weight in mice at subcutaneous (s.c.) injection and 12 mg/kg at intravenous injection. The venom analgesic effects using tail immersion and writhing tests as well as anti-inflammatory effect using carrageenan test were analyzed at doses of 9.5 and 19 mg/kg at s.c. injections. It was found that at two doses tested H. laoticus venom showed both anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity. The venom was fractionated by means of gel-filtration and reversed-phase HPLC. As a result several polypeptide toxins were isolated and new toxin hetlaxin was identified. Its amino acid sequence was determined and binding to the extracellular vestibule of the K⁺-conducting pore of Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 potassium channels was studied. Hetlaxin belongs to the scorpion alpha-toxin family and is the first toxin isolated from H. laoticus venom which possesses high affinity (K(i) 59 nM) to Kv1.3 potassium channel.

  5. Activation of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Stimulates Cardiac ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels via a ROS/Calmodulin/CaMKII Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yongping; Zhang, Dai-Min; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is recognized as an important signaling component in diverse cell types. PKG may influence the function of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, an ion channel critical for stress adaptation in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to address this issue. Methods and Findings Single-channel recordings of cardiac KATP channels were performed in both cell-attached and inside-out patch configurations using transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes. We found that Kir6.2/SUR2A (the cardiac-type KATP) channels were activated by cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-attached patches obtained from HEK293 cells, an effect mimicked by the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP whereas abolished by selective PKG inhibitors. Intriguingly, direct application of PKG moderately reduced rather than augmented Kir6.2/SUR2A single-channel currents in excised, inside-out patches. Moreover, PKG stimulation of Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells was abrogated by ROS/H2O2 scavenging, antagonism of calmodulin, and blockade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), respectively. Exogenous H2O2 also concentration-dependently stimulated Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells, and its effect was prevented by inhibition of calmodulin or CaMKII. PKG stimulation of KATP channels was confirmed in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes, which was ROS- and CaMKII-dependent. Kinetically, PKG appeared to stimulate these channels by destabilizing the longest closed state while stabilizing the long open state and facilitating opening transitions. Conclusion The present study provides novel evidence that PKG exerts dual regulation of cardiac KATP channels, including marked stimulation resulting from intracellular signaling mediated by ROS (H2O2 in

  6. Baclofen, an agonist at peripheral GABAB receptors, induces antinociception via activation of TEA-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Reis, G M L; Duarte, I D G

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Central anti-nociceptive actions of baclofen involve activation of K+ channels. Here we assessed what types of K+ channel might participate in the peripheral anti-nociception induced by baclofen. Experimental approach: Nociceptive thresholds to mechanical stimulation in rat paws treated with intraplantar prostaglandin E2.(PGE2) to induce hyperalgesia were measured 3h after PGE2 injection. Other agents were also given by intraplantar injection Key results: Baclofen elicited a dose-dependent (15 - 240 μg per paw) anti-nociceptive effect. An intermediate dose of baclofen (60 μg) did not produce antinociception in the contralateral paw, showing its peripheral site of action. The GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen (12.5 - 100 μg per paw) antagonized, in a dose-dependent manner, peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg), suggesting a specific effect. This antinociceptive action of baclofen was unaffected by bicuculline, GABAA receptor antagonist (80 μg per paw), or by (1,2,5,6 tetrahydropyridin-4-yl) methylphosphinic acid, GABAC receptor antagonist (20 μg per paw). The peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg) was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by the voltage-dependent K+ channel blockers tetraethylammonium (7.5 - 30 μg per paw) and 4-aminopyridine (2.5 - 10 μg per paw). The blockers of other K+ channels, glibenclamide (160 μg), tolbutamide (320 μg), charybdotoxin (2 μg), dequalinium (50 μg) and caesium (500 μg) had no effect. Conclusions and Implications: This study provides evidence that the peripheral antinociceptive effect of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen results from the activation of tetraethylammonium-sensitive K+ channels. Other K+ channels appear not to be involved. PMID:17016510

  7. The Cyclooctadepsipeptide Anthelmintic Emodepside Differentially Modulates Nematode, Insect and Human Calcium-Activated Potassium (SLO) Channel Alpha Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Schoenhense, Eva; Harder, Achim; Raming, Klaus; O’Kelly, Ita; Ndukwe, Kelechi; O’Connor, Vincent; Walker, Robert J.; Holden-Dye, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    The anthelmintic emodepside paralyses adult filarial worms, via a mode of action distinct from previous anthelmintics and has recently garnered interest as a new treatment for onchocerciasis. Whole organism data suggest its anthelmintic action is underpinned by a selective activation of the nematode isoform of an evolutionary conserved Ca2+-activated K+ channel, SLO-1. To test this at the molecular level we compared the actions of emodepside at heterologously expressed SLO-1 alpha subunit orthologues from nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans), Drosophila melanogaster and human using whole cell voltage clamp. Intriguingly we found that emodepside modulated nematode (Ce slo-1), insect (Drosophila, Dm slo) and human (hum kcnma1)SLO channels but that there are discrete differences in the features of the modulation that are consistent with its anthelmintic efficacy. Nematode SLO-1 currents required 100 μM intracellular Ca2+ and were strongly facilitated by emodepside (100 nM; +73.0 ± 17.4%; n = 9; p<0.001). Drosophila Slo currents on the other hand were activated by emodepside (10 μM) in the presence of 52 nM Ca2+ but were inhibited in the presence of 290 nM Ca2+ and exhibited a characteristic loss of rectification. Human Slo required 300nM Ca2+ and emodepside transiently facilitated currents (100nM; +33.5 ± 9%; n = 8; p<0.05) followed by a sustained inhibition (-52.6 ± 9.8%; n = 8; p<0.001). This first cross phyla comparison of the actions of emodepside at nematode, insect and human channels provides new mechanistic insight into the compound’s complex modulation of SLO channels. Consistent with whole organism behavioural studies on C. elegans, it indicates its anthelmintic action derives from a strong activation of SLO current, not observed in the human channel. These data provide an important benchmark for the wider deployment of emodepside as an anthelmintic treatment. PMID:26437177

  8. Natural and synthetic modulators of SK (Kca2) potassium channels inhibit magnesium-dependent activity of the kinase-coupled cation channel TRPM7

    PubMed Central

    Chubanov, V; Mederos y Schnitzler, M; Meißner, M; Schäfer, S; Abstiens, K; Hofmann, T; Gudermann, T

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a TRP ion channel segment linked to an α-type protein kinase domain. TRPM7 is essential for proliferation and cell growth. Up-regulation of TRPM7 function is involved in anoxic neuronal death, cardiac fibrosis and tumour cell proliferation. The goal of this work was to identify non-toxic inhibitors of the TRPM7 channel and to assess the effect of blocking endogenous TRPM7 currents on the phenotype of living cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We developed an aequorin bioluminescence-based assay of TRPM7 channel activity and performed a hypothesis-driven screen for inhibitors of the channel. The candidates identified were further assessed electrophysiologically and in cell biological experiments. KEY RESULTS TRPM7 currents were inhibited by modulators of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (KCa2.1–2.3; SK) channels, including the antimalarial plant alkaloid quinine, CyPPA, dequalinium, NS8593, SKA31 and UCL 1684. The most potent compound NS8593 (IC50 1.6 µM) specifically targeted TRPM7 as compared with other TRP channels, interfered with Mg2+-dependent regulation of TRPM7 channel and inhibited the motility of cultured cells. NS8593 exhibited full and reversible block of native TRPM7-like currents in HEK 293 cells, freshly isolated smooth muscle cells, primary podocytes and ventricular myocytes. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study reveals a tight overlap in the pharmacological profiles of TRPM7 and KCa2.1–2.3 channels. NS8593 acts as a negative gating modulator of TRPM7 and is well-suited to study functional features and cellular roles of endogenous TRPM7. PMID:22242975

  9. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in the genesis of 3,4-diaminopyridine-induced periodic contractions in isolated canine coronary artery smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasumi; Maezawa, Yuko; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Uchida, Yasuto; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2011-09-01

    We found that 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), a voltage-gated potassium channel (K(V)) inhibitor, elicits pH-sensitive periodic contractions (PCs) of coronary smooth muscles. Underlying mechanisms of PCs, however, remained to be elucidated. The present study was performed to examine the roles of ion channels in the genesis of PCs. To determine the electromechanical changes of smooth muscles, isolated coronary arterial rings from beagles were suspended in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Henseleit solution, and 10(-2) M 3,4-DAP was added to elicit PCs. 3,4-DAP caused periodic spike-and-plateau depolarization accompanied by contraction. PCs were not produced when the CaCl(2) concentration in the chamber was ≤ 0.3 × 10(-3) or ≥ 10(-2) M. PCs were eliminated by a CaCl(2) concentration ≥ 5 × 10(-3) M or by lowering pH below 7.20 with HCl and recovered by the addition of iberiotoxin or charybdotoxin, which inhibit large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca)), or by elevating pH above 7.35 with NaOH. PCs, as well as the spike-and-plateau depolarization, were eliminated by nifedipine, which inhibits L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(V)). Influx of Ca(2+) through L-type Ca(V), which was opened because closing of K(Ca), secondary to 3,4-DAP-induced closing of K(V), resulted in contraction; the intracellular Ca(2+) increased by this influx opened K(Ca), leading to closure of Ca(V) and consequent cessation of Ca(2+) influx with resultant relaxation. These processes were repeated spontaneously to cause PCs. H(+) and OH(-) were considered to act as the opener and closer of K(Ca), respectively.

  10. Single-channel biophysical and pharmacological characterizations of native human large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in freshly isolated detrusor smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Malysz, John; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) function in vitro and in vivo. However, in-depth characterization of human native DSM single BK channels has not yet been provided. Here, we conducted single-channel recordings from excised patches from native human DSM cells. Inside-out and outside-out recordings in high K(+) symmetrical solution (containing 140 mM KCl and ~300 nM free Ca(2+)) showed single-channel conductance of 215-220 pS, half-maximum constant for activation of ~+75 to +80 mV, and low probability of opening (P o) at +20 mV that increased ~10-fold at +40 mV and ~60-fold at +60 mV. Using the inside-out configuration at +30 mV, reduction of intracellular [Ca(2+)] from ~300 nM to Ca(2+)-free decreased the P o by ~85 %, whereas elevation to ~800 nM increased P o by ~50-fold. The BK channel activator NS1619 (10 μM) enhanced the P o by ~10-fold at +30 mV; subsequent application of the selective BK channel inhibitor paxilline (500 nM) blocked the activity. Changes in intracellular [Ca(2+)] or the addition of NS1619 did not significantly alter the current amplitude or single-channel conductance. This is the first report to provide biophysical and pharmacological profiles of native human DSM single BK channels highlighting their importance in regulating human DSM excitability.

  11. [The characteristics and oxidative modulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in guinea-pig colon smooth muscle cells.].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Feng; Ouyang, Shou; Zhang, Hui

    2009-06-25

    To investigate the characteristics of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca)) and the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on BK(Ca) in guinea-pig proximal colon smooth muscle cells, single smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig colon were enzymatically isolated in low calcium solution containing papain (3 mg/mL), DTT (2 mg/mL), and bovine serum albumin (BSA, 2 mg/mL). Tissues were incubated at 36 degrees C in enzyme solution for 15 min and were then suspended in enzyme-free low calcium solution. Inside-out single channel recording technique was used to record BK(Ca) current. The intracellular (bath) and microelectrode solution both contained symmetrical high potassium. The BK(Ca) in guinea-pig colon smooth muscle cell possesses: 1) voltage-dependence, 2) high selectivity for potassium ion, 3) large conductance (223.7 pS+/-9.2 pS), 4) dependence of [Ca(2+)](i). Intracellular application of H2O2 decreased the open probability (P(o)) of BK(Ca) at low concentration (

  12. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 activation by arachidonylcyclopropylamide in rat aortic rings causes vasorelaxation involving calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 and calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pastor, E; Andrade, F; Sánchez-Pastor, J M; Elizalde, A; Huerta, M; Virgen-Ortiz, A; Trujillo, X; Rodríguez-Hernández, A

    2014-04-15

    Cannabinoids are key regulators of vascular tone, some of the mechanisms involved include the activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 (CB); the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1); and non-(CB(1))/non-CB2 receptors. Here, we used the potent, selective CB(1) agonist arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) to elucidate the mechanism underlying vascular tone regulation. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that CB(1) was expressed in smooth muscle and endothelial cells in rat aorta. We performed isometric tension recordings in aortic rings that had been pre-contracted with phenylephrine. In these conditions, ACPA caused vasorelaxation in an endothelium-independent manner. To confirm that the effect of ACPA was mediated by CB(1) receptor, we repeated the experiment after blocking these receptors with a selective antagonist, AM281. In these conditions, ACPA did not cause vasorelaxation. We explored the role of K(+) channels in the effect of ACPA by applying high-K(+) solution to induce contraction in aortic rings. In these conditions, the ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was about half that observed with phenylephrine-induced contraction. Thus, K(+) channels were involved in the ACPA effect. Furthermore, the vasorelaxation effect was similarly reduced when we specifically blocked calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 (KCa1.1) (MaxiK; BKCa) prior to adding ACPA. Finally, ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was also diminished when we specifically blocked the calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit (Ca(v)1.2). These results showed that ACPA activation of CB(1) in smooth muscle caused vasorelaxation of aortic rings through a mechanism involving the activation of K(Ca)1.1 and the inhibition of Ca(v)1.2.

  13. Potassium channel openers are uncoupling protonophores: implication in cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Jahangir, Arshad; Oberlin, Andrew; Komarov, Alexander; Colombini, Marco; Terzic, Andre

    2004-06-18

    Excessive build-up of mitochondrial protonic potential is harmful to cellular homeostasis, and modulation of inner membrane permeability a proposed countermeasure. Here, we demonstrate that structurally distinct potassium channel openers, diazoxide and pinacidil, facilitated transmembrane proton translocation generating H(+)-selective current through planar phospholipid membrane. Both openers depolarized mitochondria, activated state 4 respiration and reduced oxidative phosphorylation, recapitulating the signature of mitochondrial uncoupling. This effect was maintained in K(+)-free conditions and shared with the prototypic protonophore 2,4-dinitrophenol. Diazoxide, pinacidil and 2,4-dinitrophenol, but not 2,4-dinitrotoluene lacking protonophoric properties, preserved functional recovery of ischemic heart. The identified protonophoric property of potassium channel openers, thus, implicates a previously unrecognized component in their mechanism of cardioprotection.

  14. Two-pore Domain Potassium Channels in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Kanghyun

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels have a distinct structure and channel properties, and are involved in a background K+ current. The 15 members of the K2P channels are identified and classified into six subfamilies on the basis of their sequence similarities. The activity of the channels is dynamically regulated by various physical, chemical, and biological effectors. The channels are expressed in a wide variety of tissues in mammals in an isoform specific manner, and play various roles in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. To function as channels, the K2P channels form dimers, and some isoforms form heterodimers that provide diversity in channel properties. In the brain, TWIK1, TREK1, TREK2, TRAAK, TASK1, and TASK3 are predominantly expressed in various regions, including the cerebral cortex, dentate gyrus, CA1-CA3, and granular layer of the cerebellum. TWIK1, TREK1, and TASK1 are highly expressed in astrocytes, where they play specific cellular roles. Astrocytes keep leak K+ conductance, called the passive conductance, which mainly involves TWIK1-TREK1 heterodimeric channel. TWIK1 and TREK1 also mediate glutamate release from astrocytes in an exocytosis-independent manner. The expression of TREK1 and TREK2 in astrocytes increases under ischemic conditions, that enhance neuroprotection from ischemia. Accumulated evidence has indicated that astrocytes, together with neurons, are involved in brain function, with the K2P channels playing critical role in these astrocytes. PMID:27790056

  15. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  16. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  17. Potassium uptake supporting plant growth in the absence of AKT1 channel activity: Inhibition by ammonium and stimulation by sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Hirsch, R. E.; Lewis, D. R.; Qi, Z.; Sussman, M. R.; Lewis, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    A transferred-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks AKT1 inward-rectifying K+ channel activity in root cells was obtained previously by a reverse-genetic strategy, enabling a dissection of the K+-uptake apparatus of the root into AKT1 and non-AKT1 components. Membrane potential measurements in root cells demonstrated that the AKT1 component of the wild-type K+ permeability was between 55 and 63% when external [K+] was between 10 and 1,000 microM, and NH4+ was absent. NH4+ specifically inhibited the non-AKT1 component, apparently by competing for K+ binding sites on the transporter(s). This inhibition by NH4+ had significant consequences for akt1 plants: K+ permeability, 86Rb+ fluxes into roots, seed germination, and seedling growth rate of the mutant were each similarly inhibited by NH4+. Wild-type plants were much more resistant to NH4+. Thus, AKT1 channels conduct the K+ influx necessary for the growth of Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings in conditions that block the non-AKT1 mechanism. In contrast to the effects of NH4+, Na+ and H+ significantly stimulated the non-AKT1 portion of the K+ permeability. Stimulation of akt1 growth rate by Na+, a predicted consequence of the previous result, was observed when external [K+] was 10 microM. Collectively, these results indicate that the AKT1 channel is an important component of the K+ uptake apparatus supporting growth, even in the "high-affinity" range of K+ concentrations. In the absence of AKT1 channel activity, an NH4+-sensitive, Na+/H+-stimulated mechanism can suffice.

  18. Proteinase inhibitor homologues as potassium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Lancelin, J M; Foray, M F; Poncin, M; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1994-04-01

    We report here the NMR structure of dendrotoxin I, a powerful potassium channel blocker from the venom of the African Elapidae snake Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba), calculated from an experimentally-derived set of 719 geometric restraints. The backbone of the toxin superimposes on bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) with a root-mean-square deviation of < 1.7 A. The surface electrostatic potential calculated for dendrotoxin I and BPTI, reveal an important difference which might account for the differences in function of the two proteins. These proteins may provide examples of adaptation for specific and diverse biological functions while at the same time maintaining the overall three-dimensional structure of a common ancestor.

  19. Cholinergic modulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels regulates synaptic strength and spine calcium in cartwheel cells of the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S; Brenowitz, Stephan D

    2014-04-09

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulatory transmitter that controls synaptic plasticity and sensory processing in many brain regions. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is an auditory brainstem nucleus that integrates auditory signals from the cochlea with multisensory inputs from several brainstem nuclei and receives prominent cholinergic projections. In the auditory periphery, cholinergic modulation serves a neuroprotective function, reducing cochlear output under high sound levels. However, the role of cholinergic signaling in the DCN is less understood. Here we examine postsynaptic mechanisms of cholinergic modulation at glutamatergic synapses formed by parallel fiber axons onto cartwheel cells (CWCs) in the apical DCN circuit from mouse brainstem slice using calcium (Ca) imaging combined with two-photon laser glutamate uncaging onto CWC spines. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) significantly increased the amplitude of both uncaging-evoked EPSPs (uEPSPs) and spine Ca transients. Our results demonstrate that mAChRs in CWC spines act by suppressing large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels, and this effect is mediated through the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. Blocking BK channels relieves voltage-dependent magnesium block of NMDA receptors, thereby enhancing uEPSPs and spine Ca transients. Finally, we demonstrate that mAChR activation inhibits L-type Ca channels and thus may contribute to the suppression of BK channels by mAChRs. In summary, we demonstrate a novel role for BK channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission and show that this mechanism is under modulatory control of mAChRs.

  20. Cholinergic Modulation of Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels Regulates Synaptic Strength and Spine Calcium in Cartwheel Cells of the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    He, Shan; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulatory transmitter that controls synaptic plasticity and sensory processing in many brain regions. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is an auditory brainstem nucleus that integrates auditory signals from the cochlea with multisensory inputs from several brainstem nuclei and receives prominent cholinergic projections. In the auditory periphery, cholinergic modulation serves a neuroprotective function, reducing cochlear output under high sound levels. However, the role of cholinergic signaling in the DCN is less understood. Here we examine postsynaptic mechanisms of cholinergic modulation at glutamatergic synapses formed by parallel fiber axons onto cartwheel cells (CWCs) in the apical DCN circuit from mouse brainstem slice using calcium (Ca) imaging combined with two-photon laser glutamate uncaging onto CWC spines. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) significantly increased the amplitude of both uncaging-evoked EPSPs (uEPSPs) and spine Ca transients. Our results demonstrate that mAChRs in CWC spines act by suppressing large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels, and this effect is mediated through the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. Blocking BK channels relieves voltage-dependent magnesium block of NMDA receptors, thereby enhancing uEPSPs and spine Ca transients. Finally, we demonstrate that mAChR activation inhibits L-type Ca channels and thus may contribute to the suppression of BK channels by mAChRs. In summary, we demonstrate a novel role for BK channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission and show that this mechanism is under modulatory control of mAChRs. PMID:24719104

  1. Effects of manipulating slowpoke calcium-dependent potassium channel expression on rhythmic locomotor activity in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmic motor behaviors are generated by networks of neurons. The sequence and timing of muscle contractions depends on both synaptic connections between neurons and the neurons’ intrinsic properties. In particular, motor neuron ion currents may contribute significantly to motor output. Large conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (BK) currents play a role in action potential repolarization, interspike interval, repetitive and burst firing, burst termination and interburst interval in neurons. Mutations in slowpoke (slo) genes encoding BK channels result in motor disturbances. This study examined the effects of manipulating slo channel expression on rhythmic motor activity using Drosophila larva as a model system. Dual intracellular recordings from adjacent body wall muscles were made during spontaneous crawling-related activity in larvae expressing a slo mutation or a slo RNA interference construct. The incidence and duration of rhythmic activity in slo mutants were similar to wild-type control animals, while the timing of the motor pattern was altered. slo mutants showed decreased burst durations, cycle durations, and quiescence intervals, and increased duty cycles, relative to wild-type. Expressing slo RNAi in identified motor neurons phenocopied many of the effects observed in the mutant, including decreases in quiescence interval and cycle duration. Overall, these results show that altering slo expression in the whole larva, and specifically in motor neurons, changes the frequency of crawling activity. These results suggest an important role for motor neuron intrinsic properties in shaping the timing of motor output. PMID:23638395

  2. Palmitoylation gates phosphorylation-dependent regulation of BK potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lijun; Jeffries, Owen; McClafferty, Heather; Molyvdas, Adam; Rowe, Iain C M; Saleem, Fozia; Chen, Lie; Greaves, Jennifer; Chamberlain, Luke H; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Ruth, Peter; Shipston, Michael J

    2008-12-30

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels are important regulators of physiological homeostasis and their function is potently modulated by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. PKA regulates the channel through phosphorylation of residues within the intracellular C terminus of the pore-forming alpha-subunits. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit effects changes in channel activity are unknown. Inhibition of BK channels by PKA depends on phosphorylation of only a single alpha-subunit in the channel tetramer containing an alternatively spliced insert (STREX) suggesting that phosphorylation results in major conformational rearrangements of the C terminus. Here, we define the mechanism of PKA inhibition of BK channels and demonstrate that this regulation is conditional on the palmitoylation status of the channel. We show that the cytosolic C terminus of the STREX BK channel uniquely interacts with the plasma membrane via palmitoylation of evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues in the STREX insert. PKA phosphorylation of the serine residue immediately upstream of the conserved palmitoylated cysteine residues within STREX dissociates the C terminus from the plasma membrane, inhibiting STREX channel activity. Abolition of STREX palmitoylation by site-directed mutagenesis or pharmacological inhibition of palmitoyl transferases prevents PKA-mediated inhibition of BK channels. Thus, palmitoylation gates BK channel regulation by PKA phosphorylation. Palmitoylation and phosphorylation are both dynamically regulated; thus, cross-talk between these 2 major posttranslational signaling cascades provides a mechanism for conditional regulation of BK channels. Interplay of these distinct signaling cascades has important implications for the dynamic regulation of BK channels and physiological homeostasis.

  3. Recruitment of Gβγ controls the basal activity of G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels: crucial role of distal C terminus of GIRK1

    PubMed Central

    Kahanovitch, Uri; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Berlin, Shai; Rubinstein, Moran; Styr, Boaz; Castel, Ruth; Peleg, Sagit; Tabak, Galit; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ivanina, Tatiana; Dascal, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK, or Kir3) channels are important mediators of inhibitory neurotransmission via activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GIRK channels are tetramers comprising combinations of subunits (GIRK1–4), activated by direct binding of the Gβγ subunit of Gi/o proteins. Heterologously expressed GIRK1/2 exhibit high, Gβγ-dependent basal currents (Ibasal) and a modest activation by GPCR or coexpressed Gβγ. Inversely, the GIRK2 homotetramers exhibit low Ibasal and strong activation by Gβγ. The high Ibasal of GIRK1 seems to be associated with its unique distal C terminus (G1-dCT), which is not present in the other subunits. We investigated the role of G1-dCT using electrophysiological and fluorescence assays in Xenopus laevis oocytes and protein interaction assays. We show that expression of GIRK1/2 increases the plasma membrane level of coexpressed Gβγ (a phenomenon we term ‘Gβγ recruitment’) but not of coexpressed Gαi3. All GIRK1-containing channels, but not GIRK2 homomers, recruited Gβγ to the plasma membrane. In biochemical assays, truncation of G1-dCT reduces the binding between the cytosolic parts of GIRK1 and Gβγ, but not Gαi3. Nevertheless, the truncation of G1-dCT does not impair activation by Gβγ. In fluorescently labelled homotetrameric GIRK1 channels and in the heterotetrameric GIRK1/2 channel, the truncation of G1-dCT abolishes Gβγ recruitment and decreases Ibasal. Thus, we conclude that G1-dCT carries an essential role in Gβγ recruitment by GIRK1 and, consequently, in determining its high basal activity. Our results indicate that G1-dCT is a crucial part of a Gβγ anchoring site of GIRK1-containing channels, spatially and functionally distinct from the site of channel activation by Gβγ. PMID:25384780

  4. Trafficking of Neuronal Two Pore Domain Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Alistair; Rees, Kathryn A; El Hachmane, Mickael F; Veale, Emma L

    2010-01-01

    The activity of two pore domain potassium (K2P) channels regulates neuronal excitability and cell firing. Post-translational regulation of K2P channel trafficking to the membrane controls the number of functional channels at the neuronal membrane affecting the functional properties of neurons. In this review, we describe the general features of K channel trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the plasma membrane via the Golgi apparatus then focus on established regulatory mechanisms for K2P channel trafficking. We describe the regulation of trafficking of TASK channels from the ER or their retention within the ER and consider the competing hypotheses for the roles of the chaperone proteins 14-3-3, COP1 and p11 in these processes and where these proteins bind to TASK channels. We also describe the localisation of TREK channels to particular regions of the neuronal membrane and the involvement of the TREK channel binding partners AKAP150 and Mtap2 in this localisation. We describe the roles of other K2P channel binding partners including Arf6, EFA6 and SUMO for TWIK1 channels and Vpu for TASK1 channels. Finally, we consider the potential importance of K2P channel trafficking in a number of disease states such as neuropathic pain and cancer and the protection of neurons from ischemic damage. We suggest that a better understanding of the mechanisms and regulations that underpin the trafficking of K2P channels to the plasma membrane and to localised regions therein may considerably enhance the probability of future therapeutic advances in these areas. PMID:21358977

  5. Reduced KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channel activity underlies impaired β-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of renal arteries in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Preet S; Zunke, Friederike; Zhu, Hai-Lei; Davis, Alison J; Jepps, Thomas A; Olesen, Søren P; Cole, William C; Moffatt, James D; Greenwood, Iain A

    2012-04-01

    KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium (Kv7.4) channels are important regulators of vascular tone that are severely compromised in models of hypertension. However, there is no information as to the role of these channels in responses to endogenous vasodilators. We used a molecular knockdown strategy, as well as pharmacological tools, to examine the hypothesis that Kv7.4 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and underlie the vascular deficit in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed gene and protein expression of KCNQ1, KCNQ3, KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and Kv7.1, Kv7.4, and Kv7.5 in rat renal artery. Isoproterenol produced concentration-dependent relaxation of precontracted renal arteries and increased Kv7 channel currents in isolated smooth muscle cells. Application of the Kv7 blocker linopirdine attenuated isoproterenol-induced relaxation and current. Isoproterenol-induced relaxations were also reduced in arteries incubated with small interference RNAs targeted to KCNQ4 that produced a ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 protein level. Relaxation to isoproterenol and the Kv7 activator S-1 were abolished in arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats, which was associated with ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 abundance. This study provides the first evidence that Kv7 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and that abrogation of Kv7.4 channels is strongly implicated in the impaired β-adrenoceptor pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These findings may provide a novel pathogenic link between arterial dysfunction and hypertension.

  6. Quantitative Localization of Cav2.1 (P/Q-Type) Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels in Purkinje Cells: Somatodendritic Gradient and Distinct Somatic Coclustering with Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Indriati, Dwi Wahyu; Kamasawa, Naomi; Matsui, Ko; Meredith, Andrea L.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels play key roles in transmitter release, integration of dendritic signals, generation of dendritic spikes, and gene expression. High intracellular calcium concentration transient produced by these channels is restricted to tens to hundreds of nanometers from the channels. Therefore, precise localization of these channels along the plasma membrane was long sought to decipher how each neuronal cell function is controlled. Here, we analyzed the distribution of Cav2.1 subunit of the P/Q-type channel using highly sensitive SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling in the rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. The labeling efficiency was such that the number of immunogold particles in each parallel fiber active zone was comparable to that of functional channels calculated from previous reports. Two distinct patterns of Cav2.1 distribution, scattered and clustered, were found in Purkinje cells. The scattered Cav2.1 had a somatodendritic gradient with the density of immunogold particles increasing 2.5-fold from soma to distal dendrites. The other population with 74-fold higher density than the scattered particles was found within clusters of intramembrane particles on the P-face of soma and primary dendrites. Both populations of Cav2.1 were found as early as P3 and increased in the second postnatal week to a mature level. Using double immunogold labeling, we found that virtually all of the Cav2.1 clusters were colocalized with two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, BK and SK2, with the nearest neighbor distance of ~40 nm. Calcium nanodomain created by the opening of Cav2.1 channels likely activates the two channels that limit the extent of depolarization. PMID:23426693

  7. Nitric oxide inhibits irreversibly P815 cell proliferation: involvement of potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Costa, R S A; Assreuy, J

    2002-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to inhibit both normal and cancer cell proliferation. Potassium channels are involved in cell proliferation and, as NO activates these channels, we investigated the effect of NO on the proliferation of murine mastocytoma cell lines and the putative involvement of potassium channels. NO (in the form of NO donors) caused dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in the P815 cell line inducing growth arrest in the mitosis phase. Incubation with NO donor for 4 or 24 h had a similar inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, indicating that this effect is irreversible. The inhibitory effect of NO was completely prevented by the blockade of voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium channels, but not by blockade of ATP-dependent channels. NO inhibition of cell proliferation was unaffected by guanylate cyclase and by cytoskeleton disruptors. Therefore, NO inhibits cell proliferation irreversibly via a potassium channel-dependent but guanylate cyclase-independent pathway in murine mastocytoma cells.

  8. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  9. Properties of shaker-type potassium channels in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Gambale, F; Uozumi, N

    2006-03-01

    Potassium (K(+)), the most abundant cation in biological organisms, plays a crucial role in the survival and development of plant cells, modulation of basic mechanisms such as enzyme activity, electrical membrane potentials, plant turgor and cellular homeostasis. Due to the absence of a Na(+)/K(+) exchanger, which widely exists in animal cells, K(+) channels and some type of K(+) transporters function as K(+) uptake systems in plants. Plant voltage-dependent K(+) channels, which display striking topological and functional similarities with the voltage-dependent six-transmembrane segment animal Shaker-type K(+) channels, have been found to play an important role in the plasma membrane of a variety of tissues and organs in higher plants. Outward-rectifying, inward-rectifying and weakly-rectifying K(+) channels have been identified and play a crucial role in K(+) homeostasis in plant cells. To adapt to the environmental conditions, plants must take advantage of the large variety of Shaker-type K(+) channels naturally present in the plant kingdom. This review summarizes the extensive data on the structure, function, membrane topogenesis, heteromerization, expression, localization, physiological roles and modulation of Shaker-type K(+) channels from various plant species. The accumulated results also help in understanding the similarities and differences in the properties of Shaker-type K(+) channels in plants in comparison to those of Shaker channels in animals and bacteria.

  10. Cell-based potassium ion channel screening using the FluxOR assay.

    PubMed

    Beacham, Daniel W; Blackmer, Trillium; O' Grady, Michael; Hanson, George T

    2010-04-01

    FluxOR technology is a cell-based assay used for high-throughput screening measurements of potassium channel activity. Using thallium influx as a surrogate indicator of potassium ion channel activity, the FluxOR Potassium Ion Channel Assay is based on the activation of a novel fluorescent dye. This indicator reports channel activity with a large fluorogenic response and is proportional to the number of open potassium channels on the cell, making it extremely useful for studying K(+) channel targets. In contrast to BTC-AM ester, FluxOR dye is roughly 10-fold more thallium sensitive, requiring much lower thallium for a larger signal window. This also means that the assay is carried out in a physiological, normal-chloride saline. In this article, the authors describe how they used BacMam gene delivery to express Kv7.2 and 7.3 (KCNQ), Kir2.1, or Kv11.1 (hERG) potassium ion channels in U2-OS cells. Using these cells, they ran the FluxOR assay to identify and characterize channel-specific inhibitory compounds discovered within the library (Tocriscreen Mini 1200 and Sigma Sodium/Potassium Modulators Ligand set). The FluxOR assay was able to identify several known specific inhibitors of Kv7.2/7.3 or hERG, highlighting its potential to identify novel and more efficacious small-molecule modulators.

  11. Inactivation of Endothelial Small/Intermediate Conductance of Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels Contributes to Coronary Arteriolar Dysfunction in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhong; Xie, An; Singh, Arun K; Ehsan, Afshin; Choudhary, Gaurav; Dudley, Samuel; Sellke, Frank W; Feng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with coronary arteriolar endothelial dysfunction. We investigated the role of the small/intermediate (SKCa/IKCa) conductance of calcium-activated potassium channels in diabetes-related endothelial dysfunction. Methods and Results Coronary arterioles (80 to 150 μm in diameter) were dissected from discarded right atrial tissues of diabetic (glycosylated hemoglobin = 9.6±0.25) and nondiabetic patients (glycosylated hemoglobin 5.4±0.12) during coronary artery bypass graft surgery (n=8/group). In-vitro relaxation response of precontracted arterioles was examined in the presence of the selective SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 and other vasodilatory agents. The channel density and membrane potential of diabetic and nondiabetic endothelial cells was measured by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. The protein expression and distribution of the SKCa/IKCa in the human myocardium and coronary arterioles was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results indicate that diabetes significantly reduced the coronary arteriolar response to the SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 compared to the respective responses of nondiabetic vessels (P<0.05 versus nondiabetes). The relaxation response of diabetic arterioles to NS309 was prevented by denudation of endothelium (P=0.001 versus endothelium-intact). Diabetes significantly decreased endothelial SKCa/IKCa currents and hyperpolarization induced by the SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 as compared with that of nondiabetics. There were no significant differences in the expression and distribution of SKCa/IKCa proteins in the coronary microvessels. Conclusions Diabetes is associated with inactivation of endothelial SKCa/IKCa channels, which may contribute to endothelial dysfunction in diabetic patients. PMID:26304940

  12. Protein complex analysis of native brain potassium channels by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Lesage, Florian

    2008-01-01

    TREK potassium channels belong to a family of channel subunits with two-pore domains (K(2P)). TREK1 knockout mice display impaired polyunsaturated fatty acid-mediated protection against brain ischemia, reduced sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, resistance to depression and altered perception of pain. Recently, we isolated native TREK1 channels from mouse brain and identified their specific components by mass spectrometry. Among the identified partners, the A-Kinase Anchoring Protein AKAP150 binds to a regulatory domain of TREK1 and acts as a molecular switch. It transforms low activity, outwardly rectifying TREK1 currents into robust leak conductances resistant to stimulation by arachidonic acid, membrane stretch and acidification. Inhibition of the TREK1/AKAP150 channel by Gs-coupled receptors is as extensive as for TREK1 alone (but faster) whereas inhibition of TREK1/AKAP150 by Gq-coupled receptors is reduced. Furthermore, the association of AKAP150 with TREK1 channels integrates them into postsynaptic scaffolds where G protein-coupled membrane receptors and channels dock simultaneously. This chapter describes the proteomic approach used to study the composition of native TREK1 channels and point out its advantages and limitations over more classical methods (two-hybrid screenings in the yeast and bacteria or GST-pull down).

