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Sample records for activated ras oncogene

  1. Inhibition of Ras oncogenic activity by Ras protooncogenes.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roberto; Lue, Jeffrey; Mathews, Jeremy; Yoon, Andrew; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-España, Antonio; Leonardi, Peter; Vargas, Marcelo P; Pellicer, Angel

    2005-01-10

    Point mutations in ras genes have been found in a large number and wide variety of human tumors. These oncogenic Ras mutants are locked in an active GTP-bound state that leads to a constitutive and deregulated activation of Ras function. The dogma that ras oncogenes are dominant, whereby the mutation of a single allele in a cell will predispose the host cell to transformation regardless of the presence of the normal allele, is being challenged. We have seen that increasing amounts of Ras protooncogenes are able to inhibit the activity of the N-Ras oncogene in the activation of Elk in NIH 3T3 cells and in the formation of foci. We have been able to determine that the inhibitory effect is by competition between Ras protooncogenes and the N-Ras oncogene that occurs first at the effector level at the membranes, then at the processing level and lastly at the effector level in the cytosol. In addition, coexpression of the N-Ras protooncogene in thymic lymphomas induced by the N-Ras oncogene is associated with increased levels of p107, p130 and cyclin A and decreased levels of Rb. In the present report, we have shown that the N-Ras oncogene is not truly dominant over Ras protooncogenes and their competing activities might be depending on cellular context.

  2. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  3. Activation of a human c-K-ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, F; Perucho, M

    1984-01-01

    The human lung carcinomas PR310 and PR371 contain activated c-K-ras oncogenes. The oncogene of PR371 was found to present a mutation at codon 12 of the first coding exon which substitutes cysteine for glycine in the encoded p21 protein. We report here that the transforming gene of PR310 tumor contains a mutation in the second coding exon. An A----T transversion at codon 61 results in the incorporation of histidine instead of glutamine in the c-K-ras gene product. By constructing c-K-ras/c-H-ras chimeric genes we show that this point mutation is sufficient to confer transforming potential to ras genes, and that a hybrid ras gene coding for a protein mutant at both codons 12 and 61 is also capable of transforming NIH3T3 cells. The relative transforming potency of p21 proteins encoded by ras genes mutant at codons 12, 61 or both has been analyzed. Our studies also show that the coding exons of ras genes, including the fourth, can be interchanged and the chimeric p21 ras proteins retain their oncogenic ability in normal rodent established cell lines. PMID:6096811

  4. RAS oncogenes: weaving a tumorigenic web

    PubMed Central

    Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    RAS proteins are essential components of signalling pathways that emanate from cell surface receptors. Oncogenic activation of these proteins owing to missense mutations is frequently detected in several types of cancer. A wealth of biochemical and genetic studies indicates that RAS proteins control a complex molecular circuitry that consists of a wide array of interconnecting pathways. In this Review, we describe how RAS oncogenes exploit their extensive signalling reach to affect multiple cellular processes that drive tumorigenesis. PMID:21993244

  5. Oncogenic Ras activation of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent pathways is sufficient to cause tumorigenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi-Far, R; White, M A; Westwick, J K; Solski, P A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, M; Van Aelst, L; Wigler, M H; Der, C J

    1996-01-01

    Substantial evidence supports a critical role for the activation of the Raf-1/MEK/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in oncogenic Ras-mediated transformation. For example, dominant negative mutants of Raf-1, MEK, and mitogen-activated protein kinase all inhibit Ras transformation. Furthermore, the observation that plasma membrane-localized Raf-1 exhibits the same transforming potency as oncogenic Ras suggests that Raf-1 activation alone is sufficient to mediate full Ras transforming activity. However, the recent identification of other candidate Ras effectors (e.g., RalGDS and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase) suggests that activation of other downstream effector-mediated signaling pathways may also mediate Ras transforming activity. In support of this, two H-Ras effector domain mutants, H-Ras(12V, 37G) and H-Ras(12V, 40C), which are defective for Raf binding and activation, induced potent tumorigenic transformation of some strains of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. These Raf-binding defective mutants of H-Ras induced a transformed morphology that was indistinguishable from that induced by activated members of Rho family proteins. Furthermore, the transforming activities of both of these mutants were synergistically enhanced by activated Raf-1 and inhibited by the dominant negative RhoA(19N) mutant, indicating that Ras may cause transformation that occurs via coordinate activation of Raf-dependent and -independent pathways that involves Rho family proteins. Finally, cotransfection of H-Ras(12V, 37G) and H-Ras(12V, 40C) resulted in synergistic cooperation of their focus-forming activities, indicating that Ras activates at least two Raf-independent, Ras effector-mediated signaling events. PMID:8668210

  6. Activation of ras oncogene in aflatoxin-induced rat liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, S; Webber, C; Marshall, C J; Knowles, M A; Proctor, A; Barrass, N C; Neal, G E

    1988-01-01

    The presence of activated transforming genes was investigated in four primary aflatoxin-induced rat liver tumors in male Fischer rats, in two cell lines generated from such tumors, in an epithelial liver-derived nontransformed cell line, and in the latter cell line after transformation by aflatoxin B1 in vitro. When DNA extracted from these sources was transfected into NIH 3T3 cells, negative results were obtained from focus assays. Cotransfection of these DNA samples with a gene for resistance to G418, followed by selection for resistance to that antibiotic, and tumorigenicity testing in nude mice demonstrated DNA-mediated transfer of the neoplastic phenotype in all cases except for DNA from the nontransformed cell line. DNA extracted from these primary nude mouse tumors used in a secondary round of transfection with NIH 3T3 cells gave positive results in focus assays, which were conserved through succeeding rounds of transfection. By use of appropriate radiolabeled probes, activated ras oncogenes were detected in all samples. N-ras activation was detected in three of the primary rat liver tumors and both hepatoma cell lines. Ki-ras activation was detected in one primary rat liver tumor, and Ha-ras activation was detected in the cell line transformed in vitro with activated aflatoxin B1. The activated Ki-ras oncogene was further characterized by use of synthetic oligonucleotide probes and was shown to contain a G----A transition at the second nucleotide in codon 12. Images PMID:3287372

  7. Oncogenic Ras diverts a host TNF tumor suppressor activity into tumor promoter.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Julia B; Macagno, Juan P; Stefanatos, Rhoda K; Strathdee, Karen E; Cagan, Ross L; Vidal, Marcos

    2010-06-15

    The roles of inflammatory cytokines and the immune response in cancer remain paradoxical. In the case of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), there is undisputed evidence indicating both protumor and antitumor activities. Recent work in Drosophila indicated that a TNF-dependent mechanism eliminates cells deficient for the polarity tumor suppressors dlg or scrib. In this study, however, we show that in tumors deficient for scrib that also expressed the Ras oncoprotein, the TNF signal was diverted into a protumor signal that enhanced tumor growth through larval arrest and stimulated invasive migration. In this case, TNF promoted malignancy and was detrimental to host survival. TNF was expressed at high levels by tumor-associated hemocytes recruited from the circulation. The expression of TNF by hemocytes was both necessary and sufficient to trigger TNF signaling in tumor cells. Our evidence suggests that tumors can evolve into malignancy through oncogenic Ras activation and the hijacking of TNF signaling.

  8. Anti-tumor activity of ESX1 on cancer cells harboring oncogenic K-ras mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Junta; Ishikawa, Susumu; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Masatomo; Koike, Takao; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2008-05-23

    Human ESX1 is a 65-kilodalton (kDa) paired-like homeoprotein that is proteolytically processed into N-terminal 45-kDa and C-terminal 20-kDa fragments. The N-terminal ESX1 fragment, which contains the homeodomain, localizes to the nucleus and represses mRNA transcription from the K-ras gene. When we inoculated human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 constitutive expressing N-terminal region of ESX1 (N-ESX1) into nude mice, transfectant cells uniformly showed decreased tumor-forming activity compared with that of the parental cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of HCT116 carcinoma cells with a fusion protein consisting of N-ESX1 and the protein-transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 TAT protein gave rise to a dramatic reduction in the tumorigenicity of HCT116 cells in nude mice. Our results provide first in vivo evidence for the molecular targeting therapeutic application of the K-ras repressor ESX1, especially TAT-mediated transduction of N-ESX1, in the treatment of human cancers having oncogenic K-ras mutations.

  9. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 is a tumor promoter target in initiated cells that express oncogenic Ras.

    PubMed

    Warmka, Janel K; Mauro, Laura J; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V

    2004-08-01

    We have capitalized on the unique properties of the skin tumor promoter palytoxin, which does not activate protein kinase C, to investigate alternative mechanisms by which major signaling molecules can be modulated during carcinogenesis. We report here that palytoxin activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through a novel mechanism that involves inactivation of an ERK phosphatase in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin (308 cells). Use of U0126 revealed that palytoxin requires the ERK kinase MEK to stimulate ERK activity, although palytoxin did not activate MEK. We found that 308 keratinocytes highly express mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3), which selectively inactivates ERK. Palytoxin induced the loss of MKP-3 in a manner that corresponded to increased ERK phosphorylation. Complementary studies showed that sustained expression of exogenous MKP-3 inhibited palytoxin-stimulated ERK activation. As is characteristic of initiated keratinocytes, 308 cells express activated H-Ras. To investigate whether expression of oncogenic Ras is key to palytoxin-stimulated ERK activation, we determined how palytoxin affected ERK and MKP-3 in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and in H-ras MCF10A cells, which stably express activated H-Ras. Palytoxin did not affect ERK activity in MCF10A cells, which had no detectable MKP-3. Like 308 cells, H-ras MCF10A cells highly express MKP-3. Strikingly, palytoxin stimulated ERK activity and induced a corresponding loss of MKP-3 in H-ras MCF10A cells. These studies indicate that in initiated cells palytoxin unleashes ERK activity by down-regulating MKP-3, an ERK inhibitor, and further suggest that MKP-3 may be a vulnerable target in cells that express oncogenic Ras.

  11. YES oncogenic activity is specified by its SH4 domain and regulates RAS/MAPK signaling in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Fanny; Leroy, Cédric; Simon, Valérie; Benistant, Christine; Roche, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SRC family of tyrosine kinases (SFK) display important functions in human cancer, but their specific role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that YES regulates a unique oncogenic signaling important for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression that is not shared with SRC. Here, we addressed the underlying mechanism involved in this process. We show that YES oncogenic signaling relies on palmitoylation of its SH4 domain that controls YES localization in cholesterol-enriched membrane micro-domains. Specifically, deletion of the palmitoylation site compromised YES transforming activity, while addition of a palmitoylation site in the SH4 domain of SRC was sufficient for SRC to restore the transforming properties of cells in which YES had been silenced. Subsequently, SILAC phosphoproteomic analysis revealed that micro-domain-associated cell adhesive components and receptor tyrosine kinases are major YES substrates. YES also phosphorylates upstream regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling, including EGFR, SHC and SHP2, which were not targeted by SRC due to the absence of palmitoylation. Accordingly, EGFR-induced MAPK activity was attenuated by YES down-regulation, while increased RAS activity significantly restored cell transformation that was lost upon YES silencing. Collectively, these results uncover a critical role for the SH4 domain in the specification of SFK oncogenic activity and a selective role for YES in the induction of RAS/MAPK signaling in CRC cells.

  12. Ras CAAX peptidomimetic FTI-277 selectively blocks oncogenic Ras signaling by inducing cytoplasmic accumulation of inactive Ras-Raf complexes.

    PubMed

    Lerner, E C; Qian, Y; Blaskovich, M A; Fossum, R D; Vogt, A; Sun, J; Cox, A D; Der, C J; Hamilton, A D; Sebti, S M

    1995-11-10

    Ras-induced malignant transformation requires Ras farnesylation, a lipid posttranslational modification catalyzed by farnesyltransferase (FTase). Inhibitors of this enzyme have been shown to block Ras-dependent transformation, but the mechanism by which this occurs remains largely unknown. We have designed FTI-276, a peptide mimetic of the COOH-terminal Cys-Val-Ile-Met of K-Ras4B that inhibited potently FTase in vitro (IC50 = 500 pM) and was highly selective for FTase over geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGTase I) (IC50 = 50 nM). FTI-277, the methyl ester derivative of FTI-276, was extremely potent (IC50 = 100 nM) at inhibiting H-Ras, but not the geranylgeranylated Rap1A processing in whole cells. Treatment of H-Ras oncogene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells with FTI-277 blocked recruitment to the plasma membrane and subsequent activation of the serine/threonine kinase c-Raf-1 in cells transformed by farnesylated Ras (H-RasF), but not geranylgeranylated, Ras (H-RasGG). FTI-277 induced accumulation of cytoplasmic non-farnesylated H-Ras that was able to bind Raf and form cytoplasmic Ras/Raf complexes in which Raf kinase was not activated. Furthermore, FTI-277 blocked constitutive activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in H-RasF, but not H-RasGG, or Raf-transformed cells. FTI-277 also inhibited oncogenic K-Ras4B processing and constitutive activation of MAPK, but the concentrations required were 100-fold higher than those needed for H-Ras inhibition. The results demonstrate that FTI-277 blocks Ras oncogenic signaling by accumulating inactive Ras/Raf complexes in the cytoplasm, hence preventing constitutive activation of the MAPK cascade.

