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Sample records for activated protein map

  1. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors: a review on pharmacophore mapping and QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Gangwal, Rahul P; Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Damre, Mangesh V; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are the serine/threonine protein kinases, which play a vital role in cellular responses to external stress signals. p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have shown anti-inflammatory effects in the preclinical disease models, primarily through inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators. A number of structurally diverse p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have been developed as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Most of the inhibitors have failed in the clinical trials either due to poor pharmacokinetic profile or selectivity issue, which makes p38 MAP kinase a promising target for molecular modelling studies. Several quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and pharmacophore models have been developed to identify the structural requirements essential for p38 MAP kinase inhibitory activity. In this review, we provide an overview of the presently known p38 MAP kinase inhibitors and how QSAR analyses among series of compounds have led to the development of molecular models and pharmacophores, allowing the design of novel inhibitors.

  2. Gene encoding T-cell-activating protein TAP maps to the Ly-6 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Yeh, E T; Gramm, C F; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    Recently we described two murine T-cell membrane proteins, TAP (T-cell-activating protein) and TAPa (TAP-associated protein). Previous experiments suggested that TAP is involved in physiologic T-cell activation. The subject of this report is a genetic analysis of these molecules. TAP and TAPa map to the Ly-6 locus. The relationship of these molecules to other antigens encoded in this locus is examined. Based on tissue distribution, molecular structure, and functional properties, TAP is distinct from any previously described Ly-6 antigen, whereas TAPa is probably identical to the 34-11-3 antigen. TAP and TAPa are coexpressed on all cell types examined so far. Moreover, comparative studies demonstrate a complex developmentally regulated pattern in the expression of molecules encoded in this locus. Images PMID:3010324

  3. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  4. Smooth-muscle mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase: purification and characterization, and the phosphorylation of caldesmon.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, T J; Mak, A S

    1993-01-01

    A single 42 kDa isoform of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is expressed in both embryonic and adult chicken gizzard. The gizzard MAP kinase, which cross-reacts with anti-p44mpk antibody, has been purified from adult chicken gizzard and partially characterized. The purification protocol employs phenyl-Sepharose, polylysine-agarose, hydroxyapatite, Mono-Q and phenyl-Superose column chromatography. The purified enzyme phosphorylates myelin basic protein and gizzard high-molecular-mass (h-)caldesmon. Sea-star p44mpk and gizzard MAP kinase phosphorylate h-caldesmon at identical sites at the C-terminal domain, as revealed by tryptic-peptide mapping of the phosphorylated protein. Phosphorylation of h-caldesmon by gizzard MAP kinase abolishes its interaction with polymerized tubulin. The specific activity of the purified gizzard kinase toward myelin basic protein is similar to that of brain tau kinase, but is only a fraction of that of activated sea-star p44mpk. This suggests that, although a large amount of MAP kinase is present in the gizzard, only a small percentage of the enzyme is activated normally. Autophosphorylation of the gizzard kinase, at least in part on tyrosine residues, activates its kinase activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8280072

  5. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans.

  6. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans. PMID:26907690

  7. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  8. Mapping the Homodimer Interface of an Optimized, Artificial, Transmembrane Protein Activator of the Human Erythropoietin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bears, Zachary; Barrera, Francisco N.; Alonso, Miriam; Engelman, Donald M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins constitute a large fraction of cellular proteins, and specific interactions involving membrane-spanning protein segments play an important role in protein oligomerization, folding, and function. We previously isolated an artificial, dimeric, 44-amino acid transmembrane protein that activates the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) in trans. This artificial protein supports limited erythroid differentiation of primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro, even though it does not resemble erythropoietin, the natural ligand of this receptor. Here, we used a directed-evolution approach to explore the structural basis for the ability of transmembrane proteins to activate the hEPOR. A library that expresses thousands of mutants of the transmembrane activator was screened for variants that were more active than the original isolate at inducing growth factor independence in mouse cells expressing the hEPOR. The most active mutant, EBC5-16, supports erythroid differentiation in human cells with activity approaching that of EPO, as assessed by cell-surface expression of glycophorin A, a late-stage marker of erythroid differentiation. EBC5-16 contains a single isoleucine to serine substitution at position 25, which increases its ability to form dimers. Genetic studies confirmed the importance of dimerization for activity and identified the residues constituting the homodimer interface of EBC5-16. The interface requires a GxxxG dimer packing motif and a small amino acid at position 25 for maximal activity, implying that tight packing of the EBC5-16 dimer is a crucial determinant of activity. These experiments identified an artificial protein that causes robust activation of its target in a natural host cell, demonstrated the importance of dimerization of this protein for engagement of the hEPOR, and provided the framework for future structure-function studies of this novel mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:24788775

  9. Rapamycin induces mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression through activation of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Jiang, Zhongliang; Ahmad, Nisar; Rosati, Rita; Liu, Yusen; Beuret, Laurent; Monks, Robert; Charron, Jean; Birnbaum, Morris J; Samavati, Lobelia

    2013-11-22

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), also known as dual specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP-1), plays a crucial role in the deactivation of MAPKs. Several drugs with immune-suppressive properties modulate MKP-1 expression as part of their mechanism of action. We investigated the effect of mTOR inhibition through rapamycin and a dual mTOR inhibitor (AZD2014) on MKP-1 expression. Low dose rapamycin led to a rapid activation of both AKT and ERK pathways with a subsequent increase in MKP-1 expression. Rapamycin treatment led to phosphorylation of CREB, transcription factor 1 (ATF1), and ATF2, three transcription factors that bind to the cyclic AMP-responsive elements on the Mkp-1 promoter. Inhibition of either the MEK/ERK or the AKT pathway attenuated rapamycin-mediated MKP-1 induction. AZD2014 did not activate AKT but activated the ERK pathway, leading to a moderate MKP-1 induction. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) derived from wild-type (WT) mice or mice deficient in AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms or BMDM from targeted deficiency in MEK1 and MEK2, we show that rapamycin treatment led to an increased MKP1 expression in BMDM from WT but failed to do so in BMDMs lacking the AKT1 isoform or MEK1 and MEK2. Importantly, rapamycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-mediated p38 activation and decreased nitric oxide and IL-6 production. Our work provides a conceptual framework for the observed immune modulatory effect of mTOR inhibition.

  10. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS ... Data Web Services Latest Detected Fire Activity Other MODIS Products Frequently Asked Questions About Active Fire Maps ...

  11. Functional Mapping of Protein Kinase A Reveals Its Importance in Adult Schistosoma mansoni Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    de Saram, Paulu S. R.; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J.; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and ‘smart’ anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology

  12. Functional mapping of protein kinase A reveals its importance in adult Schistosoma mansoni motor activity.

    PubMed

    de Saram, Paulu S R; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and 'smart' anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology.

  13. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1+/− embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  14. Regulation of endothelial protein C receptor shedding by cytokines is mediated through differential activation of MAP kinase signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele

    2009-09-10

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a pivotal role in coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, and cancer, but its activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble protein (sEPCR). In this study we examined the mechanisms involved in the regulation of EPCR shedding in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), but not interferon-{gamma} and interleukin-6, suppressed EPCR mRNA transcription and cell-associated EPCR expression in HUVEC. The release of sEPCR induced by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} correlated with activation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). EPCR shedding was also induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, ionomycin, anisomycin, thiol oxidants or alkylators, thrombin, and disruptors of lipid rafts. Both basal and induced shedding of EPCR was blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitors, TAPI-0 and GM6001, and by the reduced non-protein thiols, glutathione, dihydrolipoic acid, dithiothreitol, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Because other antioxidants and scavengers of reactive oxygen species failed to block the cleavage of EPCR, a direct suppression of metalloproteinase activity seems responsible for the observed effects of reduced thiols. In summary, the shedding of EPCR in HUVEC is effectively regulated by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}, and downstream by MAP kinase signaling pathways and metalloproteinases.

  15. Protein folding using contact maps.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, M; Domany, E

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the problem of representations of protein structure and give the definition of contact maps. We present a method to obtain a three-dimensional polypeptide conformation from a contact map. We also explain how to deal with the case of nonphysical contact maps. We describe a stochastic method to perform dynamics in contact map space. We explain how the motion is restricted to physical regions of the space. First, we introduce the exact free energy of a contact map and discuss two simple approximations to it. Second, we present a method to derive energy parameters based on perception learning. We prove in an extensive number of situations that the pairwise contact approximation both when alone and when supplemented with a hydrophobic term is unsuitable for stabilizing proteins' native states. PMID:10668399

  16. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli outer membrane proteins induce iNOS by activation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Malladi, Vasantha; Puthenedam, Manjula; Williams, Peter H; Balakrishnan, Arun

    2004-12-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infects the human intestinal epithelium and is a major cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important modulator of intestinal inflammatory response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether EPEC outer membrane proteins (OMPs) up regulate epithelial cell expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and to examine the role of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases (MAPK) on nitrite production. iNOS mRNA expression was assessed by RT-PCR. Nitrite levels were measured by Griess reaction. NF-kappaB activation by OMPs was evaluated by EMSA and immunoblotting was done to detect MAPK activation. EPEC OMP up regulated iNOS, induced nitrite production and NF-kappaB and MAPK were activated in caco-2 cells. The nitrite levels decreased when NF-kappaB and MAPK inhibitors were used. Thus, EPEC OMPs induce iNOS expression and NO production through activation of NF-kappaB and MAPK.

  17. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  18. The RAP1GA1 locus for human Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 maps to chromosome 1p36.1-->p35.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P G; McCormick, F; Cavenee, W K; Arden, K C

    1994-01-01

    Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids we have mapped the locus for Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 (RAP1GA1) to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments independently confirmed the chromosomal localization and refined it to 1p36.1-->p35.

  19. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-01

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  20. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  1. Stimulation of MAP-2 kinase activity in T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 or anti-Ti monoclonal antibody is partially dependent on protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Nel, A E; Hanekom, C; Rheeder, A; Williams, K; Pollack, S; Katz, R; Landreth, G E

    1990-04-01

    Signaling via the alpha-beta T cell Ag receptor (Ti)-CD3 complex is a complicated event that implicates several protein kinases, most notably protein kinase C (PKC). We have recently identified a serine kinase in T lymphocytes with the following characteristics: molecular mass 43 kDa, in vitro substrate affinity for microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2) with a preference for Mn2+ during the catalytic reaction, and elution from DEAE resin over a salt range 100 to 200 mM NaCl. This kinase is activated in a rapidly reversible fashion during ligation of CD3/Ti by a process which involves prior phosphorylation; in vitro exposure of activated 43-kDa MAP-2 kinase (MAP-K) to an immobilized phosphatase abrogated its kinase activity. We now show that a MAP-2K response could also be obtained during treatment with mAb to Ti and the specific PKC agonist, PMA. Although the kinetics of the former response was rapidly reversible, PMA elicited a more prolonged response. The dose responsiveness for PMA was similar to the requirements for PKC activation in intact lymphocytes. Moreover, as with PKC, we found that the CD3-induced MAP-2K response could be further enhanced by using a second layer cross-linking antibody. The specificity of CD3/Ti in the Jurkat cell response is demonstrated by the fact that OKT-11(CD2) and anti-CD4 mAb did not stimulate a MAP-2K response. It was also not possible to elicit a response in a Jurkat cell mutant that lacks surface expression of CD3 and Ti. The specificity of PKC in these events was further explored with the cell permeant diacylglycerol, 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, and the nonagonist phorbol ester, 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate: whereas the former was an effective inducer of the MAP-2K response, the latter failed to yield any stimulation. Prior exposure of Jurkat cells to 100 mM PMA for 24 h eliminated greater than 60% of the MAP-2K response during anti-CD3 treatment. This response could also be inhibited in dose-dependent fashion by prior

  2. VEGF activates protein kinase C-dependent, but Ras-independent Raf-MEK-MAP kinase pathway for DNA synthesis in primary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Ueno, H; Shibuya, M

    1999-04-01

    KDR/FIk-1 tyrosine kinase, one of the two VEGF receptors induces mitogenesis and differentiation of vascular endothelial cells. We have previously reported that a major target molecule of KDR/Flk-1 kinase is PLC-gamma, and that VEGF induces activation of MAP kinase, mainly mediated by protein kinase C (PKC) in the NIH3T3 cells overexpressing KDR/FIk-1 (Takahashi and Shibuya, 1997). However, the signal transduction initiated from VEGF in endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. In primary sinusoidal endothelial cells which showed strictly VEGF-dependent growth, we found that VEGF stimulated the activation of Raf-1-MEK-MAP kinase cascade. To our surprise, an important regulator, Ras was not efficiently activated to a significant level in response to VEGF. Consistent with this, dominant-negative Ras did not block the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of MAP kinase. On the other hand, PKC-specific inhibitors severely reduced VEGF-dependent phosphorylation of MEK, activation of MAP kinase and subsequent DNA synthesis. A potent PI3 kinase inhibitor, Wortmannin, could not inhibit either of them. These results suggest that in primary endothelial cells, VEGF-induced activation of Raf-MEK-MAP kinase and DNA synthesis are mainly mediated by PKC-dependent pathway, much more than by Ras-dependent or PI3 kinase-dependent pathway.

  3. Activation of stress-activated MAP protein kinases up-regulates expression of transgenes driven by the cytomegalovirus immediate/early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bruening, W; Giasson, B; Mushynski, W; Durham, H D

    1998-01-01

    The immediate/early promoter/enhancer of cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter) is one of the most commonly used promoters for expression of transgenes in eukaryotic cells. In practice, the CMV promoter is often thought of as a constitutively active unregulated promoter. However, we have observed that transcription from the CMV promoter can be up-regulated by a variety of environmental stresses. Many forms of cellular stress stimulate MAP kinase signalling pathways, resulting in activation of stress-activated protein kinases [SAPKs, also called Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs)] and p38 kinases. We have found that the same conditions that lead to activation of SAPK/JNKs and p38 kinases can also dramatically increase expression from the CMV promoter. Inhibitors of p38 kinases abolished basal transcription from the CMV promoter and completely blocked stress-induced up-regulation of the CMV promoter. Overexpression of a dominant negative JNK kinase had no effect on basal transcription, but significantly reduced up-regulation caused by stress. These results have grave implications for use of the CMV promoter. If the CMV promoter can be up-regulated by cellular stresses, inadvertent activation of the stress kinase pathways may complicate, if not invalidate, the interpretation of a wide range of experiments. PMID:9421504

  4. The role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling components and the Ste12 transcription factor in germination and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Schamber, Astrid; Leroch, Michaela; Diwo, Janine; Mendgen, Kurt; Hahn, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In all fungi studied so far, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades serve as central signalling complexes that are involved in various aspects of growth, stress response and infection. In this work, putative components of the yeast Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade and the putative downstream transcription factor Ste12 were analysed in the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion mutants of the MAP triple kinase Ste11, the MAP kinase kinase Ste7 and the MAP kinase adaptor protein Ste50 all resulted in phenotypes similar to that of the previously described BMP1 MAP kinase mutant, namely defects in germination, delayed vegetative growth, reduced size of conidia, lack of sclerotia formation and loss of pathogenicity. Mutants lacking Ste12 showed normal germination, but delayed infection as a result of low penetration efficiency. Two differently spliced ste12 transcripts were detected, and both were able to complement the ste12 mutant, except for a defect in sclerotium formation, which was only corrected by the full-sized transcript. Overexpression of the smaller ste12 transcript resulted in delayed germination and strongly reduced infection. Bc-Gas2, a homologue of Magnaporthe grisea Gas2 that is required for appressorial function, was found to be non-essential for growth and infection, but its expression was under the control of both Bmp1 and Ste12. In summary, the role and regulatory connections of the Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade in B. cinerea revealed both common and unique properties compared with those of other plant pathogenic fungi, and provide evidence for a regulatory link between the BMP1 MAP kinase cascade and Ste12. PMID:20078780

  5. BDNF-mediated regulation of ethanol consumption requires the activation of the MAP kinase pathway and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jeanblanc, Jerome; Logrip, Marian L; Janak, Patricia H; Ron, Dorit

    2013-02-01

    We previously found that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is part of a homeostatic pathway that gates ethanol self-administration [Jeanblanc et al. (2009). J Neurosci, 29, 13494-13502)]. Specifically, we showed that moderate levels (10%) of ethanol consumption increase BDNF expression within the DLS, and that direct infusion of BDNF into the DLS decreases operant self-administration of a 10% ethanol solution. BDNF binding to its receptor, TrkB, activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Thus, here, we set out to identify which of these intracellular pathway(s) plays a role in the regulation of ethanol consumption by BDNF. We found that inhibition of the MAPK, but not PLC-γ or PI3K, activity blocks the BDNF-mediated reduction of ethanol consumption. As activation of the MAPK pathway leads to the initiation of transcription and/or translation events, we tested whether the BDNF-mediated reduction of ethanol self-administration requires de novo protein synthesis. We found that the inhibitory effect of BDNF on ethanol intake is blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Together, our results show that BDNF attenuates ethanol drinking via activation of the MAPK pathway in a protein synthesis-dependent manner within the DLS.

  6. BDNF-mediated regulation of ethanol consumption requires the activation of the MAP kinase pathway and protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeanblanc, Jerome; Logrip, Marian L.; Janak, Patricia H.; Ron, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    We previously found that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is part of a homeostatic pathway that gates ethanol self-administration [Jeanblanc et al. (2009). J Neurosci, 29, 13494–13502)]. Specifically, we showed that moderate levels (10%) of ethanol consumption increase BDNF expression within the DLS, and that direct infusion of BDNF into the DLS decreases operant self-administration of a 10% ethanol solution. BDNF binding to its receptor, TrkB, activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Thus, here, we set out to identify which of these intracellular pathway(s) plays a role in the regulation of ethanol consumption by BDNF. We found that inhibition of the MAPK, but not PLC-γ or PI3K, activity blocks the BDNF-mediated reduction of ethanol consumption. As activation of the MAPK pathway leads to the initiation of transcription and/or translation events, we tested whether the BDNF-mediated reduction of ethanol self-administration requires de novo protein synthesis. We found that the inhibitory effect of BDNF on ethanol intake is blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Together, our results show that BDNF attenuates ethanol drinking via activation of the MAPK pathway in a protein synthesis-dependent manner within the DLS. PMID:23189980

  7. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  8. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  9. PRO40 is a scaffold protein of the cell wall integrity pathway, linking the MAP kinase module to the upstream activator protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Ines; Steffens, Eva Katharina; Schnaß, Nicole; Fränzel, Benjamin; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A; Kück, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes. Most ascomycetes possess three MAPK modules that are involved in key developmental processes like sexual propagation or pathogenesis. However, the regulation of these modules by adapters or scaffolds is largely unknown. Here, we studied the function of the cell wall integrity (CWI) MAPK module in the model fungus Sordaria macrospora. Using a forward genetic approach, we found that sterile mutant pro30 has a mutated mik1 gene that encodes the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) of the proposed CWI pathway. We generated single deletion mutants lacking MAPKKK MIK1, MAPK kinase (MAPKK) MEK1, or MAPK MAK1 and found them all to be sterile, cell fusion-deficient and highly impaired in vegetative growth and cell wall stress response. By searching for MEK1 interaction partners via tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified previously characterized developmental protein PRO40 as a MEK1 interaction partner. Although fungal PRO40 homologs have been implicated in diverse developmental processes, their molecular function is currently unknown. Extensive affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that PRO40 is able to bind MIK1, MEK1, and the upstream activator protein kinase C (PKC1). We further found that the PRO40 N-terminal disordered region and the central region encompassing a WW interaction domain are sufficient to govern interaction with MEK1. Most importantly, time- and stress-dependent phosphorylation studies showed that PRO40 is required for MAK1 activity. The sum of our results implies that PRO40 is a scaffold protein for the CWI pathway, linking the MAPK module to the upstream activator PKC1. Our data provide important insights into the mechanistic role of a protein that has been implicated in sexual and asexual development, cell fusion, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in different fungal systems.

  10. Mapping membrane protein structure with fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins regulate many cellular processes including signaling cascades, ion transport, membrane fusion, and cell-to-cell communications. Understanding the architecture and conformational fluctuations of these proteins is critical to understanding their regulation and functions. Fluorescence methods including intensity mapping, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and photo-induced electron transfer, allow for targeted measurements of domains within membrane proteins. These methods can reveal how a protein is structured and how it transitions between different conformational states. Here, I will review recent work done using fluorescence to map the structures of membrane proteins, focusing on how each of these methods can be applied to understanding the dynamic nature of individual membrane proteins and protein complexes. PMID:22445227

  11. microRNA regulation of molecular networks mapped by global microRNA, mRNA, and protein expression in activated T-lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, Yevgeniy A.; Kurian, Sunil M.; Hart, Traver; Nakorchevsky, Aleksey A.; Chen, Caifu; Campbell, Daniel; Head, Steven R.; Yates, John R.; Salomon, Daniel. R

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate specific immune mechanisms but their genome-wide regulation of T-lymphocyte activation is largely unknown. We performed a multidimensional functional genomics analysis to integrate genome-wide differential mRNA, miRNA, and protein expression as a function of human T-lymphocyte activation and time. We surveyed expression of 420 human miRNAs in parallel with genome-wide mRNA expression. We identified a unique signature of 71 differentially expressed miRNAs, 57 of which were previously not known as regulators of immune activation. The majority of miRNAs are upregulated, mRNA expression of these target genes is downregulated and this is a function of binding multiple miRNAs (combinatorial targeting). Our data reveal that consideration of this complex signature, rather than single miRNAs, is necessary to construct a full picture of miRNA-mediated regulation. Molecular network mapping of miRNA targets revealed the regulation of activation-induced immune signaling. In contrast, pathways populated by genes that are not miRNA targets are enriched for metabolism and biosynthesis. Finally, we specifically validated miR-155 (known) and miR-221 (novel in T-lymphocytes) using locked nucleic acid inhibitors. Inhibition of these 2 highly upregulated miRNAs in CD4+ T cells were shown to increase proliferation by removing suppression of 4 target genes linked to proliferation and survival. Thus, multiple lines of evidence link top functional networks directly to T-lymphocyte immunity underlining the value of mapping global gene, protein and miRNA expression. PMID:21788445

  12. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Moshiri, Houtan; Jardim, Armando; Salavati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org. PMID:26991453

  13. The protein-protein interaction map of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Selig, L; De Reuse, H; Battaglia, V; Reverdy, C; Simon, S; Lenzen, G; Petel, F; Wojcik, J; Schächter, V; Chemama, Y; Labigne, A; Legrain, P

    2001-01-11

    With the availability of complete DNA sequences for many prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, and soon for the human genome itself, it is important to develop reliable proteome-wide approaches for a better understanding of protein function. As elementary constituents of cellular protein complexes and pathways, protein-protein interactions are key determinants of protein function. Here we have built a large-scale protein-protein interaction map of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We have used a high-throughput strategy of the yeast two-hybrid assay to screen 261 H. pylori proteins against a highly complex library of genome-encoded polypeptides. Over 1,200 interactions were identified between H. pylori proteins, connecting 46.6% of the proteome. The determination of a reliability score for every single protein-protein interaction and the identification of the actual interacting domains permitted the assignment of unannotated proteins to biological pathways.

  14. Mapping and Quantitation of the Interaction between the Recombination Activating Gene Proteins RAG1 and RAG2*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Shetty, Keerthi; Surleac, Marius D.; Petrescu, Andrei J.; Schatz, David G.

    2015-01-01

    The RAG endonuclease consists of RAG1, which contains the active site for DNA cleavage, and RAG2, an accessory factor whose interaction with RAG1 is critical for catalytic function. How RAG2 activates RAG1 is not understood. Here, we used biolayer interferometry and pulldown assays to identify regions of RAG1 necessary for interaction with RAG2 and to measure the RAG1-RAG2 binding affinity (KD ∼0.4 μm) (where RAG1 and RAG2 are recombination activating genes 1 or 2). Using the Hermes transposase as a guide, we constructed a 36-kDa “mini” RAG1 capable of interacting robustly with RAG2. Mini-RAG1 consists primarily of the catalytic center and the residues N-terminal to it, but it lacks a zinc finger region in RAG1 previously implicated in binding RAG2. The ability of Mini-RAG1 to interact with RAG2 depends on a predicted α-helix (amino acids 997–1008) near the RAG1 C terminus and a region of RAG1 from amino acids 479 to 559. Two adjacent acidic amino acids in this region (Asp-546 and Glu-547) are important for both the RAG1-RAG2 interaction and recombination activity, with Asp-546 of particular importance. Structural modeling of Mini-RAG1 suggests that Asp-546/Glu-547 lie near the predicted 997-1008 α-helix and components of the active site, raising the possibility that RAG2 binding alters the structure of the RAG1 active site. Quantitative Western blotting allowed us to estimate that mouse thymocytes contain on average ∼1,800 monomers of RAG1 and ∼15,000 molecules of RAG2, implying that nuclear concentrations of RAG1 and RAG2 are below the KD value for their interaction, which could help limit off-target RAG activity. PMID:25745109

  15. Measuring MAP kinase activity in immune complex assays.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, Vera A

    2006-11-01

    I present an overview of published methods for measuring mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity on endogenous associated substrates, exogenously added substrates as well as determination of activation loop phosphorylation as a read-out of kinase activity in vivo. Detailed procedures for these assays are given for two MAP kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 and compared with other published protocols, including the protocols for Hog1 and Mpk1 MAPKs. Measuring kinase activity in immune complex assays can serve as an approach for identification of potential substrates of protein kinases as well as for detecting other kinase-associated proteins. PMID:16890454

  16. The protein interaction map of bacteriophage lambda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacteriophage lambda is a model phage for most other dsDNA phages and has been studied for over 60 years. Although it is probably the best-characterized phage there are still about 20 poorly understood open reading frames in its 48-kb genome. For a complete understanding we need to know all interactions among its proteins. We have manually curated the lambda literature and compiled a total of 33 interactions that have been found among lambda proteins. We set out to find out how many protein-protein interactions remain to be found in this phage. Results In order to map lambda's interactions, we have cloned 68 out of 73 lambda open reading frames (the "ORFeome") into Gateway vectors and systematically tested all proteins for interactions using exhaustive array-based yeast two-hybrid screens. These screens identified 97 interactions. We found 16 out of 30 previously published interactions (53%). We have also found at least 18 new plausible interactions among functionally related proteins. All previously found and new interactions are combined into structural and network models of phage lambda. Conclusions Phage lambda serves as a benchmark for future studies of protein interactions among phage, viruses in general, or large protein assemblies. We conclude that we could not find all the known interactions because they require chaperones, post-translational modifications, or multiple proteins for their interactions. The lambda protein network connects 12 proteins of unknown function with well characterized proteins, which should shed light on the functional associations of these uncharacterized proteins. PMID:21943085

  17. Gene for the catalytic subunit of the human DNA-activated protein kinase maps to the site of the XRCC7 gene on chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sipley, J.D.; Anderson, C.W.; Menninger, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The DNA-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK) is composed for a large ({approximately}460 kDa) catalytic polypeptide (DNA-PK{sub cs}) and Ku, a heterodimeric DNA-binding component (p70/p80) that targets DNA-PK{sub cs} to DNA. A 41-kbp segment of the DNA-PK{sub cs} gene was isolated, and a 7902-bp segment was sequenced. The sequence contains a polymorphic Pvu II restriction enzyme site, and comparing the sequence with that of the cDNA revealed the positions of nine exons. The DNA-PK{sub cs} gene was mapped to band q11 of chromosome 8 by in situ hybridization. This location is coincident with that of XRCC7, the gene that complements the DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination defects (where V is variable, D is diversity, and J is joining) of hamster V3 and murine severe combined immunodeficient (scid) cells. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Mapping protein and nucleic acid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, I. V.; Zrelov, P. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Polozov, R. V.; Sivozhelezov, V. S.; Stepanenko, V. A.; Chirgadze, Yu. N.

    2013-09-01

    Methods and algorithms to analyze surfaces of globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, and RNA have been developed. These methods for the construction of maps of fragments of these objects in the original cylindrical projection developed herein essentially broaden the possibilities for studying the distribution of charges and surface topography of biological structures. This approach significantly supplements the qualitative characteristics of methods of visualizing biopolymer structures.

  19. Quaternion maps of global protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew J; Thakur, Sidharth

    2012-09-01

    The geometric structures of proteins are vital to the understanding of biochemical interactions. However, there is much yet to be understood about the spatial arrangements of the chains of amino acids making up any given protein. In particular, while conventional analysis tools like the Ramachandran plot supply some insight into the local relative orientation of pairs of amino acid residues, they provide little information about the global relative orientations of large groups of residues. We apply quaternion maps to families of coordinate frames defined naturally by amino acid residue structures as a way to expose global spatial relationships among residues within proteins. The resulting visualizations enable comparisons of absolute orientations as well as relative orientations, and thus generalize the framework of the Ramachandran plot. There are a variety of possible quaternion frames and visual representation strategies that can be chosen, and very complex quaternion maps can result. Just as Ramachandran plots are useful for addressing particular questions and not others, quaternion tools have characteristic domains of relevance. In particular, quaternion maps show great potential for answering specific questions about global residue alignment in crystallographic data and statistical orientation properties in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data that are very difficult to treat by other methods. PMID:23099777

  20. Finding protein-protein interaction patterns by contact map matching.

    PubMed

    Melo, R C; Ribeiro, C; Murray, C S; Veloso, C J M; da Silveira, C H; Neshich, G; Meira, W; Carceroni, R L; Santoro, M M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel method for defining patterns of contacts present in protein-protein complexes. A new use of the traditional contact maps (more frequently used for representation of the intra-chain contacts) is presented for analysis of inter-chain contacts. Using an algorithm based on image processing techniques, we can compare protein-protein interaction maps and also obtain a dissimilarity score between them. The same algorithm used to compare the maps can align the contacts of all the complexes and be helpful in the determination of a pattern of conserved interactions at the interfaces. We present an example for the application of this method by analyzing the pattern of interaction of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitors and trypsins, chymotrypsins, a thrombin, a matriptase, and a kallikrein - all classified as serine proteases. We found 20 contacts conserved in trypsins and chymotrypsins and 3 specific ones are present in all the serine protease complexes studied. The method was able to identify important contacts for the protein family studied and the results are in agreement with the literature. PMID:18058715

  1. Mapping auroral activity with Twitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, N. A.; MacDonald, E. A.; Heavner, M.; Tapia, A. H.; Lalone, N.

    2015-05-01

    Twitter is a popular, publicly accessible, social media service that has proven useful in mapping large-scale events in real time. In this study, for the first time, the use of Twitter as a measure of auroral activity is investigated. Peaks in the number of aurora-related tweets are found to frequently coincide with geomagnetic disturbances (detection rate of 91%). Additionally, the number of daily aurora-related tweets is found to strongly correlate with several auroral strength proxies (ravg≈0.7). An examination is made of the bias for location and time of day within Twitter data, and a first-order correction of these effects is presented. Overall, the results suggest that Twitter can provide both specific details about an individual aurora and accurate real-time indication of when, and even from where, an aurora is visible.

  2. Protein Flexibility in Docking and Surface Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Lexa, Katrina W.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based drug design has become an essential tool for rapid lead discovery and optimization. As available structural information has increased, researchers have become increasingly aware of the importance of protein flexibility for accurate description of the native state. Typical protein–ligand docking efforts still rely on a single rigid receptor, which is an incomplete representation of potential binding conformations of the protein. These rigid docking efforts typically show the best performance rates between 50 and 75%, while fully flexible docking methods can enhance pose prediction up to 80–95%. This review examines the current toolbox for flexible protein–ligand docking and receptor surface mapping. Present limitations and possibilities for future development are discussed. PMID:22569329

  3. High-resolution mapping of protein sequence-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Douglas M; Araya, Carlos L; Fleishman, Sarel J; Kellogg, Elizabeth H; Stephany, Jason J; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    We present a large-scale approach to investigate the functional consequences of sequence variation in a protein. The approach entails the display of hundreds of thousands of protein variants, moderate selection for activity and high-throughput DNA sequencing to quantify the performance of each variant. Using this strategy, we tracked the performance of >600,000 variants of a human WW domain after three and six rounds of selection by phage display for binding to its peptide ligand. Binding properties of these variants defined a high-resolution map of mutational preference across the WW domain; each position had unique features that could not be captured by a few representative mutations. Our approach could be applied to many in vitro or in vivo protein assays, providing a general means for understanding how protein function relates to sequence.

  4. Whole-brain activity mapping onto a zebrafish brain atlas

    PubMed Central

    Randlett, Owen; Wee, Caroline L.; Naumann, Eva A.; Nnaemeka, Onyeka; Schoppik, David; Fitzgerald, James E.; Portugues, Ruben; Lacoste, Alix M.B.; Riegler, Clemens; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to localize the neural circuits involved in generating behaviors, it is necessary to assign activity onto anatomical maps of the nervous system. Using brain registration across hundreds of larval zebrafish, we have built an expandable open source atlas containing molecular labels and anatomical region definitions, the Z-Brain. Using this platform and immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated-Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK/MAPK) as a readout of neural activity, we have developed a system to create and contextualize whole brain maps of stimulus- and behavior-dependent neural activity. This MAP-Mapping (Mitogen Activated Protein kinase – Mapping) assay is technically simple, fast, inexpensive, and data analysis is completely automated. Since MAP-Mapping is performed on fish that are freely swimming, it is applicable to nearly any stimulus or behavior. We demonstrate the utility of our high-throughput approach using hunting/feeding, pharmacological, visual and noxious stimuli. The resultant maps outline hundreds of areas associated with behaviors. PMID:26778924

  5. Dual modulation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase activities induced by minocycline reverses the neurotoxic effects of the prion protein fragment 90-231.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Thellung, Stefano; Chiovitti, Katia; Villa, Valentina; Simi, Alessandro; Raggi, Federica; Paludi, Domenico; Russo, Claudio; Aceto, Antonio; Florio, Tullio

    2009-02-01

    Several in vitro and in vivo studies addressed the identification of molecular determinants of the neuronal death induced by PrP(Sc) or related peptides. We developed an experimental model to assess PrP(Sc) neurotoxicity using a recombinant polypeptide encompassing amino acids 90-231 of human PrP (hPrP90-231) that corresponds to the protease-resistant core of PrP(Sc) identified in prion-infected brains. By means of mild thermal denaturation, we can convert hPrP90-231 from a PrP(C)-like conformation into a PrP(Sc)-like structure. In virtue of these structural changes, hPrP90-231 powerfully affected the survival of SH-SY5Y cells, inducing caspase 3 and p38-dependent apoptosis, while in the native alpha-helix-rich conformation, hPrP90-231 did not induce cell toxicity. The aim of this study was to identify drugs able to block hPrP90-231 neurotoxic effects, focusing on minocycline, a tetracycline with known neuroprotective activity. hPrP90-231 caused a caspase 3-dependent apoptosis via the blockade of ERK1/2 activation and the subsequent activation of p38 MAP kinase. We propose that hPrP90-231-induced apoptosis is dependent on the inhibition of ERK1/2 responsiveness to neurotrophic factors, removing a tonic inhibition of p38 activity and resulting in caspase 3 activation. Minocycline prevented hPrP90-231-induced toxicity interfering with this mechanism: the pretreatment with this tetracycline restored ERK1/2 activity and reverted p38 and caspase 3 activities. The effects of minocycline were not mediated by the prevention of hPrP90-231 structural changes or cell internalization (differently from Congo Red). In conclusion, minocycline elicits anti-apoptotic effects against the neurotoxic activity of hPrP90-231 and these effects are mediated by opposite modulation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase activities.

  6. Mapping the Function of Polycomb Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are master regulators of proliferation and development that play essential roles in human pathologies including cancers. PcGs act as gatekeepers of cellular identity, maintaining repression of a multitude of target genes. However, these properties have only been recently uncovered thanks to technological advances, first of all chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP), that allowed a systematic characterization of the activity of these factors in an unbiased manner at a genome-wide level. Using PcG protein as example, this chapter introduces the readers to the use of chromatin analysis (ChIP assays and replication timing) and how to move these approaches to a level of genome-wide interpretation. PMID:27659970

  7. Hydrogen peroxide activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Noriaki; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2006-10-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) may act as a second messenger to mediate the actions of growth factors and cytokines. But the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation and regulation of cell functions in PSCs remains largely unknown. We here examined the effects of H(2)O(2) on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cell functions in PSCs. PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay. Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. The effects of H(2)O(2) on proliferation, alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production were evaluated. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed. H(2)O(2) at non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 100 microM) induced oxidative stress in PSCs. H(2)O(2) activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor kappaB. In addition, H(2)O(2) activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. H(2)O(2) induced alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression but did not induce proliferation or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. H(2)O(2) did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype. Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and collagen gene expression by H(2)O(2) may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis.

  8. Mitochondrial Protein Interaction Mapping Identifies Regulators of Respiratory Chain Function.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brendan J; Wilkerson, Emily M; Veling, Mike T; Minogue, Catie E; Xia, Chuanwu; Beebe, Emily T; Wrobel, Russell L; Cho, Holly; Kremer, Laura S; Alston, Charlotte L; Gromek, Katarzyna A; Dolan, Brendan K; Ulbrich, Arne; Stefely, Jonathan A; Bohl, Sarah L; Werner, Kelly M; Jochem, Adam; Westphall, Michael S; Rensvold, Jarred W; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are essential for numerous cellular processes, yet hundreds of their proteins lack robust functional annotation. To reveal functions for these proteins (termed MXPs), we assessed condition-specific protein-protein interactions for 50 select MXPs using affinity enrichment mass spectrometry. Our data connect MXPs to diverse mitochondrial processes, including multiple aspects of respiratory chain function. Building upon these observations, we validated C17orf89 as a complex I (CI) assembly factor. Disruption of C17orf89 markedly reduced CI activity, and its depletion is found in an unresolved case of CI deficiency. We likewise discovered that LYRM5 interacts with and deflavinates the electron-transferring flavoprotein that shuttles electrons to coenzyme Q (CoQ). Finally, we identified a dynamic human CoQ biosynthetic complex involving multiple MXPs whose topology we map using purified components. Collectively, our data lend mechanistic insight into respiratory chain-related activities and prioritize hundreds of additional interactions for further exploration of mitochondrial protein function. PMID:27499296

  9. Whole-brain activity mapping onto a zebrafish brain atlas.

    PubMed

    Randlett, Owen; Wee, Caroline L; Naumann, Eva A; Nnaemeka, Onyeka; Schoppik, David; Fitzgerald, James E; Portugues, Ruben; Lacoste, Alix M B; Riegler, Clemens; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-11-01

    In order to localize the neural circuits involved in generating behaviors, it is necessary to assign activity onto anatomical maps of the nervous system. Using brain registration across hundreds of larval zebrafish, we have built an expandable open-source atlas containing molecular labels and definitions of anatomical regions, the Z-Brain. Using this platform and immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) as a readout of neural activity, we have developed a system to create and contextualize whole-brain maps of stimulus- and behavior-dependent neural activity. This mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP)-mapping assay is technically simple, and data analysis is completely automated. Because MAP-mapping is performed on freely swimming fish, it is applicable to studies of nearly any stimulus or behavior. Here we demonstrate our high-throughput approach using pharmacological, visual and noxious stimuli, as well as hunting and feeding. The resultant maps outline hundreds of areas associated with behaviors. PMID:26778924

  10. Breast tumor kinase (protein tyrosine kinase 6) regulates heregulin-induced activation of ERK5 and p38 MAP kinases in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Julie Hanson; Daniel, Andrea R; Lofgren, Kristopher; Kleer, Celina G; Lange, Carol A

    2007-05-01

    Total tyrosine kinase activity is often elevated in both cytosolic and membrane fractions of malignant breast tissue and correlates with a decrease in disease-free survival. Breast tumor kinase (Brk; protein tyrosine kinase 6) is a soluble tyrosine kinase that was cloned from a metastatic breast tumor and found to be overexpressed in a majority of breast tumors. Herein, we show that Brk is overexpressed in 86% of invasive ductal breast tumors and coexpressed with ErbB family members in breast cancer cell lines. Additionally, the ErbB ligand, heregulin, activates Brk kinase activity. Knockdown of Brk by stable expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in T47D breast cancer cells decreases proliferation and blocks epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and heregulin-induced activation of Rac GTPase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 5, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not Akt, ERK1/2, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Furthermore, EGF- and heregulin-induced cyclin D1 expression is dependent on p38 signaling and inhibited by Brk shRNA knockdown. The myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcription factor target of p38 MAPK and ERK5 signaling is also sensitive to altered Brk expression. Finally, heregulin-induced migration of T47D cells requires p38 MAPK activity and is blocked by Brk knockdown. These results place Brk in a novel signaling pathway downstream of ErbB receptors and upstream of Rac, p38 MAPK, and ERK5 and establish the ErbB-Brk-Rac-p38 MAPK pathway as a critical mediator of breast cancer cell migration.

  11. Phosphodiesterase MoPdeH targets MoMck1 of the conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway to regulate cell wall integrity in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jingzhen; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Lina; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-06-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the high-affinity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase MoPdeH is important not only for cAMP signalling and pathogenicity, but also for cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance through an unknown mechanism. By utilizing affinity purification, we found that MoPdeH interacts with MoMck1, one of the components of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that regulates CWI. Overexpression of MoMCK1 suppressed defects in autolysis and pathogenicity of the ΔMopdeH mutant, although partially, suggesting that MoPdeH plays a critical role in CWI maintenance mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. We found that MoMck1 and two other MAP kinase cascade components, MoMkk1 and MoMps1, modulate intracellular cAMP levels by regulating the expression of MoPDEH through a feedback loop. In addition, disruption of MoMKK1 resulted in less aerial hyphal formation, defective asexual development and attenuated pathogenicity. Moreover, MoMkk1 plays a role in the response to osmotic stress via regulation of MoOsm1 phosphorylation levels, whereas endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress enhances MoMps1 phosphorylation and loss of the MAP kinase cascade component affects the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that MoPdeH functions upstream of the MoMck1-MoMkk1-MoMps1 MAP kinase pathway to regulate CWI, and that MoPdeH also mediates crosstalk between the cAMP signalling pathway, the osmotic sensing high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced UPR pathway in M. oryzae.

  12. Phosphodiesterase MoPdeH targets MoMck1 of the conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway to regulate cell wall integrity in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jingzhen; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Lina; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-06-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the high-affinity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase MoPdeH is important not only for cAMP signalling and pathogenicity, but also for cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance through an unknown mechanism. By utilizing affinity purification, we found that MoPdeH interacts with MoMck1, one of the components of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that regulates CWI. Overexpression of MoMCK1 suppressed defects in autolysis and pathogenicity of the ΔMopdeH mutant, although partially, suggesting that MoPdeH plays a critical role in CWI maintenance mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. We found that MoMck1 and two other MAP kinase cascade components, MoMkk1 and MoMps1, modulate intracellular cAMP levels by regulating the expression of MoPDEH through a feedback loop. In addition, disruption of MoMKK1 resulted in less aerial hyphal formation, defective asexual development and attenuated pathogenicity. Moreover, MoMkk1 plays a role in the response to osmotic stress via regulation of MoOsm1 phosphorylation levels, whereas endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress enhances MoMps1 phosphorylation and loss of the MAP kinase cascade component affects the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that MoPdeH functions upstream of the MoMck1-MoMkk1-MoMps1 MAP kinase pathway to regulate CWI, and that MoPdeH also mediates crosstalk between the cAMP signalling pathway, the osmotic sensing high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced UPR pathway in M. oryzae. PMID:27193947

  13. Mapping of a Region of the PA-X Protein of Influenza A Virus That Is Important for Its Shutoff Activity.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kohei; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Influenza A virus PA-X comprises an N-terminal PA endonuclease domain and a C-terminal PA-X-specific domain. PA-X reduces host and viral mRNA accumulation via its endonuclease function. Here, we found that the N-terminal 15 amino acids, particularly six basic amino acids, in the C-terminal PA-X-specific region are important for PA-X shutoff activity. These six basic amino acids enabled a PA deletion mutant to suppress protein expression at a level comparable to that of wild-type PA-X.

  14. Mapping recent chikungunya activity in the Americas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand chikungunya activity in the America we mapped recent chikungunya activity in the Americas. This activity is needed to better understand that the relationships between climatic factors and disease outbreak patters are critical to the design and constructing of predictive models....

  15. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Horne, K.

    2004-01-01

    Echo mapping makes use of the intrinsic variability of the continuum source in active galactic nuclei to map out the distribution and kinematics of line-emitting gas from its light travel time-delayed response to continuum changes. Echo mapping experiments have yielded sizes for the broad line-emitting region in about three dozen AGNs. The dynamics of the line-emitting gas seem to be dominated by the gravity of the central black hole, enabling measurement of the black-hole masses in AGNs. We discuss requirements for future echo-mapping experiments that will yield the high quality velocity-delay maps of the broad-line region that are needed to determine its physical nature.

  16. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area.

  17. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  18. Pado, a fluorescent protein with proton channel activity can optically monitor membrane potential, intracellular pH, and map gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bok Eum; Baker, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    An in silico search strategy was developed to identify potential voltage-sensing domains (VSD) for the development of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). Using a conserved charge distribution in the S2 α-helix, a single in silico search yielded most voltage-sensing proteins including voltage-gated potassium channels, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-gated sodium channels, voltage-gated proton channels, and voltage-sensing phosphatases from organisms ranging from mammals to bacteria and plants. A GEVI utilizing the VSD from a voltage-gated proton channel identified from that search was able to optically report changes in membrane potential. In addition this sensor was capable of manipulating the internal pH while simultaneously reporting that change optically since it maintains the voltage-gated proton channel activity of the VSD. Biophysical characterization of this GEVI, Pado, demonstrated that the voltage-dependent signal was distinct from the pH-dependent signal and was dependent on the movement of the S4 α-helix. Further investigation into the mechanism of the voltage-dependent optical signal revealed that inhibiting the dimerization of the fluorescent protein greatly reduced the optical signal. Dimerization of the FP thereby enabled the movement of the S4 α-helix to mediate a fluorescent response. PMID:27040905

  19. A contact map matching approach to protein structure similarity analysis.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Raquel C; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo R; Fernandes, Fernando A; da Silveira, Carlos Henrique; Santoro, Marcelo M; Carceroni, Rodrigo L; Meira, Wagner; Araújo, Arnaldo de A

    2006-01-01

    We modeled the problem of identifying how close two proteins are structurally by measuring the dissimilarity of their contact maps. These contact maps are colored images, in which the chromatic information encodes the chemical nature of the contacts. We studied two conceptually distinct image-processing algorithms to measure the dissimilarity between these contact maps; one was a content-based image retrieval method, and the other was based on image registration. In experiments with contact maps constructed from the protein data bank, our approach was able to identify, with greater than 80% precision, instances of monomers of apolipoproteins, globins, plastocyanins, retinol binding proteins and thioredoxins, among the monomers of Protein Data Bank Select. The image registration approach was only slightly more accurate than the content-based image retrieval approach. PMID:16819709

  20. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  1. Feedback phosphorylation of an RGS protein by MAP kinase in yeast.

    PubMed

    Garrison, T R; Zhang, Y; Pausch, M; Apanovitch, D; Aebersold, R; Dohlman, H G

    1999-12-17

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins) are well known to accelerate G protein GTPase activity in vitro and to promote G protein desensitization in vivo. Less is known about how RGS proteins are themselves regulated. To address this question we purified the RGS in yeast, Sst2, and used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify post-translational modifications. This analysis revealed that Sst2 is phosphorylated at Ser-539 and that phosphorylation occurs in response to pheromone stimulation. Ser-539 lies within a consensus mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation site, Pro-X-Ser-Pro. Phosphorylation is blocked by mutations in the MAP kinase genes (FUS3, KSS1), as well as by mutations in components needed for MAP kinase activation (STE11, STE7, STE4, STE18). Phosphorylation is also blocked by replacing Ser-539 with Ala, Asp, or Glu (but not Thr). These point mutations do not alter pheromone sensitivity, as determined by growth arrest and reporter transcription assays. However, phosphorylation appears to slow the rate of Sst2 degradation. These findings indicate that the G protein-regulated MAP kinase in yeast can act as a feedback regulator of Sst2, itself a regulator of G protein signaling. PMID:10593933

  2. EST2Prot: Mapping EST sequences to proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Paul; Lin, David M; Yona, Golan

    2006-01-01

    Background EST libraries are used in various biological studies, from microarray experiments to proteomic and genetic screens. These libraries usually contain many uncharacterized ESTs that are typically ignored since they cannot be mapped to known genes. Consequently, new discoveries are possibly overlooked. Results We describe a system (EST2Prot) that uses multiple elements to map EST sequences to their corresponding protein products. EST2Prot uses UniGene clusters, substring analysis, information about protein coding regions in existing DNA sequences and protein database searches to detect protein products related to a query EST sequence. Gene Ontology terms, Swiss-Prot keywords, and protein similarity data are used to map the ESTs to functional descriptors. Conclusion EST2Prot extends and significantly enriches the popular UniGene mapping by utilizing multiple relations between known biological entities. It produces a mapping between ESTs and proteins in real-time through a simple web-interface. The system is part of the Biozon database and is accessible at . PMID:16515706

  3. Identification of additional MAP kinases activated upon PAMP treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Yukino; Ding, Pingtao; Zhang, Yuelin

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades play important roles in plant immunity. Upon pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) treatment, MPK3, MPK6 and MPK4 are quickly activated by upstream MKKs through phosphorylation. Western blot analysis using α-phospho-p44/42-ERK antibody suggests that additional MPKs with similar size as MPK4 are also activated upon PAMP perception. To identify these MAP kinases, 7 candidate MPKs with similar sizes as MPK4 were selected for further analysis. Transgenic plants expressing these MPKs with a ZZ-3xFLAG double tag of 17 kD were generated and analyzed by western blot. MPK1, MPK11 and MPK13 were found to be phosphorylated upon treatment with flg22. Our study revealed additional MAPKs being activated during PAMP-triggered immunity. PMID:25482788

  4. MAP3: characterization of a novel microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies we have characterized a brain protein that copurifies with microtubules. We identify it as a microtubule- associated protein (MAP) by the following criteria: it copolymerizes with tubulin through repeated cycles of microtubule assembly in vitro; it is not associated with any brain subcellular fraction other than microtubules; in double-label immunofluorescence experiments antibodies against this protein stain the same fibrous elements in cultured cells as are stained by antitubulin; and this fibrous staining pattern is dispersed when cytoplasmic microtubules are disrupted by colchicine. Because it is distinct from previously described MAPs we designate this novel species MAP3. The MAP3 protein consists of a closely spaced pair of polypeptides on SDS gels, Mr 180,000, which are present in both glial (glioma C6) and neuronal (neuroblastoma B104) cell lines. In brain the MAP3 antigen is present in both neurons and glia. In nerve cells its distribution is strikingly restricted: anti-MAP3 staining is detectable only in neurofilament-rich axons. It is not, however, a component of isolated brain intermediate filaments. PMID:3968174

  5. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  6. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling Components in the Fungal Development, Stress Response and Virulence of the Fungal Cereal Pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been demonstrated to be involved in fungal development, sexual reproduction, pathogenicity and/or virulence in many filamentous plant pathogenic fungi, but genes for MAPKs in the fungal cereal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana have not been characterized. In this study, orthologues of three MAPK genes (CsSLT2, CsHOG1 and CsFUS3) and one MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene (CsSTE11) were identified in the whole genome sequence of the B. sorokiniana isolate ND90Pr, and knockout mutants were generated for each of them. The ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were defective in conidiation and formation of appressoria-like structures, showed hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and lost pathogenicity on non-wounded leaves of barley cv. Bowman. When inoculated on wounded leaves of Bowman, the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were reduced in virulence compared to the wild type. No morphological changes were observed in the ∆Cshog1 mutants in comparison with the wild type; however, they were slightly reduced in growth under oxidative stress and were hypersensitive to hyperosmotic stress. The ∆Cshog1 mutants formed normal appressoria-like structures but were reduced in virulence when inoculated on Bowman leaves. The ∆Csslt2 mutants produced more vegetative hyphae, had lighter pigmentation, were more sensitive to cell wall degrading enzymes, and were reduced in virulence on Bowman leaves, although they formed normal appressoria like the wild type. Root infection assays indicated that the ∆Cshog1 and ∆Csslt2 mutants were able to infect barley roots while the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 failed to cause any symptoms. However, no significant difference in virulence was observed for ∆Cshog1 mutants while ∆Csslt2 mutants showed significantly reduced virulence on barley roots in comparison with the wild type. Our results indicated that all of these MAPK and MAPKKK genes are involved in the regulation of fungal development under

  7. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling Components in the Fungal Development, Stress Response and Virulence of the Fungal Cereal Pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been demonstrated to be involved in fungal development, sexual reproduction, pathogenicity and/or virulence in many filamentous plant pathogenic fungi, but genes for MAPKs in the fungal cereal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana have not been characterized. In this study, orthologues of three MAPK genes (CsSLT2, CsHOG1 and CsFUS3) and one MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene (CsSTE11) were identified in the whole genome sequence of the B. sorokiniana isolate ND90Pr, and knockout mutants were generated for each of them. The ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were defective in conidiation and formation of appressoria-like structures, showed hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and lost pathogenicity on non-wounded leaves of barley cv. Bowman. When inoculated on wounded leaves of Bowman, the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were reduced in virulence compared to the wild type. No morphological changes were observed in the ∆Cshog1 mutants in comparison with the wild type; however, they were slightly reduced in growth under oxidative stress and were hypersensitive to hyperosmotic stress. The ∆Cshog1 mutants formed normal appressoria-like structures but were reduced in virulence when inoculated on Bowman leaves. The ∆Csslt2 mutants produced more vegetative hyphae, had lighter pigmentation, were more sensitive to cell wall degrading enzymes, and were reduced in virulence on Bowman leaves, although they formed normal appressoria like the wild type. Root infection assays indicated that the ∆Cshog1 and ∆Csslt2 mutants were able to infect barley roots while the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 failed to cause any symptoms. However, no significant difference in virulence was observed for ∆Cshog1 mutants while ∆Csslt2 mutants showed significantly reduced virulence on barley roots in comparison with the wild type. Our results indicated that all of these MAPK and MAPKKK genes are involved in the regulation of fungal development under

  8. Uav Data Processing for Rapid Mapping Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampubolon, W.; Reinhardt, W.