  13. Intermediate-conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 and Chloride Channel Modulate Chemokine Ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Migration of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in non-excitable cells such as dendritic cells. Here, we examined the role of KCa3.1 and chloride channels in lymphatic chemokines-induced migration of dendritic cells. The amplitude and kinetics of CCL19/21-induced Ca2+ influx were associated with CCR7 expression levels, extracellular free Ca2+ and Cl−, and independent of extracellular K+. Chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21, and KCa3.1 activator, 1-EBIO, induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K+ efflux, which was blocked by TRAM-34, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward CRAC. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl− in the medium, and low dose of DIDS impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca2+ influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and chloride channel are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca2+ influx, and cell volume. PMID:25583444

  14. Calcium and Potassium Channels in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Transient Global Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Marcel A.; Dibué, Maxine; Schneider, Toni; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Healthy cerebrovascular myocytes express members of several different ion channel families which regulate resting membrane potential, vascular diameter, and vascular tone and are involved in cerebral autoregulation. In animal models, in response to subarachnoid blood, a dynamic transition of ion channel expression and function is initiated, with acute and long-term effects differing from each other. Initial hypoperfusion after exposure of cerebral vessels to oxyhemoglobin correlates with a suppression of voltage-gated potassium channel activity, whereas delayed cerebral vasospasm involves changes in other potassium channel and voltage-gated calcium channels expression and function. Furthermore, expression patterns and function of ion channels appear to differ between main and small peripheral vessels, which may be key in understanding mechanisms behind subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm. Here, changes in calcium and potassium channel expression and function in animal models of subarachnoid hemorrhage and transient global ischemia are systematically reviewed and their clinical significance discussed. PMID:23251831

  15. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  16. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) mediates cAMP-dependent but protein kinase A-insensitive modulation of vascular ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Purves, Gregor I; Kamishima, Tomoko; Davies, Lowri M; Quayle, John M; Dart, Caroline

    2009-07-15

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP (Epacs or cAMP-GEF) represent a family of novel cAMP-binding effector proteins. The identification of Epacs and the recent development of pharmacological tools that discriminate between cAMP-mediated pathways have revealed previously unrecognized roles for cAMP that are independent of its traditional target cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Here we show that Epac exists in a complex with vascular ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel subunits and that cAMP-mediated activation of Epac modulates KATP channel activity via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism involving the activation of Ca2+-sensitive protein phosphatase 2B (PP-2B, calcineurin). Application of the Epac-specific cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, at concentrations that activate Epac but not PKA, caused a 41.6 +/- 4.7% inhibition (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 7) of pinacidil-evoked whole-cell KATP currents recorded in isolated rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Importantly, similar results were obtained when cAMP was elevated by addition of the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in the presence of the structurally distinct PKA inhibitors, Rp-cAMPS or KT5720. Activation of Epac by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP caused a transient 171.0 +/- 18.0 nM (n = 5) increase in intracellular Ca2+ in Fura-2-loaded aortic myocytes, which persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Inclusion of the Ca2+-specific chelator BAPTA in the pipette-filling solution or preincubation with the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A or ascomycin, significantly reduced the ability of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP to inhibit whole-cell KATP currents. These results highlight a previously undescribed cAMP-dependent regulatory mechanism that may be essential for understanding the physiological and pathophysiological roles ascribed to arterial KATP channels in the control of vascular tone and blood flow.

  17. Structural activity of a cloned potassium channel (ROMK1) monitored with the atomic force microscope: The “molecular-sandwich” technique

    PubMed Central

    Oberleithner, H.; Schneider, S. W.; Henderson, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to continuously follow height changes of individual protein molecules exposed to physiological stimuli. A AFM tip was coated with ROMK1 (a cloned renal epithelial potassium channel known to be highly pH sensitive) and lowered onto atomically flat mica surface until the protein was sandwiched between AFM tip and mica. Because the AFM tip was an integral part of a highly flexible cantilever, any structural alterations of the sandwiched molecule were transmitted to the cantilever. This resulted in a distortion of the cantilever that was monitored by means of a laser beam. With this system it was possible to resolve vertical height changes in the ROMK1 protein of ≥0.2 nm (approximately 5% of the molecule’s height) with a time resolution of ≥1 msec. When bathed in electrolyte solution that contained the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and 0.1 mM ATP (conditions that activate the native ion channel), we found stochastically occurring height fluctuations in the ROMK1 molecule. These changes in height were pH-dependent, being greatest at pH 7.6, and lowering the pH (either by titration or by the application of CO2) reduced their magnitude. The data show that overall changes in shape of proteins occur stochastically and increase in size and frequency when the proteins are active. This AFM “molecular-sandwich” technique, called MOST, measures structural activity of proteins in real time and could prove useful for studies on the relationship between structure and function of proteins at the molecular level. PMID:9391167

  18. Role of different types of potassium channels and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ in the antidepressant-like activity of bis selenide in the mouse tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Cristiano R; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2011-03-03

    In the present study we investigated the role of potassium (K(+)) channels and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in the antidepressant-like effect of bis selenide in the mouse tail suspension test (TST). Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) pretreatment with tetraethyl ammonium (TEA, a non-specific inhibitor of K(+) channels, 25 pg/site), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel inhibitor, 0.5 pg/site), charybdotoxin (a large and intermediate conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel inhibitor, 25 pg/site) or apamin (a small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel inhibitor, 10 pg/site) produced a synergistic action with a sub effective dose of bis selenide (0.1 mg/kg, per oral--p.o.). Picrotoxin (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally--i.p.) pretreatment did not prevent the reduction in immobility time elicited by bis selenide (1 mg/kg, p.o.) in the TST. The reduction in the immobility time elicited by an effective dose of bis selenide (1 mg/kg, p.o.) was prevented by the pretreatment of mice with cromakalim, minoxidil (K(+) channel openers, 10 μg/site, i.c.v.) and GW 9662 (a PPARγ antagonist, 10 μg/site, i.c.v.). The findings clearly suggest that an acute oral dose of bis selenide produced an antidepressant-like effect in the mouse TST by a mechanism that involves the K(+) channels and PPARγ receptors.

  19. Allosteric Voltage Gating of Potassium Channels I

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Frank T.; Cui, Jianmin; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    Activation of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels is controlled by both cytoplasmic Ca2+ and membrane potential. To study the mechanism of voltage-dependent gating, we examined mSlo Ca2+-activated K+ currents in excised macropatches from Xenopus oocytes in the virtual absence of Ca2+ (<1 nM). In response to a voltage step, IK activates with an exponential time course, following a brief delay. The delay suggests that rapid transitions precede channel opening. The later exponential time course suggests that activation also involves a slower rate-limiting step. However, the time constant of IK relaxation [τ(IK)] exhibits a complex voltage dependence that is inconsistent with models that contain a single rate limiting step. τ(IK) increases weakly with voltage from −500 to −20 mV, with an equivalent charge (z) of only 0.14 e, and displays a stronger voltage dependence from +30 to +140 mV (z = 0.49 e), which then decreases from +180 to +240 mV (z = −0.29 e). Similarly, the steady state GK–V relationship exhibits a maximum voltage dependence (z = 2 e) from 0 to +100 mV, and is weakly voltage dependent (z ≅ 0.4 e) at more negative voltages, where Po = 10−5–10−6. These results can be understood in terms of a gating scheme where a central transition between a closed and an open conformation is allosterically regulated by the state of four independent and identical voltage sensors. In the absence of Ca2+, this allosteric mechanism results in a gating scheme with five closed (C) and five open (O) states, where the majority of the channel's voltage dependence results from rapid C–C and O–O transitions, whereas the C–O transitions are rate limiting and weakly voltage dependent. These conclusions not only provide a framework for interpreting studies of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel voltage gating, but also have important implications for understanding the mechanism of Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:10436003

  20. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  1. WNK4 inhibits Ca2+-activated big-conductance potassium channels (BK) via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Peng; Zhang, Chengbiao; Lin, Dao-Hong; Sun, Peng; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    We used the perforated whole-cell recording technique to examine the effect of With-No-Lysine Kinase 4 (WNK4) on the Ca2+ activated big-conductance K channels (BK) in HEK293T cells transfected with BK–α subunit (BK-α). Expression of WNK4 inhibited BK channels and decreased the outward K currents. Coexpression of SGK1 abolished the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on BK channels and restored the outward K currents. Expression of WNK4S1169D//1196D, in which both SGK1-phosphorylation sites (serine 1169 and 1196) were mutated to aspartate, had no effect on BK channels. Moreover, coexpression of SGK1 had no additional effect on K currents in the cells transfected with BKα + WNK4 S1169D//1196D, suggesting that SGK1 reversed WNK4-induced inhibition of BK channels by stimulating WNK4 phosphorylation. Expression of WNK4 but not WNK4 S1169D//1196D increased the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); an effect was abolished by coexpression of SGK1. The role of ERK and p38 MAPK in mediating the effect of WNK4 on BK channels was further suggested by the finding that inhibition of ERK and P38 MAPK completely abolished the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on BK channels. In contrast, inhibition of MAPK failed to abolish the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on ROMK channels in both HEK cells and Xenopus oocytes. Expression of dominant negative dynaminK44A (DynK44A) or treatment of the cells with dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, not only increased K currents but also largely abolished the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on BK channels. However, inhibition of MAPK still increased the outward K currents in the cells transfected with BKα+WNK4 and treated with dynasore. Similar results were obtained in experiments performed in the native tissue in which inhibition of ERK and p38 MAPK increased BK channel activity in the cortical collecting duct (CCD) treated with dynasore. We concluded that WNK4 inhibited BK channels by stimulating ERK and p38 MAPK and that activation of MAPK

  2. Molecular mechanism of voltage sensor movements in a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David J S; Neale, Edward J; Aziz, Qadeer; Dunham, James P; Munsey, Tim S; Hunter, Malcolm; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2004-12-08

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are six-transmembrane (S1-S6) proteins that form a central pore domain (4 x S5-S6) surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1-S4), which detect changes in membrane voltage and control pore opening. Upon depolarization, the S4 segments move outward carrying charged residues across the membrane field, thereby leading to the opening of the pore. The mechanism of S4 motion is controversial. We have investigated how S4 moves relative to the pore domain in the prototypical Shaker potassium channel. We introduced pairs of cysteines, one in S4 and the other in S5, and examined proximity changes between each pair of cysteines during activation, using Cd2+ and copper-phenanthroline, which crosslink the cysteines with metal and disulphide bridges, respectively. Modelling of the results suggests a novel mechanism: in the resting state, the top of the S3b-S4 voltage sensor paddle lies close to the top of S5 of the adjacent subunit, but moves towards the top of S5 of its own subunit during depolarization--this motion is accompanied by a reorientation of S4 charges to the extracellular phase.

  3. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Novoseletsky, V. N.; Volyntseva, A. D.; Shaitan, K. V.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.; Feofanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application. PMID:27437138

  4. Endocytic regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kuniaki; Norota, Ikuo; Obara, Yutaro

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of cardiac ion channels is critical for the prevention of arrhythmia caused by abnormal excitability. Ion channels can be regulated by a change in function (qualitative) and a change in number (quantitative). Functional changes have been extensively investigated for many ion channels including cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels. By contrast, the regulation of ion channel numbers has not been widely examined, particularly with respect to acute modulation of ion channels. This article briefly summarizes stimulus-induced endocytic regulation of major voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart. The stimuli known to cause their endocytosis include receptor activation, drugs, and low extracellular [K(+)], following which the potassium channels undergo either clathrin-mediated or caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytic regulation has been demonstrated for Kv1.2, Kv1.5, KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), and Kv4.3, while drug-induced endocytosis has been demonstrated for Kv1.5 and hERG. Low [K(+)](o)-induced endocytosis might be unique for hERG channels, whose electrophysiological characteristics are known to be under strong influence of [K(+)](o). Although the precise mechanisms have not been elucidated, it is obvious that major cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels are modulated by endocytosis, which leads to changes in cardiac excitability.

  5. Big Potassium (BK) ion channels in biology, disease and possible targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Hoa, Neil T; Wilson, Zechariah; Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Kong, Xiao-Tang; Tajhya, Rajeev B; Beeton, Christine; Jadus, Martin R

    2014-10-01

    The Big Potassium (BK) ion channel is commonly known by a variety of names (Maxi-K, KCNMA1, slo, stretch-activated potassium channel, KCa1.1). Each name reflects a different physical property displayed by this single ion channel. This transmembrane channel is found on nearly every cell type of the body and has its own distinctive roles for that tissue type. The BKα channel contains the pore that releases potassium ions from intracellular stores. This ion channel is found on the cell membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and mitochondria. Complex splicing pathways produce different isoforms. The BKα channels can be phosphorylated, palmitoylated and myristylated. BK is composed of a homo-tetramer that interacts with β and γ chains. These accessory proteins provide a further modulating effect on the functions of BKα channels. BK channels play important roles in cell division and migration. In this review, we will focus on the biology of the BK channel, especially its role, and its immune response towards cancer. Recent proteomic studies have linked BK channels with various proteins. Some of these interactions offer further insight into the role that BK channels have with cancers, especially with brain tumors. This review shows that BK channels have a complex interplay with intracellular components of cancer cells and still have plenty of secrets to be discovered.

  6. Functional diversity of potassium channel voltage-sensing domains.

    PubMed

    Islas, León D

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels or Kv's are membrane proteins with fundamental physiological roles. They are composed of 2 main functional protein domains, the pore domain, which regulates ion permeation, and the voltage-sensing domain, which is in charge of sensing voltage and undergoing a conformational change that is later transduced into pore opening. The voltage-sensing domain or VSD is a highly conserved structural motif found in all voltage-gated ion channels and can also exist as an independent feature, giving rise to voltage sensitive enzymes and also sustaining proton fluxes in proton-permeable channels. In spite of the structural conservation of VSDs in potassium channels, there are several differences in the details of VSD function found across variants of Kvs. These differences are mainly reflected in variations in the electrostatic energy needed to open different potassium channels. In turn, the differences in detailed VSD functioning among voltage-gated potassium channels might have physiological consequences that have not been explored and which might reflect evolutionary adaptations to the different roles played by Kv channels in cell physiology.

  7. Functional diversity of potassium channel voltage-sensing domains

    PubMed Central

    Islas, León D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated potassium channels or Kv's are membrane proteins with fundamental physiological roles. They are composed of 2 main functional protein domains, the pore domain, which regulates ion permeation, and the voltage-sensing domain, which is in charge of sensing voltage and undergoing a conformational change that is later transduced into pore opening. The voltage-sensing domain or VSD is a highly conserved structural motif found in all voltage-gated ion channels and can also exist as an independent feature, giving rise to voltage sensitive enzymes and also sustaining proton fluxes in proton-permeable channels. In spite of the structural conservation of VSDs in potassium channels, there are several differences in the details of VSD function found across variants of Kvs. These differences are mainly reflected in variations in the electrostatic energy needed to open different potassium channels. In turn, the differences in detailed VSD functioning among voltage-gated potassium channels might have physiological consequences that have not been explored and which might reflect evolutionary adaptations to the different roles played by Kv channels in cell physiology. PMID:26794852

  8. Cardiac potassium channel dysfunction in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Troy E; Abraham, Robert L; Welch, Richard C; Vanoye, Carlos G; Crotti, Lia; Arnestad, Marianne; Insolia, Roberto; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Ferrandi, Chiara; Vege, Ashild; Rognum, Torleiv; Roden, Dan M; Schwartz, Peter J; George, Alfred L

    2008-03-01

    Life-threatening arrhythmias have been suspected as one cause of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and this hypothesis is supported by the observation that mutations in arrhythmia susceptibility genes occur in 5-10% of cases. However, the functional consequences of cardiac potassium channel gene mutations associated with SIDS and how these alleles might mechanistically predispose to sudden death are unknown. To address these questions, we studied four missense KCNH2 (encoding HERG) variants, one compound KCNH2 genotype, and a missense KCNQ1 mutation all previously identified in Norwegian SIDS cases. Three of the six variants exhibited functional impairments while three were biophysically similar to wild-type channels (KCNH2 variants V279M, R885C, and S1040G). When co-expressed with WT-HERG, R273Q and K897T/R954C generated currents resembling the rapid component of the cardiac delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) but with significantly diminished amplitude. Action potential modeling demonstrated that this level of functional impairment was sufficient to evoke increased action potential duration and pause-dependent early afterdepolarizations. By contrast, KCNQ1-I274V causes a gain-of-function in I(Ks) characterized by increased current density, faster activation, and slower deactivation leading to accumulation of instantaneous current upon repeated stimulation. Action potential simulations using a Markov model of heterozygous I274V-I(Ks) incorporated into the Luo-Rudy (LRd) ventricular cell model demonstrated marked rate-dependent shortening of action potential duration predicting a short QT phenotype. Our results indicate that certain potassium channel mutations associated with SIDS confer overt functional defects consistent with either LQTS or SQTS, and further emphasize the role of congenital arrhythmia susceptibility in this syndrome.

  9. Involvement of potassium channels in the progression of cancer to a more malignant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Comes, Nuria; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Capera, Jesusa; Serrano-Novillo, Clara; Condom, Enric; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Ferreres, Joan Carles; Felipe, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Potassium channels are a diverse group of pore-forming transmembrane proteins that selectively facilitate potassium flow through an electrochemical gradient. They participate in the control of the membrane potential and cell excitability in addition to different cell functions such as cell volume regulation, proliferation, cell migration, angiogenesis as well as apoptosis. Because these physiological processes are essential for the correct cell function, K+ channels have been associated with a growing number of diseases including cancer. In fact, different K+ channel families such as the voltage-gated K+ channels, the ether à-go-go K+ channels, the two pore domain K+ channels and the Ca2+-activated K+ channels have been associated to tumor biology. Potassium channels have a role in neoplastic cell-cycle progression and their expression has been found abnormal in many types of tumors and cancer cells. In addition, the expression and activity of specific K+ channels have shown a significant correlation with the tumor malignancy grade. The aim of this overview is to summarize published data on K+ channels that exhibit oncogenic properties and have been linked to a more malignant cancer phenotype. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  10. Linker-gating ring complex as passive spring and Ca(2+)-dependent machine for a voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaowei; Qian, Xiang; Magleby, Karl L

    2004-06-10

    Ion channels are proteins that control the flux of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing (gating) their pores. It has been proposed that channels gated by internal agonists have an intracellular gating ring that extracts free energy from agonist binding to open the gates using linkers that directly connect the gating ring to the gates. Here we find for a voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K+ (BK) channel that shortening the linkers increases channel activity and lengthening the linkers decreases channel activity, both in the presence and absence of intracellular Ca2+. These observations are consistent with a mechanical model in which the linker-gating ring complex forms a passive spring that applies force to the gates in the absence of Ca2+ to modulate the voltage-dependent gating. Adding Ca2+ then changes the force to further activate the channel. Both the passive and Ca(2+)-induced forces contribute to the gating of the channel.

  11. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K(+) channels discriminate K(+) over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K(+) channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K(+) channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K(+) channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance.

  12. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  13. State-dependent inactivation of the Kv3 potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Marom, S; Levitan, I B

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of Kv3 (Kv1.3) delayed rectifier potassium channels was studied in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. These channels inactivate slowly during a long depolarizing pulse. In addition, inactivation accumulates in response to a series of short depolarizing pulses (cumulative inactivation), although no significant inactivation occurs within each short pulse. The extent of cumulative inactivation does not depend on the voltage during the depolarizing pulse, but it does vary in a biphasic manner as a function of the interpulse duration. Furthermore, the rate of cumulative inactivation is influenced by changing the rate of deactivation. These data are consistent with a model in which Kv3 channel inactivation is a state-dependent and voltage-independent process. Macroscopic and single channel experiments indicate that inactivation can occur from a closed (silent) state before channel opening. That is, channels need not open to inactivate. The transition that leads to the inactivated state from the silent state is, in fact, severalfold faster then the observed inactivation of current during long depolarizing pulses. Long pulse-induced inactivation appears to be slow, because its rate is limited by the probability that channels are in the open state, rather than in the silent state from which they can inactivate. External potassium and external calcium ions alter the rates of cumulative and long pulse-induced inactivation, suggesting that antagonistic potassium and calcium binding steps are involved in the normal gating of the channel. PMID:7948675

  14. The Acid-sensitive, Anesthetic-activated Potassium Leak Channel, KCNK3, Is Regulated by 14-3-3β-dependent, Protein Kinase C (PKC)-mediated Endocytic Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Luke; Lvov, Anatoli; Orthodoxou, Demetra; Rittenhouse, Ann R.; Kobertz, William R.; Melikian, Haley E.

    2012-01-01

    The acid-sensitive neuronal potassium leak channel, KCNK3, is vital for setting the resting membrane potential and is the primary target for volatile anesthetics. Recent reports demonstrate that KCNK3 activity is down-regulated by PKC; however, the mechanisms responsible for PKC-induced KCNK3 down-regulation are undefined. Here, we report that endocytic trafficking dynamically regulates KCNK3 activity. Phorbol esters and Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation acutely decreased both native and recombinant KCNK3 currents with concomitant KCNK3 surface losses in cerebellar granule neurons and cell lines. PKC-mediated KCNK3 internalization required the presence of both 14-3-3β and a novel potassium channel endocytic motif, because depleting either 14-3-3β protein levels or ablating the endocytic motif completely abrogated PKC-regulated KCNK3 trafficking. These results demonstrate that neuronal potassium leak channels are not static membrane residents but are subject to 14-3-3β-dependent regulated trafficking, providing a straightforward mechanism to modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity by Group I mGluRs. PMID:22846993

  15. Modulation of Potassium Channel Function by Methionine Oxidation and Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciorba, Matthew A.; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Weissbach, Herbert; Brot, Nathan; Hoshi, Toshinori

    1997-09-01

    Oxidation of amino acid residues in proteins can be caused by a variety of oxidizing agents normally produced by cells. The oxidation of methionine in proteins to methionine sulfoxide is implicated in aging as well as in pathological conditions, and it is a reversible reaction mediated by a ubiquitous enzyme, peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase. The reversibility of methionine oxidation suggests that it could act as a cellular regulatory mechanism although no such in vivo activity has been demonstrated. We show here that oxidation of a methionine residue in a voltage-dependent potassium channel modulates its inactivation. When this methionine residue is oxidized to methionine sulfoxide, the inactivation is disrupted, and it is reversed by coexpression with peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase. The results suggest that oxidation and reduction of methionine could play a dynamic role in the cellular signal transduction process in a variety of systems.

  16. Blueberry juice causes potent relaxation of rat aortic rings via the activation of potassium channels and the H₂S pathway.

    PubMed

    Horrigan, Louise A; Holohan, Catherine A; Lawless, Gráinne A; Murtagh, Melissa A; Williams, Carmel T; Webster, Christina M

    2013-02-26

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of blueberry juice on healthy rat aortic rings, and to explore the roles of potassium channels and of the hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) pathway in mediating the effects of blueberry juice. Firstly, the antioxidant capacity of blueberry juice was compared to other popular juice drinks using the Folin-Ciocalteu and the DPPH assays. Blueberry juice had significantly higher total polyphenol content than any of the other drinks studied (p < 0.01). The effect of blueberry juice on noradrenaline-contracted aortic rings was then observed, and the juice caused significant inhibition of noradrenaline-induced contractions (p < 0.01). Voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv) blockers 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) and 3,4-diaminopyridine (1 mM), as well as the cystathionine γ-lysase (CSE) inhibitor d,l-propargylglycine (2 mM) were then utilised to elucidate the role of Kv channels and the CSE/H(2)S pathway. Kv channel blocker 3,4-diaminopyridine caused significant blockade at 1/100 and 1/50 dilutions of juice (p < 0.01), whilst 4-aminopyridine caused significant blockade of the 1/100 dilution of blueberry juice (p < 0.05). In addition, d,l-propargylglycine potently inhibited the effect of 1/100 and 1/50 dilutions of blueberry juice (p < 0.01). This study indicates that blueberry juice has potent vasorelaxing properties, and thus may be a useful dietary agent for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. This study also provides strong evidence that Kv channels and the CSE/H(2)S pathway may be responsible, at least in part, for mediating the effects of blueberry juice.

  17. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel by iptakalim normalizes stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behaviour by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhan; Yang, Dan-Dan; Cao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Ling; Ji, Juan; Gu, Jun; Huang, Ji-Ye; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly implicated in incidence of mood disorders. A heightened neuroinflammatory response and oxidative stress play a fundamental role in the dysfunction of the HPA axis. We have previously demonstrated that iptakalim (Ipt), a new ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener, could prevent oxidative injury and neuroinflammation against multiple stimuli-induced brain injury. The present study was to demonstrate the impacts of Ipt in stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behavior. We employed 2 stress paradigms: 8 weeks of continuous restraint stress (chronic restraint stress, CRS) and 2h of restraint stress (acute restraint stress, ARS), to mimic both chronic stress and severe acute stress. Prolonged (4 weeks) and short-term (a single injection) Ipt treatment was administered 30min before each stress paradigm. We found that HPA axis was altered after stress, with different responses to CRS (lower ACTH and CORT, higher AVP, but normal CRH) and ARS (higher CRH, ACTH and CORT, but normal AVP). Both prolonged and short-term Ipt treatment normalized stress-induced HPA axis disorders and abnormal behaviors in mice. CRS and ARS up-regulated mRNA levels of inflammation-related molecules (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and TLR4) and oxidative stress molecules (gp91phox, iNOS and Nrf2) in the mouse hypothalamus. Double immunofluorescence showed CRS and ARS increased microglia activation (CD11b and TNFα) and oxidative stress in neurons (NeuN and gp91phox), which were alleviated by Ipt. Therefore, the present study reveals that Ipt could prevent against stress-induced HPA axis disorders and depressive behavior by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in the hypothalamus.

  18. Heterodimerization within the TREK channel subfamily produces a diverse family of highly regulated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, Joshua; Royal, Perrine; Comoglio, Yannick; Wdziekonski, Brigitte; Schaub, Sébastien; Clemens, Daniel M.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Sandoz, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Twik-related K+ channel 1 (TREK1), TREK2, and Twik-related arachidonic-acid stimulated K+ channel (TRAAK) form the TREK subfamily of two-pore-domain K+ (K2P) channels. Despite sharing up to 78% sequence homology and overlapping expression profiles in the nervous system, these channels show major differences in their regulation by physiological stimuli. For instance, TREK1 is inhibited by external acidification, whereas TREK2 is activated. Here, we investigated the ability of the members of the TREK subfamily to assemble to form functional heteromeric channels with novel properties. Using single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) from HEK cell lysate and subunit counting in the plasma membrane of living cells, we show that TREK1, TREK2, and TRAAK readily coassemble. TREK1 and TREK2 can each heterodimerize with TRAAK, but do so less efficiently than with each other. We functionally characterized the heterodimers and found that all combinations form outwardly rectifying potassium-selective channels but with variable voltage sensitivity and pH regulation. TREK1-TREK2 heterodimers show low levels of activity at physiological external pH but, unlike their corresponding homodimers, are activated by both acidic and alkaline conditions. Modeling based on recent crystal structures, along with mutational analysis, suggests that each subunit within a TREK1-TREK2 channel is regulated independently via titratable His. Finally, TREK1/TRAAK heterodimers differ in function from TRAAK homodimers in two critical ways: they are activated by both intracellular acidification and alkalinization and are regulated by the enzyme phospholipase D2. Thus, heterodimerization provides a means for diversifying functionality through an expansion of the channel types within the K2P channels. PMID:27035963

  19. Heterodimerization within the TREK channel subfamily produces a diverse family of highly regulated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Levitz, Joshua; Royal, Perrine; Comoglio, Yannick; Wdziekonski, Brigitte; Schaub, Sébastien; Clemens, Daniel M; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Sandoz, Guillaume

    2016-04-12

    Twik-related K(+) channel 1 (TREK1), TREK2, and Twik-related arachidonic-acid stimulated K(+) channel (TRAAK) form the TREK subfamily of two-pore-domain K(+) (K2P) channels. Despite sharing up to 78% sequence homology and overlapping expression profiles in the nervous system, these channels show major differences in their regulation by physiological stimuli. For instance, TREK1 is inhibited by external acidification, whereas TREK2 is activated. Here, we investigated the ability of the members of the TREK subfamily to assemble to form functional heteromeric channels with novel properties. Using single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) from HEK cell lysate and subunit counting in the plasma membrane of living cells, we show that TREK1, TREK2, and TRAAK readily coassemble. TREK1 and TREK2 can each heterodimerize with TRAAK, but do so less efficiently than with each other. We functionally characterized the heterodimers and found that all combinations form outwardly rectifying potassium-selective channels but with variable voltage sensitivity and pH regulation. TREK1-TREK2 heterodimers show low levels of activity at physiological external pH but, unlike their corresponding homodimers, are activated by both acidic and alkaline conditions. Modeling based on recent crystal structures, along with mutational analysis, suggests that each subunit within a TREK1-TREK2 channel is regulated independently via titratable His. Finally, TREK1/TRAAK heterodimers differ in function from TRAAK homodimers in two critical ways: they are activated by both intracellular acidification and alkalinization and are regulated by the enzyme phospholipase D2. Thus, heterodimerization provides a means for diversifying functionality through an expansion of the channel types within the K2P channels.

  20. Inhibition of Kir4.1 potassium channels by quinacrine.

    PubMed

    Marmolejo-Murillo, Leticia G; Aréchiga-Figueroa, Iván A; Cui, Meng; Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A; Sánchez-Chapula, José A; Ferrer, Tania; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A

    2017-05-15

    Inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels are expressed in many cell types and contribute to a wide range of physiological processes. Particularly, Kir4.1 channels are involved in the astroglial spatial potassium buffering. In this work, we examined the effects of the cationic amphiphilic drug quinacrine on Kir4.1 channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells, employing the patch clamp technique. Quinacrine inhibited the currents of Kir4.1 channels in a concentration and voltage dependent manner. In inside-out patches, quinacrine inhibited Kir4.1 channels with an IC50 value of 1.8±0.3μM and with extremely slow blocking and unblocking kinetics. Molecular modeling combined with mutagenesis studies suggested that quinacrine blocks Kir4.1 by plugging the central cavity of the channels, stabilized by the residues E158 and T128. Overall, this study shows that quinacrine blocks Kir4.1 channels, which would be expected to impact the potassium transport in several tissues.

  1. Novel treatment strategies for smooth muscle disorders: Targeting Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Byron, Kenneth L

    2016-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells provide crucial contractile functions in visceral, vascular, and lung tissues. The contractile state of smooth muscle is largely determined by their electrical excitability, which is in turn influenced by the activity of potassium channels. The activity of potassium channels sustains smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization, reducing cellular excitability and thereby promoting smooth muscle relaxation. Research over the past decade has indicated an important role for Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of the excitability of smooth muscle cells. Expression of multiple Kv7 channel subtypes has been demonstrated in smooth muscle cells from viscera (gastrointestinal, bladder, myometrial), from the systemic and pulmonary vasculature, and from the airways of the lung, from multiple species, including humans. A number of clinically used drugs, some of which were developed to target Kv7 channels in other tissues, have been found to exert robust effects on smooth muscle Kv7 channels. Functional studies have indicated that Kv7 channel activators and inhibitors have the ability to relax and contact smooth muscle preparations, respectively, suggesting a wide range of novel applications for the pharmacological tool set. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the physiological functions of Kv7 channels in smooth muscle, and highlights potential therapeutic applications based on pharmacological targeting of smooth muscle Kv7 channels throughout the body.

  2. The antifungal plant defensin AtPDF2.3 from Arabidopsis thaliana blocks potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Vriens, Kim; Peigneur, Steve; De Coninck, Barbara; Tytgat, Jan; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion toxins that block potassium channels and antimicrobial plant defensins share a common structural CSαβ-motif. These toxins contain a toxin signature (K-C4-X-N) in their amino acid sequence, and based on in silico analysis of 18 plant defensin sequences, we noted the presence of a toxin signature (K-C5-R-G) in the amino acid sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana defensin AtPDF2.3. We found that recombinant (r)AtPDF2.3 blocks Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 potassium channels, akin to the interaction between scorpion toxins and potassium channels. Moreover, rAtPDF2.3[G36N], a variant with a KCXN toxin signature (K-C5-R-N), is more potent in blocking Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 channels than rAtPDF2.3, whereas rAtPDF2.3[K33A], devoid of the toxin signature, is characterized by reduced Kv channel blocking activity. These findings highlight the importance of the KCXN scorpion toxin signature in the plant defensin sequence for blocking potassium channels. In addition, we found that rAtPDF2.3 inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and that pathways regulating potassium transport and/or homeostasis confer tolerance of this yeast to rAtPDF2.3, indicating a role for potassium homeostasis in the fungal defence response towards rAtPDF2.3. Nevertheless, no differences in antifungal potency were observed between the rAtPDF2.3 variants, suggesting that antifungal activity and Kv channel inhibitory function are not linked. PMID:27573545

  3. Intracellular calcium-dependent regulation of the sperm-specific calcium-activated potassium channel, hSlo3, by the BKCa activator LDD175

    PubMed Central

    Wijerathne, Tharaka Darshana; Kim, Jihyun; Yang, Dongki

    2017-01-01

    Plasma membrane hyperpolarization associated with activation of Ca2+-activated K+ channels plays an important role in sperm capacitation during fertilization. Although Slo3 (slowpoke homologue 3), together with the auxiliary γ2-subunit, LRRC52 (leucine-rich-repeat–containing 52), is known to mediate the pH-sensitive, sperm-specific K+ current KSper in mice, the molecular identity of this channel in human sperm remains controversial. In this study, we tested the classical BKCa activators, NS1619 and LDD175, on human Slo3, heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells together with its functional interacting γ2 subunit, hLRRC52. As previously reported, Slo3 K+ current was unaffected by iberiotoxin or 4-aminopyridine, but was inhibited by ~50% by 20 mM TEA. Extracellular alkalinization potentiated hSlo3 K+ current, and internal alkalinization and Ca2+ elevation induced a leftward shift its activation voltage. NS1619, which acts intracellularly to modulate hSlo1 gating, attenuated hSlo3 K+ currents, whereas LDD175 increased this current and induced membrane potential hyperpolarization. LDD175-induced potentiation was not associated with a change in the half-activation voltage at different intracellular pHs (pH 7.3 and pH 8.0) in the absence of intracellular Ca2+. In contrast, elevation of intracellular Ca2+ dramatically enhanced the LDD175-induced leftward shift in the half-activation potential of hSlo3. Therefore, the mechanism of action does not involve pH-dependent modulation of hSlo3 gating; instead, LDD175 may modulate Ca2+-dependent activation of hSlo3. Thus, LDD175 potentially activates native KSper and may induce membrane hyperpolarization-associated hyperactivation in human sperm. PMID:28280418

  4. TRESK potassium channel in human T lymphoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Miguel, Dénison Selene; García-Dolores, Fernando; Rosa Flores-Márquez, María; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Pottosin, Igor; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • TRESK (KCNK18) mRNA is present in different T lymphoblastic cell lines. • KCNK18 mRNA was not found in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes. • Clinical samples of T lymphoblastic leukemias and lymphomas were positive for TRESK. • TRESK in T lymphoblasts has dual localization, in plasma membrane and intracellular. -- Abstract: TRESK (TWIK-related spinal cord K{sup +}) channel, encoded by KCNK18 gene, belongs to the double-pore domain K{sup +} channel family and in normal conditions is expressed predominantly in the central nervous system. In our previous patch-clamp study on Jurkat T lymphoblasts we have characterized highly selective K{sup +} channel with pharmacological profile identical to TRESK. In the present work, the presence of KCNK18 mRNA was confirmed in T lymphoblastic cell lines (Jurkat, JCaM, H9) but not in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. Positive immunostaining for TRESK was demonstrated in lymphoblastic cell lines, in germinal centers of non-tumoral lymph nodes, and in clinical samples of T acute lymphoblastic leukemias/lymphomas. Besides detection in the plasma membrane, intracellular TRESK localization was also revealed. Possible involvement of TRESK channel in lymphocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis is discussed.

  5. Thylakoid potassium channel is required for efficient photosynthesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Segalla, Anna; Allorent, Guillaume; La Rocca, Nicoletta; Leanza, Luigi; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Szabò, Ildikò

    2012-07-03

    A potassium channel (SynK) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a photoheterotrophic model organism for the study of photosynthesis, has been recently identified and demonstrated to function as a potassium selective channel when expressed in a heterologous system and to be located predominantly to the thylakoid membrane in cyanobacteria. To study its physiological role, a SynK-less knockout mutant was generated and characterized. Fluorimetric experiments indicated that SynK-less cyanobacteria cannot build up a proton gradient as efficiently as WT organisms, suggesting that SynK might be involved in the regulation of the electric component of the proton motive force. Accordingly, measurements of flash-induced cytochrome b(6)f turnover and respiration pointed to a reduced generation of ΔpH and to an altered linear electron transport in mutant cells. The lack of the channel did not cause an altered membrane organization, but decreased growth and modified the photosystem II/photosystem I ratio at high light intensities because of enhanced photosensitivity. These data shed light on the function of a prokaryotic potassium channel and reports evidence, by means of a genetic approach, on the requirement of a thylakoid ion channel for optimal photosynthesis.

  6. Thylakoid potassium channel is required for efficient photosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Segalla, Anna; Allorent, Guillaume; La Rocca, Nicoletta; Leanza, Luigi; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Szabò, Ildikò

    2012-01-01

    A potassium channel (SynK) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a photoheterotrophic model organism for the study of photosynthesis, has been recently identified and demonstrated to function as a potassium selective channel when expressed in a heterologous system and to be located predominantly to the thylakoid membrane in cyanobacteria. To study its physiological role, a SynK-less knockout mutant was generated and characterized. Fluorimetric experiments indicated that SynK-less cyanobacteria cannot build up a proton gradient as efficiently as WT organisms, suggesting that SynK might be involved in the regulation of the electric component of the proton motive force. Accordingly, measurements of flash-induced cytochrome b6f turnover and respiration pointed to a reduced generation of ΔpH and to an altered linear electron transport in mutant cells. The lack of the channel did not cause an altered membrane organization, but decreased growth and modified the photosystem II/photosystem I ratio at high light intensities because of enhanced photosensitivity. These data shed light on the function of a prokaryotic potassium channel and reports evidence, by means of a genetic approach, on the requirement of a thylakoid ion channel for optimal photosynthesis. PMID:22711813

  7. The role of Kv3-type potassium channels in cerebellar physiology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Joho, Rolf H; Hurlock, Edward C

    2009-09-01

    Different subunits of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) are expressed in distinct neuronal subpopulations in the cerebellum. Behavioral phenotypes in Kv3-null mutant mice such as ataxia with prominent hypermetria and heightened alcohol sensitivity are characteristic of cerebellar dysfunction. Here, we review how the unique biophysical properties of Kv3-type potassium channels, fast activation and fast deactivation that enable cerebellar neurons to generate brief action potentials at high frequencies, affect firing patterns and influence cerebellum-mediated behavior.