  13. MLL-AF6 fusion oncogene sequesters AF6 into the nucleus to trigger RAS activation in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Manara, Elena; Baron, Emma; Tregnago, Claudia; Aveic, Sanja; Bisio, Valeria; Bresolin, Silvia; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina

    2014-07-10

    A rare location, t(6;11)(q27;q23) (MLL-AF6), is associated with poor outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The described mechanism by which MLL-AF6, through constitutive self-association and in cooperation with DOT-1L, activates aberrant gene expression does not explain the biological differences existing between t(6;11)-rearranged and other MLL-positive patients nor their different clinical outcome. Here, we show that AF6 is expressed in the cytoplasm of healthy bone marrow cells and controls rat sarcoma viral oncogene (RAS)-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) levels. By contrast, in MLL-AF6-rearranged cells, AF6 is found localized in the nucleus, leading to aberrant activation of RAS and of its downstream targets. Silencing MLL-AF6, we restored AF6 localization in the cytoplasm, thus mediating significant reduction of RAS-GTP levels and of cell clonogenic potential. The rescue of RAS-GTP levels after MLL-AF6 and AF6 co-silencing confirmed that MLL-AF6 oncoprotein potentiates the activity of the RAS pathway through retention of AF6 within the nucleus. Exposure of MLL-AF6-rearranged AML blasts to tipifarnib, a RAS inhibitor, leads to cell autophagy and apoptosis, thus supporting RAS targeting as a novel potential therapeutic strategy in patients carrying t(6;11). Altogether, these data point to a novel role of the MLL-AF6 chimera and show that its gene partner, AF6, is crucial in AML development.

  14. An oncogene-tumor suppressor cascade drives metastatic prostate cancer by coordinately activating Ras and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Min, Junxia; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Fedele, Giuseppe; McLaughlin, Sara K.; Reczek, Elizabeth E.; De Raedt, Thomas; Guney, Isil; Strochlic, David E.; Laura, E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bronson, Roderick T.; Ryeom, Sandra; Hahn, William C.; Loda, Massimo; Cichowski, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer-related deaths; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this process. Here we identify an oncogene-tumor suppressor cascade that promotes prostate cancer initiation and metastasis by coordinately activating Ras and NF-κB. Specifically, we show that loss of the RasGAP gene DAB2IP induces metastatic prostate cancer in a murine model. Notably, DAB2IP functions as a signaling scaffold that coordinately regulates Ras and NF-κB through distinct domains to promote tumor initiation and metastasis, respectively. DAB2IP is suppressed in human prostate cancer where expression inversely correlates with tumor grade and predicts prognosis. Moreover, we report that epigenetic silencing of DAB2IP is a key mechanism by which the polycomb-group protein EZH2 activates Ras, NF-κB, and triggers metastasis. These studies define the mechanism by which two major pathways can be simultaneously activated in metastatic prostate cancer and establish EZH2 as a driver of metastasis. PMID:20154697

  15. Sodium butyrate suppresses the transforming activity of an activated N-ras oncogene in human colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddart, J.H.; Niles, R.M. ); Lane, M.A. )

    1989-09-01

    The transforming activity of DNA from a newly established undifferentiated human colon carcinoma cell line (MIP-101) was tested in the NIH-3T3 transfection assay. Southern blot analysis of the transfectant DNA revealed the presence of a human N-ras oncogene. Here the authors report that there is a significant reduction in the transforming efficiency of the DNA from butyrate-treated MIP-101 cells. A nonspecific reduction in total DNA uptake as an explanation for these findings was eliminated by showing that there was similar uptake and expression of the thymidine kinase gene from the DNA of butyrate-treated and control MIP cells. An NIH-3T3 transformant carrying the human N-ras gene was evaluated for phenotypic reversion and DNA transforming ability after treatment with sodium butyrate. Although butyrate suppressed several transformed properties similar to MIP-101 cells, DNA from control and treated cultures had an identical level of transforming activity. The results suggest that the environment of the MIP cells may contain additional elements not present in the NIH-3T3 transformants which are required to observe the effect of butyrate on reduction of transforming activity.

  16. The regulation of oncogenic Ras/ERK signalling by dual-specificity mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    Dual-specificity MAP kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (MKPs or DUSPs) are well-established negative regulators of MAPK signalling in mammalian cells and tissues. By virtue of their differential subcellular localisation and ability to specifically recognise, dephosphorylate and inactivate different MAPK isoforms, they are key spatiotemporal regulators of pathway activity. Furthermore, as they are transcriptionally regulated as downstream targets of MAPK signalling they can either act as classical negative feedback regulators or mediate cross talk between distinct MAPK pathways. Because MAPKs and particularly Ras/ERK signalling are implicated in cancer initiation and development, the observation that MKPs are abnormally regulated in human tumours has been interpreted as evidence that these enzymes can either suppress or promote carcinogenesis. However, definitive evidence of such roles has been lacking. Here we review recent work based on the use of mouse models, biochemical studies and clinical data that demonstrate key roles for MKPs in modulating the oncogenic potential of Ras/ERK signalling and also indicate that these enzymes may play a role in the response of tumours to certain anticancer drugs. Overall, this work reinforces the importance of negative regulatory mechanisms in modulating the activity of oncogenic MAPK signalling and indicates that MKPs may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:26791049

  17. Inhibition of ras oncogene: a novel approach to antineoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    Scharovsky, O G; Rozados, V R; Gervasoni, S I; Matar, P

    2000-01-01

    The most frequently detected oncogene alterations, both in animal and human cancers, are the mutations in the ras oncogene family. These oncogenes are mutated or overexpressed in many human tumors, with a high incidence in tumors of the pancreas, thyroid, colon, lung and certain types of leukemia. Ras is a small guanine nucleotide binding protein that transduces biological information from the cell surface to cytoplasmic components within cells. The signal is transduced to the cell nucleus through second messengers, and it ultimately induces cell division. Oncogenic forms of p21(ras) lead to unregulated, sustained signaling through downstream effectors. The ras family of oncogenes is involved in the development of both primary tumors and metastases making it a good therapeutic target. Several therapeutic approaches to cancer have been developed pointing to reducing the altered gene product or to eliminating its biological function: (1) gene therapy with ribozymes, which are able to break down specific RNA sequences, or with antisense oligonucleotides, (2) immunotherapy through passive or active immunization protocols, and (3) inhibition of p21(ras) farnesylation either by inhibition of farnesyl transferase or synthesis inhibition of farnesyl moieties. PMID:10895051

  18. Oncogenic Ras influences the expression of multiple lncRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Niida, Hiroyuki; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Shirasawa, Senji; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    Recent ultrahigh-density tiling array and large-scale transcriptome analysis have revealed that large numbers of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed in mammals. Several lncRNAs have been implicated in transcriptional regulation, organization of nuclear structure, and post-transcriptional processing. However, the regulation of expression of lncRNAs is less well understood. Here, we show that the exogenous and endogenous expression of an oncogenic form of small GTPase Ras (called oncogenic Ras) decrease the expression of lncRNA ANRIL (antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus), which is involved in the regulation of cellular senescence. We also show that forced expression of oncogenic Ras increases the expression of lncRNA PANDA (p21 associated ncRNA DNA damage activated), which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Microarray analysis demonstrated that expression of multiple lncRNAs fluctuated by forced expression of oncogenic Ras. These findings indicate that oncogenic Ras regulates the expression of a large number of lncRNAs including functional lncRNAs, such as ANRIL and PANDA.

  19. Dimerize RACK1 upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, L.-Y.; Chen, Y.-H.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-05-06

    From our previous studies, we learned that syndecan-2/p120-GAP complex provided docking site for Src to prosecute tyrosine kinase activity upon transformation with oncogenic ras. And, RACK1 protein was reactive with syndecan-2 to keep Src inactivated, but not when Ras was overexpressed. In the present study, we characterized the reaction between RACK1 protein and Ras. RACK1 was isolated from BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus and RACK1 was revealed to react with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), not GDP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K). This selective interaction between RACK1 and GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) was further confirmed with RACK1 of human placenta and mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein. We found that RACK1 was dimerized upon reaction with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), as well as with 14-3-3{beta} and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, as revealed by phosphorylation with Src tyrosine kinase. We reported the complex of RACK1/GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) reacted selectively with p120-GAP. This interaction was sufficient to dissemble RACK1 into monomers, a preferred form to compete for the binding of syndecan-2. These data indicate that the reaction of GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) with RACK1 in dimers may operate a mechanism to deplete RACK1 from reaction with syndecan-2 upon transformation by oncogenic ras and the RACK1/GTP-Ras complex may provide a route to react with p120-GAP and recycle monomeric RACK1 to syndecan-2.

  20. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems. PMID:26036864

  1. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-06-03

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems.

  2. Oncogenic Ras pushes (and pulls) cell cycle progression through ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling cascade is capable of channeling a wide variety of extracellular signals into control of cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and death. Because aberrant regulation at all steps of this signaling axis is observed in cancer, it remains an area of great interest in the field of tumor biology. Here we present evidence of the intricate and delicate levels of control of this pathway as it pertains to cell cycle regulation and illustrate how this control is not simply a rheostat.

  3. Transforming and oncogenic potential of activated c-Ha-ras in three immortalized human breast epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Soule, H D; Miller, F R

    1997-01-01

    The ability of activated c-Ha-ras (codon 12 valine) to transform human breast epithelial cells varied for three different immortalized normal human breast epithelial cell lines established from two different women. Although activated c-Ha-ras may transform and induce a preneoplastic phenotype in MCF10A cells, activated c-Ha-ras was not sufficient to transform MCF10-2A cells. Only two of three MCF10-2A clones which expressed mutant p21 protein acquired the ability to form colonies in soft agar. When xenografted into nude beige mice, two MCF10-2A clones formed squamous carcinomas and one formed no lesions at all. The ability to form tumors did not correlate with growth in soft agar. All three activated c-Ha-ras-transfected clones of MCF-12A formed colonies in soft agar but only two produced squamous carcinomas in nude beige mice. Unlike activated c-Ha-ras-transfected MCF10A cells, none of the activated c-Ha-ras-transfected MCF10-2A or MCF-12A clones formed ducts in xenografts. Rather, initial xenograft lesions consisted of nests of cells with squamous differentiation. These observations illustrate that additional events are involved in the transformation and progression of human breast epithelial cells with activated c-Ha-ras.

  4. NSD2 contributes to oncogenic RAS-driven transcription in lung cancer cells through long-range epigenetic activation.

    PubMed

    García-Carpizo, Verónica; Sarmentero, Jacinto; Han, Bomie; Graña, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Pisano, David G; Serrano, Manuel; Brooks, Harold B; Campbell, Robert M; Barrero, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET is overexpressed in a number of solid tumors but its contribution to the biology of these tumors is not well understood. Here, we describe that NSD2 contributes to the proliferation of a subset of lung cancer cell lines by supporting oncogenic RAS transcriptional responses. NSD2 knock down combined with MEK or BRD4 inhibitors causes co-operative inhibitory responses on cell growth. However, while MEK and BRD4 inhibitors converge in the downregulation of genes associated with cancer-acquired super-enhancers, NSD2 inhibition affects the expression of clusters of genes embedded in megabase-scale regions marked with H3K36me2 and that contribute to the RAS transcription program. Thus, combinatorial therapies using MEK or BRD4 inhibitors together with NSD2 inhibition are likely to be needed to ensure a more comprehensive inhibition of oncogenic RAS-driven transcription programs in lung cancers with NSD2 overexpression. PMID:27604143

  5. NSD2 contributes to oncogenic RAS-driven transcription in lung cancer cells through long-range epigenetic activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Carpizo, Verónica; Sarmentero, Jacinto; Han, Bomie; Graña, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Pisano, David G.; Serrano, Manuel; Brooks, Harold B.; Campbell, Robert M.; Barrero, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET is overexpressed in a number of solid tumors but its contribution to the biology of these tumors is not well understood. Here, we describe that NSD2 contributes to the proliferation of a subset of lung cancer cell lines by supporting oncogenic RAS transcriptional responses. NSD2 knock down combined with MEK or BRD4 inhibitors causes co-operative inhibitory responses on cell growth. However, while MEK and BRD4 inhibitors converge in the downregulation of genes associated with cancer-acquired super-enhancers, NSD2 inhibition affects the expression of clusters of genes embedded in megabase-scale regions marked with H3K36me2 and that contribute to the RAS transcription program. Thus, combinatorial therapies using MEK or BRD4 inhibitors together with NSD2 inhibition are likely to be needed to ensure a more comprehensive inhibition of oncogenic RAS-driven transcription programs in lung cancers with NSD2 overexpression. PMID:27604143

  6. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  7. Complex effects of Ras proto-oncogenes in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roberto; Lopez-Barcons, Lluis; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-Espana, Antonio; Yoon, Andrew; Matthews, Jeremy; Mangues, Ramon; Perez-Soler, Roman; Pellicer, Angel

    2004-04-01

    Ras proteins have been found mutated in about one-third of human tumors. In vitro, Ras has been shown to regulate distinct and contradictory effects, such as cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Nonetheless, the effects that the wild-type protein elicits in tumorigenesis are poorly understood. Depending on the type of tissue, Ras proto-oncogenes appear to either promote or inhibit the tumor phenotype. In this report, we treated wild-type and N-ras knockout mice with 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) to induce fibrosarcomas and found that MCA is more carcinogenic in wild-type mice than in knockout mice. After injecting different doses of a tumorigenic cell line, the wild-type mice exhibited a shorter latency of tumor development than the knockouts, indicating that there are N-ras-dependent differences in the stromal cells. Likewise, we have analyzed B-cell lymphomas induced by either N-methylnitrosourea or by the N-ras oncogene in mice that over-express the N-ras proto-oncogene and found that the over-expression of wild-type N-ras is able to increase the incidence of these lymphomas. Considered together, our results indicate that Ras proto-oncogenes can enhance or inhibit the malignant phenotype in vivo in different systems.