    2015-08-01

    During disaster and emergency situations, geospatial data plays an important role to serve as a framework for decision support system. As one component of basic geospatial data, large scale topographical maps are mandatory in order to enable geospatial analysis within quite a number of societal challenges. The increasing role of geo-information in disaster management nowadays consequently needs to include geospatial aspects on its analysis. Therefore different geospatial datasets can be combined in order to produce reliable geospatial analysis especially in the context of disaster preparedness and emergency response. A very well-known issue in this context is the fast delivery of geospatial relevant data which is expressed by the term "Rapid Mapping". Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is the rising geospatial data platform nowadays that can be attractive for modelling and monitoring the disaster area with a low cost and timely acquisition in such critical period of time. Disaster-related object extraction is of special interest for many applications. In this paper, UAV-borne data has been used for supporting rapid mapping activities in combination with high resolution airborne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) data. A real disaster instance from 2013 in conjunction with Mount Sinabung eruption, Northern Sumatra, Indonesia, is used as the benchmark test for the rapid mapping activities presented in this paper. On this context, the reliable IFSAR dataset from airborne data acquisition in 2011 has been used as a comparable dataset for accuracy investigation and assessment purpose in 3 D reconstructions. After all, this paper presents a proper geo-referencing and feature extraction method of UAV data to support rapid mapping activities.

  9. Global, quantitative and dynamic mapping of protein subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Itzhak, Daniel N; Tyanova, Stefka; Cox, Jürgen; Borner, Georg HH

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization critically influences protein function, and cells control protein localization to regulate biological processes. We have developed and applied Dynamic Organellar Maps, a proteomic method that allows global mapping of protein translocation events. We initially used maps statically to generate a database with localization and absolute copy number information for over 8700 proteins from HeLa cells, approaching comprehensive coverage. All major organelles were resolved, with exceptional prediction accuracy (estimated at >92%). Combining spatial and abundance information yielded an unprecedented quantitative view of HeLa cell anatomy and organellar composition, at the protein level. We subsequently demonstrated the dynamic capabilities of the approach by capturing translocation events following EGF stimulation, which we integrated into a quantitative model. Dynamic Organellar Maps enable the proteome-wide analysis of physiological protein movements, without requiring any reagents specific to the investigated process, and will thus be widely applicable in cell biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16950.001 PMID:27278775

  10. MAP kinase activity increases during mitosis in early sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Philipova, R; Whitaker, M

    1998-09-01

    A MBP kinase activity increases at mitosis during the first two embryonic cell cycles of the sea urchin embryo. The activity profile of the MBP kinase is the same both in whole cell extracts and after immunoprecipitation with an anti-MAP kinase antibody (2199). An in-gel assay of MBP activity also shows the same activity profile. The activity is associated with the 44 kDa protein that cross-reacts with anti-MAP kinase antibodies. The 44 kDa protein shows cross-reactivity to anti-phosphotyrosine and MAP kinase-directed anti-phosphotyrosine/phosphothreonine antibodies at the times that MBP kinase activity is high. The 2199 antibody co-precipitates some histone H1 kinase activity, but the MBP kinase activity cannot be accounted for by histone H1 kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MBP. The MAP kinase 2199 antibody was used to purify the MBP kinase activity. Peptide sequencing after partial digestion shows the protein to be homologous to MAP kinases from other species. These data demonstrate that MAP kinase activation during nuclear division is not confined to meiosis, but also occurs during mitotic cell cycles. MAP kinase activity in immunoprecipitates also increases immediately after fertilization, which in the sea urchin egg occurs at interphase of the cell cycle. Treating unfertilized eggs with the calcium ionophore A23187 stimulates the increase in MAP kinase activity, demonstrating that a calcium signal can activate MAP kinase and suggesting that the activation of MAP kinase at fertilization is due to the fertilization-induced increase in cytoplasmic free calcium concentration. This signalling pathway must differ from the pathway responsible for calcium-induced inactivation of MAP kinase activity that is found in eggs that are fertilized in meiotic metaphase. PMID:9701549

  11. Expression of a Recombinant Anti-HIV and Anti-Tumor Protein, MAP30, in Nicotiana tobacum Hairy Roots: A pH-Stable and Thermophilic Antimicrobial Protein

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali; Afsharifar, Alireza; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to conventional antibiotics, which microorganisms can readily evade, it is nearly impossible for a microbial strain that is sensitive to antimicrobial proteins to convert to a resistant strain. Therefore, antimicrobial proteins and peptides that are promising alternative candidates for the control of bacterial infections are under investigation. The MAP30 protein of Momordica charantia is a valuable type I ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) with anti-HIV and anti-tumor activities. Whereas the antimicrobial activity of some type I RIPs has been confirmed, less attention has been paid to the antimicrobial activity of MAP30 produced in a stable, easily handled, and extremely cost-effective protein-expression system. rMAP30-KDEL was expressed in Nicotiana tobacum hairy roots, and its effect on different microorganisms was investigated. Analysis of the extracted total proteins of transgenic hairy roots showed that rMAP30-KDEL was expressed effectively and that this protein exhibited significant antibacterial activity in a dose-dependent manner. rMAP30-KDEL also possessed thermal and pH stability. Bioinformatic analysis of MAP30 and other RIPs regarding their conserved motifs, amino-acid contents, charge, aliphatic index, GRAVY value, and secondary structures demonstrated that these factors accounted for their thermophilicity. Therefore, RIPs such as MAP30 and its derived peptides might have promising applications as food preservatives, and their analysis might provide useful insights into designing clinically applicable antibiotic agents. PMID:27459300

  12. Expression of a Recombinant Anti-HIV and Anti-Tumor Protein, MAP30, in Nicotiana tobacum Hairy Roots: A pH-Stable and Thermophilic Antimicrobial Protein.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali; Afsharifar, Alireza; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to conventional antibiotics, which microorganisms can readily evade, it is nearly impossible for a microbial strain that is sensitive to antimicrobial proteins to convert to a resistant strain. Therefore, antimicrobial proteins and peptides that are promising alternative candidates for the control of bacterial infections are under investigation. The MAP30 protein of Momordica charantia is a valuable type I ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) with anti-HIV and anti-tumor activities. Whereas the antimicrobial activity of some type I RIPs has been confirmed, less attention has been paid to the antimicrobial activity of MAP30 produced in a stable, easily handled, and extremely cost-effective protein-expression system. rMAP30-KDEL was expressed in Nicotiana tobacum hairy roots, and its effect on different microorganisms was investigated. Analysis of the extracted total proteins of transgenic hairy roots showed that rMAP30-KDEL was expressed effectively and that this protein exhibited significant antibacterial activity in a dose-dependent manner. rMAP30-KDEL also possessed thermal and pH stability. Bioinformatic analysis of MAP30 and other RIPs regarding their conserved motifs, amino-acid contents, charge, aliphatic index, GRAVY value, and secondary structures demonstrated that these factors accounted for their thermophilicity. Therefore, RIPs such as MAP30 and its derived peptides might have promising applications as food preservatives, and their analysis might provide useful insights into designing clinically applicable antibiotic agents. PMID:27459300

  13. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Elion, Elaine A; Sahoo, Rupam

    2010-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases play central roles in transmitting extracellular and intracellular information in a wide variety of situations in eukaryotic cells. Their activities are perturbed in a large number of diseases, and their activating kinases are currently therapeutic targets in cancer. MAPKs are highly conserved among all eukaryotes. MAPKs were first cloned from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast has five MAPKs and one MAPK-like kinase. The mating MAPK Fus3 is the best characterized yeast MAPK. Members of all subfamilies of human MAPKs can functionally substitute S. cerevisiae MAPKs, providing systems to use genetic approaches to study the functions of either yeast or human MAPKs and to identify functionally relevant amino acid residues that enhance or reduce the effects of therapeutically relevant inhibitors and regulatory proteins. Here, we describe an assay to measure Fus3 activity in immune complexes prepared from S. cerevisiae extracts. The assay conditions are applicable to other MAPKs, as well. PMID:20811996

  14. Mapping Protein-Ligand Interactions in the Gas Phase Using a Functional Group Replacement Strategy. Comparison of CID and BIRD Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lu; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2013-07-01

    Intermolecular interactions in the gaseous ions of two protein-ligand complexes, a single chain antibody (scFv) and its trisaccharide ligand (α-D-Gal p-(1→2)-[α-D-Abe p-(1→3)]-α-Man p-OCH3, L1) and streptavidin homotetramer (S4) and biotin (B), were investigated using a collision-induced dissociation (CID)-functional group replacement (FGR) strategy. CID was performed on protonated ions of a series of structurally related complexes based on the (scFv + L1) and (S4 + 4B) complexes, at the +10 and +13 charge states, respectively. Intermolecular interactions were identified from decreases in the collision energy required to dissociate 50 % of the reactant ion (Ec50) upon modification of protein residues or ligand functional groups. For the (scFv + L1)10+ ion, it was found that deoxygenation of L1 (at Gal C3 and C6 and Man C4 and C6) or mutation of His101 (to Ala) resulted in a decrease in Ec50 values. These results suggest that the four hydroxyl groups and His101 participate in intermolecular H-bonds. These findings agree with those obtained using the blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD)-FGR method. However, the CID-FGR method failed to reveal the relative strengths of the intermolecular interactions or establish Man C4 OH and His101 as an H-bond donor/acceptor pair. The CID-FGR method correctly identified Tyr43, but not Ser27, Trp79, and Trp120, as a stabilizing contact in the (S4 + 4B)13+ ion. In fact, mutation of Trp79 and Trp120 led to an increase in the Ec50 value. Taken together, these results suggest that the CID-FGR method, as implemented here, does not represent a reliable approach for identifying interactions in the gaseous protein-ligand complexes.

  15. Recent advances in large-scale protein interactome mapping

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Virja; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie most, if not all, cellular functions. The comprehensive mapping of these complex networks of stable and transient associations thus remains a key goal, both for systems biology-based initiatives (where it can be combined with other ‘omics’ data to gain a better understanding of functional pathways and networks) and for focused biological studies. Despite the significant challenges of such an undertaking, major strides have been made over the past few years. They include improvements in the computation prediction of PPIs and the literature curation of low-throughput studies of specific protein complexes, but also an increase in the deposition of high-quality data from non-biased high-throughput experimental PPI mapping strategies into publicly available databases. PMID:27158474

  16. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling.

  17. Robots, Bulldozers, and Other Map Activities for the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Sandra F.

    1984-01-01

    Described are activities which will increase fluency in the use of north, south, east, west, up, and down; reinforce the proper positioning of the cardinal directions on a map grid; relate map symbols to familiar surface features; give practice in identifying map symbols; and provide an opportunity to construct maps. (RM)

  18. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-11-26

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies.

  19. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  20. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  1. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  2. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression.

  3. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression. PMID:12239411

  4. Functional Mapping of Protein-Protein Interactions in an Enzyme Complex by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Roderer, Kathrin; Neuenschwander, Martin; Codoni, Giosiana; Sasso, Severin; Gamper, Marianne; Kast, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The shikimate pathway enzyme chorismate mutase converts chorismate into prephenate, a precursor of Tyr and Phe. The intracellular chorismate mutase (MtCM) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly active on its own, but becomes >100-fold more efficient upon formation of a complex with the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (MtDS). The crystal structure of the enzyme complex revealed involvement of C-terminal MtCM residues with the MtDS interface. Here we employed evolutionary strategies to probe the tolerance to substitution of the C-terminal MtCM residues from positions 84–90. Variants with randomized positions were subjected to stringent selection in vivo requiring productive interactions with MtDS for survival. Sequence patterns identified in active library members coincide with residue conservation in natural chorismate mutases of the AroQδ subclass to which MtCM belongs. An Arg-Gly dyad at positions 85 and 86, invariant in AroQδ sequences, was intolerant to mutation, whereas Leu88 and Gly89 exhibited a preference for small and hydrophobic residues in functional MtCM-MtDS complexes. In the absence of MtDS, selection under relaxed conditions identifies positions 84–86 as MtCM integrity determinants, suggesting that the more C-terminal residues function in the activation by MtDS. Several MtCM variants, purified using a novel plasmid-based T7 RNA polymerase gene expression system, showed that a diminished ability to physically interact with MtDS correlates with reduced activatability and feedback regulatory control by Tyr and Phe. Mapping critical protein-protein interaction sites by evolutionary strategies may pinpoint promising targets for drugs that interfere with the activity of protein complexes. PMID:25551646

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Testerink, C; Wang, M

    2000-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), calcium, potassium, pH and a transient activation of MAP kinase. The ABA signal transduction cascades have been shown to be tissue-specific, the transient activation of MAP kinase has until now only been found in barley aleurone cells. However, type 2C phosphatases are involved in the induction of most ABA responses, as shown by the PP2C-deficient abi-mutants. These phosphatases show high homology with phosphatases that regulate MAP kinase activity in yeast. In addition, the role of farnesyl transferase as a negative regulator of ABA responses also indicates towards involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction. Farnesyl transferase is known to regulate Ras proteins, Ras proteins in turn are known to regulate MAP kinase activation. Interestingly, Ras-like proteins were detected in barley aleurone cells. Further establishment of the involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction and its role therein, still awaits more study.

  6. Mapping Homing Endonuclease Cleavage Sites Using In Vitro Generated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the precise position of endonucleolytic cleavage sites is a fundamental experimental technique used to describe the function of a homing endonuclease. However, these proteins are often recalcitrant to cloning and over-expression in biological systems because of toxicity induced by spurious DNA cleavage events. In this chapter we outline the steps to successfully express a homing endonuclease in vitro and use this product in nucleotide-resolution cleavage assays. PMID:24510259

  7. Computational large-scale mapping of protein-protein interactions using structural complexes.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Benjamin; Wuchty, Stefan; Panchenko, Anna R

    2013-01-01

    Although the identification of protein interactions by high-throughput methods progresses at a fast pace, "interactome" datasets still suffer from high rates of false positives and low coverage. To map the interactome of any organism, this unit presents a computational framework to predict protein-protein or gene-gene interactions utilizing experimentally determined evidence of structural complexes, atomic details of binding interfaces and evolutionary conservation.

  8. Photometric reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramolla, M.; Pozo, F.; Westhues, C.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Steenbrugge, K.; Lemke, R.; Murphy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Photometric reverberation mapping is a novel method used to determine the size and geometry of the broad line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) as well as their host galaxy free luminosities. Establishing a tight luminosity - BLR-size relation may allow type-1 AGN to be used as cosmological distance probes. However, the quality of the results is most sensible to dense time sampling and continuity of the photometric lightcurves. This demands an observatory, with optimal environmental conditions, like the "Universitätssternwarte Bochum", located in the Atacama Desert in Chile. The massive amount of observations are controlled robotically, adapting observational schedules of the telescopes to the weather conditions. Here we present one of the first promising results of our studies.

  9. From Ramachandran Maps to Tertiary Structures of Proteins.

    PubMed

    DasGupta, Debarati; Kaushik, Rahul; Jayaram, B

    2015-08-27

    Sequence to structure of proteins is an unsolved problem. A possible coarse grained resolution to this entails specification of all the torsional (Φ, Ψ) angles along the backbone of the polypeptide chain. The Ramachandran map quite elegantly depicts the allowed conformational (Φ, Ψ) space of proteins which is still very large for the purposes of accurate structure generation. We have divided the allowed (Φ, Ψ) space in Ramachandran maps into 27 distinct conformations sufficient to regenerate a structure to within 5 Å from the native, at least for small proteins, thus reducing the structure prediction problem to a specification of an alphanumeric string, i.e., the amino acid sequence together with one of the 27 conformations preferred by each amino acid residue. This still theoretically results in 27(n) conformations for a protein comprising "n" amino acids. We then investigated the spatial correlations at the two-residue (dipeptide) and three-residue (tripeptide) levels in what may be described as higher order Ramachandran maps, with the premise that the allowed conformational space starts to shrink as we introduce neighborhood effects. We found, for instance, for a tripeptide which potentially can exist in any of the 27(3) "allowed" conformations, three-fourths of these conformations are redundant to the 95% confidence level, suggesting sequence context dependent preferred conformations. We then created a look-up table of preferred conformations at the tripeptide level and correlated them with energetically favorable conformations. We found in particular that Boltzmann probabilities calculated from van der Waals energies for each conformation of tripeptides correlate well with the observed populations in the structural database (the average correlation coefficient is ∼0.8). An alpha-numeric string and hence the tertiary structure can be generated for any sequence from the look-up table within minutes on a single processor and to a higher level of accuracy

  10. Mapping gene activity of Arabidopsis root hairs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative information on gene activity at single cell-type resolution is essential for the understanding of how cells work and interact. Root hairs, or trichoblasts, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specialized cells in the epidermis, represent an ideal model for cell fate acquisition and differentiation in plants. Results Here, we provide an atlas of gene and protein expression in Arabidopsis root hair cells, generated by paired-end RNA sequencing and LC/MS-MS analysis of protoplasts from plants containing a pEXP7-GFP reporter construct. In total, transcripts of 23,034 genes were detected in root hairs. High-resolution proteome analysis led to the reliable identification of 2,447 proteins, 129 of which were differentially expressed between root hairs and non-root hair tissue. Dissection of pre-mRNA splicing patterns showed that all types of alternative splicing were cell type-dependent, and less complex in EXP7-expressing cells when compared to non-root hair cells. Intron retention was repressed in several transcripts functionally related to root hair morphogenesis, indicative of a cell type-specific control of gene expression by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Concordance between mRNA and protein expression was generally high, but in many cases mRNA expression was not predictive for protein abundance. Conclusions The integrated analysis shows that gene activity in root hairs is dictated by orchestrated, multilayered regulatory mechanisms that allow for a cell type-specific composition of functional components. PMID:23800126

  11. Nanotools for Neuroscience and Brain Activity Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Andrews, Anne M.; Boyden, Edward S.; Chun, Miyoung; Church, George M.; Deisseroth, Karl; Donoghue, John P.; Fraser, Scott E.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Looger, Loren L.; Masmanidis, Sotiris; McEuen, Paul L.; Nurmikko, Arto V.; Park, Hongkun; Peterka, Darcy S.; Reid, Clay; Roukes, Michael L.; Scherer, Axel; Schnitzer, Mark; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Shepard, Kenneth L.; Tsao, Doris; Turrigiano, Gina; Weiss, Paul S.; Xu, Chris; Yuste, Rafael; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscience is at a crossroads. Great effort is being invested into deciphering specific neural interactions and circuits. At the same time, there exist few general theories or principles that explain brain function. We attribute this disparity, in part, to limitations in current methodologies. Traditional neurophysiological approaches record the activities of one neuron or a few neurons at a time. Neurochemical approaches focus on single neurotransmitters. Yet, there is an increasing realization that neural circuits operate at emergent levels, where the interactions between hundreds or thousands of neurons, utilizing multiple chemical transmitters, generate functional states. Brains function at the nanoscale, so tools to study brains must ultimately operate at this scale, as well. Nanoscience and nanotechnology are poised to provide a rich toolkit of novel methods to explore brain function by enabling simultaneous measurement and manipulation of activity of thousands or even millions of neurons. We and others refer to this goal as the Brain Activity Mapping Project. In this Nano Focus, we discuss how recent developments in nanoscale analysis tools and in the design and synthesis of nanomaterials have generated optical, electrical, and chemical methods that can readily be adapted for use in neuroscience. These approaches represent exciting areas of technical development and research. Moreover, unique opportunities exist for nanoscientists, nanotechnologists, and other physical scientists and engineers to contribute to tackling the challenging problems involved in understanding the fundamentals of brain function. PMID:23514423

  12. Modeling Protein Structures Based on Density Maps at Intermediate Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianpeng

    Structural biology is now in a special era in which increasingly more complex biomolecules are being studied. For many of them, only low- or intermediateresolution density maps (6-10 Å) can be obtained by, for instance, electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) (Bottcher et al., 1997; Conway et al., 1997; DeRosier and Harrison, 1997; Kuhn et al., 2002; Li et al., 2002; Mancini et al., 2000; Zhang et al., 2000; Zhou et al., 2000, 2001a,b). In certain cases, analysis in terms of intermediateresolution density maps is also inevitable in X-ray crystallography as exemplified in the lengthy process of structural determination of the 50S ribosomal subunit that incremented from 9 Å, 5 Å, to 2.4 Å (Ban et al., 1998, 1999, 2000). As a common feature in all these cases, it is usually impossible, with conventional methods, to construct reasonably accurate atomic models from density maps. However, for the purpose of structural analysis, it would still be very helpful if one can build some kind of pseudo-atomic models from the density maps because this will not only facilitate the structural determination to higher resolutions, but also assist further biochemical studies and functional interpretation. For example, significant insights into the architecture and organization of proteins can often be learned if one can roughly locate the major secondary structural elements such as α-helices and β-sheets. This rationale is supported by the fact that the knowledge of protein folds can be obtained primarily from the spatial arrangement of the secondary structural elements independent of the sequence identity of the proteins, as different sequences can have the same fold.

  13. Activated protein C anticoagulant system dysfunction and thrombophilia in Asia.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Naotaka; Kuma, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophilia that is common among Caucasians is caused by genetic polymorphisms of coagulation factor V Leiden (R506Q) and prothrombin G20210A. Unlike that in Caucasians, thrombophilia that is common in the Japanese and Chinese involve dysfunction of the activated protein C (APC) anticoagulant system caused by abnormal protein S and protein C molecules. Approximately 50% of Japanese and Chinese individuals who develop venous thrombosis have reduced activities of protein S. The abnormal sites causing the protein S molecule abnormalities are distributed throughout the protein S gene, PROS1. One of the most common abnormalities is protein S Tokushima (K155E), which accounts for about 30% of the protein S molecule abnormalities in the Japanese. Whether APC dysfunction occurs in other Asian countries is an important aspect of mapping thrombophilia among Asians. International surveys using an accurate assay system are needed to determine this.

  14. CapsidMaps: Protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L.; Reddy, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu. PMID:25697908

  15. CapsidMaps: protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2015-04-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu.

  16. Ribosomal protein gene mapping and human chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N.; Goodman, N.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    In Drosophila, the Minute phenotype (reduced body size, diminished viability and fertility, and short, thin bristles) results from heterozygous deficiencies (deletions) at any one of 50 loci scattered about the genome. A handful of these Minute loci have been molecularly characterized, and all have been found to encode ribosomal proteins. Thus, the Minute phenotype appears to result from reduced protein synthetic capacity in flies with one rather than two copies of a given ribosomal protein (rp) gene. We are pursuing the possibility that similar reductions in protein synthetic capacity--again resulting from rp gene deficiencies--might underlie phenotypes associated with certain chromosomal disorders in humans. We and our colleagues have reported findings consistent with a role for RPS4 deficiency in the etiology of certain features of Turner syndrome, a complex human disorder classically associated with an XO karyotype. We are intrigued by the possibility that deficiencies of other human rp genes might cause phenotypic abnormalities similar to those seen in Turner syndrome--just as deficiencies of any of a number of Drosophila rp genes cause the Minute phenotype. We must first learn the chromosomal map position of each of the estimated 83 human rp genes. The task of mapping the functional (intron-containing) rp genes is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes elsewhere in the genome. To date, we have assigned (or confirmed the previous assignment of) 38 rp genes to individual human chromosomes by PCR analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids containing subsets of human chromosomes, with all but four chromosomes carrying at least one rp gene. We have also identified more than 100 large-insert human YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones that contain individual rp genes. Such screening of YAC libraries will result in precise positioning of the rp genes on the emerging physical map of the human genome.

  17. Mapping the Topography of a Protein Energy Landscape.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Richard D; Wilkinson, James; Faccin, Mauro; Sivertsson, Elin M; Pelizzola, Alessandro; Lowe, Alan R; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2015-11-25

    Protein energy landscapes are highly complex, yet the vast majority of states within them tend to be invisible to experimentalists. Here, using site-directed mutagenesis and exploiting the simplicity of tandem-repeat protein structures, we delineate a network of these states and the routes between them. We show that our target, gankyrin, a 226-residue 7-ankyrin-repeat protein, can access two alternative (un)folding pathways. We resolve intermediates as well as transition states, constituting a comprehensive series of snapshots that map early and late stages of the two pathways and show both to be polarized such that the repeat array progressively unravels from one end of the molecule or the other. Strikingly, we find that the protein folds via one pathway but unfolds via a different one. The origins of this behavior can be rationalized using the numerical results of a simple statistical mechanics model that allows us to visualize the equilibrium behavior as well as single-molecule folding/unfolding trajectories, thereby filling in the gaps that are not accessible to direct experimental observation. Our study highlights the complexity of repeat-protein folding arising from their symmetrical structures; at the same time, however, this structural simplicity enables us to dissect the complexity and thereby map the precise topography of the energy landscape in full breadth and remarkable detail. That we can recapitulate the key features of the folding mechanism by computational analysis of the native structure alone will help toward the ultimate goal of designed amino-acid sequences with made-to-measure folding mechanisms-the Holy Grail of protein folding. PMID:26561984

  18. Endothelial protein kinase MAP4K4 promotes vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Skoura, Athanasia; Matevossian, Anouch; Danai, Laura V.; Zheng, Wei; Cortes, Christian; Bhattacharya, Samit K.; Aouadi, Myriam; Hagan, Nana; Yawe, Joseph C.; Vangala, Pranitha; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Cooper, Marcus P.; Fitzgibbons, Timothy P.; Buckbinder, Leonard; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Signalling pathways that control endothelial cell (EC) permeability, leukocyte adhesion and inflammation are pivotal for atherosclerosis initiation and progression. Here we demonstrate that the Sterile-20-like mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4), which has been implicated in inflammation, is abundantly expressed in ECs and in atherosclerotic plaques from mice and humans. On the basis of endothelial-specific MAP4K4 gene silencing and gene ablation experiments in Apoe−/− mice, we show that MAP4K4 in ECs markedly promotes Western diet-induced aortic macrophage accumulation and atherosclerotic plaque development. Treatment of Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice with a selective small-molecule MAP4K4 inhibitor also markedly reduces atherosclerotic lesion area. MAP4K4 silencing in cultured ECs attenuates cell surface adhesion molecule expression while reducing nuclear localization and activity of NFκB, which is critical for promoting EC activation and atherosclerosis. Taken together, these results reveal that MAP4K4 is a key signalling node that promotes immune cell recruitment in atherosclerosis. PMID:26688060

  19. Spatial recognition and mapping of proteins using DNA aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Congzhou; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2014-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy-based adhesion force measurements have emerged as a powerful tool for the biophysical analyses of biological systems. Such measurements can now be extended to detection and mapping of biomolecules on surfaces via integrated imaging and force spectroscopy techniques. Critical to these experiments is the choice of the biomolecular recognition probe. In this study, we demonstrate how oligonucleotide aptamers can be used as versatile probes to simultaneously image and spatially locate targets on surfaces. We focus on two structurally distinct proteins relevant to the clotting cascade—human α-thrombin and vascular endothelial growth factor. Via AFM-recognition mapping using specific DNA aptamers on a commercially available instrument, we show a clear consistency between height and force measurements obtained simultaneously. Importantly, we are able to observe changes in binding due to changes in the external microenvironment, which demonstrate the ability to study fluctuating biological systems in real time. The aptamer specificity and the ability to distinguish their targets are shown through positive and negative controls. It is therefore possible to generate high resolution maps to spatially and temporally identify proteins at the molecular level on complex surfaces.

  20. How round is a protein? Exploring protein structures for globularity using conformal mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Joel; Koehl, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm that automatically computes a measure of the geometric difference between the surface of a protein and a round sphere. The algorithm takes as input two triangulated genus zero surfaces representing the protein and the round sphere, respectively, and constructs a discrete conformal map f between these surfaces. The conformal map is chosen to minimize a symmetric elastic energy ES(f) that measures the distance of f from an isometry. We illustrate our approach on a set of basic sample problems and then on a dataset of diverse protein structures. We show first that ES(f) is able to quantify the roundness of the Platonic solids and that for these surfaces it replicates well traditional measures of roundness such as the sphericity. We then demonstrate that the symmetric elastic energy ES(f) captures both global and local differences between two surfaces, showing that our method identifies the presence of protruding regions in protein structures and quantifies how these regions make the shape of a protein deviate from globularity. Based on these results, we show that ES(f) serves as a probe of the limits of the application of conformal mapping to parametrize protein shapes. We identify limitations of the method and discuss its extension to achieving automatic registration of protein structures based on their surface geometry. PMID:25988167

  1. AlphaSpace: Fragment-Centric Topographical Mapping To Target Protein-Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rooklin, David; Wang, Cheng; Katigbak, Joseph; Arora, Paramjit S; Zhang, Yingkai

    2015-08-24

    Inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy despite the difficulty in targeting such interfaces with drug-like small molecules. PPIs generally feature large and flat binding surfaces as compared to typical drug targets. These features pose a challenge for structural characterization of the surface using geometry-based pocket-detection methods. An attractive mapping strategy--that builds on the principles of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD)--is to detect the fragment-centric modularity at the protein surface and then characterize the large PPI interface as a set of localized, fragment-targetable interaction regions. Here, we introduce AlphaSpace, a computational analysis tool designed for fragment-centric topographical mapping (FCTM) of PPI interfaces. Our approach uses the alpha sphere construct, a geometric feature of a protein's Voronoi diagram, to map out concave interaction space at the protein surface. We introduce two new features--alpha-atom and alpha-space--and the concept of the alpha-atom/alpha-space pair to rank pockets for fragment-targetability and to facilitate the evaluation of pocket/fragment complementarity. The resulting high-resolution interfacial map of targetable pocket space can be used to guide the rational design and optimization of small molecule or biomimetic PPI inhibitors. PMID:26225450

  2. Exploitation of latent protein allostery enables the evolution of novel and divergent MAP kinase regulation

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Scott M.; Flores, Jonathan; Lim, Wendell A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Allosteric interactions provide precise spatiotemporal control over signaling proteins, but how allosteric activators and their targets co-evolve is poorly understood. Here, we trace the evolution of two allosteric activator motifs within the yeast scaffold protein Ste5 that specifically target the mating MAP kinase Fus3. One activator (Ste5-VWA) provides pathway insulation and dates to the divergence of Fus3 from its paralog, Kss1; a second activator (Ste5-FBD) that tunes mating behavior is, in contrast, not conserved in most lineages. Surprisingly, both Ste5 activator motifs could regulate MAP kinases that diverged from Fus3 prior to the emergence of Ste5, suggesting that Ste5 activators arose by exploiting latent regulatory features already present in the MAPK ancestor. The magnitude of this latent allosteric potential drifts widely among pre-Ste5 MAP kinases, providing a pool of hidden phenotypic diversity that, when revealed by new activators, could lead to functional divergence and the evolution of distinct signaling behaviors. PMID:23953117

  3. A comprehensive protein-centric ID mapping service for molecular data integration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongzhan; Suzek, Baris E.; Mazumder, Raja; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Yongxing; Wu, Cathy H.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Identifier (ID) mapping establishes links between various biological databases and is an essential first step for molecular data integration and functional annotation. ID mapping allows diverse molecular data on genes and proteins to be combined and mapped to functional pathways and ontologies. We have developed comprehensive protein-centric ID mapping services providing mappings for 90 IDs derived from databases on genes, proteins, pathways, diseases, structures, protein families, protein interaction, literature, ontologies, etc. The services are widely used and have been regularly updated since 2006. Availability: www.uniprot.org/mappingandproteininformation-resource.org/pirwww/search/idmapping.shtml Contact: huang@dbi.udel.edu PMID:21478197

  4. Heterogeneity mapping of protein expression in tumors using quantitative immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Faratian, Dana; Christiansen, Jason; Gustavson, Mark; Jones, Christine; Scott, Christopher; Um, InHwa; Harrison, David J

    2011-10-25

    Morphologic heterogeneity within an individual tumor is well-recognized by histopathologists in surgical practice. While this often takes the form of areas of distinct differentiation into recognized histological subtypes, or different pathological grade, often there are more subtle differences in phenotype which defy accurate classification (Figure 1). Ultimately, since morphology is dictated by the underlying molecular phenotype, areas with visible differences are likely to be accompanied by differences in the expression of proteins which orchestrate cellular function and behavior, and therefore, appearance. The significance of visible and invisible (molecular) heterogeneity for prognosis is unknown, but recent evidence suggests that, at least at the genetic level, heterogeneity exists in the primary tumor(1,2), and some of these sub-clones give rise to metastatic (and therefore lethal) disease. Moreover, some proteins are measured as biomarkers because they are the targets of therapy (for instance ER and HER2 for tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin), respectively). If these proteins show variable expression within a tumor then therapeutic responses may also be variable. The widely used histopathologic scoring schemes for immunohistochemistry either ignore, or numerically homogenize the quantification of protein expression. Similarly, in destructive techniques, where the tumor samples are homogenized (such as gene expression profiling), quantitative information can be elucidated, but spatial information is lost. Genetic heterogeneity mapping approaches in pancreatic cancer have relied either on generation of a single cell suspension(3), or on macrodissection(4). A recent study has used quantum dots in order to map morphologic and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer tissue(5), providing proof of principle that morphology and molecular mapping is feasible, but falling short of quantifying the heterogeneity. Since immunohistochemistry is, at best, only semi

  5. Cross-species protein interactome mapping reveals species-specific wiring of stress response pathways.

    PubMed

    Das, Jishnu; Vo, Tommy V; Wei, Xiaomu; Mellor, Joseph C; Tong, Virginia; Degatano, Andrew G; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Lihua; Cordero, Nicolas A; Kruer-Zerhusen, Nathan; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Lipkin, Steven M; Yoshida, Minoru; Roth, Frederick P; Yu, Haiyuan

    2013-05-21

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has more metazoan-like features than the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet it has similarly facile genetics. We present a large-scale verified binary protein-protein interactome network, "StressNet," based on high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screens of interacting proteins classified as part of stress response and signal transduction pathways in S. pombe. We performed systematic, cross-species interactome mapping using StressNet and a protein interactome network of orthologous proteins in S. cerevisiae. With cross-species comparative network studies, we detected a previously unidentified component (Snr1) of the S. pombe mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1 pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that Snr1 interacted with Sty1 and that deletion of snr1 increased the sensitivity of S. pombe cells to stress. Comparison of StressNet with the interactome network of orthologous proteins in S. cerevisiae showed that most of the interactions among these stress response and signaling proteins are not conserved between species but are "rewired"; orthologous proteins have different binding partners in both species. In particular, transient interactions connecting proteins in different functional modules were more likely to be rewired than conserved. By directly testing interactions between proteins in one yeast species and their corresponding binding partners in the other yeast species with yeast two-hybrid assays, we found that about half of the interactions that are traditionally considered "conserved" form modified interaction interfaces that may potentially accommodate novel functions. PMID:23695164

  6. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    PubMed

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  7. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S; Carreira, Ricardo J; van Zeijl, Rene J M; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids) while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media) and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press); M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014) 465-468.) [1,2]. PMID:26217810

  8. Correlation of scintigraphic phase maps with intraoperative epicardial/endocardial maps in patients with activation disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Dae, M.W.; Botvinick, E.H.; Scheinmann, M.H.; Morady, F.J.; Davis, J.A.; Schechtmann, N.; Frais, M.; Faulkner, D.; O'Connell, W.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the true accuracy of scintigraphic findings, 8 patients (PTS), 6 with pre-excitation (PEX) syndrome and 2 with intractable ventricular tachycardia (VT), were studied by phase analysis, prior to corrective surgery. Sites of earliest phase angle were determined in multiple projections during the conduction disturbance, compared to sites of early ventricular activation determined by epicardial mapping during PEX and, when performed, by endocardial mapping during VT, and to maps previously generated at conventional electrophysiologic study (EPS). Among PEX PTS, Rt and Lt lateral, Lt anterolateral, Rt and Lt posterolateral and posteroseptal bypass pathways mapped at surgery correlated with phase localization. While localization from EPS also correlated well with surgical maps in 4 PTS, 1 PT could not be mapped by EPS and another presented ambiguities. Scintigraphic localization also correlated well with surgical mapping in a PT with a RV VT focus while EPS was suggestive but uncertain. A second PT with VT mapped scintigraphically to originate in a Lt lateral focus, demonstrated a similar localization on EPS, and during surgical mapping, an incision made through the scintigraphic focus terminated VT. Incision in regions of earliest activity in the first VT PT and in PTS with PEX resolved the arrhythmia or interrupted the bypass tract. Phase mapping correlated closely with surface mapping at surgery while providing an accurate, independent method for noninvasive assessment of conduction disturbances and a complementary tool to standard EPS.

  9. Mapping the peptide and protein immune response in the larvae of the fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Ciencialová, Alice; Neubauerová, Tereza; Sanda, Miloslav; Sindelka, Radek; Cvacka, Josef; Voburka, Zdenek; Budesínský, Milos; Kasicka, Václav; Sázelová, Petra; Solínová, Veronika; Macková, Martina; Koutek, Bohumír; Jirácek, Jirí

    2008-06-01

    We chose the larvae of fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata to map the peptide and protein immune response. The hemolymph of the third-instar larvae of S. bullata was used for isolation. The larvae were injected with bacterial suspension to induce an antimicrobial response. The hemolymph was separated into crude fractions, which were subdivided by RP-HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and free-flow electrophoresis. In several fractions, we determined significant antimicrobial activities against the pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among antimicrobially active compounds we identified dipeptide beta-alanyl-L-tyrosine, protein transferrin, and two variants of peptide sapecin. We also partially characterized two novel antimicrobially active polypeptides; odorant-binding protein 99b, and a peptide which remains unidentified.

  10. Allostery in BAX protein activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenyan; Zhang, Hansi; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-11-01

    BAX is a member of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family of proteins, which is involved in the regulation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In the process of apoptosis, BH3-only molecules activate cytosolic BAX. Activated BAX molecules insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane with their [Formula: see text]-helix and form oligomers that lead to membrane poration, resulting in the release of apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Recently, a novel interaction site for the binding of the BIM SAHB ligand to BAX was reported. BIM SAHB binding was shown to invoke the exposure of the 6A7 epitope (amino acids 13-19) and of the BH3 domain of BAX, followed by mobilization of the BAX [Formula: see text]-helix. However, the intramolecular pathway for signal transmission in BAX, from BIM SAHB binding to mobilization of the [Formula: see text]-helix largely remained elusive. For a molecular understanding of the activation of BAX, and thus the first steps in apoptosis, we performed microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations both of the BAX protein and of the BAX:BIM SAHB complex in aqueous solution. In agreement with experiment, the 6A7 and BH3 domains adopt a more solvent-exposed conformation within the BAX:BIM SAHB complex. BIM SAHB binding was found to stabilize the secondary structure of the [Formula: see text]9-helix. A force distribution analysis revealed a force network of residue-residue interactions responsible for signal transmission from the BIM SAHB binding site predominantly via the [Formula: see text]4- and [Formula: see text]6-helices to the [Formula: see text]9-helix on the opposite site of the protein.

  11. Teaching Basic Geographical Skills: Map and Compass Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Margaret Edith

    1986-01-01

    Presents a unit on map and compass activities which introduces compass direction, magnetic declination and conversion of map measurement to familiar units. Requires four, one-hour class meetings and may be followed by a half-day orienteering activity. (Author/JDH)

  12. Mapping dynamic protein interactions in MAP kinase signaling using live-cell fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Brian D; Schwartz, Joel W; Li, Rong

    2007-12-18

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), and photon counting histograms (PCH) are fluctuation methods that emerged recently as potentially useful tools for obtaining parameters of molecular dynamics, interactions, and oligomerization in vivo. Here, we report the successful implementation of FCS, FCCS, and PCH in live yeast cells using fluorescent protein-tagged proteins expressed from their native chromosomal loci, examining cytosolic dynamics and interactions among components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, a widely occurring signaling motif, in response to mating pheromone. FCS analysis detailed the diffusion characteristics and mobile concentrations of MAPK proteins. FCCS analysis using EGFP and mCherry-tagged protein pairs observed the interactions of Ste7 (MAPK kinase) with the MAPKs, Fus3 or Kss1, and of the scaffold protein, Ste5, with Ste7 and Ste11 (MAPK kinase kinase) in the cytosol, providing in vivo constants of their binding equilibrium. The interaction of Ste5 with Fus3 in the cytosol was below the limit of detection, suggesting a weak interaction, if it exists, with K(d) >400-500 nM. Using PCH, we show that cytosolic Ste5 were mostly monomers. Artificial dimerization of Ste5, as confirmed by PCH, using a dimerizing tag, stimulated the interaction between Ste5 and Fus3. Native Ste5 was found to bind Fus3 preferentially at the cortex in pheromone-treated cells, as detected by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These results provide a quantitative spatial map of MAPK complexes in vivo and directly support the model that membrane association and regulation of the Ste5 scaffold are critical steps in MAPK activation. PMID:18077328

  13. Acquisition of contextual discrimination involves the appearance of a RAS-GRF1/p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-mediated signaling pathway that promotes long term potentiation (LTP).

    PubMed

    Jin, Shan-Xue; Arai, Junko; Tian, Xuejun; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra; Feig, Larry A

    2013-07-26

    RAS-GRF1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor with the ability to activate RAS and RAC GTPases in response to elevated calcium levels. We previously showed that beginning at 1 month of age, RAS-GRF1 mediates NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-induction of long term depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of mice. Here we show that beginning at 2 months of age, when mice first acquire the ability to discriminate between closely related contexts, RAS-GRF1 begins to contribute to the induction of long term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 hippocampus by mediating the action of calcium-permeable, AMPA-type glutamate receptors (CP-AMPARs). Surprisingly, LTP induction by CP-AMPARs through RAS-GRF1 occurs via activation of p38 MAP kinase rather than ERK MAP kinase, which has more frequently been linked to LTP. Moreover, contextual discrimination is blocked by knockdown of Ras-Grf1 expression specifically in the CA1 hippocampus, infusion of a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor into the CA1 hippocampus, or the injection of an inhibitor of CP-AMPARs. These findings implicate the CA1 hippocampus in the developmentally dependent capacity to distinguish closely related contexts through the appearance of a novel LTP-supporting signaling pathway.

  14. Efficient search, mapping, and optimization of multi-protein genetic systems in diverse bacteria.

    PubMed

    Farasat, Iman; Kushwaha, Manish; Collens, Jason; Easterbrook, Michael; Guido, Matthew; Salis, Howard M

    2014-01-01

    Developing predictive models of multi-protein genetic systems to understand and optimize their behavior remains a combinatorial challenge, particularly when measurement throughput is limited. We developed a computational approach to build predictive models and identify optimal sequences and expression levels, while circumventing combinatorial explosion. Maximally informative genetic system variants were first designed by the RBS Library Calculator, an algorithm to design sequences for efficiently searching a multi-protein expression space across a > 10,000-fold range with tailored search parameters and well-predicted translation rates. We validated the algorithm's predictions by characterizing 646 genetic system variants, encoded in plasmids and genomes, expressed in six gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial hosts. We then combined the search algorithm with system-level kinetic modeling, requiring the construction and characterization of 73 variants to build a sequence-expression-activity map (SEAMAP) for a biosynthesis pathway. Using model predictions, we designed and characterized 47 additional pathway variants to navigate its activity space, find optimal expression regions with desired activity response curves, and relieve rate-limiting steps in metabolism. Creating sequence-expression-activity maps accelerates the optimization of many protein systems and allows previous measurements to quantitatively inform future designs.

  15. Mapping functional group free energy patterns at protein occluded sites: nuclear receptors and G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Yu, Wenbo; Raman, E Prabhu; Hershfeld, Alena V; Fang, Lei; Deshpande, Deepak A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-03-23

    Occluded ligand-binding pockets (LBP) such as those found in nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a significant opportunity and challenge for computer-aided drug design. To determine free energies maps of functional groups of these LBPs, a Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo/Molecular Dynamics (GCMC/MD) strategy is combined with the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) methodology. SILCS-GCMC/MD is shown to map functional group affinity patterns that recapitulate locations of functional groups across diverse classes of ligands in the LBPs of the androgen (AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-γ (PPARγ) NRs and the metabotropic glutamate (mGluR) and β2-adreneric (β2AR) GPCRs. Inclusion of protein flexibility identifies regions of the binding pockets not accessible in crystal conformations and allows for better quantitative estimates of relative ligand binding affinities in all the proteins tested. Differences in functional group requirements of the active and inactive states of the β2AR LBP were used in virtual screening to identify high efficacy agonists targeting β2AR in Airway Smooth Muscle (ASM) cells. Seven of the 15 selected ligands were found to effect ASM relaxation representing a 46% hit rate. Hence, the method will be of use for the rational design of ligands in the context of chemical biology and the development of therapeutic agents.

  16. Free-Hand Small-Scale Maps: Activities for Cognitive Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saveland, Robert N.

    1978-01-01

    Suggests that small-scale mapping activities can be used in geography courses to help students understand geographic concepts such as latitude, longitude, situation, relative location, and national boundaries. (Author/DB)

  17. Collaborative Concept Mapping Activities in a Classroom Scenario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elorriaga, J. A.; Arruarte, A.; Calvo, I.; Larrañaga, M.; Rueda, U.; Herrán, E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test collaborative concept mapping activities using computers in a classroom scenario and to evaluate the possibilities that Elkar-CM offers for collaboratively learning non-technical topics. Elkar-CM is a multi-lingual and multi-media software program designed for drawing concept maps (CMs) collaboratively. Concept…

  18. A global tectonic activity map with orbital photographic supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A three part map showing equatorial and polar regions was compiled showing tectonic and volcanic activity of the past one million years, including the present. Features shown include actively spreading ridges, spreading rates, major active faults, subduction zones, well defined plates, and volcanic areas active within the past one million years. Activity within this period was inferred from seismicity (instrumental and historic), physiography, and published literature. The tectonic activity map was used for planning global geodetic programs of satellite laser ranging and very long base line interferometry and for geologic education.

  19. Global tectonic activity map with orbital photographic supplement

    SciTech Connect

    Lowman, P.D. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A three part map showing equatorial and polar regions was compiled showing tectonic and volcanic activity of the past one million years, including the present. Features shown include actively spreading ridges, spreading rates, major active faults, subduction zones, well defined plates, and volcanic areas active within the past one million years. Activity within this period was inferred from seismicity (instrumental and historic), physiography, and published literature. The tectonic activity map was used for planning global geodetic programs of satellite laser ranging and very long base line interferometry and for geologic education.

  20. Systematic characterization of protein folding pathways using diffusion maps: Application to Trp-cage miniprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Beom; Dsilva, Carmeline J.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2015-02-28

    Understanding the mechanisms by which proteins fold from disordered amino-acid chains to spatially ordered structures remains an area of active inquiry. Molecular simulations can provide atomistic details of the folding dynamics which complement experimental findings. Conventional order parameters, such as root-mean-square deviation and radius of gyration, provide structural information but fail to capture the underlying dynamics of the protein folding process. It is therefore advantageous to adopt a method that can systematically analyze simulation data to extract relevant structural as well as dynamical information. The nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique known as diffusion maps automatically embeds the high-dimensional folding trajectories in a lower-dimensional space from which one can more easily visualize folding pathways, assuming the data lie approximately on a lower-dimensional manifold. The eigenvectors that parametrize the low-dimensional space, furthermore, are determined systematically, rather than chosen heuristically, as is done with phenomenological order parameters. We demonstrate that diffusion maps can effectively characterize the folding process of a Trp-cage miniprotein. By embedding molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of Trp-cage folding in diffusion maps space, we identify two folding pathways and intermediate structures that are consistent with the previous studies, demonstrating that this technique can be employed as an effective way of analyzing and constructing protein folding pathways from molecular simulations.

  1. Mapping the Geometric Evolution of Protein Folding Motor

    PubMed Central

    Hazam, Prakash Kishore; Shekhar, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide chain has an invariant main-chain and a variant side-chain sequence. How the side-chain sequence determines fold in terms of its chemical constitution has been scrutinized extensively and verified periodically. However, a focussed investigation on the directive effect of side-chain geometry may provide important insights supplementing existing algorithms in mapping the geometrical evolution of protein chains and its structural preferences. Geometrically, folding of protein structure may be envisaged as the evolution of its geometric variables: ϕ, and ψ dihedral angles of polypeptide main-chain directed by χ1, and χ2 of side chain. In this work, protein molecule is metaphorically modelled as a machine with 4 rotors ϕ, ψ, χ1 and χ2, with its evolution to the functional fold is directed by combinations of its rotor directions. We observe that differential rotor motions lead to different secondary structure formations and the combinatorial pattern is unique and consistent for particular secondary structure type. Further, we found that combination of rotor geometries of each amino acid is unique which partly explains how different amino acid sequence combinations have unique structural evolution and functional adaptation. Quantification of these amino acid rotor preferences, resulted in the generation of 3 substitution matrices, which later on plugged in the BLAST tool, for evaluating their efficiency in aligning sequences. We have employed BLOSUM62 and PAM30 as standard for primary evaluation. Generation of substitution matrices is a logical extension of the conceptual framework we attempted to build during the development of this work. Optimization of matrices following the conventional routines and possible application with biologically relevant data sets are beyond the scope of this manuscript, though it is a part of the larger project design. PMID:27716851

  2. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  3. MAPS: an interactive web server for membrane annotation of transmembrane protein structures.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Jitender; Basu, Gautam

    2011-04-01

    The exact positioning of the membrane in transmembrane (TM) proteins plays important functional roles. Yet, the structures of TM proteins in protein data bank (pdb) have no information about the explicit position of the membrane. Using a simple hydrophobic lipid-protein mismatch energy function and a flexible lipid/water boundary, the position of lipid bilayer for representative TM proteins in pdb have been annotated. A web server called MAPS (Membrane Annotation of Protein Structures; available at: http://www.boseinst.ernet.in/gautam/maps) has been set up that allows the user to interactively analyze membrane-protein orientations of any uploaded pdb structure with user-defined membrane flexibility parameters.

  4. Using Brain Electrical Activity Mapping to Diagnose Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torello, Michael, W.; Duffy, Frank H.

    1985-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience assumes that measurement of brain electrical activity should relate to cognition. Brain Electrical Activity Mapping (BEAM), a non-invasive technique, is used to record changes in activity from one brain area to another and is 80 to 90 percent successful in classifying subjects as dyslexic or normal. (MT)

  5. Mapping membrane protein interactions in cell signaling systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Hadi, Masood Z.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2003-12-01

    We proposed to apply a chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and modeling method called MS3D to the structure determination of the rhodopsin-transducin membrane protein complex (RTC). Herein we describe experimental progress made to adapt the MS3D approach for characterizing membrane protein systems, and computational progress in experimental design, data analysis and protein structure modeling. Over the past three years, we have developed tailored experimental methods for all steps in the MS3D method for rhodopsin, including protein purification, a functional assay, cross-linking, proteolysis and mass spectrometry. In support of the experimental effort. we have out a data analysis pipeline in place that automatically selects the monoisotopic peaks in a mass spectrometric spectrum, assigns them and stores the results in a database. Theoretical calculations using 24 experimentally-derived distance constraints have resulted in a backbone-level model of the activated form of rhodopsin, which is a critical first step towards building a model of the RTC. Cross-linked rhodopsin-transducin complexes have been isolated via gel electrophoresis and further mass spectrometric characterization of the cross-links is underway.