  8. Scorpion Potassium Channel-blocking Defensin Highlights a Functional Link with Neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lanxia; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yang; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongyun; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-03-25

    The structural similarity between defensins and scorpion neurotoxins suggests that they might have evolved from a common ancestor. However, there is no direct experimental evidence demonstrating a functional link between scorpion neurotoxins and defensins. The scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 from Mesobuthus martensiiKarsch contains 37 amino acid residues and a conserved cystine-stabilized α/β structural fold. The recombinant BmKDfsin4, a classical defensin, has been found to have inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus luteusas well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Interestingly, electrophysiological experiments showed that BmKDfsin4,like scorpion potassium channel neurotoxins, could effectively inhibit Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channel currents, and its IC50value for the Kv1.3 channel was 510.2 nm Similar to the structure-function relationships of classical scorpion potassium channel-blocking toxins, basic residues (Lys-13 and Arg-19) of BmKDfsin4 play critical roles in peptide-Kv1.3 channel interactions. Furthermore, mutagenesis and electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the channel extracellular pore region is the binding site of BmKDfsin4, indicating that BmKDfsin4 adopts the same mechanism for blocking potassium channel currents as classical scorpion toxins. Taken together, our work identifies scorpion BmKDfsin4 as the first invertebrate defensin to block potassium channels. These findings not only demonstrate that defensins from invertebrate animals are a novel type of potassium channel blockers but also provide evidence of a functional link between defensins and neurotoxins.

  9. Scorpion Potassium Channel-blocking Defensin Highlights a Functional Link with Neurotoxin*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lanxia; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yang; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongyun; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-01-01

    The structural similarity between defensins and scorpion neurotoxins suggests that they might have evolved from a common ancestor. However, there is no direct experimental evidence demonstrating a functional link between scorpion neurotoxins and defensins. The scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 from Mesobuthus martensii Karsch contains 37 amino acid residues and a conserved cystine-stabilized α/β structural fold. The recombinant BmKDfsin4, a classical defensin, has been found to have inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus luteus as well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Interestingly, electrophysiological experiments showed that BmKDfsin4,like scorpion potassium channel neurotoxins, could effectively inhibit Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channel currents, and its IC50 value for the Kv1.3 channel was 510.2 nm. Similar to the structure-function relationships of classical scorpion potassium channel-blocking toxins, basic residues (Lys-13 and Arg-19) of BmKDfsin4 play critical roles in peptide-Kv1.3 channel interactions. Furthermore, mutagenesis and electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the channel extracellular pore region is the binding site of BmKDfsin4, indicating that BmKDfsin4adopts the same mechanism for blocking potassium channel currents as classical scorpion toxins. Taken together, our work identifies scorpion BmKDfsin4 as the first invertebrate defensin to block potassium channels. These findings not only demonstrate that defensins from invertebrate animals are a novel type of potassium channel blockers but also provide evidence of a functional link between defensins and neurotoxins. PMID:26817841

  10. Stimulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibits neurogenic contraction of human bladder from patients with urinary symptoms and reverses acetic acid-induced bladder hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    La Fuente, José M; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Chen, Mao Xiang; Angulo, Javier

    2014-07-15

    We have analysed the effects of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) stimulation on neurogenic and myogenic contraction of human bladder from healthy subjects and patients with urinary symptoms and evaluated the efficacy of activating BK to relief bladder hyperactivity in rats. Bladder specimens were obtained from organ donors and from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol (CCh) were evaluated in isolated bladder strips. in vivo cystometric recordings were obtained in anesthetized rats under control and acetic acid-induced hyperactive conditions. Neurogenic contractions of human bladder were potentiated by blockade of BK and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK) but were unaffected by the blockade of intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels (IK). EFS-induced contractions were inhibited by BK stimulation with NS-8 or NS1619 or by SK/IK stimulation with NS309 (3µM). CCh-induced contractions were not modified by blockade or stimulation of BK, IK or SK. The anti-cholinergic agent, oxybutynin (0.3µM) inhibited either neurogenic or CCh-induced contractions. Neurogenic contractions of bladders from BPH patients were less sensitive to BK inhibition and more sensitive to BK activation than healthy bladders. The BK activator, NS-8 (5mg/kg; i.v.), reversed bladder hyperactivity induced by acetic acid in rats, while oxybutynin was ineffective. NS-8 did not significantly impact blood pressure or heart rate. BK stimulation specifically inhibits neurogenic contractions in patients with urinary symptoms and relieves bladder hyperactivity in vivo without compromising bladder contractile capacity or cardiovascular safety, supporting its potential therapeutic use for relieving bladder overactivity.

  11. The polarization of the G-protein activated potassium channel GIRK5 to the vegetal pole of Xenopus laevis oocytes is driven by a di-leucine motif.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bello, Beatriz; Rangel-García, Claudia I; Salvador, Carolina; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Escobar, Laura I

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channels (known as GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by G-βγ subunits. GIRK channels participate in heart rate modulation and neuronal postsynaptic inhibition in mammals. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, GIRK5 is a functional homomultimer. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y16) at its N-terminus downregulates the surface expression of GIRK5. In this work, we elucidated the subcellular localization and trafficking of GIRK5 in oocytes. Several EGFP-GIRK5 chimeras were produced and an ECFP construct was used to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas GIRK5-WT was retained in the ER at the animal pole, the phospho-null GIRK5-Y16A was localized to the vegetal pole. Interestingly, a construct with an N-terminal Δ25 deletion produced an even distribution of the channel in the whole oocyte. Through an alanine-scan, we identified an acidic cluster/di-leucine sorting-signal recognition motif between E17 and I22. We quantified the effect of each amino acid residue within this di-leucine motif in determining the distribution of GIRK5 to the animal and vegetal poles. We found that Y16 and I22 contributed to functional expression and were dominant in the polarization of GIRK5. We thus conclude that the N-terminal acidic di-leucine motif of GIRK5 determines its retention and polarized trafficking within Xl oocytes.

  12. Expression and function of potassium channels in the human placental vasculature.

    PubMed

    Wareing, Mark; Bai, Xilian; Seghier, Fella; Turner, Claire M; Greenwood, Susan L; Baker, Philip N; Taggart, Michael J; Fyfe, Gregor K

    2006-08-01

    In the placental vasculature, where oxygenation may be an important regulator of vascular reactivity, there is a paucity of data on the expression of potassium (K) channels, which are important mediators of vascular smooth muscle tone. We therefore addressed the expression and function of several K channel subtypes in human placentas. The expression of voltage-gated (Kv)2.1, KV9.3, large-conductance Ca2+-activated K channel (BKCa), inward-rectified K+ channel (KIR)6.1, and two-pore domain inwardly rectifying potassium channel-related acid-sensitive K channels (TASK)1 in chorionic plate arteries, veins, and placental homogenate was assessed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Functional activity of K channels was assessed pharmacologically in small chorionic plate arteries and veins by wire myography using 4-aminopyridine, iberiotoxin, pinacidil, and anandamide. Experiments were performed at 20, 7, and 2% oxygen to assess the effect of oxygenation on the efficacy of K channel modulators. KV2.1, KV9.3, BKCa, KIR6.1, and TASK1 channels were all demonstrated to be expressed at the message level. KV2.1, BKCa, KIR6.1, and TASK1 were all demonstrated at the protein level. Pharmacological manipulation of voltage-gated and ATP-sensitive channels produced the most marked modifications in vascular tone, in both arteries and veins. We conclude that K channels play an important role in controlling placental vascular function.

  13. Permeation of ions across the potassium channel: Brownian dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Chung, S H; Allen, T W; Hoyles, M; Kuyucak, S

    1999-11-01

    The physical mechanisms underlying the transport of ions across a model potassium channel are described. The shape of the model channel corresponds closely to that deduced from crystallography. From electrostatic calculations, we show that an ion permeating the channel, in the absence of any residual charges, encounters an insurmountable energy barrier arising from induced surface charges. Carbonyl groups along the selectivity filter, helix dipoles near the oval chamber, and mouth dipoles near the channel entrances together transform the energy barrier into a deep energy well. Two ions are attracted to this well, and their presence in the channel permits ions to diffuse across it under the influence of an electric field. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we determine the magnitude of currents flowing across the channel under various conditions. The conductance increases with increasing dipole strength and reaches its maximum rapidly; a further increase in dipole strength causes a steady decrease in the channel conductance. The current also decreases systematically when the effective dielectric constant of the channel is lowered. The conductance with the optimal choice of dipoles reproduces the experimental value when the dielectric constant of the channel is assumed to be 60. The current-voltage relationship obtained with symmetrical solutions is linear when the applied potential is less than approximately 100 mV but deviates from Ohm's law at a higher applied potential. The reversal potentials obtained with asymmetrical solutions are in agreement with those predicted by the Nernst equation. The conductance exhibits the saturation property observed experimentally. We discuss the implications of these findings for the transport of ions across the potassium channels and membrane channels in general.

  14. Activation or block of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel have opposite effects on postcardioplegic myocardial dysfunction, "stunning". A multivariate prediction based on relative operating characteristic curve.

    PubMed

    Puddu, P E; Sugimoto, S; Monti, F; Iwashiro, K; Dawodu, A A; Schiariti, M; Chiavarelli, R; Marino, B; Campa, P P

    1995-09-01

    The relative effects of nicotinic acid (NA) and nitroglycerin (NT) added to cold high K+ cardioplegia were studied, to represent the two moieties of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) activator nicorandil (N). In addition, we made a pooled analysis of a large series of experiments performed in our Laboratory to investigate the effects of KATP activation by N, or block (by glibenclamide, G), on postcardioplegic myocardial dysfunction. In both studies, reversibility from myocardial dysfunction (stunning) was assessed by the positive inotropic agent dobutamine. Guinea pig papillary muscle preparations were immersed in Tyrode's solution (O2 content 16 ml/l, 37 degrees C), then hypoxic (O2 content 5 ml/l) superfusion with hypothermic (20 degrees C) cardioplegic Saint Thomas' Hospital solution (STHS) was performed for 120 min. We investigated: A) 5 groups based on treatments added to STHS: 1) saline (Control (C)); 2) N = 1 mmol/L; 3) G = 1 mumol/L (also given for 15 min in Tyrode's solution); 4) NA = 1 mmol/L; 5) NT = 100 mumol/L; B) 76 consecutive experiments and we defined, independent of whether just before or during STHS: 1) KATP activation (by N, in the concentration range 1 mumol/L to 1 mmol/L, n = 36); 2) KATP block (by G 1 mumol/L, either alone or just before N, n = 20); 3) controls (n = 20) (either saline, n = 12, or saline plus dimethyl sulfoxide, as vehicle, at the ratio 100 to 1, n = 8). Absolute isometric contractility variables were evaluated along with percent changes of baseline values: 1) at 30 s of STHS, 2) after 60 min of reoxygenation with Tyrode's solution and 3) following further 15 min of dobutamine 10 mumol/L. In all preparations, developed tension (DT), time to peak tension (TPT), DT/TPT and time to arrest (TTA) were measured. In study A): TTA was significantly abbreviated (intergroup F = 5.79, p < 0.001) in N (49 +/- 11 s, mean +/- SD) p < 0.01 vs C and NA). At 30 s of STHS %DT/TPT was unchanged among groups. By

  15. Importance of lipid-pore loop interface for potassium channel structure and function.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Nand, Deepak; Weingarth, Markus; Prokofyev, Alexander; Hornig, Sönke; Cukkemane, Abhishek Arun; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Becker, Stefan; Hulse, Raymond E; Perozo, Eduardo; Pongs, Olaf; Baldus, Marc

    2013-08-06

    Potassium (i.e., K(+)) channels allow for the controlled and selective passage of potassium ions across the plasma membrane via a conserved pore domain. In voltage-gated K(+) channels, gating is the result of the coordinated action of two coupled gates: an activation gate at the intracellular entrance of the pore and an inactivation gate at the selectivity filter. By using solid-state NMR structural studies, in combination with electrophysiological experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the turret region connecting the outer transmembrane helix (transmembrane helix 1) and the pore helix behind the selectivity filter contributes to K(+) channel inactivation and exhibits a remarkable structural plasticity that correlates to K(+) channel inactivation. The transmembrane helix 1 unwinds when the K(+) channel enters the inactivated state and rewinds during the transition to the closed state. In addition to well-characterized changes at the K(+) ion coordination sites, this process is accompanied by conformational changes within the turret region and the pore helix. Further spectroscopic and computational results show that the same channel domain is critically involved in establishing functional contacts between pore domain and the cellular membrane. Taken together, our results suggest that the interaction between the K(+) channel turret region and the lipid bilayer exerts an important influence on the selective passage of potassium ions via the K(+) channel pore.

  16. Sodium metabisulfite modulation of potassium channels in pain-sensing dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Nie, Aifang; Wei, Cailing; Meng, Ziqiang

    2009-12-01

    The effects of sodium metabisulfite (SMB), a general food preservative, on potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. SMB increased the amplitudes of both transient outward potassium currents and delayed rectifier potassium current in concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. The transient outward potassium currents (TOCs) include a fast inactivating (A-current or IA) current and a slow inactivating (D-current or ID) current. SMB majorly increased IA, and ID was little affected. SMB did not affect the activation process of transient outward currents (TOCs), but the inactivation curve of TOCs was shifted to more positive potentials. The inactivation time constants of TOCs were also increased by SMB. For delayed rectifier potassium current (IK), SMB shifted the activation curve to hyperpolarizing direction. SMB differently affected TOCs and IK, its effects major on A-type K+ channels, which play a role in adjusting pain sensitivity in response to peripheral redox conditions. SMB did not increase TOCs and IK when adding DTT in pipette solution. These results suggested that SMB might oxidize potassium channels, which relate to adjusting pain sensitivity in pain-sensing DRG neurons.

  17. Protein expression of small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels is altered in inferior colliculus neurons of the genetically epilepsy-prone rat

    PubMed Central

    N’Gouemo, Prosper; Yasuda, Robert P.; Faingold, Carl L.

    2009-01-01

    The genetically epilepsy-prone rat (GEPR) exhibits inherited predisposition to sound stimuli-induced generalized tonic-clonic seizures (audiogenic reflex seizures) and is a valid model to study the physiopathology of epilepsy. In this model, the inferior colliculus (IC) exhibits enhanced neuronal firing that is critical in the initiation of reflex audiogenic seizures. The mechanisms underlying IC neuronal hyperexcitability that leads to seizure susceptibility are not as yet fully understood. The present report shows that the levels of protein expression of SK1 and SK3 subtypes of the small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels were significantly decreased, while SK2 channel proteins were increased in IC neurons of seizure-naive GEPR-3s (SN-GEPR-3), as compared to control Sprague-Dawley rats. No significant change was found in the expression of BK channel proteins in IC neurons of SN-GEPR-3s. Single episode of reflex audiogenic seizures in the GEPR-3s did not significantly alter the protein expression of SK1-3 and BK channels in IC neurons compared to SN-GEPR-3s. Thus, downregulation of SK1 and SK3 channels and upregulation of SK2 channels provide direct evidence that these Ca2+-activated K+ channels play important roles in IC neuronal hyperexcitability that leads to inherited seizure susceptibility in the GEPR. PMID:19254702

  18. Single potassium channels opened by opioids in rat locus ceruleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Miyake, M; Christie, M J; North, R A

    1989-05-01

    Currents through single-ion channels were recorded in the cell-attached configuration from locus ceruleus neurons enzymatically dissociated from newborn rats. When the selective mu opioid receptor agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-Gly-ol was in the patch-clamp electrode, unitary inward currents were observed with conductance of approximately 45 pS (measured at zero pipette potential, with 150 mM potassium in the recording electrode). Long silences, lasting many seconds to minutes, separated periods of activity of similar durations. Within such activity periods the distribution of closed times of the channels was best fitted by the sum of two exponential functions (time constants approximately 1 and 30 ms), and the durations of channel openings were fit by a single exponential function; mean open time increased from 2 to 120 ms as agonist concentration increased. Channel activity was not seen when high concentrations of opioids were applied to the neuron outside the patch-clamp recording electrode, indicating intimate coupling between receptor and potassium channel. Unitary currents with similar properties were also seen when pipettes contained alpha 2 adrenoceptor agonists or somatostatin. Taken with previous findings, the results indicate that mu opioid receptors, alpha 2 adrenoceptors, and somatostatin receptors can couple directly to membrane potassium channels through the local intermediary action of a GTP binding protein.

  19. Protective Roles for Potassium SK/KCa2 Channels in Microglia and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dolga, Amalia M.; Culmsee, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    New concepts on potassium channel function in neuroinflammation suggest that they regulate mechanisms of microglial activation, including intracellular calcium homeostasis, morphological alterations, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, antigen presentation, and phagocytosis. Although little is known about voltage independent potassium channels in microglia, special attention emerges on small (SK/KCNN1-3/KCa2) and intermediate (IK/KCNN4/KCa3.1)-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels as regulators of microglial activation in the field of research on neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In particular, recent findings suggested that SK/KCa2 channels, by regulating calcium homeostasis, may elicit a dual mechanism of action with protective properties in neurons and inhibition of inflammatory responses in microglia. Thus, modulating SK/KCa2 channels and calcium signaling may provide novel therapeutic strategies in neurological disorders, where neuronal cell death and inflammatory responses concomitantly contribute to disease progression. Here, we review the particular role of SK/KCa2 channels for [Ca2+]i regulation in microglia and neurons, and we discuss the potential impact for further experimental approaches addressing novel therapeutic strategies in neurological diseases, where neuronal cell death and neuroinflammatory processes are prominent. PMID:23189056

  20. The voltage-gated potassium channels and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Yellen, Gary

    2002-09-05

    The voltage-gated potassium channels are the prototypical members of a family of membrane signalling proteins. These protein-based machines have pores that pass millions of ions per second across the membrane with astonishing selectivity, and their gates snap open and shut in milliseconds as they sense changes in voltage or ligand concentration. The architectural modules and functional components of these sophisticated signalling molecules are becoming clear, but some important links remain to be elucidated.

  1. Effects of ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener on potassium transport and alveolar fluid clearance in the resected human lung.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, T; Takahashi, K; Ohya, N; Nakada, T; Matthay, M A

    1998-07-01

    Since the effect of an ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) opener on the function of alveolar epithelial cells is unknown, the effect of YM934, a newly synthesized KATP channel opener, on potassium influx into the alveolar spaces and alveolar fluid clearance was determined in the resected human lung. An isosmolar albumin solution with a low potassium concentration was instilled into the distal airspaces of resected human lungs. Alveolar fluid clearance was measured by the progressive increase in alveolar protein concentration. Net potassium transport was measured by the change in potassium concentration and alveolar fluid volume. YM934 (10(-4) M) increased net influx of potassium by 140% into the alveolar spaces and also increased alveolar fluid clearance by 60% in the experiments with a potassium concentration of 0.3 mEq/1. Glibenclamide (10(-4) M), a KATP channel blocker, inhibited the YM934-increased influx of potassium transport and the increase in alveolar fluid clearance. Also amiloride (10(-5) M), an inhibitors of apical sodium uptake, blocked the YM934 stimulated increase in net alveolar fluid clearance. These results indicate that a KATP channel opener can effect potassium transport and net vectorial fluid movement across the human alveolar epithelium.

  2. Monte Carlo study of gating and selection in potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreucci, Daniele; Bellaveglia, Dario; Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Marconi, Silvia

    2011-08-01

    The study of selection and gating in potassium channels is a very important issue in modern biology. Indeed, such structures are known in essentially all types of cells in all organisms where they play many important functional roles. The mechanism of gating and selection of ionic species is not clearly understood. In this paper we study a model in which gating is obtained via an affinity-switching selectivity filter. We discuss the dependence of selectivity and efficiency on the cytosolic ionic concentration and on the typical pore open state duration. We demonstrate that a simple modification in the way in which the selectivity filter is modeled yields larger channel efficiency.

  3. Biophysical Properties of ATP-sensitive Potassium Channels in CA3 Hippocampal Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obregón-Herrera, Armando; Márquez-Gamiño, Sergio; Onetti, Carlos G.

    2004-09-01

    Single-channel activity of glucose-sensitive channels from CA3 neurons of the rat hippocampus, was studied in cell-attached membrane patches. Single-channel activity was totally abolished at 20 mM external glucose. Glucose-sensitive channels were selective to K+ ions; the unitary conductance was 170 pS in 140 mM K+, and the K+ permeability was 3.86×10-13 cmṡs-1. The open-state probability (PO) increased with membrane depolarization as a result of mean open time enhancement and shortening of the closure periods. The activation midpoint was -79 mV. Glucose-sensitive K+ channel of CA3 neurons could be considered as an ATP-sensitive potassium channel.

  4. The β Subunit Increases the Ca2+ Sensitivity of Large Conductance Ca2+-activated Potassium Channels by Retaining the Gating in the Bursting States

    PubMed Central

    Nimigean, Crina M.; Magleby, Karl L.

    1999-01-01

    Coexpression of the β subunit (KV,Caβ) with the α subunit of mammalian large conductance Ca2+- activated K+ (BK) channels greatly increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the channel. Using single-channel analysis to investigate the mechanism for this increase, we found that the β subunit increased open probability (Po) by increasing burst duration 20–100-fold, while having little effect on the durations of the gaps (closed intervals) between bursts or on the numbers of detected open and closed states entered during gating. The effect of the β subunit was not equivalent to raising intracellular Ca2+ in the absence of the beta subunit, suggesting that the β subunit does not act by increasing all the Ca2+ binding rates proportionally. The β subunit also inhibited transitions to subconductance levels. It is the retention of the BK channel in the bursting states by the β subunit that increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the channel. In the presence of the β subunit, each burst of openings is greatly amplified in duration through increases in both the numbers of openings per burst and in the mean open times. Native BK channels from cultured rat skeletal muscle were found to have bursting kinetics similar to channels expressed from alpha subunits alone. PMID:10051518

  5. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  6. Kalium: a database of potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Chugunov, Anton O.; Grishin, Eugene V.; Vassilevski, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Kalium (http://kaliumdb.org/) is a manually curated database that accumulates data on potassium channel toxins purified from scorpion venom (KTx). This database is an open-access resource, and provides easy access to pages of other databases of interest, such as UniProt, PDB, NCBI Taxonomy Browser, and PubMed. General achievements of Kalium are a strict and easy regulation of KTx classification based on the unified nomenclature supported by researchers in the field, removal of peptides with partial sequence and entries supported by transcriptomic information only, classification of β-family toxins, and addition of a novel λ-family. Molecules presented in the database can be processed by the Clustal Omega server using a one-click option. Molecular masses of mature peptides are calculated and available activity data are compiled for all KTx. We believe that Kalium is not only of high interest to professional toxinologists, but also of general utility to the scientific community. Database URL: http://kaliumdb.org/ PMID:27087309

  7. Identification and functional characterization of cereblon as a binding protein for large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sooyeon; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Song, Sungmin; Jung, Yong-Keun; Park, Chul-Seung

    2005-09-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK(Ca)) channels are activated by membrane depolarization and modulated by intracellular Ca2+. Here, we report the direct interaction of cereblon (CRBN) with the cytosolic carboxy-terminus of the BK(Ca) channel alpha subunit (Slo). Rat CRBN contained the N-terminal domain of the Lon protease, a 'regulators of G protein-signaling' (RGS)-like domain, a leucine zipper (LZ) motif, and four putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. RNA messages of rat cereblon (rCRBN) were widely distributed in different tissues with especially high-levels of expression in the brain. Direct association of rCRBN with the BK(Ca) channel was confirmed by immunoprecipitation in brain lysate, and the two proteins were co-localized in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Ionic currents evoked by the rSlo channel were dramatically suppressed upon coexpression of rCRBN. rCRBN decreased the formation of the tetrameric rSlo complex thus reducing the surface expression of functional channels. Therefore, we suggest that CRBN may play an important role in assembly and surface expression of functional BK(Ca) channels by direct interaction with the cytosolic C-terminus of its alpha-subunit.

  8. Modeling diverse range of potassium channels with Brownian dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shin-Ho; Allen, Toby W; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2002-01-01

    Using the experimentally determined KcsA structure as a template, we propose a plausible explanation for the diversity of potassium channels seen in nature. A simplified model of KcsA is constructed from its atomic resolution structure by smoothing out the protein-water boundary and representing the atoms forming the channel protein as a homogeneous, low dielectric medium. The properties of the simplified and atomic-detail models, deduced from electrostatic calculations and Brownian dynamics simulations, are shown to be qualitatively similar. We then study how the current flowing across the simplified model channel changes as the shape of the intrapore region is modified. This is achieved by increasing the radius of the intracellular pore systematically from 1.5 to 5 A while leaving the dimensions of the selectivity filter and inner chamber unaltered. The strengths of the dipoles located near the entrances of the channel, the carbonyl groups lining the selectivity filter, and the helix macrodipoles are kept constant. The channel conductance increases steadily as the radius of the intracellular pore is increased. The rate-limiting step for both the outward and inward current is the time it takes for an ion to cross the residual energy barrier located in the intrapore region. The current-voltage relationship obtained with symmetrical solutions is linear when the applied potential is less than approximately 100 mV but deviates slightly from Ohm's law at higher applied potentials. The nonlinearity in the current-voltage curve becomes less pronounced as the radius of the intracellular pore is increased. When the strengths of the dipoles near the intracellular entrance are reduced, the channel shows a pronounced inward rectification. Finally, the conductance exhibits the saturation property observed experimentally. We discuss the implications of these findings on the transport of ions across the potassium channels and membrane channels in general. PMID:12080118

  9. CRITICAL ROLE OF LARGE CONDUCTANCE VOLTAGE- AND CALCIUM-ACTIVATED POTASSIUM CHANNELS IN LEPTIN-INDUCED NEUROPROTECTION OF N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE-EXPOSED CORTICAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Maria; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Gessner, Guido; Wissuwa, Bianka; Barrese, Vincenzo; Boscia, Francesca; Secondo, Agnese; Miceli, Francesco; Franco, Cristina; Ambrosino, Paolo; Canzoniero, Lorella MariaTeresa; Bauer, Michael; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of the adipokine leptin, and the molecular mechanism involved, have been studied in rat and mice cortical neurons exposed to N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) in vitro. In rat cortical neurons, leptin elicited neuroprotective effects against NMDA-induced cell death which were concentration-dependent (10–100 ng/ml) and largest when the adipokine was preincubated for 2 hours before the neurotoxic stimulus. In both rat and mouse cortical neurons, leptin-induced neuroprotection was fully antagonized by Paxilline (Pax, 0.01–1 μM) and Iberiotoxin (Ibtx, 1–100 nM), two blockers of Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channels (Slo1 BK channels), with EC50s (38±10 nM and 5±2 nM for Pax and Ibtx, respectively) close to those reported for Pax- and Ibtx-induced BK channel blockade; the BK channel opener NS1619 (1–30 μM) induced a concentration-dependent protection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Moreover, cortical neurons from mice lacking one or both alleles coding for Slo1 BK channel pore-forming subunits were insensitive to leptin-induced neuroprotection. Finally, leptin exposure dose-dependently (10–100 ng/ml) increased intracellular Ca2+ levels in rat cortical neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that Slo1 BK channel activation following increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels is a critical step for leptin-induced neuroprotection in NMDA-exposed cortical neurons in vitro, thus highlighting leptin-based intervention via BK channel activation as a potential strategy to counteract neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24973659

  10. Kaurenoic acid from Sphagneticola trilobata Inhibits Inflammatory Pain: effect on cytokine production and activation of the NO-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G-ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Sandra S; Arakawa, Nilton S; Ambrosio, Sergio R; Zarpelon, Ana C; Casagrande, Rubia; Cunha, Thiago M; Ferreira, Sergio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2012-05-25

    Kaurenoic acid [ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (1)] is a diterpene present in several plants including Sphagneticola trilobata. The only documented evidence for its antinociceptive effect is that it inhibits the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. Therefore, the analgesic effect of 1 in different models of pain and its mechanisms in mice were investigated further. Intraperitoneal and oral treatment with 1 dose-dependently inhibited inflammatory nociception induced by acetic acid. Oral treatment with 1 also inhibited overt nociception-like behavior induced by phenyl-p-benzoquinone, complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and both phases of the formalin test. Compound 1 also inhibited acute carrageenin- and PGE(2)-induced and chronic CFA-induced inflammatory mechanical hyperalgesia. Mechanistically, 1 inhibited the production of the hyperalgesic cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Furthermore, the analgesic effect of 1 was inhibited by l-NAME, ODQ, KT5823, and glybenclamide treatment, demonstrating that such activity also depends on activation of the NO-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G-ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway, respectively. These results demonstrate that 1 exhibits an analgesic effect in a consistent manner and that its mechanisms involve the inhibition of cytokine production and activation of the NO-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G-ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway.

  11. Transmembrane allosteric coupling of the gates in a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Bhate, Manasi P; McDermott, Ann E

    2014-01-07

    It has been hypothesized that transmembrane allostery is the basis for inactivation of the potassium channel KcsA: opening the intracellular gate is spontaneously followed by ion expulsion at the extracellular selectivity filter. This suggests a corollary: following ion expulsion at neutral pH, a spontaneous global conformation change of the transmembrane helices, similar to the motion involved in opening, is expected. Consequently, both the low potassium state and the low pH state of the system could provide useful models for the inactivated state. Unique NMR studies of full-length KcsA in hydrated bilayers provide strong evidence for such a mutual coupling across the bilayer: namely, upon removing ambient potassium ions, changes are seen in the NMR shifts of carboxylates E118 and E120 in the pH gate in the hinges of the inner transmembrane helix (98-103), and in the selectivity filter, all of which resemble changes seen upon acid-induced opening and inhibition and suggest that ion release can trigger channel helix opening.

  12. Modification of sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics by ether and halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.; Shrager, P.; Goldstein, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on the kinetics of sodium and potassium currents were investigated in the crayfish giant axon. Both general anesthetics produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding up of sodium current inactivation at all membrane potentials, with no change in the rising phase of the currents. Double-pulse inactivation experiments with ether also showed faster inactivation, but the rate of recovery from inactivation at negative potentials was not affected. Ether shifted the midpoint of the steady-state fast inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and made the curve steeper. The activation of potassium currents was faster with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state potassium currents. Ether and halothane are known to perturb the structure of lipid bilayer membranes; the alterations in sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics are consistent with the hypothesis that the rats of the gating processes of the channels can be affected by the state of the lipids surrounding the channels, but a direct effect of ether and halothane on the protein part of the channels cannot be ruled out.

  13. Voltage sensor ring in a native structure of a membrane-embedded potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Zheng, Hongjin; Zheng, Hui; Borkowski, Brian A.; Shi, Dan; Gonen, Tamir; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels support electrochemical activity in cells and are largely responsible for information flow throughout the nervous systems. The voltage sensor domains in these channels sense changes in transmembrane potential and control ion flux across membranes. The X-ray structures of a few voltage-gated ion channels in detergents have been determined and have revealed clear structural variations among their respective voltage sensor domains. More recent studies demonstrated that lipids around a voltage-gated channel could directly alter its conformational state in membrane. Because of these disparities, the structural basis for voltage sensing in native membranes remains elusive. Here, through electron-crystallographic analysis of membrane-embedded proteins, we present the detailed view of a voltage-gated potassium channel in its inactivated state. Contrary to all known structures of voltage-gated ion channels in detergents, our data revealed a unique conformation in which the four voltage sensor domains of a voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) form a ring structure that completely surrounds the pore domain of the channel. Such a structure is named the voltage sensor ring. Our biochemical and electrophysiological studies support that the voltage sensor ring represents a physiological conformation. These data together suggest that lipids exert strong effects on the channel structure and that these effects may be changed upon membrane disruption. Our results have wide implications for lipid–protein interactions in general and for the mechanism of voltage sensing in particular. PMID:23401554

  14. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  15. Critical role of large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels in leptin-induced neuroprotection of N-methyl-d-aspartate-exposed cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Maria; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Gessner, Guido; Wissuwa, Bianka; Barrese, Vincenzo; Boscia, Francesca; Secondo, Agnese; Miceli, Francesco; Franco, Cristina; Ambrosino, Paolo; Canzoniero, Lorella Maria Teresa; Bauer, Michael; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of the adipokine leptin, and the molecular mechanism involved, have been studied in rat and mice cortical neurons exposed to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in vitro. In rat cortical neurons, leptin elicited neuroprotective effects against NMDA-induced cell death, which were concentration-dependent (10-100 ng/ml) and largest when the adipokine was preincubated for 2h before the neurotoxic stimulus. In both rat and mouse cortical neurons, leptin-induced neuroprotection was fully antagonized by paxilline (Pax, 0.01-1 μM) and iberiotoxin (Ibtx, 1-100 nM), with EC50s of 38 ± 10 nM and 5 ± 2 nM for Pax and Ibtx, respectively, close to those reported for Pax- and Ibtx-induced Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channels (Slo1 BK channels) blockade; the BK channel opener NS1619 (1-30 μM) induced a concentration-dependent protection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Moreover, cortical neurons from mice lacking one or both alleles coding for Slo1 BK channel pore-forming subunits were insensitive to leptin-induced neuroprotection. Finally, leptin exposure dose-dependently (10-100 ng/ml) increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in rat cortical neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that Slo1 BK channel activation following increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels is a critical step for leptin-induced neuroprotection in NMDA-exposed cortical neurons in vitro, thus highlighting leptin-based intervention via BK channel activation as a potential strategy to counteract neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Structural correlates of selectivity and inactivation in potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jason G.; Nimigean, Crina M.

    2011-01-01

    Potassium channels are involved in a tremendously diverse range of physiological applications requiring distinctly different functional properties. Not surprisingly, the amino acid sequences for these proteins are diverse as well, except for the region that has been ordained the “selectivity filter”. The goal of this review is to examine our current understanding of the role of the selectivity filter and regions adjacent to it in specifying selectivity as well as its role in gating/inactivation and possible mechanisms by which these processes are coupled. Our working hypothesis is that an amino acid network behind the filter modulates selectivity in channels with the same signature sequence while at the same time affecting channel inactivation properties. PMID:21958666

  17. Quasi-specific access of the potassium channel inactivation gate.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Gaurav; Srikumar, Deepa; Holmgren, Miguel

    2014-06-09

    Many voltage-gated potassium channels open in response to membrane depolarization and then inactivate within milliseconds. Neurons use these channels to tune their excitability. In Shaker K(+) channels, inactivation is caused by the cytoplasmic amino terminus, termed the inactivation gate. Despite having four such gates, inactivation is caused by the movement of a single gate into a position that occludes ion permeation. The pathway that this single inactivation gate takes into its inactivating position remains unknown. Here we show that a single gate threads through the intracellular entryway of its own subunit, but the tip of the gate has sufficient freedom to interact with all four subunits deep in the pore, and does so with equal probability. This pathway demonstrates that flexibility afforded by the inactivation peptide segment at the tip of the N-terminus is used to mediate function.

  18. Chaotic dynamics in cardiac aggregates induced by potassium channel block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quail, Thomas; McVicar, Nevin; Aguilar, Martin; Kim, Min-Young; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Chaotic rhythms in deterministic models can arise as a consequence of changes in model parameters. We carried out experimental studies in which we induced a variety of complex rhythms in aggregates of embryonic chick cardiac cells using E-4031 (1.0-2.5 μM), a drug that blocks the hERG potassium channel. Following the addition of the drug, the regular rhythm evolved to display a spectrum of complex dynamics: irregular rhythms, bursting oscillations, doublets, and accelerated rhythms. The interbeat intervals of the irregular rhythms can be described by one-dimensional return maps consistent with chaotic dynamics. A Hodgkin-Huxley-style cardiac ionic model captured the different types of complex dynamics following blockage of the hERG mediated potassium current.

  19. Discovery of a pharmacologically active antagonist of the two-pore-domain potassium channel K2P9.1 (TASK-3).

    PubMed

    Coburn, Craig A; Luo, Yunfu; Cui, Mingxiang; Wang, Jiabing; Soll, Richard; Dong, Jingchao; Hu, Bin; Lyon, Michael A; Santarelli, Vincent P; Kraus, Richard L; Gregan, Yun; Wang, Yi; Fox, Steven V; Binns, Jacquelyn; Doran, Scott M; Reiss, Duane R; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Gotter, Anthony L; Meinke, Peter T; Renger, John J

    2012-01-02

    TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) (K(2P) 9.1, TASK-3) ion channels have the capacity to regulate the activity of neuronal pathways by influencing the resting membrane potential of neurons on which they are expressed. The central nervous system (CNS) expression of these channels suggests potential roles in neurologic disorders, and it is believed that the development of TASK-3 antagonists could lead to the therapeutic treatment of a number of neurological conditions. While a therapeutic potential for TASK-3 channel modulation exists, there are only a few documented examples of potent and selective small-molecule channel blockers. Herein, we describe the discovery and lead optimization efforts for a novel series of TASK-3 channel antagonists based on a 5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine high-throughput screening lead from which a subseries of potent and selective inhibitors were identified. One compound was profiled in detail with respect to its physical properties and demonstrated pharmacological target engagement as indicated by its ability to modulate sleep architecture in rodent electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry models.

  20. Expression and function of ATP-dependent potassium channels in zebrafish islet β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Emfinger, Christopher H.; Welscher, Alecia; Yan, Zihan; Wang, Yixi; Conway, Hannah; Moss, Jennifer B.; Moss, Larry G.; Remedi, Maria S.