  8. Identification of a provirally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene in an avian nephroblastoma via a novel procedure: cDNA cloning of a chimaeric viral-host transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Westaway, D; Papkoff, J; Moscovici, C; Varmus, H E

    1986-01-01

    Retrovirus without oncogenes often exert their neoplastic potential as insertional mutagens of cellular proto-oncogenes. This may be associated with the production of chimaeric viral-host transcripts; in these cases; activated cellular genes can be identified by obtaining cDNA clones of bipartite RNAs. This approach was used in the analysis of chicken nephroblastomas induced by myeloblastosis-associated virus (MAV). One tumor contained a novel mRNA species initiated within a MAV LTR. cDNA cloning revealed that this mRNA encodes a protein of 189 amino acids, identical to that of normal human Ha-ras-1 at 185 positions, including positions implicated in oncogenic activation of ras proto-oncogenes; there are no differences between the coding sequences of presumably normal Ha-ras cDNA clones from chicken lymphoma RNA and the tumor-derived cDNAs. The chimaeric mRNA in the nephroblastoma is at least 25-fold more abundant than c-Ha-ras mRNA in normal kidney tissue, and a 21-kd ras-related protein is present in relatively large amounts in the tumor. We conclude that a quantitative change in c-Ha-ras gene expression results from an upstream insertion mutation and presumably contributes to tumorigenesis in this single case. Little or no increase in c-Ha-ras RNA or protein was observed in other nephroblastomas. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 10. PMID:3011401

  9. Transforming activity of the c-Ha-ras oncogene having two point mutations in codons 12 and 61.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, T; Prassolov, V S; Fushimi, M; Nishimura, S

    1985-09-01

    A recombinant plasmid carrying the human c-Ha-ras gene with two point mutations in codons 12 and 61 was constructed and its transforming activity on mouse NIH 3T3 cells was compared with those of genes with a single mutation in either codon 12 or 61. Quantitative analyses revealed that the gene with two mutations had essentially the same transforming activity as the genes with single mutations. These results indicate that a single mutation of the c-Ha-ras gene in either codon 12 or 61 is sufficient to activate the gene and that neither of the two mutation sites involved in activation of the gene needs to be intact for transforming activity.

  10. Induction of MAP kinase phosphatase 3 through Erk/MAP kinase activation in three oncogenic Ras (H-, K- and N-Ras)-expressing NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Koo, JaeHyung; Wang, Sen; Kang, NaNa; Hur, Sun Jin; Bahk, Young Yil

    2016-01-01

    Ras oncoproteins are small molecular weight GTPases known for their involvement in oncogenesis, which operate in a complex signaling network with multiple effectors. Approximately 25% of human tumors possess mutations in a member of this family. The Raf1/MEK/Erk1/2 pathway is one of the most intensively studied signaling mechanisms. Different levels of regulation account for the inactivation of MAP kinases by MAPK phosphatases in a cell type- and stimuli-dependent manner. In the present study, using three inducible Ras-expressing NIH/3T3 cell lines, we demonstrated that MKP3 upregulation requires the activation of the Erk1/2 pathway, which correlates with the shutdown of this pathway. We also demonstrated, by applying pharmacological inhibitors and effector mutants of Ras, that induction of MKP3 at the protein level is positively regulated by the oncogenic Ras/Raf/MEK/Erk1/2 signaling pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 370-375] PMID:26818088

  11. MECP2 Is a Frequently Amplified Oncogene with a Novel Epigenetic Mechanism that Mimics the Role of Activated RAS in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Manish; Clark, Allison P.; Landini, Serena; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Eklund, Aron C.; Lim, Elgene; Culhane, Aedin C.; Barry, William T.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Szallasi, Zoltan; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Silver, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    An unbiased genome-scale screen for unmutated genes that drive cancer growth when overexpressed identified MECP2 as a novel oncogene. MECP2 resides in a region of the X-chromosome that is significantly amplified across 18% of cancers, and many cancer cell lines have amplified, overexpressed MECP2 and are dependent on MECP2 expression for growth. MECP2 copy number gain and RAS family member alterations are mutually exclusive in several cancer types. The MECP2 splicing isoforms activate the major growth factor pathways targeted by activated RAS, the MAPK and PI3K pathways. MECP2 rescued the growth of a KRASG12C-addicted cell line after KRAS down-regulation, and activated KRAS rescues the growth of an MECP2-addicted cell line after MECP2 downregulation. MECP2 binding to the epigenetic modification 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is required for efficient transformation. These observations suggest that MECP2 is a commonly amplified oncogene with an unusual epigenetic mode of action. PMID:26546296

  12. CD11c gene expression in hairy cell leukemia is dependent upon activation of the proto-oncogenes ras and junD.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Fotini; Teodoridis, Jens M; Park, Heiyoung; Georgakis, Alexander; Farokhzad, Omid C; Böttinger, Erwin P; Da Silva, Nicolas; Rousselot, Philippe; Chomienne, Christine; Ferenczi, Katalin; Arnaout, M Amin; Shelley, C Simon

    2003-05-15

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disease, the cause of which is unknown. Diagnostic of HCL is abnormal expression of the gene that encodes the beta2 integrin CD11c. In order to determine the cause of CD11c gene expression in HCL the CD11c gene promoter was characterized. Transfection of the CD11c promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene indicated that it is sufficient to direct expression in hairy cells. Mutation analysis demonstrated that of predominant importance to the activity of the CD11c promoter is its interaction with the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors. Comparison of nuclear extracts prepared from hairy cells with those prepared from other cell types indicated that hairy cells exhibit abnormal constitutive expression of an AP-1 complex containing JunD. Functional inhibition of AP-1 expressed by hairy cells reduced CD11c promoter activity by 80%. Inhibition of Ras, which represents an upstream activator of AP-1, also significantly inhibited the CD11c promoter. Furthermore, in the hairy cell line EH, inhibition of Ras signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) reduced not only CD11c promoter activity but also reduced both CD11c surface expression and proliferation. Expression in nonhairy cells of a dominant-positive Ras mutant activated the CD11c promoter to levels equivalent to those in hairy cells. Together, these data indicate that the abnormal expression of the CD11c gene characteristic of HCL is dependent upon activation of the proto-oncogenes ras and junD.

  13. ASPP1 and ASPP2 bind active RAS, potentiate RAS signalling and enhance p53 activity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Godin-Heymann, N; Dan Wang, X; Bergamaschi, D; Llanos, S; Lu, X

    2013-01-01

    RAS mutations occur frequently in human cancer and activated RAS signalling contributes to tumour development and progression. Apart from its oncogenic effects on cell growth, active RAS has tumour-suppressive functions via its ability to induce cellular senescence and apoptosis. RAS is known to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest, yet its effect on p53-dependent apoptosis remains unclear. We report here that apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 (ASPP) 1 and 2, two activators of p53, preferentially bind active RAS via their N-terminal RAS-association domains (RAD). Additionally, ASPP2 colocalises with and contributes to RAS cellular membrane localisation and potentiates RAS signalling. In cancer cells, ASPP1 and ASPP2 cooperate with oncogenic RAS to enhance the transcription and apoptotic function of p53. Thus, loss of ASPP1 and ASPP2 in human cancer cells may contribute to the full transforming property of RAS oncogene. PMID:23392125

  14. Differential induction of cytolytic susceptibility by E1A, myc, and ras oncogenes in immortalized cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; May, D L; Wilson, B A; Walker, T A

    1989-01-01

    The E1A oncogene of adenovirus serotypes 2 and 5 induces susceptibility to the cytolytic effects of natural killer lymphocytes and activated macrophages when expressed in infected and transformed mammalian cells (cytolysis-susceptible phenotype). E1A and the oncogenes v-myc, long-terminal-repeat-promoted c-myc, and activated c-ras share the ability to immortalize transfected low-passage rodent cells. The cytolytic phenotypes of well-characterized rodent cell lines immortalized by these three oncogenes were defined. In contrast to target cells expressing the intact E1A gene, myc- and ras-expressing, immortalized primary transfectants were resistant to lysis by both types of killer cell populations. The same patterns of susceptibility (E1A) and resistance (myc and ras) to cytolysis were observed in oncogene-transfected continuous rat (REF52) and mouse (NIH 3T3) cell lines, indicating that differences in the cytolytic phenotypes associated with expression of these oncogenes are not due to cell selection during immortalization. The results suggest that the E1A oncogene may possess a functional domain that is different from those of other oncogenes, such as myc and ras, and that the activity linked to this postulated domain is dissociable from the process of immortalization. Images PMID:2526229

  15. Aberrant microRNA expression likely controls RAS oncogene activation during malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial and stem cells by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Ngalame, Ntube N O; Tokar, Erik J; Person, Rachel J; Xu, Yuanyuan; Waalkes, Michael P

    2014-04-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs), a human carcinogen, potentially targets the prostate. iAs malignantly transforms the RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial line to CAsE-PE cells, and a derivative normal stem cell (SC) line, WPE-stem, to As-Cancer SC (As-CSC) line. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are noncoding but exert negative control on expression by degradation or translational repression of target mRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression is important in carcinogenesis. A miRNA array of CAsE-PE and As-CSC revealed common altered expression in both for pathways concerning oncogenesis, miRNA biogenesis, cell signaling, proliferation, and tumor metastasis and invasion. The KRAS oncogene is overexpressed in CAsE-PE cells but not by mutation or promoter hypomethylation, and is intensely overexpressed in As-CSC cells. In both transformants, decreased miRNAs targeting KRAS and RAS superfamily members occurred. Reduced miR-134, miR-373, miR-155, miR-138, miR-205, miR-181d, miR-181c, and let-7 in CAsE-PE cells correlated with increased target RAS oncogenes, RAN, RAB27A, RAB22A mRNAs, and KRAS protein. Reduced miR-143, miR-34c-5p, and miR-205 in As-CSC correlated with increased target RAN mRNA, and KRAS, NRAS, and RRAS proteins. The RAS/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathways control cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation, and when dysregulated promote a cancer phenotype. iAs transformation increased expression of activated ERK kinase in both transformants and altered components of the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway including decreased PTEN and increases in BCL2, BCL-XL, and VEGF in the absence of AKT activation. Thus, dysregulated miRNA expression may be linked to RAS activation in both transformants.

  16. Characterization of a novel oncogenic K-ras mutation in colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, Kiwamu . E-mail: akagi@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Kurosawa, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Kozu, Tomoko

    2007-01-19

    Activating mutations of RAS are frequently observed in subsets of human cancers, indicating that RAS activation is involved in tumorigenesis. Here, we identified and characterized a novel G to T transversion mutation of the K-ras gene at the third position of codon 19 (TTG) which substituted phenylalanine for leucine in 3 primary colon carcinomas. Biological and biochemical activity was examined using transformed NIH3T3 cells expressing mutant or wild-type K-ras. Transformants harboring the K-ras mutation at codon 19 showed proliferative capacity under serum-starved conditions, less contact inhibition, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenicity in nude mice and elevation of active Ras-GTP levels. These results indicated that this novel mutation possesses high oncogenic activity.

  17. p38alpha and p38gamma mediate oncogenic ras-induced senescence through differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jinny; Hong, Lixin; Liao, Rong; Deng, Qingdong; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2009-04-24

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a tumor-suppressive defense mechanism triggered upon activation of certain oncogenes in normal cells. Recently, the senescence response to oncogene activation has been shown to act as a bona fide barrier to cancer development in vivo. Multiple previous studies have implicated the importance of the p38 MAPK pathway in oncogene-induced senescence. However, the contribution of each of the four p38 isoforms (encoded by different genes) to senescence induction is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrated that p38alpha and p38gamma, but not p38beta, play an essential role in oncogenic ras-induced senescence. Both p38alpha and p38gamma are expressed in primary human fibroblasts and are activated upon transduction of oncogenic ras. Small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of p38alpha or p38gamma expression abrogated ras-induced senescence, whereas constitutive activation of p38alpha and p38gamma caused premature senescence. Furthermore, upon activation by oncogenic ras, p38gamma stimulated the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating p53 at Ser(33), suggesting that the ability of p38gamma to mediate senescence is at least partly achieved through p53. However, p38alpha contributed to ras-inducted senescence via a p53-indepdendent mechanism in cells by mediating ras-induced expression of p16(INK4A), another key senescence effector. These findings have identified p38alpha and p38gamma as essential components of the signaling pathway that regulates the tumor-suppressing senescence response, providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential involvement of the p38 isoforms in senescence induction.