  6. [Ventricular activation sequence estimated by body surface isochrone map].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H; Ishikawa, T; Takami, K; Kojima, H; Yabe, S; Ohsugi, S; Miyachi, K; Sotobata, I

    1985-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of the body surface isochrone map (VAT map) for identifying the ventricular activation sequence, and it was correlated with the isopotential map. Subjects consisted of 42 normal healthy adults, 18 patients with artificial ventricular pacemakers, and 100 patients with ventricular premature beats (VPB). The sites of pacemaker implantations were the right ventricular endocardial apex (nine cases), right ventricular epicardial apex (five cases), right ventricular inflow tract (one case), left ventricular epicardial apex (one case), and posterior base of the left ventricle via the coronary sinus (two cases). An isopotential map was recorded by the mapper HPM-6500 (Chunichi-Denshi Co.) on the basis of an 87 unipolar lead ECG, and a VAT isochrone map was drawn by a minicomputer. The normal VAT map was classified by type according to alignment of isochrone lines, and their frequency was 57.1% for type A, 16.7% for type B, and 26.2% for type C. In the VAT map of ventricular pacing, the body surface area of initial isochrone lines represented well the sites of pacemaker stimuli. In the VAT map of VPB, the sites of origin of VPB agreed well with those as determined by the previous study using an isopotential map. The density of the isochrone lines suggested the mode of conduction via the specialized conduction system or ventricular muscle. The VAT map is a very useful diagnostic method to predict the ventricular activation sequence more directly in a single sheet of the map. PMID:2419457

  7. Endogenous protein phosphorylation and protein kinase activity in winged bean.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, K; Singh, M

    1997-10-01

    In winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) protein kinases (E.C. 2.7.1.37) were found in all tissues studied. There was a significant increase in kinase activity during seed development, with a concomitant enhancement in the phosphorylation of a number of polypeptides; this was reversed in germinating seed cotyledons. Protein phosphorylation was apparently correlated with the increase in the protein content of the developing seed and the growing axis. At least three distinct autophosphorylating proteins could be distinguished in the developing seeds after SDS-PAGE, indicating the presence of different types of protein kinases in winged bean.

  8. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  9. Phosphopeptide mapping of proteins ectopically expressed in tissue culture cell lines.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Beth A.; Virshup, David M.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2004-01-01

    Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation play a vital role in the regulation of protein function. In our study of the basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor HAND1, it was suspected that HAND1 was being phosphorylated during trophoblast giant cell differentiation and that coexpression of a constitutively active kinase with HAND1 resulted in changes in the proteins dimerization profile. In order to accurately document HAND1 phosphorylation and identify the resides being modified, we employed metabolic cell labeling with (32)P of tissue culture cells coexpressing a Flag-epitope tagged HAND1 along with a number of active kinases and phosphatase subunits. We generated phosphopeptide maps of the phosphorylated HAND1 using the methods described below and linked these modifications to changes in HAND1 biological function.

  10. A Digital Tectonic Activity Map of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul; Masuoka, Penny; Montgomery, Brian; OLeary, Jay; Salisbury, Demetra; Yates, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The subject of neotectonics, covering the structures and structural activity of the last 5 million years (i.e., post-Miocene) is a well-recognized field, including "active tectonics," focussed on the last 500,000 years in a 1986 National Research Council report of that title. However, there is a cartographic gap between tectonic maps, generally showing all features regardless of age, and maps of current seismic or volcanic activity. We have compiled a map intended to bridge this gap, using modern data bases and computer-aided cartographic techniques. The maps presented here are conceptually descended from an earlier map showing tectonic and volcanic activity of the last one million years. Drawn by hand with the National Geographic Society's 1975 "The Physical World" map as a base, the 1981 map in various revisions has been widely reproduced in textbooks and various technical publications. However, two decades of progress call for a completely new map that can take advantage of new knowledge and cartographic techniques. The digital tectonic activity map (DTM), presented in shaded relief (Fig. 1) and schematic (Fig. 2) versions, is the result. The DTM is intended to show tectonism and volcanism of the last one million years, a period long enough to be representative of global activity, but short enough that features such as fault scarps and volcanos are still geomorphically recognizable. Data Sources and Cartographic Methods The DTM is based on a wide range of sources, summarized in Table 1. The most important is the digital elevation model, used to construct a shaded relief map. The bathymetry is largely from satellite altimetry, specifically the marine gravity compilations by Smith and Sandwell (1996). The shaded relief map was designed to match the new National Geographic Society world physical map (1992), although drawn independently, from the digital elevation model. The Robinson Projection is used instead of the earlier Van der Grinten one. Although neither

  11. Mapping of Protein-Protein Interactions of E. coli RNA Polymerase with Microfluidic Mechanical Trapping

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Steven R.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The biophysical details of how transcription factors and other proteins interact with RNA polymerase are of great interest as they represent the nexus of how structure and function interact to regulate gene expression in the cell. We used an in vitro microfluidic approach to map interactions between a set of ninety proteins, over a third of which are transcription factors, and each of the four subunits of E. coli RNA polymerase, and we compared our results to those of previous large-scale studies. We detected interactions between RNA polymerase and transcription factors that earlier high-throughput screens missed; our results suggest that such interactions can occur without DNA mediation more commonly than previously appreciated. PMID:24643045

  12. Salicylic acid activates a 48-kD MAP kinase in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Klessig, D F

    1997-05-01

    The involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway leading to pathogenesis-related gene induction has previously been demonstrated using kinase and phosphatase inhibitors. Here, we show that in tobacco suspension cells, SA induced a rapid and transient activation of a 48-kD kinase that uses myelin basic protein as a substrate. This kinase is called the p48 SIP kinase (for SA-Induced Protein kinase). Biologically active analogs of SA, which induce pathogenesis-related genes and enhanced resistance, also activated this kinase, whereas inactive analogs did not. Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue(s) in the SIP kinase was associated with its activation. The SIP kinase was purified to homogeneity from SA-treated tobacco suspension culture cells. The purified SIP kinase is strongly phosphorylated on a tyrosine residue(s), and treatment with either protein tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphatases abolished its activity. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, we cloned the SIP kinase gene. Analysis of the SIP kinase sequence indicates that it belongs to the MAP kinase family and that it is distinct from the other plant MAP kinases previously implicated in stress responses, suggesting that different members of the MAP kinase family are activated by different stresses.

  13. An Inquiry Activity for Genetics Using Chromosome Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; Snodgrass, George

    1982-01-01

    Concepts to be developed, objectives, and student instructions are provided for an activity useful as an introduction to or review of Mendelian genetics and sex determination. Universal codes (read by optical scanners at supermarket checkout stands) from soup can labels are used as chromosome maps during the activity. (JN)

  14. Using Catalytic Atom Maps to Predict the Catalytic Functions Present in Enzyme Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic Atom Maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the “crowdedness” of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å RMSD of the Catalytic Atom Map with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these Catalytic Atom Maps were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase RMSD to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  15. Trifunctional cross-linker for mapping protein-protein interaction networks and comparing protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dan; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Mei-Jun; Liu, Chao; Ma, Chengying; Zhang, Pan; Ding, Yue-He; Fan, Sheng-Bo; Tao, Li; Yang, Bing; Li, Xiangke; Ma, Shoucai; Liu, Junjie; Feng, Boya; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Hong-Wei; He, Si-Min; Gao, Ning; Ye, Keqiong; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Lei, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    To improve chemical cross-linking of proteins coupled with mass spectrometry (CXMS), we developed a lysine-targeted enrichable cross-linker containing a biotin tag for affinity purification, a chemical cleavage site to separate cross-linked peptides away from biotin after enrichment, and a spacer arm that can be labeled with stable isotopes for quantitation. By locating the flexible proteins on the surface of 70S ribosome, we show that this trifunctional cross-linker is effective at attaining structural information not easily attainable by crystallography and electron microscopy. From a crude Rrp46 immunoprecipitate, it helped identify two direct binding partners of Rrp46 and 15 protein-protein interactions (PPIs) among the co-immunoprecipitated exosome subunits. Applying it to E. coli and C. elegans lysates, we identified 3130 and 893 inter-linked lysine pairs, representing 677 and 121 PPIs. Using a quantitative CXMS workflow we demonstrate that it can reveal changes in the reactivity of lysine residues due to protein-nucleic acid interaction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12509.001 PMID:26952210

  16. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  17. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  18. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  19. A DNA-centric protein interaction map of ultraconserved elements reveals contribution of transcription factor binding hubs to conservation.

    PubMed

    Viturawong, Tar; Meissner, Felix; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-10-31

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) have been the subject of great interest because of their extreme sequence identity and their seemingly cryptic and largely uncharacterized functions. Although in vivo studies of UCE sequences have demonstrated regulatory activity, protein interactors at UCEs have not been systematically identified. Here, we combined high-throughput affinity purification, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and SILAC quantification to map intrinsic protein interactions for 193 UCE sequences. The interactome contains over 400 proteins, including transcription factors with known developmental roles. We demonstrate based on our data that UCEs consist of strongly conserved overlapping binding sites. We also generated a fine-resolution interactome of a UCE, confirming the hub-like nature of the element. The intrinsic interactions mapped here are reflected in open chromatin, as indicated by comparison with existing ChIP data. Our study argues for a strong contribution of protein-DNA interactions to UCE conservation and provides a basis for further functional characterization of UCEs.

  20. Activity-dependent plasticity of hippocampal place maps

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, Philipp; O'Neill, Joseph; Csicsvari, Jozsef

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode a cognitive map of space. These maps are thought to be updated during learning and in response to changes in the environment through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here we examine how changes in activity influence spatial coding in rats using halorhodopsin-mediated, spatially selective optogenetic silencing. Halorhoposin stimulation leads to light-induced suppression in many place cells and interneurons; some place cells increase their firing through disinhibition, whereas some show no effect. We find that place fields of the unaffected subpopulation remain stable. On the other hand, place fields of suppressed place cells were unstable, showing remapping across sessions before and after optogenetic inhibition. Disinhibited place cells had stable maps but sustained an elevated firing rate. These findings suggest that place representation in the hippocampus is constantly governed by activity-dependent processes, and that disinhibition may provide a mechanism for rate remapping. PMID:27282121

  1. Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) associates with the NMDA receptor and is spatially redistributed within rat hippocampal neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Buddle, Michele; Eberhardt, Eric; Ciminello, Lauren H; Levin, Tal; Wing, Richard; DiPasquale, Kathleen; Raley-Susman, Kathleen M

    2003-07-18

    MAP2 (microtubule-associated protein 2) is a cytoskeletal phosphoprotein that regulates the dynamic assembly characteristics of microtubules and appears to provide scaffolding for organelle distribution into the dendrites and for the localization of signal transduction apparatus in dendrites, particularly near spines. MAP2 is degraded after ischemia and other metabolic insults, but the time course and initial triggers of that breakdown are not fully understood. This study determined that MAP2 resides in a complex with the NMDA receptor, suggesting that spatially localized changes may be important in the mechanism of MAP2 redistribution and breakdown after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Using OGD in the adult rat hippocampal slice as a model system, this study demonstrated that MAP2 breakdown occurs very early after OGD, with the first statistical decrease in MAP2 levels within the first 30 min after the insult. There is a dramatic redistribution of MAP2 to the somata of pyramidal neurons, particularly neurons at the CA1-subiculum border. Free radicals and nitric oxide are not involved in the damage to MAP2. NMDA-receptor activation plays a prominent role in the MAP2 breakdown. In direct response to NMDA receptor activation, calcium influx, likely through the receptor ion channel complex, as well as release of calcium from the mitochondria through activation of the 2Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger of mitochondria, triggers MAP2 degradation. The proteolysis of MAP2 is limited by endogenous calpain activity, likely via the spatial access of calpain to MAP2.

  2. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Enslen, H; Tokumitsu, H; Stork, P J; Davis, R J; Soderling, T R

    1996-01-01

    Membrane depolarization of NG108 cells gives rapid (< 5 min) activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaM-KIV), as well as activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). To investigate whether the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38) might be mediated by the CaM kinase cascade, we have transfected PC12 cells, which lack CaM-KIV, with constitutively active mutants of CaM kinase kinase and/or CaM-KIV (CaM-KKc and CaM-KIVc, respectively). In the absence of depolarization, CaM-KKc transfection had no effect on Elk-dependent transcription of a luciferase reporter gene, whereas CaM-KIVc alone or in combination with CaM-KKc gave 7- to 10-fold and 60- to 80-fold stimulations, respectively, which were blocked by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase cotransfection. When epitope-tagged constructs of MAP kinases were co-transfected with CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc, the immunoprecipitated MAP kinases were activated 2-fold (ERK-2) and 7- to 10-fold (JNK-1 and p38). The JNK and p38 pathways were further investigated using specific c-Jun or ATF2-dependent transcriptional assays. We found that c-Jun/ATF2-dependent transcriptions were enhanced 7- to 10-fold by CaM-KIVc and 20- to 30-fold by CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc. In the case of the Jun-dependent transcription, this effect was not due to direct phosphorylation of c-Jun by activated CaM-KIV, since transcription was blocked by a dominant-negative JNK and by two MAP kinase phosphatases. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (Thr196) in CaM-KIV, which mediates its activation by CaM-KIV kinase, prevented activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF2 by the CaM kinase cascade. These results establish a new Ca2+-dependent mechanism for regulating MAP kinase pathways and resultant transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855261

  3. RefSOFI for Mapping Nanoscale Organization of Protein-protein Interactions in Living cells

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Fabian; Mo, Gary C. H.; Duwé, Sam; Dedecker, Peter; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Summary It has become increasingly clear that protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are compartmentalized in nanoscale domains that define the biochemical architecture of the cell. Despite tremendous advances in super-resolution imaging, strategies to observe PPIs at sufficient resolution to discern their organization are just emerging. Here we describe a strategy in which PPIs induce reconstitution of fluorescent proteins (FPs) that are capable of exhibiting single-molecule fluctuations suitable for Stochastic Optical Fluctuation Imaging (SOFI). Subsequently, spatial maps of these interactions can be resolved in super-resolution in living cells. Using this strategy, termed reconstituted fluorescence-based SOFI (refSOFI), we investigated the interaction between the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor STIM1 and the pore-forming channel subunit ORAI1, a crucial process in store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Stimulating SOCE does not appear to change the size of existing STIM1/ORAI1 interaction puncta at the ER-plasma membrane junctions, but results in an apparent increase in the number of interaction puncta. PMID:26748717

  4. Computational Introduction of Catalytic Activity into Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bertolani, Steve J; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Siegel, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several successful cases of introducing catalytic activity into proteins. One method that has been used successfully to achieve this is the theozyme placement and enzyme design algorithms implemented in Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite. Here, we illustrate how to use this software to recapitulate the placement of catalytic residues and ligand into a protein using a theozyme, protein scaffold, and catalytic constraints as input. PMID:27094294

  5. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 Protects against Nickel-induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Tan, Zongqing; Chen, Liang; Peng, Zhimin; Dietsch, Maggie; Su, Bing; Leikauf, George; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Nickel compounds are environmental and occupational hazards that pose serious health problems and are causative factors of acute lung injury. The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are regulated through a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) 3 kinase-MAP2 kinase cascade and have been implicated in nickel toxicity. In this study, we used genetically modified cells and mice to investigate the involvement of two upstream MAP3Ks, MAP3K1 and 2, in nickel-induced JNK activation and acute lung injury. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity induced by nickel were similar in the Map3k2-null and wild-type cells but were much lower in the Map3k1/Map3k2 double-null cells. Conversely, the levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity were unexpectedly much higher in the Map3k1-null cells. In adult mouse tissue, MAP3K1 was widely distributed but was abundantly expressed in the bronchiole epithelium of the lung. Accordingly, MAP3K1 ablation in mice resulted in severe nickel-induced acute lung injury and reduced survival. Based on these findings, we propose a role for MAP3K1 in reducing JNK activation and protecting the mice from nickel-induced acute lung injury. PMID:18467339

  6. Active plasma source formation in the MAP diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, K.P.; Stinnett, R.W.; Renk, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST) program is exploring using ion beams to treat the surface of a wide variety of materials. These experiments have shown that improved corrosion resistance, surface hardening, grain size modification, polishing and surface cleaning can all be achieved using a pulsed 0.4-0.8 MeV ion beam delivering 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The Magnetically-confined Anode Plasma (MAP) diode, developed at Cornell University, produces an active plasma which can be used to treat the surfaces of materials. The diode consists of a fast puff valve as the source of gas to produce the desired ions and two capacitively driven B-fields. A slow magnetic field is used for electron insulation and a fast field is used to both ionize the puffed gas and to position the plasma in the proper spatial location in the anode prior to the accelerator pulse. The relative timing between subsystems is an important factor in the effective production of the active plasma source for the MAP diode system. The MAP diode has been characterized using a Langmuir probe to measure plasma arrival times at the anode annulus for hydrogen gas. This data was then used to determine the optimum operating point for the MAP diode on RHEPP-1 accelerator shots. Operation of the MAP diode system to produce an ion beam of 500 kV, 12 kA with 40% efficiency (measured at the diode) has been demonstrated.

  7. Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1978-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the United States increased by about one-quarter in the past year. Examinations of mapping trends were in the following categories: (1) Mapping at scales of 1:100, 000; (2) Metric-scale base maps; (3) International mapping, and (4) Planetary mapping. (MA)

  8. Protein Kinase Cδ Mediates Neurogenic but Not Mitogenic Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Foster, David A.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    1999-01-01

    In several neuronal cell systems, fibroblast-derived growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) act as neurogenic agents, whereas epidermal growth factor (EGF) acts as a mitogen. The mechanisms responsible for these different cellular fates are unclear. We report here that although FGF, NGF, and EGF all activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (extracellular signal-related kinase [ERK]) in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, the activation of ERK by the neurogenic agents FGF and NGF is dependent upon protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas ERK activation in response to the mitogenic EGF is independent of PKCδ. Antisense PKCδ oligonucleotides or the PKCδ-specific inhibitor rottlerin inhibited FGF- and NGF-induced, but not EGF-induced, ERK activation. In contrast, EGF-induced ERK activation was inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, which had no effect upon FGF-induced ERK activation. Rottlerin also inhibited the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK) in response to activated Raf, but had no effect upon c-Raf activity or ERK activation by activated MEK. These results indicate that PKCδ functions either downstream from or in parallel with c-Raf, but upstream of MEK. Inhibition of PKCδ also blocked neurite outgrowth induced by FGF and NGF in PC12 cells and by activated Raf in H19-7 cells, indicating a role for PKCδ in the neurogenic effects of FGF, NGF, and Raf. Interestingly, the PKCδ requirement is apparently cell type specific, since FGF-induced ERK activation was independent of PKCδ in NIH 3T3 murine fibroblasts, in which FGF is a mitogen. These data demonstrate that PKCδ contributes to growth factor specificity and response in neuronal cells and may also promote cell-type-specific differences in growth factor signaling. PMID:10330161

  9. A two-dimensional protein map of Pleurotus ostreatus microsomes-proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petráčková, Denisa; Halada, Petr; Bezoušková, Silvia; Křesinová, Zdena; Svobodová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies documented that several processes in filamentous fungi are connected with microsomal enzyme activities. In this work, microsomal subproteomes of Pleurotus ostreatus were analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. To assess proteome dynamics, microsomal proteins were isolated from fungal cultures after 7 and 12 days of cultivation. Additionally, 10 mg/L of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) was treated with the cultures during 2 days. Despite the EE2 degradation by the fungus reached 97 and 76.3 % in 7- and 12-day-old cultures, respectively, only a minor effect on the composition of microsomal proteins was observed. The changes in protein maps related to ageing prevailed over those induced by EE2. Epoxide hydrolase, known to metabolize EE2, was detected in 12-day-old cultures only which suggests differences in EE2 degradation pathways utilized by fungal cultures of different age. The majority (32 %) of identified microsomal proteins were parts of mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:26122365

  10. Insurance Applications of Active Fault Maps Showing Epistemic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, G.

    2005-12-01

    Insurance loss modeling for earthquakes utilizes available maps of active faulting produced by geoscientists. All such maps are subject to uncertainty, arising from lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history. Field work to undertake geological fault investigations drains human and monetary resources, and this inevitably limits the resolution of fault parameters. Some areas are more accessible than others; some may be of greater social or economic importance than others; some areas may be investigated more rapidly or diligently than others; or funding restrictions may have curtailed the extent of the fault mapping program. In contrast with the aleatory uncertainty associated with the inherent variability in the dynamics of earthquake fault rupture, uncertainty associated with lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history is epistemic. The extent of this epistemic uncertainty may vary substantially from one regional or national fault map to another. However aware the local cartographer may be, this uncertainty is generally not conveyed in detail to the international map user. For example, an area may be left blank for a variety of reasons, ranging from lack of sufficient investigation of a fault to lack of convincing evidence of activity. Epistemic uncertainty in fault parameters is of concern in any probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard, not least in insurance earthquake risk applications. A logic-tree framework is appropriate for incorporating epistemic uncertainty. Some insurance contracts cover specific high-value properties or transport infrastructure, and therefore are extremely sensitive to the geometry of active faulting. Alternative Risk Transfer (ART) to the capital markets may also be considered. In order for such insurance or ART contracts to be properly priced, uncertainty should be taken into account. Accordingly, an estimate is needed for the likelihood of surface rupture capable of causing severe damage. Especially where a

  11. Conditional independence mapping of DIGE data reveals PDIA3 protein species as key nodes associated with muscle aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kenyani, Jenna; Gray, Donna; Guadagnin, Eleonora; Jarman, Ian H.; Cobley, James N.; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Lisboa, Paulo J.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Profiling of protein species is important because gene polymorphisms, splice variations and post-translational modifications may combine and give rise to multiple protein species that have different effects on cellular function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is one of the most robust methods for differential analysis of protein species, but bioinformatic interrogation is challenging because the consequences of changes in the abundance of individual protein species on cell function are unknown and cannot be predicted. We conducted DIGE of soleus muscle from male and female rats artificially selected as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively). In total 696 protein species were resolved and LC–MS/MS identified proteins in 337 spots. Forty protein species were differentially (P < 0.05, FDR < 10%) expressed between HCR and LCR and conditional independence mapping found distinct networks within these data, which brought insight beyond that achieved by functional annotation. Protein disulphide isomerase A3 emerged as a key node segregating with differences in aerobic capacity and unsupervised bibliometric analysis highlighted further links to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which were confirmed by western blotting. Thus, conditional independence mapping is a useful technique for interrogating DIGE data that is capable of highlighting latent features. PMID:24769234

  12. RKIP regulates MAP kinase signaling in cells with defective B-Raf activity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingchun; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Menon, Jyotsana; Menard, Ray; Kern, Florian; Nakazawa, Yoko; Bevilacqua, Elena; Imamoto, Akira; Baccarini, Manuela; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2013-05-01

    MAP kinase (MAPK) signaling results from activation of Raf kinases in response to external or internal stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) regulates the activation of MAPK when B-Raf signaling is defective. We used multiple models including mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary keratinocytes from RKIP- or Raf-deficient mice as well as allografts in mice to investigate the mechanism. Loss of B-Raf protein or activity significantly reduces MAPK activation in these cells. We show that RKIP depletion can rescue the compromised ERK activation and promote proliferation, and this rescue occurs through a Raf-1 dependent mechanism. These results provide formal evidence that RKIP is a bona fide regulator of Raf-1. We propose a new model in which RKIP plays a key role in regulating the ability of cells to signal through Raf-1 to ERK in B-Raf compromised cells.

  13. Activated protein C mediates a healing phenotype in cultured tenocytes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meilang; Smith, Margaret M; Little, Christopher B; Sambrook, Philip; March, Lyn; Jackson, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    Tendon injuries cause considerable morbidity in the general adult population. The tenocytes within the tendon have the full capacity to heal the tendon intrinsically. Activated protein C (APC) plays an important role in coagulation and inflammation and more recently has been shown to promote cutaneous wound healing. In this study we examined whether APC can induce a wound healing phenotype in tenocytes. Sheep tenocytes were treated with APC, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) blocking antibody (RCR252) and/or EPCR small interfering (si)RNA. Cell proliferation and migration were measured by crystal violet assay and a scratch wounding assay, respectively. The expression of EPCR, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, type I collagen and MAP kinase activity were detected by real time PCR, zymography, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. APC stimulated proliferation, MMP-2 activity and type I collagen deposition in a dose-dependent manner and promoted migration of cultured tenocytes. APC dose-dependently stimulated phosphorylated (P)-ERK2 and inhibited P-p38. Interestingly, tenocytes expressed EPCR protein, which was up-regulated by APC. When tenocytes were pre-treated with RCR252 or EPCR siRNA the effect of APC on proliferation, MMP-2 and type 1 collagen synthesis and MAP kinases was blocked. APC promotes the growth, MMP-2 activity, type I collagen deposition and migration of tenocytes. Furthermore, EPCR is expressed by tenocytes and mediates the actions of APC, at least partly by signalling through selective MAP kinases. These data implicate APC as a potential healing agent for injured tendons.

  14. Mapping of the gene for a major penicillin-binding protein to a genetically conserved region of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and conservation of the protein among related species of Bacillus.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C E; Gustafson, A

    1991-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 is the most abundant penicillin-binding protein in the vegetative membranes of Bacillus subtilis and accounts for 95% of the D,D-carboxypeptidase activity of the cell. The structural gene for penicillin-binding protein 5 was mapped to a genetically conserved region near guaB at 0 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome, and immunoassays revealed that there is conservation of this major penicillin-binding protein among related species. Images PMID:1900282

  15. Automatic Classification of Protein Structure Using the Maximum Contact Map Overlap Metric

    SciTech Connect

    Andonov, Rumen; Djidjev, Hristo Nikolov; Klau, Gunnar W.; Le Boudic-Jamin, Mathilde; Wohlers, Inken

    2015-10-09

    In this paper, we propose a new distance measure for comparing two protein structures based on their contact map representations. We show that our novel measure, which we refer to as the maximum contact map overlap (max-CMO) metric, satisfies all properties of a metric on the space of protein representations. Having a metric in that space allows one to avoid pairwise comparisons on the entire database and, thus, to significantly accelerate exploring the protein space compared to no-metric spaces. We show on a gold standard superfamily classification benchmark set of 6759 proteins that our exact k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) scheme classifies up to 224 out of 236 queries correctly and on a larger, extended version of the benchmark with 60; 850 additional structures, up to 1361 out of 1369 queries. Finally, our k-NN classification thus provides a promising approach for the automatic classification of protein structures based on flexible contact map overlap alignments.

  16. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  17. MAP(2.0)3D: a sequence/structure based server for protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajni; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Roccatano, Danilo

    2012-04-20

    The Mutagenesis Assistant Program (MAP) is a web-based tool to provide statistical analyses of the mutational biases of directed evolution experiments on amino acid substitution patterns. MAP analysis assists protein engineers in the benchmarking of random mutagenesis methods that generate single nucleotide mutations in a codon. Herein, we describe a completely renewed and improved version of the MAP server, the MAP(2.0)3D server, which correlates the generated amino acid substitution patterns to the structural information of the target protein. This correlation aids in the selection of a more suitable random mutagenesis method with specific biases on amino acid substitution patterns. In particular, the new server represents MAP indicators on secondary and tertiary structure and correlates them to specific structural components such as hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic contacts, salt bridges, solvent accessibility, and crystallographic B-factors. Three model proteins (D-amino oxidase, phytase, and N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase) are used to illustrate the novel capability of the server. MAP(2.0)3D server is available publicly at http://map.jacobs-university.de/map3d.html.

  18. Increased flexibility decreases antifreeze protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti N; Graether, Steffen P

    2010-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins protect several cold-blooded organisms from subzero environments by preventing death from freezing. The Type I antifreeze protein (AFP) isoform from Pseudopleuronectes americanus, named HPLC6, is a 37-residue protein that is a single α-helix. Mutational analysis of the protein showed that its alanine-rich face is important for binding to and inhibiting the growth of macromolecular ice. Almost all structural studies of HPLC6 involve the use of chemically synthesized protein as it requires a native N-terminal aspartate and an amidated C-terminus for full activity. Here, we examine the role of C-terminal amide and C-terminal arginine side chain in the activity, structure, and dynamics of nonamidated Arg37 HPLC6, nonamidated HPLC6 Ala37, amidated HPLC6 Ala37, and fully native HPLC6 using a recombinant bacterial system. The thermal hysteresis (TH) activities of the nonamidated mutants are 35% lower compared with amidated proteins, but analysis of the NMR data and circular dichroism spectra shows that they are all still α-helical. Relaxation data from the two nonamidated mutants indicate that the C-terminal residues are considerably more flexible than the rest of the protein because of the loss of the amide group, whereas the amidated Ala37 mutant has a C-terminus that is as rigid as the wild-type protein and has high TH activity. We propose that an increase in flexibility of the AFP causes it to lose activity because its dynamic nature prevents it from binding strongly to the ice surface. PMID:20936690

  19. Mapping conformational dynamics of proteins using torsional dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K; Wagner, Jeffrey R; Park, In-Hee; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations are widely used to study the flexibility of protein conformations. However, enhanced sampling techniques are required for simulating protein dynamics that occur on the millisecond timescale. In this work, we show that torsional molecular dynamics simulations enhance protein conformational sampling by performing conformational search in the low-frequency torsional degrees of freedom. In this article, we use our recently developed torsional-dynamics method called Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) to study the conformational dynamics of four proteins. We investigate the use of the GNEIMO method in simulations of the conformationally flexible proteins fasciculin and calmodulin, as well as the less flexible crambin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. For the latter two proteins, the GNEIMO simulations with an implicit-solvent model reproduced the average protein structural fluctuations and sample conformations similar to those from Cartesian simulations with explicit solvent. The application of GNEIMO with replica exchange to the study of fasciculin conformational dynamics produced sampling of two of this protein's experimentally established conformational substates. Conformational transition of calmodulin from the Ca(2+)-bound to the Ca(2+)-free conformation occurred readily with GNEIMO simulations. Moreover, the GNEIMO method generated an ensemble of conformations that satisfy about half of both short- and long-range interresidue distances obtained from NMR structures of holo to apo transitions in calmodulin. Although unconstrained all-atom Cartesian simulations have failed to sample transitions between the substates of fasciculin and calmodulin, GNEIMO simulations show the transitions in both systems. The relatively short simulation times required to capture these long-timescale conformational dynamics indicate that GNEIMO is a promising molecular-dynamics technique for studying domain motion in

  20. How much of the human protein interactome remains to be mapped?

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marc

    2016-05-10

    Using systematic approaches, a high-quality reference map of the human protein-protein interactome is within reach. Such a reference will help researchers connect genomic data to cellular phenotypes and enable full exploitation of the output of the genomic revolution for biomedical applications.

  1. Singlet oxygen triplet energy transfer-based imaging technology for mapping protein-protein proximity in intact cells.

    PubMed

    To, Tsz-Leung; Fadul, Michael J; Shu, Xiaokun

    2014-01-01

    Many cellular processes are carried out by large protein complexes that can span several tens of nanometres. Whereas forster resonance energy transfer has a detection range of <10 nm, here we report the theoretical development and experimental demonstration of a new fluorescence-imaging technology with a detection range of up to several tens of nanometres: singlet oxygen triplet energy transfer. We demonstrate that our method confirms the topology of a large protein complex in intact cells, which spans from the endoplasmic reticulum to the outer mitochondrial membrane and the matrix. This new method is thus suited for mapping protein proximity in large protein complexes.

  2. Singlet oxygen Triplet Energy Transfer based imaging technology for mapping protein-protein proximity in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    To, Tsz-Leung; Fadul, Michael J.; Shu, Xiaokun

    2014-01-01

    Many cellular processes are carried out by large protein complexes that can span several tens of nanometers. Whereas Forster resonance energy transfer has a detection range of <10 nm, here we report the theoretical development and experimental demonstration of a new fluorescence imaging technology with a detection range of up to several tens of nanometers: singlet oxygen triplet energy transfer. We demonstrate that our method confirms the topology of a large protein complex in intact cells, which spans from the endoplasmic reticulum to the outer mitochondrial membrane and the matrix. This new method is thus suited for mapping protein proximity in large protein complexes. PMID:24905026

  3. The light chains of microtubule-associated proteins MAP1A and MAP1B interact with α1-syntrophin in the central and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Noiges, Rainer; Descovich, Luise; Fischer, Irmgard; Albrecht, Douglas E; Nothias, Fatiha; Froehner, Stanley C; Propst, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins of the MAP1 family (MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) share, among other features, a highly conserved COOH-terminal domain approximately 125 amino acids in length. We conducted a yeast 2-hybrid screen to search for proteins interacting with this domain and identified α1-syntrophin, a member of a multigene family of adapter proteins involved in signal transduction. We further demonstrate that the interaction between the conserved COOH-terminal 125-amino acid domain (which is located in the light chains of MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) and α1-syntrophin is direct and occurs through the pleckstrin homology domain 2 (PH2) and the postsynaptic density protein 95/disk large/zonula occludens-1 protein homology domain (PDZ) of α1-syntrophin. We confirmed the interaction of MAP1B and α1-syntrophin by co-localization of the two proteins in transfected cells and by co-immunoprecipitation experiments from mouse brain. In addition, we show that MAP1B and α1-syntrophin partially co-localize in Schwann cells of the murine sciatic nerve during postnatal development and in the adult. However, intracellular localization of α1-syntrophin and other Schwann cell proteins such as ezrin and dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2) and the localization of the axonal node of Ranvier-associated protein Caspr1/paranodin were not affected in MAP1B null mice. Our findings add to a growing body of evidence that classical MAPs are likely to be involved in signal transduction not only by directly modulating microtubule function, but also through their interaction with signal transduction proteins. PMID:23152929

  4. The Light Chains of Microtubule-Associated Proteins MAP1A and MAP1B Interact with α1-Syntrophin in the Central and Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Descovich, Luise; Fischer, Irmgard; Albrecht, Douglas E.; Nothias, Fatiha; Froehner, Stanley C.; Propst, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins of the MAP1 family (MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) share, among other features, a highly conserved COOH-terminal domain approximately 125 amino acids in length. We conducted a yeast 2-hybrid screen to search for proteins interacting with this domain and identified α1-syntrophin, a member of a multigene family of adapter proteins involved in signal transduction. We further demonstrate that the interaction between the conserved COOH-terminal 125-amino acid domain (which is located in the light chains of MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) and α1-syntrophin is direct and occurs through the pleckstrin homology domain 2 (PH2) and the postsynaptic density protein 95/disk large/zonula occludens-1 protein homology domain (PDZ) of α1-syntrophin. We confirmed the interaction of MAP1B and α1-syntrophin by co-localization of the two proteins in transfected cells and by co-immunoprecipitation experiments from mouse brain. In addition, we show that MAP1B and α1-syntrophin partially co-localize in Schwann cells of the murine sciatic nerve during postnatal development and in the adult. However, intracellular localization of α1-syntrophin and other Schwann cell proteins such as ezrin and dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2) and the localization of the axonal node of Ranvier-associated protein Caspr1/paranodin were not affected in MAP1B null mice. Our findings add to a growing body of evidence that classical MAPs are likely to be involved in signal transduction not only by directly modulating microtubule function, but also through their interaction with signal transduction proteins. PMID:23152929

  5. Mapping Conformational Dynamics of Proteins Using Torsional Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K.; Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Park, In-Hee; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations are widely used to study the flexibility of protein conformations. However, enhanced sampling techniques are required for simulating protein dynamics that occur on the millisecond timescale. In this work, we show that torsional molecular dynamics simulations enhance protein conformational sampling by performing conformational search in the low-frequency torsional degrees of freedom. In this article, we use our recently developed torsional-dynamics method called Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) to study the conformational dynamics of four proteins. We investigate the use of the GNEIMO method in simulations of the conformationally flexible proteins fasciculin and calmodulin, as well as the less flexible crambin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. For the latter two proteins, the GNEIMO simulations with an implicit-solvent model reproduced the average protein structural fluctuations and sample conformations similar to those from Cartesian simulations with explicit solvent. The application of GNEIMO with replica exchange to the study of fasciculin conformational dynamics produced sampling of two of this protein’s experimentally established conformational substates. Conformational transition of calmodulin from the Ca2+-bound to the Ca2+-free conformation occurred readily with GNEIMO simulations. Moreover, the GNEIMO method generated an ensemble of conformations that satisfy about half of both short- and long-range interresidue distances obtained from NMR structures of holo to apo transitions in calmodulin. Although unconstrained all-atom Cartesian simulations have failed to sample transitions between the substates of fasciculin and calmodulin, GNEIMO simulations show the transitions in both systems. The relatively short simulation times required to capture these long-timescale conformational dynamics indicate that GNEIMO is a promising molecular-dynamics technique for studying domain motion in

  6. Protein mapping of calcium carbonate biominerals by immunogold.

    PubMed

    Marin, Frédéric; Pokroy, Boaz; Luquet, Gilles; Layrolle, Pierre; De Groot, Klaas

    2007-05-01

    The construction of metazoan calcium carbonate skeletons is finely regulated by a proteinaceous extracellular matrix, which remains embedded within the exoskeleton. In spite of numerous biochemical studies, the precise localization of skeletal proteins has remained for a long time as an elusive goal. In this paper, we describe a technique for visualizing shell matrix proteins on the surface of calcium carbonate crystals or within the biominerals. The technique is as follows: freshly broken pieces of biominerals or NaOCl then EDTA-etched polished surfaces are incubated with an antibody elicited against one matrix protein, then with a secondary gold-coupled antibody. After silver enhancement, the samples are subsequently observed with scanning electron microscopy by using back-scattered electron mode. In the present case, the technique is applied to a particular example, the calcitic prisms that compose the outer shell layer of the mediterranean fan mussel Pinna nobilis. One major soluble protein, caspartin, which was identified recently, was partly de novo sequenced after enzymatic digestions. A polyclonal antibody raised against caspartin was used for its localization within and on the prisms. The immunogold localization indicated that caspartin surrounds the calcitic prisms, but is also dispersed within the biominerals. This example illustrates the deep impact of the technique on the definition of intracrystalline versus intercrystalline matrix proteins. Furthermore, it is an important tool for assigning a putative function to a matrix protein of interest.

  7. Topological mapping methods for α-helical bacterial membrane proteins – an update and a guide

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Salim T; Lam, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins with α-helical transmembrane segments (TMS) are known to play important and diverse roles in prokaryotic cell physiology. The net hydrophobicity of TMS directly corresponds to the observed difficulties in expressing and purifying these proteins, let alone producing sufficient yields for structural studies using two-/three-dimensional (2D/3D) crystallographic or nuclear magnetic resonance methods. To gain insight into the function of these integral membrane proteins, topological mapping has become an important tool to identify exposed and membrane-embedded protein domains. This approach has led to the discovery of protein tracts of functional importance and to the proposition of novel mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we synthesize the various methods available for topological mapping of α-helical integral membrane proteins to provide investigators with a comprehensive reference for choosing techniques suited to their particular topological queries and available resources. PMID:23408725

  8. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Romina; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  9. How can yeast cells decide between three activated MAP kinase pathways? A model approach.

    PubMed

    Rensing, Ludger; Ruoff, Peter

    2009-04-21

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the regulation of three MAP kinase pathways responding to pheromones (Fus3 pathway), carbon/nitrogen starvation (Kss1 pathway), and high osmolarity/osmotic stress (Hog1 pathway) is the subject of intensive research. We were interested in the question how yeast cells would respond when more than one of the MAP kinase pathways are activated simultaneously. Here, we give a brief overview over the regulatory mechanisms of the yeast MAP kinase pathways and investigate a kinetic model based on presently known molecular interactions and feedbacks within and between the three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. When two pathways are activated simultaneously with the osmotic stress response as one of them, the model predicts that the osmotic stress response (Hog1 pathway) is turned on first. The same is true when all three pathways are activated at the same time. When testing simultaneous stimulations by low nitrogen and pheromones through the Kss1 and Fus3 pathways, respectively, the low nitrogen response dominates over the pheromone response. Due to its autocatalytic activation mechanism, the pheromone response (Fus3 pathway) shows typical sigmoid response kinetics and excitability. In the presence of a small but sufficient amount of activated Fus3, a stimulation by pheromones will lead to a rapid self-amplification of the pheromone response. This 'excitability' appears to be a feature of the pheromone pathway that has specific biological significance. PMID:19322936

  10. Theoretical considerations for mapping activation in human cardiac fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2013-06-01

    Defining mechanisms for cardiac fibrillation is challenging because, in contrast to other arrhythmias, fibrillation exhibits complex non-repeatability in spatiotemporal activation but paradoxically exhibits conserved spatial gradients in rate, dominant frequency, and electrical propagation. Unlike animal models, in which fibrillation can be mapped at high spatial and temporal resolution using optical dyes or arrays of contact electrodes, mapping of cardiac fibrillation in patients is constrained practically to lower resolutions or smaller fields-of-view. In many animal models, atrial fibrillation is maintained by localized electrical rotors and focal sources. However, until recently, few studies had revealed localized sources in human fibrillation, so that the impact of mapping constraints on the ability to identify rotors or focal sources in humans was not described. Here, we determine the minimum spatial and temporal resolutions theoretically required to detect rigidly rotating spiral waves and focal sources, then extend these requirements for spiral waves in computer simulations. Finally, we apply our results to clinical data acquired during human atrial fibrillation using a novel technique termed focal impulse and rotor mapping (FIRM). Our results provide theoretical justification and clinical demonstration that FIRM meets the spatio-temporal resolution requirements to reliably identify rotors and focal sources for human atrial fibrillation.

  11. A simple contact mapping algorithm for identifying potential peptide mimetics in protein–protein interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Alex; Brunn, Jonathan; Kankanala, Spandana; Peters, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    A simple, static contact mapping algorithm has been developed as a first step at identifying potential peptide biomimetics from protein interaction partner structure files. This rapid and simple mapping algorithm, “OpenContact” provides screened or parsed protein interaction files based on specified criteria for interatomic separation distances and interatomic potential interactions. The algorithm, which uses all-atom Amber03 force field models, was blindly tested on several unrelated cases from the literature where potential peptide mimetics have been experimentally developed to varying degrees of success. In all cases, the screening algorithm efficiently predicted proposed or potential peptide biomimetics, or close variations thereof, and provided complete atom-atom interaction data necessary for further detailed analysis and drug development. In addition, we used the static parsing/mapping method to develop a peptide mimetic to the cancer protein target, epidermal growth factor receptor. In this case, secondary, loop structure for the peptide was indicated from the intra-protein mapping, and the peptide was subsequently synthesized and shown to exhibit successful binding to the target protein. The case studies, which all involved experimental peptide drug advancement, illustrate many of the challenges associated with the development of peptide biomimetics, in general. Proteins 2014; 82:2253–2262. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24756879

  12. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  13. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  14. Human hair neutron activation analysis: Analysis on population level, mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, L. I.; Kist, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is an outstanding analytical method having very wide applications in various fields. Analysis of human hair within last decades mostly based on neutron activation analysis is a very attractive illustration of the application of nuclear analytical techniques. Very interesting question is how the elemental composition differs in different areas or cities. In this connection the present paper gives average data and maps of various localities in the vicinity of drying-out Aral Sea and of various industrial cities in Central Asia.

  15. You are lost without a map: Navigating the sea of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Audrey L.; Kappock, T. Joseph; Silvaggi, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures propel biochemistry research like no other experimental method, since they answer many questions directly and inspire new hypotheses. Unfortunately, many users of crystallographic models mistake them for actual experimental data. Crystallographic models are interpretations, several steps removed from the experimental measurements, making it difficult for nonspecialists to assess the quality of the underlying data. Crystallographers mainly rely on “global” measures of data and model quality to build models. Robust validation procedures based on global measures now largely ensure that structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are largely correct. However, global measures do not allow users of crystallographic models to judge the reliability of “local” features in a region of interest. Refinement of a model to fit into an electron density map requires interpretation of the data to produce a single “best” overall model. This process requires inclusion of most probable conformations in areas of poor density. Users who misunderstand this can be misled, especially in regions of the structure that are mobile, including active sites, surface residues, and especially ligands. This article aims to equip users of macromolecular models with tools to critically assess local model quality. Structure users should always check the agreement of the electron density map and the derived model in all areas of interest, even if the global statistics are good. We provide illustrated examples of interpreted electron density as a guide for those unaccustomed to viewing electron density. PMID:25554228

  16. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  17. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J. A.; Metaxas, M. G.; Royle, G. J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J. M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS).

  18. Maximum contrast beamformer for electromagnetic mapping of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Sheng; Cheng, Chih-Yu; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chen, Li-Fen

    2006-09-01

    Beamforming technique can be applied to map the neuronal activities from magnetoencephalographic/electroencephalographic (MEG/EEG) recordings. One of the major difficulties of the scalar-type MEG/EEG beamformer is the determination of accurate dipole orientation, which is essential to an effective spatial filter. This paper presents a new beamforming technique which exploits a maximum contrast criterion to maximize the ratio of the neuronal activity estimated in a specified active state to the activity estimated in a control state. This criterion leads to a closed-form solution of the dipole orientation. Experiments with simulation, phantom, and finger-lifting data clearly demonstrate the effectiveness, efficiency, and accuracy of the proposed method.

  19. Epitope mapping and functional analysis of sigma A and sigma NS proteins of avian reovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Pi H.; Li, Ying J.; Su, Yu P.; Lee, Long H.; Liu, Hung J. . E-mail: hjliu@mail.npust.edu.tw

    2005-02-20

    We have previously shown that avian reovirus (ARV) {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins possess dsRNA and ssRNA binding activity and suggested that there are two epitopes on {sigma}A (I and II) and three epitopes (A, B, and C) on {sigma}NS. To further define the location of epitopes on {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins and to further elucidate the biological functions of these epitopes by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 62, 1F9, H1E1, and 4A123 against the ARV S1133 strain, the full-length and deletion fragments of S2 and S4 genes of ARV generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were cloned into pET32 expression vectors and the fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain. Epitope mapping using MAbs and E. coli-expressed deletion fragments of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS of the ARV S1133 strain, synthetic peptides, and the cross reactivity of MAbs to heterologous ARV strains demonstrated that epitope II on {sigma}A was located at amino acid residues {sup 340}QWVMAGLVSAA{sup 350} and epitope B on {sigma}NS at amino acid residues {sup 180}MLDMVDGRP{sup 188}. The MAbs (62, 1F9, and H1E1) directed against epitopes II and B did not require the native conformation of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS, suggesting that their binding activities were conformation-independent. On the other hand, MAb 4A123 only reacted with complete {sigma}NS but not with truncated {sigma}NS fusion proteins in Western blot, suggesting that the binding activity of MAb to epitope A on {sigma}NS was conformation-dependent. Amino acid sequence analysis and the binding assays of MAb 62 to heterologous ARV strains suggested that epitope II on {sigma}A was highly conserved among ARV strains and that this epitope is suitable as a serological marker for the detection of ARV antibodies following natural infection in chickens. On the contrary, an amino acid substitution at position 183 (M to V) in epitope B of ARV could hinder the reactivity of the {sigma}NS with MAb 1F9. The {sigma}NS of ARV with ss

  20. Label-free measuring and mapping of binding kinetics of membrane proteins in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Nagaraj, Vinay J.; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-10-01

    Membrane proteins mediate a variety of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Although membrane proteins are studied intensively for their values as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, in situ investigation of the binding kinetics of membrane proteins with their ligands has been a challenge. Traditional approaches isolate membrane proteins and then study them ex situ, which does not reflect accurately their native structures and functions. We present a label-free plasmonic microscopy method to map the local binding kinetics of membrane proteins in their native environment. This analytical method can perform simultaneous plasmonic and fluorescence imaging, and thus make it possible to combine the strengths of both label-based and label-free techniques in one system. Using this method, we determined the distribution of membrane proteins on the surface of single cells and the local binding kinetic constants of different membrane proteins. Furthermore, we studied the polarization of the membrane proteins on the cell surface during chemotaxis.

  1. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  2. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is not conserved, then it is likely that its counterpart will also be mutated. For each target protein, protein databases were searched for the primary amino acid sequences of all known members of distinct protein families. Primary sequence alignment was carried out using PileUp algorithms in the GCG package. To search for correlated mutations, we listed only the positions where cysteine residues were highly conserved and emphasized the mutated residues. In proteins of known three-dimensional structure, a striking pattern of paired cysteine mutations correlated with the positions of known disulfide bridges. For proteins of unknown architecture, the mutation maps showed several positions where disulfide bridging might occur. PMID:8563638

  3. Proteins of human semen. I. Two-dimensional mapping of human seminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J J; Tollaksen, S L; Anderson, N G

    1981-08-01

    The proteins in human seminal plasma were mapped by high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (ISO-DALT and BASO-DALT systems). When analyzed under dissociating conditions, samples from normal fertile males revealed a pattern of over 200 proteins, ranging in mass from 10 000 to 100 000 daltons. Comparison of the mapped proteins from these males and those who had undergone vasectomy allowed us to identify one series of glycoproteins as missing from the semen from vasectomized individuals. Glycoproteins isolated by affinity chromatography with use of concanavalin A were also mapped. Some of the protein spots were identified either by co-electrophoresis with purified proteins or by the electrophoretic transfer of proteins to nitrocellulose sheets and subsequent detection by immunological procedures. The proteins identified include a number of serum proteins as well as prostatic acid phosphatase and creatine kinase. Proteolytic events shown to occur during the liquefaction of semen that occurs early after collection indicate the importance of carefully controlled collection and preparation methods for clinical evaluation of seminal plasma. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride inhibit this proteolysis. PMID:7273394

  4. Activation of Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase in murine macrophages partially mimics lipopolysaccharide-induced signaling events

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a highly conserved component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, stimulates macrophages to release various cytokine and eicosanoid mediators of the immune response. The mechanism by which LPS stimulates these cells is poorly characterized. One of the most rapid LPS-stimulated events is the phosphorylation and activation of the p42 and p44 isoforms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We wished to examine the role of MAP kinase in LPS- induced signaling in murine macrophages by activating MAP kinase independently of LPS. An expression vector encoding a Raf-1:estrogen receptor (ER) chimeric protein was transfected into the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Activation of this chimeric protein (delta Raf-1:ER) by estradiol resulted in rapid and prolonged activation of MAP kinase, as expected from previous results implicating Raf-1 as an upstream activator of this signaling cascade. LPS stimulation induced accumulation of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 messenger RNA, whereas delta Raf-1:ER activation did not, perhaps accounting for the more prolonged activation of MAP kinase seen in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation. Similarly, activation of DNA binding by the transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF) kappa B, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, occurred in response to LPS stimulation but not in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for murine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), we found that LPS and PMA stimulation and delta Raf-1:ER activation induced secretion of TNF-alpha, although the amount of TNF-alpha secreted in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation and PMA stimulation was approximately 20-fold less than that secreted in response to LPS. Correspondingly, accumulation of TNF-alpha messenger RNA was weakly induced by delta Raf-1:ER activation or PMA stimulation, whereas strong induction was noted in

  5. Activation of Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase in murine macrophages partially mimics lipopolysaccharide-induced signaling events.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, J; McMahon, M; DeFranco, A L

    1995-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a highly conserved component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, stimulates macrophages to release various cytokine and eicosanoid mediators of the immune response. The mechanism by which LPS stimulates these cells is poorly characterized. One of the most rapid LPS-stimulated events is the phosphorylation and activation of the p42 and p44 isoforms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We wished to examine the role of MAP kinase in LPS-induced signaling in murine macrophages by activating MAP kinase independently of LPS. An expression vector encoding a Raf-1:estrogen receptor (ER) chimeric protein was transfected into the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Activation of this chimeric protein (delta Raf-1:ER) by estradiol resulted in rapid and prolonged activation of MAP kinase, as expected from previous results implicating Raf-1 as an upstream activator of this signaling cascade. LPS stimulation induced accumulation of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 messenger RNA, whereas delta Raf-1:ER activation did not, perhaps accounting for the more prolonged activation of MAP kinase seen in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation. Similarly, activation of DNA binding by the transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF) kappa B, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, occurred in response to LPS stimulation but not in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for murine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), we found that LPS and PMA stimulation and delta Raf-1:ER activation induced secretion of TNF-alpha, although the amount of TNF-alpha secreted in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation and PMA stimulation was approximately 20-fold less than that secreted in response to LPS. Correspondingly, accumulation of TNF-alpha messenger RNA was weakly induced by delta Raf-1:ER activation or PMA stimulation, whereas strong induction was noted in

  6. Determination of contact maps in proteins: A combination of structural and chemical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołek, Karol; Gómez-Sicilia, Àngel; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Contact map selection is a crucial step in structure-based molecular dynamics modelling of proteins. The map can be determined in many different ways. We focus on the methods in which residues are represented as clusters of effective spheres. One contact map, denoted as overlap (OV), is based on the overlap of such spheres. Another contact map, named Contacts of Structural Units (CSU), involves the geometry in a different way and, in addition, brings chemical considerations into account. We develop a variant of the CSU approach in which we also incorporate Coulombic effects such as formation of the ionic bridges and destabilization of possible links through repulsion. In this way, the most essential and well defined contacts are identified. The resulting residue-residue contact map, dubbed repulsive CSU (rCSU), is more sound in its physico-chemical justification than CSU. It also provides a clear prescription for validity of an inter-residual contact: the number of attractive atomic contacts should be larger than the number of repulsive ones — a feature that is not present in CSU. However, both of these maps do not correlate well with the experimental data on protein stretching. Thus, we propose to use rCSU together with the OV map. We find that the combined map, denoted as OV+rCSU, performs better than OV. In most situations, OV and OV+rCSU yield comparable folding properties but for some proteins rCSU provides contacts which improve folding in a substantial way. We discuss the likely residue-specificity of the rCSU contacts. Finally, we make comparisons to the recently proposed shadow contact map, which is derived from different principles.