    2017-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP channels) are critical nutrient sensors in many mammalian tissues. In the pancreas, KATP channels are essential for coupling glucose metabolism to insulin secretion. While orthologous genes for many components of metabolism–secretion coupling in mammals are present in lower vertebrates, their expression, functionality and ultimate impact on body glucose homeostasis are unclear. In this paper, we demonstrate that zebrafish islet β-cells express functional KATP channels of similar subunit composition, structure and metabolic sensitivity to their mammalian counterparts. We further show that pharmacological activation of native zebrafish KATP using diazoxide, a specific KATP channel opener, is sufficient to disturb glucose tolerance in adult zebrafish. That β-cell KATP channel expression and function are conserved between zebrafish and mammals illustrates the evolutionary conservation of islet metabolic sensing from fish to humans, and lends relevance to the use of zebrafish to model islet glucose sensing and diseases of membrane excitability such as neonatal diabetes. PMID:28386438

  1. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K(+) channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K(+) channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa 3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa 1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv 7.1), KCNH2 (Kv 11.1), KCNH5 (Kv 10.2), KCNT1 (KCa 4.1), KCNT2 (KCa 4.2), and KCNK5 (K 2P 5.1). We will give an overview of K(+) channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K(+) channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K(+) channels may be of importance.

  2. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K+ channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K+ channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), KCNH2 (Kv11.1), KCNH5 (Kv10.2), KCNT1 (KCa4.1), KCNT2 (KCa4.2), and KCNK5 (K2P5.1). We will give an overview of K+ channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K+ channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K+ channels may be of importance. PMID:23962792

  3. Histidine phosphorylation relieves copper inhibition in the mammalian potassium channel KCa3.1

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shekhar; Panda, Saswati; Li, Zhai; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Thiele, Dennis J; Hubbard, Stevan R; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-01-01

    KCa2.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 constitute a family of mammalian small- to intermediate-conductance potassium channels that are activated by calcium-calmodulin. KCa3.1 is unique among these four channels in that activation requires, in addition to calcium, phosphorylation of a single histidine residue (His358) in the cytoplasmic region, by nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B). The mechanism by which KCa3.1 is activated by histidine phosphorylation is unknown. Histidine phosphorylation is well characterized in prokaryotes but poorly understood in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of His358 activates KCa3.1 by antagonizing copper-mediated inhibition of the channel. Furthermore, we show that activated CD4+ T cells deficient in intracellular copper exhibit increased KCa3.1 histidine phosphorylation and channel activity, leading to increased calcium flux and cytokine production. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for a mammalian potassium channel and for T-cell activation, and highlight a unique feature of histidine versus serine/threonine and tyrosine as a regulatory phosphorylation site. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16093.001 PMID:27542194

  4. Effects of protamine sulphate on spontaneous and calcium-induced contractile activity in the rat uterus are potassium channels-mediated.

    PubMed

    Orescanin-Dusić, Zorana; Milovanović, Slobodan; Radojicić, Ratko; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Appiah, Isabella; Slavić, Marija; Cutura, Nedo; Trbojević, Stevan; Spasić, Mihajlo; Blagojević, Dusko

    2009-01-01

    Protamine sulphate (PS) effect on spontaneous and calcium-induced rhythmic contractions of isolated virgin rat uteri was studied. PS caused dose-dependent relaxation of both types of contractions (two-way ANOVA, significant dose effects). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-5) mol/l), methylene blue (MB; 0.9 x 10(-6) mol/l) or propranolol (1.7 x 10(-5) mol/l) enhanced PS-mediated uterine muscle relaxation of spontaneous contractions. Dosedependent relaxation of spontaneous active isolated rat uterus with PS was lower in uteri pretreated with single dose of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 6 x 10(-3) mol/l), glibenclamide (2 x 10(-6) mol/l) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 10(-3) mol/l). Calcium-induced activity of the isolated rat uterus pretreated with the same concentration of L-NAME, MB, or propranolol modified the kinetic of PS-induced relaxation without changes in EC(50) values. Pre-treatment with glibenclamide, TEA and 4-AP significantly reduce PS relaxing effect of calcium-induced activity and according to EC(50) values the order of magnitude was glibenclamide > TEA > 4-AP. PS is mixture of polyamines and may activate different signal-transduction pathways. Our results cleary demonstrate that in uterine smooth muscle PS act dominantly through potassium chanels and marginaly through beta-adrenergic receptos or nitric oxide-dependent pathways.

  5. Unitary conductance variation in Kir2.1 and in cardiac inward rectifier potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Picones, A; Keung, E; Timpe, L C

    2001-01-01

    Kir2.1 (IRK1) is the complementary DNA for a component of a cardiac inwardly rectifying potassium channel. When Kir2.1 is expressed in Xenopus oocytes or human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells (150 mM external KCl), the unitary conductances form a broad distribution, ranging from 2 to 33 pS. Channels with a similarly broad distribution of unitary conductance amplitudes are also observed in recordings from adult mouse cardiac myocytes under similar experimental conditions. In all three cell types channels with conductances smaller, and occasionally larger, than the ~30 pS ones are found in the same patches as the ~30 pS openings, or in patches by themselves. The unitary conductances in patches with a single active channel are stable for the durations of the recordings. Channels of all amplitudes share several biophysical characteristics, including inward rectification, voltage sensitivity of open probability, sensitivity of open probability to external divalent cations, shape of the open channel i-V relation, and Cs(+) block. The only biophysical difference found between large and small conductance channels is that the rate constant for Cs(+) block is reduced for the small-amplitude channels. The unblocking rate constant is similar for channels of different unitary conductances. Apparently there is significant channel-to-channel variation at a site in the outer pore or in the selectivity filter, leading to variability in the rate at which K(+) or Cs(+) enters the channel. PMID:11566776

  6. Unitary conductance variation in Kir2.1 and in cardiac inward rectifier potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Picones, A; Keung, E; Timpe, L C

    2001-10-01

    Kir2.1 (IRK1) is the complementary DNA for a component of a cardiac inwardly rectifying potassium channel. When Kir2.1 is expressed in Xenopus oocytes or human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells (150 mM external KCl), the unitary conductances form a broad distribution, ranging from 2 to 33 pS. Channels with a similarly broad distribution of unitary conductance amplitudes are also observed in recordings from adult mouse cardiac myocytes under similar experimental conditions. In all three cell types channels with conductances smaller, and occasionally larger, than the ~30 pS ones are found in the same patches as the ~30 pS openings, or in patches by themselves. The unitary conductances in patches with a single active channel are stable for the durations of the recordings. Channels of all amplitudes share several biophysical characteristics, including inward rectification, voltage sensitivity of open probability, sensitivity of open probability to external divalent cations, shape of the open channel i-V relation, and Cs(+) block. The only biophysical difference found between large and small conductance channels is that the rate constant for Cs(+) block is reduced for the small-amplitude channels. The unblocking rate constant is similar for channels of different unitary conductances. Apparently there is significant channel-to-channel variation at a site in the outer pore or in the selectivity filter, leading to variability in the rate at which K(+) or Cs(+) enters the channel.

  7. The thermosensitive potassium channel TREK-1 contributes to coolness-evoked responses of Grueneberg ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Stebe, Sabrina; Schellig, Katharina; Lesage, Florian; Breer, Heinz; Fleischer, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion (GG) residing in the vestibule of the murine nose are activated by cool ambient temperatures. Activation of thermosensory neurons is usually mediated by thermosensitive ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family. However, there is no evidence for the expression of thermo-TRPs in the GG, suggesting that GG neurons utilize distinct mechanisms for their responsiveness to cool temperatures. In search for proteins that render GG neurons responsive to coolness, we have investigated whether TREK/TRAAK channels may play a role; in heterologous expression systems, these potassium channels have been previously found to close upon exposure to coolness, leading to a membrane depolarization. The results of the present study indicate that the thermosensitive potassium channel TREK-1 is expressed in those GG neurons that are responsive to cool temperatures. Studies analyzing TREK-deficient mice revealed that coolness-evoked responses of GG neurons were clearly attenuated in these animals compared with wild-type conspecifics. These data suggest that TREK-1 channels significantly contribute to the responsiveness of GG neurons to cool temperatures, further supporting the concept that TREK channels serve as thermoreceptors in sensory cells. Moreover, the present findings provide the first evidence of how thermosensory GG neurons are activated by given temperature stimuli in the absence of thermo-TRPs.

  8. Carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector of trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive potassium channels identified in congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Olson, Erik M; Zhou, Qing; Kryukova, Yelena; Sampson, Heidi M; Thomas, David Y; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-07-19

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels consisting of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and the potassium channel Kir6.2 play a key role in insulin secretion by coupling metabolic signals to β-cell membrane potential. Mutations in SUR1 and Kir6.2 that impair channel trafficking to the cell surface lead to loss of channel function and congenital hyperinsulinism. We report that carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant, corrects the trafficking defects of mutant KATP channels previously identified in congenital hyperinsulinism. Strikingly, of the 19 SUR1 mutations examined, only those located in the first transmembrane domain of SUR1 responded to the drug. We show that unlike that reported for several other protein misfolding diseases, carbamazepine did not correct KATP channel trafficking defects by activating autophagy; rather, it directly improved the biogenesis efficiency of mutant channels along the secretory pathway. In addition to its effect on channel trafficking, carbamazepine also inhibited KATP channel activity. Upon subsequent removal of carbamazepine, however, the function of rescued channels was recovered. Importantly, combination of the KATP channel opener diazoxide and carbamazepine led to enhanced mutant channel function without carbamazepine washout. The corrector effect of carbamazepine on mutant KATP channels was also demonstrated in rat and human β-cells with an accompanying increase in channel activity. Our findings identify carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector that may be used to restore KATP channel expression and function in a subset of congenital hyperinsulinism patients.

  9. Carbamazepine as a Novel Small Molecule Corrector of Trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive Potassium Channels Identified in Congenital Hyperinsulinism*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Olson, Erik M.; Zhou, Qing; Kryukova, Yelena; Sampson, Heidi M.; Thomas, David Y.; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels consisting of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and the potassium channel Kir6.2 play a key role in insulin secretion by coupling metabolic signals to β-cell membrane potential. Mutations in SUR1 and Kir6.2 that impair channel trafficking to the cell surface lead to loss of channel function and congenital hyperinsulinism. We report that carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant, corrects the trafficking defects of mutant KATP channels previously identified in congenital hyperinsulinism. Strikingly, of the 19 SUR1 mutations examined, only those located in the first transmembrane domain of SUR1 responded to the drug. We show that unlike that reported for several other protein misfolding diseases, carbamazepine did not correct KATP channel trafficking defects by activating autophagy; rather, it directly improved the biogenesis efficiency of mutant channels along the secretory pathway. In addition to its effect on channel trafficking, carbamazepine also inhibited KATP channel activity. Upon subsequent removal of carbamazepine, however, the function of rescued channels was recovered. Importantly, combination of the KATP channel opener diazoxide and carbamazepine led to enhanced mutant channel function without carbamazepine washout. The corrector effect of carbamazepine on mutant KATP channels was also demonstrated in rat and human β-cells with an accompanying increase in channel activity. Our findings identify carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector that may be used to restore KATP channel expression and function in a subset of congenital hyperinsulinism patients. PMID:23744072

  10. Probing the cavity of the slow inactivated conformation of shaker potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Panyi, Gyorgy; Deutsch, Carol

    2007-05-01

    Slow inactivation involves a local rearrangement of the outer mouth of voltage-gated potassium channels, but nothing is known regarding rearrangements in the cavity between the activation gate and the selectivity filter. We now report that the cavity undergoes a conformational change in the slow-inactivated state. This change is manifest as altered accessibility of residues facing the aqueous cavity and as a marked decrease in the affinity of tetraethylammonium for its internal binding site. These findings have implications for global alterations of the channel during slow inactivation and putative coupling between activation and slow-inactivation gates.

  11. Role of individual disulfide bridges in the conformation and activity of spinoxin (α-KTx6.13), a potassium channel toxin from Heterometrus spinifer scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoko; Peigneur, Steve; Liu, Junyi; Uemura, Shiho; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-11-01

    Spinoxin (SPX; α-KTx6.13), isolated from venom of the scorpion Heterometrus spinifer, is a K(+) channel-specific peptide toxin (KTx), which adopts a cysteine-stabilized α/β scaffold that is cross-linked by four disulfide bridges (Cys1-Cys5, Cys2-Cys6, Cys3-Cys7, and Cys4-Cys8). To investigate the role of the individual disulfide bonds in the structure-activity relationship of SPX, we synthesized four SPX analogs in which each pair of cysteine residues was replaced by alanine residues. The analysis of circular dichroism spectra and inhibitory activity against Kv1.3 channels showed that the SPX analogs lacking any of three specific disulfide bonds (Cys1-Cys5, Cys2-Cys6, and Cys3-Cys7) were unable to form the native secondary structure and completely lost inhibitory activities. Thus, we conclude that Cys1-Cys5, Cys2-Cys6, and Cys3-Cys7 are required for the inhibition of the Kv1.3 channel by SPX. In contrast, the analog lacking Cys4-Cys8 retained both native secondary structure and inhibitory activity. Interestingly, one of the isomers of the analog lacking Cys1-Cys5 also showed inhibitory activities, although its inhibition was ∼18-fold weaker than native SPX. This isomer had an atypical disulfide bond pairing (Cys3-Cys4 and Cys7-Cys8) that corresponds to that of maurotoxin (MTX), another α-KTx6 family member. These results indicate that the Cys1-Cys5 and Cys2-Cys6 bonds are important for restricting the toxin from forming an atypical (MTX-type) disulfide bond pairing among the remaining four cysteine residues (Cys3, Cys4, Cys7, and Cys8) in native SPX.

  12. Potassium channel openers stimulate DNA synthesis in mouse epidermal keratinocyte and whole hair follicle cultures.

    PubMed

    Harmon, C S; Lutz, D; Ducote, J

    1993-01-01

    We have conducted studies using primary mouse epidermal keratinocyte and whole hair follicle cultures to investigate the mechanism of the hypertrichotic activity of potassium channel openers. In a time course study, the extent of stimulation of epidermal keratinocyte DNA synthesis by minoxidil increased as the rate of DNA synthesis in control cultures declined. Minoxidil stimulation of DNA synthesis in 7-day cultures required prolonged (> 1 day) exposure to the agent. Pinacidil and diazoxide also stimulated DNA synthesis in mouse epidermal keratinocyte cultures. In addition, minoxidil, pinacidil, diazoxide, and cromakalim stimulated DNA synthesis in whole-organ cultures of mouse hair follicles. These results suggest that potassium channel openers retard the loss of proliferative activity of differentiating keratinocytes and support the hypothesis that these agents stimulate hair growth through a direct effect on hair follicles.

  13. In Vivo Role of a Potassium Channel-binding Protein in Regulating Neuronal Excitability and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Reddy, Smitha; Fei, Hong; Levitan, Irwin B.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular details of ion channel interactions with modulatory subunits have been investigated widely in transfected cells, but the physiological roles of ion channel modulatory protein complexes in native neurons remain largely unexplored. The Drosophila large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (dSlo) binds to and is modulated by its binding partner Slob. We have constructed flies in which Slob expression is manipulated by P-element mutagenesis, or by transgenic expression of Slob protein or Slob-RNAi. In vivo recordings of both macroscopic and single dSlo channel currents in identified neurosecretory neurons in the pars intercerebralis (PI) region of the Drosophila brain reveal that whole cell potassium current and properties of single dSlo channels are modulated by Slob expression level. Furthermore, Slob genotype influences action potential duration in vivo. This unprecedented combination of current clamp, macroscopic current and single channel recordings from neurons in brains of living flies defines a critical role for an ion channel modulatory protein complex in the control of neuronal excitability. We show further that Slob null flies exhibit significantly longer lifespan than controls under conditions of complete food deprivation. Crosses with deficiency lines demonstrate that this enhanced resistance to starvation-induced death maps close to the slob locus. Taken together, these results indicate that Slob may serve a novel regulatory function in feeding behavior, possibly by influencing the excitability of the PI neurons. PMID:19846720

  14. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New Tricyclic Dihydropyridine Based Derivatives on Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Gündüz, Miyase Gözde; Kaya, Yesim; Şimşek, Rahime; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci; Şafak, Cihat

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a microwave-assisted method for the synthesis of twelve novel tricyclic 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives in which dimethyl-substituted cyclohexane and / or tetrahydrothiophene rings are fused to the DHP ring. The structures of the compounds were confirmed by spectral methods and elemental analysis. The potassium channel opening effects of the compounds were determined on rat mesenteric arteries and urinary bladders. The obtained results indicated that some compounds produced mesenteric artery-selective relaxant properties and the effects of these compounds were mediated through ATP-sensitive potassium channels. The replacement of the second tetrahydrothiophene ring with dimethyl-substituted cyclohexane ring led to more active compounds. Docking studies were carried out to understand the interactions of the compounds with the active site of potassium channel. The unsubstituted nitrogen atom on the 1,4-dihydropyridine ring and one of the sulfonyl oxygens were found to be important for the formation of hydrogen bonds to stabilize the compound in the center of the cavity. The nature and position of phenyl ring substituents were also effective on the activity of the compounds. Finally, a theoretical study was established to predict the ADME of the most active compounds. PMID:28243272

  15. Structural properties of PAS domains from the KCNH potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Adaixo, Ricardo; Harley, Carol A; Castro-Rodrigues, Artur F; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2013-01-01

    KCNH channels form an important family of voltage gated potassium channels. These channels include a N-terminal Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain with unknown function. In other proteins PAS domains are implicated in cellular responses to environmental queues through small molecule binding or involvement in signaling cascades. To better understand their role we characterized the structural properties of several channel PAS domains. We determined high resolution structures of PAS domains from the mouse EAG (mEAG), drosophila ELK (dELK) and human ERG (hERG) channels and also of the hERG domain without the first nine amino acids. We analyzed these structures for features connected to ligand binding and signaling in other PAS domains. In particular, we have found cavities in the hERG and mEAG structures that share similarities with the ligand binding sites from other PAS domains. These cavities are lined by polar and apolar chemical groups and display potential flexibility in their volume. We have also found that the hydrophobic patch on the domain β-sheet is a conserved feature and appears to drive the formation of protein-protein contacts. In addition, the structures of the dELK domain and of the truncated hERG domain revealed the presence of N-terminal helices. These helices are equivalent to the helix described in the hERG NMR structures and are known to be important for channel function. Overall, these channel domains retain many of the PAS domain characteristics known to be important for cell signaling.

  16. Alcohol modulation of G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels: from binding to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bodhinathan, Karthik; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol)-induced behaviors may arise from direct interaction of alcohol with discrete protein cavities within brain proteins. Recent structural and biochemical studies have provided new insights into the mechanism of alcohol-dependent activation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, which regulate neuronal responses in the brain reward circuit. GIRK channels contain an alcohol binding pocket formed at the interface of two adjacent channel subunits. Here, we discuss the physiochemical properties of the alcohol pocket and the roles of G protein βγ subunits and membrane phospholipid PIP2 in regulating the alcohol response of GIRK channels. Some of the features of alcohol modulation of GIRK channels may be common to other alcohol-sensitive brain proteins. We discuss the possibility of alcohol-selective therapeutics that block alcohol access to the pocket. Understanding alcohol recognition and modulation of brain proteins is essential for development of therapeutics for alcohol abuse and addiction. PMID:24611054

  17. VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNELS AT THE CROSSROADS OF NEURONAL FUNCTION, ISCHEMIC TOLERANCE, AND NEURODEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Niyathi Hegde; Aizenman, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, and are crucial mediators of neuronal excitability. Importantly, these channels also actively participate in cellular and molecular signaling pathways that regulate the life and death of neurons. Injury-mediated increased K+ efflux through Kv2.1 channels promotes neuronal apoptosis, contributing to widespread neuronal loss in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. In contrast, some forms of neuronal activity can dramatically alter Kv2.1 channel phosphorylation levels and influence their localization. These changes are normally accompanied by modifications in channel voltage-dependence, which may be neuroprotective within the context of ischemic injury. Kv1 and Kv7 channel dysfunction leads to neuronal hyperexcitability that critically contributes to the pathophysiology of human clinical disorders such as episodic ataxia and epilepsy. This review summarizes the neurotoxic, neuroprotective, and neuroregulatory roles of Kv channels, and highlights the consequences of Kv channel dysfunction on neuronal physiology. The studies described in this review thus underscore the importance of normal Kv channel function in neurons, and emphasize the therapeutic potential of targeting Kv channels in the treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases. PMID:24323720

  18. Expression of the two pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 in human intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Hughes, Stephen; El Haj, Alicia; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-07-01

    Potassium channels play a major role in intracellular homeostasis and regulation of cell volume. Intervertebral disc cells respond to mechanical loading in a complex manner. Mechanical loading may play a role in disc degeneration. Lumbar intervertebral disc samples from 5 patients (average age: 47 years, range: 25-64 years) were used for this study, investigating cells from the nucleus pulposus and the annulus fibrosus duplicate samples to determine RNA expression and protein expression. Analysis of mRNA expression by RT-PCR demonstrated that TREK 1 was expressed by nucleus pulposus (n=5) and annulus fibrosus (n=5) cells. Currently, TREK-1 is the only potassium channel known to be activated by intracellular acidosis, and responds to mechanical and chemical stimuli. Whilst the precise role of potassium channels in cellular homeostasis remains to be determined, TREK-1 may be important to protect disc cells against ischaemic damage, and subsequent disc degeneration, and may also play a role in effecting mechanotransduction. Further research is required to fully elucidate the role of the TREK-1 ion channel in intervertebral disc cells.

  19. Src Kinase Is the Connecting Player between Protein Kinase A (PKA) Activation and Hyperpolarization through SLO3 Potassium Channel Regulation in Mouse Sperm.

    PubMed

    Stival, Cintia; La Spina, Florenza A; Baró Graf, Carolina; Arcelay, Enid; Arranz, Silvia E; Ferreira, Juan J; Le Grand, Sibylle; Dzikunu, Victor A; Santi, Celia M; Visconti, Pablo E; Buffone, Mariano G; Krapf, Dario

    2015-07-24

    Plasma membrane hyperpolarization is crucial for mammalian sperm to acquire acrosomal responsiveness during capacitation. Among the signaling events leading to mammalian sperm capacitation, the immediate activation of protein kinase A plays a pivotal role, promoting the subsequent stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation that associates with fertilizing capacity. We have shown previously that mice deficient in the tyrosine kinase cSrc are infertile and exhibit improper cauda epididymis development. It is therefore not clear whether lack of sperm functionality is due to problems in epididymal maturation or to the absence of cSrc in sperm. To further address this problem, we investigated the kinetics of cSrc activation using anti-Tyr(P)-416-cSrc antibodies that only recognize active cSrc. Our results provide evidence that cSrc is activated downstream of PKA and that inhibition of its activity blocks the capacitation-induced hyperpolarization of the sperm plasma membrane without blocking the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation that accompanies capacitation. In addition, we show that cSrc inhibition also blocks the agonist-induced acrosome reaction and that this inhibition is overcome by pharmacological hyperpolarization. Considering that capacitation-induced hyperpolarization is mediated by SLO3, we evaluated the action of cSrc inhibitors on the heterologously expressed SLO3 channel. Our results indicate that, similar to SLO1 K(+) channels, cSrc blockers significantly decreased SLO3-mediated currents. Together, these results are consistent with findings showing that hyperpolarization of the sperm plasma membrane is necessary and sufficient to prepare the sperm for the acrosome reaction and suggest that changes in sperm membrane potential are mediated by cSrc activation.

  20. Long-pore Electrostatics in Inward-rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Janice L.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels differ from the canonical K+ channel structure in that they possess a long extended pore (∼85 Å) for ion conduction that reaches deeply into the cytoplasm. This unique structural feature is presumably involved in regulating functional properties specific to Kir channels, such as conductance, rectification block, and ligand-dependent gating. To elucidate the underpinnings of these functional roles, we examine the electrostatics of an ion along this extended pore. Homology models are constructed based on the open-state model of KirBac1.1 for four mammalian Kir channels: Kir1.1/ROMK, Kir2.1/IRK, Kir3.1/GIRK, and Kir6.2/KATP. By solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the electrostatic free energy of a K+ ion is determined along each pore, revealing that mammalian Kir channels provide a favorable environment for cations and suggesting the existence of high-density regions in the cytoplasmic domain and cavity. The contribution from the reaction field (the self-energy arising from the dielectric polarization induced by the ion's charge in the complex geometry of the pore) is unfavorable inside the long pore. However, this is well compensated by the electrostatic interaction with the static field arising from the protein charges and shielded by the dielectric surrounding. Decomposition of the static field provides a list of residues that display remarkable correspondence with existing mutagenesis data identifying amino acids that affect conduction and rectification. Many of these residues demonstrate interactions with the ion over long distances, up to 40 Å, suggesting that mutations potentially affect ion or blocker energetics over the entire pore. These results provide a foundation for understanding ion interactions in Kir channels and extend to the study of ion permeation, block, and gating in long, cation-specific pores. PMID:19001143

  1. Novel Leishmania and Malaria Potassium Channels: Candidate Therapeutic Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    of Ca 2*-activated and voltage-gated K÷ channels) and verruclogen ( isolated from Penicillium verruculosum and a blocker of high conductance Ca 2...containing plasmid (plus 1/101h the amount of GFP voltage steps between -80 and 80mV. 0 = zero plasmid for identification ) by Lipofectamine 2000 current...assays were used to investigate parasite sensitivity to various K+ channel blocking compounds. The identification of only two putative K+ channels

  2. Emerging concepts for G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, Christian; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels hyperpolarize neurons in response to the activation of many G-protein coupled receptors and thus control the excitability of neurons through GIRK-mediated self-inhibition, slow synaptic potentials and volume transmission. GIRK channel function and trafficking are highly dependent on their subunit composition. Pharmacological investigations of GIRK channels and studies in animal models suggest that GIRK activity has an important role in physiological responses, including pain perception and memory modulation. Moreover, abnormal GIRK function has been implicated in altering neuronal excitability and cell death that may be important in the pathophysiology of human diseases such as epilepsy, Down’s syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. GIRK channels may therefore prove to be a valuable new therapeutic target for treating these health problems. PMID:20389305

  3. The effect of ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulation on heart rate in isolated muskrat and guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Streeby, D R; McKean, T A

    1994-12-01

    Muskrats (Ondontra zibethicus) are common freshwater diving mammals exhibiting a bradycardia with both forced and voluntary diving. This bradycardia is mediated by vagal innervation; however, if hypoxia is present there may be local factors that also decrease heart rate. Some of these local factors may include ATP-sensitive potassium channel activation and extracellular accumulation of potassium ions, hydrogen ions and lactate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of these factors in the isolated perfused hearts of muskrats and of a non-diving mammal, the guinea pig. Although lactate and proton administration reduced heart rate in isolated muskrat and guinea pig hearts, there was no difference in the response to lactate and proton infusion between the two species. Muskrat hearts were more sensitive to the heart-rate-lowering effects of exogenously applied potassium than were guinea pig hearts. Early increases in extracellular potassium concentration during hypoxia are thought to be mediated by the ATP-sensitive potassium channel. Activation of these channels under normoxic conditions had a mildly negative chronotropic effect in both species; however, activation of these channels with Lemakalim under hypoxic conditions caused the guinea pig heart to respond with an augmented bradycardia similar to that seen in the hypoxic muskrat heart in the absence of drugs. Inhibition of these channels by glibenclamide during hypoxia was partially successful in blocking the bradycardia in guinea pig hearts, but inhibition of the same channels in hypoxic muskrat hearts had a damaging effect as two of five hearts went into contracture during the hypoxia. Thus, although ATP-sensitive potassium channels appear to have a major role in the bradycardia of hypoxia in guinea pigs, the failure to prevent the bradycardia by inhibition of these channels in muskrat hearts suggests that multiple factors are involved in the hypoxia-induced bradycardia in this species.

  4. AMIGO-Kv2.1 Potassium Channel Complex Is Associated With Schizophrenia-Related Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Marjaana A.; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Liuhanen, Johanna; Võikar, Vootele; Piepponen, Petteri; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E.; Suvisaari, Jaana; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Paunio, Tiina; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The enormous variability in electrical properties of neurons is largely affected by a multitude of potassium channel subunits. Kv2.1 is a widely expressed voltage-dependent potassium channel and an important regulator of neuronal excitability. The Kv2.1 auxiliary subunit AMIGO constitutes an integral part of the Kv2.1 channel complex in brain and regulates the activity of the channel. AMIGO and Kv2.1 localize to the distinct somatodendritic clusters at the neuronal plasma membrane. Here we have created and characterized a mouse line lacking the AMIGO gene. Absence of AMIGO clearly reduced the amount of the Kv2.1 channel protein in mouse brain and altered the electrophysiological properties of neurons. These changes were accompanied by behavioral and pharmacological abnormalities reminiscent of those identified in schizophrenia. Concomitantly, we have detected an association of a rare, population-specific polymorphism of KV2.1 (KCNB1) with human schizophrenia in a genetic isolate enriched with schizophrenia. Our study demonstrates the involvement of AMIGO-Kv2.1 channel complex in schizophrenia-related behavioral domains in mice and identifies KV2.1 (KCNB1) as a strong susceptibility gene for schizophrenia spectrum disorders in humans. PMID:26240432

  5. Potassium Channels Mediate Killing by Human Natural Killer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Lyanne; Sidell, Neil; Hagiwara, Susumu

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. However, no direct evidence exists for ion channels in NK cells or in their target cells. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, we found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. We tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na+ current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. We could not find any evidence of a Ca2+ current in target cells or in NK cells; therefore, our results cannot explain the Ca dependence of killing. Our findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process. In contrast, the endogenous channel type in the target cell is probably not a factor in determining target cell

  6. Effect of potassium channel blockade and alpha 2-adrenoceptor activation on the release of nitric oxide from non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerves.

    PubMed

    De Man, J G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A

    1994-05-01

    1. Using a superfusion bioassay cascade, we studied the effect of K+ channel blockers and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agents on the release of a transferable factor, previously characterized as nitric oxide (NO) or a nitric oxide-related substance (NO-R), in response to non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) nerve stimulation in the canine ileocolonic junction (ICJ). 2. The non-selective K+ channel blockers, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 50 microM) and tetraethylammonium (TEA, 1 mM) and the more selective blocker of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, charybdotoxin (Leiurus quinquestriatus venom (LQV), 0.4 microgram ml-1), significantly enhanced the release of NO-R induced by low frequency stimulation (2-4 Hz). In the presence of 4-AP and TEA, the release of NO-R was nearly abolished by tetrodotoxin (2 microM), and by L-NG-nitroarginine (L-NOARG, 0.1 mM). Relaxations induced by direct injection of exogenous NO (5-50 pmol) or nitroglycerin (GTN, 10-30 pmol) onto the rabbit aortic detector ring were not affected. 3. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK-14,304 (0.3 microM) inhibited the release of NO-R induced by low (2-4 Hz), but not that induced by high (16 Hz), frequency stimulation. This inhibitory effect was completely reversed by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine (0.3 microM). Neither UK-14,304 nor yohimbine affected the relaxations induced by exogenous NO (5 pmol) or GTN (10 pmol) on the aortic detector ring.3+

  7. Kv3.3 potassium channels and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-15

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed at high levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells, in auditory brainstem nuclei and in many other neurons capable of firing at high rates. In the cerebellum, it helps to shape the very characteristic complex spike of Purkinje cells. Kv3.3 differs from other closely related channels in that human mutations in the gene encoding Kv3.3 (KCNC3) result in a unique neurodegenerative disease termed spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). This primarily affects the cerebellum, but also results in extracerebellar symptoms. Different mutations produce either early onset SCA13, associated with delayed motor and impaired cognitive skill acquisition, or late onset SCA13, which typically produces cerebellar degeneration in middle age. This review covers the localization and physiological function of Kv3.3 in the central nervous system and how the normal function of the channel is altered by the disease-causing mutations. It also describes experimental approaches that are being used to understand how Kv3.3 mutations are linked to neuronal survival, and to develop strategies for treatment.

  8. Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Menghang; Shahane, Sampada; Huang, Ruili; Titus, Steven A.; Shum, Enoch; Zhao, Yong; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially lead to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screened the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC50 potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 μM. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC50 value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo. PMID:21362439

  9. Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Menghang; Shahane, Sampada A.; Huang, Ruili; Titus, Steven A.; Shum, Enoch; Zhao Yong; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2011-05-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially leads to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screened the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC{sub 50} potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 {mu}M. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC{sub 50} value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo.

  10. Gating and flickery block differentially affected by rubidium in homomeric KCNQ1 and heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, M; Bertorello, L; Conti, F

    2000-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 associates with the small KCNE1 subunit to form the cardiac IKs delayed rectifier potassium current and mutations in both genes can lead to the long QT syndrome. KCNQ1 can form functional homotetrameric channels, however with drastically different biophysical properties compared to heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels. We analyzed gating and conductance of these channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage-clamp and the patch-clamp technique and high extracellular potassium (K) and rubidium (Rb) solutions. Inward tail currents of homomeric KCNQ1 channels are increased about threefold upon substitution of 100 mM potassium with 100 mM rubidium despite a smaller rubidium permeability, suggesting an effect of rubidium on gating. However, the kinetics of tail currents and the steady-state activation curve are only slightly changed in rubidium. Single-channel amplitude at negative voltages was estimated by nonstationary noise analysis, and it was found that rubidium has only a small effect on homomeric channels (1.2-fold increase) when measured at a 5-kHz bandwidth. The apparent single-channel conductance was decreased after filtering the data at lower cutoff frequencies indicative of a relatively fast "flickery/block" process. The relative conductance in rubidium compared to potassium increased at lower cutoff frequencies (about twofold at 10 Hz), suggesting that the main effect of rubidium is to decrease the probability of channel blockage leading to an increase of inward currents without large changes in gating properties. Macroscopic inward tail currents of heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels in rubidium are reduced by about twofold and show a pronounced sigmoidal time course that develops with a delay similar to the inactivation process of homomeric KCNQ1, and is indicative of the presence of several open states. The single channel amplitude of heteromers is about twofold smaller in rubidium than in

  11. hERG1 potassium channel in cancer cells: a tool to reprogram immortality.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Saverio

    2016-10-01

    It has been well established that changes in ion fluxes across cellular membranes as a function of time is fundamental in maintaining cellular homeostasis of every living cell. Consequently, dysregulation of ion channels activity is a critical event in pathological conditions of several tissues, including cancer. Nevertheless, the role of ion channels in cancer biology is still not well understood and very little is known about the possible therapeutic opportunities offered by the use of the vast collection of drugs that target ion channels. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in understanding the role of the voltage-gated hERG1 potassium channel in cancer and on the effects of pharmacologic manipulation of the hERG1 in cancer cells aiming to provide insights into the biochemical signaling and cellular processes that are altered by using these drugs.

  12. Opening paths to novel analgesics: the role of potassium channels in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is associated with abnormal excitability of the somatosensory system and remains poorly treated in the clinic. Potassium (K+) channels are crucial determinants of neuronal activity throughout the nervous system. Opening of these channels facilitates a hyperpolarizing K+ efflux across the plasma membrane that counteracts inward ion conductance and therefore limits neuronal excitability. Accumulating research has highlighted a prominent involvement of K+ channels in nociceptive processing, particularly in determining peripheral hyperexcitability. We review salient findings from expression, pharmacological, and genetic studies that have untangled a hitherto undervalued contribution of K+ channels in maladaptive pain signaling. These emerging data provide a framework to explain enigmatic pain syndromes and to design novel pharmacological treatments for these debilitating states. PMID:24461875

  13. Free RCK arrangement in Kch, a putative escherichia coli potassium channel, as suggested by electron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qie; Purhonen, Pasi; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Koeck, Philip J B; Hebert, Hans

    2015-01-06

    The ligand-gated potassium channels are stimulated by various kinds of messengers. Previous studies showed that ligand-gated potassium channels containing RCK domains (the regulator of the conductance of potassium ion) form a dimer of tetramer structure through the RCK octameric gating ring in the presence of detergent. Here, we have analyzed the structure of Kch, a channel of this type from Escherichia coli, in a lipid environment using electron crystallography. By combining information from the 3D map of the transmembrane part of the protein and docking of an atomic model of a potassium channel, we conclude that the RCK domains face the solution and that an RCK octameric gating ring arrangement does not form under our crystallization condition. Our findings may be applied to other potassium channels that have an RCK gating ring arrangement.

  14. Movement of the S4 segment in the hERG potassium channel during membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David J S; Dondas, Naciye Y; Munsey, Tim S; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2009-12-01

    The hERG potassium channel is a member of the voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel family, comprising a pore domain and four voltage sensing domains (VSDs). Like other Kv channels, the VSD senses changes in membrane voltage and transmits the signal to gates located in the pore domain; the gates open at positive potentials (activation) and close at negative potentials, thereby controlling the ion flux. hERG, however, differs from other Kv channels in that it is activated slowly but inactivated rapidly - a property that is crucial for the role it plays in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Voltage-gating requires movement of gating charges across the membrane electric field, which is accomplished by the transmembrane movement of the fourth transmembrane segment, S4, of the VSD containing the positively charged arginine or lysine residues. Here we ask if the functional differences between hERG and other Kv channels could arise from differences in the transmembrane movement of S4. To address this, we have introduced single cysteine residues into the S4 region of the VSD, expressed the mutant channels in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effect of membrane impermeable para-chloromercuribenzene sulphonate on function by the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our results show that depolarization results in the accessibility of seven consecutive S4 residues, including the first two charged residues, K525 and R528, to extracellularly applied reagent. These data indicate that the extent of S4 movement in hERG is similar to other Kv channels, including the archabacterial KvAP and the Shaker channel of Drosophila.