  18. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  19. Silent assassin: oncogenic ras directs epigenetic inactivation of target genes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is associated with genetic changes and epigenetic alterations. A study now shows that oncogenic Ras uses a complex and elaborate epigenetic silencing program to specifically repress the expression of multiple unrelated cancer-suppressing genes through a common pathway. These results suggest that cancer-related epigenetic modifications may arise through a specific and instructive mechanism and that genetic changes and epigenetic alterations are intimately connected and contribute to tumorigenesis cooperatively. PMID:18385037

  20. P120-GAP associated with syndecan-2 to function as an active switch signal for Src upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-W.; Chen, C.-L.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-04-15

    BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus were applied to reveal a complex of p120-GAP/syndecan-2 being highly expressed upon transformation. Of interest, most of the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was localized at caveolae, a membrane microdomain enriched with caveolin-1. To confirm the molecular interaction between syndecan-2 and p120-GAP, we further purified p120-GAP protein from mouse brains by using an affinity column of HiTrap-RACK1 and expressed mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein and mouse syndecan-2-encoded fusion protein in bacteria. We report molecular affinities exist between p120-GAP and RACK1, syndecan-2 and RACK1 as well as p120-GAP and syndecan-2. The selective affinity between p120-GAP and syndecan-2 was found to be sufficient to detach RACK1. The p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was demonstrated to keep Src tyrosine kinase in an activated form. On the other hand, the syndecan-2/RACK1 complex was found to have Src in an inactivated form. These data indicate that the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex at caveolae could provide a docking site for Src to transmit tyrosine signaling, implying that syndecan-2/p120-GAP functions as a tumor promoter upon transformation with oncogenic ras of shrimp P. japonicus.

  1. Notch-1 expression levels in 3T3-L1 cells influence ras signaling and transformation by oncogenic ras.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hidalgo, M J; Garcés, C; Laborda, J

    1999-04-01

    Notch proteins participate in interactions between several cell types involved on the specification of numerous cell fates during development. We previously showed that enforced downregulation of Notch-1 expression prevented adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. Since adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells can be induced by oncogenic ras, we studied whether this was also the case in 3T3-L1 cells with decreased levels of Notch-1 expression. We found that oncogenic ras induces transformation and not differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells with diminished levels of Notch-1. This result suggests that Notch-1 is implicated in the interpretation of signals leading to activation of p21 Ras.

  2. Tissue-specific p19Arf regulation dictates the response to oncogenic K-ras.

    PubMed

    Young, Nathan P; Jacks, Tyler

    2010-06-01

    The ability of oncogenes to engage tumor suppressor pathways represents a key regulatory mechanism that can limit the outgrowth of incipient tumor cells. For example, in a number of settings oncogenic Ras strongly activates the Ink4a/Arf locus, resulting in cell cycle arrest or senescence. The capacity of different cell types to execute tumor suppressor programs following expression of endogenous K-ras(G12D) in vivo has not been examined. Using compound mutant mice containing the Arf(GFP) reporter and the spontaneously activating K-ras(LA2) allele, we have uncovered dramatic tissue specificity of K-ras(G12D)-dependent p19(Arf) up-regulation. Lung tumors, which can arise in the presence of functional p19(Arf), rarely display p19(Arf) induction. In contrast, sarcomas always show robust activation, which correlates with genetic evidence, suggesting that loss of the p19(Arf)-p53 pathway is a requisite event for sarcomagenesis. Using constitutive and inducible RNAi systems in vivo, we highlight cell type-specific chromatin regulation of Ink4a/Arf as a critical determinant of cellular responses to oncogenic K-ras. Polycomb-group complexes repress the locus in lung tumors, whereas the SWI/SNF family member Snf5 acts as an important mediator of p19(Arf) induction in sarcomas. This variation in tumor suppressor induction might explain the inherent differences between tissues in their sensitivity to Ras-mediated transformation. PMID:20479239

  3. Targeting Bcl-2 stability to sensitize cells harboring oncogenic ras.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Ganapathy, Suthakar; Shen, Ling; Huang, Junchi; Yi, Bo; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dai, Wei; Chen, Changyan

    2015-09-01

    The pro-survival factor Bcl-2 and its family members are critical determinants of the threshold of the susceptibility of cells to apoptosis. Studies are shown that cells harboring an oncogenic ras were extremely sensitive to the inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) and Bcl-2 could antagonize this apoptotic process. However, it remains unrevealed how Bcl-2 is being regulated in this apoptotic process. In this study, we investigate the role of Bcl-2 stability in sensitizing the cells harboring oncogenic K-ras to apoptosis triggered by PKC inhibitor GO6976. We demonstrated that Bcl-2 in Swiss3T3 cells ectopically expressing or murine lung cancer LKR cells harboring K-ras rapidly underwent ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway after the treatment of GO6976, accompanied with induction of apoptosis. In this process, Bcl-2 formed the complex with Keap-1 and Cul3. The mutation of serine-17 and deletion of BH-2 or 4 was required for Bcl-2 ubiquitination and degradation, which elevate the signal threshold for the induction of apoptosis in the cells following PKC inhibition. Thus, Bcl-2 appears an attractive target for the induction of apoptosis by PKC inhibition in cancer cells expressing oncogenic K-ras. PMID:26041886

  4. Characterization and developmental expression of a Drosophila ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Mozer, B; Marlor, R; Parkhurst, S; Corces, V

    1985-01-01

    We cloned a Drosophila melanogaster ras gene (Dmras64B) on the basis of its homology to the ras oncogen from Harvey murine sarcoma virus. This gene mapped at chromosomal position 64B on the left arm of the third chromosome. Sequencing of Dmras64B revealed extensive amino acid homology with the proteins encoded by the human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras genes. The coding region of the Drosophila gene is interrupted by two introns located in different positions with respect to its human counterpart. Dmras64B encodes three different RNAs (1.6, 2.1, and 2.6 kilobases long) that are constantly expressed throughout the development of the fly. Images PMID:3921827

  5. Oncogenic Ras modulates p38 MAPK-mediated inflammatory cytokine production in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Lenka; Yeung, Yiu To; Grewal, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation is an important factor promoting the progression of glioblastoma. In the present study we examined the contribution of Ras signaling and TNFα/IL-1β cytokines to the development of the glioblastoma inflammatory microenvironment. Enhanced activation of Ras through de-regulated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as EGFR, PDGFR and cMet, is a hallmark of the majority of glioblastomas. Glioblastoma microenvironment contains high levels of TNFα and IL-1β, which mediate inflammation through induction of a local network of cytokines and chemokines. While many studies have focused on Ras- and TNFα/IL-1β-driven inflammation in isolation, little is known about the co-operation between these oncogenic and microenvironment-derived stimuli. Using constitutively active HRasG12V that mimics enhanced Ras activation, we demonstrate that elevated Ras activity in glioblastoma cells leads to up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, Ras synergizes with the microenvironment-derived TNFα and IL-1β resulting in amplified IL-6/IL-8 secretion. IL-8 secretion induced by Ras and TNFα/IL-1β is attenuated by inhibitors targeting Erk, JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. IL-6 secretion significantly decreased upon inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. Interestingly, although constitutively active HRasG12V does not increase basal or TNFα/IL-1β stimulated p38 MAPK activity, HRasG12V increased the efficacy of the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 to inhibit IL-1β-induced IL-6 secretion. In summary, oncogenic Ras co-operates with the microenvironment-derived TNFα/IL-1β to sustain inflammatory microenvironment, which was effectively attenuated via inhibition of p38 MAPK signaling. PMID:26794430

  6. Induction of p38δ Expression Plays an Essential Role in Oncogenic ras-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jinny; Chen, Michelle; Lv, Dan; Luo, Na; Su, Weijun; Xiang, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a stable proliferative arrest that serves as a tumor-suppressing defense mechanism. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been implicated in oncogene-induced senescence and tumor suppression. However, the specific role of each of the four p38 isoforms in oncogene-induced senescence is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that p38δ mediates oncogene-induced senescence through a p53- and p16INK4A-independent mechanism. Instead, evidence suggests a link between p38δ and the DNA damage pathways. Moreover, we have discovered a novel mechanism that enhances the expression of p38δ during senescence. In this mechanism, oncogenic ras induces the Raf-1–MEK–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which, in turn, activates the AP-1 and Ets transcription factors that are bound to the p38δ promoter, leading to increased transcription of p38δ. These findings indicate that induction of the prosenescent function of p38δ by oncogenic ras is achieved through 2 mechanisms, transcriptional activation by the Raf-1–MEK–ERK–AP-1/Ets pathway, which increases the cellular concentration of the p38δ protein, and posttranslational modification by MKK3/6, which stimulates the enzymatic activity of p38δ. In addition, these studies identify the AP-1 and Ets transcription factors as novel signaling components in the senescence-inducing pathway. PMID:23878395

  7. Activation of the c-H-ras proto-oncogene by retrovirus insertion and chromosomal rearrangement in a Moloney leukemia virus-induced T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ihle, J N; Smith-White, B; Sisson, B; Parker, D; Blair, D G; Schultz, A; Kozak, C; Lunsford, R D; Askew, D; Weinstein, Y

    1989-01-01

    A rearrangement of the c-H-ras locus was detected in a T-cell line (DA-2) established from a Moloney leukemia virus-induced tumor. This rearrangement was associated with the high-level expression of H-ras RNA and the H-ras gene product, p21. DNA from DA-2 cells transformed fibroblasts in DNA transfection experiments, and the transformed fibroblasts contained the rearranged H-ras locus. The rearrangement involved one allele and was present in tissue from the primary tumor from which the cell line was isolated. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged allele and comparison with the normal allele demonstrated that the rearrangement was complex and probably resulted from the integration of a retrovirus in the H-ras locus between a 5' noncoding exon and the first coding exon and a subsequent homologous recombination between this provirus and another newly acquired provirus also located on chromosome 7. These events resulted in the translocation of the coding exons of the H-ras locus away from the 5' noncoding exon region to a new genomic site on chromosome 7. Sequencing of the coding regions of the gene failed to detect mutations in the 12th, 13th, 59th, or 61st codons. The possible reasons for the complexity of the rearrangement and the significance of the activation of the H-ras locus to T-cell transformation are discussed. Images PMID:2542606

  8. Simian virus 40 large T antigen contains two independent activities that cooperate with a ras oncogene to transform rat embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Cavender, J F; Conn, A; Epler, M; Lacko, H; Tevethia, M J

    1995-01-01

    The simian virus 40 large T antigen immortalizes growing primary cells in culture. In addition, this viral oncoprotein cooperates with an activated ras protein to produce dense foci on monolayers of rat embryo fibroblasts (REF). The relationship between independent immortalization and cooperative transformation with ras has not been defined. Previously, two regions of T antigen were shown to contain immortalization activities. An N-terminal fragment consisting of amino acids 1 to 147 immortalizes rodent cells (L. Sompayrac and K. J. Danna, Virology 181:412-415, 1991). Loss-of-function analysis indicated that immortalization depended on integrity of the T-antigen segments containing amino acids 351 to 450 and 533 to 626 (T. D. Kierstead and M. J. Tevethia, J. Virol. 67:1817-1829, 1993). The experiments described here were directed toward determining whether these same T-antigen regions were sufficient for cooperation with ras. Initially, constructs that produce T antigens containing amino acids 176 to 708 (T176-708) or 1 to 147 were tested in a ras cooperation assay. Both polypeptides cooperated with ras to produce dense foci on monolayers of primary REF. These results showed that T antigen contains two separate ras cooperation activities. In order to determine the N-terminal limit of the ras cooperation activity contained within the T176-708 polypeptide, a series of constructs designed to produce fusion proteins containing T-antigen segments beginning at residues 251, 301, 337, 351, 371, 401, 451, 501, 551, 601, and 651 was generated. Each of these constructs was tested for the capacity to cooperate with ras to produce dense foci on REF monolayers. The results indicated that a polypeptide containing T-antigen amino acids 251 to 708 (T251-708) was sufficient to cooperate with ras, whereas the more extensively truncated products were not. The abilities of the N-terminally truncated T antigens to bind p53 were examined in p53-deficient cells infected with a

  9. Ras Oncogene-Mediated Progressive Silencing of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; de Vita, Gabriella; Salvatore, Marco; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) is a secreted enzyme that uses superoxide anion as a substrate in a dismutase reaction that results in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Both of these reactive oxygen species affect growth signaling in cells. Although SOD3 has growth-supporting characteristics, the expression of SOD3 is downregulated in epithelial cancer cells. In the current work, we studied the mechanisms regulating SOD3 expression in vitro using thyroid cell models representing different stages of thyroid cancer. We demonstrate that a low level of RAS activation increases SOD3 mRNA synthesis that then gradually decreases with increasing levels of RAS activation and the decreasing degree of differentiation of the cancer cells. Our data indicate that SOD3 regulation can be divided into two classes. The first class involves RAS–driven reversible regulation of SOD3 expression that can be mediated by the following mechanisms: RAS GTPase regulatory genes that are responsible for SOD3 self-regulation; RAS-stimulated p38 MAPK activation; and RAS-activated increased expression of the mir21 microRNA, which inversely correlates with sod3 mRNA expression. The second class involves permanent silencing of SOD3 mediated by epigenetic DNA methylation in cells that represent more advanced cancers. Therefore, the work suggests that SOD3 belongs to the group of ras oncogene-silenced genes. PMID:26550576