  7. Determination of contact maps in proteins: A combination of structural and chemical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wołek, Karol; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-12-28

    Contact map selection is a crucial step in structure-based molecular dynamics modelling of proteins. The map can be determined in many different ways. We focus on the methods in which residues are represented as clusters of effective spheres. One contact map, denoted as overlap (OV), is based on the overlap of such spheres. Another contact map, named Contacts of Structural Units (CSU), involves the geometry in a different way and, in addition, brings chemical considerations into account. We develop a variant of the CSU approach in which we also incorporate Coulombic effects such as formation of the ionic bridges and destabilization of possible links through repulsion. In this way, the most essential and well defined contacts are identified. The resulting residue-residue contact map, dubbed repulsive CSU (rCSU), is more sound in its physico-chemical justification than CSU. It also provides a clear prescription for validity of an inter-residual contact: the number of attractive atomic contacts should be larger than the number of repulsive ones — a feature that is not present in CSU. However, both of these maps do not correlate well with the experimental data on protein stretching. Thus, we propose to use rCSU together with the OV map. We find that the combined map, denoted as OV+rCSU, performs better than OV. In most situations, OV and OV+rCSU yield comparable folding properties but for some proteins rCSU provides contacts which improve folding in a substantial way. We discuss the likely residue-specificity of the rCSU contacts. Finally, we make comparisons to the recently proposed shadow contact map, which is derived from different principles.

  8. Using catalytic atom maps to predict the catalytic functions present in enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-09-18

    Catalytic atom maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the "crowdedness" of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å rmsd of the CAM with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these CAMs were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase rmsd to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  9. Ex Vivo Signaling Protein Mapping in T Lymphocytes in the Psoriatic Arthritis Joints.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Molena, Beatrice; Zambello, Renato; Ramonda, Roberta; Cozzi, Franco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We assessed signaling protein mapping in total T cells, to analyze the proportions of T regulatory (Treg) and TCD4+ effector (Teff) cell phenotypes, and the respective interleukin 6Rα (IL-6Rα) expression in the inflammatory microenvironment of synovial fluid (SF) of patients with sustained psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Our approach was to measure the IL-6 level in SF using a multiplex bead immunoassay. Reverse-phase protein array was used to assess Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK2, extra-cellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), signal transducer and activator and transcription (STAT) 1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of patients with PsA. Frequencies of CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD4+ Th cells producing IL-17A and IL-17F (Th17) and CD4+CD25high intracellular forkhead box transcription factor+ (FOXP3+) phenotypes, and the percentage of Treg- and Teff- cells were quantified in SF and matched peripheral blood (PB) of patients with PsA and PB of healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometry. Our results were the following: In PsA SF samples, a coordinate increase of JAK1, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins was found in total T cells in SF of PsA; where IL-6 levels were higher than in PB from HC. Expanded CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ Th17, CD4+ CD25- Teff- and CD4+CD25(high) FoxP3+Treg subsets, showing similar levels of enhanced IL-6Rδ expression, were confined to PsA joints. In our studies, the transcriptional network profile identified by ex vivo signaling protein mapping in T lymphocytes in PsA joints revealed the complex interplay between IL-1, IL-6, and IL-23 signaling and differentiation of Th17 cells and CD4+Tregs in sustained joint inflammation in PsA. PMID:26523057

  10. Differential protein mapping of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas: identification of potential markers for distinct tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Wu, Rong; Cho, Kathleen R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Gossner, Gabrielle; Liu, J Rebecca; Giordano, Thomas J; Shedden, Kerby A; Misek, David E; Lubman, David M

    2009-03-01

    Ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) comprise over half of all ovarian carcinomas and account for the majority of ovarian cancer-related deaths. We used a 2-dimensional liquid-based protein mapping strategy to characterize global protein expression patterns in 19 OSC tumor samples from 15 different patients to facilitate molecular classification of tumor stage. Protein expression profiles were produced, using pI-based separation in the first dimension and hydrophobicity-based separation in the second dimension, over a pH range of 4.0-7.0. Hierarchical clustering was applied to protein maps to indicate the tumor interrelationships. The 19 tumor samples could be classified into two different groups, one group associated with low stage (Stage 1) tumors and the other group associated with high stage (Stages 3/4) tumors. Proteins that were differentially expressed in different groups were selected for identification by LTQ-ESI-MS/MS. Fourteen of the selected proteins were overexpressed in the low stage tumors; 46 of the proteins were overexpressed in the high stage tumors. These proteins are known to play an important role in cellular functions such as glycolysis, protein biosynthesis, and cytoskeleton rearrangement and may serve as markers associated with different stages of OSCs. To further confirm the stage-dependent protein identifications, Lamin A/C and Vimentin expression in ovarian serous carcinomas was assessed by immunohistochemistry using ovarian tumor tissue microarrays for 66 samples.

  11. Map and Compass Skills for the Elementary School. Instructional Activities Series IA/E-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Robert P.; Grogger, Paul K.

    Twenty activities are described that can be used to develop map and compass skills in elementary grades. The activities range from simple, beginners' projects to more complex tasks as students acquire more skills. Most can be carried out in the classroom, schoolyard, or local neighborhood. Map activities include drawing maps of the classroom,…

  12. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps

  13. TGF-β activates Erk MAP kinase signalling through direct phosphorylation of ShcA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Matt K; Pardoux, Cécile; Hall, Marie C; Lee, Pierre S; Warburton, David; Qing, Jing; Smith, Susan M; Derynck, Rik

    2007-01-01

    Erk1/Erk2 MAP kinases are key regulators of cell behaviour and their activation is generally associated with tyrosine kinase signalling. However, TGF-β stimulation also activates Erk MAP kinases through an undefined mechanism, albeit to a much lower level than receptor tyrosine kinase stimulation. We report that upon TGF-β stimulation, the activated TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) recruits and directly phosphorylates ShcA proteins on tyrosine and serine. This dual phosphorylation results from an intrinsic TβRI tyrosine kinase activity that complements its well-defined serine-threonine kinase function. TGF-β-induced ShcA phosphorylation induces ShcA association with Grb2 and Sos, thereby initiating the well-characterised pathway linking receptor tyrosine kinases with Erk MAP kinases. We also found that TβRI is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to TGF-β. Thus, TβRI, like the TGF-β type II receptor, is a dual-specificity kinase. Recruitment of tyrosine kinase signalling pathways may account for aspects of TGF-β biology that are independent of Smad signalling. PMID:17673906

  14. Synthetic Physical Interactions Map Kinetochore-Checkpoint Activation Regions

    PubMed Central

    Ólafsson, Guðjón; Thorpe, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a key mechanism to regulate the timing of mitosis and ensure that chromosomes are correctly segregated to daughter cells. The recruitment of the Mad1 and Mad2 proteins to the kinetochore is normally necessary for SAC activation. This recruitment is coordinated by the SAC kinase Mps1, which phosphorylates residues at the kinetochore to facilitate binding of Bub1, Bub3, Mad1, and Mad2. There is evidence that the essential function of Mps1 is to direct recruitment of Mad1/2. To test this model, we have systematically recruited Mad1, Mad2, and Mps1 to most proteins in the yeast kinetochore, and find that, while Mps1 is sufficient for checkpoint activation, recruitment of either Mad1 or Mad2 is not. These data indicate an important role for Mps1 phosphorylation in SAC activation, beyond the direct recruitment of Mad1 and Mad2. PMID:27280788

  15. T cell-activating protein on murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E T; Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-12-01

    A functional T cell surface molecule, T cell-activating protein (TAP), has been identified on murine lymphocytes. TAP is a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 10-12 kilodaltons (kDa) nonreduced, 16-17 kDa reduced. Cross-linking of TAP can result in profound activation of T lymphocytes to produce lymphokines and to enter the cell cycle. Furthermore, antibody binding to TAP can modulate antigen-driven T cell stimulation. Current data suggest that TAP is physically distinct from the T cell receptor complex. On unstimulated lymphocytes, TAP is expressed on T cells and defines heterogeneity within the major T cell subsets. Its profile of expression is rapidly altered on cell activation. Ontologically, it is first detected in the thymus, where it is found on both the most immature and the most mature cell subsets, and it is functional on both. Together, these TAP+ cells constitute a small fraction of thymocytes. TAP expression, however, defines the immunocompetent compartment of the thymus, and thus could be involved in functional maturation. Finally, the gene controlling TAP expression has been mapped, and is tightly linked to a locus of hematopoietic antigens (Ly-6). TAP is molecularly distinct from these antigens. Furthermore, all of these proteins show a markedly distinct developmental regulation in their cell surface expression.

  16. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  17. M2SG: mapping human disease-related genetic variants to protein sequences and genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renkai; Cong, Qian; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a manually curated compendium of human genetic variants and the corresponding phenotypes, mostly human diseases. Instead of directly documenting the native sequences for gene entries, OMIM links its entries to protein and DNA sequences in other databases. However, because of the existence of gene isoforms and errors in OMIM records, mapping a specific OMIM mutation to its corresponding protein sequence is not trivial. Combining computer programs and extensive manual curation of OMIM full-text descriptions and original literature, we mapped 98% of OMIM amino acid substitutions (AASs) and all SwissProt Variant (SwissVar) disease-related AASs to reference sequences and confidently mapped 99.96% of all AASs to the genomic loci. Based on the results, we developed an online database and interactive web server (M2SG) to (i) retrieve the mapped OMIM and SwissVar variants for a given protein sequence; and (ii) obtain related proteins and mutations for an input disease phenotype. This database will be useful for analyzing sequences, understanding the effect of mutations, identifying important genetic variations and designing experiments on a protein of interest. Availability and implementation: The database and web server are freely available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/M2S/mut2seq.cgi. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24002112

  18. FTMAP: extended protein mapping with user-selected probe molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Chi Ho; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott E.; Beglov, Dmitri; Villar, Elizabeth A.; Hall, David R.; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor

    2012-01-01

    Binding hot spots, protein sites with high-binding affinity, can be identified using X-ray crystallography or NMR by screening libraries of small organic molecules that tend to cluster at such regions. FTMAP, a direct computational analog of the experimental screening approaches, globally samples the surface of a target protein using small organic molecules as probes, finds favorable positions, clusters the conformations and ranks the clusters on the basis of the average energy. The regions that bind several probe clusters predict the binding hot spots, in good agreement with experimental results. Small molecules discovered by fragment-based approaches to drug design also bind at the hot spot regions. To identify such molecules and their most likely bound positions, we extend the functionality of FTMAP (http://ftmap.bu.edu/param) to accept any small molecule as an additional probe. In its updated form, FTMAP identifies the hot spots based on a standard set of probes, and for each additional probe shows representative structures of nearby low energy clusters. This approach helps to predict bound poses of the user-selected molecules, detects if a compound is not likely to bind in the hot spot region, and provides input for the design of larger ligands. PMID:22589414

  19. Translational control of myelin basic protein expression by ERK2 MAP kinase regulates timely remyelination in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Michel, Kelly; Zhao, Tianna; Karl, Molly; Lewis, Katherine; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2015-05-20

    Successful myelin repair in the adult CNS requires the robust and timely production of myelin proteins to generate new myelin sheaths. The underlying regulatory mechanisms and complex molecular basis of myelin regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of ERK MAP kinase signaling in this process. Conditional deletion of Erk2 from cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage resulted in delayed remyelination following demyelinating injury to the adult mouse corpus callosum. The delayed repair occurred as a result of a specific deficit in the translation of the major myelin protein, MBP. In the absence of ERK2, activation of the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its downstream target, ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP), was impaired at a critical time when premyelinating oligodendrocytes were transitioning to mature cells capable of generating new myelin sheaths. Thus, we have described an important link between the ERK MAP kinase signaling cascade and the translational machinery specifically in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo. These results suggest an important role for ERK2 in the translational control of MBP, a myelin protein that appears critical for ensuring the timely generation of new myelin sheaths following demyelinating injury in the adult CNS.

  20. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  1. Active Wnt proteins are secreted on exosomes.

    PubMed

    Gross, Julia Christina; Chaudhary, Varun; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Wnt signalling has important roles during development and in many diseases. As morphogens, hydrophobic Wnt proteins exert their function over a distance to induce patterning and cell differentiation decisions. Recent studies have identified several factors that are required for the secretion of Wnt proteins; however, how Wnts travel in the extracellular space remains a largely unresolved question. Here we show that Wnts are secreted on exosomes both during Drosophila development and in human cells. We demonstrate that exosomes carry Wnts on their surface to induce Wnt signalling activity in target cells. Together with the cargo receptor Evi/WIs, Wnts are transported through endosomal compartments onto exosomes, a process that requires the R-SNARE Ykt6. Our study demonstrates an evolutionarily conserved functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of Wnt proteins.

  2. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  3. Electrochemical Activation of Engineered Protein Switches

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jay H.; Zayats, Maya; Searson, Peter C.; Ostermeier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Engineered protein switches have a large dynamic range, high specificity for the activating ligand, and a modular architecture, and have been explored for a wide range of applications including biosensors and therapeutics. The ability to externally control switch function is important in extending applications for protein switches. We recently demonstrated that the on/off state could be controlled by the redox state of disulfide bonds introduced into the switches at select locations. Here, we demonstrate that an electrochemical signal can be used as an exogenous input to control switch function via reduction of the engineered disulfide bonds. This study suggests that disulfide-containing protein switch is a potentially useful platform for bioelectronic sensors with remote control of the sensing ability. PMID:26241391

  4. Mapping fast protein folding with multiple-site fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Chao, Shu-Han; Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Fast protein folding involves complex dynamics in many degrees of freedom, yet microsecond folding experiments provide only low-resolution structural information. We enhance the structural resolution of the five-helix bundle protein λ6–85 by engineering into it three fluorescent tryptophan–tyrosine contact probes. The probes report on distances between three different helix pairs: 1–2, 1–3, and 3–2. Temperature jump relaxation experiments on these three mutants reveal two different kinetic timescales: a slower timescale for 1–3 and a faster one for the two contacts involving helix 2. We hypothesize that these differences arise from a single folding mechanism that forms contacts on different timescales, and not from changes of mechanism due to adding the probes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the corresponding three distances in one published single-trajectory all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation of a similar mutant. Autocorrelation analysis of the trajectory reveals the same “slow” and “fast” distance change as does experiment, but on a faster timescale; smoothing the trajectory in time shows that this ordering is robust and persists into the microsecond folding timescale. Structural investigation of the all-atom computational data suggests that helix 2 misfolds to produce a short-lived off-pathway trap, in agreement with the experimental finding that the 1–2 and 3–2 distances involving helix 2 contacts form a kinetic grouping distinct from 1 to 3. Our work demonstrates that comparison between experiment and simulation can be extended to several order parameters, providing a stronger mechanistic test. PMID:26080403

  5. Mapping fast protein folding with multiple-site fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Prigozhin, Maxim B; Chao, Shu-Han; Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-30

    Fast protein folding involves complex dynamics in many degrees of freedom, yet microsecond folding experiments provide only low-resolution structural information. We enhance the structural resolution of the five-helix bundle protein λ6-85 by engineering into it three fluorescent tryptophan-tyrosine contact probes. The probes report on distances between three different helix pairs: 1-2, 1-3, and 3-2. Temperature jump relaxation experiments on these three mutants reveal two different kinetic timescales: a slower timescale for 1-3 and a faster one for the two contacts involving helix 2. We hypothesize that these differences arise from a single folding mechanism that forms contacts on different timescales, and not from changes of mechanism due to adding the probes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the corresponding three distances in one published single-trajectory all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation of a similar mutant. Autocorrelation analysis of the trajectory reveals the same "slow" and "fast" distance change as does experiment, but on a faster timescale; smoothing the trajectory in time shows that this ordering is robust and persists into the microsecond folding timescale. Structural investigation of the all-atom computational data suggests that helix 2 misfolds to produce a short-lived off-pathway trap, in agreement with the experimental finding that the 1-2 and 3-2 distances involving helix 2 contacts form a kinetic grouping distinct from 1 to 3. Our work demonstrates that comparison between experiment and simulation can be extended to several order parameters, providing a stronger mechanistic test. PMID:26080403

  6. Mapping lipid and detergent molecules at the surface of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogdell, Richard J; Gardiner, Alastair T; Roszak, Aleksander W; Stončius, Sigitas; Kočovský, Pavel; Isaacs, Neil W

    2011-06-01

    Electron-density maps for the crystal structures of membrane proteins often show features suggesting binding of lipids and/or detergent molecules on the hydrophobic surface, but usually it is difficult to identify the bound molecules. In our studies, heavy-atom-labelled phospholipids and detergents have been used to unequivocally identify these binding sites at the surfaces of test membrane proteins, the reaction centres from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis. The generality of this method is discussed in the present article.

  7. Activation of brain B-Raf protein kinase by Rap1B small GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, T; Shimizu, K; Yamamori, B; Kuroda, S; Takai, Y

    1996-01-19

    Rap1 small GTP-binding protein has the same amino acid sequence at its effector domain as that of Ras. Rap1 has been shown to antagonize the Ras functions, such as the Ras-induced transformation of NIH 3T3 cells and the Ras-induced activation of the c-Raf-1 protein kinase-dependent mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in Rat-1 cells, whereas we have shown that Rap1 as well as Ras stimulates DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. We have established a cell-free assay system in which Ras activates bovine brain B-Raf protein kinase. Here we have used this assay system and examined the effect of Rap1 on the B-Raf activity to phosphorylate recombinant MAP kinase kinase (MEK). Recombinant Rap1B stimulated the activity of B-Raf, which was partially purified from bovine brain and immunoprecipitated by an anti-B-Raf antibody. The GTP-bound form was active, but the GDP-bound form was inactive. The fully post-translationally lipid-modified form was active, but the unmodified form was nearly inactive. The maximum B-Raf activity stimulated by Rap1B was nearly the same as that stimulated by Ki-Ras. Rap1B enhanced the Ki-Ras-stimulated B-Raf activity in an additive manner. These results indicate that not only Ras but also Rap1 is involved in the activation of the B-Raf-dependent MAP kinase cascade.

  8. Inducement of mitogen-activated protein kinases in frozen shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Kanbe, Katsuaki; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Inoue, Yasuo; Chen, Qian

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are well-known molecules that play key roles in mechanical stress signals during skeletal development. To test our hypothesis that the synovium in frozen shoulders is induced by MAP kinases, immunohistochemical analyses for detecting expression and signal transduction of MAP kinases were performed in synovial tissue obtained from the rotator interval (RI) in frozen shoulders. Methods Synovial tissues were examined from 10 frozen shoulder patients with a mean age of 55.4 years (46–62 years). Synovial tissues between the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB) and the RI in frozen shoulders were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and then examined with immunohistochemical staining. Extracellular signal-regulated (ERK), the Jun N-terminal (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), p50, CD29 (β1-integrin), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, interleukin-6 (IL-6), CD56, CD68, S-100, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were analyzed to detect expression patterns. Results H&E showed vascular proliferation with fibrin and fibrous tissue in the synovium of frozen shoulders. ERK was expressed in the epithelial cells of vascular tissue, and JNK was expressed strongly in the interstitial cells around vascular tissue; p38 MAPK was not expressed. NF-κB was expressed in vascular tissue, and IL-6 was expressed around vascular tissue. CD29 (β1-integrin) was expressed in vascular tissue and in superficial cells of synovial tissue. MMP-3 and VEGF were expressed on the surface layer of synovial tissue and vascular tissue, and CD68 was expressed on the surface layer. Nerve-related proteins, CD56 and S-100, were expressed weakly. Conclusions Mechanical stress on the LHB and RI in the shoulder may induce ERK and JNK to express NF-κB by CD29 to develop capsule contracture, producing MMP-3, IL-6, and VEGF. PMID:19214689

  9. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    PubMed

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. PMID:27586341

  10. Discovering a "True" Map of the World--Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    "True" maps of the world, as seen from the perspective of the time in which they were produced, remain an ethnocentric visual language in modern times. Students can gain insight into such "true" maps by studying maps produced in the great traditions of the West and East. Teachers can determine a map's appropriateness by identifying its title,…

  11. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  12. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kittel, Robert J; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  13. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  14. Mapping proteins in the presence of paralogs using units of coevolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We study the problem of mapping proteins between two protein families in the presence of paralogs. This problem occurs as a difficult subproblem in coevolution-based computational approaches for protein-protein interaction prediction. Results Similar to prior approaches, our method is based on the idea that coevolution implies equal rates of sequence evolution among the interacting proteins, and we provide a first attempt to quantify this notion in a formal statistical manner. We call the units that are central to this quantification scheme the units of coevolution. A unit consists of two mapped protein pairs and its score quantifies the coevolution of the pairs. This quantification allows us to provide a maximum likelihood formulation of the paralog mapping problem and to cast it into a binary quadratic programming formulation. Conclusion CUPID, our software tool based on a Lagrangian relaxation of this formulation, makes it, for the first time, possible to compute state-of-the-art quality pairings in a few minutes of runtime. In summary, we suggest a novel alternative to the earlier available approaches, which is statistically sound and computationally feasible. PMID:24564758

  15. A tractable genotype-phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, Sam F; Johnston, Iain G; Louis, Ard A; Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2014-06-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype-phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps.

  16. A tractable genotype–phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype–phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps. PMID:24718456

  17. Signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Yang, M S; Oh, C D; Kim, K T; Ha, M J; Kang, S S; Chun, J S

    1999-01-15

    The signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes Erk-1 and -2 upon stimulation of muscarinic receptor with carbachol in human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2(C) cells was investigated. Carbachol activated Erk-1/-2 by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor, as determined by specific antagonists for individual muscarinic receptors. The activation of Erk-1/-2 by carbachol was blocked by the inhibition or down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Among the multiple PKC isoforms expressed in SK-N-BE2(C) cells, only PKCepsilon was activated by the treatment of carbachol, and selective down-regulation of PKCepsilon was sufficient to block Erk-1/-2 activation. Carbachol treatment induced activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase Raf, and an inhibition of Raf blocked Erk-1/-2 activation. Ectopic expression of inhibitory small GTPase Ras, RasN17, blocked the carbachol-induced Raf activation without affecting the activation of PKCepsilon, while the inhibition of PKC blocked the Raf activation. Thus, these results suggest that carbachol-induced activation of PKCepsilon mediates Erk-1/-2 activation by a sequential activation of Ras, Raf and MAP kinase kinase.

  18. Molecular Cytogenetic Mapping of Chromosomal Fragments and Immunostaining of Kinetochore Proteins in Beta

    PubMed Central

    Dechyeva, Daryna; Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    By comparative multicolor FISH, we have physically mapped small chromosome fragments in the sugar beet addition lines PRO1 and PAT2 and analyzed the distribution of repetitive DNA families in species of the section Procumbentes of the genus Beta. Six repetitive probes were applied, including genotype-specific probes—satellites pTS4.1, pTS5, and pRp34 and a dispersed repeat pAp4, the telomere (TTTAGGG)n, and the conserved 18S-5.8S-25S rRNA genes. Pachytene-FISH analysis of the native centromere organization allowed proposing the origin of PRO1 and PAT2 fragments. Comparative analysis of the repetitive DNA distribution and organization in the wild beet and in the addition lines allowed the development of a physical model of the chromosomal fragments. Immunostaining revealed that the PRO1 chromosome fragment binds α-tubulin and the serine 10-phosphorylated histone H3 specific for the active centromere. This is the first experimental detection of the kinetochore proteins in Beta showing their active involvement in chromosome segregation in mitosis. PMID:19911065

  19. Molecular cytogenetic mapping of chromosomal fragments and immunostaining of kinetochore proteins in Beta.

    PubMed

    Dechyeva, Daryna; Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    By comparative multicolor FISH, we have physically mapped small chromosome fragments in the sugar beet addition lines PRO1 and PAT2 and analyzed the distribution of repetitive DNA families in species of the section Procumbentes of the genus Beta. Six repetitive probes were applied, including genotype-specific probes-satellites pTS4.1, pTS5, and pRp34 and a dispersed repeat pAp4, the telomere (TTTAGGG)(n), and the conserved 18S-5.8S-25S rRNA genes. Pachytene-FISH analysis of the native centromere organization allowed proposing the origin of PRO1 and PAT2 fragments. Comparative analysis of the repetitive DNA distribution and organization in the wild beet and in the addition lines allowed the development of a physical model of the chromosomal fragments. Immunostaining revealed that the PRO1 chromosome fragment binds alpha-tubulin and the serine 10-phosphorylated histone H3 specific for the active centromere. This is the first experimental detection of the kinetochore proteins in Beta showing their active involvement in chromosome segregation in mitosis. PMID:19911065

  20. MAPping the eukaryotic tree of life: structure, function, and evolution of the MAP215/Dis1 family of microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gard, David L; Becker, Bret E; Josh Romney, S

    2004-01-01

    The MAP215/Dis1 family of proteins is an evolutionarily ancient family of microtubule-associated proteins, with characterized members in all major kingdoms of eukaryotes, including fungi (Stu2 in S. cerevisiae, Dis1 and Alp14 in S. pombe), Dictyostelium (DdCP224), plants (Mor1 in A. thaliana and TMBP200 in N. tabaccum), and animals (Zyg9 in C. elegans, Msps in Drosophila, XMAP215 in Xenopus, and ch-TOG in humans). All MAP215/Dis1 proteins (with the exception of those in plants) localize to microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs), including spindle pole bodies in yeast and centrosomes in animals, and all bind to microtubules in vitro and?or in vivo. Diverse roles in regulating microtubule assembly and organization have been proposed for individual family members, and a substantial body of evidence suggests that MAP215/Dis1-related proteins play critical roles in the assembly and function of the meiotic/mitotic spindles and/or cell division. An extensive search of public databases (including both EST and genome databases) identified partial sequences predicted to encode more than three dozen new members of the MAP215/Dis1 family, including putative MAP215/Dis1-related proteins in Giardia lamblia and four other protists, sixteen additional species of fungi, six plants, and twelve animals. The structure and function of MAP215/Dis1 proteins are discussed in relation to the evolution of this ancient family of microtubule-associated proteins.

  1. MKK3- and MKK6-regulated gene expression is mediated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Raingeaud, J; Whitmarsh, A J; Barrett, T; Dérijard, B; Davis, R J

    1996-01-01

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction pathway is activated by proinflammatory cytokines and environmental stress. The detection of p38 MAP kinase in the nucleus of activated cells suggests that p38 MAP kinase can mediate signaling to the nucleus. To test this hypothesis, we constructed expression vectors for activated MKK3 and MKK6, two MAP kinase kinases that phosphorylate and activate p38 MAP kinase. Expression of activated MKK3 and MKK6 in cultured cells caused a selective increase in p38 MAP kinase activity. Cotransfection experiments demonstrated that p38 MAP kinase activation causes increased reporter gene expression mediated by the transcription factors ATF2 and Elk-1. These data demonstrate that the nucleus is one target of the p38 MAP kinase signal transduction pathway. PMID:8622669

  2. Communication maps computed for homodimeric hemoglobin: computational study of water-mediated energy transport in proteins.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Agbo, Johnson K; Leitner, David M

    2011-08-14

    Frequency-resolved communication maps provide a coarse-grained picture of energy transport in nanoscale systems. We calculate communication maps for homodimeric hemoglobin from Scapharca inaequivalvis and sample them to elucidate energy transfer pathways between the binding sites and other parts of the protein with focus on the role of the cluster of water molecules at the interface between the globules. We complement analysis of communication maps with molecular simulations of energy flow. Both approaches reveal that excess energy in one heme flows mainly to regions of the interface where early hydrogen bond rearrangements occur in the allosteric transition. In particular, energy is carried disproportionately by the water molecules, consistent with the larger thermal conductivity of water compared to proteins.

  3. A Highly Efficient Approach to Protein Interactome Mapping Based on Collaborative Filtering Framework

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; You, Zhuhong; Zhou, Mengchu; Li, Shuai; Leung, Hareton; Xia, Yunni; Zhu, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive mapping of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is highly desired for one to gain deep insights into both fundamental cell biology processes and the pathology of diseases. Finely-set small-scale experiments are not only very expensive but also inefficient to identify numerous interactomes despite their high accuracy. High-throughput screening techniques enable efficient identification of PPIs; yet the desire to further extract useful knowledge from these data leads to the problem of binary interactome mapping. Network topology-based approaches prove to be highly efficient in addressing this problem; however, their performance deteriorates significantly on sparse putative PPI networks. Motivated by the success of collaborative filtering (CF)-based approaches to the problem of personalized-recommendation on large, sparse rating matrices, this work aims at implementing a highly efficient CF-based approach to binary interactome mapping. To achieve this, we first propose a CF framework for it. Under this framework, we model the given data into an interactome weight matrix, where the feature-vectors of involved proteins are extracted. With them, we design the rescaled cosine coefficient to model the inter-neighborhood similarity among involved proteins, for taking the mapping process. Experimental results on three large, sparse datasets demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms several sophisticated topology-based approaches significantly. PMID:25572661

  4. LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    EPA Science Inventory

    LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22. GR Klinefelter1, JE Welch*1, HDM Moore*2, K Bobseine*1, J Suarez*1 ,N Roberts*1 ,R Zucker *1 1U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC and 2University of Sheffield...

  5. Proteome-wide Mapping of Cholesterol-Interacting Proteins in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulce, Jonathan J.; Cognetta, Armand B.; Niphakis, Micah J.; Tully, Sarah E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential structural component of cellular membranes and serves as a precursor for several classes of signaling molecules. Cholesterol exerts its effects and is, itself, regulated in large part by engaging in specific interactions with proteins. The full complement of sterol-binding proteins that exist in mammalian cells, however, remains unknown. Here, we describe a chemoproteomic strategy that uses clickable, photoreactive sterol probes in combination with quantitative mass spectrometry to globally map cholesterol-protein interactions directly in living cells. We identified over 250 cholesterol-binding proteins, including many established and previously unreported interactions with receptors, channels, and enzymes. Prominent among the newly identified interactions were enzymes that regulate sugars, glycerolipids, and cholesterol itself, as well as those involved in vesicular transport and protein glycosylation and degradation, pointing to key nodes in biochemical pathways that may couple sterol concentrations to the control of other metabolites and protein localization and modification. PMID:23396283

  6. Development of Novel Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Activators

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Jih-Hwa; Chang, Wei-Ling; Yang, Jian; Lee, Su-Lin; Wei, Shuo; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2010-01-01

    In light of the unique ability of thiazolidinediones to mediate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 production, we conducted a screening of an in-house, thiazolidinedione-based focused compound library to identify novel agents with these dual pharmacological activities. Cell-based assays pertinent to the activation status of AMPK and mammalian homolog of target of rapamycin (i.e., phosphorylation of AMPK and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase, respectively), and IL-6/IL-6 receptor signaling (i.e., IL-6 production and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation, respectively) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated THP-1 human macrophages were used to screen this compound library, which led to the identification of compound 53 (N-{4-[3-(1-Methylcyclohexylmethyl)-2,4-dioxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene-methyl]-phenyl}-4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzenesulfonamide) as the lead agent. Evidence indicates that this drug-induced suppression of LPS-stimulated IL-6 production was attributable to AMPK activation. Furthermore, compound 53-mediated AMPK activation was demonstrated in C-26 colon adenocarcinoma cells, indicating that it is not a cell line-specific event. PMID:20170185

  7. Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, Carlee; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent hydroxyl radicals for these measurements; however, many of these approaches require use of radioactive sources or caustic oxidizing chemicals. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and optimize the use of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as a highly accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals as a means to induce a controllable level of oxidation on a range of intact proteins. These experiments utilize a relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber, along with a unique cell activation approach to improve control over the intact protein oxidation yield. Studies were conducted to evaluate the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface. This report demonstrates a robust protocol for the use of BDD electrochemistry and high performance LC-MS/MS as a high-throughput experimental pipeline for probing higher order protein structure, and illustrates how it is complementary to predictive computational modeling efforts.

  8. Comparing Two Forms of Concept Map Critique Activities to Facilitate Knowledge Integration Processes in Evolution Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendimann, Beat A.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Concept map activities often lack a subsequent revision step that facilitates knowledge integration. This study compares two collaborative critique activities using a Knowledge Integration Map (KIM), a form of concept map. Four classes of high school biology students (n?=?81) using an online inquiry-based learning unit on evolution were assigned…

  9. Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Miguel, Anitza San; Puertollano, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking plays an important role in the regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). To address if cellular kinases regulate EGFR internalization, we used anisomycin, a potent activator of kinase cascades in mammalian cells, especially the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes. Here, we report that activation of p38 MAP kinase by anisomycin is sufficient to induce internalization of EGFR. Anisomycin and EGF employ different mechanisms to promote EGFR endocytosis as anisomycin-induced internalization does not require tyrosine kinase activity or ubiquitination of the receptor. In addition, anisomycin treatment did not result in delivery and degradation of EGFR at lysosomes. Incubation with a specific inhibitor of p38, or depletion of endogenous p38 by small interfering RNAs, abolished anisomycin-induced internalization of EGFR while having no effect on transferrin endocytosis, indicating that the effect of p38 activation on EGFR endocytosis is specific. Interestingly, inhibition of p38 activation also abolished endocytosis of EGFR induced by UV radiation. Our results reveal a novel role for p38 in the regulation of EGFR endocytosis and suggest that stimulation of EGFR internalization by p38 might represent a general mechanism to prevent generation of proliferative or anti-apoptotic signals under stress conditions. PMID:16683917

  10. Epitope Mapping of Avian Influenza M2e Protein: Different Species Recognise Various Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Noor Haliza; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Tarigan, Simson; Peaston, Anne; Hemmatzadeh, Farhid

    2016-01-01

    A common approach for developing diagnostic tests for influenza virus detection is the use of mouse or rabbit monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies against a target antigen of the virus. However, comparative mapping of the target antigen using antibodies from different animal sources has not been evaluated before. This is important because identification of antigenic determinants of the target antigen in different species plays a central role to ensure the efficiency of a diagnostic test, such as competitive ELISA or immunohistochemistry-based tests. Interest in the matrix 2 ectodomain (M2e) protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) as a candidate for a universal vaccine and also as a marker for detection of virus infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA) is the rationale for the selection of this protein for comparative mapping evaluation. This study aimed to map the epitopes of the M2e protein of avian influenza virus H5N1 using chicken, mouse and rabbit monoclonal or monospecific antibodies. Our findings revealed that rabbit antibodies (rAbs) recognized epitope 6EVETPTRN13 of the M2e, located at the N-terminal of the protein, while mouse (mAb) and chicken antibodies (cAbs) recognized epitope 10PTRNEWECK18, located at the centre region of the protein. The findings highlighted the difference between the M2e antigenic determinants recognized by different species that emphasized the importance of comparative mapping of antibody reactivity from different animals to the same antigen, especially in the case of multi-host infectious agents such as influenza. The findings are of importance for antigenic mapping, as well as diagnostic test and vaccine development. PMID:27362795

  11. A protein-protein interaction map of the Trypanosoma brucei paraflagellar rod.

    PubMed

    Lacomble, Sylvain; Portman, Neil; Gull, Keith

    2009-01-01

    We have conducted a protein interaction study of components within a specific sub-compartment of a eukaryotic flagellum. The trypanosome flagellum contains a para-crystalline extra-axonemal structure termed the paraflagellar rod (PFR) with around forty identified components. We have used a Gateway cloning approach coupled with yeast two-hybrid, RNAi and 2D DiGE to define a protein-protein interaction network taking place in this structure. We define two clusters of interactions; the first being characterised by two proteins with a shared domain which is not sufficient for maintaining the interaction. The other cohort is populated by eight proteins, a number of which possess a PFR domain and sub-populations of this network exhibit dependency relationships. Finally, we provide clues as to the structural organisation of the PFR at the molecular level. This multi-strand approach shows that protein interactome data can be generated for insoluble protein complexes. PMID:19888464

  12. Proteomic analysis of cellular soluble proteins from human bronchial smooth muscle cells by combining nondenaturing micro 2DE and quantitative LC-MS/MS. 2. Similarity search between protein maps for the analysis of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Yuan, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle cell soluble proteins were analyzed by a combined method of nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS and a native protein map was prepared for each of the identified 4323 proteins [1]. A method to evaluate the degree of similarity between the protein maps was developed since we expected the proteins comprising a protein complex would be separated together under nondenaturing conditions. The following procedure was employed using Excel macros; (i) maps that have three or more squares with protein quantity data were selected (2328 maps), (ii) within each map, the quantity values of the squares were normalized setting the highest value to be 1.0, (iii) in comparing a map with another map, the smaller normalized quantity in two corresponding squares was taken and summed throughout the map to give an "overlap score," (iv) each map was compared against all the 2328 maps and the largest overlap score, obtained when a map was compared with itself, was set to be 1.0 thus providing 2328 "overlap factors," (v) step (iv) was repeated for all maps providing 2328 × 2328 matrix of overlap factors. From the matrix, protein pairs that showed overlap factors above 0.65 from both protein sides were selected (431 protein pairs). Each protein pair was searched in a database (UniProtKB) on complex formation and 301 protein pairs, which comprise 35 protein complexes, were found to be documented. These results demonstrated that native protein maps and their similarity search would enable simultaneous analysis of multiple protein complexes in cells.

  13. Malaria parasite-inhibitory antibody epitopes on Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-1(19) mapped by TROSY NMR.

    PubMed

    Morgan, William D; Lock, Matthew J; Frenkiel, Thomas A; Grainger, Munira; Holder, Anthony A

    2004-11-01

    Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1)(19), the C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1, is a leading candidate antigen for development of a vaccine against the blood stages of the malaria parasite. Many human and animal studies have indicated the importance of MSP1(19)-specific immune responses. Anti-MSP1(19) antibodies can prevent invasion of red blood cells by P. falciparum parasites in vitro. However, the fine specificity of anti-MSP1(19) antibodies is also important, as only a fraction of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have parasite-inhibitory activity in vitro. Human sera from malaria-endemic locations show strong MSP1(19) reactivity, but individual serum samples vary greatly in inhibitory activity. NMR is an excellent method for studying protein-protein interactions, and has been used widely to study binding of peptides representing known epitopes (as well as non-protein antigens) to antibodies and antibody fragments. The recent development of transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) and related methods has significantly extended the maximum size limit of molecules that can be studied by NMR. TROSY NMR experiments produce high quality spectra of Fab complexes that allow the mapping of epitopes by the chemical shift perturbation technique on a complete, folded protein antigen such as MSP1(19). We studied the complexes of P. falciparum MSP1(19) with Fab fragments from three monoclonal antibodies. Two of these antibodies have parasite-inhibitory activity in vitro, while the third is non-inhibitory. NMR epitope mapping showed a close relationship between binding sites for the two inhibitory antibodies, distinct from the location of the non-inhibitory antibody. Together with a previously published crystal structure of the P. falciparum MSP1(19) complex with the Fab fragment of another non-inhibitory antibody, these results revealed a surface on MSP1(19) where inhibitory antibodies bind. This information will be useful in

  14. Automatic Classification of Protein Structure Using the Maximum Contact Map Overlap Metric

    DOE PAGES

    Andonov, Rumen; Djidjev, Hristo Nikolov; Klau, Gunnar W.; Le Boudic-Jamin, Mathilde; Wohlers, Inken

    2015-10-09

    In this paper, we propose a new distance measure for comparing two protein structures based on their contact map representations. We show that our novel measure, which we refer to as the maximum contact map overlap (max-CMO) metric, satisfies all properties of a metric on the space of protein representations. Having a metric in that space allows one to avoid pairwise comparisons on the entire database and, thus, to significantly accelerate exploring the protein space compared to no-metric spaces. We show on a gold standard superfamily classification benchmark set of 6759 proteins that our exact k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) scheme classifiesmore » up to 224 out of 236 queries correctly and on a larger, extended version of the benchmark with 60; 850 additional structures, up to 1361 out of 1369 queries. Finally, our k-NN classification thus provides a promising approach for the automatic classification of protein structures based on flexible contact map overlap alignments.« less

  15. Comparison of Metalloproteinase Protein and Activity Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Giricz, Orsi; Lauer, Janelle L.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play fundamental roles in many biological processes. Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been shown to take part in processes crucial in disease progression. The present study used the ExcelArray Human MMP/TIMP Array to quantify MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production in the lysates and media of 14 cancer and one normal cell line. The overall patterns were very similar in terms of which MMPs and TIMPs were secreted in the media versus associated with the cells in the individual samples. However, more MMP was found in the media, both in amount and in variety. TIMP-1 was produced in all cell lines. MMP activity assays with three different FRET substrates were then utilized to determine if protein production correlated with function for the WM-266-4 and BJ cell lines. Metalloproteinase activity was observed for both cell lines with a general MMP substrate (Knight SSP), consistent with protein production data. However, although both cell lines promoted the hydrolysis of a more selective MMP substrate (NFF-3), metalloproteinase activity was only confirmed in the BJ cell line. The use of inhibitors to confirm metalloproteinase activities pointed to the strengths and weaknesses of in situ FRET substrate assays. PMID:20920458

  16. Crowding Activates Heat Shock Protein 90.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Jackson C; Huang, Bin; Sun, Ming; Street, Timothy O

    2016-03-18

    Hsp90 is a dimeric ATP-dependent chaperone involved in the folding, maturation, and activation of diverse target proteins. Extensive in vitro structural analysis has led to a working model of Hsp90's ATP-driven conformational cycle. An implicit assumption is that dilute experimental conditions do not significantly perturb Hsp90 structure and function. However, Hsp90 undergoes a dramatic open/closed conformational change, which raises the possibility that this assumption may not be valid for this chaperone. Indeed, here we show that the ATPase activity of Hsp90 is highly sensitive to molecular crowding, whereas the ATPase activities of Hsp60 and Hsp70 chaperones are insensitive to crowding conditions. Polymer crowders activate Hsp90 in a non-saturable manner, with increasing efficacy at increasing concentration. Crowders exhibit a non-linear relationship between their radius of gyration and the extent to which they activate Hsp90. This experimental relationship can be qualitatively recapitulated with simple structure-based volume calculations comparing open/closed configurations of Hsp90. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that crowding activation of Hsp90 is entropically driven, which is consistent with a model in which excluded volume provides a driving force that favors the closed active state of Hsp90. Multiple Hsp90 homologs are activated by crowders, with the endoplasmic reticulum-specific Hsp90, Grp94, exhibiting the highest sensitivity. Finally, we find that crowding activation works by a different mechanism than co-chaperone activation and that these mechanisms are independent. We hypothesize that Hsp90 has a higher intrinsic activity in the cell than in vitro. PMID:26797120

  17. A role for mitogen-activated protein kinase in the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Zhai, Y; Ferrell, J E

    1997-04-21

    The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents cells whose spindles are defective or chromosomes are misaligned from initiating anaphase and leaving mitosis. Studies of Xenopus egg extracts have implicated the Erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) in this checkpoint. Other studies have suggested that MAP kinases might be important for normal mitotic progression. Here we have investigated whether MAP kinase function is required for mitotic progression or the spindle assembly checkpoint in vivo in Xenopus tadpole cells (XTC). We determined that Erk1 and/or Erk2 are present in the mitotic spindle during prometaphase and metaphase, consistent with the idea that MAP kinase might regulate or monitor the status of the spindle. Next, we microinjected purified recombinant XCL100, a Xenopus MAP kinase phosphatase, into XTC cells in various stages of mitosis to interfere with MAP kinase activation. We found that mitotic progression was unaffected by the phosphatase. However, XCL100 rendered the cells unable to remain arrested in mitosis after treatment with nocodazole. Cells injected with phosphatase at prometaphase or metaphase exited mitosis in the presence of nocodazole-the chromosomes decondensed and the nuclear envelope re-formed-whereas cells injected with buffer or a catalytically inactive XCL100 mutant protein remained arrested in mitosis. Coinjection of constitutively active MAP kinase kinase-1, which opposes XCL100's effects on MAP kinase, antagonized the effects of XCL100. Since the only known targets of MAP kinase kinase-1 are Erk1 and Erk2, these findings argue that MAP kinase function is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

  18. Chemical shift mapping of RNA interactions with the polypyrimidine tract binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xuemei; Davydova, Natalia; Conte, Maria R.; Curry, Stephen; Matthews, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB), a homodimer that contains four RRM-type RNA binding domains per monomer, plays important roles in both the regulation of alternative splicing and the stimulation of translation initiation as directed by the internal ribosome entry sites of certain picornaviruses. We have used chemical shift mapping experiments to probe the interactions between PTB-34, a recombinant fragment that contains the third and fourth RRM domains of the protein, and a number of short pyrimidine-rich RNA oligonucleotides. The results confirm that the RNAs interact primarily with the β-sheet surface of PTB-34, but also reveal roles for the two long flexible linkers within the protein fragment, a result that is supported by mutagenesis experiments. The mapping indicates distinct binding preferences for RRM3 and RRM4 with the former making a particularly specific interaction with the sequence UCUUC. PMID:11788707

  19. Fine Mapping of the Interaction between C4b-Binding Protein and Outer Membrane Proteins LigA and LigB of Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Breda, Leandro C D; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica M; da Silva, Ludmila B; Barbosa, Angela S; Blom, Anna M; Chang, Yung-Fu; Yung-Fu, Chang; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The complement system consists of more than 40 proteins that participate in the inflammatory response and in pathogen killing. Complement inhibitors are necessary to avoid the excessive consumption and activation of this system on host cells. Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic leptospires are able to escape from complement activation by binding to host complement inhibitors Factor H [FH] and C4b-binding protein (C4BP) while non-pathogenic leptospires are rapidly killed in the presence of fresh serum. In this study, we demonstrate that complement control protein domains (CCP) 7 and 8 of C4BP α-chain interact with the outer membrane proteins LcpA, LigA and LigB from the pathogenic leptospire L. interrogans. The interaction between C4BP and LcpA, LigA and LigB is sensitive to ionic strength and inhibited by heparin. We fine mapped the LigA and LigB domains involved in its binding to C4BP and heparin and found that both interactions are mediated through the bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains 7 and 8 (LigA7-8 and LigB7-8) of both LigA and LigB and also through LigB9-10. Therefore, C4BP and heparin may share the same binding sites on Lig proteins.

  20. Identification and fine mapping of a soybean seed protein QTL from PI 407788A on Chromosome 15

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is grown primarily as a source of vegetable protein and oil. The objectives of this study were to identify soybean seed protein quantitative trait loci (QTL) from the high protein line PI 407788A and to fine map an important QTL for protein on chromosome (chr) 15. Th...

  1. Tryptase Activation of Immortalized Human Urothelial Cell Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marentette, John O.; Hauser, Paul J.; Hurst, Robert E.; Klumpp, David J.; Rickard, Alice; McHowat, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is multifactorial, but likely involves urothelial cell dysfunction and mast cell accumulation in the bladder wall. Activated mast cells in the bladder wall release several inflammatory mediators, including histamine and tryptase. We determined whether mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to tryptase stimulation of urothelial cells derived from human normal and IC/PBS bladders. Tryptase stimulation of normal urothelial cells resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). A 5.5-fold increase in ERK 1/2 activity was observed in urothelial cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. No significant change in p38 MAP kinase was observed in tryptase-stimulated normal urothelial cells but a 2.5-fold increase was observed in cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 with PD98059 or inhibition of p38 MAP kinase with SB203580 did not block tryptase-stimulated iPLA2 activation. Incubation with the membrane phospholipid-derived PLA2 hydrolysis product lysoplasmenylcholine increased ERK 1/2 activity, suggesting the iPLA2 activation is upstream of ERK 1/2. Real time measurements of impedance to evaluate wound healing of cell cultures indicated increased healing rates in normal and IC/PBS urothelial cells in the presence of tryptase, with inhibition of ERK 1/2 significantly decreasing the wound healing rate of IC/PBS urothelium. We conclude that activation of ERK 1/2 in response to tryptase stimulation may facilitate wound healing or cell motility in areas of inflammation in the bladder associated with IC/PBS. PMID:23922867

  2. Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP) Maps the Epitope of EGFR Binding to Adnectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yuetian; Chen, Guodong; Wei, Hui; Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Mo, Jingjie; Rempel, Don L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Gross, Michael L.

    2014-12-01

    Epitope mapping is an important tool for the development of monoclonal antibodies, mAbs, as therapeutic drugs. Recently, a class of therapeutic mAb alternatives, adnectins, has been developed as targeted biologics. They are derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (10Fn3). A common approach to map the epitope binding of these therapeutic proteins to their binding partners is X-ray crystallography. Although the crystal structure is known for Adnectin 1 binding to human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), we seek to determine complementary binding in solution and to test the efficacy of footprinting for this purpose. As a relatively new tool in structural biology and complementary to X-ray crystallography, protein footprinting coupled with mass spectrometry is promising for protein-protein interaction studies. We report here the use of fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) coupled with MS to map the epitope of EGFR-Adnectin 1 at both the peptide and amino-acid residue levels. The data correlate well with the previously determined epitopes from the crystal structure and are consistent with HDX MS data, which are presented in an accompanying paper. The FPOP-determined binding interface involves various amino-acid and peptide regions near the N terminus of EGFR. The outcome adds credibility to oxidative labeling by FPOP for epitope mapping and motivates more applications in the therapeutic protein area as a stand-alone method or in conjunction with X-ray crystallography, NMR, site-directed mutagenesis, and other orthogonal methods.

  3. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. K.; Castagnoli, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Rome

    2003-01-01

    This unit describes the process and analysis of affinity selecting bacteriophage M13 from libraries displaying combinatorial peptides fused to either a minor or major capsid protein. Direct affinity selection uses target protein bound to a microtiter plate followed by purification of selected phage by ELISA. Alternatively, there is a bead-based affinity selection method. These methods allow one to readily isolate peptide ligands that bind to a protein target of interest and use the consensus sequence to search proteomic databases for putative interacting proteins.