  15. Angiotensin II inhibits the ROMK-like small conductance K channel in renal cortical collecting duct during dietary potassium restriction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Zavilowitz, Beth; Satlin, Lisa M; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2007-03-02

    Base-line urinary potassium secretion in the distal nephron is mediated by small conductance rat outer medullary K (ROMK)-like channels. We used the patch clamp technique applied to split-open cortical collecting ducts (CCDs) isolated from rats fed a normal potassium (NK) or low potassium (LK) diet to test the hypothesis that AngII directly inhibits ROMK channel activity. We found that AngII inhibited ROMK channel activity in LK but not NK rats in a dose-dependent manner. The AngII-induced reduction in channel activity was mediated by AT1 receptor (AT1R) binding, because pretreatment of CCDs with losartan but not PD123319 AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists, respectively, blocked the response. Pretreatment of CCDs with U73122 and calphostin C, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC), respectively, abolished the AngII-induced decrease in ROMK channel activity, confirming a role of the PLC-PKC pathway in this response. Studies by others suggest that AngII stimulates an Src family protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) via PKC-NADPH oxidase. PTK has been shown to regulate the ROMK channel. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with diphenyliodonium abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII or the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate on ROMK channels. Suppression of PTK by herbimycin A significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of AngII on ROMK channel activity. We conclude that AngII inhibits ROMK channel activity through PKC-, NADPH oxidase-, and PTK-dependent pathways under conditions of dietary potassium restriction.

  16. Angiotensin II Inhibits the ROMK-like Small Conductance K Channel in Renal Cortical Collecting Duct during Dietary Potassium Restriction*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuan; Zavilowitz, Beth; Satlin, Lisa M.; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Base-line urinary potassium secretion in the distal nephron is mediated by small conductance rat outer medullary K (ROMK)-like channels. We used the patch clamp technique applied to split-open cortical collecting ducts (CCDs) isolated from rats fed a normal potassium (NK) or low potassium (LK) diet to test the hypothesis that AngII directly inhibits ROMK channel activity. We found that AngII inhibited ROMK channel activity in LK but not NK rats in a dose-dependent manner. The AngII-induced reduction in channel activity was mediated by AT1 receptor (AT1R) binding, because pretreatment of CCDs with losartan but not PD123319 AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists, respectively, blocked the response. Pretreatment of CCDs with U73122 and calphostin C, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC), respectively, abolished the AngII-induced decrease in ROMK channel activity, confirming a role of the PLC-PKC pathway in this response. Studies by others suggest that AngII stimulates an Src family protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) via PKC-NADPH oxidase. PTK has been shown to regulate the ROMK channel. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with diphenyliodonium abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII or the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate on ROMK channels. Suppression of PTK by herbimycin A significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of AngII on ROMK channel activity. We conclude that AngII inhibits ROMK channel activity through PKC-, NADPH oxidase-, and PTK-dependent pathways under conditions of dietary potassium restriction. PMID:17194699

  17. Identification of the Intracellular Na+ Sensor in Slo2.1 Potassium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Steven J.; Hansen, Angela; Sanguinetti, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Slo2 potassium channels have a very low open probability under normal physiological conditions, but are readily activated in response to an elevated [Na+]i (e.g. during ischemia). An intracellular Na+ coordination motif (DX(R/K)XXH) was previously identified in Kir3.2, Kir3.4, Kir5.1, and Slo2.2 channel subunits. Based loosely on this sequence, we identified five potential Na+ coordination motifs in the C terminus of the Slo2.1 subunit. The Asp residue in each sequence was substituted with Arg, and single mutant channels were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The Na+ sensitivity of each of the mutant channels was assessed by voltage clamp of oocytes using micropipettes filled with 2 m NaCl. Wild-type channels and four of the mutant Slo2.1 channels were rapidly activated by leakage of NaCl solution into the cytoplasm. D757R Slo2.1 channels were not activated by NaCl, but were activated by the fenamate niflumic acid, confirming their functional expression. In whole cell voltage clamp recordings of HEK293 cells, wild-type but not D757R Slo2.1 channels were activated by a [NaCl]i of 70 mm. Thus, a single Asp residue can account for the sensitivity of Slo2.1 channels to intracellular Na+. In excised inside-out macropatches of HEK293 cells, activation of wild-type Slo2.1 currents by 3 mm niflumic acid was 14-fold greater than activation achieved by increasing [NaCl]i from 3 to 100 mm. Thus, relative to fenamates, intracellular Na+ is a poor activator of Slo2.1. PMID:25903137

  18. Identification of the Intracellular Na+ Sensor in Slo2.1 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Steven J; Hansen, Angela; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2015-06-05

    Slo2 potassium channels have a very low open probability under normal physiological conditions, but are readily activated in response to an elevated [Na(+)]i (e.g. during ischemia). An intracellular Na(+) coordination motif (DX(R/K)XXH) was previously identified in Kir3.2, Kir3.4, Kir5.1, and Slo2.2 channel subunits. Based loosely on this sequence, we identified five potential Na(+) coordination motifs in the C terminus of the Slo2.1 subunit. The Asp residue in each sequence was substituted with Arg, and single mutant channels were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The Na(+) sensitivity of each of the mutant channels was assessed by voltage clamp of oocytes using micropipettes filled with 2 M NaCl. Wild-type channels and four of the mutant Slo2.1 channels were rapidly activated by leakage of NaCl solution into the cytoplasm. D757R Slo2.1 channels were not activated by NaCl, but were activated by the fenamate niflumic acid, confirming their functional expression. In whole cell voltage clamp recordings of HEK293 cells, wild-type but not D757R Slo2.1 channels were activated by a [NaCl]i of 70 mM. Thus, a single Asp residue can account for the sensitivity of Slo2.1 channels to intracellular Na(+). In excised inside-out macropatches of HEK293 cells, activation of wild-type Slo2.1 currents by 3 mM niflumic acid was 14-fold greater than activation achieved by increasing [NaCl]i from 3 to 100 mM. Thus, relative to fenamates, intracellular Na(+) is a poor activator of Slo2.1.

  19. Altered Expression of Two-Pore Domain Potassium (K2P) Channels in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels have become a focus in cancer biology as they play roles in cell behaviours associated with cancer progression, including proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are background channels which enable the leak of potassium ions from cells. As these channels are open at rest they have a profound effect on cellular membrane potential and subsequently the electrical activity and behaviour of cells in which they are expressed. The K2P family of channels has 15 mammalian members and already 4 members of this family (K2P2.1, K2P3.1, K2P9.1, K2P5.1) have been implicated in cancer. Here we examine the expression of all 15 members of the K2P family of channels in a range of cancer types. This was achieved using the online cancer microarray database, Oncomine (www.oncomine.org). Each gene was examined across 20 cancer types, comparing mRNA expression in cancer to normal tissue. This analysis revealed all but 3 K2P family members (K2P4.1, K2P16.1, K2P18.1) show altered expression in cancer. Overexpression of K2P channels was observed in a range of cancers including breast, leukaemia and lung while more cancers (brain, colorectal, gastrointestinal, kidney, lung, melanoma, oesophageal) showed underexpression of one or more channels. K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P12.1, were overexpressed in a range of cancers. While K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P5.1, K2P6.1, K2P7.1 and K2P10.1 showed significant underexpression across the cancer types examined. This analysis supports the view that specific K2P channels may play a role in cancer biology. Their altered expression together with their ability to impact the function of other ion channels and their sensitivity to environmental stimuli (pO2, pH, glucose, stretch) makes understanding the role these channels play in cancer of key importance. PMID:24116006

  20. Altered expression of two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels in cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels have become a focus in cancer biology as they play roles in cell behaviours associated with cancer progression, including proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are background channels which enable the leak of potassium ions from cells. As these channels are open at rest they have a profound effect on cellular membrane potential and subsequently the electrical activity and behaviour of cells in which they are expressed. The K2P family of channels has 15 mammalian members and already 4 members of this family (K2P2.1, K2P3.1, K2P9.1, K2P5.1) have been implicated in cancer. Here we examine the expression of all 15 members of the K2P family of channels in a range of cancer types. This was achieved using the online cancer microarray database, Oncomine (www.oncomine.org). Each gene was examined across 20 cancer types, comparing mRNA expression in cancer to normal tissue. This analysis revealed all but 3 K2P family members (K2P4.1, K2P16.1, K2P18.1) show altered expression in cancer. Overexpression of K2P channels was observed in a range of cancers including breast, leukaemia and lung while more cancers (brain, colorectal, gastrointestinal, kidney, lung, melanoma, oesophageal) showed underexpression of one or more channels. K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P12.1, were overexpressed in a range of cancers. While K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P5.1, K2P6.1, K2P7.1 and K2P10.1 showed significant underexpression across the cancer types examined. This analysis supports the view that specific K2P channels may play a role in cancer biology. Their altered expression together with their ability to impact the function of other ion channels and their sensitivity to environmental stimuli (pO2, pH, glucose, stretch) makes understanding the role these channels play in cancer of key importance.

  1. Characterization of single potassium channels in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Single K(+)-selective channels with a conductance of about 48 pS (pipette, 145 mM KCl; bath, 140 mM NaCl + 4.7 mM KCl) were recorded in the patch-clamp whole-cell configuration in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Neither application of the secretagogues acetylcholine (second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) or secretin (second messenger, cAMP), nor addition of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A to the pipette solution changed the activity of the 48 pS K+ channel. 3. Intracellular acidification with sodium propionate (20 mM) diminished activity of the 48 pS channel, whereas channel open probability was increased by cytosolic alkalization with 20 mM NH4Cl. 4. BaCl2 (5 mM), TEA (10 mM) or apamin (1 microM) added to the bath solution had no obvious effect on the kinetics of the 48 pS channel. Similarly, glibenclamide and diazoxide failed to influence the channel activity. 5. When extracellular NaCl was replaced by KCl, whole-cell recordings revealed an inwardly rectifying K+ current carried by a 17 pS K+ channel. 6. The inwardly rectifying K+ current was not pH dependent and could largely be blocked by Ba2+ but not by TEA. 7. Since the 48 pS K+ channel is neither Ca2+ nor cAMP regulated, we suggest that this channel could play a role in the maintenance of the negative cell resting potential. PMID:7623283

  2. Role of renal vascular potassium channels in physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Salomonsson, Max; Brasen, Jens Christian; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2017-03-30

    The control of renal vascular tone is important for the regulation of salt and water balance, blood pressure and the protection against damaging elevated glomerular pressure. The K(+) conductance is a major factor in the regulation of the membrane potential (Vm ) in vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) and endothelial cells (EC). The vascular tone is controlled by Vm via its effect on the opening probability of voltage operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCC) in VSMC. When K(+) conductance increases Vm becomes more negative and vasodilation follows, while deactivation of K(+) channels leads to depolarization and vasoconstriction. K(+) channels in EC indirectly participate in the control of vascular tone by endothelium derived vasodilation. Therefore, by regulating the tone of renal resistance vessels, K(+) channels have a potential role in the control of fluid homeostasis and blood pressure as well as in the protection of the renal parenchyma. The main classes of K(+) channels (calcium activated (KCa ), inward rectifier (Kir ), voltage activated (Kv ) and ATP sensitive (KATP )) have been found in the renal vessels. In this review, we summarize results available in the literature and our own studies in the field. We compare the ambiguous in vitro and in vivo results. We discuss the role of single types of K(+) channels and the integrated function of several classes. We also deal with the possible role of renal vascular K(+) channels in the pathophysiology of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and sepsis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. PKC and AMPK regulation of Kv1.5 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Petersen, Frederic; MacAulay, Nanna; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.5 potassium channel, conducting the ultra-rapid rectifier K+ current (IKur), is regulated through several pathways. Here we investigate if Kv1.5 surface expression is controlled by the 2 kinases PKC and AMPK, using Xenopus oocytes, MDCK cells and atrial derived HL-1 cells. By confocal microscopy combined with electrophysiology we demonstrate that PKC activation reduces Kv1.5 current, through a decrease in membrane expressed channels. AMPK activation was found to decrease the membrane expression in MDCK cells, but not in HL-1 cells and was furthermore shown to be dependent on co-expression of Nedd4–2 in Xenopus oocytes. These results indicate that Kv1.5 channels are regulated by both kinases, although through different molecular mechanisms in different cell systems. PMID:26043299

  4. The Vasorelaxant Effect of p-Cymene in Rat Aorta Involves Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Martapolyana T. M.; Ribeiro, Fernanda P. R. A.; Medeiros, Maria Alice M. B.; Sampaio, Pedrita A.; Silva, Yonara M. S.; Silva, Morganna T. A.; Quintans, Jullyana S. S.; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.; Ribeiro, Luciano A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The monoterpenes are the main constituents of most essential oils and p-cymene is a monoterpene commonly found in various species of aromatic herbs, which has been reported for anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, and antimicrobial activities. However, there is no report concerning its pharmacological activity on the vascular smooth muscle. The aim of current work was to investigate the effects of p-cymene in isolated rat aorta and also study its mechanism of action. In this work, we show that p-cymene has a relaxant effect, in a dose-dependent way, on the vascular smooth muscle, regardless of the presence of the endothelium. Using a nonselective potassium channel blocker, the CsCl, the relaxant effect of p-cymene was attenuated. In the presence of more selective potassium channels blockers, such as TEA or 4-AP, no change in the relaxant effect of p-cymene was evidenced, indicating that BKCa and KV channels are not involved in that relaxant effect. However, in the presence of glibenclamide or BaCl2, KATP and Kir blockers, respectively, the relaxant effect of p-cymene was attenuated. The data presented indicate that p-cymene has a relaxing effect on rat aorta, regardless of the endothelium, but with the participation of the KATP and Kir channels. PMID:25667938

  5. Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Current Required for Circadian Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    JN, Itri; S, Michel; MJ, Vansteensel; JH, Meijer; CS, Colwell

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, the precise circadian timing of many biological processes depends on the generation of oscillations in neural activity of pacemaker cells in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The ionic mechanisms underlying these rhythms are largely unknown. Using the mouse brain slice preparation, we demonstrate that the magnitude of fast delayed rectifier potassium currents exhibits a diurnal rhythm that peaks during the day. Importantly, this rhythm continues in constant darkness, providing the first demonstration of the circadian regulation of an intrinsic voltage–gated current in mammalian cells. Blocking this current prevented the daily rhythm in firing rate in SCN neurons. Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 potassium channels were found to be widely distributed within the SCN with higher expression during the day. We conclude that the fast delayed rectifier is necessary for the circadian modulation of electrical activity in SCN neurons, and represents an important part of the ionic basis for the generation of rhythmic output. PMID:15852012

  6. Dendritic A-type potassium channel subunit expression in CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Menegola, M; Misonou, H; Vacher, H; Trimmer, J S

    2008-06-26

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into neuronal dendrites. BAPs have been well studied in a variety of neurons, and have been recently described in hippocampal and cortical interneurons, a heterogeneous population of GABAergic inhibitory cells that regulate activity of principal cells and neuronal networks. We used well-characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies against the Kv4.3 and potassium channel interacting protein (KChIP) 1 subunits of A-type Kv channels, and antibodies against different interneuron markers in single- and double-label immunohistochemistry experiments to analyze the expression patterns of Kv4.3 and KChIP1 in hippocampal Ammon's horn (CA1) neurons. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 40 mum rat brain sections using nickel-enhanced diaminobenzidine staining or multiple-label immunofluorescence. Our results show that Kv4.3 and KChIP1 component subunits of A-type channels are co-localized in the soma and dendrites of a large number of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. These subunits co-localize extensively but not completely with markers defining the four major interneuron subpopulations tested (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin). These results suggest that CA1 hippocampal interneurons can be divided in two groups according to the expression of Kv4.3/KChIP1 channel subunits. Antibodies against Kv4.3 and KChIP1 represent an important new tool for identifying a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons with a unique dendritic A-type channel complement and ability to control BAPs.

  7. Cloning and characterization of a human delayed rectifier potassium channel gene.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, B; Lorra, C; Stocker, M; Pongs, O

    1993-01-01

    A human genomic DNA library was screened for sequences homologues to the rat delayed rectifier Kv 2.1 (DRK1) K+ channel cDNA. Three phages were isolated which hybridized to Kv 2.1 cDNA probes. Alignment of the human genomic DNA sequence with the rat cDNA sequence indicated that the open reading frame (ORF) is interrupted by a large intervening sequence, that separates exons encoding the membrane spanning core region of the K+ channel polypeptide. The Kv 2.1 gene occurs once in the human genome and has been mapped to chromosome 20. The human, mouse and rat Kv 2.1 proteins have been highly conserved, showing only a few substitutions outside of the membrane spanning domains in the amino- and carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domains. Nevertheless, expression of human DRK1 channels in Xenopus oocytes showed that mouse, rat and human Kv 2.1 channels have distinct pharmacological and electrophysiological properties. The observed differences in activation, voltage-dependence, 4-aminopyridine sensitivity and single-channel conductance have to be attributed to amino acid substitutions in the amino-and/or carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domains. Obviously, these domains of Kv 2.1 channels influence biophysical K+ channel properties, which are thought to be determined solely by the membrane spanning core domain of potassium channels.

  8. Pharmacophore mapping based inhibitor selection and molecular interaction studies for identification of potential drugs on calcium activated potassium channel blockers, tamulotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tamulotoxin (TmTx) from Buthus tamulus was found to be a highly venomous toxin which accelerates the neurotransmitter release that directly affects the cardiovascular tissues and the respiratory system leading to death. TmTx from red Indian scorpion is a crucial inhibitor for Ca2+ activated K+ channel in humans. Objective: The study is aimed at the identification of potential inhibitors of TmTx through pharmacophore based inhibitor screening and understanding the molecular level interactions. Materials and Method: The potential inhibitors for TmTx were identified using pharmacophore model based descriptor information present in existing drugs with the analysis of pharmacokinetic properties. The compounds with good ADMET (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity) descriptors were subjected to molecular interaction studies. The stability of bound toxin-inhibitor complex was studied using molecular dynamics simulation over a period of one nanosecond. Results: From a dataset of 3406 compounds, few compounds were selected as potential inhibitors based on the generated best pharmacophore models, pharmacokinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, two compounds containing better inhibition properties against TmTx are suggested to be better lead molecules for drug development in future and this study will help us to explore more inhibitors from natural origin against tamulotoxin. PMID:23772102

  9. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  10. Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels Control Rotor Frequency in Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jalife, José

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the most important cause of sudden cardiac death. While traditionally thought to result from random activation of the ventricles by multiple independent wavelets, recent evidence suggests that VF may be determined by the sustained activation of a relatively small number of reentrant sources. In addition, recent experimental data in various species as well as computer simulations have provided important clues about its ionic and molecular mechanisms, particularly in regards to the role of potassium currents in such mechanisms. The results strongly argue that the inward rectifier current, Ik1, is an important current during functional reentry because it mediates the electrotonic interactions between the unexcited core and its immediate surroundings. In addition, IK1 is a stabilizer of reentry due to its ability to shorten action potential duration and reducing conduction velocity near the center of rotation. Increased I K1 prevents wavefront-wavetail interactions and thus averts rotor destabilization and breakup. Other studies have shown that while the slow component of the delayed rectifier potassium current, IKs, does not significantly modify rotor frequency or stability, it plays a major role in post-repolarization refractoriness and wavebreak formation. Therefore, the interplay between IK1 and the rapid sodium inward current (INa) is a major factor in the control of cardiac excitability and therefore the stability and frequency of reentry while IKs is an important determinant of fibrillatory conduction. PMID:19880073

  11. Somatostatin peptides inhibit basolateral potassium channels in human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Warhurst, G; Butterfield, I; Higgs, N B; Lomax, R B

    1999-11-01

    Somatostatin is a powerful inhibitor of intestinal Cl(-) secretion. We used patch-clamp recording techniques to investigate the effects of somatostatin on low-conductance (23-pS) K(+) channels in the basolateral membrane of human colonic crypts, which are an important component of the Cl(-) secretory process. Somatostatin (2 microM) elicited a >80% decrease in "spontaneous" K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patches in nonstimulated crypts (50% inhibition = approximately 8 min), which was voltage-independent and was prevented by pretreating crypts for 18 h with pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml), implicating a G protein-dependent mechanism. In crypts stimulated with 100-200 microM dibutyryl cAMP, 2 microM somatostatin and its synthetic analog octreotide (2 microM) both produced similar degrees of K(+) channel inhibition to that seen in nonstimulated crypts, which was also present under low-Cl(-) (5 mM) conditions. In addition, 2 microM somatostatin abolished the increase in K(+) channel activity stimulated by 2 microM thapsigargin but had no effect on the thapsigargin-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca(2+). These results indicate that somatostatin peptides inhibit 23-pS basolateral K(+) channels in human colonic crypt cells via a G protein-dependent mechanism, which may result in loss of the channel's inherent Ca(2+) sensitivity.

  12. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  13. Segmental differences in upregulated apical potassium channels in mammalian colon during potassium adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Matthew D.; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M.; MacLennan, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rat proximal and distal colon are net K+ secretory and net K+ absorptive epithelia, respectively. Chronic dietary K+ loading increases net K+ secretion in the proximal colon and transforms net K+ absorption to net K+ secretion in the distal colon, but changes in apical K+ channel expression are unclear. We evaluated expression/activity of apical K+ (BK) channels in surface colonocytes in proximal and distal colon of control and K+-loaded animals using patch-clamp recording, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analyses. In controls, BK channels were more abundant in surface colonocytes from K+ secretory proximal colon (39% of patches) than in those from K+-absorptive distal colon (12% of patches). Immunostaining demonstrated more pronounced BK channel α-subunit protein expression in surface cells and cells in the upper 25% of crypts in proximal colon, compared with distal colon. Dietary K+ loading had no clear-cut effects on the abundance, immunolocalization, or expression of BK channels in proximal colon. By contrast, in distal colon, K+ loading 1) increased BK channel abundance in patches from 12 to 41%; 2) increased density of immunostaining in surface cells, which extended along the upper 50% of crypts; and 3) increased expression of BK channel α-subunit protein when assessed by Western blotting (P < 0.001). Thus apical BK channels are normally more abundant in K+ secretory proximal colon than in K+ absorptive distal colon, and apical BK channel expression in distal (but not proximal) colon is greatly stimulated as part of the enhanced K+ secretory response to dietary K+ loading. PMID:27609768

  14. Clustering of neuronal potassium channels is independent of their interaction with PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Rasband, Matthew N.; Park, Eunice W.; Zhen, Dongkai; Arbuckle, Margaret I.; Poliak, Sebastian; Peles, Elior; Grant, Seth G.N.; Trimmer, James S.

    2002-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium channels regulate membrane excitability and cell–cell communication in the mammalian nervous system, and are found highly localized at distinct neuronal subcellular sites. Kv1 (mammalian Shaker family) potassium channels and the neurexin Caspr2, both of which contain COOH-terminal PDZ domain binding peptide motifs, are found colocalized at high density at juxtaparanodes flanking nodes of Ranvier of myelinated axons. The PDZ domain–containing protein PSD-95, which clusters Kv1 potassium channels in heterologous cells, has been proposed to play a major role in potassium channel clustering in mammalian neurons. Here, we show that PSD-95 colocalizes precisely with Kv1 potassium channels and Caspr2 at juxtaparanodes, and that a macromolecular complex of Kv1 channels and PSD-95 can be immunopurified from mammalian brain and spinal cord. Surprisingly, we find that the high density clustering of Kv1 channels and Caspr2 at juxtaparanodes is normal in a mutant mouse lacking juxtaparanodal PSD-95, and that the indirect interaction between Kv1 channels and Caspr2 is maintained in these mutant mice. These data suggest that the primary function of PSD-95 at juxtaparanodes lies outside of its accepted role in mediating the high density clustering of Kv1 potassium channels at these sites. PMID:12438413

  15. Human Slack potassium channel mutations increase positive cooperativity between individual channels

    PubMed Central

    Barcia, Giulia; Quraishi, Imran H.; Martin, Hilary C.; Blair, Edward; Taylor, Jenny C.; Dulac, Olivier; Colleaux, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Summary Disease-causing mutations in ion channels generally alter intrinsic gating properties such as activation, inactivation or voltage-dependence. We examined nine different mutations of the KCNT1 (Slack) Na+-activated K+ channel that give rise to three distinct forms of epilepsy. All produced many fold-increases in current amplitude over that of the wild type channel. This could not be accounted for by increases in the intrinsic open probability of individual channels. Rather, greatly increased opening was a consequence of cooperative interactions between multiple channels in a patch. The degree of cooperative gating was much greater for all of the mutant channels than for the wild type channel, and could explain increases in current even in a mutant with reduced unitary conductance. We also found that the same mutation gives rise to different forms of epilepsy in different individuals. Our findings indicate that a major consequence of the mutations is to alter channel-channel interactions. PMID:25482562

  16. Human slack potassium channel mutations increase positive cooperativity between individual channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Grace E; Kronengold, Jack; Barcia, Giulia; Quraishi, Imran H; Martin, Hilary C; Blair, Edward; Taylor, Jenny C; Dulac, Olivier; Colleaux, Laurence; Nabbout, Rima; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2014-12-11

    Disease-causing mutations in ion channels generally alter intrinsic gating properties such as activation, inactivation, and voltage dependence. We examined nine different mutations of the KCNT1 (Slack) Na(+)-activated K(+) channel that give rise to three distinct forms of epilepsy. All produced many-fold increases in current amplitude compared to the wild-type channel. This could not be accounted for by increases in the intrinsic open probability of individual channels. Rather, greatly increased opening was a consequence of cooperative interactions between multiple channels in a patch. The degree of cooperative gating was much greater for all of the mutant channels than for the wild-type channel, and could explain increases in current even in a mutant with reduced unitary conductance. We also found that the same mutation gave rise to different forms of epilepsy in different individuals. Our findings indicate that a major consequence of these mutations is to alter channel-channel interactions.

  17. Escitalopram block of hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hong Joon; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2014-01-01

    Escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the pharmacologically active S-enantiomer of the racemic mixture of RS-citalopram and is widely used in the treatment of depression. The effects of escitalopram and citalopram on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels expressed in human embryonic kidney cells were investigated using voltage-clamp and Western blot analyses. Both drugs blocked hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.6 μM for escitalopram and an IC50 value of 3.2 μM for citalopram. The blocking of hERG by escitalopram was voltage-dependent, with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. However, voltage independence was observed over the full range of activation. The blocking by escitalopram was frequency dependent. A rapid application of escitalopram induced a rapid and reversible blocking of the tail current of hERG. The extent of the blocking by escitalopram during the depolarizing pulse was less than that during the repolarizing pulse, suggesting that escitalopram has a high affinity for the open state of the hERG channel, with a relatively lower affinity for the inactivated state. Both escitalopram and citalopram produced a reduction of hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane but did not affect the short-term internalization of the hERG channel. These results suggest that escitalopram blocked hERG currents at a supratherapeutic concentration and that it did so by preferentially binding to both the open and the inactivated states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking of hERG channel protein to the plasma membrane.

  18. Sequential phosphorylation mediates receptor- and kinase-induced inhibition of TREK-1 background potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Murbartián, Janet; Lei, Qiubo; Sando, Julianne J; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2005-08-26

    Background potassium channels determine membrane potential and input resistance and serve as prominent effectors for modulatory regulation of cellular excitability. TREK-1 is a two-pore domain background K+ channel (KCNK2, K2P2.1) that is sensitive to a variety of physicochemical and humoral factors. In this work, we used a recombinant expression system to show that activation of G alpha(q)-coupled receptors leads to inhibition of TREK-1 channels via protein kinase C (PKC), and we identified a critical phosphorylation site in a key regulatory domain that mediates inhibition of the channel. In HEK 293 cells co-expressing TREK-1 and either the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR1) or the Orexin receptor (Orx1R), agonist stimulation induced robust channel inhibition that was suppressed by a bisindolylmaleimide PKC inhibitor but not by a protein kinase A blocker ((R(p))-cAMP-S). Channel inhibition by agonists or by direct activators of PKC (phorbol dibutyrate) and PKA (forskolin) was disrupted not only by alanine or aspartate mutations at an identified PKA site (Ser-333) in the C terminus, but also at a more proximal regulatory site in the cytoplasmic C terminus (Ser-300); S333A and S300A mutations enhanced basal TREK-1 current, whereas S333D and S300D substitutions mimicked phosphorylation and strongly diminished currents. When studied in combination, TREK-1 current density was enhanced in S300A/S333D but reduced in S300D/S333A mutant channels. Channel mutants were expressed and appropriately targeted to cell membranes. Together, these data support a sequential phosphorylation model in which receptor-induced kinase activation drives modification at Ser-333 that enables subsequent phosphorylation at Ser-300 to inhibit TREK-1 channel activity.

  19. Potassium Channel Block and Novel Autoimmune-Associated Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boutjdir, Mohamed; Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; El-Sherif, Nabil

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews advances in the pathogenesis of anti-SSA/Ro antibody-induced corrected QT (QTc) prolongation in patients with autoimmune diseases; particularly connective tissue disease (CTD). Evidence shows that anti-SSA/Ro antibody-positive patients with CTD show QTc prolongation and complex ventricular arrhythmias. Molecular and functional data provide evidence that the human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channel conducting the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current is directly inhibited by anti-SSA/Ro antibodies, resulting in action potential duration prolongation leading to QT interval lengthening. Routine electrocardiogram screening in anti-SSA/Ro antibody-positive patients and counseling for patients with other QTc prolonging risk factors is recommended.

  20. Effect of NIP-142 on potassium channel alpha-subunits Kv1.5, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3, and mouse atrial repolarization.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hikaru; Namekata, Iyuki; Hamaguchi, Shogo; Kawamura, Taro; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshio; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Takahara, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Effects of NIP-142, a benzopyran compound which terminates experimental atrial arrhythmia, on potassium channel alpha-subunits and mouse atrial repolarization were examined. NIP-142 concentration-dependently blocked the outward current through potassium channel alpha subunits Kv1.5, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In isolated mouse atrial myocardia, NIP-142 prolonged the action potential duration and effective refractory period, and increased the contractile force. These results suggest that NIP-142 blocks the potassium channels underlying the transient and sustained outward currents, which may contribute to its antiarrhythmic activity.

  1. Gating motions in voltage-gated potassium channels revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Treptow, Werner; Marrink, Siewert-J; Tarek, Mounir

    2008-03-20

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electric signaling of excitable tissues. A fundamental property of these channels is the ability to open or close in response to changes in the membrane potential. To date, their structure-based activation mechanism remains unclear, and there is a large controversy on how these gates function at the molecular level, in particular, how movements of the voltage sensor domain are coupled to channel gating. So far, all mechanisms proposed for this coupling are based on the crystal structure of the open voltage-gated Kv1.2 channel and structural models of the closed form based on electrophysiology experiments. Here, we use coarse-grain (CG) molecular dynamics simulations that allow conformational changes from the open to the closed form of the channel (embedded in its membrane environment) to be followed. Despite the low specificity of the CG force field, the obtained closed structure satisfies several experimental constraints. The overall results suggest a gating mechanism in which a lateral displacement the S4-S5 linker leads to a closing of the gate. Only a small up-down movement of the S4 helices is noticed. Additionally, the study suggests a peculiar upward motion of the intracellular tetramerization domain of the channel, hence providing a molecular view on how this domain may further regulate conduction in Kv channels.

  2. Potassium Channels in Peripheral Pain Pathways: Expression, Function and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita

    2013-01-01

    Electrical excitation of peripheral somatosensory nerves is a first step in generation of most pain signals in mammalian nervous system. Such excitation is controlled by an intricate set of ion channels that are coordinated to produce a degree of excitation that is proportional to the strength of the external stimulation. However, in many disease states this coordination is disrupted resulting in deregulated peripheral excitability which, in turn, may underpin pathological pain states (i.e. migraine, neuralgia, neuropathic and inflammatory pains). One of the major groups of ion channels that are essential for controlling neuronal excitability is potassium channel family and, hereby, the focus of this review is on the K+ channels in peripheral pain pathways. The aim of the review is threefold. First, we will discuss current evidence for the expression and functional role of various K+ channels in peripheral nociceptive fibres. Second, we will consider a hypothesis suggesting that reduced functional activity of K+ channels within peripheral nociceptive pathways is a general feature of many types of pain. Third, we will evaluate the perspectives of pharmacological enhancement of K+ channels in nociceptive pathways as a strategy for new analgesic drug design. PMID:24396338

  3. Biomimetic membrane platform containing hERG potassium channel and its application to drug screening.

    PubMed

    Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Kang, CongBao; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2013-04-07

    The hERG (human ether-à-go-go-related gene) potassium channel has been extensively studied by both academia and industry because of its relation to inherited or drug-induced long QT syndrome (LQTS). Unpredicted hERG and drug interaction affecting channel activity is of main concern for drug discovery. Although there are several methods to test hERG and drug interaction, it is still necessary to develop some efficient and economic ways to probe hERG and drug interactions. To contribute this aim, we have developed a biomimetic lipid membrane platform into which the hERG channel can be folded. Expression and integration of the hERG channel was achieved using a cell-free (CF) expression system. The folding of hERG in the biomimetic membrane system was investigated using Surface Plasmon Enhanced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SPFS) and Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance (iSPR). In addition, the hERG channel folded into our biomimetic membrane platform was used for probing the channel and drug interactions through fluorescence polarization (FP) assay. Our results suggest that the biomimetic system employed is capable of detecting the interaction between hERG and different channel blockers at varied concentrations. We believe that our current approach could be applied to other membrane proteins for drug screening or other protein-related interactions.

  4. Characterization of apical potassium channels induced in rat distal colon during potassium adaptation.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, I; Warhurst, G; Jones, M N; Sandle, G I

    1997-06-15

    1. Chronic dietary K+ loading stimulates an active K+ secretory process in rat distal colon, which involves an increase in the macroscopic apical K+ conductance of surface epithelial cells. In the present study, the abundance and characteristics of K+ channels constituting this enhanced apical K+ conductance were evaluated using patch clamp recording techniques. 2. In isolated non-polarized surface cells, K+ channels were seen in 9 of 90 (10%) cell-attached patches in cells from control animals, and in 247 of 437 (57%) cell-attached patches in cells from K(+)-loaded animals, with a significant (P < 0.001) shift in distribution density. Similarly, recordings from cell-attached patches of the apical membrane of surface cells surrounding the openings of distal colonic crypts revealed identical K+ channels in 1 of 11 (9%) patches in control animals, and in 9 of 13 (69%) patches in K(+)-loaded animals. 3. In isolated surface cells and surface cells in situ, K+ channels had mean slope conductances of 209 +/- 6 and 233 +/- 14 pS, respectively, when inside-out patches were bathed symmetrically in K2SO4 solution. The channels were sensitive to 'cytosolic' Ca2+ concentration, were voltage sensitive at 'cytosolic' Ca2+ concentrations encountered in colonic epithelial cells, and were inhibited by 1 mM quinidine, 20 mM TEA or 5 mM Ba2+ ions. 4. The data show that dietary K+ loading increases the abundance of Ca(2+)- and voltage-sensitive large-conductance K+ channels in the apical membrane of surface cells in rat distal colon. These channels constitute the enhanced macroscopic apical K+ conductance previously identified in these cells, and are likely to play a critical role in the active K+ secretory process that typifies this model of colonic K+ adaptation.

  5. EAG2 potassium channel with evolutionarily conserved function as a brain tumor target

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi; He, Ye; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Hashizume, Rintaro; Zhang, Wei; Reimand, Jüri; Yang, Huanghe; Wang, Tongfei A.; Stehbens, Samantha J.; Younger, Susan; Barshow, Suzanne; Zhu, Sijun; Cooper, Michael K.; Peacock, John; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Garzia, Livia; Wu, Xiaochong; Remke, Marc; Forester, Craig M.; Kim, Charles C.; Weiss, William A.; James, C. David; Shuman, Marc A.; Bader, Gary D.; Mueller, Sabine; Taylor, Michael D.; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Over 20% of the drugs for treating human diseases target ion channels, however, no cancer drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is intended to target an ion channel. Here, we demonstrate the evolutionarily conserved function of EAG2 potassium channel in promoting brain tumor growth and metastasis, delineate downstream pathways and uncover a mechanism for different potassium channels to functionally corporate and regulate mitotic cell volume and tumor progression. We show that EAG2 potassium channel is enriched at the trailing edge of migrating MB cells to regulate local cell volume dynamics, thereby facilitating cell motility. We identify the FDA-approved antipsychotic drug thioridazine as an EAG2 channel blocker that reduces xenografted MB growth and metastasis, and present a case report of repurposing thioridazine for treating a human patient. Our findings thus illustrate the potential of targeting ion channels in cancer treatment. PMID:26258683

  6. Dietary potassium modulates active potassium absorption and secretion in rat distal colon

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, E.S.; Sandle, G.I.; Hayslett, J.P.; Binder, H.J.