  10. p38α and p38γ Mediate Oncogenic ras-induced Senescence through Differential Mechanisms*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jinny; Hong, Lixin; Liao, Rong; Deng, Qingdong; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2009-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a tumor-suppressive defense mechanism triggered upon activation of certain oncogenes in normal cells. Recently, the senescence response to oncogene activation has been shown to act as a bona fide barrier to cancer development in vivo. Multiple previous studies have implicated the importance of the p38 MAPK pathway in oncogene-induced senescence. However, the contribution of each of the four p38 isoforms (encoded by different genes) to senescence induction is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrated that p38α and p38γ, but not p38β, play an essential role in oncogenic ras-induced senescence. Both p38α and p38γ are expressed in primary human fibroblasts and are activated upon transduction of oncogenic ras. Small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of p38α or p38γ expression abrogated ras-induced senescence, whereas constitutive activation of p38α and p38γ caused premature senescence. Furthermore, upon activation by oncogenic ras, p38γ stimulated the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating p53 at Ser33, suggesting that the ability of p38γ to mediate senescence is at least partly achieved through p53. However, p38α contributed to ras-inducted senescence via a p53-indepdendent mechanism in cells by mediating ras-induced expression of p16INK4A, another key senescence effector. These findings have identified p38α and p38γ as essential components of the signaling pathway that regulates the tumor-suppressing senescence response, providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential involvement of the p38 isoforms in senescence induction. PMID:19251701

  11. Modulation of maturation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation in Xenopus oocytes by microinjection of oncogenic ras protein and protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, T; Kung, H F

    1990-01-01

    Using Xenopus oocytes as a model system, we investigated the possible involvement of ras proteins in the pathway leading to phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Our results indicate that microinjection of oncogenic T24 H-ras protein (which contains valine at position 12) markedly stimulated S6 phosphorylation on serine residues in oocytes, whereas normal ras protein (which contains glycine at position 12) was without effect. The S6 phosphorylation activity in the cell extract from T24 ras protein-injected oocytes was increased significantly. In addition, injection of protein kinase C potentiated the induction of maturation and S6 phosphorylation by the oncogenic ras protein. A similar potentiation was detected when T24 ras protein-injected oocytes were incubated with active phorbol ester. These findings suggest that ras proteins activate the pathway linked to S6 phosphorylation and that protein kinase C has a synergistic effect on the ras-mediated pathway. Images PMID:2406569

  12. Regulation of autophagy and chloroquine sensitivity by oncogenic RAS in vitro is context-dependent.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Michael J; Gamez, Graciela; Menke, Christina; Hernandez, Ariel; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Gidan, Freddi; Staskiewicz, Leah; Morgan, Shellie; Cummings, Christopher; Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an antimalarial drug and late-stage inhibitor of autophagy currently FDA-approved for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Based primarily on its ability to inhibit autophagy, CQ and its derivative, hydroxychloroquine, are currently being investigated as primary or adjuvant therapy in multiple clinical trials for cancer treatment. Oncogenic RAS has previously been shown to regulate autophagic flux, and cancers with high incidence of RAS mutations, such as pancreatic cancer, have been described in the literature as being particularly susceptible to CQ treatment, leading to the hypothesis that oncogenic RAS makes cancer cells dependent on autophagy. This autophagy "addiction" suggests that the mutation status of RAS in tumors could identify patients who would be more likely to benefit from CQ therapy. Here we show that RAS mutation status itself is unlikely to be beneficial in such a patient selection because oncogenic RAS does not always promote autophagy addiction. Moreover, oncogenic RAS can have opposite effects on both autophagic flux and CQ sensitivity in different cells. Finally, for any given cell type, the positive or negative effect of oncogenic RAS on autophagy does not necessarily predict whether RAS will promote or inhibit CQ-mediated toxicity. Thus, although our results confirm that different tumor cell lines display marked differences in how they respond to autophagy inhibition, these differences can occur irrespective of RAS mutation status and, in different contexts, can either promote or reduce chloroquine sensitivity of tumor cells.

  13. Degradation of Activated K-Ras Orthologue via K-Ras-specific Lysine Residues Is Required for Cytokinesis*

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Kazutaka; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Mika; Majd, Nazanin; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Takahashi, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Koh; Kuroda, Taruho; Lee, Susan; Charest, Pascale G.; Takeda, Kosuke; Asara, John M.; Firtel, Richard A.; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Sasaki, Atsuo T.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells encode three closely related Ras proteins, H-Ras, N-Ras, and K-Ras. Oncogenic K-Ras mutations frequently occur in human cancers, which lead to dysregulated cell proliferation and genomic instability. However, mechanistic role of the Ras isoform regulation have remained largely unknown. Furthermore, the dynamics and function of negative regulation of GTP-loaded K-Ras have not been fully investigated. Here, we demonstrate RasG, the Dictyostelium orthologue of K-Ras, is targeted for degradation by polyubiquitination. Both ubiquitination and degradation of RasG were strictly associated with RasG activity. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis indicated that RasG ubiquitination occurs at C-terminal lysines equivalent to lysines found in human K-Ras but not in H-Ras and N-Ras homologues. Substitution of these lysine residues with arginines (4KR-RasG) diminished RasG ubiquitination and increased RasG protein stability. Cells expressing 4KR-RasG failed to undergo proper cytokinesis and resulted in multinucleated cells. Ectopically expressed human K-Ras undergoes polyubiquitin-mediated degradation in Dictyostelium, whereas human H-Ras and a Dictyostelium H-Ras homologue (RasC) are refractory to ubiquitination. Our results indicate the existence of GTP-loaded K-Ras orthologue-specific degradation system in Dictyostelium, and further identification of the responsible E3-ligase may provide a novel therapeutic approach against K-Ras-mutated cancers. PMID:24338482

  14. The Significance of Ras Activity in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Craig D.; Lu, Weiqin

    2016-01-01

    The genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer shows nearly ubiquitous mutations of K-RAS. However, oncogenic K-Rasmt alone is not sufficient to lead to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in either human or in genetically modified adult mouse models. Many stimulants, such as high fat diet, CCK, LPS, PGE2 and others, have physiological effects at low concentrations that are mediated in part through modest increases in K-Ras activity. However, at high concentrations, they induce inflammation that, in the presence of oncogenic K-Ras expression, substantially accelerates PDAC formation. The mechanism involves increased activity of oncogenic K-Rasmt. Unlike what has been proposed in the standard paradigm for the role of Ras in oncogenesis, oncogenic K-Rasmt is now known to not be constitutively active. Rather, it can be activated by standard mechanisms similar to wild-type K-Ras, but its activity is sustained for a prolonged period. Furthermore, if the level of K-Ras activity exceeds a threshold at which it begins to generate its own activators, then a feed-forward loop is formed between K-Ras activity and inflammation and pathological processes including oncogenesis are initiated. Oncogenic K-Rasmt activation, a key event in PDAC initiation and development, is subject to complex regulatory mechanisms. Reagents which inhibit inflammation, such as the Cox2 inhibitor celecoxib, block the feed-forward loop and prevent induction of PDAC in models with endogenous oncogenic K-Rasmt. Increased understanding of the role of activating and inhibitory mechanisms on oncogenic K-Rasmt activity is of paramount importance for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies to fight against this lethal disease. PMID:26929740

  15. ras oncogene-dependent activation of the P4 promoter of minute virus of mice through a proximal P4 element interacting with the Ets family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Fuks, F; Deleu, L; Dinsart, C; Rommelaere, J; Faisst, S

    1996-01-01

    The P4 promoter of parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMp) directs transcription of the genes coding for nonstructural proteins. The activity of promoter P4 is regulated by several cis-acting DNA elements. Among these, a promoter-proximal GC box was shown to be essential for P4 activity (J.K. Ahn, B.J. Gavin, G. Kumar, and D.C. Ward, J. Virol. 63:5425-5439, 1989). In this study, a motif homologous to an Ets transcription factor-binding site (EBS), located immediately upstream from the GC box, was found to be required for the full activity of promoter P4 in the ras-transformed rat fibroblast cell line FREJ4. In normal parental FR3T3 cells, the transcriptional function of P4 EBS was insignificant but could be restored by transient cell transfection with the c-Ha-ras oncogene. P4 EBS may thus contribute to the stimulation of promoter P4 in ras-transformed cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using crude extracts from FREJ4 cells revealed the binding of a member(s) of the Ets family of transcription factors to the P4 EBS, as well as the interaction of two members of the Sp1 family, Sp1 and Sp3, with the adjacent GC box. When produced in Drosophila melanogaster SL2 cells, Ets-1 and Sp1 proteins acted synergistically to transactivate promoter P4 through their respective cognate sites. PMID:8627649

  16. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Audemard, Eric; Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells.

  17. Carcinogen-specific mutations in preferred Ras-Raf pathway oncogenes directed by strand bias.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ross R; Gestl, Shelley A; Lu, Amy Q; Hoke, Alicia; Feith, David J; Gunther, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    Carcinogen exposures inscribe mutation patterns on cancer genomes and sometimes bias the acquisition of driver mutations toward preferred oncogenes, potentially dictating sensitivity to targeted agents. Whether and how carcinogen-specific mutation patterns direct activation of preferred oncogenes remains poorly understood. Here, mouse models of breast cancer were exploited to uncover a mechanistic link between strand-biased mutagenesis and oncogene preference. When chemical carcinogens were employed during Wnt1-initiated mammary tumorigenesis, exposure to either 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) dramatically accelerated tumor onset. Mammary tumors that followed DMBA exposure nearly always activated the Ras pathway via somatic Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations. Surprisingly, mammary tumors that followed ENU exposure typically lacked Hras mutations, and instead activated the Ras pathway downstream via Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations. Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations involve an A-to-T change on the sense strand, whereas Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations involve an inverse T-to-A change, suggesting that strand-biased mutagenesis may determine oncogene preference. To examine this possibility further, we turned to an alternative Wnt-driven tumor model in which carcinogen exposures augment a latent mammary tumor predisposition in Apc(min) mice. DMBA and ENU each accelerated mammary tumor onset in Apc(min) mice by introducing somatic, "second-hit" Apc mutations. Consistent with our strand bias model, DMBA and ENU generated strikingly distinct Apc mutation patterns, including stringently strand-inverse mutation signatures at A:T sites. Crucially, these contrasting signatures precisely match those proposed to confer bias toward Hras(CAA61CTA) versus Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations in the original tumor sets. Our findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby exposure history acts through strand-biased mutagenesis to specify activation of preferred oncogenes. PMID:27207659

  18. Ras-mediated cell cycle arrest is altered by nuclear oncogenes to induce Schwann cell transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, A J; Paterson, H F; Noble, M; Land, H

    1988-01-01

    The cellular responses to ras and nuclear oncogenes were investigated in purified populations of rat Schwann cells. v-Ha-ras and SV40 large T cooperate to transform Schwann cells, inducing growth in soft agar and allowing proliferation in the absence of added mitogens. Expression of large T alone reduces their growth factor requirements but is insufficient to induce full transformation. In contrast, expression of v-Ha-ras leads to proliferation arrest in Schwann cells expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant of large T at the restrictive temperature. Cells arrest in either the G1 or G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and can re-enter cell division at the permissive temperature even after prolonged periods at the restrictive conditions. Oncogenic ras proteins also inhibit DNA synthesis when microinjected into Schwann cells. Adenovirus E1a and c-myc oncogenes behave similarly to SV40 large T. They cooperate with Ha-ras oncogenes to transform Schwann cells, and prevent ras-induced growth arrest. Thus nuclear oncogenes fundamentally alter the response of Schwann cells to a ras oncogene from cell cycle arrest to transformation. Images PMID:3049071

  19. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Doggett, Karen; Turkel, Nezaket; Willoughby, Lee F; Ellul, Jason; Murray, Michael J; Richardson, Helena E; Brumby, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch) in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib). Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF) domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo). chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that EMT

  20. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, Karen; Turkel, Nezaket; Willoughby, Lee F.; Ellul, Jason; Murray, Michael J.; Richardson, Helena E.; Brumby, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch) in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib). Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF) domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo). chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that EMT

  1. Expression of oncogenic K-ras from its endogenous promoter leads to a partial block of erythroid differentiation and hyperactivation of cytokine-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangang; Beard, Caroline; Tuveson, David A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Jacks, Tyler E; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-06-15

    When overexpressed in primary erythroid progenitors, oncogenic Ras leads to the constitutive activation of its downstream signaling pathways, severe block of terminal erythroid differentiation, and cytokine-independent growth of primary erythroid progenitors. However, whether high-level expression of oncogenic Ras is required for these phenotypes is unknown. To address this issue, we expressed oncogenic K-ras (K-ras(G12D)) from its endogenous promoter using a tetracycline-inducible system. We show that endogenous K-ras(G12D) leads to a partial block of terminal erythroid differentiation in vivo. In contrast to results obtained when oncogenic Ras was overexpressed from retroviral vectors, endogenous levels of K-ras(G12D) fail to constitutively activate but rather hyperactivate cytokine-dependent signaling pathways, including Stat5, Akt, and p44/42 MAPK, in primary erythroid progenitors. This explains previous observations that hematopoietic progenitors expressing endogenous K-ras(G12D) display hypersensitivity to cytokine stimulation in various colony assays. Our results support efforts to modulate Ras signaling for treating hematopoietic malignancies.