  4. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  5. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K.; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs. PMID:25566309

  6. AlphaSpace: Fragment-Centric Topographical Mapping To Target Protein–Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy despite the difficulty in targeting such interfaces with drug-like small molecules. PPIs generally feature large and flat binding surfaces as compared to typical drug targets. These features pose a challenge for structural characterization of the surface using geometry-based pocket-detection methods. An attractive mapping strategy—that builds on the principles of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD)—is to detect the fragment-centric modularity at the protein surface and then characterize the large PPI interface as a set of localized, fragment-targetable interaction regions. Here, we introduce AlphaSpace, a computational analysis tool designed for fragment-centric topographical mapping (FCTM) of PPI interfaces. Our approach uses the alpha sphere construct, a geometric feature of a protein’s Voronoi diagram, to map out concave interaction space at the protein surface. We introduce two new features—alpha-atom and alpha-space—and the concept of the alpha-atom/alpha-space pair to rank pockets for fragment-targetability and to facilitate the evaluation of pocket/fragment complementarity. The resulting high-resolution interfacial map of targetable pocket space can be used to guide the rational design and optimization of small molecule or biomimetic PPI inhibitors. PMID:26225450

  7. Towards a map of the Populus biomass protein-protein interaction network

    SciTech Connect

    Beers, Eric; Brunner, Amy; Helm, Richard; Dickerman, Allan

    2015-07-31

    Biofuels can be produced from a variety of plant feedstocks. The value of a particular feedstock for biofuels production depends in part on the degree of difficulty associated with the extraction of fermentable sugars from the plant biomass. The wood of trees is potentially a rich source fermentable sugars. However, the sugars in wood exist in a tightly cross-linked matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, making them largely recalcitrant to release and fermentation for biofuels production. Before breeders and genetic engineers can effectively develop plants with reduced recalcitrance to fermentation, it is necessary to gain a better understanding of the fundamental biology of the mechanisms responsible for wood formation. Regulatory, structural, and enzymatic proteins are required for the complicated process of wood formation. To function properly, proteins must interact with other proteins. Yet, very few of the protein-protein interactions necessary for wood formation are known. The main objectives of this project were to 1) identify new protein-protein interactions relevant to wood formation, and 2) perform in-depth characterizations of selected protein-protein interactions. To identify relevant protein-protein interactions, we cloned a set of approximately 400 genes that were highly expressed in the wood-forming tissue (known as secondary xylem) of poplar (Populus trichocarpa). We tested whether the proteins encoded by these biomass genes interacted with each other in a binary matrix design using the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method for protein-protein interaction discovery. We also tested a subset of the 400 biomass proteins for interactions with all proteins present in wood-forming tissue of poplar in a biomass library screen design using Y2H. Together, these two Y2H screens yielded over 270 interactions involving over 75 biomass proteins. For the second main objective we selected several interacting pairs or groups of interacting proteins for in

  8. Mapping Plant Interactomes Using Literature Curated and Predicted Protein–Protein Interaction Data Sets[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KiYoung; Thorneycroft, David; Achuthan, Premanand; Hermjakob, Henning; Ideker, Trey

    2010-01-01

    Most cellular processes are enabled by cohorts of interacting proteins that form dynamic networks within the plant proteome. The study of these networks can provide insight into protein function and provide new avenues for research. This article informs the plant science community of the currently available sources of protein interaction data and discusses how they can be useful to researchers. Using our recently curated IntAct Arabidopsis thaliana protein–protein interaction data set as an example, we discuss potentials and limitations of the plant interactomes generated to date. In addition, we present our efforts to add value to the interaction data by using them to seed a proteome-wide map of predicted protein subcellular locations. PMID:20371643

  9. Polycarboxylates Enhance Beetle Antifreeze Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Amornwittawat, Natapol; Wang, Sen; Duman, John G.; Wen, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Summary Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) lower the noncolligative freezing point of water in the presence of ice below the ice melting point. The temperature difference between the melting point and the noncolligative freezing point is termed thermal hysteresis (TH). The magnitude of the TH depends on the specific activity and the concentration of AFP, and the concentration of enhancers in the solution. Known enhancers are certain low molecular mass molecules and proteins. Here, we investigated a series of polycarboxylates that enhance the TH activity of an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis (DAFP) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Triethylenetetramine-N,N,N′,N″,N‴,N‴-hexaacetate, the most efficient enhancer identified in this work, can increase the TH of DAFP by nearly 1.5 fold over than that of the published best enhancer, citrate. The Zn2+ coordinated carboxylate results in loss of the enhancement ability of the carboxylate on antifreeze activity. There is not an additional increase in TH when a weaker enhancer is added to a stronger enhancer solution. These observations suggest that the more carboxylate groups per enhancer molecule the better the efficiency of the enhancer and that the freedom of motion of these molecules is necessary for them to serve as enhancers for AFP. The hydroxyl groups in the enhancer molecules can also positively affect their TH enhancement efficiency, though not as strongly as carboxylate groups. Mechanisms are discussed. PMID:18620083

  10. Fine mapping of sequential neutralization epitopes on the subunit protein VP8 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Yoo, Dongwan; Mine, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    The epitopes of the HRV (human rotavirus), especially those involved in virus neutralization, have not been determined in their entirety, and would have significant implications for HRV vaccine development. In the present study, we report on the epitope mapping and identification of sequential neutralization epitopes, on the Wa strain HRV subunit protein VP8, using synthetic overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant Wa VP8 were produced previously in chicken, and purified from egg yolk, which showed neutralizing activity against HRV in vitro. Overlapping VP8 peptide fragments were synthesized and probed with the anti-VP8 antibodies, revealing five sequential epitopes on VP8. Further analysis suggested that three of the five epitopes detected, M1-L10, I55-D66 and L223-P234, were involved in virus neutralization, indicating that sequential epitopes may also be important for the HRV neutralization. The interactions of the antibodies with the five epitopes were characterized by an examination of the critical amino acids involved in antibody binding. Epitopes comprised primarily of hydrophobic amino acid residues, followed by polar and charged residues. The more critical amino acids appeared to be located near the centre of the epitopes, with proline, isoleucine, serine, glutamine and arginine playing an important role in the binding of antibody to the VP8 epitopes. PMID:12901721

  11. Improving Protocols for Protein Mapping through Proper Comparison to Crystallography Data

    PubMed Central

    Lexa, Katrina W.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    Computational approaches to fragment-based drug design (FBDD) can complement experiments and facilitate the identification of potential hot spots along the protein surface. However, the evaluation of computational methods for mapping binding sites frequently focuses upon the ability to reproduce crystallographic coordinates to within a low RMSD threshold. This dependency on the deposited coordinate data overlooks the original electron density from the experiment, thus techniques may be developed based upon subjective - or even erroneous - atomic coordinates. This can become a significant drawback in applications to systems where the location of hot spots is unknown. Based on comparison to crystallographic density, we previously showed that mixed-solvent molecular dynamics (MixMD) accurately identifies the active site for HEWL, with acetonitrile as an organic solvent. Here, we concentrated on the influence of protic solvent on simulation and refined the optimal MixMD approach for extrapolation of the method to systems without established sites. Our results establish an accurate approach for comparing simulations to experiment. We have outlined the most efficient strategy for MixMD, based on simulation length and number of runs. The development outlined here makes MixMD a robust method which should prove useful across a broad range of target structures. Lastly, our results with MixMD match experimental data so well that consistency between simulations and density may be a useful way to aid the identification of probes vs waters during the refinement of future MSCS crystallographic structures. PMID:23327200

  12. Improving protocols for protein mapping through proper comparison to crystallography data.

    PubMed

    Lexa, Katrina W; Carlson, Heather A

    2013-02-25

    Computational approaches to fragment-based drug design (FBDD) can complement experiments and facilitate the identification of potential hot spots along the protein surface. However, the evaluation of computational methods for mapping binding sites frequently focuses upon the ability to reproduce crystallographic coordinates to within a low RMSD threshold. This dependency on the deposited coordinate data overlooks the original electron density from the experiment, thus techniques may be developed based upon subjective-or even erroneous-atomic coordinates. This can become a significant drawback in applications to systems where the location of hot spots is unknown. On the basis of comparison to crystallographic density, we previously showed that mixed-solvent molecular dynamics (MixMD) accurately identifies the active site for HEWL, with acetonitrile as an organic solvent. Here, we concentrated on the influence of protic solvent on simulation and refined the optimal MixMD approach for extrapolation of the method to systems without established sites. Our results establish an accurate approach for comparing simulations to experiment. We have outlined the most efficient strategy for MixMD, based on simulation length and number of runs. The development outlined here makes MixMD a robust method which should prove useful across a broad range of target structures. Lastly, our results with MixMD match experimental data so well that consistency between simulations and density may be a useful way to aid the identification of probes vs waters during the refinement of future multiple solvent crystallographic structures. PMID:23327200

  13. FeatureMap3D--a tool to map protein features and sequence conservation onto homologous structures in the PDB.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Staerfeldt, Hans-Henrik; Sackett, Peter Wad; Mølgaard, Anne

    2006-07-01

    FeatureMap3D is a web-based tool that maps protein features onto 3D structures. The user provides sequences annotated with any feature of interest, such as post-translational modifications, protease cleavage sites or exonic structure and FeatureMap3D will then search the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for structures of homologous proteins. The results are displayed both as an annotated sequence alignment, where the user-provided annotations as well as the sequence conservation between the query and the target sequence are displayed, and also as a publication-quality image of the 3D protein structure with the selected features and sequence conservation enhanced. The results are also returned in a readily parsable text format as well as a PyMol (http://pymol.sourceforge.net/) script file, which allows the user to easily modify the protein structure image to suit a specific purpose. FeatureMap3D can also be used without sequence annotation, to evaluate the quality of the alignment of the input sequences to the most homologous structures in the PDB, through the sequence conservation colored 3D structure visualization tool. FeatureMap3D is available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/FeatureMap3D/. PMID:16845115

  14. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-02-27

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation.

  15. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12039.001 PMID:26920220

  16. A cDNA encoding tyrosinase-related protein maps to the brown locus in mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, I J

    1988-01-01

    A mouse melanoma cDNA clone was isolated by virtue of its reactivity with two antisera raised against tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) from two species, hamster and mouse. The cDNA (5A) cross-hybridizes with another, pMT4 [Shibahara, S., Tomita, V., Sakakura, T., Nager, C., Bhabatosh, C. & Muller, R. (1986) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 2413-2427], previously thought to encode mouse tyrosinase. Two other cDNAs, one human and one mouse, have been reported recently [Kwon, B. S., Haq, A. K., Pomerantz, S. H. & Halaban, R. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 7473-7477; and Yamamoto, H., Takeuchi, S., Kudo, T., Makino, K., Nakata, A., Shinoda, T. & Takeuchi, T. (1987) Jpn. J. Genet. 62, 271-277] as candidates for tyrosinase, and they map at or very close to the mouse albino (c) locus. The proteins they encode are very similar to each other but are distinct from (although related to) the pMT4-encoded protein. Here I use recombinant inbred strains to localize pMT4 at or close to the mouse brown (b) locus. I suggest that the gene mapping to c is the authentic tyrosinase gene, whereas that mapping to b encodes a tyrosinase-related protein. All b mutations in laboratory strains are associated with the same diagnostic Taq I fragment, suggesting that all derive from the same original mutation. I discuss possible function(s) of the tyrosinase-related protein. Images PMID:3132713

  17. Protein domain mapping by internal labeling and single particle electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Lander, Gabriel C; Nogales, Eva

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, electron microscopy (EM) and single particle analysis have emerged as essential tools for investigating the architecture of large biological complexes. When high resolution is achievable, crystal structure docking and de-novo modeling allows for precise assignment of individual protein domain sequences. However, the achievable resolution may limit the ability to do so, especially when small or flexible complexes are under study. In such cases, protein labeling has emerged as an important complementary tool to characterize domain architecture and elucidate functional mechanistic details. All labeling strategies proposed to date are either focused on the identification of the position of protein termini or require multi-step labeling strategies, potentially interfering with the final labeling efficiency. Here we describe a strategy for determining the position of internal protein domains within EM maps using a recombinant one-step labeling approach named Efficient Mapping by Internal Labeling (EMIL). EMIL takes advantage of the close spatial proximity of the GFP's N- and C-termini to generate protein chimeras containing an internal GFP at desired locations along the main protein chain. We apply this method to characterize the subunit domain localization of the human Polycomb Repressive Complex 2. PMID:26431894

  18. Chondroitinase enhances cortical map plasticity and increases functionally active sprouting axons after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Harris, Neil G; Nogueira, Marcia S M; Verley, Derek R; Sutton, Richard L

    2013-07-15

    The beneficial effect of interventions with chondroitinase ABC enzyme to reduce axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulphate side chains after central nervous system injuries has been mainly attributed to enhanced axonal sprouting. After traumatic brain injury (TBI), it is unknown whether newly sprouting axons that occur as a result of interventional strategies are able to functionally contribute to existing circuitry, and it is uncertain whether maladaptive sprouting occurs to increase the well-known risk for seizure activity after TBI. Here, we show that after a controlled cortical impact injury in rats, chondroitinase infusion into injured cortex at 30 min and 3 days reduced c-Fos⁺ cell staining resulting from the injury alone at 1 week postinjury, indicating that at baseline, abnormal spontaneous activity is likely to be reduced, not increased, with this type of intervention. c-Fos⁺ cell staining elicited by neural activity from stimulation of the affected forelimb 1 week after injury was significantly enhanced by chondroitinase, indicating a widespread effect on cortical map plasticity. Underlying this map plasticity was a larger contribution of neuronal, rather than glial cells and an absence of c-Fos⁺ cells surrounded by perineuronal nets that were normally present in stimulated naïve rats. After injury, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan digestion produced the expected increase in growth-associated protein 43-positive axons and perikarya, of which a significantly greater number were double labeled for c-Fos after intervention with chondroitinase, compared to vehicle. These data indicate that chondroitinase produces significant gains in cortical map plasticity after TBI, and that either axonal sprouting and/or changes in perineuronal nets may underlie this effect. Chondroitinase dampens, rather than increases nonspecific c-Fos activity after brain injury, and induction of axonal sprouting is not maladaptive because greater numbers are functionally

  19. Combined computational and experimental analysis reveals mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated feedback phosphorylation as a mechanism for signaling specificity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Yildirim, Necmettin; Nagiec, Michal J; Parnell, Stephen C; Errede, Beverly; Dohlman, Henrik G; Elston, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    Different environmental stimuli often use the same set of signaling proteins to achieve very different physiological outcomes. The mating and invasive growth pathways in yeast each employ a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that includes Ste20, Ste11, and Ste7. Whereas proper mating requires Ste7 activation of the MAP kinase Fus3, invasive growth requires activation of the alternate MAP kinase Kss1. To determine how MAP kinase specificity is achieved, we used a series of mathematical models to quantitatively characterize pheromone-stimulated kinase activation. In accordance with the computational analysis, MAP kinase feedback phosphorylation of Ste7 results in diminished activation of Kss1, but not Fus3. These findings reveal how feedback phosphorylation of a common pathway component can limit the activity of a competing MAP kinase through feedback phosphorylation of a common activator, and thereby promote signal fidelity. PMID:22875986

  20. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  1. Fractionation profiling: a fast and versatile approach for mapping vesicle proteomes and protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Borner, Georg H. H.; Hein, Marco Y.; Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R.; Mann, Matthias; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    We developed “fractionation profiling,” a method for rapid proteomic analysis of membrane vesicles and protein particles. The approach combines quantitative proteomics with subcellular fractionation to generate signature protein abundance distribution profiles. Functionally associated groups of proteins are revealed through cluster analysis. To validate the method, we first profiled >3500 proteins from HeLa cells and identified known clathrin-coated vesicle proteins with >90% accuracy. We then profiled >2400 proteins from Drosophila S2 cells, and we report the first comprehensive insect clathrin-coated vesicle proteome. Of importance, the cluster analysis extends to all profiled proteins and thus identifies a diverse range of known and novel cytosolic and membrane-associated protein complexes. We show that it also allows the detailed compositional characterization of complexes, including the delineation of subcomplexes and subunit stoichiometry. Our predictions are presented in an interactive database. Fractionation profiling is a universal method for defining the clathrin-coated vesicle proteome and may be adapted for the analysis of other types of vesicles and particles. In addition, it provides a versatile tool for the rapid generation of large-scale protein interaction maps. PMID:25165137

  2. A fluorescent reporter for mapping cellular protein-protein interactions in time and space.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Daniel; Neller, Joachim; Kestler, Hans A; Kraus, Johann; Dünkler, Alexander; Johnsson, Nils

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a fluorescent reporter for monitoring protein-protein interactions in living cells. The method is based on the Split-Ubiquitin method and uses the ratio of two auto-fluorescent reporter proteins as signal for interaction (SPLIFF). The mating of two haploid yeast cells initiates the analysis and the interactions are followed online by two-channel time-lapse microscopy of the diploid cells during their first cell cycle. Using this approach we could with high spatio-temporal resolution visualize the differences between the interactions of the microtubule binding protein Stu2p with two of its binding partners, monitor the transient association of a Ran-GTPase with its receptors at the nuclear pore, and distinguish between protein interactions at the polar cortical domain at different phases of polar growth. These examples further demonstrate that protein-protein interactions identified from large-scale screens can be effectively followed up by high-resolution single-cell analysis. PMID:23511205

  3. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; French, M.; Manolopoulos, S.; Tyndel, M.; Allport, P.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Hall, G.; Raymond, M.

    2003-03-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to tape. Because of the large number of pixels, data reduction is needed on the sensor itself or just outside. This brings in stringent requirements on the temporal noise as well as to the sensor uniformity, expressed as a Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN). A pixel architecture with an additional transistor is proposed. This architecture, coupled to correlated double sampling of the signal will allow cancellation of the two dominant noise sources, namely the reset or kTC noise and the FPN. A prototype has been designed in a standard 0.25 μm CMOS technology. It has also a structure for electrical calibration of the sensor. The prototype is functional and detailed tests are under way.

  4. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  5. Mapping brain activity at scale with cluster computing.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy; Vladimirov, Nikita; Kawashima, Takashi; Mu, Yu; Sofroniew, Nicholas J; Bennett, Davis V; Rosen, Joshua; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Looger, Loren L; Ahrens, Misha B

    2014-09-01

    Understanding brain function requires monitoring and interpreting the activity of large networks of neurons during behavior. Advances in recording technology are greatly increasing the size and complexity of neural data. Analyzing such data will pose a fundamental bottleneck for neuroscience. We present a library of analytical tools called Thunder built on the open-source Apache Spark platform for large-scale distributed computing. The library implements a variety of univariate and multivariate analyses with a modular, extendable structure well-suited to interactive exploration and analysis development. We demonstrate how these analyses find structure in large-scale neural data, including whole-brain light-sheet imaging data from fictively behaving larval zebrafish, and two-photon imaging data from behaving mouse. The analyses relate neuronal responses to sensory input and behavior, run in minutes or less and can be used on a private cluster or in the cloud. Our open-source framework thus holds promise for turning brain activity mapping efforts into biological insights.

  6. Phospholipases as GTPase activity accelerating proteins (GAPs) in plants.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sona

    2016-05-01

    GTPase activity accelerating proteins (GAPs) are key regulators of the G-protein signaling cycle. By facilitating effective hydrolysis of the GTP bound on Gα proteins, GAPs control the timing and amplitude of the signaling cycle and ascertain the availability of the inactive heterotrimer for the next round of activation. Until very recently, the studies of GAPs in plants were focused exclusively on the regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) protein. We now show that phospholipase Dα1 (PLDα1) is also a bona fide GAP in plants and together with the RGS protein controls the level of activeprotein. PMID:27124090

  7. Development of Potent Adenosine Monophosphate Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activators.

    PubMed

    Dokla, Eman M E; Fang, Chun-Sheng; Lai, Po-Ting; Kulp, Samuel K; Serya, Rabah A T; Ismail, Nasser S M; Abouzid, Khaled A M; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported the identification of a thiazolidinedione-based adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, compound 1 (N-[4-({3-[(1-methylcyclohexyl)methyl]-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene}methyl)phenyl]-4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide), which provided a proof of concept to delineate the intricate role of AMPK in regulating oncogenic signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. In this study, we used 1 as a scaffold to conduct lead optimization, which generated a series of derivatives. Analysis of the antiproliferative and AMPK-activating activities of individual derivatives revealed a distinct structure-activity relationship and identified 59 (N-(3-nitrophenyl)-N'-{4-[(3-{[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl}-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl]phenyl}urea) as the optimal agent. Relative to 1, compound 59 exhibits multifold higher potency in upregulating AMPK phosphorylation in various cell lines irrespective of their liver kinase B1 (LKB1) functional status, accompanied by parallel changes in the phosphorylation/expression levels of p70S6K, Akt, Foxo3a, and EMT-associated markers. Consistent with its predicted activity against tumors with activated Akt status, orally administered 59 was efficacious in suppressing the growth of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-null PC-3 xenograft tumors in nude mice. Together, these findings suggest that 59 has clinical value in therapeutic strategies for PTEN-negative cancer and warrants continued investigation in this regard.

  8. Interactome Mapping: Using Protein Microarray Technology to Reconstruct Diverse Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Uzoma, Ijeoma; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    A major focus of systems biology is to characterize interactions between cellular components, in order to develop an accurate picture of the intricate networks within biological systems. Over the past decade, protein microarrays have greatly contributed to advances in proteomics and are becoming an important platform for systems biology. Protein microarrays are highly flexible, ranging from large-scale proteome microarrays to smaller customizable microarrays, making the technology amenable for detection of a broad spectrum of biochemical properties of proteins. In this article, we will focus on the numerous studies that have utilized protein microarrays to reconstruct biological networks including protein–DNA interactions, posttranslational protein modifications (PTMs), lectin–glycan recognition, pathogen–host interactions and hierarchical signaling cascades. The diversity in applications allows for integration of interaction data from numerous molecular classes and cellular states, providing insight into the structure of complex biological systems. We will also discuss emerging applications and future directions of protein microarray technology in the global frontier. PMID:23395178

  9. Improving the Understanding of Pathogenesis of Human Papillomavirus 16 via Mapping Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yongcheng; Kuang, Qifan; Dai, Xu; Li, Rong; Wu, Yiming; Leng, Weijia; Li, Yizhou; Li, Menglong

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) has high risk to lead various cancers and afflictions, especially, the cervical cancer. Therefore, investigating the pathogenesis of HPV16 is very important for public health. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network between HPV16 and human was used as a measure to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. By adopting sequence and topological features, a support vector machine (SVM) model was built to predict new interactions between HPV16 and human proteins. All interactions were comprehensively investigated and analyzed. The analysis indicated that HPV16 enlarged its scope of influence by interacting with human proteins as much as possible. These interactions alter a broad array of cell cycle progression. Furthermore, not only was HPV16 highly prone to interact with hub proteins and bottleneck proteins, but also it could effectively affect a breadth of signaling pathways. In addition, we found that the HPV16 evolved into high carcinogenicity on the condition that its own reproduction had been ensured. Meanwhile, this work will contribute to providing potential new targets for antiviral therapeutics and help experimental research in the future. PMID:25961044

  10. Genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis protein kinases MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 indicates roles in cell expansion and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongsar, Suraphon; Strohm, Allison K; Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana genes that encode protein kinases related to cdc7p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have previously shown that the map3kε1;map3kε2 double-mutant combination causes pollen lethality. In this study, we have used an ethanol-inducible promoter construct to rescue this lethal phenotype and create map3kε1(-/-);map3kε2(-/-) double-mutant plants in order to examine the function of these genes in the sporophyte. These rescued double-mutant plants carry a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-MAP3Kε1 transgene under the control of the alcohol-inducible AlcA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. The double-mutant plants were significantly smaller and had shorter roots than wild-type when grown in the absence of ethanol treatment. Microscopic analysis indicated that cell elongation was reduced in the roots of the double-mutant plants and cell expansion was reduced in rosette leaves. Treatment with ethanol to induce expression of YFP-MAP3Kε1 largely rescued the leaf phenotypes. The double-mutant combination also caused embryos to arrest in the early stages of development. Through the use of YFP reporter constructs we determined that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are expressed during embryo development, and also in root tissue. Our results indicate that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 have roles outside of pollen development and that these genes affect several aspects of sporophyte development.

  11. Mutations in the Microtubule-Associated Protein 1A (Map1a) Gene Cause Purkinje Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Lee, Jeong Woong

    2015-01-01

    The structural microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are critical for the organization of neuronal microtubules (MTs). Microtubule-associated protein 1A (MAP1A) is one of the most abundantly expressed MAPs in the mammalian brain. However, its in vivo function remains largely unknown. Here we describe a spontaneous mouse mutation, nm2719, which causes tremors, ataxia, and loss of cerebellar Purkinje neurons in aged homozygous mice. The nm2719 mutation disrupts the Map1a gene. We show that targeted deletion of mouse Map1a gene leads to similar neurodegenerative defects. Before neuron death, Map1a mutant Purkinje cells exhibited abnormal focal swellings of dendritic shafts and disruptions in axon initial segment (AIS) morphology. Furthermore, the MT network was reduced in the somatodendritic and AIS compartments, and both the heavy and light chains of MAP1B, another brain-enriched MAP, was aberrantly distributed in the soma and dendrites of mutant Purkinje cells. MAP1A has been reported to bind to the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) scaffolding proteins, as well as to MTs. Indeed, PSD-93, the MAGUK specifically enriched in Purkinje cells, was reduced in Map1a−/− Purkinje cells. These results demonstrate that MAP1A functions to maintain both the neuronal MT network and the level of PSD-93 in neurons of the mammalian brain. PMID:25788676

  12. Microtubule-associated proteins 1 (MAP1) promote human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) intracytoplasmic routing to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Juliette; Portilho, Débora M; Danckaert, Anne; Munier, Sandie; Becker, Andreas; Roux, Pascal; Zambo, Anaba; Shorte, Spencer; Jacob, Yves; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Charneau, Pierre; Clavel, François; Arhel, Nathalie J

    2015-02-20

    After cell entry, HIV undergoes rapid transport toward the nucleus using microtubules and microfilaments. Neither the cellular cytoplasmic components nor the viral proteins that interact to mediate transport have yet been identified. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified four cytoskeletal components as putative interaction partners for HIV-1 p24 capsid protein: MAP1A, MAP1S, CKAP1, and WIRE. Depletion of MAP1A/MAP1S in indicator cell lines and primary human macrophages led to a profound reduction in HIV-1 infectivity as a result of impaired retrograde trafficking, demonstrated by a characteristic accumulation of capsids away from the nuclear membrane, and an overall defect in nuclear import. MAP1A/MAP1S did not impact microtubule network integrity or cell morphology but contributed to microtubule stabilization, which was shown previously to facilitate infection. In addition, we found that MAP1 proteins interact with HIV-1 cores both in vitro and in infected cells and that interaction involves MAP1 light chain LC2. Depletion of MAP1 proteins reduced the association of HIV-1 capsids with both dynamic and stable microtubules, suggesting that MAP1 proteins help tether incoming viral capsids to the microtubular network, thus promoting cytoplasmic trafficking. This work shows for the first time that following entry into target cells, HIV-1 interacts with the cytoskeleton via its p24 capsid protein. Moreover, our results support a role for MAP1 proteins in promoting efficient retrograde trafficking of HIV-1 by stimulating the formation of stable microtubules and mediating the association of HIV-1 cores with microtubules.

  13. Microtubule-associated Proteins 1 (MAP1) Promote Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1) Intracytoplasmic Routing to the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Juliette; Portilho, Débora M.; Danckaert, Anne; Munier, Sandie; Becker, Andreas; Roux, Pascal; Zambo, Anaba; Shorte, Spencer; Jacob, Yves; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Charneau, Pierre; Clavel, François; Arhel, Nathalie J.

    2015-01-01

    After cell entry, HIV undergoes rapid transport toward the nucleus using microtubules and microfilaments. Neither the cellular cytoplasmic components nor the viral proteins that interact to mediate transport have yet been identified. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified four cytoskeletal components as putative interaction partners for HIV-1 p24 capsid protein: MAP1A, MAP1S, CKAP1, and WIRE. Depletion of MAP1A/MAP1S in indicator cell lines and primary human macrophages led to a profound reduction in HIV-1 infectivity as a result of impaired retrograde trafficking, demonstrated by a characteristic accumulation of capsids away from the nuclear membrane, and an overall defect in nuclear import. MAP1A/MAP1S did not impact microtubule network integrity or cell morphology but contributed to microtubule stabilization, which was shown previously to facilitate infection. In addition, we found that MAP1 proteins interact with HIV-1 cores both in vitro and in infected cells and that interaction involves MAP1 light chain LC2. Depletion of MAP1 proteins reduced the association of HIV-1 capsids with both dynamic and stable microtubules, suggesting that MAP1 proteins help tether incoming viral capsids to the microtubular network, thus promoting cytoplasmic trafficking. This work shows for the first time that following entry into target cells, HIV-1 interacts with the cytoskeleton via its p24 capsid protein. Moreover, our results support a role for MAP1 proteins in promoting efficient retrograde trafficking of HIV-1 by stimulating the formation of stable microtubules and mediating the association of HIV-1 cores with microtubules. PMID:25505242

  14. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  15. Fully human MAP-fusion protein selectively targets and eliminates proliferating CD64(+) M1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Mladenov, Radoslav; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Thepen, Theo

    2016-05-01

    Classical immunotoxins compromise a binding component (for example, a ligand, antibody or fragment thereof) and a cytotoxic component, usually derived from bacteria or plants (for example, Pseudomonas exotoxin A or ricin). Despite successful testing in vitro, the clinical development of immunotoxins has been hampered by immunogenicity and unsatisfactory safety profiles. Therefore, research has focused on fully human pro-apoptotic components suitable for the development of cytolytic fusion proteins (CFP). We recently reported that human microtubule-associated protein tau (MAP) can induce apoptosis when delivered to rapidly proliferating cancer cells. Here, we describe a new fully human CFP called H22(scFv)-MAP, which specifically targets CD64(+) cells. We show that H22(scFv)-MAP can efficiently kill proliferating HL-60 pro-monocytic cells in vitro. In addition, the human CFP specifically eliminates polarized M1 macrophages in a transgenic mouse model of cutaneous chronic inflammation. Because M1 macrophages promote the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases, targeting this cell population with H22(scFv)-MAP could help to treat diseases such as atopic dermatitis, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. High-Resolution Sequence-Function Mapping of Full-Length Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kowalsky, Caitlin A.; Klesmith, Justin R.; Stapleton, James A.; Kelly, Vince; Reichkitzer, Nolan; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive sequence-function mapping involves detailing the fitness contribution of every possible single mutation to a gene by comparing the abundance of each library variant before and after selection for the phenotype of interest. Deep sequencing of library DNA allows frequency reconstruction for tens of thousands of variants in a single experiment, yet short read lengths of current sequencers makes it challenging to probe genes encoding full-length proteins. Here we extend the scope of sequence-function maps to entire protein sequences with a modular, universal sequence tiling method. We demonstrate the approach with both growth-based selections and FACS screening, offer parameters and best practices that simplify design of experiments, and present analytical solutions to normalize data across independent selections. Using this protocol, sequence-function maps covering full sequences can be obtained in four to six weeks. Best practices introduced in this manuscript are fully compatible with, and complementary to, other recently published sequence-function mapping protocols. PMID:25790064

  17. Automated two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for mapping proteins in highly complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Isobe, T; Uchida, K; Taoka, M; Shinkai, F; Manabe, T; Okuyama, T

    1991-12-27

    An automated two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system was developed for systematic protein separations which could serve for analytical mapping and preparative separations of proteins. The system applies the principles of the column-switching technique, and consists of two different columns connected in tandem through an electrical column switching valve, two pumping systems to operate each column independently and a system controller to perform sequential chromatography on the two columns. A protein mixture is applied to the first-dimensional anion-exchange column and is separated by stepwise elution with an increasing sodium chloride concentration. The eluent is introduced directly to the second-dimensional reversed-phase column, and is further separated by gradient elution with an increasing acetonitrile concentration. The two elution stages are synchronized by a computer program. By this system, very complex protein mixtures such as crude cerebellar extracts were resolved reproducibly into ca. 200 peaks within 12 h. The method can be used for the total analysis of proteins in various tissues and cells without complicated premanupulation of samples, and allows the simultaneous analysis of a protein isolated by chromatography. The isolated protein is most suitable for use in the strategy of protein and gene sequence analysis.

  18. Mapping Protein-Ligand Interactions with Proteolytic Fragmentation, Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Elyssia S; Hudgens, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    Biological processes are the result of noncovalent, protein-ligand interactions, where the ligands range from small organic and inorganic molecules to lipids, nucleic acids, peptides, and proteins. Amide groups within proteins constantly exchange protons with water. When immersed in heavy water (D2O), mass spectrometry (MS) can measure the change of mass associated with the hydrogen to deuterium exchange (HDX). Protein-ligand interactions modify the hydrogen exchange rates of amide protons, and the measurement of the amide exchange rates can provide rich information regarding the dynamical structure of the protein-ligand complex. This chapter describes a protocol for conducting bottom-up, continuous uptake, proteolytic fragmentation HDX-MS experiments that can help identify and map the interacting peptides of a protein-ligand interface. This tutorial outlines the fundamental theory governing hydrogen exchange; provides practical information regarding the preparation of protein samples and solutions; and describes the exchange reaction, reaction quenching, enzymatic digestion, chromatographic separation, and peptide analysis by MS. Tables list representative combinations of fluidic components used by HDX-MS researchers and summarize the available HDX-MS analysis software packages. Additionally, two HDX-MS case studies are used to illustrate protein-ligand interactions involving: (1) a continuous sequence of interacting residues and (2) a set of discontinuously numbered residues, residing spatially near each other.

  19. Structural analysis and mapping of individual protein complexes by infrared nanospectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amenabar, Iban; Poly, Simon; Nuansing, Wiwat; Hubrich, Elmar H.; Govyadinov, Alexander A.; Huth, Florian; Krutokhvostov, Roman; Zhang, Lianbing; Knez, Mato; Heberle, Joachim; Bittner, Alexander M.; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a widely used tool for material identification and secondary structure analysis in chemistry, biology and biochemistry. However, the diffraction limit prevents nanoscale protein studies. Here we introduce mapping of protein structure with 30 nm lateral resolution and sensitivity to individual protein complexes by Fourier transform infrared nanospectroscopy (nano-FTIR). We present local broadband spectra of one virus, ferritin complexes, purple membranes and insulin aggregates, which can be interpreted in terms of their α-helical and/or β-sheet structure. Applying nano-FTIR for studying insulin fibrils—a model system widely used in neurodegenerative disease research—we find clear evidence that 3-nm-thin amyloid-like fibrils contain a large amount of α-helical structure. This reveals the surprisingly high level of protein organization in the fibril’s periphery, which might explain why fibrils associate. We envision a wide application potential of nano-FTIR, including cellular receptor in vitro mapping and analysis of proteins within quaternary structures. PMID:24301518

  20. Mapping of Protein–Protein Interaction Sites by the ‘Absence of Interference’ Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Laser, Heike; Reinhardt, Richard; Jia, Da; Cheng, Xiaodong; Jeltsch, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are critical to most biological processes, and locating protein–protein interfaces on protein structures is an important task in molecular biology. We developed a new experimental strategy called the ‘absence of interference’ approach to determine surface residues involved in protein–protein interaction of established yeast two-hybrid pairs of interacting proteins. One of the proteins is subjected to high-level randomization by error-prone PCR. The resulting library is selected by yeast two-hybrid system for interacting clones that are isolated and sequenced. The interaction region can be identified by an absence or depletion of mutations. For data analysis and presentation, we developed a Web interface that analyzes the mutational spectrum and displays the mutational frequency on the surface of the structure (or a structural model) of the randomized protein†. Additionally, this interface might be of use for the display of mutational distributions determined by other types of random mutagenesis experiments. We applied the approach to map the interface of the catalytic domain of the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a with its regulatory factor Dnmt3L. Dnmt3a was randomized with high mutational load. A total of 76 interacting clones were isolated and sequenced, and 648 mutations were identified. The mutational pattern allowed to identify a unique interaction region on the surface of Dnmt3a, which comprises about 500−600 Å2. The results were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and structural analysis. The absence-of-interference approach will allow high-throughput mapping of protein interaction sites suitable for functional studies and protein docking. PMID:18191145

  1. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  2. Boosting AthaMap Database Content with Data from Protein Binding Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Reinhard; Norval, Leo; Romanov, Artyom; Bülow, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and small RNA target sites for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. With the advent of protein binding microarrays (PBM), the number of known TFBS for A. thaliana transcription factors (TFs) has increased dramatically. Using 113 positional weight matrices (PWMs) generated from a single PBM study and representing a total number of 68 different TFs, the number of predicted TFBS in AthaMap was now increased by about 3.8 × 10(7) to 4.9 × 10(7). The number of TFs with PWM-predicted TFBS annotated in AthaMap has increased to 126, representing a total of 29 TF families and newly including ARF, AT-Hook, YABBY, LOB/AS2 and SRS. Furthermore, links from all Arabidopsis TFs and genes to the newly established Arabidopsis Information Portal (AIP) have been implemented. With this qualitative and quantitative update, the improved AthaMap increases its value as a resource for the analysis of A. thaliana gene expression regulation at www.athamap.de. PMID:26542109

  3. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway triggers B16 melanoma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Englaro, W; Bertolotto, C; Buscà, R; Brunet, A; Pagès, G; Ortonne, J P; Ballotti, R

    1998-04-17

    In B16 melanoma cells, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated during cAMP-induced melanogenesis (Englaro, W., Rezzonico, R., Durand-Clément, M., Lallemand, D., Ortonne, J. P., and Ballotti, R. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 24315-24320). To establish the role of the MAP kinases in melanogenesis, we studied the effects of a specific MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD 98059 on different melanogenic parameters. We showed that PD 98059 inhibits the activation of MAP kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 by cAMP, but does not impair the effects of cAMP either on the morphological differentiation, characterized by an increase in dendrite outgrowth, or on the up-regulation of tyrosinase that is the key enzyme in melanogenesis. On the contrary, PD 98059 promotes by itself cell dendricity and increases the tyrosinase amount and activity. Moreover, down-regulation of the MAP kinase pathway by PD 98059, or with dominant negative mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, triggers a stimulation of the tyrosinase promoter activity and enhances the effect of cAMP on this parameter. Conversely, activation of the MAP kinase pathway, using constitutive active mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, leads to an inhibition of basal and cAMP-induced tyrosinase gene transcription. These results demonstrate that the MAP kinase pathway activation is not required for cAMP-induced melanogenesis. Furthermore, the inhibition of this pathway induces B16 melanoma cell differentiation, while a sustained activation impairs the melanogenic effect of cAMP-elevating agents. PMID:9545341

  4. Comparative analysis of the activation of MAP/ERK kinases in the CNS of animals with different learning abilities.

    PubMed

    Grinkevich, L N; Lisachev, P D; Baranova, K A; Kharchenko, O A

    2007-09-01

    Western blot analysis was used to study the activation of MAP/ERK protein kinases responsible for controlling gene expression via phosphorylation of transcription factors CREB and ELK-1 in native common snails and animals with impaired abilities to form long-term types of conditioned aversive reflexes. Different periods of the formation of this reflex were found to be characterized by different levels of activation of MAP-ERK kinases. The extents of activation of MAP-ERK kinase cascade were different in ganglia (parietal-visceral, cerebral, and pedal) with different roles in the formation of this reflex. The dynamics of activation showed a wavelike nature, with peaks at 10 min and 4 h. Administration of the neurotoxin 5,7-DHT, which induces dysfunction of serotonin terminals and decreases the ability to acquire this type of learning, led to significant decreases in activation of the MAP-ERK kinase cascade at the early stages of learning, which is evidence for an important role for the serotoninergic system in inducing this cascade. Activation of the MAP/ERK kinase cascade 4 h after training was seen both in native and DHT-treated animals, which is probably evidence for activation of non-specific adaptive processes in response to the sensitizing unconditioned stimulus. Thus, the MAP/ERK kinase intracellular regulatory cascade, which plays an important role in the survival of neurons, the regeneration of neuron processes, and synaptic sprouting, also plays an important role in forming the serotonin-dependent food-aversive reflex in the common snail.

  5. Characterization of murine BATF: a negative regulator of activator protein-1 activity in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Williams, K L; Nanda, I; Lyons, G E; Kuo, C T; Schmid, M; Leiden, J M; Kaplan, M H; Taparowsky, E J

    2001-05-01

    BATF belongs to the AP-1/ATF superfamily of transcription factors and forms heterodimers with Jun proteins to bind AP-1 consensus DNA. Unlike Fos/Jun heterodimers which stimulate gene transcription, BATF/Jun heterodimers are transcriptionally inert and inhibit biological processes that are associated with the overstimulation of AP-1 activity. Here, we describe the murine BATF cDNA and genomic clones and map the BATF locus to chromosome 12 D2-3. Using in situ hybridization of BATF mRNA, we show that BATF gene expression is highly restricted, with the most prominent signals detected in the thymus. BATF mRNA levels are regulated differentially during discrete stages of T cell development and are up-regulated following activation of T cells in the periphery. To demonstrate the impact of BATF on AP-1 activity in vivo, AP-1 luciferase reporter mice were crossed to transgenic mice overexpressing BATF exclusively in thymic T cells. Results show that elevated levels of BATF protein correlate with reduced transactivation by AP-1. Since the differential regulation of AP-1 activity is linked to key transitions in the developing immune system, our observations support a critical role for BATF in determining the overall level of AP-1 activity, and thus AP-1 target gene expression, in specific T cell subtypes.

  6. Areas activated during naturalistic reading comprehension overlap topological visual, auditory, and somatotomotor maps.

    PubMed

    Sood, Mariam R; Sereno, Martin I

    2016-08-01

    Cortical mapping techniques using fMRI have been instrumental in identifying the boundaries of topological (neighbor-preserving) maps in early sensory areas. The presence of topological maps beyond early sensory areas raises the possibility that they might play a significant role in other cognitive systems, and that topological mapping might help to delineate areas involved in higher cognitive processes. In this study, we combine surface-based visual, auditory, and somatomotor mapping methods with a naturalistic reading comprehension task in the same group of subjects to provide a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the cortical overlap between sensory-motor maps in all major sensory modalities, and reading processing regions. Our results suggest that cortical activation during naturalistic reading comprehension overlaps more extensively with topological sensory-motor maps than has been heretofore appreciated. Reading activation in regions adjacent to occipital lobe and inferior parietal lobe almost completely overlaps visual maps, whereas a significant portion of frontal activation for reading in dorsolateral and ventral prefrontal cortex overlaps both visual and auditory maps. Even classical language regions in superior temporal cortex are partially overlapped by topological visual and auditory maps. By contrast, the main overlap with somatomotor maps is restricted to a small region on the anterior bank of the central sulcus near the border between the face and hand representations of M-I. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2784-2810, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Areas activated during naturalistic reading comprehension overlap topological visual, auditory, and somatotomotor maps.

    PubMed

    Sood, Mariam R; Sereno, Martin I

    2016-08-01

    Cortical mapping techniques using fMRI have been instrumental in identifying the boundaries of topological (neighbor-preserving) maps in early sensory areas. The presence of topological maps beyond early sensory areas raises the possibility that they might play a significant role in other cognitive systems, and that topological mapping might help to delineate areas involved in higher cognitive processes. In this study, we combine surface-based visual, auditory, and somatomotor mapping methods with a naturalistic reading comprehension task in the same group of subjects to provide a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the cortical overlap between sensory-motor maps in all major sensory modalities, and reading processing regions. Our results suggest that cortical activation during naturalistic reading comprehension overlaps more extensively with topological sensory-motor maps than has been heretofore appreciated. Reading activation in regions adjacent to occipital lobe and inferior parietal lobe almost completely overlaps visual maps, whereas a significant portion of frontal activation for reading in dorsolateral and ventral prefrontal cortex overlaps both visual and auditory maps. Even classical language regions in superior temporal cortex are partially overlapped by topological visual and auditory maps. By contrast, the main overlap with somatomotor maps is restricted to a small region on the anterior bank of the central sulcus near the border between the face and hand representations of M-I. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2784-2810, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061771

  8. Areas activated during naturalistic reading comprehension overlap topological visual, auditory, and somatotomotor maps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical mapping techniques using fMRI have been instrumental in identifying the boundaries of topological (neighbor‐preserving) maps in early sensory areas. The presence of topological maps beyond early sensory areas raises the possibility that they might play a significant role in other cognitive systems, and that topological mapping might help to delineate areas involved in higher cognitive processes. In this study, we combine surface‐based visual, auditory, and somatomotor mapping methods with a naturalistic reading comprehension task in the same group of subjects to provide a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the cortical overlap between sensory‐motor maps in all major sensory modalities, and reading processing regions. Our results suggest that cortical activation during naturalistic reading comprehension overlaps more extensively with topological sensory‐motor maps than has been heretofore appreciated. Reading activation in regions adjacent to occipital lobe and inferior parietal lobe almost completely overlaps visual maps, whereas a significant portion of frontal activation for reading in dorsolateral and ventral prefrontal cortex overlaps both visual and auditory maps. Even classical language regions in superior temporal cortex are partially overlapped by topological visual and auditory maps. By contrast, the main overlap with somatomotor maps is restricted to a small region on the anterior bank of the central sulcus near the border between the face and hand representations of M‐I. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2784–2810, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061771

  9. A Framework of Active Learning by Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wang-Kun; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a student-centered teaching model based on concept mapping and problem-solving. The concept map is used as a tool to develop curriculum and evaluate teaching performance. Case-based teaching was implemented on the course of building energy conservation. The results of this study, which include teaching plans, evaluation tools,…

  10. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Knoch, Eva; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Geshi, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/) involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development. PMID:24966860

  11. Mapping Epileptic Activity: Sources or Networks for the Clinicians?

    PubMed Central

    Pittau, Francesca; Mégevand, Pierre; Sheybani, Laurent; Abela, Eugenio; Grouiller, Frédéric; Spinelli, Laurent; Michel, Christoph M.; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures of focal origin are classically considered to arise from a focal epileptogenic zone and then spread to other brain regions. This is a key concept for semiological electro-clinical correlations, localization of relevant structural lesions, and selection of patients for epilepsy surgery. Recent development in neuro-imaging and electro-physiology and combinations, thereof, have been validated as contributory tools for focus localization. In parallel, these techniques have revealed that widespread networks of brain regions, rather than a single epileptogenic region, are implicated in focal epileptic activity. Sophisticated multimodal imaging and analysis strategies of brain connectivity patterns have been developed to characterize the spatio-temporal relationships within these networks by combining the strength of both techniques to optimize spatial and temporal resolution with whole-brain coverage and directional connectivity. In this paper, we review the potential clinical contribution of these functional mapping techniques as well as invasive electrophysiology in human beings and animal models for characterizing network connectivity. PMID:25414692

  12. Role of the stress-activated protein kinases in endothelin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Choukroun, G; Hajjar, R; Kyriakis, J M; Bonventre, J V; Rosenzweig, A; Force, T

    1998-01-01

    The signal transduction pathways governing the hypertrophic response of cardiomyocytes are not well defined. Constitutive activation of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) family of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases or another stress-response MAP kinase, p38, by overexpression of activated mutants of various components of the pathways is sufficient to induce a hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes, but it is not clear what role these pathways play in the response to physiologically relevant hypertrophic stimuli. To determine the role of the SAPKs in the hypertrophic response, we used adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of SAPK/ERK kinase-1 (KR) [SEK-1(KR)], a dominant inhibitory mutant of SEK-1, the immediate upstream activator of the SAPKs, to block signal transmission down the SAPK pathway in response to the potent hypertrophic agent, endothelin-1 (ET-1). SEK-1(KR) completely inhibited ET-1-induced SAPK activation without affecting activation of the other MAP kinases implicated in the hypertrophic response, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK)-1/ERK-2. Expression of SEK-1(KR) markedly inhibited the ET-1-induced increase in protein synthesis. In contrast, the MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor, PD98059, which blocks ERK activation, and the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, had no effect on ET-1-induced protein synthesis. ET-1 also induced a significant increase in atrial natriuretic factor mRNA expression as well as in the percentage of cells with highly organized sarcomeres, responses which were also blocked by expression of SEK-1(KR). In summary, inhibiting activation of the SAPK pathway abrogated the hypertrophic response to ET-1. These data are the first demonstration that the SAPKs are necessary for the development of agonist-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and suggest that in response to ET-1, they transduce critical signals governing the hypertrophic response. PMID:9769323

  13. Global mapping of herpesvirus-host protein complexes reveals a novel transcription strategy for late genes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zoe H.; Verschueren, Erik; Jang, Gwendolyn M.; Kleffman, Kevin; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Park, Jimin; Von Dollen, John; Maher, M. Cyrus; Johnson, Tasha; Newton, William; Jäger, Stefanie; Shales, Michael; Horner, Julie; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mapping host-pathogen interactions has proven instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate host machinery and how numerous cellular processes are regulated. DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have relatively large coding capacity and thus can target an extensive network of cellular proteins. To identify the host proteins hijacked by this pathogen, we systematically affinity tagged and purified all 89 proteins of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from human cells. Mass spectrometry of this material identified over 500 virus-host interactions. KSHV causes AIDS-associated cancers and its interaction network is enriched for proteins linked to cancer and overlaps with proteins that are also targeted by HIV-1. We found that the conserved KSHV protein ORF24 binds to RNA polymerase II and brings it to viral late promoters by mimicking and replacing cellular TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). This is required for herpesviral late gene expression, a complex and poorly understood phase of the viral lifecycle. PMID:25544563

  14. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  15. Observation of microtubule-based motor protein activity.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Roger D

    2015-02-01

    It is possible to detect the presence of motor proteins that have the ability to translocate particles along microtubules. The two procedures described here were developed to detect microtubule-dependent motor protein activity in cell lysates or of purified proteins. In the first procedure, latex beads bound to the putative motor protein are assayed for their ability to translocate along microtubules in an ATP-dependent fashion. If motor protein activity is present, it will bind to the beads and translocate them unidirectionally along the microtubules. In the second procedure, motor proteins induce microtubule gliding over a glass coverslip surface that is coated with active motor protein. Because the mass of a microtubule is negligible compared to that of a coverslip or slide, the microtubule glides over the glass surface when the surface is coated with active motor protein. Also included here are descriptions of assays designed to determine the directionality of movement of microtubule-based motor proteins. PMID:25646501

  16. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the signal-transduction pathways of the soya bean oxidative burst.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A T; Kim, J; Low, P S

    2001-01-01

    The oxidative burst constitutes one of the most rapid defence responses characterized in the Plant Kingdom. We have observed that four distinct elicitors of the soya bean oxidative burst activate kinases of masses approximately 44 kDa and approximately 47 kDa. Evidence that these kinases regulate production of reactive oxygen species include: (i) their rapid activation by oxidative burst elicitors, (ii) their tight temporal correlation between activation/deactivation of the kinases and activation/deactivation of the oxidative burst, (iii) the identical pharmacological profile of kinase activation and oxidant production for 13 commonly used inhibitors, and (iv) the autologous activation of both kinases and oxidant production by calyculin A and cantharidin, two phosphatase inhibitors. Immunological and biochemical studies reveal that the activated 44 kDa and 47 kDa kinases are mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members. The kinases prefer myelin basic protein as a substrate, and they phosphorylate primarily on threonine residues. The kinases are themselves phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, and this phosphorylation is required for activity. Finally, both kinases are recognized by an antibody against activated MAP kinase immediately after (but not before) cell stimulation by elicitors. Based on these and other observations, a preliminary sequence of signalling steps linking elicitor stimulation, kinase activation and Ca(2+) entry, to initiation of oxidant production, is proposed. PMID:11311144

  17. The inducible G protein-coupled receptor edg-1 signals via the G(i)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Evans, M; Hla, T

    1996-05-10

    The edg-1 gene encodes an inducible G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) homologue that is induced during the in vitro differentiation of human endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the G protein-coupling and -signaling properties of the edg-1 polypeptide. The third cytosolic loop (i3) of edg-1 associates with G(i) alpha and G(o) alpha polypeptides in a guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate)-sensitive manner. Immunoprecipitation of the edg-1 polypeptide in transfected cells results in the co-precipitation of G(i) alpha 1 and G(i) alpha 3 polypeptides. These data strongly suggest that edg-1 is capable of coupling to the Gi pathway. Overexpression of the edg-1 GPR in human embryonic kidney 293 cells results in the sustained activation of the MAP kinase activity that is blocked by pertussis toxin treatment. Moreover, NIH3T3 cells permanently transfected with edg-1 exhibit enhanced MAP kinase and phospholipase A2 activities. These data suggest that the G(i)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is a major signaling pathway regulated by the orphan receptor edg-1. PMID:8626678

  18. Improving the Accuracy of Fitted Atomic Models in Cryo-EM Density Maps of Protein Assemblies Using Evolutionary Information from Aligned Homologous Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, Ramachandran; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) has become an important technique to obtain structural insights into large macromolecular assemblies. However the resolution of the density maps do not allow for its interpretation at atomic level. Hence they are combined with high resolution structures along with information from other experimental or bioinformatics techniques to obtain pseudo-atomic models. Here, we describe the use of evolutionary conservation of residues as obtained from protein structures and alignments of homologous proteins to detect errors in the fitting of atomic structures as well as improve accuracy of the protein-protein interfacial regions in the cryo-EM density maps.