    1986-11-01

    To determine the effect of variations in body stores of potassium on the rate of active potassium transport in the large intestine, unidirectional 42K fluxes were performed under short-circuit conditions across isolated distal colonic mucosa of control, dietary potassium-depleted and dietary potassium-loaded rats. Potassium depletion stimulated net potassium absorption (JK net) (0.87 +/- 0.19 vs. 0.49 +/- 0.04 mu eq X h-1 X cm-2, P less than 0.025) due to a 40% increase in mucosal-to-serosal potassium transport (JK m----s). In sodium-free Ringer solution JK net in the potassium-depleted group was also significantly greater than in controls (1.93 +/- 0.26 vs. 1.01 +/- 0.11 mu eq X h-1 X cm-2, P less than 0.005). In contrast, in chloride-free Ringer solution JK net was identical in the control and potassium-depleted groups (0.39 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.46 +/- 0.07 mu eq X h-1 X cm-2, P = NS). Potassium loading reversed net potassium absorption to net potassium secretion (-0.76 +/- 0.08 mu eq X h-1 X cm-2, P less than 0.001) as the result of a decrease in JK m----s and an increase in serosal-to-mucosal potassium transport (JK s----m). Net potassium secretion was abolished in the absence of either sodium or chloride from the bathing solution but not by mucosal amiloride. In sodium-free Ringer solution JK net was similar in control and potassium-loaded groups, respectively.

  7. Model Development for the Viral Kcv Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Tayefeh, Sascha; Kloss, Thomas; Kreim, Michael; Gebhardt, Manuela; Baumeister, Dirk; Hertel, Brigitte; Richter, Christian; Schwalbe, Harald; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Kast, Stefan M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A computational model for the open state of the short viral Kcv potassium channel was created and tested based on homology modeling and extensive molecular-dynamics simulation in a membrane environment. Particular attention was paid to the structure of the highly flexible N-terminal region and to the protonation state of membrane-exposed lysine residues. Data from various experimental sources, NMR spectroscopy, and electrophysiology, as well as results from three-dimensional reference interaction site model integral equation theory were taken into account to select the most reasonable model among possible variants. The final model exhibits spontaneous ion transitions across the complete pore, with and without application of an external field. The nonequilibrium transport events could be induced reproducibly without abnormally large driving potential and without the need to place ions artificially at certain key positions along the transition path. The transport mechanism through the filter region corresponds to the classic view of single-file motion, which in our case is coupled to frequent exchange of ions between the innermost filter position and the cavity. PMID:19167299

  8. Overexpression of the rice AKT1 potassium channel affects potassium nutrition and rice drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Izhar; Mian, Afaq; Maathuis, Frans J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K+) is the most important cationic nutrient for all living organisms and has roles in most aspects of plant physiology. To assess the impact of one of the main K+ uptake components, the K+ inward rectifying channel AKT1, we characterized both loss of function and overexpression of OsAKT1 in rice. In many conditions, AKT1 expression correlated with K+ uptake and tissue K+ levels. No salinity-related growth phenotype was observed for either loss or gain of function mutants. However, a correlation between AKT1 expression and root Na+ when the external Na/K ratio was high suggests that there may be a role for AKT1 in Na+ uptake in such conditions. In contrast to findings with Arabidopsis thaliana, we did not detect any change in growth of AKT1 loss of function mutants in the presence of NH4 +. Nevertheless, NH4 +-dependent inhibition was detected during K+ uptake assays in loss of function and wild type plants, depending on pre-growth conditions. The most prominent result of OsAKT1 overexpression was a reduction in sensitivity to osmotic/drought stress in transgenic plants: the data suggest that AKT1 overexpression improved rice osmotic and drought stress tolerance by increasing tissue levels of K+, especially in the root. PMID:26969743

  9. Toxin-induced conformational changes in a potassium channel revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adam; Giller, Karin; Hornig, Sönke; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2006-04-01

    The active site of potassium (K+) channels catalyses the transport of K+ ions across the plasma membrane-similar to the catalytic function of the active site of an enzyme-and is inhibited by toxins from scorpion venom. On the basis of the conserved structures of K+ pore regions and scorpion toxins, detailed structures for the K+ channel-scorpion toxin binding interface have been proposed. In these models and in previous solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies using detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, scorpion toxins were docked to the extracellular entrance of the K+ channel pore assuming rigid, preformed binding sites. Using high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, here we show that high-affinity binding of the scorpion toxin kaliotoxin to a chimaeric K+ channel (KcsA-Kv1.3) is associated with significant structural rearrangements in both molecules. Our approach involves a combined analysis of chemical shifts and proton-proton distances and demonstrates that solid-state NMR is a sensitive method for analysing the structure of a membrane protein-inhibitor complex. We propose that structural flexibility of the K+ channel and the toxin represents an important determinant for the high specificity of toxin-K+ channel interactions.

  10. Basolateral potassium (IKCa) channel inhibition prevents increased colonic permeability induced by chemical hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, A; Linley, J E; Rajput, I; Hunter, M; Lodge, J P A; Sandle, G I

    2011-01-01

    Major liver resection is associated with impaired intestinal perfusion and intestinal ischemia, resulting in decreased mucosal integrity, increased bacterial translocation, and an increased risk of postoperative sepsis. However, the mechanism by which ischemia impairs intestinal mucosal integrity is unclear. We therefore evaluated the role of Ca(2+)-sensitive, intermediate-conductance (IK(Ca)) basolateral potassium channels in enhanced intestinal permeability secondary to chemical hypoxia. The effects of chemical hypoxia induced by 100 μM dinitrophenol (DNP) and 5 mM deoxyglucose (DG) on basolateral IK(Ca) channel activity and whole cell conductance in intact human colonic crypts, and paracellular permeability (G(S)) in isolated colonic sheets, were determined by patch-clamp recording and transepithelial electrical measurements, respectively. DNP and DG rapidly stimulated IK(Ca) channels in cell-attached basolateral membrane patches and elicited a twofold increase (P = 0.004) in whole cell conductance in amphotericin B-permeabilized membrane patches, changes that were inhibited by the specific IK(Ca) channel blockers TRAM-34 (100 nM) and clotrimazole (CLT; 10 μM). In colonic sheets apically permeabilized with nystatin, DNP elicited a twofold increase (P = 0.005) in G(S), which was largely inhibited by the serosal addition of 50 μM CLT. We conclude that, in intestinal epithelia, chemical hypoxia increases G(S) through a mechanism involving basolateral IK(Ca) channel activation. Basolateral IK(Ca) channel inhibition may prevent or limit increased intestinal permeability during liver surgery.

  11. Molecular Diversity and Functional Evolution of Scorpion Potassium Channel Toxins*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shunyi; Peigneur, Steve; Gao, Bin; Luo, Lan; Jin, Di; Zhao, Yong; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Scorpion toxins affecting K+ channels (KTxs) represent important pharmacological tools and potential drug candidates. Here, we report molecular characterization of seven new KTxs in the scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus by cDNA cloning combined with biochemical approaches. Comparative modeling supports that all these KTxs share a conserved cysteine-stabilized α-helix/β-sheet structural motif despite the differences in protein sequence and size. We investigated functional diversification of two orthologous α-KTxs (MeuTXKα1 from M. eupeus and BmP01 from Mesobuthus martensii) by comparing their K+ channel-blocking activities. Pharmacologically, MeuTXKα1 selectively blocked Kv1.3 channel with nanomolar affinity (IC50, 2.36 ± 0.9 nm), whereas only 35% of Kv1.1 currents were inhibited at 3 μm concentration, showing more than 1271-fold selectivity for Kv1.3 over Kv1.1. This peptide displayed a weak effect on Drosophila Shaker channel and no activity on Kv1.2, Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, and human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K+ channels. Although BmB01 and MeuTXKα1 have a similar channel spectrum, their affinity and selectivity for these channels largely varies. In comparison with MeuTXKα1, BmP01 only exhibits a submicromolar affinity (IC50, 133.72 ± 10.98 nm) for Kv1.3, showing 57-fold less activity than MeuTXKα1. Moreover, it lacks the ability to distinguish between Kv1.1 and Kv1.3. We also found that MeuTXKα1 inhibited the proliferation of activated T cells induced by phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin at micromolar concentrations. Our results demonstrate that accelerated evolution drives affinity variations of orthologous α-KTxs on Kv channels and indicate that MeuTXKα1 is a promising candidate to develop an immune modulation agent for human autoimmune diseases. PMID:20889474

  12. The effect of intracellular anions on ATP-dependent potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    McKillen, H C; Davies, N W; Stanfield, P R; Standen, N B

    1994-01-01

    1. We have used excised inside-out patches to study the effects of anions bathing the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane on ATP-dependent K+ channels of rat flexor digitorum brevis muscle. Channels were closed by ATP applied to the cytoplasmic face of the patch with a concentration for half-closure (Ki) of 14 microM, were highly selective for K+ and had unitary conductances of 62 pS in symmetrical 155 mM K+ and 27 pS in 5 mM [K+]o. 2. In 139 mM Cl- internal solution channel activity declined rapidly after excision of the patch. Inclusion of 40 mM potassium gluconate (substituted for KCl) in the solution both restored channel activity and greatly slowed its subsequent run-down. 3. The action of gluconate was concentration dependent. The effect did not involve a change in ATP binding, since the Ki for ATP was not significantly changed by gluconate, and was specific for the cytoplasmic face of the patch. 4. The anions pyruvate, lactate and acetate were all able to restore channel activity after run-down, though less well than gluconate, while sulphate and methylsulphate were without effect. 5. Analysis of single channel kinetics showed that gluconate did not affect mean open lifetime, but led to a decrease in the number and duration of long closings. 6. Anions are most likely to act by stabilizing the structure of the channel protein. Changes in the intracellular concentration of certain anions may play a role in regulating channel activity. PMID:7837093

  13. BK channel activators and their therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bentzen, Bo H.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Rønn, Lars C. B.; Grunnet, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated K+ channel (KCa1.1, BK, MaxiK) is ubiquitously expressed in the body, and holds the ability to integrate changes in intracellular calcium and membrane potential. This makes the BK channel an important negative feedback system linking increases in intracellular calcium to outward hyperpolarizing potassium currents. Consequently, the channel has many important physiological roles including regulation of smooth muscle tone, neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Additionally, cardioprotective roles have been revealed in recent years. After a short introduction to the structure, function and regulation of BK channels, we review the small organic molecules activating BK channels and how these tool compounds have helped delineate the roles of BK channels in health and disease. PMID:25346695

  14. Barium, TEA and sodium sensitive potassium channels are present in the human placental syncytiotrophoblast apical membrane.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Vallejos, C; Guerrero, I; Riquelme, G

    2008-10-01

    The human placental syncytiotrophoblast (hSTB) is a polarized epithelial structure, without paracellular routes, forming the main barrier for materno-fetal exchange. There is ample evidence suggesting the presence of potassium (K(+)) channels in the placental apical membrane; which could contribute to membrane potential and volume regulation. We have therefore examined the K(+) currents of isolated apical membranes from human term placenta using electrophysiological methods: reconstitution of ion channels from apical membranes into giant liposomes (single channel recordings, patch clamp method) or their functional transplantation into Xenopus laevis oocytes (total currents recording, voltage clamp method). Single channel recording experiments show the presence of K(+) channels in the hSTB microvillous membrane sensitive to Tetraethylammonium (TEA) and Barium (Ba(+2)). Patch current activity was diminished 50% and 70% by 20 mmol/L TEA and 5 mmol/L Ba(+2) respectively. The more frequent conductance was approximately 73pS, however several levels of current were detected suggesting the presence of more than one type of K(+) channel. In addition, sodium (Na(+)) sensitivity was detected in the patch current thus, over 10 mmol/L Na(+) reduced the seal current to 38%. These results were corroborated by the total current experiments where the K(+) current elicited in injected oocytes with apical purified membrane was blocked by Ba(+2) and TEA. The total current was also affected by Na(+), becoming larger when a Na(+)-free solution was used. Our results show the existence of at least two types of Ba(+2)-sensitive K(+) channels including a TEA sensitive sub-population, and some of them Na(+) sensitive K(+) channels. These channels could be the conductive pathways proposed previously for this cation in placental hSTB. Our novel contribution has been to successfully obtain K(+) channel recordings in systems suitable for electrophysiological studies of isolated apical membranes.

  15. Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probe for the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A novel environment-sensitive probe S2 with turn-on switch for Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel was developed herein. After careful evaluation, this fluorescent probe showed high binding affinity with hERG potassium channel with an IC50 value of 41.65 nM and can be well applied to hERG channel imaging or cellular distribution study for hERG channel blockers. Compared with other imaging techniques, such as immunofluorescence and fluorescent protein-based approaches, this method is convenient and affordable, especially since a washing procedure is not needed. Meanwhile, this environment-sensitive turn-on design strategy may provide a good example for the probe development for these targets that have no reactive or catalytic activity. PMID:26730746

  16. Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probe for the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Beilei; Ke, Bowen; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-02-02

    A novel environment-sensitive probe S2 with turn-on switch for Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel was developed herein. After careful evaluation, this fluorescent probe showed high binding affinity with hERG potassium channel with an IC50 value of 41.65 nM and can be well applied to hERG channel imaging or cellular distribution study for hERG channel blockers. Compared with other imaging techniques, such as immunofluorescence and fluorescent protein-based approaches, this method is convenient and affordable, especially since a washing procedure is not needed. Meanwhile, this environment-sensitive turn-on design strategy may provide a good example for the probe development for these targets that have no reactive or catalytic activity.

  17. Effects of fluoxetine on protein expression of potassium ion channels in the brain of chronic mild stress rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Ling; Rong, Xianfang; Wang, Weiping; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of major potassium channel subtypes in the brain of chronical mild stress (CMS) rats and reveal the effects of fluoxetine on the expression of these channels. Rats were exposed to a variety of unpredictable stress for three weeks and induced anhedonia, lower sucrose preference, locomotor activity and lower body weight. The protein expressions were determined by Western blot. CMS significantly increased the expression of Kv2.1 channel in frontal cortex but not in hippocampus, and the expression level was normalized after fluoxetine treatment. The expression of TREK-1 channel was also obviously increased in frontal cortex in CMS rats. Fluoxetine treatment might prevent this increase. However, the expression of Kv3.1 and Kv4.2 channels was considerably decreased in hippocampus after CMS, and was not affected by fluoxetine. These results suggest that different subtypes of potassium channels are associated with the pathophysiology of depression and that the therapeutical effects of fluoxetine may relate to Kv2.1 and TREK-1 potassium channels. PMID:26579425

  18. Manipulation of the delayed rectifier Kv1.5 potassium channel in glial cells by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Roy, M L; Saal, D; Perney, T; Sontheimer, H; Waxman, S G; Kaczmarek, L K

    1996-11-01

    Glial cells have been shown to express several biophysically and pharmacology distinct potassium channel types. However, the molecular identity of most glial K+ channels is unknown. We have developed an antibody specific for the Shaker type potassium channel Kv1.5 protein, and demonstrate by immunohistochemistry the presence of this channel in glial cells of adult rat hippocampal and cerebellar slices, as well as in cultured spinal cord astrocytes. Immunoreactivity was particularly intense in the endfoot processes of astrocytes surrounding the microvasculature of the hippocampus. The specific contribution of this channel protein to the delayed rectifying K+ current of spinal cord astrocytes was determined by incubating these cells with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to the mRNA coding for Kv1.5 protein. Such treatment reduced delayed rectifier current density and shifted the potassium current steadystate inactivation, without altering current activation, cell capacitance, or cell resting potential. The tetraethylammonium acetate (TEA) sensitivity of astrocytic delayed rectifier current was enhanced following antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment, suggesting that Kv1.5 channel protein may provide a significant component of the TEA-insensitive current in this preparation. Our results suggest that Kv1.5 is widely expressed in glial cells of brain and spinal cord and that delayed rectifying K+ currents in astrocytes are largely mediated by Kv1.5 channel protein.

  19. Novel nucleotide-binding sites in ATP-sensitive potassium channels formed at gating interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Tang, Lie-Qi; MacGregor, Gordon G; Leng, Qiang; Hebert, Steven C

    2005-04-06

    The coupling of cell metabolism to membrane electrical activity is a vital process that regulates insulin secretion, cardiac and neuronal excitability and the responses of cells to ischemia. ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP); Kir6.x) are a major part of this metabolic-electrical coupling system and translate metabolic signals such as the ATP:ADP ratio to changes in the open or closed state (gate) of the channel. The localization of the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) on Kir6.x channels and how nucleotide binding gates these K(ATP) channels remain unclear. Here, we use fluorescent nucleotide binding to purified Kir6.x proteins to define the peptide segments forming the NBS on Kir6.x channels and show that unique N- and C-terminal interactions from adjacent subunits are required for high-affinity nucleotide binding. The short N- and C-terminal segments comprising the novel intermolecular NBS are next to helices that likely move with channel opening/closing, suggesting a lock-and-key model for ligand gating.

  20. Novel intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer-based probe for the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2015-12-21

    Drug induced long QT syndrome is a high risk event in clinic, which mainly results from their high affinity to the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel. Therefore, evaluation of the drug's inhibitory activity against the hERG potassium channel is a required step in drug discovery and development. In this study, we developed a series of novel conformation-mediated intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer fluorogenic probes for the hERG potassium channel. After careful evaluation, probes N4 and N6 showed good activity and may have a promising application in the cell-based hERG potassium channel inhibitory activity assay, as well as potential hERG-associated cardiotoxicity evaluation. Compared with other assay methods, such as patch clamp assay, radio-ligand competitive binding assay, fluorescence polarization and potential-sensitive fluorescent probes, this method is convenient and can also selectively measure the inhibitory activity in the native state of the hERG potassium channel. Meanwhile, these probes can also be used for hERG potassium channel imaging without complex washing steps.

  1. BK potassium channels control transmitter release at CA3-CA3 synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Raffaelli, Giacomo; Saviane, Chiara; Mohajerani, Majid H; Pedarzani, Paola; Cherubini, Enrico

    2004-05-15

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK channels) activate in response to calcium influx during action potentials and contribute to the spike repolarization and fast afterhyperpolarization. BK channels targeted to active zones in presynaptic nerve terminals have been shown to limit calcium entry and transmitter release by reducing the duration of the presynaptic spike at neurosecretory nerve terminals and at the frog neuromuscular junction. However, their functional role in central synapses is still uncertain. In the hippocampus, BK channels have been proposed to act as an 'emergency brake' that would control transmitter release only under conditions of excessive depolarization and accumulation of intracellular calcium. Here we demonstrate that in the CA3 region of hippocampal slice cultures, under basal experimental conditions, the selective BK channel blockers paxilline (10 microM) and iberiotoxin (100 nM) increase the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneously occurring action potential-dependent EPSCs. These drugs did not affect miniature currents recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin, suggesting that their action was dependent on action potential firing. Moreover, in double patch-clamp recordings from monosynaptically interconnected CA3 pyramidal neurones, blockade of BK channels enhanced the probability of transmitter release, as revealed by the increase in success rate, EPSC amplitude and the concomitant decrease in paired-pulse ratio in response to pairs of presynaptic action potentials delivered at a frequency of 0.05 Hz. BK channel blockers also enhanced the appearance of delayed responses, particularly following the second action potential in the paired-pulse protocol. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that BK channels are powerful modulators of transmitter release and synaptic efficacy in central neurones.

  2. Effects of potassium channel openers on Na+ and K+ currents in rabbit sinus node and atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Cohen, I S

    1995-05-12

    The effects of the potassium channel openers (KCOs) Cromakalim and Lemakalim on rabbit sinoatrial and atrial myocytes were examined by means of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Lemakalin (up to 100 microM) had no effect on potassium current in sinoatrial cells. Both Lemakalim and Cromakalim (100 microM) displayed a two-fold action on atrial myocytes: (1) they increased an outwardly rectifying conductance at potentials positive to EK and, (2) they markedly decreased a TTX-sensitive Na+ current active in the voltage range -50/-30 mV. This novel action on TTX-sensitive currents is of particular interest since these two benzopyrans have been thought to specifically target potassium channels.

  3. Role of calcium and potassium channels in effects of hydrogen sulfide on frog myocardial contractility.

    PubMed

    Sitdikova, G F; Khaertdinov, N N; Zefirov, A L

    2011-06-01

    The effects of sodium hydrosulfide NaHS, a donor of hydrogen sulfide H2S, on the force of muscle contraction were examined on isolated myocardial strips from frog ventricles. NaHS decreased the amplitude of muscle contractions in a dose-dependent manner under normal conditions and during inhibition of Ca channels with nifedipine. In contrast, under conditions of blockade of ATP-dependent potassium channels with glibenclamide, NaHS exerted a positive inotropic effect from the first minute of application. Neither blockade, nor activation of ATP-dependent K-channels with glibenclamide modulated the negative inotropic effect of NaHS. Inhibition of K-channels with tetraethylammonium (TEA) (3, 5, 10 mM) or 4-aminopyridine increased the amplitude of myocardial contractions. Preliminary application of 4-aminopyridine or TEA (3 mM) did not eliminate NaHS-induced negative inotropic effect, although higher TEA concentrations (5 or 10 mM) prevented it. The data indicate that the targets of H(2)S in frog myocardium are ATP-dependent, Ca-activated, and voltage-dependent K-channels.

  4. Lipid-dependent gating of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Liu, Weiran; Anderson, Lingyan Y.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies hypothesized that phospholipids stabilize two voltage-sensing arginine residues of certain voltage-gated potassium channels in activated conformations. It remains unclear how lipids directly affect these channels. Here, by examining the conformations of the KvAP in different lipids, we showed that without voltage change, the voltage-sensor domains switched from the activated to the resting state when their surrounding lipids were changed from phospholipids to nonphospholipids. Such lipid-determined conformational change was coupled to the ion-conducting pore, suggesting that parallel to voltage gating, the channel is gated by its annular lipids. Our measurements recognized that the energetic cost of lipid-dependent gating approaches that of voltage gating, but kinetically it appears much slower. Our data support that a channel and its surrounding lipids together constitute a functional unit, and natural nonphospholipids such as cholesterol should exert strong effects on voltage-gated channels. Our first observation of lipid-dependent gating may have general implications to other membrane proteins. PMID:21427721

  5. Complex voltage-dependent behavior of single unliganded calcium-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, G; Aldrich, R W

    2000-01-01

    study and characterization of unliganded openings is of central significance for the elucidation of gating mechanisms for allosteric ligand-gated ion channels. Unliganded openings have been reported for many channel types, but their low open probability can make it difficult to study their kinetics in detail. Because the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel mSlo is sensitive to both intracellular calcium and to membrane potential, we have been able to obtain stable unliganded single-channel recordings of mSlo with relatively high opening probability. We have found that the single-channel gating behavior of mSlo is complex, with multiple open and closed states, even when no ligand is present. Our results rule out a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric mechanism with a central voltage-dependent concerted step, and they support the existence of quaternary states with less than the full number of voltage sensors activated, as has been suggested by previous work involving measurements of gating currents. PMID:10653789

  6. The cooperative voltage sensor motion that gates a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Medha; Kurtz, Lisa; Tombola, Francesco; Isacoff, Ehud

    2005-01-01

    The four arginine-rich S4 helices of a voltage-gated channel move outward through the membrane in response to depolarization, opening and closing gates to generate a transient ionic current. Coupling of voltage sensing to gating was originally thought to operate with the S4s moving independently from an inward/resting to an outward/activated conformation, so that when all four S4s are activated, the gates are driven to open or closed. However, S4 has also been found to influence the cooperative opening step (Smith-Maxwell et al., 1998a), suggesting a more complex mechanism of coupling. Using fluorescence to monitor structural rearrangements in a Shaker channel mutant, the ILT channel (Ledwell and Aldrich, 1999), that energetically isolates the steps of activation from the cooperative opening step, we find that opening is accompanied by a previously unknown and cooperative movement of S4. This gating motion of S4 appears to be coupled to the internal S6 gate and to two forms of slow inactivation. Our results suggest that S4 plays a direct role in gating. While large transmembrane rearrangements of S4 may be required to unlock the gating machinery, as proposed before, it appears to be the gating motion of S4 that drives the gates to open and close.

  7. Comparison of the effects of DC031050, a class III antiarrhythmic agent, on hERG channel and three neuronal potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Sun, Hai-feng; Zhou, Ping-zheng; Ma, Chao-ying; Hu, Guo-yuan; Jiang, Hua-liang; Li, Min; Liu, Hong; Gao, Zhao-bing

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to test the selectivity of DC031050 on cardiac and neuronal potassium channels. Methods: Human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG), KCNQ and Kv1.2 channels were expressed in CHO cells. The delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) was recorded from dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons of neonatal rats. Whole-cell voltage patch clamp was used to record the voltage-activated potassium currents. Drug-containing solution was delivered using a RSC-100 Rapid Solution Changer. Results: Both DC031050 and dofetilide potently inhibited hERG currents with IC50 values of 2.3±1.0 and 17.9±1.2 nmol/L, respectively. DC031050 inhibited the IK current with an IC50 value of 2.7±1.5 μmol/L, which was >1000 times the concentration required to inhibit hERG current. DC031050 at 3 μmol/L did not significantly affect the voltage-dependence of the steady activation, steady inactivation of IK, or the rate of IK from inactivation. Intracellular application of DC031050 (5 μmol/L) was insufficient to inhibit IK. DC031050 up to 10 μmol/L had no effects on KCNQ2 and Kv1.2 channel currents. Conclusion: DC031050 is a highly selective hERG potassium channel blocker with a substantial safety margin of activity over neuronal potassium channels, thus holds significant potential for therapeutic application as a class III antiarrhythmic agent. PMID:22609836

  8. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits potassium currents in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Weir, B; Daniel, E E

    1995-04-01

    The effect of protein kinase C on potassium channels in cultured endothelial cells was investigated by using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), but not phorbol 12-monomyristate (PMM), an inactive analogue of phorbol esters, depressed an outward calcium-dependent potassium current. The inhibitory actions of PMA and PDBu could be reversed by the kinase inhibitor H-7. Cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, and LP-805, a novel vasodilator which also releases endothelium-derived relaxing factors, activated the outward calcium-dependent potassium conductance. PMA and PDBu, but not PMM, reduced the outward conductance induced by cyclopiazonic acid and LP-805. These effects of PMA and PDBu on potassium currents may be mediated either by phosphorylation of ion channels, or by decreasing intracellular calcium concentration.

  9. Determinants of frequency-dependent regulation of Kv1.2-containing potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Baronas, Victoria A; Yang, Runying; Vilin, Yury Y; Kurata, Harley T

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are important regulators of electrical excitation in many tissues, with Kv1.2 standing out as an essential contributor in the CNS. Genetic deletion of Kv1.2 invariably leads to early lethality in mice. In humans, mutations affecting Kv1.2 function are linked to epileptic encephalopathy and movement disorders. We have demonstrated that Kv1.2 is subject to a unique regulatory mechanism in which repetitive stimulation leads to dramatic potentiation of current. In this study, we explore the properties and molecular determinants of this use-dependent potentiation/activation. First, we examine how alterations in duty cycle (depolarization and repolarization/recovery times) affect the onset and extent of use-dependent activation. Also, we use trains of repetitive depolarizations to test the effects of a variety of Thr252 (S2-S3 linker) mutations on use-dependent activation. Substitutions of Thr with some sterically similar amino acids (Ser, Val, and Met, but not Cys) retain use-dependent activation, while bulky or charged amino acid substitutions eliminate use-dependence. Introduction of Thr at the equivalent position in other Kv1 channels (1.1, 1.3, 1.4), was not sufficient to transfer the phenotype. We hypothesize that use-dependent activation of Kv1.2 channels is mediated by an extrinsic regulator that binds preferentially to the channel closed state, with Thr252 being necessary but not sufficient for this interaction to alter channel function. These findings extend the conclusions of our recent demonstration of use-dependent activation of Kv1.2-containing channels in hippocampal neurons, by adding new details about the molecular mechanism underlying this effect.

  10. Domain reorientation and rotation of an intracellular assembly regulate conduction in Kir potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Oliver B; Caputo, Alessandro T; Hill, Adam P; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Smith, Brian J; Gulbis, Jacqueline M

    2010-06-11

    Potassium channels embedded in cell membranes employ gates to regulate K+ current. While a specific constriction in the permeation pathway has historically been implicated in gating, recent reports suggest that the signature ion selectivity filter located in the outer membrane leaflet may be equally important. Inwardly rectifying K+ channels also control the directionality of flow, using intracellular polyamines to stem ion efflux by a valve-like action. This study presents crystallographic evidence of interdependent gates in the conduction pathway and reveals the mechanism of polyamine block. Reorientation of the intracellular domains, concomitant with activation, instigates polyamine release from intracellular binding sites to block the permeation pathway. Conformational adjustments of the slide helices, achieved by rotation of the cytoplasmic assembly relative to the pore, are directly correlated to the ion configuration in the selectivity filter. Ion redistribution occurs irrespective of the constriction, suggesting a more expansive role of the selectivity filter in gating than previously appreciated.

  11. The potassium current carried by TREK-1 channels in rat cardiac ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Bodnár, Mandy; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    We studied the potassium current flowing through TREK-1 channels in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes. We separated the TREK-1 current from other current components by blocking most other channels with a blocker cocktail. We tried to inhibit the TREK-1 current by activating protein kinase A (PKA) with a mixture of forskolin and isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX). Activation of PKA blocked an outwardly rectifying current component at membrane potentials positive to -40 mV. At 37 °C, application of forskolin plus IBMX reduced the steady-state outward current measured at positive voltages by about 52 %. Application of the potassium channel blockers quinidine or tetrahexylammonium also reduced the steady-state outward current by about 50 %. Taken together, our results suggest that the increase in temperature from 22 to 37 °C increased the TREK-1 current by a factor of at least 5 and that the average density of the TREK-1 current in rat cardiomyocytes at 37 °C is about 1.5 pA/pF at +30 mV. The contribution of TREK-1 to the action potential was assessed by using a dynamic patch clamp technique. After subtraction of simulated TREK-1 currents, action potential duration at 50 or 90 % repolarisation was increased by about 12 %, indicating that TREK-1 may be functionally important in rat ventricular muscle. During sympathetic stimulation, inhibition of TREK-1 channels via PKA is expected to prolong the action potential primarily in subendocardial myocytes; this may decrease the transmural dispersion of repolarisation and thus may serve to prevent the occurrence of arrhythmias.

  12. Electrophysiology and pharmacology of tandem domain potassium channel TREK-1 related BDNF synthesis in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Wang, Weiping; Peng, Ying; Li, Jiang; Wang, Ling; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, the functional properties and pharmacology of two-pore domain potassium channel (K2P) TREK-1 in primary cultured rat brain astrocytes were investigated. Western blot, patch clamping techniques, and ELISA were used to detect the distribution and function of TREK-1 as well as the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the primary cultured astrocytes. It was shown that TREK-1 protein expressed in astrocytes was 2.4-fold higher than it was expressed in microglia. Single channel recording via patch clamping showed that the TREK-1 outward currents in astrocytes could be activated by arachidonic acid (AA) or chloroform with the conductance of 113 ± 14 and 120 ± 13 pS, respectively. The current was also sensitive to mechanical stretch and intracellular acidification. Negative pressure (-30 cm H2O) and acidification of intracellular solution (pH 6.8 or 6.3) both enhanced TREK-1 channel open probability significantly. Further pharmacological studies showed that TREK-1 antagonist penfluridol inhibited AA-induced currents, and both penfluridol and methionine (TREK-1 blockers) significantly increased BDNF level in astrocytes by 50 %. These results indicated that TREK-1 channel current was a major component of K2P currents in astrocytes. TREK-1 channels might play important roles in regulating the function of astrocytes and might be used as a drug target for neuroprotection.

  13. Calcium channels responsible for potassium-induced transmitter release at rat cerebellar synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, A; Takahashi, T

    1994-01-01

    The effects of calcium channel blockers on potassium-induced transmitter release were studied in thin slices of cerebellum from neonatal rats using whole-cell patch clamp methods. Miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were recorded from deep cerebellar nuclear neurones in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The frequency of mIPSCs was reproducibly increased by a brief application of high-potassium solution. In the presence of the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nicardipine (10 microM), the potassium-induced increase in mIPSC frequency was suppressed by 49%. Neither the mean amplitude nor the time course of mIPSCs was affected by the blocker. The N-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTX, 3 microM) had no effect on the frequency of potassium-induced mIPSCs. The P-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-Aga-IVA (200 nM) suppressed the potassium-induced increase in mIPSC frequency by 83% without affecting the mean amplitude or time course of mIPSCs. Comparing these data with previous studies of neurally evoked transmission, it is concluded that the Ca2+ channel subtypes responsible for potassium-induced transmitter release may be different from those mediating fast synaptic transmission. PMID:7913967

  14. Potassium ions in the cavity of a KcsA channel model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei; Qiao, Baofu; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The high rate of ion flux and selectivity of potassium channels has been attributed to the conformation and dynamics of the ions in the filter which connects the channel cavity and the extracellular environment. The cavity serves as the reservoir for potassium ions diffusing from the intracellular medium. The cavity is believed to decrease the dielectric barrier for the ions to enter the filter. We study here the equilibrium and dynamic properties of potassium ions entering the water-filled cavity of a KcsA channel model. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that are supplemented by electrostatic calculations reveal the important role of water molecules and the partially charged protein helices at the bottom of the cavity in overcoming the energy barrier and stabilizing the potassium ion in the cavity. We further show that the average time for a potassium ion to enter the cavity is much shorter than the conduction rate of a potassium passing through the filter, and this time duration is insensitive over a wide range of the membrane potential. The conclusions drawn from the study of the channel model are applicable in generalized contexts, including the entry of ions in artificial ion channels and other confined geometries.

  15. Potassium ions in the cavity of a KcsA channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Qiao, Baofu; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The high rate of ion flux and selectivity of potassium channels has been attributed to the conformation and dynamics of the ions in the filter which connects the channel cavity and the extracellular environment. The cavity serves as the reservoir for potassium ions diffusing from the intracellular medium. The cavity is believed to decrease the dielectric barrier for the ions to enter the filter. We study here the equilibrium and dynamic properties of potassium ions entering the water-filled cavity of a KcsA channel model. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that are supplemented by electrostatic calculations reveal the important role of water molecules and the partially charged protein helices at the bottom of the cavity in overcoming the energy barrier and stabilizing the potassium ion in the cavity. We further show that the average time for a potassium ion to enter the cavity is much shorter than the conduction rate of a potassium passing through the filter, and this time duration is insensitive over a wide range of the membrane potential. The conclusions drawn from the study of the channel model are applicable in generalized contexts, including the entry of ions in artificial ion channels and other confined geometries.

  16. Antisense suppression of potassium channel expression demonstrates its role in maturation of the action potential.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Lautermilch, N J; Spitzer, N C

    2000-08-15

    A developmental increase in delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kv)) in embryonic Xenopus spinal neurons is critical for the maturation of excitability and action potential waveform. Identifying potassium channel genes that generate I(Kv) is essential to understanding the mechanisms by which they are controlled. Several Kv genes are upregulated during embryogenesis in parallel with increases in I(Kv) and produce delayed rectifier current when heterologously expressed, indicating that they could encode channels underlying this current. We used antisense (AS) cRNA to test the contribution of xKv3.1 to the maturation of I(Kv), because xKv3.1 AS appears to suppress specifically heterologous expression of potassium current by xKv3.1 mRNA. The injection of xKv3.1 AS into embryos reduces endogenous levels of xKv3.1 mRNA in the developing spinal cord and reduces the amplitude and rate of activation of I(Kv) in 40% of cultured neurons, similar to the percentage of neurons in which endogenous xKv3.1 transcripts are detected. The current in these mature neurons resembles that at an earlier stage of differentiation before the appearance of xKv3.1 mRNA. Furthermore, AS expression increases the duration of the action potential in 40% of the neurons. No change in voltage-dependent calcium current is observed, suggesting that the decrease in I(Kv) is sufficient to account for lengthening of the action potential. Computer-simulated action potentials incorporating observed reductions in amplitude and rate of activation of I(Kv) exhibit an increase in duration similar to that observed experimentally. Thus xKv3.1 contributes to the maturation of I(Kv) in a substantial percentage of these developing spinal neurons.

  17. Acepromazine inhibits hERG potassium ion channels expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Young Shin; Lee, Hong Joon; Choi, Jin-Sung

    2017-01-01

    The effects of acepromazine on human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channels were investigated using whole-cell voltage-clamp technique in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells transfected with hERG. The hERG currents were recorded with or without acepromazine, and the steady-state and peak tail currents were analyzed for the evaluating the drug effects. Acepromazine inhibited the hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 1.5 µM and Hill coefficient of 1.1. Acepromazine blocked hERG currents in a voltage-dependent manner between –40 and +10 mV. Before and after application of acepromazine, the half activation potentials of hERG currents changed to hyperpolarizing direction. Acepromazine blocked both the steady-state hERG currents by depolarizing pulse and the peak tail currents by repolarizing pulse; however, the extent of blocking by acepromazine in the repolarizing pulse was more profound than that in the depolarizing pulse, indicating that acepromazine has a high affinity for the open state of the channels, with a relatively lower affinity for the closed state of hERG channels. A fast application of acepromazine during the tail currents inhibited the open state of hERG channels in a concentration-dependent. The steady-state inactivation of hERG currents shifted to the hyperpolarized direction by acepromazine. These results suggest that acepromazine inhibits the hERG channels probably by an open- and inactivated-channel blocking mechanism. Regarding to the fact that the hERG channels are the potential target of drug-induced long QT syndrome, our results suggest that acepromazine can possibly induce a cardiac arrhythmia through the inhibition of hERG channels. PMID:28066143

  18. Identification of yeast proteins necessary for cell-surface function of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Haass, Friederike A; Jonikas, Martin; Walter, Peter; Weissman, Jonathan S; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Jan, Lily Y; Schuldiner, Maya

    2007-11-13

    Inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels form gates in the cell membrane that regulate the flow of K(+) ions into and out of the cell, thereby influencing the membrane potential and electrical signaling of many cell types, including neurons and cardiomyocytes. Kir-channel function depends on other cellular proteins that aid in the folding of channel subunits, assembly into tetrameric complexes, trafficking of quality-controlled channels to the plasma membrane, and regulation of channel activity at the cell surface. We used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to identify proteins necessary for the functional expression of a mammalian Kir channel at the cell surface. A screen of 376 yeast strains, each lacking one nonessential protein localized to the early secretory pathway, identified seven deletion strains in which functional expression of the Kir channel at the plasma membrane was impaired. Six deletions were of genes with known functions in trafficking and lipid biosynthesis (sur4Delta, csg2Delta, erv14Delta, emp24Delta, erv25Delta, and bst1Delta), and one deletion was of an uncharacterized gene (yil039wDelta). We provide genetic and functional evidence that Yil039wp, a conserved, phosphoesterase domain-containing protein, which we named "trafficking of Emp24p/Erv25p-dependent cargo disrupted 1" (Ted1p), acts together with Emp24p/Erv25p in cargo exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The seven yeast proteins identified in our screen likely impact Kir-channel functional expression at the level of vesicle budding from the ER and/or the local lipid environment at the plasma membrane.