  2. A human oncogene of the RAS superfamily unmasked by expression cDNA cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A M; Miki, T; Meyers, K A; Aaronson, S A

    1994-01-01

    As an approach to identify human oncogenes, we generated an expression cDNA library from an ovarian carcinoma line. A potent transforming gene was detected by transfection analysis and identified as TC21, a recently cloned member of the RAS gene superfamily. A single point mutation substituting glutamine for leucine at position 72 was shown to be responsible for activation of transforming properties. While the cDNA clone possessed high transforming activity, the ovarian tumor genomic DNA, which contained the mutated TC21 allele, failed to induce transformed foci. Thus, expression cDNA cloning made it possible to identify and isolate a human oncogene that has evaded detection by conventional approaches. Images PMID:8052619

  3. K-Ras4B phosphorylation at Ser181 is inhibited by calmodulin and modulates K-Ras activity and function.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Moya, B; López-Alcalá, C; Drosten, M; Bachs, O; Agell, N

    2010-11-01

    Fine tuning of Ras activity is widely known as a mechanism to induce different cellular responses. Recently, we have shown that calmodulin (CaM) binds to K-Ras and that K-Ras phosphorylation inhibits its interaction with CaM. In this study we report that CaM inhibits K-Ras phosphorylation at Ser181 by protein kinase C (PKC) in vivo, and this is a mechanism to modulate K-Ras activity and signaling. Although CaM inhibition increased the activation of endogenous K-Ras, PKC inhibition decreased its activation status. We demonstrate that K-Ras phosphorylation decreased susceptibility to p120GAP activity. Accordingly, we also observed that non-phosphorylable K-Ras mutant exhibits a less sustained activation profile and do not efficiently activate AKT at low growth factor doses compared with wild-type K-Ras. It is interesting that the physiological responses induced by K-Ras are affected by this phosphorylation; when K-Ras cannot be phosphorylated it exhibits a remarkably decreased ability to stimulate proliferation in non-saturated serum conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that phosphorylation also regulates oncogenic K-Ras functions, as focus formation capacity, mobility and apoptosis resistance upon adriamycin treatment of cells expressing oncogenic K-Ras that cannot be phosphorylated are highly compromised. Moreover, at low serum concentration proliferation and survival is practically inhibited when cells cannot phosphorylate oncogenic K-Ras. In this condition, K-Ras phosphorylation is essential to ensure a proper activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. In summary, our findings suggest that the interplay between CaM interaction and PKC phosphorylation is essential to regulate non-oncogenic and oncogenic K-Ras activity and functionality.

  4. Registered report: Kinase-dead BRAF and oncogenic RAS cooperate to drive tumor progression through CRAF

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Ajay; Anant, Madan; Mack, Hildegard

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "Kinase-dead BRAF and oncogenic RAS cooperate to drive tumor progression through CRAF" by Heidorn and colleagues, published in Cell in 2010 (Heidorn et al., 2010). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 1A, 1B, 3A, 3B, and 4D. Heidorn and colleagues report that paradoxical activation of the RAF-RAS-MEK-ERK pathway by BRAF inhibitors when applied to BRAFWT cells is a result of BRAF/CRAF heterodimer formation upon inactivation of BRAF kinase activity, and occurs only in the context of active RAS. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11999.001 PMID:26885666

  5. The Structural Basis of Oncogenic Mutations G12, G13 and Q61 in Small GTPase K-Ras4B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Ras mediates cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Mutations in K-Ras4B are predominant at residues G12, G13 and Q61. Even though all impair GAP-assisted GTP → GDP hydrolysis, the mutation frequencies of K-Ras4B in human cancers vary. Here we aim to figure out their mechanisms and differential oncogenicity. In total, we performed 6.4 μs molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GTP/GDP) catalytic domain, the K-Ras4BWT-GTP–GAP complex, and the mutants (K-Ras4BG12C/G12D/G12V-GTP/GDP, K-Ras4BG13D-GTP/GDP, K-Ras4BQ61H-GTP/GDP) and their complexes with GAP. In addition, we simulated ‘exchanged’ nucleotide states. These comprehensive simulations reveal that in solution K-Ras4BWT-GTP exists in two, active and inactive, conformations. Oncogenic mutations differentially elicit an inactive-to-active conformational transition in K-Ras4B-GTP; in K-Ras4BG12C/G12D-GDP they expose the bound nucleotide which facilitates the GDP-to-GTP exchange. These mechanisms may help elucidate the differential mutational statistics in K-Ras4B-driven cancers. Exchanged nucleotide simulations reveal that the conformational transition is more accessible in the GTP-to-GDP than in the GDP-to-GTP exchange. Importantly, GAP not only donates its R789 arginine finger, but stabilizes the catalytically-competent conformation and pre-organizes catalytic residue Q61; mutations disturb the R789/Q61 organization, impairing GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Together, our simulations help provide a mechanistic explanation of key mutational events in one of the most oncogenic proteins in cancer. PMID:26902995

  6. Hyperactivation of Ha-ras oncogene, but not Ink4a/Arf deficiency, triggers bladder tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lan; Zheng, Xiaoyong; Huang, Hong-Ying; Shapiro, Ellen; Lepor, Herbert; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2007-02-01

    Although ras is a potent mitogenic oncogene, its tumorigenicity depends on cellular context and cooperative events. Here we show that low-level expression of a constitutively active Ha-ras in mouse urothelium induces simple urothelial hyperplasia that is resistant to progression to full-fledged bladder tumors even in the absence of Ink4a/Arf. In stark contrast, doubling of the gene dosage of the activated Ha-ras triggered early-onset, rapidly growing, and 100% penetrant tumors throughout the urinary tract. Tumor initiation required superseding a rate-limiting step between simple and nodular hyperplasia, the latter of which is marked by the emergence of mesenchymal components and the coactivation of AKT and STAT pathways as well as PTEN inactivation. These results indicate that overactivation of Ha-ras is both necessary and sufficient to induce bladder tumors along a low-grade, noninvasive papillary pathway, and they shed light on the recent findings that ras activation, via point mutation, overexpression, or intensified signaling from FGF receptor 3, occurs in 70%-90% of these tumors in humans. Our results highlight the critical importance of the dosage/strength of Ha-ras activation in dictating its tumorigenicity--a mechanism of oncogene activation not fully appreciated to date. Finally, our results have clinical implications, as inhibiting ras and/or its downstream effectors, such as AKT and STAT3/5, could provide alternative means to treat low-grade, superficial papillary bladder tumors, the most common tumor in the urinary system. PMID:17256055

  7. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  8. Oncogenic and RASopathy-associated K-RAS mutations relieve membrane-dependent occlusion of the effector-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T.; Marshall, Christopher B.; Smith, Matthew J.; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M. C.; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kay, Lewis E.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    K-RAS4B (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog 4B) is a prenylated, membrane-associated GTPase protein that is a critical switch for the propagation of growth factor signaling pathways to diverse effector proteins, including rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) kinases and RAS-related protein guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RALGDS) proteins. Gain-of-function KRAS mutations occur frequently in human cancers and predict poor clinical outcome, whereas germ-line mutations are associated with developmental syndromes. However, it is not known how these mutations affect K-RAS association with biological membranes or whether this impacts signal transduction. Here, we used solution NMR studies of K-RAS4B tethered to nanodiscs to investigate lipid bilayer-anchored K-RAS4B and its interactions with effector protein RAS-binding domains (RBDs). Unexpectedly, we found that the effector-binding region of activated K-RAS4B is occluded by interaction with the membrane in one of the NMR-observable, and thus highly populated, conformational states. Binding of the RAF isoform ARAF and RALGDS RBDs induced marked reorientation of K-RAS4B from the occluded state to RBD-specific effector-bound states. Importantly, we found that two Noonan syndrome-associated mutations, K5N and D153V, which do not affect the GTPase cycle, relieve the occluded orientation by directly altering the electrostatics of two membrane interaction surfaces. Similarly, the most frequent KRAS oncogenic mutation G12D also drives K-RAS4B toward an exposed configuration. Further, the D153V and G12D mutations increase the rate of association of ARAF-RBD with lipid bilayer-tethered K-RAS4B. We revealed a mechanism of K-RAS4B autoinhibition by membrane sequestration of its effector-binding site, which can be disrupted by disease-associated mutations. Stabilizing the autoinhibitory interactions between K-RAS4B and the membrane could be an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery. PMID:25941399

  9. Oncogenic and RASopathy-associated K-RAS mutations relieve membrane-dependent occlusion of the effector-binding site.

    PubMed

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T; Marshall, Christopher B; Smith, Matthew J; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M C; Stathopulos, Peter B; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kay, Lewis E; Neel, Benjamin G; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-05-26

    K-RAS4B (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog 4B) is a prenylated, membrane-associated GTPase protein that is a critical switch for the propagation of growth factor signaling pathways to diverse effector proteins, including rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) kinases and RAS-related protein guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RALGDS) proteins. Gain-of-function KRAS mutations occur frequently in human cancers and predict poor clinical outcome, whereas germ-line mutations are associated with developmental syndromes. However, it is not known how these mutations affect K-RAS association with biological membranes or whether this impacts signal transduction. Here, we used solution NMR studies of K-RAS4B tethered to nanodiscs to investigate lipid bilayer-anchored K-RAS4B and its interactions with effector protein RAS-binding domains (RBDs). Unexpectedly, we found that the effector-binding region of activated K-RAS4B is occluded by interaction with the membrane in one of the NMR-observable, and thus highly populated, conformational states. Binding of the RAF isoform ARAF and RALGDS RBDs induced marked reorientation of K-RAS4B from the occluded state to RBD-specific effector-bound states. Importantly, we found that two Noonan syndrome-associated mutations, K5N and D153V, which do not affect the GTPase cycle, relieve the occluded orientation by directly altering the electrostatics of two membrane interaction surfaces. Similarly, the most frequent KRAS oncogenic mutation G12D also drives K-RAS4B toward an exposed configuration. Further, the D153V and G12D mutations increase the rate of association of ARAF-RBD with lipid bilayer-tethered K-RAS4B. We revealed a mechanism of K-RAS4B autoinhibition by membrane sequestration of its effector-binding site, which can be disrupted by disease-associated mutations. Stabilizing the autoinhibitory interactions between K-RAS4B and the membrane could be an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery.

  10. Posttranslational modification of the Ha-ras oncogene protein: evidence for a third class of protein carboxyl methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, S; Vogel, J P; Deschenes, R J; Stock, J

    1988-01-01

    The ras oncogene products require membrane localization for their function, and this is thought to be accomplished by the addition of a palmitoyl group to a cysteine residue near the carboxyl terminus of the nascent chain. A lipidated carboxyl-terminal cysteine residue is also found in sequence-related yeast sex factors, and in at least two cases, the alpha-carboxyl group is also methyl esterified. To determine if ras proteins are themselves modified by a similar type of methylation reaction, we incubated rat embryo fibroblasts transformed with p53 and activated Ha-ras oncogenes with L-[methyl-3H]methionine under conditions in which the isotope was converted to the methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-3H]methionine. By using an assay that detects methyl ester linkages, we found that immunoprecipitated ras proteins are in fact esterified and that the stability of these esters is consistent with a carboxyl-terminal localization. This methylation reaction may be important in regulating the interaction of ras proteins with plasma membrane components. The presence of analogous carboxyl-terminal tetrapeptide sequences in other proteins may provide a general recognition sequence for lipidation and methylation modification reactions. Images PMID:3290900

  11. Expression of ras oncogenes in cultured human cells alters the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of cytokine genes.