  19. The p38/RK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway regulates interleukin-6 synthesis response to tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Beyaert, R; Cuenda, A; Vanden Berghe, W; Plaisance, S; Lee, J C; Haegeman, G; Cohen, P; Fiers, W

    1996-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, the activities of which include effects on gene expression, cell growth and cell death. The biological signalling mechanisms which are responsible for these TNF effects remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the stress-responsive p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is involved in TNF-induced cytokine expression. TNF Treatment of cell activated the p38 MAP kinase pathway, as revealed by increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase itself, activation of the substrate protein MAPKAP kinase-2, and culminating in the phosphorylation of the heat shock protein 27 (hsp27). Pretreatment of cells with the highly specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 completely blocked this TNF-induced activation of MAPKAP kinase-2 and hsp27 phosphorylation. Under the same conditions, SB203580 also completely inhibited TNF-induced synthesis of interleukin (IL)-6 and expression of a reporter gene that was driven by a minimal promoter containing two NF-Kappa B elements. However, neither TNF-induced DNA binding of TNF-Kappa B nor TNF-induced phosphorylation of its subunits was modulated by SB203580, suggesting that NF-Kappa B is not a direct target for the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Interestingly, TNF-induced cytotoxicity was not affected by SB203580, indicating that p38 MAP kinase might be an interesting target to interfere selectively with TNF-induced gene activation. Images PMID:8617238

  20. Double-Stranded RNA-Induced Activation of Activating Protein-1 Promoter Is Differentially Regulated by the Non-structural Protein 1 of Avian Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zohari, Siamak; Belák, Sándor; Berg, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses is a multifunctional protein that antagonizes the host immune response by interfering with several host signaling pathways. Based on putative amino acid sequences, NS1 proteins are categorized into two gene pools, allele A and allele B. Here we identified that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are able to inhibit double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced activating protein-1 (AP-1) promoter in cultured cell lines (human A549 and mink lung cells). Allele B NS1 proteins from corresponding subtypes of influenza A viruses are weak in this inhibition, despite significant levels of expression of each NS1 protein in human A549 cells. Furthermore, the capability to inhibit AP-1 promoter was mapped in the effector domain, since RNA binding domain alone lost its ability to inhibit this promoter activation. Chimeric forms of NS1 protein, composed of either RNA binding domain of allele A or B and effector domain of allele A or B, showed comparable inhibition to that of their wild-type NS1 proteins, or to the effector domain of corresponding NS1 proteins. Both alleles A and B NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 were expressed to significant levels, and were localized predominantly in the nucleus of human A549 cells. These results underscore the importance of the effector domain in inhibiting AP-1 promoter activation, and the biological function of the effector domain in stabilizing the RNA binding domain. Further, we revealed the versatile nature of NS1 in inhibiting the AP-1 transcription factor, in a manner dependent on allele type. Comprehensive studies, focusing on the molecular mechanisms behind this differential inhibition, may facilitate exploration of the zoonotic and pathogenic potential of influenza A viruses. PMID:22239235

  1. Discovery and Fine Mapping of Serum Protein Loci through Transethnic Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Nora; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Prins, Bram P.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Karakas, Mahir; Eckfeldt, John H.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Kopp, Jeffrey; Vaez, Ahmad; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Baumert, Jens; Boraska, Vesna; Broer, Linda; Hayward, Caroline; Ngwa, Julius S.; Okada, Yukinori; Polasek, Ozren; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wang, Ying A.; Del Greco M., Fabiola; Glazer, Nicole L.; Kapur, Karen; Kema, Ido P.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Schillert, Arne; Smith, Albert V.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Zgaga, Lina; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bergmann, Sven; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Chen, Y.D.; Davies, Gail; Dehghan, Abbas; Ding, Jingzhong; Doering, Angela; Durda, J. Peter; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H.; Franke, Lude; Gunjaca, Grog; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraja, Aldi; Kubo, Michiaki; Lackner, Karl J.; Launer, Lenore; Loehr, Laura R.; Li, Guo; Meisinger, Christa; Nakamura, Yusuke; Schwienbacher, Christine; Starr, John M.; Takahashi, Atsushi; Torlak, Vesela; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vitart, Veronique; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wild, Philipp S.; Kirin, Mirna; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zhang, Qunyuan; Ziegler, Andreas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Campbell, Harry; Deary, Ian J.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Koenig, Wolfgang; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Fox, Caroline S.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiner, Alex P.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Snieder, Harold; Tanaka, Toshihiro; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wright, Alan F.; Wu, Qingyu; Liu, Yongmei; Jenny, Nancy S.; North, Kari E.; Felix, Janine F.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Perry, John R.B.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Many disorders are associated with altered serum protein concentrations, including malnutrition, cancer, and cardiovascular, kidney, and inflammatory diseases. Although these protein concentrations are highly heritable, relatively little is known about their underlying genetic determinants. Through transethnic meta-analysis of European-ancestry and Japanese genome-wide association studies, we identified six loci at genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10−8) for serum albumin (HPN-SCN1B, GCKR-FNDC4, SERPINF2-WDR81, TNFRSF11A-ZCCHC2, FRMD5-WDR76, and RPS11-FCGRT, in up to 53,190 European-ancestry and 9,380 Japanese individuals) and three loci for total protein (TNFRS13B, 6q21.3, and ELL2, in up to 25,539 European-ancestry and 10,168 Japanese individuals). We observed little evidence of heterogeneity in allelic effects at these loci between groups of European and Japanese ancestry but obtained substantial improvements in the resolution of fine mapping of potential causal variants by leveraging transethnic differences in the distribution of linkage disequilibrium. We demonstrated a functional role for the most strongly associated serum albumin locus, HPN, for which Hpn knockout mice manifest low plasma albumin concentrations. Other loci associated with serum albumin harbor genes related to ribosome function, protein translation, and proteasomal degradation, whereas those associated with serum total protein include genes related to immune function. Our results highlight the advantages of transethnic meta-analysis for the discovery and fine mapping of complex trait loci and have provided initial insights into the underlying genetic architecture of serum protein concentrations and their association with human disease. PMID:23022100

  2. [Mapping of the B Cell Neutralizing Epitopes on ED III of Envelope Protein from Dengue Virus].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yaying; Wen, Kun; Guo, Yonghui; Qiu, Liwen; Pan, Yuxian; Yu, Lan; Di, Biao; Chen, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) envelope [E] protein is the major surface protein of the virions that indued neutralizing antibodies. The domain III of envelope protein (EDIII) is an immunogenic region that holds potential for the development of vaccines; however, the epitopes of DENV EDIII, especially neutralizing B-cell linear epitopes, have not been comprehensively mapped. We mapped neutralizing B-cell linear epitopes on DENV-1 EDIII using 27 monoclonal antibodies against DENV-1 EDIII proteins from mice immunized with the DENV-1 EDIII. Epitope recognition analysis was performed using two set of sequential overlapping peptides (16m and 12m) that spanned the entire EDIII protein from DENV-1, respectively. This strategy identified a DENV-1 type- specific and a group-specific neutralizing epitope, which were highly conserved among isolates of DENV-1 and the four DENV serotypes and located at two regions from DENV-1 E, namely amino acid residues 309-320 and 381-392(aa 309-320 and 381-392), respectively. aa310 -319(310KEVAETQHGT319)was similar among the four DENV serotypes and contact residues on aa 309 -320 from E protein were defined and found that substitution of residues E309 , V312, A313 and V320 in DENV-2, -3, -4 isolates were antigenically silent. We also identified a DENV-1 type-specific strain-restricted neutralizing epitope, which was located at the region from DENV-1 E, namely amino acid residues 329-348 . These novel type- and group-specific B-cell epitopes of DENV EDIII may aid help us elucidate the dengue pathogenesis and accelerate vaccine design. PMID:26951013

  3. Activity landscape modeling of PPAR ligands with dual-activity difference maps.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Pérez-Villanueva, Jaime; Castillo, Rafael; Medina-Franco, José L

    2012-06-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes offers a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and metabolic diseases. Selective and dual PPAR agonists have been developed and the systematic characterization of their structure-activity relationships (SAR) is of major significance. Herein, we report a systematic description of the SAR of 168 compounds screened against the three PPAR subtypes using the principles of activity landscape modeling. As part of our effort to develop and apply chemoinformatic tools to navigate through activity landscapes, we employed consensus dual-activity difference maps recently reported. The analysis is based on pairwise relationships of potency difference and structure-similarity which were calculated from the combination of four different 2D and 3D structure representations. Dual-activity difference maps uncovered regions in the landscape with similar SAR for two or three receptor subtypes as well as regions with inverse SAR, that is, changes in structure that increase activity for one subtype but decrease activity for the other subtype. Analysis of pairs of compounds with high structure similarity revealed the presence of single-, dual-, and 'pan-receptor' activity cliffs, that is, small changes in structure with high changes in potency for one, two, or three receptor subtypes, respectively. Single-, dual-, and pan-receptor scaffold hops are also discussed. The analysis of the chemical structures of selected data points reported in this paper points to specific structural features that are helpful for the design of new PPAR agonists. The approach presented in this work is general and can be extended to analyze larger data sets. PMID:22564380

  4. SUPERFICIAL – Surface mapping of proteins via structure-based peptide library design

    PubMed Central

    Goede, Andrean; Jaeger, Ines S; Preissner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background The determination of protein surfaces and the detection of binding sites are essential to our understanding of protein-protein interactions. Such binding sites can be characterised as linear and non-linear, the non-linear sites being prevailant. Conventional mapping techniques with arrays of synthetic peptides have limitations with regard to the location of discontinuous or non-linear binding sites of proteins. Results We present a structure-based approach to the design of peptide libraries that mimic the whole surface or a particular region of a protein. Neighbouring sequence segments are linked by short spacers to conserve local conformation. To this end, we have developed SUPERFICIAL, a program that uses protein structures as input and generates library proposals consisting of linear and non-linear peptides. This process can be influenced by a graphical user interface at different stages, from the surface computation up to the definition of spatial regions. Conclusion Based on 3D structures, SUPERFICIAL may help to negotiate some of the existing limitations, since binding sites consisting of several linear pieces can now be detected. PMID:16153304

  5. The Evolution of a Collaborative Concept Mapping Activity for Undergraduate Microbiology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinchin, Ian M.; De-Leij, Frans A. A. M.; Hay, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Concept mapping activities were trialed over a 2 year period as part of an undergraduate microbiology course. This paper describes this developmental process and offers insight into the most beneficial ways of employing this tool in a higher education setting. The aim was to investigate the use of mapping activities to improve students'…

  6. Asymmetric friction of non-motor MAPs can lead to their directional motion in active microtubule networks

    PubMed Central

    Forth, Scott; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Shimamoto, Yuta; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes require microtubules to be organized into distinct structures, such as asters or bundles. Within these dynamic motifs, microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are frequently under load, but how force modulates these proteins’ function is poorly understood. Here, we combine optical-trapping with TIRF-based microscopy to measure the force-dependence of microtubule interaction for three non-motor MAPs (NuMA, PRC1, and EB1) required for cell division. We find that frictional forces increase non-linearly with MAP velocity across microtubules and depend on filament polarity, with NuMA’s friction being lower when moving towards minus-ends, EB1’s lower towards plus-ends, and PRC1 exhibiting no directional preference. Mathematical models predict, and experiments confirm, that MAPs with asymmetric friction can move directionally within active microtubule pairs they crosslink. Our findings reveal how non-motor MAPs can generate frictional resistance in dynamic cytoskeletal networks via micromechanical adaptations whose anisotropy may be optimized for MAP localization and function within cellular structures. PMID:24725408

  7. Irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating the MAP kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiaoyong; Yong Qiao, Xiao; Nie, Ying; Ma, Yaxian; Xian Ma, Ya; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ran; Yin, Weiyao; Yao Yinrg, Wei; Hu, Ying; Xu, Wenming; Ming Xu, Wen; Xu, Liangzhi; Zhi Xu, Liang

    2016-01-07

    Physical exercise is able to improve skeletal health. However, the mechanisms are poorly known. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, secreted by skeletal muscle in response to exercise, have been shown to mediate beneficial effects of exercise in many disorders. In the current study, we demonstrated that irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation, and increases the expression of osteoblastic transcription regulators, such as Runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix/sp7; and osteoblast differentiation markers, including alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 alpha-1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in vitro. Irisin also increase ALP activity and calcium deposition in cultured osteoblast. These osteogenic effects were mediated by activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB023580 or pERK by U0126 abolished the proliferation and up-regulatory effects of irisin on Runx2 expression and ALP activity. Together our observation suggest that irisin directly targets osteoblast, promoting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating P38/ERK MAP kinase signaling cascades in vitro. Whether irisin can be utilized as the therapeutic agents for osteopenia and osteoporosis is worth to be further pursued.

  8. Irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating the MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yong Qiao, Xiao; Nie, Ying; Xian Ma, Ya; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ran; Yao Yinrg, Wei; Hu, Ying; Ming Xu, Wen; Zhi Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is able to improve skeletal health. However, the mechanisms are poorly known. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, secreted by skeletal muscle in response to exercise, have been shown to mediate beneficial effects of exercise in many disorders. In the current study, we demonstrated that irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation, and increases the expression of osteoblastic transcription regulators, such as Runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix/sp7; and osteoblast differentiation markers, including alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 alpha-1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in vitro. Irisin also increase ALP activity and calcium deposition in cultured osteoblast. These osteogenic effects were mediated by activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB023580 or pERK by U0126 abolished the proliferation and up-regulatory effects of irisin on Runx2 expression and ALP activity. Together our observation suggest that irisin directly targets osteoblast, promoting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating P38/ERK MAP kinase signaling cascades in vitro. Whether irisin can be utilized as the therapeutic agents for osteopenia and osteoporosis is worth to be further pursued. PMID:26738434

  9. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD. PMID:21262823

  10. Creating Protein Models from Electron-Density Maps using Particle-Filtering Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bitto, Eduard; Soni, Ameet; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, George N.; Shavlik, Jude W.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation One bottleneck in high-throughput protein crystallography is interpreting an electron-density map; that is, fitting a molecular model to the 3D picture crystallography produces. Previously, we developed Acmi, an algorithm that uses a probabilistic model to infer an accurate protein backbone layout. Here we use a sampling method known as particle filtering to produce a set of all-atom protein models. We use the output of Acmi to guide the particle filter's sampling, producing an accurate, physically feasible set of structures. Results We test our algorithm on ten poor-quality experimental density maps. We show that particle filtering produces accurate all-atom models, resulting in fewer chains, lower sidechain RMS error, and reduced R factor, compared to simply placing the best-matching sidechains on Acmi's trace. We show that our approach produces a more accurate model than three leading methods – Textal, Resolve, and ARP/wARP – in terms of main chain completeness, sidechain identification, and crystallographic R factor. PMID:17933855

  11. Deep ultraviolet mapping of intracellular protein and nucleic acid in femtograms per pixel.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Man C; Evans, James G; McKenna, Brian; Ehrlich, Daniel J

    2011-11-01

    By using imaging spectrophotometry with paired images in the 200- to 280-nm wavelength range, we have directly mapped intracellular nucleic acid and protein distributions across a population of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. A broadband 100× objective with a numerical aperture of 1.2 NA (glycerin immersion) and a novel laser-induced-plasma point source generated high-contrast images with short (∼100 ms) exposures and a lateral resolution nearing 200 nm that easily resolves internal organelles. In a population of 420 CHO-K1 cells and 477 nuclei, we found a G1 whole-cell nucleic acid peak at 26.6 pg, a nuclear-isolated total nucleic acid peak at 11.4 pg, and, as inferred by RNase treatment, a G1 total DNA mass of 7.4 pg. At the G1 peak, we found a whole-cell protein mass of 95.6 pg, and a nuclear-isolated protein mass of 39.3 pg. An algorithm for protein quantification that senses peptide-bond (220-nm) absorbance was found to have a higher signal-to-noise ratio and to provide more reliable nucleic acid and protein determinations when compared to more classical 280/260-nm algorithms when used for intracellular mass mapping. Using simultaneous imaging with common nuclear stains (Hoechst 33342, Syto-14, and Sytox Orange), we have compared staining patterns to deep-UV images of condensed chromatin and have confirmed bias of these common nuclear stains related to nuclear packaging. The approach allows absolute mass measurements with no special sample preparation or staining. It can be used in conjunction with normal fluorescence microscopy and with relatively modest modification of the microscope.

  12. The U.S. Geological Survey mapping and cartographic database activities, 2006-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craun, Kari J.; Donnelly, John P.; Allord, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began systematic topographic mapping of the United States in the 1880s, beginning with scales of 1:250,000 and 1:125,000 in support of geological mapping. Responding to the need for higher resolution and more detail, the 1:62,500-scale, 15-minute, topographic map series was begun in the beginning of the 20th century. Finally, in the 1950s the USGS adopted the 1:24,000-scale, 7.5-minute topographic map series to portray even more detail, completing the coverage of the conterminous 48 states of the United States with this series in 1992. In 2001, the USGS developed the vision and concept of The National Map, a topographic database for the 21st century and the source for a new generation of topographic maps (http://nationalmap.gov/). In 2008, the initial production of those maps began with a 1:24,000-scale digital product. In a separate, but related project, the USGS began scanning the existing inventory of historical topographic maps at all scales to accompany the new topographic maps. The USGS also had developed a digital database of The National Atlas of the United States. The digital version of Atlas is now Web-available and supports a mapping engine for small scale maps of the United States and North America. These three efforts define topographic mapping activities of the USGS during the last few years and are discussed below.

  13. Mapping the conformational transition in Src activation by cumulating the information from multiple molecular dynamics trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sichun; Banavali, Nilesh K.; Roux, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    The Src-family kinases are allosteric enzymes that play a key role in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. In response to cellular signals, they undergo large conformational changes to switch between distinct inactive and active states. A computational strategy for characterizing the conformational transition pathway is presented to bridge the inactive and active states of the catalytic domain of Hck. The information from a large number (78) of independent all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories with explicit solvent is combined together to assemble a connectivity map of the conformational transition. Two intermediate states along the activation pathways are identified, and their structural features are characterized. A coarse free-energy landscape is built in terms of the collective motions corresponding to the opening of the activation loop (A-loop) and the rotation of the αC helix. This landscape shows that the protein can adopt a multitude of conformations in which the A-loop is partially open, while the αC helix remains in the orientation characteristic of the inactive conformation. The complete transition leading to the active conformation requires a concerted movement involving further opening of the A-loop, the relative alignment of N-lobe and C-lobe, and the rotation of the αC helix needed to recruit the residues necessary for catalysis in the active site. The analysis leads to a dynamic view of the full-length kinase activation, whereby transitions of the catalytic domain to intermediate configurations with a partially open A-loop are permitted, even while the SH2-SH3 clamp remains fully engaged. These transitions would render Y416 available for the transphosphorylation event that ultimately locks down the active state. The results provide a broad framework for picturing the conformational transitions leading to kinase activation. PMID:19225111

  14. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  15. Biologically active LIL proteins built with minimal chemical diversity

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Erin N.; Marston, Jez L.; Federman, Ross S.; Edwards, Anne P. B.; Karabadzhak, Alexander G.; Petti, Lisa M.; Engelman, Donald M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed 26-amino acid transmembrane proteins that specifically transform cells but consist of only two different amino acids. Most proteins are long polymers of amino acids with 20 or more chemically distinct side-chains. The artificial transmembrane proteins reported here are the simplest known proteins with specific biological activity, consisting solely of an initiating methionine followed by specific sequences of leucines and isoleucines, two hydrophobic amino acids that differ only by the position of a methyl group. We designate these proteins containing leucine (L) and isoleucine (I) as LIL proteins. These proteins functionally interact with the transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor and specifically activate the receptor to transform cells. Complete mutagenesis of these proteins identified individual amino acids required for activity, and a protein consisting solely of leucines, except for a single isoleucine at a particular position, transformed cells. These surprisingly simple proteins define the minimal chemical diversity sufficient to construct proteins with specific biological activity and change our view of what can constitute an active protein in a cellular context. PMID:26261320

  16. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  17. From the Cover: Toward a protein-protein interaction map of the budding yeast: A comprehensive system to examine two-hybrid interactions in all possible combinations between the yeast proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takashi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Muta, Shigeru; Ozawa, Ritsuko; Chiba, Tomoko; Nishizawa, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Kuhara, Satoru; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki

    2000-02-01

    Protein-protein interactions play pivotal roles in various aspects of the structural and functional organization of the cell, and their complete description is indispensable to thorough understanding of the cell. As an approach toward this goal, here we report a comprehensive system to examine two-hybrid interactions in all of the possible combinations between proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We cloned all of the yeast ORFs individually as a DNA-binding domain fusion ("bait") in a MATa strain and as an activation domain fusion ("prey") in a MATα strain, and subsequently divided them into pools, each containing 96 clones. These bait and prey clone pools were systematically mated with each other, and the transformants were subjected to strict selection for the activation of three reporter genes followed by sequence tagging. Our initial examination of ≈4 × 106 different combinations, constituting ≈10% of the total to be tested, has revealed 183 independent two-hybrid interactions, more than half of which are entirely novel. Notably, the obtained binary data allow us to extract more complex interaction networks, including the one that may explain a currently unsolved mechanism for the connection between distinct steps of vesicular transport. The approach described here thus will provide many leads for integration of various cellular functions and serve as a major driving force in the completion of the protein-protein interaction map.

  18. Photo-initiated crosslinking extends mapping of the protein-protein interface to membrane-embedded portions of cytochromes P450 2B4 and b₅.

    PubMed

    Ječmen, Tomáš; Ptáčková, Renata; Černá, Věra; Dračínská, Helena; Hodek, Petr; Stiborová, Marie; Hudeček, Jiří; Šulc, Miroslav

    2015-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a central role in the regulation of many biochemical processes (e.g. the system participating in enzyme catalysis). Therefore, a deeper understanding of protein-protein interactions may contribute to the elucidation of many biologically important mechanisms. For this purpose, it is necessary to establish the composition and stoichiometry of supramolecular complexes and to identify the crucial portions of the interacting molecules. This study is devoted to structure-functional relationships in the microsomal Mixed Function Oxidase (MFO) complex, which is responsible for biotransformation of many hydrophobic endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. In particular, the cytochrome b5 interaction with MFO terminal oxygenase cytochrome P-450 (P450) was studied. To create photolabile probes suitable for this purpose, we prepared cytochrome b5 which had a photolabile diazirine analog of methionine (pMet) incorporated into the protein sequence, employing recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. In addition to wild-type cytochrome b5, where three methionines (Met) are located at positions 96, 126, and 131, six mutants containing only one Met in the sequence were designed and expressed (see Table 1). In these mutants, a single Met was engineered into the catalytic domain (at positions 23, 41, or 46), into the linker between the protein domains (at position 96), or into the membrane region (at positions 126 or 131). These mutants should confirm or exclude these portions of cytochrome b5 which are involved in the interaction with P450. After UV irradiation, the pMet group(s) in the photolabile cytochrome b5 probe was(were) activated, producing covalent crosslinks with the interacting parts of P450 2B4 in the close vicinity. The covalent complexes were analyzed by the "bottom up" approach with high-accuracy mass spectrometry. The analysis provided an identification of the contacts in the supramolecular complex with low structural resolution. We

  19. Receptor activity modifying protein-3 mediates the protumorigenic activity of lysyl oxidase-like protein-2.

    PubMed

    Brekhman, Vera; Lugassie, Jennie; Zaffryar-Eilot, Shelly; Sabo, Edmond; Kessler, Ofra; Smith, Victoria; Golding, Hana; Neufeld, Gera

    2011-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like protein-2 (LOXL2) induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition and promotes invasiveness. To understand the mechanisms involved, we examined the effect of LOXL2 overexpression in MCF-7 cells on gene expression. We found that LOXL2 up-regulated the expression of receptor activity modifying protein-3 (RAMP3). Expression of RAMP3 in MDA-MB-231 cells in which LOXL2 expression was inhibited restored vimentin expression, invasiveness, and tumor development. Inhibition of RAMP3 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells mimicked the effects produced by inhibition of LOXL2 expression and was accompanied by inhibition of p38 phosphorylation. LOXL2 overexpression in these cells did not restore invasiveness, suggesting that RAMP3 functions downstream to LOXL2. LOXL2 and RAMP3 are strongly coexpressed in human colon, breast, and gastric carcinomas but not in normal colon or gastric epithelial cells. RAMP3 associates with several G-protein-coupled receptors forming receptors for peptides, such as adrenomedullin and amylin. We hypothesized that RAMP3 could function as a transducer of autocrine signals induced by such peptides. However, the proinvasive effects of RAMP3 could not be abrogated following inhibition of the expression or activity of these peptides. Our experiments suggest that the protumorigenic effects of LOXL2 are partially mediated by RAMP3 and that RAMP3 inhibitors may function as antitumorigenic agents. -

  20. Stochastic interaction between neural activity and molecular cues in the formation of topographic maps

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Melinda T.; Feldheim, David A.; Stryker, Michael P.; Triplett, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Topographic maps in visual processing areas maintain the spatial order of the visual world. Molecular cues and neuronal activity both play critical roles in map formation, but their interaction remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that when molecular- and activity-dependent cues are rendered nearly equal in force, they drive topographic mapping stochastically. The functional and anatomical representation of azimuth in the superior colliculus of heterozygous Islet2-EphA3 knock-in (Isl2EphA3/+) mice is variable: maps may be single, duplicated, or a combination of the two. This heterogeneity is not due to genetic differences, since map organizations in individual mutant animals often differ between colliculi. Disruption of spontaneous waves of retinal activity resulted in uniform map organization in Isl2EphA3/+ mice, demonstrating that correlated spontaneous activity is required for map heterogeneity. Computational modeling replicates this heterogeneity, revealing that molecular- and activity-dependent forces interact simultaneously and stochastically during topographic map formation. PMID:26402608

  1. An Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Carlee S; Hettich, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent – hydroxyl radicals – for these measurements; however, these approaches range significantly in their complexity and expense of operation. This research expands upon earlier work to enhance the controllability of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as an easily accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals in order to oxidize a range of intact proteins. Efforts to modulate oxidation level while minimizing the adsorption of protein to the electrode involved the use of relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber. Additionally, a different cell activation approach using variable voltage to supply a controlled current allowed us to precisely tune the extent of oxidation in a protein-dependent manner. In order to gain perspective on the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface, studies were conducted to monitor protein concentration during electrolysis and gauge changes in the electrode surface between cell activation events. This report demonstrates the successful use of BDD electrochemistry for greater precision in generating a target number of oxidation events upon intact proteins. PMID:23210708

  2. Genomic organization of the human VP16 accessory protein, a housekeeping gene (HCFC1) mapping to Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Frattini, A.; Faranda, S.; Redolfi, E.

    1994-09-01

    The region between DXS52 and Factor VIII gene in the human Xq28 chromosomal band contains a G+C-rich isochore to which many genes have been mapped. We report here the isolation and characterization of a transcript mapping about 50 kb telomeric from the vasopressin type 2 receptor gene in a 180-kb YAC/cosmid contig containing the L1CAM gene at its centromeric end. The determined transcribed sequence from a human fetal brain library is identical to that of the recently identified accessory protein HCFC1 (host cell factor, also called C1) that activates herpes simplex virus VP16 ({alpha}TIF) transactivator protein for association with the octamer motif-binding protein Oct-1. The gene is expressed in a ubiquitous pattern and a larger transcript of approximately 10 kb is present in all the tissues tested, while an alternatively spliced RNA of approximately 8.0 kb is present in muscle and heart tissues. Genomic sequencing allowed us to determine that the sequenced transcript is assembled from 26 exons spread over a relatively small genomic region of approximately 24 kb. This allowed us to determine that a previously reported cDNA clone arises from the splicing out of an internal portion of exon 8 which does not change the reading frame. All together these results raise the possibility that alternative mRNA processing could partly contribute to the diversity of the polypeptide HCFC1 family in a subset of tissues. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Modeling Protein Folding and Applying It to a Relevant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Allan; Goetze, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The different levels of protein structure that can be easily understood by creating a model that simulates protein folding, which can then be evaluated by applying it to a relevant activity, is presented. The materials required and the procedure for constructing a protein folding model are mentioned.

  4. MAP17 (PDZKIP1) Expression Determines Sensitivity to the Proteasomal Inhibitor Bortezomib by Preventing Cytoprotective Autophagy and NFκB Activation in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Galván, Sandra; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Perez, Marco; Carnero, Amancio

    2015-06-01

    MAP17 is a small nonglycosylated membrane protein that is overexpressed in a high percentage of carcinomas. High levels of MAP17 enhance the tumorigenic properties of tumor cells by increasing oxidative stress, which is dependent on Na(+)-coupled cotransport. Here, we show that MAP17 is associated with proteins involved in protein degradation and that proteasome inhibition induces autophagy. To analyze whether MAP17 could also alter this process, we used the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), which is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, although it has a high rate of resistance emergence and poor efficacy in solid tumors. We provide evidence that bortezomib induces a cytoprotective effect by activating autophagy and NFκB nuclear translocation, responses that are repressed in the presence of high levels of MAP17 both in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, patients with multiple myeloma treated with bortezomib showed higher response rates and a longer time to progression associated with increased levels of MAP17 expression. The MAP17-induced sensitivity to bortezomib is dependent on the oxidative status of the cells and the activity of Na(+)-coupled transporters because treatment with antioxidants or the inhibitor furosemide restores the cytoprotective activity induced by bortezomib. Therefore, bortezomib induces a prosurvival response through cytoprotective autophagy and NFκB nuclear translocation, which is repressed by high levels of MAP17. We propose that the levels of MAP17 could be used as a prognostic marker to predict the response to bortezomib in hematologic malignancies and in other tissues that are not commonly responsive to the drug.

  5. Analyzing Large-Scale Structural Change in Proteins: Comparison of Principal Component Projection and Sammon Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2006-04-01

    Effective analysis of large-scale conformational transitions in macromolecules requires transforming them into a lower dimensional representation that captures the dominant motions. Herein, we apply and compare two different dimensionality reduction techniques, namely, principal component analysis (PCA), a linear method, and Sammon mapping, which is nonlinear. The two methods are used to analyze four different protein transition pathways of varying complexity, obtained by using either the conjugate peak refinement method or constrained molecular dynamics. For the return-stroke in myosin, both Sammon mapping and PCA show that the conformational change is dominated by a simple rotation of a rigid body. Also, in the case of the T{yields}R transition in hemoglobin, both methods are able to identify the two main quaternary transition events. In contrast, in the cases of the unfolding transition of staphylococcal nuclease or the signaling switch of Ras p21, which are both more complex conformational transitions, only Sammon mapping is able to identify the distinct phases of motion.

  6. Bone morphogenetic proteins, eye patterning, and retinocollicular map formation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Daniel T.; Dhande, Onkar; Lopez, Joshua E.; Murali, Deepa; Thaller, Christina; Henkemeyer, Mark; Furuta, Yasuhide; Overbeek, Paul; Crair, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Patterning events during early eye formation determine retinal cell fate and can dictate the behavior of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons as they navigate toward central brain targets. The temporally and spatially regulated expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their receptors in the retina are thought to play a key role in this process, initiating gene expression cascades that distinguish different regions of the retina, particularly along the dorsoventral axis. Here, we examine the role of BMP and a potential downstream effector, EphB, in retinotopic map formation in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and superior colliculus (SC). RGC axon behaviors during retinotopic map formation in wild type mice are compared with those in several strains of mice with engineered defects of BMP and EphB signaling. Normal RGC axon sorting produces axon order in the optic tract that reflects the dorsoventral position of the parent RGCs in the eye. A dramatic consequence of disrupting BMP signaling is a missorting of RGC axons as they exit the optic chiasm. This sorting is not dependent on EphB. When BMP signaling in the developing eye is genetically modified, RGC order in the optic tract and targeting in the LGN and SC are correspondingly disrupted. These experiments show that BMP signaling regulates dorsoventral RGC cell fate, RGC axon behavior in the ascending optic tract and retinotopic map formation in the LGN and SC through mechanisms that are in part distinct from EphB signaling in the LGN and SC. PMID:18614674

  7. Protein kinase C catalyses the phosphorylation and activation of rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, M; Pajares, M A; Renart, M F; Mato, J M

    1987-01-01

    When a partially purified rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase is incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP and rat brain protein kinase C, phospholipid methyltransferase (Mr 50,000, pI 4.75) becomes phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of the enzyme showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase was accompanied by an approx. 2-fold activation of the enzyme activity. Activity changes and enzyme phosphorylation showed the same time course. Activation of the enzyme also showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C mediates phosphorylation of predominantly serine residues of the methyltransferase. One major peak of phosphorylation was identified by analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides by isoelectrofocusing. This peak (pI 5.2) differs from that phosphorylated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (pI 7.2), demonstrating the specificity of phosphorylation of protein kinase C. Tryptic-peptide mapping by h.p.l.c. of the methyltransferase phosphorylated by protein kinase C revealed one major peak of radioactivity, which could be resolved into two labelled phosphopeptides by t.l.c. The significance of protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3593229

  8. Unc-51 controls active zone density and protein composition by downregulating ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wairkar, Yogesh P.; Toda, Hirofumi; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Tomoda, Toshifumi; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Efficient synaptic transmission requires the apposition of neurotransmitter release sites opposite clusters of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Transmitter is released at active zones, which are composed of a large complex of proteins necessary for synaptic development and function. Many active zone proteins have been identified, but little is known of the mechanisms that ensure that each active zone receives the proper complement of proteins. Here we use a genetic analysis in Drosophila to demonstrate that the serine threonine kinase Unc-51 acts in the presynaptic motoneuron to regulate the localization of the active zone protein Bruchpilot opposite to glutamate receptors at each synapse. In the absence of Unc-51, many glutamate receptor clusters are unapposed to Bruchpilot, and ultrastructural analysis demonstrates that fewer active zones contain dense body T-bars. In addition to the presence of these aberrant synapses, there is also a decrease in the density of all synapses. This decrease in synaptic density and abnormal active zone composition is associated with impaired evoked transmitter release. Mechanistically, Unc-51 inhibits the activity of the MAP kinase ERK to promote synaptic development. In the unc-51 mutant, increased ERK activity leads to the decrease in synaptic density and the absence of Bruchpilot from many synapses. Hence, activated ERK negatively regulates synapse formation, resulting in either the absence of active zones or the formation of active zones without their proper complement of proteins. The Unc-51-dependent inhibition of ERK activity provides a potential mechanism for synapse-specific control of active zone protein composition and release probability. PMID:19144852

  9. Unc-51 controls active zone density and protein composition by downregulating ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Wairkar, Yogesh P; Toda, Hirofumi; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Diantonio, Aaron

    2009-01-14

    Efficient synaptic transmission requires the apposition of neurotransmitter release sites opposite clusters of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Transmitter is released at active zones, which are composed of a large complex of proteins necessary for synaptic development and function. Many active zone proteins have been identified, but little is known of the mechanisms that ensure that each active zone receives the proper complement of proteins. Here we use a genetic analysis in Drosophila to demonstrate that the serine threonine kinase Unc-51 acts in the presynaptic motoneuron to regulate the localization of the active zone protein Bruchpilot opposite to glutamate receptors at each synapse. In the absence of Unc-51, many glutamate receptor clusters are unapposed to Bruchpilot, and ultrastructural analysis demonstrates that fewer active zones contain dense body T-bars. In addition to the presence of these aberrant synapses, there is also a decrease in the density of all synapses. This decrease in synaptic density and abnormal active zone composition is associated with impaired evoked transmitter release. Mechanistically, Unc-51 inhibits the activity of the MAP kinase ERK to promote synaptic development. In the unc-51 mutant, increased ERK activity leads to the decrease in synaptic density and the absence of Bruchpilot from many synapses. Hence, activated ERK negatively regulates synapse formation, resulting in either the absence of active zones or the formation of active zones without their proper complement of proteins. The Unc-51-dependent inhibition of ERK activity provides a potential mechanism for synapse-specific control of active zone protein composition and release probability.

  10. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  11. Cloning, sequencing, and mapping of the human chromosome 14 heat shock protein gene (HSPA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnycastle, L.L.C.; Chang-En Yu; Schellenberg, G.D.

    1994-09-01

    A genomic clone for the human heat shock protein (HSP) 70 gene located on chromosome 14 was isolated and sequenced. The gene, designated HSPA2, has a single open reading frame of 1917 bp that encodes a 639-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 70,030 Da. Analysis of the sequence indicates that HLPA2 is the human homologue of the murine Hsp 70-2 gene with 91.7% identity in the nucleotide coding sequence and 98.2% in the corresponding amino acid sequence. HSPA2 has less amino acid homology to other members of the human HSP70 gene family, 83.3% to the heat-inducible HSP70-1 gene and 86.1% with the human heat shock cognate gene HSC70. HSPA2 is constitutively expressed in most tissues, with very high levels in testis and skeletal muscle. Significant but lower levels are also expressed in ovary, small intestine, colon, brain, placenta, and kidney. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone containing HSPA2 (YAC741H4) that also contained the polymorphic marker D14S63 was identified. This 670-kb YAC was mapped to 14q24.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subsequent two-color FISH and genetic mapping placed HSPA2/D14S63 proximal to the markers D14S57 and D14S77. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Complementary DNA sequence and chromosomal mapping of human proteoglycan-binding cell-adhesion protein (dermatopontin)

    SciTech Connect

    Superti-Furga, A.; Gitzelmann, R.; Schaefer, B.W. ); Rocchi, M. )

    1993-08-01

    The authors have noticed the presence of a protein with a M[sub r] of approx 22 kDa in proteoglycan preparations from human fibroblast cultures and speculated that it might be related to a 22-kDa protein from bovine skin (22K) with proteoglycan- and cell-binding properties. Using degenerated oligomers designed from the amino acid sequence of the bovine protein, they amplified and subcloned sequences from human fibroblast and fibrosarcoma cDNA. The three clones that were characterized contain an open reading frame (603 bp) coding for 201 amino acids comprising a secretory leader peptide of 18 amino acids and a secreted part of 183 amino acids with 96% identity to the bovine sequence, indicating that they code for the human homologue ([open quotes]dermatopontin[close quotes]) of the bovine 22K protein. Expression of dermatopontin is not limited to connective tissue, as northern blots show specific mRNAs in cultured fibroblasts, muscle, heart, pancreas, and lung. Two species of mRNA (1.0 and 2.2 kb) are present, indicating alternative polyadenylation or alternative splicing. The cDNA clones map to 1q12-q23 in a cell hybrid panel containing specific chromosomal deletions. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Imaging metals in proteins by combining electrophoresis with rapid x-ray fluorescence mapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, L.; Chishti, Y.; Khare, T.; Giometti, C.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A.; Vogt, S.; Univ. of Sydney; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence points toward a very dynamic role for metals in biology. This suggests that physiological circumstance may mandate metal ion redistribution among ligands. This work addresses a critical need for technology that detects, identifies, and measures the metal-containing components of complex biological matrixes. We describe a direct, user-friendly approach for identifying and quantifying metal?protein adducts in complex samples using native- or SDS-PAGE, blotting, and rapid synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping with micro-XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) of entire blots. The identification and quantification of each metal bound to a protein spot has been demonstrated, and the technique has been applied in two exemplary cases. In the first, the speciation of the in vitro binding of exogenous chromium to blood serum proteins was influenced markedly by both the oxidation state of chromium exposed to the serum proteins and the treatment conditions, which is of relevance to the biochemistry of Cr dietary supplements. In the second case, in vivo changes in endogenous metal speciation were examined to probe the influence of oxygen depletion on iron speciation in Shewanella oneidensis.

  14. MSV3d: database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin-Mihai; Walter, Vincent; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Toursel, Thierry; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the complex relationships linking genotypic and phenotypic variations to protein structure is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. We present MSV3d (Database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure), a new database that contains detailed annotation of missense variants of all human proteins (20 199 proteins). The multi-level characterization includes details of the physico-chemical changes induced by amino acid modification, as well as information related to the conservation of the mutated residue and its position relative to functional features in the available or predicted 3D model. Major releases of the database are automatically generated and updated regularly in line with the dbSNP (database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and SwissVar releases, by exploiting the extensive Décrypthon computational grid resources. The database (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d) is easily accessible through a simple web interface coupled to a powerful query engine and a standard web service. The content is completely or partially downloadable in XML or flat file formats. Database URL: http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d.

  15. A combined binary interaction and phenotypic map of C. elegans cell polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koorman, Thijs; Lemmens, Irma; Ramalho, João J.; Nieuwenhuize, Susan; van den Heuvel, Sander; Tavernier, Jan; Nance, Jeremy; Boxem, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of cell polarity is an essential process for the development of multicellular organisms and the functioning of cells and tissues. Here, we combine large-scale protein interaction mapping with systematic phenotypic profiling to study the network of physical interactions that underlies polarity establishment and maintenance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using a fragment-based yeast two-hybrid strategy, we identified 439 interactions between 296 proteins, as well as the protein regions that mediate these interactions. Phenotypic profiling of the network resulted in the identification of 100 physically interacting protein pairs for which RNAi-mediated depletion caused a defect in the same polarity-related process. We demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the network by showing that the physical interaction between the RhoGAP PAC-1 and PAR-6 is required for radial polarization of the C. elegans embryo. Our network represents a valuable resource of candidate interactions that can be used to further our insight into cell polarization. PMID:26780296

  16. Determination of Protein Carbonylation and Proteasome Activity in Seeds.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiong; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Bailly, Christophe; Meimoun, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be toxic but also function as signaling molecules in a process called redox signaling. In seeds, ROS are produced at different developmental stages including dormancy release and germination. Main targets of oxidation events by ROS in cell are lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. Protein oxidation has various effects on their function, stability, location, and degradation. Carbonylation represents an irreversible and unrepairable modification that can lead to protein degradation through the action of the 20S proteasome. Here, we present techniques which allow the quantification of protein carbonyls in complex protein samples after derivatization by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and the determination proteasome activity by an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) using the probe MV151. These techniques, routinely easy to handle, allow the rapid assessment of protein carbonyls and proteasome activity in seeds in various physiological conditions where ROS may act as signaling or toxic elements. PMID:27424756

  17. Cyclin B interaction with microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4) targets p34cdc2 kinase to microtubules and is a potential regulator of M-phase microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated (Ookata et al., 1992, 1993) that the p34cdc2/cyclin B complex associates with microtubules in the mitotic spindle and premeiotic aster in starfish oocytes, and that microtubule- associated proteins (MAPs) might be responsible for this interaction. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which p34cdc2 kinase associates with the microtubule cytoskeleton in primate tissue culture cells whose major MAP is known to be MAP4. Double staining of primate cells with anti-cyclin B and anti-MAP4 antibodies demonstrated these two antigens were colocalized on microtubules and copartitioned following two treatments that altered MAP4 distribution. Detergent extraction before fixation removed cyclin B as well as MAP4 from the microtubules. Depolymerization of some of the cellular microtubules with nocodazole preferentially retained the microtubule localization of both cyclin B and MAP4. The association of p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase with microtubules was also shown biochemically to be mediated by MAP4. Cosedimentation of purified p34cdc2/cyclin B with purified microtubule proteins containing MAP4, but not with MAP-free microtubules, as well as binding of MAP4 to GST-cyclin B fusion proteins, demonstrated an interaction between cyclin B and MAP4. Using recombinant MAP4 fragments, we demonstrated that the Pro-rich C-terminal region of MAP4 is sufficient to mediate the cyclin B-MAP4 interaction. Since p34cdc2/cyclin B physically associated with MAP4, we examined the ability of the kinase complex to phosphorylate MAP4. Incubation of a ternary complex of p34cdc2, cyclin B, and the COOH-terminal domain of MAP4, PA4, with ATP resulted in intracomplex phosphorylation of PA4. Finally, we tested the effects of MAP4 phosphorylation on microtubule dynamics. Phosphorylation of MAP4 by p34cdc2 kinase did not prevent its binding to microtubules, but abolished its microtubule stabilizing activity. Thus, the cyclin B/MAP4 interaction we have described may be

  18. EM-fold: de novo atomic-detail protein structure determination from medium-resolution density maps.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Alexander, Nathan; Wötzel, Nils; Karakaş, Mert; Stewart, Phoebe L; Meiler, Jens

    2012-03-01

    Electron density maps of membrane proteins or large macromolecular complexes are frequently only determined at medium resolution between 4 Å and 10 Å, either by cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. In these density maps, the general arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSEs) is revealed, whereas their directionality and connectivity remain elusive. We demonstrate that the topology of proteins with up to 250 amino acids can be determined from such density maps when combined with a computational protein folding protocol. Furthermore, we accurately reconstruct atomic detail in loop regions and amino acid side chains not visible in the experimental data. The EM-Fold algorithm assembles the SSEs de novo before atomic detail is added using Rosetta. In a benchmark of 27 proteins, the protocol consistently and reproducibly achieves models with root mean square deviation values <3 Å.

  19. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  20. Wounding activates p38 map kinase and activation transcription factor 3 in leading keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Harper, Erin G; Alvares, Stacy M; Carter, William G

    2005-08-01

    Quiescent epidermis anchors to laminin 5 in the basement membrane via integrin alpha6beta4. Wounding elevates expression of laminin 5, generating leading keratinocytes (LKs) that migrate via beta1 integrins. Laminin 5 was evaluated as a regulator of cell signaling, and mRNA and protein expression in LKs. An in vitro wound model was developed based on suspension and re-adhesion of quiescent human keratinocytes (HKs). DNA microarrays identified multiple mRNAs elevated 1.5 hours after suspension and re-adhesion including activation transcription factor 3 (ATF3). In vitro and in vivo, levels of ATF3 protein elevate in nuclei of LKs, but not in nuclei of the following cells, 2 hours after suspension or wounding but decline by 12-18 hours post injury. Significantly, null defects in laminin 5 or integrin beta4 that inhibit anchorage chronically elevate ATF3 in vivo. This suggests that adhesion to laminin 5, but not other ligands, suppresses activation. On suspension, ATF3 and other transcripts in the microarrays are elevated by phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P-p38), a stress kinase that regulates mRNA and cell motility. Inhibition of P-p38 with SB203580 prevents phosphorylation of ATF2, a transcription factor for ATF3 in LKs. Re-adhesion to laminin 5 via alpha6beta4 dephosphorylates P-p38 and suppresses ATF3 protein relative to cells in suspension. Thus, wounding of quiescent HKs disrupts laminin 5 adhesion to activate p38, generating mRNA transcripts that define LKs. Adhesion to deposits of laminin 5 via alpha6beta4 suppresses P-p38 and activation mRNAs including ATF3. Defects in laminin 5 and alpha6beta4 sustain P-p38 with probable pathological effects on transcription and migration.

  1. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  2. Transcriptional activation of MMP-13 by periodontal pathogenic LPS requires p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Rossa, Carlos; Liu, Min; Bronson, Paul; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP-13) is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased expression is associated with a number of pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal diseases. MMP-13 gene regulation and the signal transduction pathways activated in response to bacterial LPS are largely unknown. In these studies, the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the regulation of MMP-13 induced by lipopolysaccharide was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans significantly (P < 0.05) increased MMP-13 steady-state mRNA (average of 27% and 46% increase, respectively) in murine periodontal ligament fibroblasts. MMP-13 mRNA induction was significantly reduced by inhibition of p38 MAP kinase. Immunoblot analysis indicated that p38 signaling was required for LPS-induced MMP-13 expression. Lipopolysaccharide induced proximal promoter reporter (-660/+32 mMMP-13) gene activity required p38 signaling. Collectively, these results indicate that lipopolysaccharide-induced murine MMP-13 is regulated by p38 signaling through a transcriptional mechanism.

  3. Genome-wide protein interaction maps using two-hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Legrain, P; Selig, L

    2000-08-25

    Automated sequence technology has rendered functional biology amenable to genomic scale analysis. Among genome-wide exploratory approaches, the two-hybrid system in yeast (Y2H) has outranked other techniques because it is the system of choice to detect protein-protein interactions. Deciphering the cascade of binding events in a whole cell helps define signal transduction and metabolic pathways or enzymatic complexes. The function of proteins is eventually attributed through whole cell protein interaction maps where totally unknown proteins are partnered with fully annotated proteins belonging to the same functional category. Since its first description in the late 1980's, several versions of the Y2H have been developed in order to overcome the major limitations of the system, namely false positives and false negatives. Optimized versions have been recently applied at multi-molecular and genomic scale. These genome-wide surveys can be methodologically divided into two types of approaches: one either tests combinations of predefined polypeptides (the so-called matrix approach) using various short-cuts to speed up the process, or one screens with a given polypeptide (bait) for potential partners (preys) present in complex libraries of genomic or complementary DNA (library screening). In the former strategy, one tests what one knows, for example pair-wise interactions between full-length open reading frames from recently sequenced and annotated genomes. Although based on a one-by-one scheme, this method is reported to be amenable to large-scale genomics thanks to multicloning strategies and to the use of small robotics workstations. In the latter, highly complex cDNA or genomic libraries of protein domains can be screened to saturation with high-throughput screening systems allowing the discovery of yet unidentified proteins. Both approaches have strengths and drawbacks that will be discussed here. None yields a full proteome-wide screening since certain proteins (e

  4. Visualization and modelling of STLmax topographic brain activity maps.

    PubMed

    Mammone, Nadia; Principe, José C; Morabito, Francesco C; Shiau, Deng S; Sackellares, J Chris

    2010-06-15

    This paper evaluates the descriptive power of brain topography based on a dynamical parameter, the Short-Term Maximum Lyapunov Exponent (STLmax), estimated from EEG, for finding out a relationship of STLmax spatial distribution with the onset zone and with the mechanisms leading to epileptic seizures. Our preliminary work showed that visual assessment of STLmax topography exhibited a link with the location of seizure onset zone. The objective of the present work is to model the spatial distribution of STLmax in order to automatically extract these features from the maps. One-hour preictal segments from four long-term continuous EEG recordings (two scalp and two intracranial) were processed and the corresponding STLmax profiles were estimated. The spatial STLmax maps were modelled by a combination of two Gaussians functions. The parameters of the fitted model allow automatic extraction of quantitative information about the spatial distribution of STLmax: the EEG signal recorded from the brain region where seizures originate exhibited low-STLmax levels, long before the seizure onset, in 3 out of 4 patients (1 out of 2 of scalp patients and 2 out of 2 in intracranial patients). Topographic maps extracted directly from the EEG power did not provide useful information about the location, therefore we conclude that the analysis so far carried out suggests the possibility of using a model of STLmax topography as a tool for monitoring the evolution of epileptic brain dynamics. In the future, a more elaborate approach will be investigated in order to improve the specificity of the method.

  5. Reactive oxygen species and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activate Bax to induce mitochondrial cytochrome c release and apoptosis in response to malonate.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lazaro, M; Galindo, M F; Melero-Fernandez de Mera, R M; Fernandez-Gómez, F J; Concannon, C G; Segura, M F; Comella, J X; Prehn, J H M; Jordan, J

    2007-03-01

    Malonate, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex II, is a widely used toxin to study neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease and ischemic stroke. We have shown previously that malonate increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, leading to oxidative stress, cytochrome c release, and apoptotic cell death. Expression of a green fluorescent protein-Bax fusion protein in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells demonstrated a Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after 12 to 24 h of malonate treatment that coincided with mitochondrial potential collapse and chromatin condensation. Inhibition of Bax translocation using furosemide, as well as Bax gene deletion, afforded significant protection against malonate-induced apoptosis. Further experiments revealed that malonate induced a prominent increase in the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and that treatment with the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SKF86002 potently blocked malonate-induced Bax translocation and apoptosis. Treatment with vitamin E diminished ROS production, reduced the activation status of p38 MAP kinase, inhibited Bax translocation, and protected against malonate-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that malonate-induced ROS production and subsequent p38 MAP kinase activation mediates the activation of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein to induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and neuronal apoptosis.

  6. Systematic discovery of linear binding motifs targeting an ancient protein interaction surface on MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Zeke, András; Bastys, Tomas; Alexa, Anita; Garai, Ágnes; Mészáros, Bálint; Kirsch, Klára; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Kalinina, Olga V; Reményi, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are broadly used regulators of cellular signaling. However, how these enzymes can be involved in such a broad spectrum of physiological functions is not understood. Systematic discovery of MAPK networks both experimentally and in silico has been hindered because MAPKs bind to other proteins with low affinity and mostly in less-characterized disordered regions. We used a structurally consistent model on kinase-docking motif interactions to facilitate the discovery of short functional sites in the structurally flexible and functionally under-explored part of the human proteome and applied experimental tools specifically tailored to detect low-affinity protein-protein interactions for their validation in vitro and in cell-based assays. The combined computational and experimental approach enabled the identification of many novel MAPK-docking motifs that were elusive for other large-scale protein-protein interaction screens. The analysis produced an extensive list of independently evolved linear binding motifs from a functionally diverse set of proteins. These all target, with characteristic binding specificity, an ancient protein interaction surface on evolutionarily related but physiologically clearly distinct three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38). This inventory of human protein kinase binding sites was compared with that of other organisms to examine how kinase-mediated partnerships evolved over time. The analysis suggests that most human MAPK-binding motifs are surprisingly new evolutionarily inventions and newly found links highlight (previously hidden) roles of MAPKs. We propose that short MAPK-binding stretches are created in disordered protein segments through a variety of ways and they represent a major resource for ancient signaling enzymes to acquire new regulatory roles. PMID:26538579

  7. Mapping of cavitational activity in a pilot plant dyeing equipment.

    PubMed

    Actis Grande, G; Giansetti, M; Pezzin, A; Rovero, G; Sicardi, S

    2015-11-01

    A large number of papers of the literature quote dyeing intensification based on the application of ultrasound (US) in the dyeing liquor. Mass transfer mechanisms are described and quantified, nevertheless these experimental results in general refer to small laboratory apparatuses with a capacity of a few hundred millilitres and extremely high volumetric energy intensity. With the strategy of overcoming the scale-up inaccuracy consequent to the technological application of ultrasounds, a dyeing pilot-plant prototype of suitable liquor capacity (about 40 L) and properly simulating several liquor to textile hydraulic relationships was designed by including US transducers with different geometries. Optimal dyeing may be obtained by optimising the distance between transducer and textile material, the liquid height being a non-negligible operating parameter. Hence, mapping the cavitation energy in the machinery is expected to provide basic data on the intensity and distribution of the ultrasonic field in the aqueous liquor. A flat ultrasonic transducer (absorbed electrical power of 600 W), equipped with eight devices emitting at 25 kHz, was mounted horizontally at the equipment bottom. Considering industrial scale dyeing, liquor and textile substrate are reciprocally displaced to achieve a uniform colouration. In this technology a non uniform US field could affect the dyeing evenness to a large extent; hence, mapping the cavitation energy distribution in the machinery is expected to provide fundamental data and define optimal operating conditions. Local values of the cavitation intensity were recorded by using a carefully calibrated Ultrasonic Energy Meter, which is able to measure the power per unit surface generated by the cavitation implosion of bubbles. More than 200 measurements were recorded to define the map at each horizontal plane positioned at a different distance from the US transducer; tap water was heated at the same temperature used for dyeing tests (60

  8. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Palmer, E; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell-activating protein TAP is a murine phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein whose expression is controlled by the Ly-6 locus. Previous studies have suggested an important role for this protein in physiological T-cell activation. Using oligonucleotide probes, we have now isolated a cDNA clone whose predicted sequence would encode a protein with an NH2-terminal sequence identical to that of the TAP molecule. Further analysis of the predicted protein sequence revealed a cysteine-rich protein with a hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus and without N-linked glycosylation sites--all features consistent with our previous analysis of the TAP protein. In Southern blot analysis, the Ly-6.2 cDNA clone detects a multigene family and a restriction fragment length polymorphism that maps precisely to the Ly-6 locus. Expression of the cDNA clone in COS cells demonstrates that it codes for TAP and clarifies the relationship between the epitopes recognized by various alpha Ly-6 monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we have studied the expression of Ly-6 mRNA in a variety of cell lineages. Ly-6 transcripts were detected in all organs examined, including spleen, kidney, lung, brain, and heart. This demonstrates that the Ly-6 locus is transcriptionally active in a wide range of organs and suggests that the role of TAP or TAP-like proteins might extend to other tissues. Images PMID:2895473

  9. Functional region identification in proteins by accumulative-quantitative peptide mapping using RP-HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Bas J H; Bakx, E J; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-11-14

    A new method was developed to identify regions in proteins from which peptides are derived with specific functional properties. This method is applicable for systems in which peptides of a hydrolyzed protein possess specific functional properties, but are too large to be sequenced directly and/or the peptide mixture is too complex to purify and characterize each peptide individually. In the present work, aggregating peptides obtained by proteolytic hydrolysis of soy glycinin were used as a case study. The aggregating peptides are isolated and subsequently further degraded with trypsin to result in peptides with a mass <5000 Da to enable sequence identification using RP-HPLC-MS in combination with MS/MS. Prior to RP-HPLC the peptides are fractionated using anion and cation exchange chromatography. The fractions obtained are analyzed with RP-HPLC-MS. The peptides, with identified sequences, were quantified using the peak areas of the RP-HPLC chromatograms measured at 214 nm. Next, the peak areas were corrected for the molar extinction coefficient of the individual peptides, followed by accumulative-quantitative peptide mapping. The results show that in complex systems, based on the method described, the regions in the parental protein from which the functional peptides originate can be properly identified.