  19. Effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv1.1)

    PubMed Central

    Tytgat, J; Maertens, Ch; Daenens, P

    1997-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is widely used as an antidepressant drug and is assumed to be a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Claims that its beneficial psychotropic effects extend beyond those in treatment of depression have drawn clinical and popular attention to this compound, raising the question of whether there is anything exceptional about the supposed selective actions.We have used the voltage clamp technique to study the effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel (RCK1; Kv1.1), expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This channel subunit is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and K+ channels containing this subunit are involved in the repolarization process of many types of neurones.Blockade of the K+ currents by fluoxetine was found to be use- and dose-dependent. Wash-out of this compound could not be achieved. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of this K+ channel, as the reversal potential was unaltered.Slowing of both activation and deactivation kinetics of the channel by fluoxetine was observed, including tail current crossover upon repolarization.Hodgkin-Huxley type of models and more generalized Markov chain models were used to fit the kinetics of the data. Based upon a Markov kinetic scheme, our data can be interpreted to mean that blockade of fluoxetine consists of two components: a voltage-independent occurring in the last closed, but available state of the channel, and a voltage-dependent occurring in the open state.This study describes the first biophysical working model for the mechanism of action of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent K+ channel, RCK1. Although this channel is not very potently blocked by fluoxetine when expressed in oocytes, this study may help us to understand some of the clinical symptoms seen with elevated serum concentrations of this SSRI. PMID:9421290

  20. Gambierol Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels Augments Spontaneous Ca2+ Oscillations in Cerebrocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Cui, Yanjun; Busse, Eric; Mehrotra, Suneet; Rainier, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus and is a member of the ciguatoxin toxin family. Gambierol has been demonstrated to be either a low-efficacy partial agonist/antagonist of voltage-gated sodium channels or a potent blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kvs). Here we examined the influence of gambierol on intact cerebrocortical neurons. We found that gambierol produced both a concentration-dependent augmentation of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations, and an inhibition of Kv channel function with similar potencies. In addition, an array of selective as well as universal Kv channel inhibitors mimicked gambierol in augmenting spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in cerebrocortical neurons. These data are consistent with a gambierol blockade of Kv channels underlying the observed increase in spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation frequency. We also found that gambierol produced a robust stimulation of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Gambierol-stimulated ERK1/2 activation was dependent on both inotropic [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)] and type I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) inasmuch as MK-801 [NMDA receptor inhibitor; (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate], S-(4)-CGP [S-(4)-carboxyphenylglycine], and MTEP [type I mGluR inhibitors; 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine] attenuated the response. In addition, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, and U73122 (1-[6-[[(17b)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione), a phospholipase C inhibitor, both suppressed gambierol-induced ERK1/2 activation, further confirming the role of type I mGluR-mediated signaling in the observed ERK1/2 activation. Finally, we found that gambierol produced a concentration-dependent stimulation of neurite outgrowth that was mimicked by 4-aminopyridine, a universal potassium

  1. Effect of tyrphostin AG879 on Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibo; Zou, Beiyan; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose A-type potassium channels (IA) are important proteins for modulating neuronal membrane excitability. The expression and activity of Kv4.2 channels are critical for neurological functions and pharmacological inhibitors of Kv4.2 channels may have therapeutic potential for Fragile X syndrome. While screening various compounds, we identified tyrphostin AG879, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a Kv4.2 inhibitor from. In the present study we characterized the effect of AG879 on cloned Kv4.2/Kv channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) channels. Experimental Approach To screen the library of pharmacologically active compounds, the thallium flux assay was performed on HEK-293 cells transiently-transfected with Kv4.2 cDNA using the Maxcyte transfection system. The effects of AG879 were further examined on CHO-K1 cells expressing Kv4.2/KChIP2 channels using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Key Results Tyrphostin AG879 selectively and dose-dependently inhibited Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 channels. In Kv4.2/KChIP2 channels, AG879 induced prominent acceleration of the inactivation rate, use-dependent block and slowed the recovery from inactivation. AG879 induced a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of the steady-state inactivation of Kv4.2 channels without apparent effect on the V1/2 of the voltage-dependent activation. The blocking effect of AG879 was enhanced as channel inactivation increased. Furthermore, AG879 significantly inhibited the A-type potassium currents in the cultured hippocampus neurons. Conclusion and Implications AG879 was identified as a selective and potent inhibitor the Kv4.2 channel. AG879 inhibited Kv4.2 channels by preferentially interacting with the open state and further accelerating their inactivation. PMID:25752739

  2. Membrane lipids tune synaptic transmission by direct modulation of presynaptic potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Carta, Mario; Lanore, Frederic; Rebola, Nelson; Szabo, Zsolt; Da Silva, Silvia Viana; Lourenço, Joana; Verraes, Agathe; Nadler, André; Schultz, Carsten; Blanchet, Christophe; Mulle, Christophe

    2014-02-19

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are involved in action potential (AP) repolarization in excitable cells. Exogenous application of membrane-derived lipids, such as arachidonic acid (AA), regulates the gating of Kv channels. Whether membrane-derived lipids released under physiological conditions have an impact on neuronal coding through this mechanism is unknown. We show that AA released in an activity-dependent manner from postsynaptic hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells acts as retrograde messenger, inducing a robust facilitation of mossy fiber (Mf) synaptic transmission over several minutes. AA acts by broadening presynaptic APs through the direct modulation of Kv channels. This form of short-term plasticity can be triggered when postsynaptic cell fires with physiologically relevant patterns and sets the threshold for the induction of the presynaptic form of long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal Mf synapses. Hence, direct modulation of presynaptic Kv channels by activity-dependent release of lipids serves as a physiological mechanism for tuning synaptic transmission.

  3. A medium-throughput functional assay of KCNQ2 potassium channels using rubidium efflux and atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scott, Clay W; Wilkins, Deidre E; Trivedi, Shephali; Crankshaw, Denis J

    2003-08-15

    Heterologous expression of KCNQ2 (Kv7.2) results in the formation of a slowly activating, noninactivating, voltage-gated potassium channel. Using a cell line that stably expresses KCNQ2, we developed a rubidium flux assay to measure the functional activity and pharmacological modulation of this ion channel. Rubidium flux was performed in a 96-well microtiter plate format; rubidium was quantified using an automated atomic absorption spectrometer to enable screening of 1000 data points/day. Cells accumulated rubidium at 37 degrees C in a monoexponential manner with t(1/2)=40min. Treating cells with elevated extracellular potassium caused membrane depolarization and stimulation of rubidium efflux through KCNQ2. The rate of rubidium efflux increased with increasing extracellular potassium: the t(1/2) at 50mM potassium was 5.1 min. Potassium-stimulated efflux was potentiated by the anticonvulsant drug retigabine (EC(50)=0.5 microM). Both potassium-induced and retigabine-facilitated efflux were blocked by TEA (IC(50)s=0.4 and 0.3mM, respectively) and the neurotransmitter release enhancers and putative cognition enhancers linopirdine (IC(50)s=2.3 and 7.1 microM, respectively) and XE991 (IC(50)s=0.3 and 0.9 microM, respectively). Screening a collection of ion channel modulators revealed additional inhibitors including clofilium (IC(50) = 27 microM). These studies extend the pharmacological profile of KCNQ2 and demonstrate the feasibility of using this assay system to rapidly screen for compounds that modulate the function of KCNQ2.

  4. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Hai; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xin; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2014-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV) to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  5. MinK, MiRP1, and MiRP2 diversify Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 potassium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Anthony; McCrossan, Zoe A; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2004-02-27

    High frequency firing in mammalian neurons requires ultra-rapid delayed rectifier potassium currents generated by homomeric or heteromeric assemblies of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 potassium channel alpha subunits. Kv3.1 alpha subunits can also form slower activating channels by coassembling with MinK-related peptide 2 (MiRP2), a single transmembrane domain potassium channel ancillary subunit. Here, using channel subunits cloned from rat and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, we show that modulation by MinK, MiRP1, and MiRP2 is a general mechanism for slowing of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channel activation and deactivation and acceleration of inactivation, creating a functionally diverse range of channel complexes. MiRP1 also negatively shifts the voltage dependence of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channel activation. Furthermore, MinK, MiRP1, and MiRP2 each form channels with Kv3.1-Kv3.2 heteromers that are kinetically distinct from one another and from MiRP/homomeric Kv3 channels. The findings illustrate a mechanism for dynamic expansion of the functional repertoire of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 potassium currents and suggest roles for these alpha subunits outside the scope of sustained rapid neuronal firing.

  6. Regulation of neuronal excitability by interaction of fragile X mental retardation protein with slack potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Brown, Maile R; Hyland, Callen; Chen, Yi; Kronengold, Jack; Fleming, Matthew R; Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Leonid L; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2012-10-31

    Loss of the RNA-binding protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) represents the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. Studies with heterologous expression systems indicate that FMRP interacts directly with Slack Na(+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Na)), producing an enhancement of channel activity. We have now used Aplysia bag cell (BC) neurons, which regulate reproductive behaviors, to examine the effects of Slack and FMRP on excitability. FMRP and Slack immunoreactivity were colocalized at the periphery of isolated BC neurons, and the two proteins could be reciprocally coimmunoprecipitated. Intracellular injection of FMRP lacking its mRNA binding domain rapidly induced a biphasic outward current, with an early transient tetrodotoxin-sensitive component followed by a slowly activating sustained component. The properties of this current matched that of the native Slack potassium current, which was identified using an siRNA approach. Addition of FMRP to inside-out patches containing native Aplysia Slack channels increased channel opening and, in current-clamp recordings, produced narrowing of action potentials. Suppression of Slack expression did not alter the ability of BC neurons to undergo a characteristic prolonged discharge in response to synaptic stimulation, but prevented recovery from a prolonged inhibitory period that normally follows the discharge. Recovery from the inhibited period was also inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin. Our studies indicate that, in BC neurons, Slack channels are required for prolonged changes in neuronal excitability that require new protein synthesis, and raise the possibility that channel-FMRP interactions may link changes in neuronal firing to changes in protein translation.

  7. Involvement of Potassium and Cation Channels in Hippocampal Abnormalities of Embryonic Ts65Dn and Tc1 Trisomic Mice.

    PubMed

    Stern, Shani; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome (DS) mouse models exhibit cognitive deficits, and are used for studying the neuronal basis of DS pathology. To understand the differences in the physiology of DS model neurons, we used dissociated neuronal cultures from the hippocampi of Ts65Dn and Tc1 DS mice. Imaging of [Ca(2+)]i and whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to analyze network activity and single neuron properties, respectively. We found a decrease of ~ 30% in both fast (A-type) and slow (delayed rectifier) outward potassium currents. Depolarization of Ts65Dn and Tc1 cells produced fewer spikes than diploid cells. Their network bursts were smaller and slower than diploids, displaying a 40% reduction in Δf / f0 of the calcium signals, and a 30% reduction in propagation velocity. Additionally, Ts65Dn and Tc1 neurons exhibited changes in the action potential shape compared to diploid neurons, with an increase in the amplitude of the action potential, a lower threshold for spiking, and a sharp decrease of about 65% in the after-hyperpolarization amplitude. Numerical simulations reproduced the DS measured phenotype by variations in the conductance of the delayed rectifier and A-type, but necessitated also changes in inward rectifying and M-type potassium channels and in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. We therefore conducted whole cell patch clamp measurements of M-type potassium currents, which showed a ~ 90% decrease in Ts65Dn neurons, while HCN measurements displayed an increase of ~ 65% in Ts65Dn cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicates overexpression of 40% of KCNJ15, an inward rectifying potassium channel, contributing to the increased inhibition. We thus find that changes in several types of potassium channels dominate the observed DS model phenotype.

  8. Involvement of Potassium and Cation Channels in Hippocampal Abnormalities of Embryonic Ts65Dn and Tc1 Trisomic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Shani; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) mouse models exhibit cognitive deficits, and are used for studying the neuronal basis of DS pathology. To understand the differences in the physiology of DS model neurons, we used dissociated neuronal cultures from the hippocampi of Ts65Dn and Tc1 DS mice. Imaging of [Ca2+]i and whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to analyze network activity and single neuron properties, respectively. We found a decrease of ~ 30% in both fast (A-type) and slow (delayed rectifier) outward potassium currents. Depolarization of Ts65Dn and Tc1 cells produced fewer spikes than diploid cells. Their network bursts were smaller and slower than diploids, displaying a 40% reduction in Δf / f0 of the calcium signals, and a 30% reduction in propagation velocity. Additionally, Ts65Dn and Tc1 neurons exhibited changes in the action potential shape compared to diploid neurons, with an increase in the amplitude of the action potential, a lower threshold for spiking, and a sharp decrease of about 65% in the after-hyperpolarization amplitude. Numerical simulations reproduced the DS measured phenotype by variations in the conductance of the delayed rectifier and A-type, but necessitated also changes in inward rectifying and M-type potassium channels and in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. We therefore conducted whole cell patch clamp measurements of M-type potassium currents, which showed a ~ 90% decrease in Ts65Dn neurons, while HCN measurements displayed an increase of ~ 65% in Ts65Dn cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicates overexpression of 40% of KCNJ15, an inward rectifying potassium channel, contributing to the increased inhibition. We thus find that changes in several types of potassium channels dominate the observed DS model phenotype. PMID:26501103

  9. Dendritic A-type potassium channel subunit expression in CA1 hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Menegola, Milena; Misonou, Hiroaki; Vacher, Helene; Trimmer, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into neuronal dendrites. BAPs have been well studied in a variety of neurons, and have been recently described in hippocampal and cortical interneurons, a heterogeneous population of GABAergic inhibitory cells that regulate activity of principal cells and neuronal networks. We used well-characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies against the Kv4.3 and KChIP1 subunits of A-type Kv channels, and antibodies against different interneuron markers in single- and double-label immunohistochemistry experiments to analyze the expression patterns of Kv4.3 and KChIP1 in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 40 μm rat brain sections using nickel-enhanced diaminobenzidine staining or multiple-label immunofluorescence. Our results show that Kv4.3 and KChIP1 component subunits of A-type channels are co-localized in the soma and dendrites of a large number of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. These subunits co-localize extensively but not completely with markers defining the four major interneuron subpopulations tested (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin). These results suggest that CA1 hippocampal interneurons can be divided in two groups according to the expression of Kv4.3/KChIP1 channel subunits. Antibodies against Kv4.3 and KChIP1 represent an important new tool for identifying a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons with unique dendritic A-type channel complement and ability to control BAPs. PMID:18495361

  10. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hille, Bertil

    2012-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (K(ir)) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P(2). Wide expression of K(V) channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of K(V) channels by PI(4,5)P(2), we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (M(1)R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P(2) with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited K(V)7.1, K(V)7.2/7.3, and K(ir)2.1 channel current by 90-95%. Activation of M(1)R inhibited K(V)7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P(2) regulation of activity of K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1, K(V)1.3, K(V)1.4, and K(V)1.5/K(V)β1.3, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.4, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1 and K(V)3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M(1)R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested K(V) channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the K(V)7 and K(ir) families.

  11. Molecular simulation of the interaction of kappa-conotoxin-PVIIA with the Shaker potassium channel pore.

    PubMed

    Moran, O

    2001-12-01

    Molecular simulation techniques were appplied to predict the interaction of the voltage-dependent Shaker potassium channel with the channel-blocking toxin kappa-conotoxin-PVIIA (PVIIA). A structural thee-dimensional model of the extracellular vestibule of the potassium channel was constructed based on structural homologies with the bacterial potassium channel Kcsa, whose structure has been solved by X-ray crystallography. The docking of the PVIIA molecule was obtained by a geometric recognition algorithm, yielding 100 possible conformations. A series of residue-residue distance restraints, predicted from mutation-cycle experiments, were used to select a small set of a plausible channel-toxin complex models among the resulting possible conformations. The four final conformations, with similar characteristics, can explain most of the single-point mutation experiments done with this system. The models of the Shaker-PVIIA interaction predict two clusters of amino acids, critical for the binding of the toxin to the channel. The first cluster is the amino acids R2, I3, Q6 and K7 that form the plug of the toxin that interacts with the entrance to the selectivity filter of the channel. The second cluster of residues, R22, F23, N24 and K25, interacts with a channel region near to the external entrance of the pore vestibule. The consistency of the obtained models and the experimental data indicate that the Shaker-PVIIA complex model is reasonable and can be used in further biological studies such as the rational design of blocking agents of potassium channels and the mutagenesis of both toxins and potassium channels.

  12. Structure of KCNE1 and implications for how it modulates the KCNQ1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Kang, Congbao; Tian, Changlin; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Smith, Jarrod A; Meiler, Jens; George, Alfred L; Vanoye, Carlos G; Kim, Hak Jun; Sanders, Charles R

    2008-08-05

    KCNE1 is a single-span membrane protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 (K V7.1) by slowing activation and enhancing channel conductance to generate the slow delayed rectifier current ( I Ks) that is critical for the repolarization phase of the cardiac action potential. Perturbation of channel function by inherited mutations in KCNE1 or KCNQ1 results in increased susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death with or without accompanying deafness. Here, we present the three-dimensional structure of KCNE1. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of KCNE1 is a curved alpha-helix and is flanked by intra- and extracellular domains comprised of alpha-helices joined by flexible linkers. Experimentally restrained docking of the KCNE1 TMD to a closed state model of KCNQ1 suggests that KCNE1 slows channel activation by sitting on and restricting the movement of the S4-S5 linker that connects the voltage sensor to the pore domain. We postulate that this is an adhesive interaction that must be disrupted before the channel can be opened in response to membrane depolarization. Docking to open KCNQ1 indicates that the extracellular end of the KCNE1 TMD forms an interface with an intersubunit cleft in the channel that is associated with most known gain-of-function disease mutations. Binding of KCNE1 to this "gain-of-function cleft" may explain how it increases conductance and stabilizes the open state. These working models for the KCNE1-KCNQ1 complexes may be used to formulate testable hypotheses for the molecular bases of disease phenotypes associated with the dozens of known inherited mutations in KCNE1 and KCNQ1.

  13. Increased motor drive and sleep loss in mice lacking Kv3-type potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, F; Marks, G; Heintz, N; Joho, R H

    2004-04-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 are widely expressed in the brain, including areas implicated in the control of motor activity and in areas thought to regulate arousal states. Although Kv3.1 and Kv3.3-single mutants show some physiological changes, previous studies revealed relatively subtle behavioral alterations suggesting that Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channel subunits may be encoded by a pair of redundant genes. In agreement with this hypothesis, Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice display a 'strong' mutant phenotype that includes motor dysfunction (ataxia, myoclonus, tremor) and hyperactivity when exposed to a novel environment. In this paper we report that Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice are also constitutively hyperactive. Compared to wildtype mice, double mutants display 'restlessness' that is particularly prominent during the light period, when mice are normally at rest, characterized by more than a doubling of ambulatory and stereotypic activity, and accompanied by a 40% sleep reduction. When we reinvestigated both single mutants, we observed constitutive increases of ambulatory and stereotypic activity in conjunction with sleep loss in Kv3.1-single mutants but not in Kv3.3-single mutants. These findings indicate that the absence of Kv3.1-channel subunits is primarily responsible for the increased motor drive and the reduction in sleep time.

  14. Label-free cell phenotypic profiling decodes the composition and signaling of an endogenous ATP-sensitive potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haiyan; Wei, Ying; Deng, Huayun; Xiong, Qiaojie; Li, Min; Lahiri, Joydeep; Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Current technologies for studying ion channels are fundamentally limited because of their inability to functionally link ion channel activity to cellular pathways. Herein, we report the use of label-free cell phenotypic profiling to decode the composition and signaling of an endogenous ATP-sensitive potassium ion channel (KATP) in HepG2C3A, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Label-free cell phenotypic agonist profiling showed that pinacidil triggered characteristically similar dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) signals in A431, A549, HT29 and HepG2C3A, but not in HepG2 cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR, RNAi knockdown, and KATP blocker profiling showed that the pinacidil DMR is due to the activation of SUR2/Kir6.2 KATP channels in HepG2C3A cells. Kinase inhibition and RNAi knockdown showed that the pinacidil activated KATP channels trigger signaling through Rho kinase and Janus kinase-3, and cause actin remodeling. The results are the first demonstration of a label-free methodology to characterize the composition and signaling of an endogenous ATP-sensitive potassium ion channel. PMID:24816792

  15. The Eag potassium channel as a new prognostic marker in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is the second most common cancer of the female genital tract in the United Kingdom (UK), accounting for 6% of female deaths due to cancer. This cancer is associated with poor survival and there is a need for new treatments in addition to existing chemotherapy to improve survival. Potassium (K+) channels have been shown to be overexpressed in various cancers where they appear to play a role in cell proliferation and progression. Objectives To determine the expression of the potassium channels Eag and HERG in ovarian cancer tissue and to assess their role in cell proliferation. Methods The expression of Eag and HERG potassium channels was examined in an ovarian cancer tissue microarray. Their role in cell proliferation was investigated by blocking voltage-gated potassium channels in an ovarian cancer cell line (SK-OV-3). Results We show for the first time that high expression of Eag channels in ovarian cancer patients is significantly associated with poor survival (P = 0.016) unlike HERG channel expression where there was no correlation with survival. There was also a significant association of Eag staining with high tumour grade (P = 0.014) and presence of residual disease (P = 0.011). Proliferation of SK-OV-3 cells was significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited after treatment with voltage gated K+ channel blockers. Conclusion This novel finding demonstrates a role for Eag as a prognostic marker for survival in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:21138547

  16. Uncoupling Charge Movement from Channel Opening in Voltage-gated Potassium Channels by Ruthenium Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Ishida, Itzel G.; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.; Espinosa-Jalapa, Noel; Pérez-Guzmán, José A.; Elías-Viñas, David; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D.

    2011-01-01

    The Kv2.1 channel generates a delayed-rectifier current in neurons and is responsible for modulation of neuronal spike frequency and membrane repolarization in pancreatic β-cells and cardiomyocytes. As with other tetrameric voltage-activated K+-channels, it has been proposed that each of the four Kv2.1 voltage-sensing domains activates independently upon depolarization, leading to a final concerted transition that causes channel opening. The mechanism by which voltage-sensor activation is coupled to the gating of the pore is still not understood. Here we show that the carbon-monoxide releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) is an allosteric inhibitor of the Kv2.1 channel and that its inhibitory properties derive from the CORM-2 ability to largely reduce the voltage dependence of the opening transition, uncoupling voltage-sensor activation from the concerted opening transition. We additionally demonstrate that CORM-2 modulates Shaker K+-channels in a similar manner. Our data suggest that the mechanism of inhibition by CORM-2 may be common to voltage-activated channels and that this compound should be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of electromechanical coupling. PMID:21454671

  17. Uncoupling charge movement from channel opening in voltage-gated potassium channels by ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Ishida, Itzel G; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Espinosa-Jalapa, Noel; Pérez-Guzmán, José A; Elías-Viñas, David; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D

    2011-05-06

    The Kv2.1 channel generates a delayed-rectifier current in neurons and is responsible for modulation of neuronal spike frequency and membrane repolarization in pancreatic β-cells and cardiomyocytes. As with other tetrameric voltage-activated K(+)-channels, it has been proposed that each of the four Kv2.1 voltage-sensing domains activates independently upon depolarization, leading to a final concerted transition that causes channel opening. The mechanism by which voltage-sensor activation is coupled to the gating of the pore is still not understood. Here we show that the carbon-monoxide releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) is an allosteric inhibitor of the Kv2.1 channel and that its inhibitory properties derive from the CORM-2 ability to largely reduce the voltage dependence of the opening transition, uncoupling voltage-sensor activation from the concerted opening transition. We additionally demonstrate that CORM-2 modulates Shaker K(+)-channels in a similar manner. Our data suggest that the mechanism of inhibition by CORM-2 may be common to voltage-activated channels and that this compound should be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of electromechanical coupling.

  18. Viruses infecting marine picoplancton encode functional potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Siotto, Fenja; Martin, Corinna; Rauh, Oliver; Van Etten, James L; Schroeder, Indra; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Phycodnaviruses are dsDNA viruses, which infect algae. Their large genomes encode many gene products, like small K(+) channels, with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Screening for K(+) channels revealed their abundance in viruses from fresh-water habitats. Recent sequencing of viruses from marine algae or from salt water in Antarctica revealed sequences with the predicted characteristics of K(+) channels but with some unexpected features. Two genes encode either 78 or 79 amino acid proteins, which are the smallest known K(+) channels. Also of interest is an unusual sequence in the canonical α-helixes in K(+) channels. Structural prediction algorithms indicate that the new channels have the conserved α-helix folds but the algorithms failed to identify the expected transmembrane domains flanking the K(+) channel pores. In spite of these unexpected properties electophysiological studies confirmed that the new proteins are functional K(+) channels.

  19. Identification of novel small molecule modulators of K2P18.1 two-pore potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, J. Kyle; Zou, Beiyan; Zhang, Hongkang; Zhang, Yixin; Schmidt, Katharina; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background potassium (K+) current, which is crucial for the maintenance of resting membrane potential. K2P18.1, also called TWIK-related spinal cord K+ channel (TRESK) or KCNK18, is thought to be a major contributor to background K+ currents, particularly in sensory neurons where it is abundantly expressed. Despite its critical role and potential therapeutic implication, pharmacological tools for probing K2P18.1 activity remain unavailable. Here, we report a high-throughput screen against a collection of bioactive compounds that yielded 26 inhibitors and 8 activators of K2P18.1 channel activity with more than 10-fold selectivity over the homologous channel K2P9.1. Among these modulators, the antihistamine loratadine inhibited K2P18.1 activity with IC50 of 0.49 ± 0.23 μM and is considerably more potent than existing K2P18.1 inhibitors. Importantly, the inhibition by loratadine remains equally efficacious upon potentiation of K2P18.1 by calcium signaling. Furthermore, the loratadine effect is dependent on transmembrane residues F145 and F352, providing orthogonal evidence that the inhibition is caused by a direct compound-channel interaction. This study reveals new pharmacological modulators of K2P18.1 activity useful in dissecting native K2P18.1 function. PMID:24972239

  20. Identification of novel small molecule modulators of K2P18.1 two-pore potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Bruner, J Kyle; Zou, Beiyan; Zhang, Hongkang; Zhang, Yixin; Schmidt, Katharina; Li, Min

    2014-10-05

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background potassium (K+) current, which is crucial for the maintenance of resting membrane potential. K2P18.1, also called TWIK-related spinal cord K+ channel (TRESK) or KCNK18, is thought to be a major contributor to background K+ currents, particularly in sensory neurons where it is abundantly expressed. Despite its critical role and potential therapeutic implication, pharmacological tools for probing K2P18.1 activity remain unavailable. Here, we report a high-throughput screen against a collection of bioactive compounds that yielded 26 inhibitors and 8 activators of K2P18.1 channel activity with more than 10-fold selectivity over the homologous channel K2P9.1. Among these modulators, the antihistamine loratadine inhibited K2P18.1 activity with IC50 of 0.49±0.23 µM and is considerably more potent than existing K2P18.1 inhibitors. Importantly, the inhibition by loratadine remains equally efficacious upon potentiation of K2P18.1 by calcium signaling. Furthermore, the loratadine effect is dependent on transmembrane residues F145 and F352, providing orthogonal evidence that the inhibition is caused by a direct compound-channel interaction. This study reveals new pharmacological modulators of K2P18.1 activity useful in dissecting native K2P18.1 function.

  1. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated K(ATP) channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system.

  2. Pharmacological rescue of trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory M.; Chen, Pei-Chun; Devaraneni, Prasanna; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels link cell metabolism to membrane excitability and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes including hormone secretion, control of vascular tone, and protection of cardiac and neuronal cells against ischemic injuries. In pancreatic β-cells, KATP channels play a key role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and gain or loss of channel function results in neonatal diabetes or congenital hyperinsulinism, respectively. The β-cell KATP channel is formed by co-assembly of four Kir6.2 inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunits encoded by KCNJ11 and four sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits encoded by ABCC8. Many mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 cause loss of channel function, thus, congenital hyperinsulinism by hampering channel biogenesis and hence trafficking to the cell surface. The trafficking defects caused by a subset of these mutations can be corrected by sulfonylureas, KATP channel antagonists that have long been used to treat type 2 diabetes. More recently, carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant that is thought to target primarily voltage-gated sodium channels has been shown to correct KATP channel trafficking defects. This article reviews studies to date aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which mutations impair channel biogenesis and trafficking and the mechanisms by which pharmacological ligands overcome channel trafficking defects. Insight into channel structure-function relationships and therapeutic implications from these studies are discussed. PMID:24399968

  3. Simulations of ion current in realistic models of ion channels: the KcsA potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Burykin, A; Schutz, C N; Villá, J; Warshel, A

    2002-05-15

    Realistic studies of ion current in biologic channels present a major challenge for computer simulation approaches. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations involve serious time limitations that prevent their use in direct evaluation of ion current in channels with significant barriers. The alternative use of Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations can provide the current for simplified macroscopic models. However, the time needed for accurate calculations of electrostatic energies can make BD simulations of ion current expensive. The present work develops an approach that overcomes some of the above challenges and allows one to simulate ion currents in models of biologic channels. Our method provides a fast and reliable estimate of the energetics of the system by combining semimacroscopic calculations of the self-energy of each ion and an implicit treatment of the interactions between the ions, as well as the interactions between the ions and the protein-ionizable groups. This treatment involves the use of the semimacroscopic version of the protein dipole Langevin dipole (PDLD/S) model in its linear response approximation (LRA) implementation, which reduces the uncertainties about the value of the protein "dielectric constant." The resulting free energy surface is used to generate the forces for on-the-fly BD simulations of the corresponding ion currents. Our model is examined in a preliminary simulation of the ion current in the KcsA potassium channel. The complete free energy profile for a single ion transport reflects reasonable energetics and captures the effect of the protein-ionized groups. This calculated profile indicates that we are dealing with the channel in its closed state. Reducing the barrier at the gate region allows us to simulate the ion current in a reasonable computational time. Several limiting cases are examined, including those that reproduce the observed current, and the nature of the productive trajectories is considered. The ability to simulate

  4. Allitridi Inhibits Multiple Cardiac Potassium Channels Expressed in HEK 293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Hui; Wu, Wei; Chen, Kui-Hao; Liu, Yi; Deng, Chun-Yu; Yu, Xi-Yong; Jin, Man-Wen; Li, Gui-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Allitridi (diallyl trisulfide) is an active compound (volatile oil) from garlic. The previous studies reported that allitridi had anti-arrhythmic effect. The potential ionic mechanisms are, however, not understood. The present study was designed to determine the effects of allitridi on cardiac potassium channels expressed in HEK 293 cells using a whole-cell patch voltage-clamp technique and mutagenesis. It was found that allitridi inhibited hKv4.3 channels (IC50 = 11.4 µM) by binding to the open channel, shifting availability potential to hyperpolarization, and accelerating closed-state inactivation of the channel. The hKv4.3 mutants T366A, T367A, V392A, and I395A showed a reduced response to allitridi with IC50s of 35.5 µM, 44.7 µM, 23.7 µM, and 42.4 µM. In addition, allitridi decreased hKv1.5, hERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells with IC50s of 40.2 µM, 19.6 µM and 17.7 µM. However, it slightly inhibited hKir2.1 current (100 µM, inhibited by 9.8% at −120 mV). Our results demonstrate for the first time that allitridi preferably blocks hKv4.3 current by binding to the open channel at T366 and T367 of P-loop helix, and at V392 and I395 of S6 domain. It has a weak inhibition of hKv1.5, hERG, and hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 currents. These effects may account for its anti-arrhythmic effect observed in experimental animal models. PMID:23272117

  5. Block by a putative antiarrhythmic agent of a calcium-dependent potassium channel in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    McLarnon, J G

    1990-05-04

    The actions of a new, putative antiarrhythmic drug, KC-8851 on single channel currents in hippocampal CA1 neurons have been studied. A calcium-dependent potassium current IK(Ca) was activated in the cultured neurons when a solution containing 140 mM K+ and 0.2 mM Ca2+ was applied to inside-out patches. Addition of the compound KC-8851, at concentrations between 1-50 microM, resulted in significant, dose-dependent, decreases in the mean open times of the K channel. The onward (blocking) rate constant was determined from a simple channel blockade scheme and was 5 x 10(7) M-1s-1; this rate constant was not dependent on voltage. Addition of KC-8851 to the solution bath with outside-out patches also caused significant decreases in the mean open times of the IK(Ca) channel consistent with channel blockade by the drug.

  6. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Astroglial Potassium and Glutamate Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Giselle; Sibille, Jérémie; Zapata, Jonathan; Rouach, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that astrocytes play essential roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Nevertheless, how neuronal activity alters astroglial functional properties and whether such properties also display specific forms of plasticity still remain elusive. Here, we review research findings supporting this aspect of astrocytes, focusing on their roles in the clearance of extracellular potassium and glutamate, two neuroactive substances promptly released during excitatory synaptic transmission. Their subsequent removal, which is primarily carried out by glial potassium channels and glutamate transporters, is essential for proper functioning of the brain. Similar to neurons, different forms of short- and long-term plasticity in astroglial uptake have been reported. In addition, we also present novel findings showing robust potentiation of astrocytic inward currents in response to repetitive stimulations at mild frequencies, as low as 0.75 Hz, in acute hippocampal slices. Interestingly, neurotransmission was hardly affected at this frequency range, suggesting that astrocytes may be more sensitive to low frequency stimulation and may exhibit stronger plasticity than neurons to prevent hyperexcitability. Taken together, these important findings strongly indicate that astrocytes display both short- and long-term plasticity in their clearance of excess neuroactive substances from the extracellular space, thereby regulating neuronal activity and brain homeostasis. PMID:26346563

  7. Potassium channels in the heart: structure, function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Eleonora; Sanguinetti, Michael C; Bartos, Daniel C; Bers, Donald M; Chen-Izu, Ye; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Colecraft, Henry M; Delisle, Brian P; Heijman, Jordi; Navedo, Manuel F; Noskov, Sergei; Proenza, Catherine; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    This paper is the outcome of the fourth UC Davis Systems Approach to Understanding Cardiac Excitation-Contraction Coupling and Arrhythmias Symposium, a biannual event that aims to bring together leading experts in subfields of cardiovascular biomedicine to focus on topics of importance to the field. The theme of the 2016 symposium was 'K(+) Channels and Regulation'. Experts in the field contributed their experimental and mathematical modelling perspectives and discussed emerging questions, controversies and challenges on the topic of cardiac K(+) channels. This paper summarizes the topics of formal presentations and informal discussions from the symposium on the structural basis of voltage-gated K(+) channel function, as well as the mechanisms involved in regulation of K(+) channel gating, expression and membrane localization. Given the critical role for K(+) channels in determining the rate of cardiac repolarization, it is hardly surprising that essentially every aspect of K(+) channel function is exquisitely regulated in cardiac myocytes. This regulation is complex and highly interrelated to other aspects of myocardial function. K(+) channel regulatory mechanisms alter, and are altered by, physiological challenges, pathophysiological conditions, and pharmacological agents. An accompanying paper focuses on the integrative role of K(+) channels in cardiac electrophysiology, i.e. how K(+) currents shape the cardiac action potential, and how their dysfunction can lead to arrhythmias, and discusses K(+) channel-based therapeutics. A fundamental understanding of K(+) channel regulatory mechanisms and disease processes is fundamental to reveal new targets for human therapy.