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, G D; Ernst, T J; Pratt, E S; Zenzie, B W; Rheinwald, J G; Griffin, J D

    1990-01-01

    Autonomous production of cytokines such as the hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), IL-1, or IL-6 has been demonstrated in numerous human and murine neoplasms, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of several paraneoplastic syndromes such as leukocytosis, fever, and hypercalcemia. Because of the high frequency with which mutations in ras protooncogenes have been detected in human tumors, as well as evidence linking ras gene products to activation of certain cellular functions, we investigated whether ras mutations might influence the regulation of cytokine genes. Normal human fibroblasts transfected with a mutant val12 H-ras oncogene expressed increased levels of mRNA transcripts encoding granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), and IL-1 beta compared with controls. Human mesothelioma cells transfected with a mutant asp12 N-ras oncogene exhibited similar alterations in cytokine gene expression. Estimates of transcriptional activity by nuclear run-on analysis revealed a selective increase in transcription only for the IL-1 gene. Analysis of mRNA half-life demonstrated a marked increase in the stability of numerous cytokine transcripts, including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1, and IL-6. The addition of anti-IL-1 neutralizing antibody to cultures of cells expressing ras mutants did not block the expression of any of the cytokines examined, suggesting that the baseline expression of GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-6 was not a secondary event due to the increased transcription of IL-1. These results indicate that mutations in ras genes may alter expression of several cytokine genes through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Images PMID:2212010

  12. Ras-mutant cancer cells display B-Raf binding to Ras that activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase and is inhibited by protein kinase A phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanping; Takahashi, Maho; Stork, Philip J S

    2013-09-20

    The small G protein Ras regulates proliferation through activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) cascade. The first step of Ras-dependent activation of ERK signaling is Ras binding to members of the Raf family of MAP kinase kinase kinases, C-Raf and B-Raf. Recently, it has been reported that in melanoma cells harboring oncogenic Ras mutations, B-Raf does not bind to Ras and does not contribute to basal ERK activation. For other types of Ras-mutant tumors, the relative contributions of C-Raf and B-Raf are not known. We examined non-melanoma cancer cell lines containing oncogenic Ras mutations and express both C-Raf and B-Raf isoforms, including the lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. Both B-Raf and C-Raf were constitutively bound to oncogenic Ras and contributed to Ras-dependent ERK activation. Ras binding to B-Raf and C-Raf were both subject to inhibition by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA. cAMP inhibited the growth of H1299 cells and Ras-dependent ERK activation via PKA. PKA inhibited the binding of Ras to both C-Raf and B-Raf through phosphorylations of C-Raf at Ser-259 and B-Raf at Ser-365, respectively. These studies demonstrate that in non-melanocytic Ras-mutant cancer cells, Ras signaling to B-Raf is a significant contributor to ERK activation and that the B-Raf pathway, like that of C-Raf, is a target for inhibition by PKA. We suggest that cAMP and hormones coupled to cAMP may prove useful in dampening the effects of oncogenic Ras in non-melanocytic cancer cells through PKA-dependent actions on B-Raf as well as C-Raf.

  13. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncogenesis is frequently accompanied by the activation of specific metabolic pathways. One such pathway is fatty acid biosynthesis, whose induction is observed upon transformation of a wide variety of cell types. Here, we explored how defined oncogenic alleles, specifically the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigens and oncogenic Ras12V, affect fatty acid metabolism. Our results indicate that SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation of fibroblasts induces fatty acid biosynthesis in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. This oncogene-induced activation of fatty acid biosynthesis was found to be mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent, as it was attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation induced sensitivity to treatment with fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitors. Pharmaceutical inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC), a key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme, induced caspase-dependent cell death in oncogene-transduced cells. In contrast, isogenic nontransformed cells were resistant to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. This oncogene-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the cells' growth rates and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Both the activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and the sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition could be conveyed to nontransformed breast epithelial cells through transduction with oncogenic Ras12V. Similar to what was observed in the transformed fibroblasts, the Ras12V-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the proliferative status and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Combined, our results indicate that specific oncogenic alleles can directly confer sensitivity to inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE Viral oncoproteins and cellular mutations

  14. Mutations, expression and genomic instability of the H-ras proto-oncogene in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Kiaris, H.; Spandidos, D. A.; Jones, A. S.; Vaughan, E. D.; Field, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Mutation and overexpression are the main activating mechanisms for the ras family of genes in human cancer and the variable tandem repeat (VTR) located at the 3' end of H-ras has been associated with this risk. In the present study, we have analysed the relative levels of expression of H-ras mRNA in 26 samples of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (competitive RT-PCR) and also investigated whether there is an association between ras expression and alterations in the 3'-VTR region. In addition, we have studied the incidence of point mutations in codon 12 of H-ras, codons 12 and 13 of K-ras and codon 61 of N-ras in 120 SCCHN samples. Our results indicate that only two samples carry mutations, both of which are located in codon 12 of K-ras, but that overexpression of the H-ras proto-oncogene is a frequent event in SCCHN [54% (14/26)] and is associated with a favourable prognosis: 3 of 14 patients with H-ras overexpression have died, whereas 9 of 12 patients with low levels of H-ras expression have died. We have also undertaken an analysis of these results together with our previous investigations on microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in SCCHN, but no associations were found. We therefore conclude that ras mutations are an infrequent event in the progression of the SCCHN in the Western world, whereas overexpression of the H-ras proto-oncogene is a common event. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7599040

  15. Oncogenic K-Ras promotes proliferation in quiescent intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gierut, Jessica J; Lyons, Jesse; Shah, Manasvi S; Genetti, Casie; Breault, David T; Haigis, Kevin M

    2015-07-01

    K-Ras is a monomeric GTPase that controls cellular and tissue homeostasis. Prior studies demonstrated that mutationally activated K-Ras (K-Ras(G12D)) signals through MEK to promote expansion and hyperproliferation of the highly mitotically active transit-amplifying cells (TACs) in the intestinal crypt. Its effect on normally quiescent stem cells was unknown, however. Here, we have used an H2B-Egfp transgenic system to demonstrate that K-Ras(G12D) accelerates the proliferative kinetics of quiescent intestinal stem cells. As in the TAC compartment, the effect of mutant K-Ras on the quiescent stem cell is dependent upon activation of MEK. Mutant K-Ras is also able to increase self-renewal potential of intestinal stem cells following damage. These results demonstrate that mutant K-Ras can influence intestinal homeostasis on multiple levels.

  16. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  17. Adenovirus E1A coding sequences that enable ras and pmt oncogenes to transform cultured primary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zerler, B; Moran, B; Maruyama, K; Moomaw, J; Grodzicker, T; Ruley, H E

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids expressing partial adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) coding sequences were tested for activities which facilitate in vitro establishment (immortalization) of primary baby rat kidney cells and which enable the T24 Harvey ras-related oncogene and the polyomavirus middle T antigen (pmt) gene to transform primary baby rat kidney cells. E1A cDNAs expressing the 289- and 243-amino acid proteins expressed both E1A transforming functions. Mutant hrA, which encodes a 140-amino acid protein derived from the amino-terminal domain shared by the 289- and 243-amino acid proteins, enabled ras (but not pmt) to transform and facilitated in vitro establishment to a low, but detectable, extent. These studies suggest that E1A functions which collaborate with ras oncogenes and those which facilitate establishment are linked. Furthermore, E1A transforming functions are not associated with activities of the 289-amino acid E1A proteins required for efficient transcriptional activation of viral early region promoters. Images PMID:3022137

  18. Targeting the RAS pathway by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of oncogenic driver mutations with small-molecule inhibitors resulted in powerful treatment options for cancer patients in recent years. The RAS (rat sarcoma) pathway is among the most frequently mutated pathways in human cancer. Whereas targeting mutant Kirsten RAS (KRAS) remains difficult, mutant B rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (BRAF) kinase is an established drug target in cancer. Now data show that neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) and even Harvey RAS (HRAS) mutations could be predictive markers for treatment with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitors. This review discusses recent preclinical and clinical studies of MEK inhibitors in BRAF and RAS mutant cancer. PMID:26691679

  19. Amino-acid substitutions at codon 13 of the N-ras oncogene in human acute myeloid leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Johannes L.; Toksoz, Deniz; Marshall, Christopher J.; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Veeneman, Gerrit H.; van der Eb, Alex J.; van Boom, Jacques H.; Janssen, Johannes W. G.; Steenvoorden, Ada C. M.

    1985-06-01

    DNAs from four out of five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) tested by an in vivo selection assay in nude mice using transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells were found to contain an activated N-ras oncogene. Using a set of synthetic oligonucleotide probes, we have detected a mutation at codon 13 in all four genes. The same codon is mutated in an additional AML DNA that is positive in the focus-formation assay on 3T3 cells. DNA from the peripheral blood of one patient in remission does not contain a codon 13 mutation.

  20. Inactivation of RASA1 promotes melanoma tumorigenesis via R-Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyeran; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Wang, Xue; Hill, Kristen S.; Messina, Jane L.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Youngchul; Dees, Nathan D.; Ding, Li; Teer, Jamie K.; Yang, Shengyu; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Mulé, James J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Kim, Minjung

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) can activate Ras, increasing the risk for tumor development. Utilizing a melanoma whole genome sequencing (WGS) data from 13 patients, we identified two novel, clustered somatic missense mutations (Y472H and L481F) in RASA1 (RAS p21 protein activator 1, also called p120RasGAP). We have shown that wild type RASA1, but not identified mutants, suppresses soft agar colony formation and tumor growth of BRAF mutated melanoma cell lines via its RasGAP activity toward R-Ras (related RAS viral (r-ras) oncogene homolog) isoform. Moreover, R-Ras increased and RASA1 suppressed Ral-A activation among Ras downstream effectors. In addition to mutations, loss of RASA1 expression was frequently observed in metastatic melanoma samples on melanoma tissue microarray (TMA) and a low level of RASA1 mRNA expression was associated with decreased overall survival in melanoma patients with BRAF mutations. Thus, these data support that RASA1 is inactivated by mutation or by suppressed expression in melanoma and that RASA1 plays a tumor suppressive role by inhibiting R-Ras, a previously less appreciated member of the Ras small GTPases. PMID:26993606

  1. Introduction of v-Ha-ras oncogene induces differentiation of cultured human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, T.; Mabry, M.; De Bustros, A.; Ihle, J.N.; Nelkin, B.D.; Baylin, S.B.

    1987-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is an endocrine tumor of the thyroid C cells that expresses high levels of the neuroendocrine peptide hormone calcitonin. During tumor progression in the host, there is an apparent loss of differentiation in MTC cells that involves a consistent decrease in calcitonin content of the tumor cells associated with decreased expression of the calcitonin gene and/or changes in a mRNA alternative-processing pattern away from that characteristic of the parent thyroid C cell. The authors now report that introduction of the viral Harvey ras (v-Ha-ras) oncogene into cultured human MTC cells can reverse such changes in gene expression and can induce endocrine differentiation of the tumor cells. The expression of v-Ha-ras is associated with decreased cellular proliferation and DNA synthesis. There is a marked increase in the number of cytoplasmic secretory granules that are a classic feature of differentiated thyroid C cells. v-Ha-ras expression induces increased expression of the calcitonin gene and the processing of the primary gene transcript is shifted to favor calcitonin mRNA rather than calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA production. These studies with cultured human MTC cells provide a model system to study the role of Ha-ras and related genes in neuroendocrine differentiation. The findings suggest an important approach for identifying genes in solid tumors whose altered expression may play a role in the impaired maturational capacity characteristic of cancer cells during tumor progression.

  2. Oncogenic Activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Staudt, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent genetic evidence has established a pathogenetic role for NF-κB signaling in cancer. NF-κB signaling is engaged transiently when normal B lymphocytes respond to antigens, but lymphomas derived from these cells accumulate genetic lesions that constitutively activate NF-κB signaling. Many genetic aberrations in lymphomas alter CARD11, MALT1, or BCL10, which constitute a signaling complex that is intermediate between the B-cell receptor and IκB kinase. The activated B-cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma activates NF-κB by a variety of mechanisms including oncogenic mutations in CARD11 and a chronic active form of B-cell receptor signaling. Normal plasma cells activate NF-κB in response to ligands in the bone marrow microenvironment, but their malignant counterpart, multiple myeloma, sustains a variety of genetic hits that stabilize the kinase NIK, leading to constitutive activation of the classical and alternative NF-κB pathways. Various oncogenic abnormalities in epithelial cancers, including mutant K-ras, engage unconventional IκB kinases to activate NF-κB. Inhibition of constitutive NF-κB signaling in each of these cancer types induces apoptosis, providing a rationale for the development of NF-κB pathway inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:20516126

  3. Transformation of primary human embryonic kidney cells to anchorage independence by a combination of BK virus DNA and the Harvey-ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, A.; Pater, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    Primary human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells were transformed by a focus assay with BK virus (BKV) DNA molecularly cloned at its unique EcoRI site. Both viral DNA sequences and viral tumor antigens were present and expressed in all the foci that the authors examined. However, cells isolated from foci were incapable of growth in soft agar. They then examined the transformation of HEK cells after their transfection with a combination of BKV DNA and either the normal or the activated form of the human Ha-ras oncogene (EJ c-Ha-ras-1). Only the cells transfected with a combination of BKV DNA and the activated form of Ha-ras DNAs were present in the transformed colonies. BKV tumor antigens and the Ha-ras p21 protein were also expressed.