  10. Distribution of circular proteins in plants: large-scale mapping of cyclotides in the Violaceae

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Robert; Yeshak, Mariamawit Y.; Larsson, Sonny; Craik, David J.; Rosengren, K. Johan; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing interest in small circular proteins found in plants of the violet family (Violaceae). These so-called cyclotides consist of a circular chain of approximately 30 amino acids, including six cysteines forming three disulfide bonds, arranged in a cyclic cystine knot (CCK) motif. In this study we map the occurrence and distribution of cyclotides throughout the Violaceae. Plant material was obtained from herbarium sheets containing samples up to 200 years of age. Even the oldest specimens contained cyclotides in the preserved leaves, with no degradation products observable, confirming their place as one of the most stable proteins in nature. Over 200 samples covering 17 of the 23–31 genera in Violaceae were analyzed, and cyclotides were positively identified in 150 species. Each species contained a unique set of between one and 25 cyclotides, with many exclusive to individual plant species. We estimate the number of different cyclotides in the Violaceae to be 5000–25,000, and propose that cyclotides are ubiquitous among all Violaceae species. Twelve new cyclotides from six phylogenetically dispersed genera were sequenced. Furthermore, the first glycosylated derivatives of cyclotides were identified and characterized, further increasing the diversity and complexity of this unique protein family. PMID:26579135

  11. Rapid micro-scale proteolysis of proteins for MALDI-MS peptide mapping using immobilized trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobom, Johan; Nordhoff, Eckhard; Ekman, Rolf; Roepstorff, Peter

    1997-12-01

    In this study we present a rapid method for tryptic digestion of proteins using micro-columns with enzyme immobilized on perfusion chromatography media. The performance of the method is exemplified with acyl-CoA-binding protein and reduced carbamidomethylated bovine serum albumin. The method proved to be significantly faster and yielded a better sequence coverage and an improved signal-to-noise ratio for the MALDI-MS peptide maps, compared to in-solution- and on-target digestion. Only a single sample transfer step is required, and therefore sample loss due to adsorption to surfaces is reduced, which is a critical issue when handling low picomole to femtomole amounts of proteins. An example is shown with on-column proteolytic digestion and subsequent elution of the digest into a reversed-phase micro-column. This is useful if the sample contains large amounts of salt or is too diluted for MALDI-MS analysis. Furthermore, by step-wise elution from the reversedphase column, a complex digest can be fractionated, which reduces signal suppression and facilitates data interpretation in the subsequent MS-analysis. The method also proved useful for consecutive digestions with enzymes of different cleavage specificity. This is exemplified with on-column tryptic digestion, followed by reversed-phase step-wise elution, and subsequent on-target V8 protease digestion.

  12. Mapping Local Cytosolic Enzymatic Activity in Human Esophageal Mucosa with Porous Silicon Nanoneedles.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Ciro; Campagnolo, Paola; Almeida, Carina S; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Chow, Lesley W; Hanna, George B; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-09-16

    Porous silicon nanoneedles can map Cathepsin B activity across normal and tumor human esophageal mucosa. Assembling a peptide-based Cathepsin B cleavable sensor over a large array of nano-needles allows the discrimination of cancer cells from healthy ones in mixed culture. The same sensor applied to tissue can map Cathepsin B activity with high resolution across the tumor margin area of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  13. Antibody epitopes on g protein-coupled receptors mapped with genetically encoded photoactivatable cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Ray-Saha, Sarmistha; Huber, Thomas; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2014-03-01

    We developed a strategy for creating epitope maps of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) containing photo-cross-linkers. Using human CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) as a model system, we genetically incorporated the photolabile unnatural amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine (azF) at various positions within extracellular loop 2 (EC2). We then mapped the interactions of the azF-CXCR4 variants with mAb 12G5 using targeted loss-of-function studies and photo-cross-linking in whole cells in a microplate-based format. We used a novel variation of a whole cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate cross-linking efficiency. 12G5 cross-linked primarily to residues 184, 178, and 189 in EC2 of CXCR4. Mapping of the data to the crystal structure of CXCR4 showed a distinct mAb epitope footprint with the photo-cross-linked residues clustered around the loss-of-function sites. We also used the targeted photo-cross-linking approach to study the interaction of human CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) with PRO 140, a humanized mAb that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus-1 cellular entry, and 2D7. The mAbs produced distinct cross-linking patterns on EC2 of CCR5. PRO 140 cross-linked primarily to residues 174 and 175 at the amino-terminal end of EC2, and 2D7 cross-linked mainly to residues 170, 176, and 184. These results were mapped to the recent crystal structure of CCR5 in complex with maraviroc, showing cross-linked residues at the tip of the maraviroc binding crevice formed by EC2. As a strategy for mapping mAb epitopes on GPCRs, our targeted photo-cross-linking method is complementary to loss-of-function mutagenesis results and should be especially useful for studying mAbs with discontinuous epitopes. PMID:24490954

  14. Steps towards a repertoire of comprehensive maps of human protein interaction networks: the Human Proteotheque Initiative (HuPI).

    PubMed

    Coulombe, Benoit; Blanchette, Mathieu; Jeronimo, Célia

    2008-04-01

    Defining human protein interaction networks has become essential to develop an overall, systems-based understanding of the molecular events that sustain cell growth in normal and disease conditions. To characterize protein interaction networks from human cells, we have undertaken the development of a systematic, unbiased technology pipeline that couples experimental and computational approaches. This discovery engine is central to the Human Proteotheque Initiative (HuPI), a multidisciplinary project aimed at building a repertoire of comprehensive maps of human protein interaction networks, the Human Proteotheque. The information contained in the Proteotheque is made publicly available through an interactive web site that can be consulted to visualize some of the fundamental molecular connections formed in human cells and to determine putative functions of previously uncharacterized proteins based on guilt by association. The process governing the evolution of HuPI towards becoming a repository of accurate and complete protein interaction maps is described.

  15. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H; Wang, Haixing H; Livesay, Eric A; Monroe, Matthew E; Adkins, Joshua N; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J; Camp, David G; Smith, Desmond J; Smith, Richard D

    2007-01-25

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a “universal” stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion.

  16. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  17. Using MapMyFitness to Place Physical Activity into Neighborhood Context.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jana A; James, Peter; Robinson, Jamaica R M; Eastman, Kyler M; Conley, Kevin D; Evenson, Kelly R; Laden, Francine

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to obtain detailed information on the context of physical activity at large geographic scales, such as the entire United States, as well as over long periods of time, such as over years. MapMyFitness is a suite of interactive tools for individuals to track their workouts online or using global positioning system in their phones or other wireless trackers. This method article discusses the use of physical activity data tracked using MapMyFitness to examine patterns over space and time. An overview of MapMyFitness, including data tracked, user information, and geographic scope, is explored. We illustrate the utility of MapMyFitness data using tracked physical activity by users in Winston-Salem, NC, USA between 2006 and 2013. Types of physical activities tracked are described, as well as the percent of activities occurring in parks. Strengths of MapMyFitness data include objective data collection, low participant burden, extensive geographic scale, and longitudinal series. Limitations include generalizability, behavioral change as the result of technology use, and potential ethical considerations. MapMyFitness is a powerful tool to investigate patterns of physical activity across large geographic and temporal scales.

  18. Using MapMyFitness to Place Physical Activity into Neighborhood Context

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jana A.; James, Peter; Robinson, Jamaica R. M.; Eastman, Kyler M.; Conley, Kevin D.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Laden, Francine

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to obtain detailed information on the context of physical activity at large geographic scales, such as the entire United States, as well as over long periods of time, such as over years. MapMyFitness is a suite of interactive tools for individuals to track their workouts online or using global positioning system in their phones or other wireless trackers. This method article discusses the use of physical activity data tracked using MapMyFitness to examine patterns over space and time. An overview of MapMyFitness, including data tracked, user information, and geographic scope, is explored. We illustrate the utility of MapMyFitness data using tracked physical activity by users in Winston-Salem, NC, USA between 2006 and 2013. Types of physical activities tracked are described, as well as the percent of activities occurring in parks. Strengths of MapMyFitness data include objective data collection, low participant burden, extensive geographic scale, and longitudinal series. Limitations include generalizability, behavioral change as the result of technology use, and potential ethical considerations. MapMyFitness is a powerful tool to investigate patterns of physical activity across large geographic and temporal scales. PMID:24653982

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Kühne, Sina; Bocksberger, Simone; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation. PMID:25421240

  20. Reverberation Mapping of Accretion Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangham, S.

    2015-09-01

    Reverberation mapping is commonly used for determining black holes masses in AGN from the delayed response of the Broad Line Region (BLR) to fluctuations in the intensity of the AGN continuum source. However, it can also be an effective tool for investigating the structure and kinematics of the BLR itself. Much prior work has been performed to simulate the transfer functions associated with a range of basic geometries (e.g. Keplerian disks, Hubble-like outflows, etc). One promising model for the BLR is that the emission lines are formed in an equatorial accretion disk wind. Here, we predict the reverberation signatures expected from such a model, by modifying the radiative transfer and ionisation code Python that has previously been used to model broad absorption line quasars. This allows to account self-consistently for ionization and radiative transfer effects in the predicted BLR response, which are normally ignored in such calculations. We discuss the agreement between our results and prior work and consider the possibility of detecting the signature of rotating equatorial disk winds in observations obtained by velocity-resolved reverberation mapping campaigns.

  1. Protein C activity in dogs envenomed by Vipera palaestinae.

    PubMed

    Hadar, Gil; Kelmer, Efrat; Segev, Gilad; Bruchim, Yaron; Aroch, Itamar

    2014-09-01

    Vipera palaestinae is responsible for most envenomations in humans and domestic animal in Israel. Its venom has pro- and anticoagulant properties. Protein C is a major natural anticoagulant, preventing excess clotting and thrombosis. This study investigated protein C activity and its prognostic value, as well as several other hemostatic analytes in dogs (Canis familiaris) accidently envenomed by V. palaestinae. Protein C activity was compared between envenomed dogs and 33 healthy control dogs. Mean protein C was lower in dogs envenomed by V. palaestinae compared to controls (12.9% vs. 22.9%, respectively; P < 0.01). It was positively correlated with antithrombin activity (r = 0.3, P = 0.04), but not with other hemostatic analytes. The overall mortality rate was 13%, and at presentation no significant protein C activity difference was noted between survivors and non-survivors. A receiver operator characteristics analysis of protein C activity as a predictor of mortality had an area under the curve of 0.7 (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.87). A protein C cutoff point of 8% corresponded to sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 57%, respectively. Dogs diagnosed with consumptive coagulopathy (14%) tended to have lower protein C activity compared to others; however, their mortality did differ from that of other dogs. This is the first study assessing protein C activity in V. palaestinae victims. Decreased protein C activity in such dogs may play a role in formation of thrombosis and hemostatic derangement as well as inflammation in V. palaestinae envenomations.

  2. Mapping the orientation of nuclear pore proteins in living cells with polarized fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Martin; Atkinson, Claire E.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) perforates the nuclear envelope to facilitate selective transport between nucleus and cytoplasm. The NPC is composed of multiple copies of ~30 different proteins, termed nucleoporins, whose arrangement within the NPC is a major unsolved puzzle in structural biology. Various alternative models for NPC architecture have been proposed but not tested experimentally in intact NPCs. We present a method using polarized fluorescence microscopy to investigate nucleoporin orientation in live yeast and mammalian cells. Our results support an arrangement of both yeast Nic96 and human Nup133–Nup107 with their long axes approximately parallel to the nuclear envelope plane. This method can complement X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to generate a high-resolution map of the entire NPC, and could monitor nucleoporin rearrangements during nucleocytoplasmic transport and NPC assembly. This strategy can also be adapted for other macromolecular machines. PMID:21499242

  3. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  4. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  5. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease.

  6. Performance Benchmarking Tsunami Models for NTHMP's Inundation Mapping Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrillo, Juan; Grilli, Stéphan T.; Nicolsky, Dmitry; Roeber, Volker; Zhang, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    The coastal states and territories of the United States (US) are vulnerable to devastating tsunamis from near-field or far-field coseismic and underwater/subaerial landslide sources. Following the catastrophic 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) accelerated the development of public safety products for the mitigation of these hazards. In response to this initiative, US coastal states and territories speeded up the process of developing/enhancing/adopting tsunami models that can be used for developing inundation maps and evacuation plans. One of NTHMP's requirements is that all operational and inundation-based numerical (O&I) models used for such purposes be properly validated against established standards to ensure the reliability of tsunami inundation maps as well as to achieve a basic level of consistency between parallel efforts. The validation of several O&I models was considered during a workshop held in 2011 at Texas A&M University (Galveston). This validation was performed based on the existing standard (OAR-PMEL-135), which provides a list of benchmark problems (BPs) covering various tsunami processes that models must meet to be deemed acceptable. Here, we summarize key approaches followed, results, and conclusions of the workshop. Eight distinct tsunami models were validated and cross-compared by using a subset of the BPs listed in the OAR-PMEL-135 standard. Of the several BPs available, only two based on laboratory experiments are detailed here for sake of brevity; since they are considered as sufficiently comprehensive. Average relative errors associated with expected parameters values such as maximum surface amplitude/runup are estimated. The level of agreement with the reference data, reasons for discrepancies between model results, and some of the limitations are discussed. In general, dispersive models were found to perform better than nondispersive models, but differences were relatively small, in part

  7. Space Weather Activities of IONOLAB Group: TEC Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Yilmaz, A.; Arikan, O.; Sayin, I.; Gurun, M.; Akdogan, K. E.; Yildirim, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    Being a key player in Space Weather, ionospheric variability affects the performance of both communication and navigation systems. To improve the performance of these systems, ionosphere has to be monitored. Total Electron Content (TEC), line integral of the electron density along a ray path, is an important parameter to investigate the ionospheric variability. A cost-effective way of obtaining TEC is by using dual-frequency GPS receivers. Since these measurements are sparse in space, accurate and robust interpolation techniques are needed to interpolate (or map) the TEC distribution for a given region in space. However, the TEC data derived from GPS measurements contain measurement noise, model and computational errors. Thus, it is necessary to analyze the interpolation performance of the techniques on synthetic data sets that can represent various ionospheric states. By this way, interpolation performance of the techniques can be compared over many parameters that can be controlled to represent the desired ionospheric states. In this study, Multiquadrics, Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Cubic Splines, Ordinary and Universal Kriging, Random Field Priors (RFP), Multi-Layer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP-NN), and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF-NN) are employed as the spatial interpolation algorithms. These mapping techniques are initially tried on synthetic TEC surfaces for parameter and coefficient optimization and determination of error bounds. Interpolation performance of these methods are compared on synthetic TEC surfaces over the parameters of sampling pattern, number of samples, the variability of the surface and the trend type in the TEC surfaces. By examining the performance of the interpolation methods, it is observed that both Kriging, RFP and NN have important advantages and possible disadvantages depending on the given constraints. It is also observed that the determining parameter in the error performance is the trend in the Ionosphere

  8. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins. PMID:14514663

  9. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins.

  10. Breadboard activities for advanced protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The proposed work entails the design, assembly, testing, and delivery of a turn-key system for the semi-automated determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature. The system will utilize optical scintillation as a means of detecting and monitoring nucleation and crystallite growth during temperature lowering (or raising, with retrograde solubility systems). The deliverables of this contract are: (1) turn-key scintillation system for the semi-automatic determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature, (2) instructions and software package for the operation of the scintillation system, and (3) one semi-annual and one final report including the test results obtained for ovostatin with the above scintillation system.

  11. Where Have All the Interactions Gone? Estimating the Coverage of Two-Hybrid Protein Interaction Maps

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hailiang; Jedynak, Bruno M; Bader, Joel S

    2007-01-01

    Yeast two-hybrid screens are an important method for mapping pairwise physical interactions between proteins. The fraction of interactions detected in independent screens can be very small, and an outstanding challenge is to determine the reason for the low overlap. Low overlap can arise from either a high false-discovery rate (interaction sets have low overlap because each set is contaminated by a large number of stochastic false-positive interactions) or a high false-negative rate (interaction sets have low overlap because each misses many true interactions). We extend capture–recapture theory to provide the first unified model for false-positive and false-negative rates for two-hybrid screens. Analysis of yeast, worm, and fly data indicates that 25% to 45% of the reported interactions are likely false positives. Membrane proteins have higher false-discovery rates on average, and signal transduction proteins have lower rates. The overall false-negative rate ranges from 75% for worm to 90% for fly, which arises from a roughly 50% false-negative rate due to statistical undersampling and a 55% to 85% false-negative rate due to proteins that appear to be systematically lost from the assays. Finally, statistical model selection conclusively rejects the Erdös-Rényi network model in favor of the power law model for yeast and the truncated power law for worm and fly degree distributions. Much as genome sequencing coverage estimates were essential for planning the human genome sequencing project, the coverage estimates developed here will be valuable for guiding future proteomic screens. All software and datasets are available in Datasets S1 and S2, Figures S1–S5, and Tables S1−S6, and are also available from our Web site, http://www.baderzone.org. PMID:18039026

  12. Epitope mapping of the Brucella melitensis BP26 immunogenic protein: usefulness for diagnosis of sheep brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Seco-Mediavilla, Patricia; Verger, Jean-Michel; Grayon, Maggy; Cloeckaert, Axel; Marín, Clara M; Zygmunt, Michel S; Fernández-Lago, Luis; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2003-07-01

    Sequencing of bp26, the gene encoding the Brucella sp. immunogenic BP26 periplasmic protein, was performed in the reference strains of Brucella abortus, B. suis, and B. ovis. The three bp26 sequences were almost identical to that published for B. melitensis 16M bp26, and only minor nucleotide substitutions, without modifying the amino acid sequence, were observed between species. The bp26 genes of the seven B. abortus biovar reference strains and B. abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine strains were also sequenced. Again, only minor differences were found. Surprisingly, the bp26 nucleotide sequence for B. abortus S19 was almost identical to that found for B. melitensis 16M and differed from the sequence described previously by others (O. L. Rossetti, A. I. Arese, M. L. Boschiroli, and S. L. Cravero, J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:165-169, 1996) for the same B. abortus strain. The epitope mapping of BP26, performed by using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant DNA techniques, allowed the identification of an immunodominant region of the protein interesting for the diagnosis of B. melitensis and B. ovis infection in sheep. A recombinant fusion protein containing this region of BP26 reacted indeed, in Western blotting, as the entire recombinant BP26 against sera from B. melitensis- or B. ovis-infected sheep while it avoided false-positive reactions observed with sera from Brucella-free sheep when using the entire recombinant BP26. Thus, use of this recombinant fusion protein instead the entire recombinant BP26 could improve the specific serological diagnosis of B. melitensis or B. ovis infection in sheep.

  13. Comprehensive mapping of protein N-glycosylation in human liver by combining hydrophilic interaction chromatography and hydrazide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Sun, Zhen; Cheng, Kai; Chen, Rui; Ye, Mingliang; Xu, Bo; Sun, Deguang; Wang, Liming; Liu, Jing; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-03-01

    Although glycoproteomics is greatly developed in recent years, our knowledge about N-glycoproteome of human tissues is still very limited. In this study, we comprehensively mapped the N-glycosylation sites of human liver by combining click maltose-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and the improved hydrazide chemistry. The specificity could be as high as 90% for hydrazide chemistry and 80% for HILIC. Altogether, we identified 14,480 N-glycopeptides matched with N-!P-[S|T|C] sequence motif from human liver, corresponding to 2210 N-glycoproteins and 4783 N-glycosylation sites. These N-glycoproteins are widely involved into different types of biological processes, such as hepatic stellate cell activation and acute phase response of human liver, which all highly associate with the progression of liver diseases. Moreover, the exact N-glycosylation sites of some key-regulating proteins within different human liver physiological processes were also obtained, such as E-cadherin, transforming growth factor beta receptor and 29 members of G protein coupled receptors family.

  14. Visualizing active membrane protein complexes by electron cryotomography

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Vicki A.M.; Ieva, Raffaele; Walter, Andreas; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Unravelling the structural organization of membrane protein machines in their active state and native lipid environment is a major challenge in modern cell biology research. Here we develop the STAMP (Specifically TArgeted Membrane nanoParticle) technique as a strategy to localize protein complexes in situ by electron cryotomography (cryo-ET). STAMP selects active membrane protein complexes and marks them with quantum dots. Taking advantage of new electron detector technology that is currently revolutionizing cryotomography in terms of achievable resolution, this approach enables us to visualize the three-dimensional distribution and organization of protein import sites in mitochondria. We show that import sites cluster together in the vicinity of crista membranes, and we reveal unique details of the mitochondrial protein import machinery in action. STAMP can be used as a tool for site-specific labelling of a multitude of membrane proteins by cryo-ET in the future. PMID:24942077

  15. Dual role for membrane localization in yeast MAP kinase cascade activation and its contribution to signaling fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lamson, Rachel E; Takahashi, Satoe; Winters, Matthew J; Pryciak, Peter M

    2006-03-21

    Distinct MAP kinase pathways in yeast share several signaling components , including the PAK Ste20 and the MAPKKK Ste11, yet signaling is specific. Mating pheromones trigger an initial step in which Ste20 activates Ste11 , and this requires plasma membrane recruitment of the MAP kinase cascade scaffold protein, Ste5 . Here, we demonstrate an additional role for Ste5 membrane localization. Once Ste11 is activated, signaling through the mating pathway remains minimal but is substantially amplified when Ste5 is recruited to the membrane either by the Gbetagamma dimer or by direct membrane targeting, even to internal membranes. Ste11 signaling is also amplified by Ste5 oligomerization and by a hyperactivating mutation in the Ste7 binding region of Ste5. We suggest a model in which membrane recruitment of Ste5 concentrates its binding partners and thereby amplifies signaling through the kinase cascade. We find similar behavior in the osmotically responsive HOG pathway. Remarkably, while both pheromone and hyperosmotic stimuli amplify signaling from constitutively active Ste11, the resulting signaling output remains pathway specific. These findings suggest a common mode of regulation in which pathway stimuli both initiate and amplify MAP kinase cascade signaling. The regulation of rate-limiting steps that lie after a branchpoint from shared components helps ensure signaling specificity.

  16. Antioxidant activities of protein hydrolysates obtained from the housefly larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Ai-Jun; Li, Xuan; Zhang, Ji-Hong; Qin, Qi-Lian; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2016-09-01

    The housefly is an important resource insect and the housefly larvae are ideal source of food additives. The housefly larvae protein hydrolysates were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis by alcalase and neutral proteinase. Their antioxidant activities were investigated, including the superoxide and hydroxyl radicalscavenging activity, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity, reducing power and metal chelating activity. The antioxidant activities of both hydrolysates increased with their increasing concentrations. The alcalase hydrolysate (AH) showed higher scavenging activities against hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion radical at low concentrations and higher metal-chelating activity than the neutral proteinase hydrolysate (NPH). The NPH exhibited higher scavenging activity against DPPH free radical and higher reducing power than the AH. Both hydrolysates showed more than 50% superoxide anion radical-scavenging activity at 10 μg/mL. These results indicate that both housefly larvae protein hydrolysates display high antioxidant activities and they could serve as potential natural antioxidant food additives. PMID:27630047

  17. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein induces transcription factor AP-1 by activation of extracellular signal-regulated and c-Jun N-terminal mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Su, F; Doria, M; Schneider, R J

    1996-01-01

    The HBx protein of hepatitis B virus is a dual-specificity activator of transcription, stimulating signal transduction pathways in the cytoplasm and transcription factors in the nucleus, when expressed in cell lines in culture. In the cytoplasm, HBx was shown to stimulate the Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) cascade, which is essential for activation of transcription factor AP-1. Here we show that HBx protein stimulates two independently regulated members of the MAP kinase family when expressed transiently in cells. HBx protein stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). HBx activation of ERKs and JNKs leads to induction and activation of AP-1 DNA binding activity involving transient de novo synthesis of c-Fos protein and prolonged synthesis of c-Jun, mediated by N-terminal phosphorylation of c-Jun carried out by HBx-activated JNK. New c-Jun synthesis was blocked by coexpression with a dominant-negative MAP kinase kinase (MEK kinase, MEKK-1), confirming that HBx stimulates the prolonged synthesis of c-Jun by activating JNK signalling pathways. Activation of the c-fos gene was blocked by coexpression with a Raf-C4 catalytic mutant, confirming that HBx induces c-Fos by acting on Ras-Raf linked pathways. HBx activation of ERK and JNK pathways resulted in prolonged accumulation of AP-1-c-Jun dimer complexes. HBx activation of JNK and sustained activation of c-jun, should they occur in the context of hepatitis B virus infection, might play a role in viral transformation and pathogenesis. PMID:8764004

  18. Empirical maps for the calculation of amide I vibrational spectra of proteins from classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Straub, John E

    2014-07-17

    New sets of parameters (maps) for calculating amide I vibrational spectra for proteins through a vibrational exciton model are proposed. The maps are calculated as a function of electric field and van der Waals forces on the atoms of peptide bonds, taking into account the full interaction between peptide bonds and the surrounding environment. The maps are designed to be employed using data obtained from standard all-atom molecular simulations without any additional constraints on the system. Six proteins representing a wide range of sizes and secondary structure complexity were chosen as a test set. Spectra calculated for these proteins reproduce experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively. The proposed maps lead to spectra that capture the weak second peak observed in proteins containing β-sheets, allowing for clear distinction between α-helical and β-sheet proteins. While the parametrization is specific to the CHARMM force field, the methodology presented can be readily applied to any empirical force field. PMID:24654732

  19. Empirical Maps For The Calculation of Amide I Vibrational Spectra of Proteins From Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New sets of parameters (maps) for calculating amide I vibrational spectra for proteins through a vibrational exciton model are proposed. The maps are calculated as a function of electric field and van der Waals forces on the atoms of peptide bonds, taking into account the full interaction between peptide bonds and the surrounding environment. The maps are designed to be employed using data obtained from standard all-atom molecular simulations without any additional constraints on the system. Six proteins representing a wide range of sizes and secondary structure complexity were chosen as a test set. Spectra calculated for these proteins reproduce experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively. The proposed maps lead to spectra that capture the weak second peak observed in proteins containing β-sheets, allowing for clear distinction between α-helical and β-sheet proteins. While the parametrization is specific to the CHARMM force field, the methodology presented can be readily applied to any empirical force field. PMID:24654732

  20. Mapping the Structure and Conformational Movements of Proteins with Transition Metal Ion FRET

    SciTech Connect

    Taraska, J.; Puljung, M; Olivier, N; Olivier, G; Zagotta, W

    2009-01-01

    Visualizing conformational dynamics in proteins has been difficult, and the atomic-scale motions responsible for the behavior of most allosteric proteins are unknown. Here we report that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a small fluorescent dye and a nickel ion bound to a dihistidine motif can be used to monitor small structural rearrangements in proteins. This method provides several key advantages over classical FRET, including the ability to measure the dynamics of close-range interactions, the use of small probes with short linkers, a low orientation dependence, and the ability to add and remove unique tunable acceptors. We used this 'transition metal ion FRET' approach along with X-ray crystallography to determine the structural changes of the gating ring of the mouse hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel HCN2. Our results suggest a general model for the conformational switch in the cyclic nucleotide-binding site of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels.

  1. Controlled Activation of Protein Rotational Dynamics Using Smart Hydrogel Tethering

    SciTech Connect

    Beech, Brenda M.; Xiong, Yijia; Boschek, Curt B.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-05

    Stimulus-responsive hydrogel materials that stabilize and control protein dynamics have the potential to enable a range of applications to take advantage of the inherent specificity and catalytic efficiencies of proteins. Here we describe the modular construction of a hydrogel using an engineered calmodulin (CaM) within a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix that involves the reversible tethering of proteins through an engineered CaM-binding sequence. For these measurements, maltose binding protein (MBP) was isotopically labeled with [13C] and [15N], permitting dynamic structural measurements using TROSY-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Upon initial formation of hydrogels protein dynamics are suppressed, with concomitant increases in protein stability. Relaxation of the hydrogel matrix following transient heating results in the activation of protein dynamics and restoration of substrate-induced large-amplitude domain motions necessary for substrate binding.

  2. Roles of mitogen activated protein kinases and EGF receptor in arsenite-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Myers, Terrance Alix; Rosenberg, Martina; Chavez, Miquella; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lghudson@unm.edu

    2004-11-01

    The dermatotoxicity of arsenic is well established and epidemiological studies identify an increased incidence of keratinocytic tumors (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) associated with arsenic exposure. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of arsenic-mediated skin carcinogenesis, but activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and subsequent regulation of downstream target genes may contribute to tumor promotion and progression. In this study, we investigated activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and the stress-associated kinase p38 by arsenite in HaCat cells, a spontaneously immortalized human keratinocyte cell line. Arsenite concentrations {>=}100 {mu}M stimulate rapid activation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. However, upon extended exposure (24 h), persistent stimulation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases was detected at low micromolar concentrations of arsenite. Although ERK and p38 were activated with similar time and concentration dependence, the mechanism of activation differed for these two MAP kinases. ERK activation by arsenite was fully dependent on the catalytic activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and partially dependent on Src-family kinase activity. In contrast, p38 activation was independent of EGF receptor or Src-family kinase activity. Arsenite-stimulated MAP kinase signal transduction resulted in increased production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an AP-1 regulated gene product. MMP-9 induction by arsenite was prevented when EGF receptor or MAP kinase signaling was inhibited. These studies indicate that EGF receptor activation is a component of arsenite-mediated signal transduction and gene expression in keratinocytes and that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite stimulate key signaling pathways upon extended exposure. Stimulation of MAP kinase cascades by arsenic and subsequent regulation of genes including c-fos, c-jun, and the matrix degrading proteases may play an important

  3. G-Protein binding domains of the angiotensin II AT1A receptors mapped with synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, H; Alexander, R W; Ushio-Fukai, M; Lyons, P R; Akers, M; Griendling, K K

    1998-01-01

    The vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1AR) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. We mapped the G-protein binding domains of the AT1AR using synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence, which interfere with AT1AR-G-protein coupling. Membrane GTPase activity was used as a measure of the functional coupling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Peptides corresponding to the N-terminal region of the second intracellular loop (residues 125-137), the N-terminal region of the third intracellular loop (217-227) and the juxtamembranous region of the C-terminal tail (304-316) inhibited angiotensin II-induced GTPase activation by 30%, 30%, and 70%, respectively. The latter two domains (217-227 and 304-316) are predicted to form amphiphilic alpha-helices. Only the peptide representing residues 217-227 stimulated basal activity (45%). No synthetic peptide had a significant effect on either the number or the affinity of the AT1AR binding. These observations indicate that domains of the second and third regions and the cytoplasmic tail of the AT1AR interact with G-proteins, and that multiple contacts with these receptor domains may be important for binding and activation of the G-proteins. PMID:9620883

  4. Hox proteins: sculpting body parts by activating localized cell death.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Claudio R

    2002-11-19

    Hox proteins shape animal structures by eliciting different developmental programs along the anteroposterior body axis. A recent study reveals that the Drosophila Hox protein Deformed directly activates the cell-death-promoting gene reaper to maintain the boundaries between distinct head segments.

  5. A novel approach for targeted elimination of CSPG4-positive triple-negative breast cancer cells using a MAP tau-based fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Amoury, Manal; Mladenov, Radoslav; Nachreiner, Thomas; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Di Fiore, Stefano; Helfrich, Wijnand; Pardo, Alessa; Fey, Georg; Schwenkert, Michael; Thepen, Theophilus; Kiessling, Fabian; Hussain, Ahmad F; Fischer, Rainer; Kolberg, Katharina; Barth, Stefan

    2016-08-15

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) has been identified as a highly promising target antigen for immunotherapy of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). TNBC represents a highly aggressive heterogeneous group of tumors lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. TNBC is particularly prevalent among young premenopausal women. No suitable targeted therapies are currently available and therefore, novel agents for the targeted elimination of TNBC are urgently needed. Here, we present a novel cytolytic fusion protein (CFP), designated αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP, that consists of a high affinity CSPG4-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) genetically fused to a functionally enhanced form of the human microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau. Our data indicate that αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP efficiently targets CSPG4(+) TNBC-derived cell lines MDA-MB-231 and Hs 578T and potently inhibits their growth with IC50 values of ∼200 nM. Treatment with αCSPG(scFv)-MAP resulted in induction of the mitochondrial stress pathway by activation of caspase-9 as well as endonuclease G translocation to the nucleus, while induction of the caspase-3 apoptosis pathway was not detectable. Importantly, in vivo studies in mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts revealed efficient targeting to and accumulation of αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP at tumor sites resulting in prominent tumor regression. Taken together, this preclinical proof of concept study confirms the potential clinical value of αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP as a novel targeted approach for the elimination of CSPG4-positive TNBC.

  6. A novel approach for targeted elimination of CSPG4-positive triple-negative breast cancer cells using a MAP tau-based fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Amoury, Manal; Mladenov, Radoslav; Nachreiner, Thomas; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Di Fiore, Stefano; Helfrich, Wijnand; Pardo, Alessa; Fey, Georg; Schwenkert, Michael; Thepen, Theophilus; Kiessling, Fabian; Hussain, Ahmad F; Fischer, Rainer; Kolberg, Katharina; Barth, Stefan

    2016-08-15

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) has been identified as a highly promising target antigen for immunotherapy of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). TNBC represents a highly aggressive heterogeneous group of tumors lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. TNBC is particularly prevalent among young premenopausal women. No suitable targeted therapies are currently available and therefore, novel agents for the targeted elimination of TNBC are urgently needed. Here, we present a novel cytolytic fusion protein (CFP), designated αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP, that consists of a high affinity CSPG4-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) genetically fused to a functionally enhanced form of the human microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau. Our data indicate that αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP efficiently targets CSPG4(+) TNBC-derived cell lines MDA-MB-231 and Hs 578T and potently inhibits their growth with IC50 values of ∼200 nM. Treatment with αCSPG(scFv)-MAP resulted in induction of the mitochondrial stress pathway by activation of caspase-9 as well as endonuclease G translocation to the nucleus, while induction of the caspase-3 apoptosis pathway was not detectable. Importantly, in vivo studies in mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts revealed efficient targeting to and accumulation of αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP at tumor sites resulting in prominent tumor regression. Taken together, this preclinical proof of concept study confirms the potential clinical value of αCSPG4(scFv)-MAP as a novel targeted approach for the elimination of CSPG4-positive TNBC. PMID:27037627

  7. Characterization and genomic mapping of genes and pseudogenes of a new human protein tyrosine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Monckton, D.G.

    1996-07-01

    Previously described protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are classified into three types according to their sequence homology and structural features. Here we describe the characterization of genes and pseudogenes of a member of a fourth type of PTP, designated protein tyrosine phosphatase 4A (PTP4A). The 167-amino-acid human PTPs, but does not show any other sequence homology to any of the previously described PTPs. Two cDNA encoding PTP4A that differed in their noncoding regions were isolated. Another cDNA that has a high level of sequence identity with these two cDNAs and a deletion in the coding region was also isolated. Northern analysis using a probe from a common 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNAs recognized mRNAs of about 2 and 4 kb. Both species of mRNA were seen in all human adult and fetal tissues tested. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of the corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones and sequence-tagged site analysis suggested that one of the PTP4A coding genes is located at 1p35 and the other is on chromosome 11. A processed pseudogene for PTP4A was found in the BRCA1 region of 17q21 and shares 96% sequence identity to one of the PTP4A coding cDNAs. Our studies also suggest the existence of another processed pseudogene on chromosome 11. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Structural and kinetic analysis of protein-aggregate strains in vivo using binary epitope mapping.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Johan; Zetterström, Per; Andersen, Peter M; Brännström, Thomas; Graffmo, Karin S; Jonsson, P Andreas; Lang, Lisa; Danielsson, Jens; Oliveberg, Mikael; Marklund, Stefan L

    2015-04-01

    Despite considerable progress in uncovering the molecular details of protein aggregation in vitro, the cause and mechanism of protein-aggregation disease remain poorly understood. One reason is that the amount of pathological aggregates in neural tissue is exceedingly low, precluding examination by conventional approaches. We present here a method for determination of the structure and quantity of aggregates in small tissue samples, circumventing the above problem. The method is based on binary epitope mapping using anti-peptide antibodies. We assessed the usefulness and versatility of the method in mice modeling the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which accumulate intracellular aggregates of superoxide dismutase-1. Two strains of aggregates were identified with different structural architectures, molecular properties, and growth kinetics. Both were different from superoxide dismutase-1 aggregates generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. The strains, which seem kinetically under fragmentation control, are associated with different disease progressions, complying with and adding detail to the growing evidence that seeding, infectivity, and strain dependence are unifying principles of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25802384

  9. Modeling the SHG activities of diverse protein crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haupert, Levi M.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2012-11-01

    The origins of the diversity in the SHG signal from protein crystals are investigated and potential protein-crystal coverage by SHG microscopy is assessed. A symmetry-additive ab initio model for second-harmonic generation (SHG) activity of protein crystals was applied to assess the likely protein-crystal coverage of SHG microscopy. Calculations were performed for 250 proteins in nine point-group symmetries: a total of 2250 crystals. The model suggests that the crystal symmetry and the limit of detection of the instrument are expected to be the strongest predictors of coverage of the factors considered, which also included secondary-structural content and protein size. Much of the diversity in SHG activity is expected to arise primarily from the variability in the intrinsic protein response as well as the orientation within the crystal lattice. Two or more orders-of-magnitude variation in intensity are expected even within protein crystals of the same symmetry. SHG measurements of tetragonal lysozyme crystals confirmed detection, from which a protein coverage of ∼84% was estimated based on the proportion of proteins calculated to produce SHG responses greater than that of tetragonal lysozyme. Good agreement was observed between the measured and calculated ratios of the SHG intensity from lysozyme in tetragonal and monoclinic lattices.

  10. Hemagglutinating activity of proteins from Parkia speciosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Chankhamjon, Kanokwan; Petsom, Amorn; Sawasdipuksa, Narumon; Sangvanich, Polkit

    2010-01-01

    Proteins from Parkia speciosa Hassk. (Fabaceae) seeds were extracted and stepwise precipitated using ammonium sulfate. Proteins precipitated with 25% ammonium sulfate were separated by affinity chromatography on Affi-Gel Blue gel followed by protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 200. The protein Gj, which was identified as a protein similar to putative aristolochene synthase, 3'-partial from Oryza sativa L. (Poaceae), had hemagglutinating activity of 0.39 mug/muL. Moreover, fraction C2 from the proteins precipitated with 60% ammonium sulfate, separated by lectin-specific adsorption chromatography using Con A Sepharose, had hemagglutinating activity of 1.17 mug/muL. Using gel electrophoresis, two proteins C2a and C2b were separated, having molecular weights of 45 kDa and 23 kDa, respectively. From protein identification, C2a was found to be similar to the hypothetical protein B1342F01.11 from Oryza sativa, and C2b was similar to the hypothetical protein At1g51560 from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Brassicaceae). PMID:20645760

  11. Vibrational energy flow through the green fluorescent protein-water interface: communication maps and thermal boundary conductance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Leitner, David M

    2014-07-17

    We calculate communication maps for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to elucidate energy transfer pathways between the chromophore and other parts of the protein in the ground and excited state. The approach locates energy transport channels from the chromophore to remote regions of the protein via residues and water molecules that hydrogen bond to the chromophore. We calculate the thermal boundary conductance between GFP and water over a wide range of temperature and find that the interface between the protein and the cluster of water molecules in the β-barrel poses negligible resistance to thermal flow, consistent with facile vibrational energy transfer from the chromophore to the β-barrel waters observed in the communication maps.

  12. Differential regulation of protein subdomain activity with caged bivalent ligands.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Günter; Müller, Jens; Mack, Timo; Freitag, Daniel F; Höver, Thomas; Pötzsch, Bernd; Heckel, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    Subtle change: Spatiotemporal modulation of individual protein subdomains with light as the trigger signal becomes possible by using bivalent aptamers and introducing photolabile "caging groups" to switch individual aptamer modules ON or OFF differentially. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that it is possible to modulate individual domain activity in aptamers, and thus also domain activity in proteins, with light.

  13. The GAAIN Entity Mapper: An Active-Learning System for Medical Data Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Ashish, Naveen; Dewan, Peehoo; Toga, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on mapping biomedical datasets to a common representation, as an integral part of data harmonization for integrated biomedical data access and sharing. We present GEM, an intelligent software assistant for automated data mapping across different datasets or from a dataset to a common data model. The GEM system automates data mapping by providing precise suggestions for data element mappings. It leverages the detailed metadata about elements in associated dataset documentation such as data dictionaries that are typically available with biomedical datasets. It employs unsupervised text mining techniques to determine similarity between data elements and also employs machine-learning classifiers to identify element matches. It further provides an active-learning capability where the process of training the GEM system is optimized. Our experimental evaluations show that the GEM system provides highly accurate data mappings (over 90% accuracy) for real datasets of thousands of data elements each, in the Alzheimer's disease research domain. Further, the effort in training the system for new datasets is also optimized. We are currently employing the GEM system to map Alzheimer's disease datasets from around the globe into a common representation, as part of a global Alzheimer's disease integrated data sharing and analysis network called GAAIN1. GEM achieves significantly higher data mapping accuracy for biomedical datasets compared to other state-of-the-art tools for database schema matching that have similar functionality. With the use of active-learning capabilities, the user effort in training the system is minimal. PMID:26793094

  14. Cloning of three novel neuronal Cdk5 activator binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ching, Y P; Qi, Z; Wang, J H

    2000-01-25

    Neuronal Cdc2-like kinase (Nclk) is involved in the regulation of neuronal differentiation and neuro-cytoskeleton dynamics. The active kinase consists of a catalytic subunit, Cdk5, and a 25 kDa activator protein (p25nck5a) derived from a 35 kDa neuronal-specific protein (p35nck5a). As an extension of our previous study (Qi, Z., Tang, D., Zhu, X., Fujita, D.J., Wang, J.H., 1998. Association of neurofilament proteins with neuronal Cdk5 activator. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 2329-2335), which showed that neurofilament is one of the p35nck5a-associated proteins, we now report the isolation of three other novel p35nck5a-associated proteins using the yeast two-hybrid screen. The full-length forms of these three novel proteins, designated C42, C48 and C53, have a molecular mass of 66, 24, and 57 kDa, respectively. Northern analysis indicates that these novel proteins are widely expressed in human tissues, including the heart, brain, skeletal muscle, placenta, lung, liver, kidney and pancreas. The bacterially expressed glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion forms of these three proteins were able to co-precipitate p35nck5a complexed with Cdk5 from insect cell lysate. Among these three proteins, only C48 and C53 can be phosphorylated by Nclk, suggesting that they may be the substrates of Nclk. Sequence homology searches have suggested that the C48 protein is marginally related to restin protein, whereas the C42 protein has homologues of unknown function in Caenorhabditis elegans and Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:10721722

  15. A conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is required for mating in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangye; Chen, Jing; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping

    2002-12-01

    Candida albicans had been thought to lack a mating process until the recent discovery of a mating type-like locus and mating between MTLa and MTL(alpha) strains. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate mating in C. albicans, we examined the function of Cph1 and its upstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway in mating, as they are homologues of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that overexpressing CPH1 in MTLa, but not in MTLa/alpha strains, induced the transcription of orthologues of S. cerevisiae pheromone-induced genes and also increased mating efficiency. Furthermore, cph1 and hst7 mutants were completely defective in mating, and cst20 and cek1 mutants showed reduced mating efficiency, as in S. cerevisiae. The partial mating defect in cek1 results from the presence of a functionally redundant MAP kinase, Cek2. CEK2 complemented the mating defect of a fus3 kss1 mutant of S. cerevisiae and was expressed only in MTLa or MTL(alpha), but not in MTLa/alpha cell types. Moreover, a cek1 cek2 double mutant was completely defective in mating. Our data suggest that the conserved MAP kinase pathway regulates mating in C. albicans. We also observed that C. albicans mating efficiency was greatly affected by medium composition, indicating the potential involvement of nutrient-sensing pathways in mating in addition to the MAP kinase pathway. PMID:12453219

  16. Activation of an Endoribonuclease by Non-intein Protein Splicing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stephen J; Stern, David B

    2016-07-29

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast-localized poly(A)-binding protein RB47 is predicted to contain a non-conserved linker (NCL) sequence flanked by highly conserved N- and C-terminal sequences, based on the corresponding cDNA. RB47 was purified from chloroplasts in association with an endoribonuclease activity; however, protein sequencing failed to detect the NCL. Furthermore, while recombinant RB47 including the NCL did not display endoribonuclease activity in vitro, versions lacking the NCL displayed strong activity. Both full-length and shorter forms of RB47 could be detected in chloroplasts, with conversion to the shorter form occurring in chloroplasts isolated from cells grown in the light. This conversion could be replicated in vitro in chloroplast extracts in a light-dependent manner, where epitope tags and protein sequencing showed that the NCL was excised from a full-length recombinant substrate, together with splicing of the flanking sequences. The requirement for endogenous factors and light differentiates this protein splicing from autocatalytic inteins, and may allow the chloroplast to regulate the activation of RB47 endoribonuclease activity. We speculate that this protein splicing activity arose to post-translationally repair proteins that had been inactivated by deleterious insertions or extensions. PMID:27311716

  17. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Substance P Expression and Topographic Map Maintenance by a Cholinergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shichun; Butt, Christopher M.; Pauly, James R.; Debski, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    We have assessed the role of activity in the adult frog visual system in modulating two aspects of neuronal plasticity: neurotransmitter expression and topographic map maintenance. Chronic treatment of one tectal lobe with the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione decreased the percentage of substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-IR) tectal cells in the untreated lobe while disrupting topographic map formation in the treated one. Treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist d-(−)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (d-AP-5) disrupted the topographic map but had no affect on SP-IR cells. These results indicate that maintenance of the topographic map is dependent on direct input from the glutamatergic retinal ganglion cells, whereas substance P (SP) expression is being regulated by a pathway that relays activity from one tectal lobe to the other. Such a pathway is provided by the cholinergic nucleus isthmi, which is reciprocally connected to the ipsilateral tectum and sends a projection to the contralateral one. Mecamylamine and atropine, antagonists of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, respectively, were used together to block all cholinergic activity or alone to block receptor subclass activity. All three treatments decreased SP expression and disrupted the topographic map in the treated tectal lobe. We conclude that both SP expression and topographic map maintenance in the adult optic tectum are activity-dependent processes. Although our results are consistent with the maintenance of the topographic map through an NMDA receptor-based mechanism, they suggest that SP expression is regulated by a cholinergic interaction that depends on retinal ganglion cell input only for its activation. PMID:10884319

  18. Distance Mapping in Proteins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy: Tyrosine, like Tryptophan, Quenches Bimane Fluorescence in a Distance-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan-induced quenching of fluorophores (TrIQ) uses intramolecular fluorescence quenching to assess distances in proteins too small (<15 Å) to be easily probed by traditional Forster resonance energy transfer methods. A powerful aspect of TrIQ is its ability to obtain an ultrafast snapshot of a protein conformation, by identifying “static quenching” (contact between the Trp and probe at the moment of light excitation). Here we report new advances in this site-directed fluorescence labeling (SDFL) approach, gleaned from recent studies of T4 lysozyme (T4L). First, we show that like TrIQ, tyrosine-induced quenching (TyrIQ) occurs for the fluorophore bimane in a distance-dependent fashion, although with some key differences. The Tyr “sphere of quenching” for bimane (≤10 Å) is smaller than for Trp (≤15 Å, Cα–Cα distance), and the size difference between the quenching residue (Tyr) and control (Phe) differs by only a hydroxyl group. Second, we show how TrIQ and TyrIQ can be used together to assess the magnitude and energetics of a protein movement. In these studies, we placed a bimane (probe) and Trp or Tyr (quencher) on opposite ends of a “hinge” in T4L and conducted TrIQ and TyrIQ measurements. Our results are consistent with an ∼5 Å change in Cα–Cα distances between these sites upon substrate binding, in agreement with the crystal structures. Subsequent Arrhenius analysis suggests the activation energy barrier (Ea) to this movement is relatively low (∼1.5–2.5 kcal/mol). Together, these results demonstrate that TyrIQ, used together with TrIQ, significantly expands the power of quenching-based distance mapping SDFL studies. PMID:25144569

  19. Relics of Mining Activities in West Bohemia - Mapping by Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Pavelka, K.

    2013-07-01

    The part of the Czech Republic - West Bohemia is well known for mining activities, different types of raw materials have been extracted from mines near Jáchymov, Sokolov and other sites since medieval times till today. There are original maps of some sites, as well there is effort of some geologists to find and map relics of mining activities (such as digs visible in terrain) by land survey. The quality of these available maps is unfortunately questionable - due to its age or used methods. Our aim was to find resource useful for searching for these sites, than to use field survey to confirm our findings. We used available digital terrain model (DTM) based on airborne laser scanning (ALS) technology to map relics of mining activities in West Bohemia. The Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre started in 2008 project for terrain mapping using the ALS method. The aim of mapping was to get authentic and detailed DTM of the Czech Republic. About 2/3 of area is currently covered by the DTM based on ALS, this year the mapping should be complete. The dataset is characterised by the density of 1-2 points/m2 and the standard deviation in altitude of model points is up to 30 cm (in forested areas). We had DTM in form of shaded surface for one third of the Czech Republic. The shaded surface enables to highlight terrain break lines, which is suitable for archaeological research. Terrain modifications caused by human activity are characterized by terrain break lines, local tops or pits, which do not fit to local geomorphology. Visual image interpretation of the dataset is in the process.

  20. 4-Anilino-6-phenyl-quinoline inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2).

    PubMed

    Olsson, Henric; Sjö, Peter; Ersoy, Oguz; Kristoffersson, Anna; Larsson, Joakim; Nordén, Bo

    2010-08-15

    A class of inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated kinase 2 (MK2) was discovered via high-throughput screening. This compound class demonstrates activity against the enzyme with sub-microM IC(50) values, and suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha levels in THP-1 cells. MK2 inhibition kinetic measurements indicated mixed binding approaching non-ATP competitive inhibition.