  8. A recombinant inwardly rectifying potassium channel coupled to GTP- binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    GTP-binding (G) proteins have been shown to mediate activation of inwardly rectifying potassium (K+) channels in cardiac, neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. Here, we report functional expression of a recombinant inwardly rectifying channel which we call KGP (or hpKir3.4), to signify that it is K+ selective, G-protein-gated and isolated from human pancreas. KGP expression in Xenopus oocytes resulted in sizeable basal (or agonist-independent) currents while coexpression with a G-protein-linked receptor, yielded additional agonist-induced currents. Coexpression of KGP and hGIRK1 (a human brain homolog of GIRK1/Kir3.1) produced much larger basal currents than those observed with KGP or hGIRK1 alone, and upon coexpression with receptor, similarly large agonist-induced currents could be obtained. Pertussis toxin treatment significantly diminished agonist-dependent currents due to either KGP or KGP/hGIRK1 expression. Interestingly, PTX also significantly reduced basal KGP or KGP/hGIRK1 currents, suggesting that basal activity is largely the result of G-protein gating as well. When the two channels were coexpressed with receptor, the relative increase in current elicited by agonist was similar whether KGP and hGIRK1 were expressed alone or together. When in vitro translated or when expressed in Xenopus oocytes or CHO mammalian cells, KGP gave rise to a nonglycosylated 45-kD protein. Antibodies directed against either KGP or hGIRK1 coprecipitated both proteins coexpressed in oocytes, providing evidence for the heteromeric assembly of the two channels and suggesting that the current potentiation seen with coexpression of the two channel subunits is due to specific interactions between them. An endogenous oocyte protein similar in size to KGP was also coprecipitated with hGIRK1. PMID:8868049

  9. Tityustoxin-K(alpha) blockade of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Aldo Rogelis A; Arantes, Eliane C; Monje, Francisco; Stuhmer, Walter; Varanda, Wamberto Antonio

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the action of TsTX-Kα on cloned Kv1.3 channels of the Shaker subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels, using the voltage–clamp technique. Highly purified TsTX-Kα was obtained from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus using a new purification protocol. Our results show that TsTX-Kα blocks Kv1.3 with high affinity in two expression systems. TsTX-Kα blockade of Kv1.3 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes was found to be completely reversible and to exhibit a pH dependence. The KD was 3.9 nM at pH 7.5, 9.5 nM at pH 7.0 and 94.5 nM at pH 6.5. The blocking properties of TsTX-Kα in a mammalian cell line (L929), stably transfected to express Kv1.3, were studied using the patch–clamp technique. In this preparation, the toxin had a KD of 19.8 nM at pH 7.4. TsTX-Kα was found to affect neither the voltage-dependence of activation, nor the activation and deactivation time constants. The block appeared to be independent of the transmembrane voltage and the toxin did not interfere with the C-type inactivation process. Taken as a whole, our findings indicate that TsTX-Kα acts as a simple blocker of Kv1.3 channels. It is concluded that this toxin is a useful tool for probing not only the physiological roles of Kv1.2, but also those mediated by Kv1.3 channels. PMID:12871837

  10. PGE2 inhibits basolateral 50 pS potassium channels in the thick ascending limb of the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ruimin; Jin, Yan; Zhai, Yuanyuan; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Chengbiao; Li, Wennan; Wang, lijun; Kong, Shumin; Zhang, Yunhong; Yang, Baofeng; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2010-01-01

    To study the inhibition of the inwardly rectifying basolateral 50 pS potassium channels by PGE2 we performed patch-clamp studies on the basolateral membrane of the rat kidney thick ascending limb. PGE2's effect was mimicked by the selective EP1- and EP3-receptor agonist, sulprostone, but was prevented by inhibiting protein kinase-C with calphostin-C. The mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 (ERK) or SB203580 (p38) increased basal channel activity; however, while neither alone prevented the inhibitory effect of PGE2, but using both of them together completely abolished PGE2's effect on channel activity. Treatment with PGE2 stimulated phosphorylation of both p38 and ERK in primary cultures of medullary thick ascending limb cells. The PGE2-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was not affected by indomethacin, but was completely blocked by calphostin-C. These studies show that inhibition of basolateral 50 pS potassium channels by PGE2 is mediated by protein kinase-C, which in turn stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinases in the thick ascending limb of the rat kidney. PMID:18496512

  11. A novel muscarinic receptor-independent mechanism of KCNQ2/3 potassium channel blockade by Oxotremorine-M.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Ruud; Reed, Hannah; Clarke, Sophie; Sher, Emanuele

    2016-11-15

    Inhibition of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels by activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been well established, and the ion currents through these channels have been long known as M-currents. We found that this cross-talk can be reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes by co-transfection of human recombinant muscarinic M1 receptors and KCNQ2/3 potassium channels. Application of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist Oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M) between voltage pulses to activate KCNQ2/3 channels caused inhibition of the subsequent KCNQ2/3 responses. This effect of Oxo-M was blocked by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. We also found that KCNQ2/3 currents were inhibited when Oxo-M was applied during an ongoing KCNQ2/3 response, an effect that was not blocked by atropine, suggesting that Oxo-M inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels directly. Indeed, also in oocytes that were transfected with only KCNQ2/3 channels, but not with muscarinic M1 receptors, Oxo-M inhibited the KCNQ2/3 response. These results show that besides the usual muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated inhibition, Oxo-M also inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels by a direct mechanism. We subsequently tested xanomeline, which is a chemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, and oxotremorine, which is a close analogue of Oxo-M. Both compounds inhibited KCNQ2/3 currents via activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but, in contrast to Oxo-M, they did not directly inhibit KCNQ2/3 channels. Xanomeline and oxotremorine do not contain a positively charged trimethylammonium moiety that is present in Oxo-M, suggesting that such a charged moiety could be a crucial component mediating this newly described direct inhibition of KCNQ2/3 channels.

  12. A hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore of the TWIK-1 K2P potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Prafulla; Abd-Wahab, Firdaus; Bucci, Giovanna; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2014-07-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structures of the two-pore domain (K2P) family of potassium channels have revealed a unique structural architecture at the point where the cytoplasmic bundle-crossing gate is found in most other tetrameric K+ channels. However, despite the apparently open nature of the inner pore in the TWIK-1 (K2P1/KCNK1) crystal structure, the reasons underlying its low levels of functional activity remain unclear. In this study, we use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and functional validation to demonstrate that TWIK-1 possesses a hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore, and that stochastic dewetting of this hydrophobic constriction acts as a major barrier to ion conduction. These results not only provide an important insight into the mechanisms which control TWIK-1 channel activity, but also have important implications for our understanding of how ion permeation may be controlled in similar ion channels and pores.

  13. How does a voltage sensor interact with a lipid bilayer? Simulations of a potassium channel domain.

    PubMed

    Sands, Zara A; Sansom, Mark S P

    2007-02-01

    The nature of voltage sensing by voltage-activated ion channels is a key problem in membrane protein structural biology. The way in which the voltage-sensor (VS) domain interacts with its membrane environment remains unclear. In particular, the known structures of Kv channels do not readily explain how a positively charged S4 helix is able to stably span a lipid bilayer. Extended (2 x 50 ns) molecular dynamics simulations of the high-resolution structure of the isolated VS domain from the archaebacterial potassium channel KvAP, embedded in zwitterionic and in anionic lipid bilayers, have been used to explore VS/lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The simulations reveal penetration of water into the center of the VS and bilayer. Furthermore, there is significant local deformation of the lipid bilayer by interactions between lipid phosphate groups and arginine side chains of S4. As a consequence of this, the electrostatic field is "focused" across the center of the bilayer.

  14. How Does a Voltage Sensor Interact with a Lipid Bilayer? Simulations of a Potassium Channel Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Zara A.; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The nature of voltage sensing by voltage-activated ion channels is a key problem in membrane protein structural biology. The way in which the voltage-sensor (VS) domain interacts with its membrane environment remains unclear. In particular, the known structures of Kv channels do not readily explain how a positively charged S4 helix is able to stably span a lipid bilayer. Extended (2 × 50 ns) molecular dynamics simulations of the high-resolution structure of the isolated VS domain from the archaebacterial potassium channel KvAP, embedded in zwitterionic and in anionic lipid bilayers, have been used to explore VS/lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The simulations reveal penetration of water into the center of the VS and bilayer. Furthermore, there is significant local deformation of the lipid bilayer by interactions between lipid phosphate groups and arginine side chains of S4. As a consequence of this, the electrostatic field is “focused” across the center of the bilayer. PMID:17292841

  15. Divalent ion trapping inside potassium channels of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we investigated the influence of external Ca2+, Ba2+, K+, Rb+, and internal Ca2+ on the rate of K+ channel inactivation in the human T lymphocyte-derived cell line, Jurkat E6-1. Raising external Ca2+ or Ba2+, or reducing external K+, accelerated the rate of the K+ current decay during a depolarizing voltage pulse. External Ba2+ also produced a use-dependent block of the K+ channels by entering the open channel and becoming trapped inside. Raising internal Ca2+ accelerated inactivation at lower concentrations than external Ca2+, but increasing the Ca2+ buffering with BAPTA did not affect inactivation. Raising [K+]o or adding Rb+ slowed inactivation by competing with divalent ions. External Rb+ also produced a use-dependent removal of block of K+ channels loaded with Ba2+ or Ca2+. From the removal of this block we found that under normal conditions approximately 25% of the channels were loaded with Ca2+, whereas under conditions with 10 microM internal Ca2+ the proportion of channels loaded with Ca2+ increased to approximately 50%. Removing all the divalent cations from the external and internal solution resulted in the induction of a non-selective, voltage-independent conductance. We conclude that Ca2+ ions from the outside or the inside can bind to a site at the K+ channel and thereby block the channel or accelerate inactivation. PMID:2786551

  16. Influence of Thromboxane A2 on the Regulation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channels in Mouse Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, In Seok; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Kim, Sang Hyung; Na, Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play an important role in myocardial protection. We examined the effects of thromboxane A2 on the regulation of KATP channel activity in single ventricular myocytes. Subjects and Methods Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of adult Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by enzymatic digestion. Single channel activity was recorded by excised inside-out and cell-attached patch clamp configurations at −60 mV holding potential during the perfusion of an ATP-free K-5 solution. Results In the excised inside-out patches, the thromboxane A2 analog, U46619, decreased the KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner; however, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, did not significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of U46619. In the cell-attached patches, U46619 inhibited dinitrophenol (DNP)-induced KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner, and SQ29548 attenuated the inhibitory effects of U46619 on DNP-induced KATP channel activity. Conclusion Thromboxane A2 may inhibit KATP channel activity, and may have a harmful effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:27482267

  17. Mechanisms of maurotoxin action on Shaker potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Avdonin, V; Nolan, B; Sabatier, J M; De Waard, M; Hoshi, T

    2000-01-01

    Maurotoxin (alpha-KTx6.2) is a toxin derived from the Tunisian chactoid scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus, and it is a member of a new family of toxins that contain four disulfide bridges (, Eur. J. Biochem. 254:468-479). We investigated the mechanism of the maurotoxin action on voltage-gated K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Maurotoxin blocks the channels in a voltage-dependent manner, with its efficacy increasing with greater hyperpolarization. We show that an amino acid residue in the external mouth of the channel pore segment that is known to be involved in the actions of other peptide toxins is also involved in maurotoxin's interaction with the channel. We conclude that, despite the unusual disulfide bridge pattern, the mechanism of the maurotoxin action is similar to those of other K(+) channel toxins with only three disulfide bridges. PMID:10920011

  18. G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels modulate respiratory depression by opioids

    PubMed Central

    Montandon, Gaspard; Ren, Jun; Victoria, Nicole C.; Liu, Hattie; Wickman, Kevin; Greer, John J.; Horner, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Drugs acting on μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are widely used as analgesics, but present side-effects including life-threatening respiratory depression. MOR are G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting neuronal activity through calcium channels, adenylyl cyclase, and/or G-protein–gated inwardly-rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels. The pathways underlying MOR-dependent inhibition of rhythmic breathing are unknown. Methods Using a combination of genetic, pharmacological and physiological tools in rodents in vivo, we aimed to identify the role of GIRK channels in MOR-mediated inhibition of respiratory circuits. Results GIRK channels were expressed in the ventrolateral medulla, a neuronal population regulating rhythmic breathing, and GIRK channel activation with flupirtine reduced respiratory rate in rats (percentage of baseline rate in mean±SD: 79.4±7.4%, n=7), wild-type mice (82.6±3.8%, n=3), but not in mice lacking the GIRK2 subunit, an integral subunit of neuronal GIRK channels (GIRK2−/−, 101.0±1.9%, n=3). Application of the MOR agonist DAMGO to the ventrolateral medulla depressed respiratory rate, an effect partially reversed by the GIRK channel blocker Tertiapin Q (baseline: 42.1±7.4 breath/min, DAMGO: 26.1±13.4 breath/min, TertiapinQ+DAMGO: 33.9±9.8 breath/min, n=4). Importantly, DAMGO applied to the ventrolateral medulla failed to reduce rhythmic breathing in GIRK2−/− mice (percentage of baseline rate: 103.2±12.1%, n=4), whereas it considerably reduced rate in wild-type mice (62.5±17.7% of baseline, n=4). Respiratory rate depression by systemic injection of the opioid analgesic fentanyl was markedly reduced in GIRK2−/− (percentage of baseline: 12.8±15.8%, n=5) compared to wild-type mice (72.9±27.3%). Conclusion Overall, these results identify that GIRK channels contribute to respiratory inhibition by MOR, an essential step toward understanding respiratory depression by opioids. PMID:26675532

  19. Photoaffinity Ligand for the Inhalational Anesthetic Sevoflurane Allows Mechanistic Insight into Potassium Channel Modulation.

    PubMed

    Woll, Kellie A; Peng, Wesley; Liang, Qiansheng; Zhi, Lianteng; Jacobs, Jack A; Maciunas, Lina; Bhanu, Natarajan; Garcia, Benjamin A; Covarrubias, Manuel; Loll, Patrick J; Dailey, William P; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2017-04-03

    Sevoflurane is a commonly used inhaled general anesthetic. Despite this, its mechanism of action remains largely elusive. Compared to other anesthetics, sevoflurane exhibits distinct functional activity. In particular, sevoflurane is a positive modulator of voltage-gated Shaker-related potassium channels (Kv1.x), which are key regulators of action potentials. Here, we report the synthesis and validation of azisevoflurane, a photoaffinity ligand for the direct identification of sevoflurane binding sites in the Kv1.2 channel. Azisevoflurane retains major sevoflurane protein binding interactions and pharmacological properties within in vivo models. Photoactivation of azisevoflurane induces adduction to amino acid residues that accurately reported sevoflurane protein binding sites in model proteins. Pharmacologically relevant concentrations of azisevoflurane analogously potentiated wild-type Kv1.2 and the established mutant Kv1.2 G329T. In wild-type Kv1.2 channels, azisevoflurane photolabeled Leu317 within the internal S4-S5 linker, a vital helix that couples the voltage sensor to the pore region. A residue lining the same binding cavity was photolabeled by azisevoflurane and protected by sevoflurane in the Kv1.2 G329T. Mutagenesis of Leu317 in WT Kv1.2 abolished sevoflurane voltage-dependent positive modulation. Azisevoflurane additionally photolabeled a second distinct site at Thr384 near the external selectivity filter in the Kv1.2 G329T mutant. The identified sevoflurane binding sites are located in critical regions involved in gating of Kv channels and related ion channels. Azisevoflurane has thus emerged as a new tool to discover inhaled anesthetic targets and binding sites and investigate contributions of these targets to general anesthesia.

  20. Characterization of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaarschmidt, Grit; Wegner, Florian; Schwarz, Sigrid C.; Schmidt, Hartmut; Schwarz, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are among the earliest ion channels to appear during brain development, suggesting a functional requirement for progenitor cell proliferation and/or differentiation. We tested this hypothesis, using human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) as a model system. Methodology/Principal Findings In proliferating hNPCs a broad spectrum of Kv channel subtypes was identified using quantitative real-time PCR with a predominant expression of the A-type channel Kv4.2. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings Kv currents were separated into a large transient component characteristic for fast-inactivating A-type potassium channels (IA) and a small, sustained component produced by delayed-rectifying channels (IK). During differentiation the expression of IA as well as A-type channel transcripts dramatically decreased, while IK producing delayed-rectifiers were upregulated. Both Kv currents were differentially inhibited by selective neurotoxins like phrixotoxin-1 and α-dendrotoxin as well as by antagonists like 4-aminopyridine, ammoniumchloride, tetraethylammonium chloride and quinidine. In viability and proliferation assays chronic inhibition of the A-type currents severely disturbed the cell cycle and precluded proper hNPC proliferation, while the blockade of delayed-rectifiers by α-dendrotoxin increased proliferation. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that A-type potassium currents are essential for proper proliferation of immature multipotent hNPCs. PMID:19584922

  1. Functional coupling of TRPV4 cationic channel and large conductance, calcium-dependent potassium channel in human bronchial epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, José M; Andrade, Yaniré N; Arniges, Maite; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Plata, Cristina; Rubio-Moscardo, Francisca; Vázquez, Esther; Valverde, Miguel A

    2008-10-01

    Calcium-dependent potassium channels are implicated in electrolyte transport, cell volume regulation and mechanical responses in epithelia, although the pathways for calcium entry and their coupling to the activation of potassium channels are not fully understood. We now show molecular evidence for the presence of TRPV4, a calcium permeable channel sensitive to osmotic and mechanical stress, and its functional coupling to the large conductance calcium-dependent potassium channel (BK(Ca)) in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (HBE). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, intracellular calcium imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments using HBE cells demonstrated the presence of TRPV4 messenger and Ca(2+) entry, and outwardly rectifying cationic currents elicited by the TRPV4 specific activator 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4alphaPDD). Cell-attached and whole-cell patch-clamp of HBE cells exposed to 4alphaPDD, and hypotonic and high-viscosity solutions (related to mechanical stress) revealed the activation of BK(Ca) channels subsequent to extracellular Ca(2+) influx via TRPV4, an effect lost upon antisense-mediated knock-down of TRPV4. Further analysis of BK(Ca) modulation after TRPV4 activation showed that the Ca(2+) signal can be generated away from the BK(Ca) location at the plasma membrane, and it is not mediated by intracellular Ca(2+) release via ryanodine receptors. Finally, we have shown that, unlike the reported disengagement of TRPV4 and BK(Ca) in response to hypotonic solutions, cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells (CFBE) preserve the functional coupling of TRPV4 and BK(Ca) in response to high-viscous solutions.

  2. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K+ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  3. ATP-sensitive potassium channels mediate contraction-induced attenuation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G D; Hansen, J; Victor, R G

    1997-06-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction is sensitive to inhibition by metabolic events in contracting rat and human skeletal muscle, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are unknown. In rats, this inhibition involves mainly alpha2-adrenergic vasoconstriction, which relies heavily on Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. We therefore hypothesized that contraction-induced inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction is mediated by ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, a hyperpolarizing vasodilator mechanism that could be activated by some metabolic product(s) of skeletal muscle contraction. We tested this hypothesis in anesthetized rats by measuring femoral artery blood flow responses to lumbar sympathetic nerve stimulation or intraarterial hindlimb infusion of the specific alpha2-adrenergic agonist UK 14,304 during KATP channel activation with diazoxide in resting hindlimb and during KATP channel block with glibenclamide in contracting hindlimb. The major new findings are twofold. First, like muscle contraction, pharmacologic activation of KATP channels with diazoxide in resting hindlimb dose dependently attenuated the vasoconstrictor responses to either sympathetic nerve stimulation or intraarterial UK 14,304. Second, the large contraction-induced attenuation in sympathetic vasoconstriction elicited by nerve stimulation or UK 14,304 was partially reversed when the physiologic activation of KATP channels produced by muscle contraction was prevented with glibenclamide. We conclude that contraction-induced activation of KATP channels is a major mechanism underlying metabolic inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising skeletal muscle.

  4. Mechanism of functional interaction between potassium channel Kv1.3 and sodium channel NavBeta1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Tomoya; Correa, Ana M.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily A member 3 (Kv1.3) dominantly expresses on T cells and neurons. Recently, the interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 subunits has been explored through ionic current measurements, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated yet. We explored the functional interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 through gating current measurements using the Cut-open Oocyte Voltage Clamp (COVC) technique. We showed that the N-terminal 1–52 sequence of hKv1.3 disrupts the channel expression on the Xenopus oocyte membrane, suggesting a potential role as regulator of hKv1.3 expression in neurons and lymphocytes. Our gating currents measurements showed that NavBeta1 interacts with the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of Kv1.3 through W172 in the transmembrane segment and modifies the gating operation. The comparison between G-V and Q-V with/without NavBeta1 indicates that NavBeta1 may strengthen the coupling between hKv1.3-VSD movement and pore opening, inducing the modification of kinetics in ionic activation and deactivation. PMID:28349975

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are cerebral vasodilators via the TREK-1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, Nicolas; Pétrault, Olivier; Manta, Stella; Giordanengo, Valérie; Gounon, Pierre; Bordet, Régis; Lazdunski, Michel; Heurteaux, Catherine

    2007-07-20

    Vessel occlusion is the most frequent cause for impairment of local blood flow within the brain resulting in neuronal damage and is a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and especially alpha-linolenic acid improve brain resistance against cerebral ischemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids and particularly alpha-linolenic acid on the cerebral blood flow and on the tone of vessels that regulate brain perfusion. alpha-Linolenic acid injections increased cerebral blood flow and induced vasodilation of the basilar artery but not of the carotid artery. The saturated fatty acid palmitic acid did not produce vasodilation. This suggested that the target of the polyunsaturated fatty acids effect was the TREK-1 potassium channel. We demonstrate the presence of this channel in basilar but not in carotid arteries. We show that vasodilations induced by the polyunsaturated fatty acid in the basilar artery as well as the laser-Doppler flow increase are abolished in TREK-1(-/-) mice. Altogether these data indicate that TREK-1 activation elicits a robust dilation that probably accounts for the increase of cerebral blood flow induced by polyunsaturated fatty acids such as alpha-linolenic acid or docosahexanoic acid. They suggest that the selective expression and activation of TREK-1 in brain collaterals could play a significant role in the protective mechanisms of polyunsaturated fatty acids against stroke by providing residual circulation during ischemia.

  6. Up-regulation of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Ester; Noé, Véronique; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Lluis, Carmen; Ferrer, Isidre; Ciudad, Carlos J; Franco, Rafael

    2004-11-01

    Gene expression throughout the different stages of Alzheimer's disease was analysed in samples from cerebral cortex. The gene encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.4 was already overexpressed in early stages of the disease, and in advanced stages Kv3.4 was present at high levels in neurodegenerative structures. This subunit regulates delayed-rectifier currents, which are primary determinants of spike repolarization in neurones. In unique samples from a patient with Alzheimer's disease whose amount of amyloid plaques was decreased by beta amyloid immunization, Kv3.4 was overexpressed. The channel subunit was expressed in the neuropil, in the remaining conventional plaques in the frontal cortex and in collapsed plaques in the orbitary cortex. Therefore, amyloid deposition in plaques does not seem to be responsible for the increase in Kv3.4 levels. Nevertheless, Kv3.4 up-regulation is related to amyloid pathology, given that transgenic mice with the Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein showed increased expression of Kv3.4. Up-regulation of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits alters potassium currents in neurones and leads to altered synaptic activity that may underlie the neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, Kv3.4 likely represents a novel therapeutic target for the disease.

  7. Kv3.4 potassium channel-mediated electrosignaling controls cell cycle and survival of irradiated leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Palme, Daniela; Misovic, Milan; Schmid, Evi; Klumpp, Dominik; Salih, Helmut R; Rudner, Justine; Huber, Stephan M

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant ion channel expression in the plasma membrane is characteristic for many tumor entities and has been attributed to neoplastic transformation, tumor progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance. The present study aimed to define the function of these "oncogenic" channels for radioresistance of leukemia cells. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells were irradiated (0-6 Gy X ray), ion channel expression and activity, Ca(2+)- and protein signaling, cell cycle progression, and cell survival were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, patch-clamp recording, fura-2 Ca(2+)-imaging, immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and clonogenic survival assays, respectively. Ionizing radiation-induced G2/M arrest was preceded by activation of Kv3.4-like voltage-gated potassium channels. Channel activation in turn resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) entry and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase-II, and inactivation of the phosphatase cdc25B and the cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2. Accordingly, channel inhibition by tetraethylammonium and blood-depressing substance-1 and substance-2 or downregulation by RNA interference led to release from radiation-induced G2/M arrest, increased apoptosis, and decreased clonogenic survival. Together, these findings indicate the functional significance of voltage-gated K(+) channels for the radioresistance of myeloid leukemia cells.

  8. RNA editing modulates the binding of drugs and highly unsaturated fatty acids to the open pore of Kv potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Decher, Niels; Streit, Anne K; Rapedius, Markus; Netter, Michael F; Marzian, Stefanie; Ehling, Petra; Schlichthörl, Günter; Craan, Tobias; Renigunta, Vijay; Köhler, Annemarie; Dodel, Richard C; Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Klebe, Gerhard; Budde, Thomas; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Daut, Jürgen

    2010-07-07

    The time course of inactivation of voltage-activated potassium (Kv) channels is an important determinant of the firing rate of neurons. In many Kv channels highly unsaturated lipids as arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and anandamide can induce fast inactivation. We found that these lipids interact with hydrophobic residues lining the inner cavity of the pore. We analysed the effects of these lipids on Kv1.1 current kinetics and their competition with intracellular tetraethylammonium and Kvbeta subunits. Our data suggest that inactivation most likely represents occlusion of the permeation pathway, similar to drugs that produce 'open-channel block'. Open-channel block by drugs and lipids was strongly reduced in Kv1.1 channels whose amino acid sequence was altered by RNA editing in the pore cavity, and in Kv1.x heteromeric channels containing edited Kv1.1 subunits. We show that differential editing of Kv1.1 channels in different regions of the brain can profoundly alter the pharmacology of Kv1.x channels. Our findings provide a mechanistic understanding of lipid-induced inactivation and establish RNA editing as a mechanism to induce drug and lipid resistance in Kv channels.

  9. The effect of copper sulfate, potassium permanganate, and peracetic acid on Ichthyobodo necator in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ichthyobodo necator is a single celled biflagellate that can cause significant mortalities in fish, particularly young, tank-reared fish. Copper sulfate (CuSO4), potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and peracetic acid (PAA) were evaluated for effectiveness against Ichthybodosis in juvenile channel catfis...

  10. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  11. Mutations in voltage-gated potassium channel KCNC3 cause degenerative and developmental central nervous system phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael F; Minassian, Natali A; Stevanin, Giovanni; Figueroa, Karla P; Bannister, John P A; Nolte, Dagmar; Mock, Allan F; Evidente, Virgilio Gerald H; Fee, Dominic B; Müller, Ulrich; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Papazian, Diane M; Pulst, Stefan M

    2006-04-01

    Potassium channel mutations have been described in episodic neurological diseases. We report that K+ channel mutations cause disease phenotypes with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative features. In a Filipino adult-onset ataxia pedigree, the causative gene maps to 19q13, overlapping the SCA13 disease locus described in a French pedigree with childhood-onset ataxia and cognitive delay. This region contains KCNC3 (also known as Kv3.3), encoding a voltage-gated Shaw channel with enriched cerebellar expression. Sequencing revealed two missense mutations, both of which alter KCNC3 function in Xenopus laevis expression systems. KCNC3(R420H), located in the voltage-sensing domain, had no channel activity when expressed alone and had a dominant-negative effect when co-expressed with the wild-type channel. KCNC3(F448L) shifted the activation curve in the negative direction and slowed channel closing. Thus, KCNC3(R420H) and KCNC3(F448L) are expected to change the output characteristics of fast-spiking cerebellar neurons, in which KCNC channels confer capacity for high-frequency firing. Our results establish a role for KCNC3 in phenotypes ranging from developmental disorders to adult-onset neurodegeneration and suggest voltage-gated K+ channels as candidates for additional neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ran; Chen, Jian; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-05

    Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack) genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel's sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)]i) concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po). We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na(+)]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects.

  13. Channeling your inner ear potassium: K(+) channels in vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Rennie, Katherine J

    2016-08-01

    During development of vestibular hair cells, K(+) conductances are acquired in a specific pattern. Functionally mature vestibular hair cells express different complements of K(+) channels which uniquely shape the hair cell receptor potential and filtering properties. In amniote species, type I hair cells (HCI) have a large input conductance due to a ubiquitous low-voltage-activated K(+) current that activates with slow sigmoidal kinetics at voltages negative to the membrane resting potential. In contrast type II hair cells (HCII) from mammalian and non-mammalian species have voltage-dependent outward K(+) currents that activate rapidly at or above the resting membrane potential and show significant inactivation. A-type, delayed rectifier and calcium-activated K(+) channels contribute to the outward K(+) conductance and are present in varying proportions in HCII. In many species, K(+) currents in HCII in peripheral locations of vestibular epithelia inactivate more than HCII in more central locations. Two types of inward rectifier currents have been described in both HCI and HCII. A rapidly activating K(+)-selective inward rectifier current (IK1, mediated by Kir2.1 channels) predominates in HCII in peripheral zones, whereas a slower mixed cation inward rectifier current (Ih), shows greater expression in HCII in central zones of vestibular epithelia. The implications for sensory coding of vestibular signals by different types of hair cells are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  14. Behavioral motor dysfunction in Kv3-type potassium channel-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Joho, R H; Street, C; Matsushita, S; Knöpfel, T

    2006-08-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 are expressed in several distinct neuronal subpopulations in brain areas known to be involved in motor control such as cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Depending on the lack of Kv3.1 or Kv3.3 channel subunits, mutant mice show different Kv3-null allele-dependent behavioral alterations that include constitutive hyperactivity, sleep loss, impaired motor performance and, in the case of the Kv3.1/Kv3.3 double mutant, also severe ataxia, tremor and myoclonus (Espinosa et al. 2001, J Neurosci 21, 6657-6665, Genes, Brain Behav 3, 90-100). The lack of Kv3.1 channel subunits is mainly responsible for the constitutively increased locomotor activity and for sleep loss, whereas the absence of Kv3.3 subunits affects cerebellar function, in particular Purkinje cell discharges and olivocerebellar system properties (McMahon et al. 2004, Eur J Neurosci 19, 3317-3327). Here, we describe two sensitive and non-invasive tests to reliably quantify normal and abnormal motor functions, and we apply these tests to characterize motor dysfunction in Kv3-mutant mice. In contrast to wildtype and Kv3.1-single mutants, Kv3.3-single mutants and Kv3 mutants lacking three and four Kv3 alleles display Kv3-null allele-dependent gait alterations. Although the Kv3-null allele-dependent gait changes correlate with reduced motor performance, they appear to not affect the training-induced improvement of motor performance. These findings suggest that altered cerebellar physiology in the absence of Kv3.3 channels is responsible for impaired motor task execution but not motor task learning.

  15. Coupled Motions between Pore and Voltage-Sensor Domains: A Model for Shaker B, a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Treptow, Werner; Maigret, Bernard; Chipot, Christophe; Tarek, Mounir

    2004-01-01

    A high-resolution crystal structure of KvAP, an archeabacterial voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, complexed with a monoclonal Fab fragment has been recently determined. Based on this structure, a mechanism for the activation (opening) of Kv channels has been put forward. This mechanism has since been criticized, suggesting that the resolved structure is not representative of the family of voltage-gated potassium channels. Here, we propose a model of the transmembrane domain of Shaker B, a well-characterized Kv channel, built by homology modeling and docking calculations. In this model, the positively charged S4 helices are oriented perpendicular to the membrane and localized in the groove between segments S5 and S6 of adjacent subunits. The structure and the dynamics of the full atomistic model embedded in a hydrated lipid bilayer were investigated by means of two large-scale molecular dynamics simulations under transmembrane-voltage conditions known to induce, respectively, the resting state (closed) and the activation (opening) of voltage-gated channels. Upon activation, the model undergoes conformational changes that lead to an increase of the hydration of the charged S4 helices, correlated with an upward translation and a tilting of the latter, concurrently with movements of the S5 helices and the activation gate. Although small, these conformational changes ultimately result in an alteration of the ion-conduction pathway. Our findings support the transporter model devised by Bezanilla and collaborators, and further underline the crucial role played by internal hydration in the activation of the channel. PMID:15454436

  16. Nicotine depresses the functions of multiple cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Shi, H; Wang, Z

    1999-01-01

    Nicotine is the main constituent of tobacco smoke responsible for the elevated risk of the cardiovascular disease and sudden coronary death associated with smoking, presumably by provoking cardiac arrhythmias. The cellular mechanisms may be related to the ability of nicotine to prolong action potentials and to depolarize membrane potential. However, the underlying ionic mechanisms remained unknown. We showed here that nicotine blocked multiple types of K+ currents, including the native currents in canine ventricular myocytes and the cloned channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes: A-type K+ currents (I(to)/Kv4.3), delayed rectifier K+ currents (I(Kr)/HERG) and inward rectifier K+ currents (I(K1)/Kir2.1). Most noticeably, nicotine at a concentration as low as of 10 nM significantly suppressed I(to) and Kv4.3 by approximately 20%. The effects of nicotine were independent of nicotinic receptor simulation or catecholamine release. Our results indicate that nicotine is a non-specific blocker of K+ channels and the inhibitory effects are the consequence of direct interactions between nicotine molecules and the channel proteins. Our study provided for the first time the evidence for the direct inhibition of cardiac K+ channels by nicotine and established a novel aspect of nicotine pharmacology.

  17. [Isolation and purification of human blood plasma proteins able to form potassium channels in artificial bilayer lipid membrane].

    PubMed

    Venediktova, N I; Kuznetsov, K V; Gritsenko, E N; Gulidova, G P; Mironova, G D

    2012-01-01

    Protein fraction able to induce K(+)-selective transport across bilayer lipid membrane was isolated from human blood plasma with the use of the detergent and proteolytic enzyme-free method developed at our laboratory. After addition of the studied sample to the artificial membrane in the presence of 100 mM KCl, a discrete current change was observed. No channel activity was recorded in the presence of calcium and sodium ions. Channel forming activity of fraction was observed only in the presence of K+. Using a threefold gradient of KCl in the presence of studied proteins the potassium-selective potential balanced by voltage of -29 mV was registered. This value is very close to the theoretical Nernst potential in this case. This means that the examined ion channel is cation-selective. According to data obtained with MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF and database NCBI three protein components were identified in isolated researched sample.

  18. Structural and functional consequences of the presence of a fourth disulfide bridge in the scorpion short toxins: solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1.

    PubMed Central

    Savarin, P.; Romi-Lebrun, R.; Zinn-Justin, S.; Lebrun, B.; Nakajima, T.; Gilquin, B.; Menez, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1, using nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling. This protein belongs to the scorpion short toxin family, which essentially contains potassium channel blockers of 29 to 39 amino acids and three disulfide bridges. It is highly active on voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels. Furthermore, it has the particularity to possess a fourth disulfide bridge. We show that HsTX1 has a fold similar to that of the three-disulfide-bridged toxins and conserves the hydrophobic core found in the scorpion short toxins. Thus, the fourth bridge has no influence on the global conformation of HsTX1. Most residues spatially analogous to those interacting with voltage-gated potassium channels in the three-disulfide-bridged toxins are conserved in HsTX1. Thus, we propose that Tyr21, Lys23, Met25, and Asn26 are involved in the biological activity of HsTX1. As an additional positively charged residue is always spatially close to the aromatic residue in toxins blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels, and as previous mutagenesis experiments have shown the critical role played by the C-terminus in HsTX1, we suggest that Arg33 is also important for the activity of the four disulfide-bridged toxin. Docking calculations confirm that, if Lys23 and Met25 interact with the GYGDMH motif of Kv1.3, Arg33 can contact Asp386 and, thus, play the role of the additional positively charged residue of the toxin functional site. This original configuration of the binding site of HsTX1 for Kv1.3, if confirmed experimentally, offers new structural possibilities for the construction of a molecule blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:10631983

  19. Suppression of the hERG potassium channel response to premature stimulation by reduction in extracellular potassium concentration.

    PubMed

    Melgari, Dario; Du, Chunyun; El Harchi, Aziza; Zhang, Yihong; Hancox, Jules C

    2014-10-01

    Potassium channels encoded by human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) mediate the cardiac rapid delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr), which participates in ventricular repolarization and has a protective role against unwanted premature stimuli late in repolarization and early in diastole. Ionic current carried by hERG channels (IhERG) is known to exhibit a paradoxical dependence on external potassium concentration ([K(+)]e), but effects of acute [K(+)]e changes on the response of IhERG to premature stimulation have not been characterized. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements of hERG current were made at 37°C from hERG channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Under conventional voltage-clamp, both wild-type (WT) and S624A pore-mutant IhERG during depolarization to +20 mV and subsequent repolarization to -40 mV were decreased when superfusate [K(+)]e was decreased from 4 to 1 mmol/L. When [K(+)]e was increased from 4 to 10 mmol/L, pulse current was increased and tail IhERG was decreased. Increasing [K(+)]e produced a +10 mV shift in voltage-dependent inactivation of WT IhERG and slowed inactivation time course, while lowering [K(+)]e from 4 to 1 mmol/L produced little change in inactivation voltage dependence, but accelerated inactivation time course. Under action potential (AP) voltage-clamp, lowering [K(+)]e reduced the amplitude of IhERG during the AP and suppressed the maximal IhERG response to premature stimuli. Raising [K(+)]e increased IhERG early during the AP and augmented the IhERG response to premature stimuli. Our results are suggestive that during hypokalemia not only is the contribution of IKr to ventricular repolarization reduced but its ability to protect against unwanted premature stimuli also becomes impaired.

  20. Developmental Expression of Kv Potassium Channels at the Axon Initial Segment of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ponce, Diana; DeFelipe, Javier; Garrido, Juan José; Muñoz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth and the formation of the axon initial segment (AIS) are early events in the acquisition of neuronal polarity. The AIS is characterized by a high concentration of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. However, the specific ion channel subunits present and their precise localization in this axonal subdomain vary both during development and among the types of neurons, probably determining their firing characteristics in response to stimulation. Here, we characterize the developmental expression of different subfamilies of voltage-gated potassium channels in the AISs of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, including subunits Kv1.2, Kv2.2 and Kv7.2. In contrast to the early appearance of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Kv7.2 subunit at the AIS, Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits were tethered at the AIS only after 10 days in vitro. Interestingly, we observed different patterns of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunit expression, with each confined to distinct neuronal populations. The accumulation of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits at the AIS was dependent on ankyrin G tethering, it was not affected by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and it was resistant to detergent extraction, as described previously for other AIS proteins. This distribution of potassium channels in the AIS further emphasizes the heterogeneity of this structure in different neuronal populations, as proposed previously, and suggests corresponding differences in action potential regulation. PMID:23119056