  1. Mapping Active Faults and Tectonic Geomorphology offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hart, P. E.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2008, and July 2009, the USGS conducted two high-resolution, marine, seismic-reflection surveys across the continental shelf and upper slope between Piedras Blancas and Point Sal, central California, in order to better characterize regional earthquake sources. More than 1,300 km of single-channel seismic data were acquired aboard the USGS R/V Parke Snavely using a 500-joule mini-sparker source fired at a 0.5-second shot interval and recorded with a 15-meter streamer. Most tracklines were run perpendicular to the coast at 800-meter spacing, extending from the nearshore (~ 10-15 m water depth) to as far as 20 km offshore. Sub-bottom imaging varies with substrate, ranging from outstanding (100 to 150 m of penetration) in inferred Quaternary shallow marine, shelf and upper slope deposits to poor (0 to 10 m) in the Mesozoic basement rocks. Marine magnetic data were collected simultaneously on this survey, and both data sets are being integrated with new aeromagnetic data, publicly available industry seismic-reflection data, onshore geology, seismicity, and high-resolution bathymetry. Goals of the study are to map geology, structure, and sediment distribution; to document fault location, length, segmentation, shallow geometry and structure; and to identify possible sampling targets for constraining fault slip rates, earthquake recurrence, and tsunami hazard potential. The structure and tectonic geomorphology of the >100-km-long, right-lateral, Hosgri fault zone and its connections to the Los Osos, Pecho, Oceano and other northwest-trending inboard faults are the focus of this ongoing work. The Hosgri fault forms the eastern margin of the offshore Santa Maria basin and coincides in places with the outer edge of the narrow (5- to 15-km-wide), structurally complex continental shelf. The Hosgri is imaged as a relatively continuous, vertical fault zone that extends upward to the seafloor; varies significantly and rapidly along strike; and incorporates numerous

  2. 125I-labeled peptide mapping of some heat-modifiable proteins of the gonococcal outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J

    1980-01-01

    Gonococci from opaque colonies have cell wall outer membrane proteins that are lacking from organisms which form transparent colonies. These "colony opacity-associated" proteins are among a group of "minor" proteins that exhibit heat modification of their apparent subunit molecular sizes, are easily extracted by deoxycholate, have apparent subunit molecular weights varying from 24,000 to 29,000 and are exposed on the surfaces of gonococci. Other minor proteins found on gonococci are the "leukocyte association proteins," whose presence correlates with reactivities of gonococci with human neutrophils. Several of the colony opacity-associated proteins and leukocyte association proteins were subjected to 125I-peptide mapping of protein bands separated by polyacrylamide electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The structural similarities and differences among these heat-modifiable surface proteins were studied, as well as their similarities with the major protein of the gonococcal outer membrane. A relatively high apparent degree of structural homology is found among the heat-modifiable proteins from different strains of opaque colony gonococcal forms. There is also some apparent structural homology for 125I-peptides of heat-modifiable versus major proteins of the gonococcal outer membrane. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6769820

  3. Phosphorylation of platelet actin-binding protein during platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.C.; Gerrard, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    In this study we have followed the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein as a function of platelet activation. Utilizing polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to resolve total platelet protein samples, we found 2 to 3-fold labeling increases in actin-binding protein 30 to 60 sec after thrombin stimulation. Somewhat larger increases were observed for 40,000 and 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptides. The actin-binding protein was identified on the gels by coelectrophoresis with purified actin-binding protein, its presence in cytoskeletal cores prepared by detergent extraction of activated 32P-labeled platelets, and by direct immunoprecipitation with antibodies against guinea pig vas deferens filamin (actin-binding protein). In addition, these cytoskeletal cores indicated that the 32P-labeled actin-binding protein was closely associated with the activated platelet's cytoskeleton. Following the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein over an 8-min time course revealed that in aggregating platelet samples rapid dephosphorylation to almost initial levels occurred between 3 and 5 min. A similar curve was obtained for the 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptide. However, rapid dephosphorylation was not observed if platelet aggregation was prevented by chelating external calcium or by using thrombasthenic platelets lacking the aggregation response. Thus, cell-cell contact would seem to be crucial in initiating the rapid dephosphorylation response.

  4. Comparing Computer-Supported Dynamic Modeling and "Paper & Pencil" Concept Mapping Technique in Students' Collaborative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komis, Vassilis; Ergazaki, Marida; Zogza, Vassiliki

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at highlighting the collaborative activity of two high school students (age 14) in the cases of modeling the complex biological process of plant growth with two different tools: the "paper & pencil" concept mapping technique and the computer-supported educational environment "ModelsCreator". Students' shared activity in both cases…

  5. Multiple docking sites on substrate proteins form a modular system that mediates recognition by ERK MAP kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Dave; Glossip, Danielle; Xing, Heming; Muslin, Anthony J.; Kornfeld, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    MAP kinases phosphorylate specific groups of substrate proteins. Here we show that the amino acid sequence FXFP is an evolutionarily conserved docking site that mediates ERK MAP kinase binding to substrates in multiple protein families. FXFP and the D box, a different docking site, form a modular recognition system, as they can function independently or in combination. FXFP is specific for ERK, whereas the D box mediates binding to ERK and JNK MAP kinase, suggesting that the partially overlapping substrate specificities of ERK and JNK result from recognition of shared and unique docking sites. These findings enabled us to predict new ERK substrates and design peptide inhibitors of ERK that functioned in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9925641

  6. IRS-PCR-based genetic mapping of the huntingtin interacting protein gene (HIP1) on mouse chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Himmelbauer, H; Wedemeyer, N; Haaf, T; Wanker, E E; Schalkwyk, L C; Lehrach, H

    1998-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating central nervous system disorder. Even though the gene responsible has been positionally cloned recently, its etiology has remained largely unclear. To investigate potential disease mechanisms, we conducted a search for binding partners of the HD-protein huntingtin. With the yeast two-hybrid system, one such interacting factor, the huntingtin interacting protein-1 (HIP-1), was identified (Wanker et al. 1997; Kalchman et al. 1997) and the human gene mapped to 7q11.2. In this paper we demonstrate the localization of the HIP1 mouse homologue (Hip1) into a previously identified region of human-mouse synteny on distal mouse Chromosome (Chr) 5, both employing an IRS-PCR-based mapping strategy and traditional fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping.

  7. Prototype active scanner for nighttime oil spill mapping and classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandness, G. A.; Ailes, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype, active, aerial scanner system was constructed for nighttime water pollution detection and nighttime multispectral imaging of the ground. An arc lamp was used to produce the transmitted light and four detector channels provided a multispectral measurement capability. The feasibility of the design concept was demonstrated by laboratory and flight tests of the prototype system.

  8. Detecting protein complexes from active protein interaction networks constructed with dynamic gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein interaction networks (PINs) are known to be useful to detect protein complexes. However, most available PINs are static, which cannot reflect the dynamic changes in real networks. At present, some researchers have tried to construct dynamic networks by incorporating time-course (dynamic) gene expression data with PINs. However, the inevitable background noise exists in the gene expression array, which could degrade the quality of dynamic networkds. Therefore, it is needed to filter out contaminated gene expression data before further data integration and analysis. Results Firstly, we adopt a dynamic model-based method to filter noisy data from dynamic expression profiles. Then a new method is proposed for identifying active proteins from dynamic gene expression profiles. An active protein at a time point is defined as the protein the expression level of whose corresponding gene at that time point is higher than a threshold determined by a standard variance involved threshold function. Furthermore, a noise-filtered active protein interaction network (NF-APIN) is constructed. To demonstrate the efficiency of our method, we detect protein complexes from the NF-APIN, compared with those from other dynamic PINs. Conclusion A dynamic model based method can effectively filter out noises in dynamic gene expression data. Our method to compute a threshold for determining the active time points of noise-filtered genes can make the dynamic construction more accuracy and provide a high quality framework for network analysis, such as protein complex prediction. PMID:24565281

  9. Structural mechanism of G protein activation by G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Kim, Hee Ryung; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a family of membrane receptors that regulate physiology and pathology of various organs. Consequently, about 40% of drugs in the market targets GPCRs. Heterotrimeric G proteins are composed of α, β, and γ subunits, and act as the key downstream signaling molecules of GPCRs. The structural mechanism of G protein activation by GPCRs has been of a great interest, and a number of biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed since the late 80's. These studies investigated the interface between GPCR and G proteins and the structural mechanism of GPCR-induced G protein activation. Recently, arrestins are also reported to be important molecular switches in GPCR-mediated signal transduction, and the physiological output of arrestin-mediated signal transduction is different from that of G protein-mediated signal transduction. Understanding the structural mechanism of the activation of G proteins and arrestins would provide fundamental information for the downstream signaling-selective GPCR-targeting drug development. This review will discuss the structural mechanism of GPCR-induced G protein activation by comparing previous biochemical and biophysical studies.

  10. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  11. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; et al

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function.more » We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.« less

  12. Heterozygous Mutations in MAP3K7, Encoding TGF-β-Activated Kinase 1, Cause Cardiospondylocarpofacial Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Carine; Rogers, Curtis; Le Goff, Wilfried; Pinto, Graziella; Bonnet, Damien; Chrabieh, Maya; Alibeu, Olivier; Nistchke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Picard, Capucine; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiospondylocarpofacial (CSCF) syndrome is characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly with carpal-tarsal fusion and extensive posterior cervical vertebral synostosis, cardiac septal defects with valve dysplasia, and deafness with inner ear malformations. Whole-exome sequencing identified heterozygous MAP3K7 mutations in six distinct CSCF-affected individuals from four families and ranging in age from 5 to 37 years. MAP3K7 encodes transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 signaling pathway. MAPK-p38 signaling was markedly altered when expression of non-canonical TGF-β-driven target genes was impaired. These findings support the loss of transcriptional control of the TGF-β-MAPK-p38 pathway in fibroblasts obtained from affected individuals. Surprisingly, although TAK1 is located at the crossroad of inflammation, immunity, and cancer, this study reports MAP3K7 mutations in a developmental disorder affecting mainly cartilage, bone, and heart. PMID:27426734

  13. Identification of a common protein association region in the neuronal Cdk5 activator.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Ching, Y P; Lam, W H; Qi, Z; Zhang, M; Wang, J H

    2000-10-13

    Cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) depends on the association with neuronal Cdk5 activator (Nck5a) for kinase activity. A variety of cellular proteins have been shown to undergo high affinity association with Nck5a, including three novel proteins, C42, C48, and C53 found by a yeast two-hybrid screen (Ching, Y. P., Qi, Z., and Wang, J. H. (2000) Gene 242, 285-294). The three proteins show competitive binding to Nck5a suggesting that they bind at a common site. The binding site has been mapped to a region of 26 amino acid residues (residues 145 to 170) at the N-terminal boundary of the kinase activation domain of Nck5a. This region of Nck5a contains an amphipathic alpha-helix whose hydrophobic face is involved in Cdk5 activation (Chin, K. T., Ohki, S, Tang, D., Cheng, H. C., Wang, J. H. , and Zhang, M. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 7120-7127). Several lines of evidence suggest that Nck5a interacts with the binding proteins at the hydrophilic face of the amphipathic alpha-helix. First, the Nck5a-(145-170) peptide can bind Cdk5 and Nck5a-binding proteins simultaneously. Second, the association of Nck5a-(145-170) to C48 can be markedly reduced by high ionic strength whereas the interaction between Nck5a and Cdk5 is not affected. Third, substitution of Glu(157) by glutamine in Nck5a-(145-170) abolishes the peptide's ability to bind to the three Nck5a-binding proteins without diminishing its Cdk5 binding activity. PMID:10915792

  14. Notum deacylates Wnt proteins to suppress signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Satoshi; Langton, Paul F; Zebisch, Matthias; Howell, Steven A; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Jones, E Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-12

    Signalling by Wnt proteins is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnt proteins from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity, as glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which probably help Notum to co-localize with Wnt proteins. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnt proteins and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  15. The role of photogeologic mapping in traverse planning: Lessons from DRATS 2010 activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, , James A.; Fortezzo, Corey M.

    2013-10-01

    We produced a 1:24,000 scale photogeologic map of the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) 2010 simulated lunar mission traverse area and surrounding environments located within the northeastern part of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), north-central Arizona. To mimic an exploratory mission, we approached the region "blindly" by rejecting prior knowledge or preconceived notions of the regional geologic setting and focused instead only on image and topographic base maps that were intended to be equivalent to pre-cursor mission "orbital returns". We used photogeologic mapping techniques equivalent to those employed during the construction of modern planetary geologic maps. Based on image and topographic base maps, we identified 4 surficial units (talus, channel, dissected, and plains units), 5 volcanic units (older cone, younger cone, older flow, younger flow, and block field units), and 5 basement units (grey-toned mottled, red-toned platy, red-toned layered, light-toned slabby, and light-toned layered units). Comparison of our remote-based map units with published field-based map units indicates that the two techniques yield pervasively similar results of contrasting detail, with higher accuracies linked to remote-based units that have high topographic relief and tonal contrast relative to adjacent units. We list key scientific questions that remained after photogeologic mapping and prior to DRATS activities and identify 13 specific observations that the crew and science team would need to make in order to address those questions and refine the interpreted geologic context. We translated potential observations into 62 recommended sites for visitation and observation during the mission traverse. The production and use of a mission-specific photogeologic map for DRATS 2010 activities resulted in strategic and tactical recommendations regarding observational context and hypothesis tracking over the course of an exploratory mission.

  16. The role of photogeologic mapping in traverse planning: lessons learned from DRATS 2010 activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, James A.; Fortezzo, Corey M.

    2013-01-01

    We produced a 1:24,000 scale photogeologic map of the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) 2010 simulated lunar mission traverse area and surrounding environments located within the northeastern part of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), north-central Arizona. To mimic an exploratory mission, we approached the region "blindly" by rejecting prior knowledge or preconceived notions of the regional geologic setting and focused instead only on image and topographic base maps that were intended to be equivalent to pre-cursor mission "orbital returns". We used photogeologic mapping techniques equivalent to those employed during the construction of modern planetary geologic maps. Based on image and topographic base maps, we identified 4 surficial units (talus, channel, dissected, and plains units), 5 volcanic units (older cone, younger cone, older flow, younger flow, and block field units), and 5 basement units (grey-toned mottled, red-toned platy, red-toned layered, light-toned slabby, and light-toned layered units). Comparison of our remote-based map units with published field-based map units indicates that the two techniques yield pervasively similar results of contrasting detail, with higher accuracies linked to remote-based units that have high topographic relief and tonal contrast relative to adjacent units. We list key scientific questions that remained after photogeologic mapping and prior to DRATS activities and identify 13 specific observations that the crew and science team would need to make in order to address those questions and refine the interpreted geologic context. We translated potential observations into 62 recommended sites for visitation and observation during the mission traverse. The production and use of a mission-specific photogeologic map for DRATS 2010 activities resulted in strategic and tactical recommendations regarding observational context and hypothesis tracking over the course of an exploratory mission.

  17. The human renin-binding protein gene (RENBP) maps in Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van der; Verdijk, M.; Oost, B.A. van ); Kiochis, P.; Poustka, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors report here the successful application of the method by which cDNA libraries are screened with positionally identified genomic clones. Human cosmid clones were selected from a cosmid library derived from the Q1Z cell line. This Q1Z cell line is a hamster-human somatic cell hybrid that contains the Xq28 region as its sole human component. To search for kidney-expressed genes, they screened a kidney cDNA library purchased from Clontech with cosmid-derived probes. Based on the physical mapping of the vasopressin V2 receptor gene close to the L1CAM gene, they analyzed cosmids derived from this region. One of the cosmids was 12B2, located 50 kb from the L1CAM gene. A 20-kb EcoRI subclone from the 12B2 cosmid was used as probe. This fragment did not hybridize to the probe 2-55 in contrast to the whole cosmid 12B2. Screening of 200,000 cDNA clones resulted in the identification of two positive clones. After sequence determination, it appeared that one of the positive cDNA clones contained Escherichia coli DNA as insert (data not shown). The other cDNA (pMV24) contained an open reading frame corresponding to the 243 amino-terminal amino acids of the human renin binding protein. The RENBP gene maps to interval 3 between the loci for DX52 and G-6-PD. This is the same interval as that for the color blindness gene, DXS707, and the AVPR2, L1CAM, and QM genes. This result confirms that the isolated RENBP cDNA originates from the same location as that from which the parental cosmid clone was derived. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  19. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Carlos M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  20. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  1. Mapping the Putative G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Docking Site on GPCR Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Beautrait, Alexandre; Michalski, Kevin R.; Lopez, Thomas S.; Mannix, Katelynn M.; McDonald, Devin J.; Cutter, Amber R.; Medina, Christopher B.; Hebert, Aaron M.; Francis, Charnelle J.; Bouvier, Michel; Tesmer, John J. G.; Sterne-Marr, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate agonist-occupied receptors initiating the processes of desensitization and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Interaction of GRKs with activated receptors serves to stimulate their kinase activity. The extreme N-terminal helix (αN), the kinase small lobe, and the active site tether (AST) of the AGC kinase domain have previously been implicated in mediating the allosteric activation. Expanded mutagenesis of the αN and AST allowed us to further assess the role of these two regions in kinase activation and receptor phosphorylation in vitro and in intact cells. We also developed a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay to monitor the recruitment of GRK2 to activated α2A-adrenergic receptors (α2AARs) in living cells. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer signal exhibited a biphasic response to norepinephrine concentration, suggesting that GRK2 is recruited to Gβγ and α2AAR with EC50 values of 15 nm and 8 μm, respectively. We show that mutations in αN (L4A, V7E, L8E, V11A, S12A, Y13A, and M17A) and AST (G475I, V477D, and I485A) regions impair or potentiate receptor phosphorylation and/or recruitment. We suggest that a surface of GRK2, including Leu4, Val7, Leu8, Val11, and Ser12, directly interacts with receptors, whereas residues such as Asp10, Tyr13, Ala16, Met17, Gly475, Val477, and Ile485 are more important for kinase domain closure and activation. Taken together with data on GRK1 and GRK6, our data suggest that all three GRK subfamilies make conserved interactions with G protein-coupled receptors, but there may be unique interactions that influence selectivity. PMID:25049229

  2. Evaluation of feasibility of mapping seismically active faults in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, L. D. (Principal Investigator); Vanwormer, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery is proving to be exceptionally useful in delineating structural features in Alaska which have never been recognized on the ground. Previously unmapped features such as seismically active faults and major structural lineaments are especially evident. Among the more significant results of this investigation is the discovery of an active strand of the Denali fault. The new fault has a history of scattered activity and was the scene of a magnitude 4.8 earthquake on October 1, 1972. Of greater significance is the disclosure of a large scale conjugate fracture system north of the Alaska Range. This fracture system appears to result from compressive stress radiating outward from around Mt. McKinley. One member of the system was the scene of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake in 1968. The potential value of ERTS-1 imagery to land use planning is reflected in the fact that this earthquake occurred within 10 km of the site which was proposed for the Rampart Dam, and the fault on which it occurred passes very near the proposed site for the bridge and oil pipeline crossing of the Yukon River.

  3. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554) in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins) as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression—including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding, and degradation) steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:26579181

  4. RNAi screens reveal novel metabolic regulators: RIP140, MAP4k4 and the lipid droplet associated fat specific protein (FSP) 27.

    PubMed

    Puri, V; Virbasius, J V; Guilherme, A; Czech, M P

    2008-01-01

    Adipose tissue modulates whole body metabolism and insulin sensitivity by controlling circulating lipid levels and producing molecules that can regulate fatty acid metabolism in such tissues as muscle and liver. We have developed RNA interference (RNAi) screens to identify genes in cultured adipocytes that regulate insulin signalling and key metabolic pathways. These short interfering RNA (siRNA)-based screens identified the transcriptional corepressor receptor interacting protein 140 (RIP140) (J Clin Invest 116: 125, 2006) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP4k4) (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103: 2087, 2006) as negative regulators of insulin-responsive hexose uptake and oxidative metabolism. Gene expression profiling revealed that RIP140 depletion upregulates the expression of clusters of genes in the pathways of glucose uptake, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. RIP140-null mice resist weight gain on a high-fat diet and display enhanced glucose tolerance. MAP4k4 depletion in adipocytes increases many of the RIP140-sensitive genes, increases adipogenesis and mediates some actions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Remarkably, another hit in our RNAi screens was fat specific protein 27 (FSP27), a highly expressed isoform of Cidea. We discovered that FSP27 unexpectedly associates specifically with lipid droplets and regulates fat storage. We conclude that RIP140, MAP4k4 and the novel lipid droplet protein FSP27 are powerful regulators of adipose tissue metabolism and are potential therapeutic targets for controlling metabolic disease. The discovery of these novel proteins validates the power of RNAi screening for discovery of new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:18171433

  5. Dependency of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) for tubulin stability and assembly; use of estramustine phosphate in the study of microtubules.

    PubMed

    Fridén, B; Wallin, M

    1991-07-10

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were separated from tubulin with several different methods. The ability of the isolated MAPs to reinduce assembly of phosphocellulose purified tubulin differed markedly between the different methods. MAPs isolated by addition of 0.35 M NaCl to taxol-stabilized microtubules stimulated tubulin assembly most effectively, while addition of 0.6 M NaCl produced MAPs with a substantially lower ability to stimulate tubulin assembly. The second best preparation was achieved with phosphocellulose chromatographic separation of MAPs with 0.6 M NaCl elution. The addition of estramustine phosphate to microtubules reconstituted of MAPs prepared by 0.35 M NaCl or phosphocellulose chromatography, induced less disassembly than for microtubules assembled from unseparated proteins, and was almost without effect on microtubules reconstituted from MAPs prepared by taxol and 0.6 M NaCl. Estramustine phosphate binds to the tubulin binding part of the MAPs, and the results do therefore indicate that the MAPs are altered by the separation methods. Since the MAPs are regarded as highly stable molecules, one probable alteration could be aggregation of the MAPs, as also indicated by the results. The purified tubulin itself seemed not to be affected by the phosphocellulose purification, since the microtubule proteins were unchanged by the low buffer strenght used during the cromatography. However, the assembly competence after a prolonged incubation of the microtubule proteins at 4 degrees C was dependent on intact bindings between the tubulin and MAPs.

  6. The effects of cardamonin on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory protein production and MAP kinase and NFκB signalling pathways in monocytes/macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hatziieremia, S; Gray, A I; Ferro, V A; Paul, A; Plevin, R

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study we examined the effect of the natural product cardamonin, upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory gene expression in order to attempt to pinpoint the mechanism of action. Experimental approaches: Cardamonin was isolated from the Greek plant A. absinthium L. Its effects were assessed on LPS-induced nitrite release and iNOS and COX-2 protein expression in two macrophage cell lines. Western blotting was used to investigate its effects on phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases, ERK, JNK and p38 MAP kinase, and activation of the NFκB pathway, at the level of IκBα degradation and phosphorylation of NFκB. Also its effects on NFκB and GAS/GAF-DNA binding were assessed by EMSA. Key results: Cardamonin concentration-dependently inhibited both NO release and iNOS expression but had no effect on COX-2 expression. It did not affect phosphorylation of the MAP kinases, degradation of IκBα or phosphorylation of NFκB. However, it inhibited NFκB DNA-binding in both LPS-stimulated cells and nuclear extracts of the cells (in vitro). It also inhibited IFNγ-stimulated iNOS induction and GAS/GAF-DNA binding. Conclusions and Implications: These results show that the inhibitory effect of cardamonin on LPS-induced iNOS induction is not mediated via effects on the initial activation of the NFκB or MAP kinase pathways but is due to a direct effect on transcription factor binding to DNA. However, although some selectivity in cardamonin's action is implicated by its inability to affect COX-2 expression, its exact mechanism(s) of action has yet to be identified. PMID:16894344

  7. Mapping Muscles Activation to Force Perception during Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Simone; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It has been largely proved that while judging a force humans mainly rely on the motor commands produced to interact with that force (i.e., sense of effort). Despite of a large bulk of previous investigations interested in understanding the contributions of the descending and ascending signals in force perception, very few attempts have been made to link a measure of neural output (i.e., EMG) to the psychophysical performance. Indeed, the amount of correlation between EMG activity and perceptual decisions can be interpreted as an estimate of the contribution of central signals involved in the sensation of force. In this study we investigated this correlation by measuring the muscular activity of eight arm muscles while participants performed a quasi-isometric force detection task. Here we showed a method to quantitatively describe muscular activity (“muscle-metric function”) that was directly comparable to the description of the participants' psychophysical decisions about the stimulus force. We observed that under our experimental conditions, muscle-metric absolute thresholds and the shape of the muscle-metric curves were closely related to those provided by the psychophysics. In fact a global measure of the muscles considered was able to predict approximately 60% of the perceptual decisions total variance. Moreover the inter-subjects differences in psychophysical sensitivity showed high correlation with both participants' muscles sensitivity and participants' joint torques. Overall, our findings gave insights into both the role played by the corticospinal motor commands while performing a force detection task and the influence of the gravitational muscular torque on the estimation of vertical forces. PMID:27032087

  8. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  9. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  10. Organization, structure and activity of proteins in monolayers.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Julie; Trudel, Eric; Méthot, Mario; Desmeules, Philippe; Salesse, Christian

    2007-08-01

    Many different processes take place at the cell membrane interface. Indeed, for instance, ligands bind membrane proteins which in turn activate peripheral membrane proteins, some of which are enzymes whose action is also located at the membrane interface. Native cell membranes are difficult to use to gain information on the activity of individual proteins at the membrane interface because of the large number of different proteins involved in membranous processes. Model membrane systems, such as monolayers at the air-water interface, have thus been extensively used during the last 50 years to reconstitute proteins and to gain information on their organization, structure and activity in membranes. In the present paper, we review the recent work we have performed with membrane and peripheral proteins as well as enzymes in monolayers at the air-water interface. We show that the structure and orientation of gramicidin has been determined by combining different methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin is indistinguishable from that in native membranes when appropriate conditions are used. We also show that the kinetics and extent of monolayer binding of myristoylated recoverin is much faster than that of the nonmyristoylated form and that this binding is highly favored by the presence polyunsaturated phospholipids. Moreover, we show that the use of fragments of RPE65 allow determine which region of this protein is most likely involved in membrane binding. Monomolecular films were also used to further understand the hydrolysis of organized phospholipids by phospholipases A2 and C.

  11. Anthelmintic activity of Leucaena leucocephala protein extracts on Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Alexandra Martins dos Santos; de Araújo, Sandra Alves; Lopes, Suzana Gomes; Costa Junior, Livio Martins

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of protein extracts obtained from the plant Leucaena leucocephala on the nematode parasite Haemonchus contortus. The seeds, shell and cotyledon of L. leucocephala were separated and their proteins extracted using a sodium phosphate buffer, and named as TE (total seed extract), SE (shell extract) and CE (cotyledon extract). Soluble protein content, protease, protease inhibitory and chitinase activity assays were performed. Exsheathment inhibition of H. contortus larvae were performed at concentrations of 0.6 mg mL-1, and egg hatch assays were conducted at protein concentrations of 0.8, 0.4, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 mg mL-1. The effective concentration for 50% hatching inhibition (EC50) was estimated by probit. Different proportions of soluble proteins, protease and chitinase were found in TE and CE. Protease inhibitory activity was detected in all extracts. The EC50 of the CE and TE extracts were 0.48 and 0.33 mg mL-1, respectively. No ovicidal effects on H. contortus were detected in SE extracts, and none of the protein extracts demonstrated larvicidal effects on H. contortus. We therefore conclude that protein extracts of L. leucocephala had a detrimental effect on nematode eggs, which can be correlated with the high protease and chitinase activity of these extracts. PMID:26689178

  12. Organization, Structure and Activity of Proteins in Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher,J.; Trudel, E.; Methot, M.; Desmeules, P.; Salesse, C.

    2007-01-01

    Many different processes take place at the cell membrane interface. Indeed, for instance, ligands bind membrane proteins which in turn activate peripheral membrane proteins, some of which are enzymes whose action is also located at the membrane interface. Native cell membranes are difficult to use to gain information on the activity of individual proteins at the membrane interface because of the large number of different proteins involved in membranous processes. Model membrane systems, such as monolayers at the air-water interface, have thus been extensively used during the last 50 years to reconstitute proteins and to gain information on their organization, structure and activity in membranes. In the present paper, we review the recent work we have performed with membrane and peripheral proteins as well as enzymes in monolayers at the air-water interface. We show that the structure and orientation of gramicidin has been determined by combining different methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin is indistinguishable from that in native membranes when appropriate conditions are used. We also show that the kinetics and extent of monolayer binding of myristoylated recoverin is much faster than that of the nonmyristoylated form and that this binding is highly favored by the presence polyunsaturated phospholipids. Moreover, we show that the use of fragments of RPE65 allow determine which region of this protein is most likely involved in membrane binding. Monomolecular films were also used to further understand the hydrolysis of organized phospholipids by phospholipases A2 and C.

  13. Biologically active protein fragments containing specific binding regions of serum albumin or related proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, biologically active protein fragments can be constructed which contain only those specific portions of the serum albumin family of proteins such as regions known as subdomains IIA and IIIA which are primarily responsible for the binding properties of the serum albumins. The artificial serums that can be prepared from these biologically active protein fragments are advantageous in that they can be produced much more easily than serums containing the whole albumin, yet still retain all or most of the original binding potential of the full albumin proteins. In addition, since the protein fragment serums of the present invention can be made from non-natural sources using conventional recombinant DNA techniques, they are far safer than serums containing natural albumin because they do not carry the potentially harmful viruses and other contaminants that will be found in the natural substances.

  14. DNA-dependent protein phosphorylation activity in Xenopus is coupled to a Ku-like protein.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, J; Cameron, R S; Takeda, Y; Hardin, J A

    1997-10-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a nuclear enzyme and functions as a serine/threonine kinase that has been well characterized in both the human and the mouse. The regulatory subunit of DNA-PK is the Ku autoantigen. To demonstrate that a Ku-like protein is present in Xenopus oocytes, we used immunoprecipitation analysis with a monoclonal antibody raised against human Ku antigen and autoimmune serum containing anti-Ku antibodies. Metabolic labeling studies indicate that the Ku-like protein is synthesized mainly in late vitellogenic oocytes. By using a specific peptide substrate for DNA-PK, we demonstrate the activity of a DNA-dependent protein kinase in oocyte extracts. The kinase activity requires the Ku-like protein, since extracts depleted of Ku protein by immunoadsorption with human anti-Ku antibodies fail to demonstrate the DNA-dependent phosphorylation activity. The increased enzyme activity in vitellogenic oocytes may be correlated to the increased levels of Ku protein observed in these oocytes compared to the pre- and early vitellogenic oocytes.

  15. Factor H-related proteins determine complement-activating surfaces.

    PubMed

    Józsi, Mihály; Tortajada, Agustin; Uzonyi, Barbara; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2015-06-01

    Complement factor H-related proteins (FHRs) are strongly associated with different diseases involving complement dysregulation, which suggests a major role for these proteins regulating complement activation. Because FHRs are evolutionarily and structurally related to complement inhibitor factor H (FH), the initial assumption was that the FHRs are also negative complement regulators. Whereas weak complement inhibiting activities were originally reported for these molecules, recent developments indicate that FHRs may enhance complement activation, with important implications for the role of these proteins in health and disease. We review these findings here, and propose that FHRs represent a complex set of surface recognition molecules that, by competing with FH, provide improved discrimination of self and non-self surfaces and play a central role in determining appropriate activation of the complement pathway.

  16. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  17. Mapping the Potential for Eolian Surface Activity in Grasslands of the High Plains using Landsat Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, Ethan Dain

    2002-01-01

    There are over 100,000 square kilometers of eolian sand dunes and sand sheets in the High Plains of the central United States. These land-forms may be unstable and may reactivate again as a result of land-use, climate change, or natural climatic variability. The main goal of this thesis was to develop a model that could be used to map an estimate of future dune activity. Multi-temporal calibrated Landsats 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and 7 Enhanced Thematic Map per Plus (ETM+) NDVI imagery were used in conjunction with the CENTURY vegetation model to correlate vegetation cover to climatic variability. This allows the creation of a predicted vegetation map which, combined with current wind and soil data, was used to create a potential sand transport map for range land in the High Plains under drought conditions.

  18. Compliance potential mapping: a tool to assess potential contributions of walking towards physical activity guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Walking for transport is increasingly considered an important component for meeting physical activity guidelines. This is true for individuals of all ages, and particularly important for seniors, for whom other physical activities may not be recommended. In order to evaluate the potential contributions of walking to physical activity, in this paper the concept of Compliance Potential Mapping is introduced. The concept is illustrated using seniors as a case study. Methods Based on estimates of walking trip distance and frequency, estimates of expected total daily walking distance are obtained. These estimates are converted to weekly walking minutes, which are in turn compared to recommended physical activity guidelines for seniors. Once estimates of travel behavior are available, the approach is straightforward and based on relatively simple map algebra operations. Results Compliance Potential Mapping as a tool to assess the potential contributions of walking towards physical activity is demonstrated using data from Montreal’s 2008 travel survey. The results indicate that the central parts of Montreal Island display higher potential for compliance with physical activity guidelines, but with variations according to age, income, occupation, possession of driver’s license and vehicle, and neighborhood and accessibility parameters. Conclusions Compliance Potential Maps offer valuable information for public health and transportation planning and policy analysis. PMID:24885360

  19. Teaching Plate Tectonic Concepts using GeoMapApp Learning Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Kluge, S.

    2012-12-01

    GeoMapApp Learning Activities ( http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp/collection.html ) can help educators to expose undergraduate students to a range of earth science concepts using high-quality data sets in an easy-to-use map-based interface called GeoMapApp. GeoMapApp Learning Activities require students to interact with and analyse research-quality geoscience data as a means to explore and enhance their understanding of underlying content and concepts. Each activity is freely available through the SERC-Carleton web site and offers step-by-step student instructions and answer sheets. Also provided are annotated educator versions of the worksheets that include teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work. The activities can be used "off-the-shelf". Or, since the educator may require flexibility to tailor the activities, the documents are provided in Word format for easy modification. Examples of activities include one on the concept of seafloor spreading that requires students to analyse global seafloor crustal age data to calculate spreading rates in different ocean basins. Another activity has students explore hot spots using radiometric age dating of rocks along the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain. A third focusses upon the interactive use of contours and profiles to help students visualise 3-D topography on 2-D computer screens. A fourth activity provides a study of mass wasting as revealed through geomorphological evidence. The step-by-step instructions and guided inquiry approach reduce the need for teacher intervention whilst boosting the time that students can spend on productive exploration and learning. The activities can be used, for example, in a classroom lab with the educator present and as self-paced assignments in an out-of-class setting. GeoMapApp Learning Activities are funded through the NSF GeoEd program and are aimed at students in the introductory undergraduate, community college and high school levels. The activities are

  20. Utilizing avidity to improve antifreeze protein activity: a type III antifreeze protein trimer exhibits increased thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Özge; Holland, Nolan B

    2013-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice growth inhibitors that allow the survival of several species living at temperatures colder than the freezing point of their bodily fluids. AFP activity is commonly defined in terms of thermal hysteresis, which is the difference observed for the solution freezing and melting temperatures. Increasing the thermal hysteresis activity of these proteins, particularly at low concentrations, is of great interest because of their wide range of potential applications. In this study, we have designed and expressed one-, two-, and three-domain antifreeze proteins to improve thermal hysteresis activity through increased binding avidity. The three-domain type III AFP yielded significantly greater activity than the one- and two-domain proteins, reaching a thermal hysteresis of >1.6 °C at a concentration of <1 mM. To elucidate the basis of this increase, the data were fit to a multidomain protein adsorption model based on the classical Langmuir isotherm. Fits of the data to the modified isotherms yield values for the equilibrium binding constants for the adsorption of AFP to ice and indicate that protein surface coverage is proportional to thermal hysteresis activity.

  1. Adjunctive use of systematic retinal thickness map analysis to monitor disease activity in punctate inner choroidopathy.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Savitha; Keane, Pearse A; Denniston, Alastair K

    2016-12-01

    A challenge in the management of 'white dot syndromes' is the lack of sensitive objective measures of disease activity. Retinal thickness maps from spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) inform treatment decisions in other retinal conditions such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic maculopathy. In this report, we demonstrate their value in providing quantitative monitoring of a patient with punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC). Retinal thickness maps referenced against a baseline scan reliably detected focal areas of increased macular volume in active PIC lesions during symptomatic episodes, highlighting these as 'hot spots' that could be quantified, providing an objective basis for treatment decisions.

  2. Gc protein (vitamin D-binding protein): Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Okamura, Natsuko; Murakami, Aya; Kubo, Shinichi; Kirk, Kenneth L; Hori, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The Gc protein (human group-specific component (Gc), a vitamin D-binding protein or Gc globulin), has important physiological functions that include involvement in vitamin D transport and storage, scavenging of extracellular G-actin, enhancement of the chemotactic activity of C5a for neutrophils in inflammation and macrophage activation (mediated by a GalNAc-modified Gc protein (GcMAF)). In this review, the structure and function of the Gc protein is focused on especially with regard to Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity. A discussion of the research strategy "GcMAF as a target for drug discovery" is included, based on our own research. PMID:16302727

  3. Fluorogen-Activating-Proteins as Universal Affinity Biosensors for Immunodetection

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Eugenio; Vasilev, Kalin V.; Jarvik, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorogen-activating-proteins (FAPs) are a novel platform of fluorescence biosensors utilized for protein discovery. The technology currently demands molecular manipulation methods that limit its application and adaptability. Here, we highlight an alternative approach based on universal affinity reagents for protein detection. The affinity reagents were engineered as bi-partite fusion proteins, where the specificity moiety is derived from IgG-binding proteinsProtein-A or Protein-G – and the signaling element is a FAP. In this manner, primary antibodies provide the antigenic selectivity against a desired protein in biological samples, while FAP affinity reagents target the constant region (Fc) of antibodies and provide the biosensor component of detection. Fluorescence results using various techniques indicate minimal background and high target specificity for exogenous and endogenous proteins in mammalian cells. Additionally, FAP-based affinity reagents provide enhanced properties of detection previously absent using conventional affinity systems. Distinct features explored in this report include: (1) unfixed signal wavelengths (excitation and emission) determined by the particular fluorogen chosen, (2) real-time user controlled fluorescence on-set and off-set, (3) signal wavelength substitution while performing live analysis, and (4) enhanced resistance to photobleaching. PMID:24122476

  4. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is activated by B-Raf in response to nerve growth factor through interaction with p21ras.

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, R K; Moodie, S A; Wolfman, A; Landreth, G E

    1994-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) activates the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade through a p21ras-dependent signal transduction pathway in PC12 cells. The linkage between p21ras and MEK1 was investigated to identify those elements which participate in the regulation of MEK1 activity. We have screened for MEK activators using a coupled assay in which the MAP kinase cascade has been reconstituted in vitro. We report that we have detected a single NGF-stimulated MEK-activating activity which has been identified as B-Raf. PC12 cells express both B-Raf and c-Raf1; however, the MEK-activating activity was found only in fractions containing B-Raf. c-Raf1-containing fractions did not exhibit a MEK-activating activity. Gel filtration analysis revealed that the B-Raf eluted with an apparent M(r) of 250,000 to 300,000, indicating that it is present within a stable complex with other unidentified proteins. Immunoprecipitation with B-Raf-specific antisera quantitatively precipitated all MEK activator activity from these fractions. We also demonstrate that B-Raf, as well as c-Raf1, directly interacted with activated p21ras immobilized on silica beads. NGF treatment of the cells had no effect on the ability of B-Raf or c-Raf1 to bind to activated p21ras. These data indicate that this interaction was not dependent upon the activation state of these enzymes; however, MEK kinase activity was found to be associated with p21ras following incubation with NGF-treated samples at levels higher than those obtained from unstimulated cells. These data provide direct evidence that NGF-stimulated B-Raf is responsible for the activation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells, whereas c-Raf1 activity was not found to function within this pathway. Images PMID:7935411

  5. Counteracting Protein Kinase Activity in the Heart: The Multiple Roles of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Silvio; Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Wagner, Michael; Dobrev, Dobromir; El-Armouche, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Decades of cardiovascular research have shown that variable and flexible levels of protein phosphorylation are necessary to maintain cardiac function. A delicate balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states of proteins is guaranteed by a complex interplay of protein kinases (PKs) and phosphatases. Serine/threonine phosphatases, in particular members of the protein phosphatase (PP) family govern dephosphorylation of the majority of these cardiac proteins. Recent findings have however shown that PPs do not only dephosphorylate previously phosphorylated proteins as a passive control mechanism but are capable to actively control PK activity via different direct and indirect signaling pathways. These control mechanisms can take place on (epi-)genetic, (post-)transcriptional, and (post-)translational levels. In addition PPs themselves are targets of a plethora of proteinaceous interaction partner regulating their endogenous activity, thus adding another level of complexity and feedback control toward this system. Finally, novel approaches are underway to achieve spatiotemporal pharmacologic control of PPs which in turn can be used to fine-tune misleaded PK activity in heart disease. Taken together, this review comprehensively summarizes the major aspects of PP-mediated PK regulation and discusses the subsequent consequences of deregulated PP activity for cardiovascular diseases in depth. PMID:26617522

  6. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  7. Epidermal growth factor stimulates the disruption of gap junctional communication and connexin43 phosphorylation independent of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-sensitive protein kinase C: the possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, M Y; Lau, A F

    1993-08-01

    We previously reported that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced the disruption of gap junctional communication (gjc) and serine phosphorylation of connexin43 (Cx43) in T51B rat liver epithelial cells. However, the cascade of events linking EGF receptor activation to these particular responses have not been fully characterized. Furthermore, the serine kinase(s) acting directly on Cx43 remain unidentified. In the current study, we demonstrate that downmodulation of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) activity does not affect EGF's ability to reduce junctional permeability or phosphorylate Cx43 in T51B cells. EGF in the presence or absence of chronic TPA treatment stimulated marked increases in Cx43 phosphorylation on numerous sites as determined by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping. Computer-assisted sequence analysis of Cx43 identified several protein kinase phosphorylation consensus sites including two sites for mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. EGF stimulated activation of MAP kinase in a time- and dose-dependent manner where the kinetics of kinase activity corroborated its possible involvement in mediating EGF's effects. Moreover, purified MAP kinase directly phosphorylated Cx43 on serine residues in vitro. Two-dimensional tryptic and chymotryptic phosphopeptide mapping demonstrated that the in vitro phosphopeptides represented a specific subset of the in vivo phosphopeptides produced in response to EGF after chronic TPA treatment. Therefore, EGF-induced disruption of gjc and phosphorylation of Cx43 may be mediated in part by MAP kinase in vivo.

  8. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L.; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M.; Vannieuwenhze, Michael S.; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure-function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division.

  9. Structure–function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ

    PubMed Central

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L.; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure–function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division. PMID:27346279

  10. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits MAP kinases and AP-1 activation via potent MKK inhibition: the role in TNF-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Kyung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Young Choong; Kim, Sang Geon

    2004-10-01

    Arctigenin, naturally occurring in Bardanae fructus, Saussurea medusa, Arctium lappa L., Torreya nucifera and Ipomea cairica, is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we showed that arctigenin potently inhibited the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which involved suppression of NF-kappaB activation. In the present study, we examined the effects of arctigenin on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in Raw264.7 cells and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) activity. The effect of arctigenin on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was also studied in association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Immunoblot analysis showed that arctigenin inhibited phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK and their activities in Raw264.7 cells treated with LPS. Arctigenin potently inhibited the activity of MKK1 in vitro with the IC(50) value of 1 nM. Gel shift and reporter gene analyses revealed that arctigenin inhibited LPS-inducible AP-1 binding to the AP-1 consensus oligonucleotide and AP-1-mediated reporter gene expression. In view of the potential role of AP-1 in the induction of TNF-alpha, we next examined the inhibitory effects of arctigenin on the expression of TNF-alpha. Arctigenin blocked TNF-alpha production and decreased the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the cells exposed to LPS. These results showed that arctigenin inhibited activation of MAP kinases including ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK through the inhibition of MKK activities, leading to AP-1 inactivation, which might, at least in part, contribute to the inhibition of TNF-alpha production.

  11. Peptides and proteins with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Lôbo, Katiuscia Menezes; Bezerra, Denise Aline Casimiro; Lôbo, Inalzuir

    2008-01-01

    The increase of microbial resistance to antibiotics has led to a continuing search for newer and more effective drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are generally found in animals, plants, and microorganisms and are of great interest to medicine, pharmacology, and the food industry. These peptides are capable of inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms. They can attack parasites, while causing little or no harm to the host cells. The defensins are peptides found in granules in the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and are responsible for the defense of the organism. Several animal defensins, like dermaseptin, antileukoprotease, protegrin, and others, have had their activities and efficacy tested and been shown to be effective against bacteria, fungi, and protists; there are also specific defensins from invertebrates, e.g., drosomycin and heliomicin; from plants, e.g., the types A and B; and the bacteriocins, e.g., acrocin, marcescin, etc. The aim of the present work was to compile a comprehensive bibliographic review of the diverse potentially antimicrobial peptides in an effort to systematize the current knowledge on these substances as a contribution for further researches. The currently available bibliography does not give a holistic approach on this subject. The present work intends to show that the mechanism of defense represented by defensins is promising from the perspective of its application in the treatment of infectious diseases in human, animals and plants.

  12. Heated Proteins are Still Active in a Functionalized Nanoporous Support

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Qi, Wen N.; Li, Xiaolin; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-08

    We report that even under the heated condition, the conformation and activity of a protein can be hoarded in a functionalized nanoporous support via non-covalent interaction, although the hoarded protein was not exhibiting the full protein activity, the protein released subsequently still maintained its native conformation and activity. Glucose oxidase (GOX) was spontaneously and largely entrapped in aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-FMS) at 20 oC via a dominant electrostatic interaction. Although FMS-GOX displayed 45% activity of the free enzyme in solution, the GOX released from FMS exhibited its 100% activity prior to the entrapment. Surprisingly, the released GOX from FMS still maintained 89% of its initial activity prior to the entrapment after FMS-GOX was incubated at 60 oC for 1 h prior to release, while the free GOX in solution lost nearly all activity under the same incubation. Intrinsic fluorescence emission of GOX and native electrophoresis demonstrated that the heating resulted in significant conformational changes and oligomeric structures of the free GOX, but FMS efficiently maintained the thermal stability of GOX therein and resisted the thermal denaturation and oligomeric aggregation.

  13. Staphylokinase as a Plasminogen Activator Component in Recombinant Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, S. J.; Sihota, E. G.; Habibi, H. R.; Wong, S.-L.

    1999-01-01

    The plasminogen activator staphylokinase (SAK) is a promising thrombolytic agent for treatment of myocardial infarction. It can specifically stimulate the thrombolysis of both erythrocyte-rich and platelet-rich clots. However, SAK lacks fibrin-binding and thrombin inhibitor activities, two functions which would supplement and potentially improve its thrombolytic potency. Creating a recombinant fusion protein is one approach for combining protein domains with complementary functions. To evaluate SAK for use in a translational fusion protein, both N- and C-terminal fusions to SAK were constructed by using hirudin as a fusion partner. Recombinant fusion proteins were secreted from Bacillus subtilis and purified from culture supernatants. The rate of plasminogen activation by SAK was not altered by the presence of an additional N- or C-terminal protein sequence. However, cleavage at N-terminal lysines within SAK rendered the N-terminal fusion unstable in the presence of plasmin. The results of site-directed mutagenesis of lysine 10 and lysine 11 in SAK suggested that a plasmin-resistant variant cannot be created without interfering with the plasmin processing necessary for activation of SAK. Although putative plasmin cleavage sites are located at the C-terminal end of SAK at lysine 135 and lysine 136, these sites were resistant to plasmin cleavage in vitro. Therefore, C-terminal fusions represent stable configurations for developing improved thrombolytic agents based on SAK as the plasminogen activator component. PMID:9925575

  14. Ca2+ activates human homologous recombination protein Rad51 by modulating its ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Bugreev, Dmitry V.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2004-01-01

    Human Rad51 (hRad51) protein plays a key role in homologous recombination and DNA repair. hRad51 protein forms a helical filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which performs the basic steps of homologous recombination: a search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and DNA strand exchange. hRad51 protein possesses DNA-dependent ATPase activity; however, the role of this activity has not been understood. Our current results show that Ca2+ greatly stimulates DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. We found that Ca2+ exerts its stimulatory effect by modulating the ATPase activity of hRad51 protein. Our data demonstrate that, in the presence of Mg2+, the hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament is quickly converted to an inactive hRad51-ADP-ssDNA form, due to relatively rapid ATP hydrolysis and slow dissociation of ADP. Ca2+ maintains the active hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament by reducing the ATP hydrolysis rate. These findings demonstrate a crucial role of the ATPase activity in regulation of DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. This mechanism of Rad51 protein regulation by modulating its ATPase activity is evolutionarily recent; we found no such mechanism for yeast Rad51 (yRad51) protein. PMID:15226506

  15. Phytochrome activation of two nuclear genes requires cytoplasmic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E; Green, P J; Wong, M; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on light-induced expression of two plant nuclear genes, Cab and rbcS, in wheat, pea and transgenic tobacco. Light activation of these two genes is very sensitive to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis but not to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of organellar protein synthesis. Studies with chimeric gene constructs in transgenic tobacco seedlings show that cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional level. As a control, we show that the expression of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is enhanced by cycloheximide treatment, irrespective of the coding sequence used. Escape-time analyses with green wheat seedlings show that the cycloheximide block for Cab gene expression is after the primary signal transduction step linked to phytochrome photoconversion. Our results suggest that phytochrome activation of Cab and rbcS is mediated by a labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Images PMID:2583082

  16. Joint reconstruction of activity and attenuation map using LM SPECT emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2013-03-01

    Attenuation and scatter correction in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging often requires a computed tomography (CT) scan to compute the attenuation map of the patient. This results in increased radiation dose for the patient, and also has other disadvantages such as increased costs and hardware complexity. Attenuation in SPECT is a direct consequence of Compton scattering, and therefore, if the scattered photon data can give information about the attenuation map, then the CT scan may not be required. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of joint reconstruction of the activity and attenuation map using list- mode (LM) SPECT emission data, including the scattered-photon data. We propose a path-based formalism to process scattered-photon data. Following this, we derive analytic expressions to compute the Craḿer-Rao bound (CRB) of the activity and attenuation map estimates, using which, we can explore the fundamental limit of information-retrieval capacity from LM SPECT emission data. We then suggest a maximum-likelihood (ML) scheme that uses the LM emission data to jointly reconstruct the activity and attenuation map. We also propose an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to compute the ML solution.

  17. Evaluation of feasibility of mapping seismically active faults in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, L. D.; Vanwormer, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The sharp bend in the Alaska Range near 65 deg N, 150 deg W in now thought to enclose a corner of the northwesterly migrating north Pacific lithospheric plate. Subduction of the plate beneath the continent is believed, on the basis of hypocentral distribution, to occur along Cook Inlet and the eastern flanks of the Aleutian and Alaska Ranges as far northward as Mt. McKinley. The nature of tectonic deformation here, particularly in the area of the bend in the Alaska Range, is understandably complex. The Denali fault is thought to be a transform character in the vicinity of Mt. McKinley (i.e., it is thought to be the surface along which the oceanic plate separates from the continental plate). On the ERTS-1 imagery, however, it appears that there are a number of sub-parallel faults which branch off of the Denali fault in a southwesterly direction. Slippage along these would tend to squeeze material around the inside of the band rather than the plate being directly underthrust. All of these sub-parallel faults are seismically active. The right-lateral fault-plane solution obtained for this event is consistent with the concept of slippage around the bend on a set of sub-parallel faults in the manner postulated. The best images to show these features are 1066-20444 and 1266-20572.

  18. Endocytosis of Seven-Transmembrane RGS Protein Activates G- protein Coupled Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Phan, Nguyen; Jones, Janice C.; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jirong; Grigston, Jeffrey; Taylor, J. Philip; Jones, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction typically begins by ligand-dependent activation of a concomitant partner which is otherwise in its resting state. However, in cases where signal activation is constitutive by default, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric Gα protein self-activates without accessory proteins, and is kept in its resting state by the negative regulator, AtRGS1 (Regulator of G protein Signaling 1), which is the prototype of a seven transmembrane receptor fused with an RGS domain. Endocytosis of AtRGS1 by ligand-dependent endocytosis physically uncouples the GTPase accelerating activity of AtRGS1 from the Gα protein, permitting sustained activation. Phosphorylation of AtRGS1 by AtWNK8 kinase causes AtRGS1 endocytosis, required both for G protein-mediated sugar signaling and cell proliferation. In animals, receptor endocytosis results in signal desensitization, whereas in plants, endocytosis results in signal activation. These findings reveal how different organisms rearrange a regulatory system to result in opposite outcomes using similar phosphorylation-dependent endocytosis. PMID:22940907

  19. Beyond the zone: protein needs of active individuals.

    PubMed

    Lemon, P W

    2000-10-01

    There has been debate among athletes and nutritionists regarding dietary protein needs for centuries. Although contrary to traditional belief, recent scientific information collected on physically active individuals tends to indicate that regular exercise increases daily protein requirements; however, the precise details remain to be worked out. Based on laboratory measures, daily protein requirements are increased by perhaps as much as 100% vs. recommendations for sedentary individuals (1.6-1.8 vs. 0.8 g/kg). Yet even these intakes are much less than those reported by most athletes. This may mean that actual requirements are below what is needed to optimize athletic performance, and so the debate continues. Numerous interacting factors including energy intake, carbohydrate availability, exercise intensity, duration and type, dietary protein quality, training history, gender, age, timing of nutrient intake and the like make this topic extremely complex. Many questions remain to be resolved. At the present time, substantial data indicate that the current recommended protein intake should be adjusted upward for those who are physically active, especially in populations whose needs are elevated for other reasons, e.g., growing individuals, dieters, vegetarians, individuals with muscle disease-induced weakness and the elderly. For these latter groups, specific supplementation may be appropriate, but for most North Americans who consume a varied diet, including complete protein foods (meat, eggs, fish and dairy products), and sufficient energy the increased protein needs induced by a regular exercise program can be met in one's diet.

  20. Identification of Phosphoinositide-Binding Protein PATELLIN2 as a Substrate of Arabidopsis MPK4 MAP Kinase during Septum Formation in Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takamasa; Matsushima, Chiyuki; Nishimura, Shingo; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Sasabe, Michiko; Machida, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylation of proteins by protein kinases controls many cellular and physiological processes, which include intracellular signal transduction. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of such controls and numerous substrates of protein kinases remain to be characterized. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is of particular importance in a variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling processes. In plant cells, the progress