  4. The role of the ras oncogene in the formation of tumours.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P X; Harris, H

    1988-07-01

    A c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, cloned from the EJ human bladder carcinoma cell line, was inserted into a shuttle vector carrying the selectable marker gene gpt that encodes the enzyme xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This construct, pSV2gptEJ, was transfected into NIH 3T3 cells by the calcium phosphate precipitation method and cells that had incorporated the plasmid were selected by growth in the presence of mycophenolic acid to which gpt confers resistance. A number of transfectant clones were tested for tumorigenicity by inoculation into nude mice. The take incidence was variable and the tumours arose only after a prolonged latent period. Many inocula produced no tumours. These results were consistent with the view that the tumours arose by selective overgrowth of minority cell populations. Cell lines were derived by explantation of these tumours and were back-selected in 2-thioxanthine, a cytotoxic analogue of the xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase substrate. Five clones were obtained that did not express detectable levels of the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene product, p21ras. All of them showed a less-transformed morphology than the transfected NIH 3T3 cells from which they originated. Nonetheless three of these clones were found to be tumorigenic at all sites tested. This finding demonstrates that once tumorigenic variants have been selected from the ras-transformed cells, continued production of the p21ras protein is not necessary for the maintenance of tumorigenicity. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that the transfection procedure itself introduced major and stable perturbations of the genome of the transfected cells and confirmed that tumours were produced by selective overgrowth of variants with a chromosome constitution palpably different from that of the majority of the cells injected. In the light of the complex background of genomic changes produced in NIH 3T3 cells by transfection with the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, no conclusion can be drawn in genetic

  5. The role of the ras oncogene in the formation of tumours.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P X; Harris, H

    1988-07-01

    A c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, cloned from the EJ human bladder carcinoma cell line, was inserted into a shuttle vector carrying the selectable marker gene gpt that encodes the enzyme xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This construct, pSV2gptEJ, was transfected into NIH 3T3 cells by the calcium phosphate precipitation method and cells that had incorporated the plasmid were selected by growth in the presence of mycophenolic acid to which gpt confers resistance. A number of transfectant clones were tested for tumorigenicity by inoculation into nude mice. The take incidence was variable and the tumours arose only after a prolonged latent period. Many inocula produced no tumours. These results were consistent with the view that the tumours arose by selective overgrowth of minority cell populations. Cell lines were derived by explantation of these tumours and were back-selected in 2-thioxanthine, a cytotoxic analogue of the xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase substrate. Five clones were obtained that did not express detectable levels of the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene product, p21ras. All of them showed a less-transformed morphology than the transfected NIH 3T3 cells from which they originated. Nonetheless three of these clones were found to be tumorigenic at all sites tested. This finding demonstrates that once tumorigenic variants have been selected from the ras-transformed cells, continued production of the p21ras protein is not necessary for the maintenance of tumorigenicity. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that the transfection procedure itself introduced major and stable perturbations of the genome of the transfected cells and confirmed that tumours were produced by selective overgrowth of variants with a chromosome constitution palpably different from that of the majority of the cells injected. In the light of the complex background of genomic changes produced in NIH 3T3 cells by transfection with the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, no conclusion can be drawn in genetic

  6. Myc and Ras oncogenes engage different energy metabolism programs and evoke distinct patterns of oxidative and DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Ostrakova, Jitka; Kosar, Martin; Hall, Arnaldur; Duskova, Pavlina; Mistrik, Martin; Merchut-Maya, Joanna Maria; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartkova, Jirina; Christensen, Claus; Bartek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Both Myc and Ras oncogenes impact cellular metabolism, deregulate redox homeostasis and trigger DNA replication stress (RS) that compromises genomic integrity. However, how are such oncogene-induced effects evoked and temporally related, to what extent are these kinetic parameters shared by Myc and Ras, and how are these cellular changes linked with oncogene-induced cellular senescence in different cell context(s) remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the above-mentioned open questions by multifaceted comparative analyses of human cellular models with inducible expression of c-Myc and H-RasV12 (Ras), two commonly deregulated oncoproteins operating in a functionally connected signaling network. Our study of DNA replication parameters using the DNA fiber approach and time-course assessment of perturbations in glycolytic flux, oxygen consumption and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed the following results. First, overabundance of nuclear Myc triggered RS promptly, already after one day of Myc induction, causing slow replication fork progression and fork asymmetry, even before any metabolic changes occurred. In contrast, Ras overexpression initially induced a burst of cell proliferation and increased the speed of replication fork progression. However, after several days of induction Ras caused bioenergetic metabolic changes that correlated with slower DNA replication fork progression and the ensuing cell cycle arrest, gradually leading to senescence. Second, the observed oncogene-induced RS and metabolic alterations were cell-type/context dependent, as shown by comparative analyses of normal human BJ fibroblasts versus U2-OS sarcoma cells. Third, the energy metabolic reprogramming triggered by Ras was more robust compared to impact of Myc. Fourth, the detected oncogene-induced oxidative stress was due to ROS (superoxide) of non-mitochondrial origin and mitochondrial OXPHOS was reduced (Crabtree effect). Overall, our study provides novel

  7. Formation of the Ras dimer is essential for Raf-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Inouye, K; Mizutani, S; Koide, H; Kaziro, Y

    2000-02-11

    Although it is well established that Ras requires membrane localization for activation of its target molecule, Raf-1, the reason for this requirement is not fully understood. In this study, we found that modified Ras, which is purified from Sf9 cells, could activate Raf-1 in a cell-free system, when incorporated into liposome. Using a bifunctional cross-linker and a protein-fragmentation complementation assay, we detected dimer formation of Ras in the liposome and in the intact cells, respectively. These results suggest that dimerization of Ras in the lipid membrane is essential for activation of Raf-1. To support this, we found that, when fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), unprocessed Ras expressed in Escherichia coli could bypass the requirement for liposome. A Ras-dependent Raf-1 activator, which we previously reported (Mizutani, S., Koide, H., and Kaziro, Y. (1998) Oncogene 16, 2781-2786), was still required for Raf-1 activation by GST-Ras. Furthermore, an enforced dimerization of unmodified oncogenic Ras mutant in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, using a portion of gyrase B or estrogen receptor, also resulted in activation of Raf-1. From these results, we conclude that membrane localization allows Ras to form a dimer, which is essential, although not sufficient, for Raf-1 activation.

  8. The Tumor Suppressor DiRas3 Forms a Complex with H-Ras and C-RAF Proteins and Regulates Localization, Dimerization, and Kinase Activity of C-RAF*

    PubMed Central

    Baljuls, Angela; Beck, Matthias; Oenel, Ayla; Robubi, Armin; Kroschewski, Ruth; Hekman, Mirko; Rudel, Thomas; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2012-01-01

    The maternally imprinted Ras-related tumor suppressor gene DiRas3 is lost or down-regulated in more than 60% of ovarian and breast cancers. The anti-tumorigenic effect of DiRas3 is achieved through several mechanisms, including inhibition of cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of apoptosis and autophagy. Re-expression of DiRas3 in cancer cells interferes with the signaling through Ras/MAPK and PI3K. Despite intensive research, the mode of interference of DiRas3 with the Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK signal transduction is still a matter of speculation. In this study, we show that DiRas3 associates with the H-Ras oncogene and that activation of H-Ras enforces this interaction. Furthermore, while associated with DiRas3, H-Ras is able to bind to its effector protein C-RAF. The resulting multimeric complex consisting of DiRas3, C-RAF, and active H-Ras is more stable than the two protein complexes H-Ras·C-RAF or H-Ras·DiRas3, respectively. The consequence of this complex formation is a DiRas3-mediated recruitment and anchorage of C-RAF to components of the membrane skeleton, suppression of C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization, and inhibition of C-RAF kinase activity. PMID:22605333

  9. C/EBPβ represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage independent of oncogenic Ras and p19Arf

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, SJ; Zhu, S; Zhu, F; House, JS; Smart, RC

    2013-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a mediator of cell survival and tumorigenesis. When C/EBPβ−/− mice are treated with carcinogens that produce oncogenic Ras mutations in keratinocytes, they respond with abnormally elevated keratinocyte apoptosis and a block in skin tumorigenesis. Although this aberrant carcinogen-induced apoptosis results from abnormal upregulation of p53, it is not known whether upregulated p53 results from oncogenic Ras and its ability to induce p19Arf and/or activate DNA-damage response pathways or from direct carcinogen-induced DNA damage. We report that p19Arf is dramatically elevated in C/EBPβ−/− epidermis and that C/EBPβ represses a p19Arf promoter reporter. To determine whether p19Arf is responsible for the proapoptotic phenotype in C/EBPβ−/− mice, C/EBPβ−/−;p19Arf−/− mice were generated. C/EBPβ−/−;p19Arf−/− mice responded to carcinogen treatment with increased p53 and apoptosis, indicating p19Arf is not essential. To ascertain whether oncogenic Ras activation induces aberrant p53 and apoptosis in C/EBPβ−/− epidermis, we generated K14-ER:Ras; C/EBPβ−/− mice. Oncogenic Ras activation induced by 4-hydroxytamoxifen did not produce increased p53 or apoptosis. Finally, when C/EBPβ−/− mice were treated with differing types of DNA-damaging agents, including alkylating chemotherapeutic agents, they displayed aberrant levels of p53 and apoptosis. These results indicate that C/EBPβ represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage and suggest that inhibition of C/EBPβ may be a target for cancer cotherapy to increase the efficacy of alkylating chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18636078

  10. Profiling of transcripts and proteins modulated by K-ras oncogene in the lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice by omics approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojung; Kang, Jungwoo; Cho, Minchul; Seo, Eunhee; Choi, Heesook; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Heejong; Kang, Gum Yong; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Young-Ho; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Yum, Young Na; Park, Sue-Nie; Yoon, Do-Young

    2009-01-01

    The mutated K-ras gene is involved in approximately 30% of human cancers. In order to search for K-ras oncogene-induced modulators in lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice, we performed microarray and proteomics (LC/ESI-MS/MS) analysis. Genes (RAB27b RAS family, IL-1RA, IL-33, chemokine ligand 6, epiregulin, EGF-like domain and cathepsin) related to cancer development (Wnt signaling pathway) and inflammation (chemokine/cytokine signaling pathway, Toll receptor signaling) were up-regulated while genes (troponin, tropomodulin 2, endothelial lipase, FGFR4, integrin alpha8 and adenylate cyclase 8) related to the tumor suppression such as p53 pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and cadherin signaling pathway were down-regulated by K-ras oncogene. Proteomics approach revealed that up-regulated proteins in lung adenomas of K-ras mice were classified as follows: proteins related to the metabolism/catabolism (increased from 7 to 22% by K-ras gene), proteins related to translation/transcription and nucleotide (from 4 to 6%), proteins related to signal transduction (from 3 to 5%), proteins related to phosphorylation (from 1 to 2%). ATP synthase, Ras oncogene family, cytochrome c oxidase, flavoprotein, TEF 1, adipoprotein A-1 BP, glutathione oxidase, fatty acid BP 4, diaphorase 1, MAPK4 and transgelin were up-regulated by K-ras oncogene. However, integrin alpha1, Ras-interacting protein (Rain), endothelin-converting enzyme-1d and splicing factor 3b were down-regulated. These studies suggest that genes related to cancer development and inflammation were up-regulated while genes related to the tumor suppression were down-regulated by K-ras, resulting in the tumor growth. Putative biomarkers such as cell cycle related genes (Cdc37), cancer cell adhesion (Glycam 1, integrin alpha8, integrin alphaX and Clec4n), signal transduction (Tlr2, IL-33, and Ccbp2), migration (Ccr1, Ccl6, and diaphorase 1 (Cyb5r3) and cancer development (epiregulin) can be useful for diagnosis and as

  11. Profiling of transcripts and proteins modulated by K-ras oncogene in the lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice by omics approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojung; Kang, Jungwoo; Cho, Minchul; Seo, Eunhee; Choi, Heesook; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Heejong; Kang, Gum Yong; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Young-Ho; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Yum, Young Na; Park, Sue-Nie; Yoon, Do-Young

    2009-01-01

    The mutated K-ras gene is involved in approximately 30% of human cancers. In order to search for K-ras oncogene-induced modulators in lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice, we performed microarray and proteomics (LC/ESI-MS/MS) analysis. Genes (RAB27b RAS family, IL-1RA, IL-33, chemokine ligand 6, epiregulin, EGF-like domain and cathepsin) related to cancer development (Wnt signaling pathway) and inflammation (chemokine/cytokine signaling pathway, Toll receptor signaling) were up-regulated while genes (troponin, tropomodulin 2, endothelial lipase, FGFR4, integrin alpha8 and adenylate cyclase 8) related to the tumor suppression such as p53 pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and cadherin signaling pathway were down-regulated by K-ras oncogene. Proteomics approach revealed that up-regulated proteins in lung adenomas of K-ras mice were classified as follows: proteins related to the metabolism/catabolism (increased from 7 to 22% by K-ras gene), proteins related to translation/transcription and nucleotide (from 4 to 6%), proteins related to signal transduction (from 3 to 5%), proteins related to phosphorylation (from 1 to 2%). ATP synthase, Ras oncogene family, cytochrome c oxidase, flavoprotein, TEF 1, adipoprotein A-1 BP, glutathione oxidase, fatty acid BP 4, diaphorase 1, MAPK4 and transgelin were up-regulated by K-ras oncogene. However, integrin alpha1, Ras-interacting protein (Rain), endothelin-converting enzyme-1d and splicing factor 3b were down-regulated. These studies suggest that genes related to cancer development and inflammation were up-regulated while genes related to the tumor suppression were down-regulated by K-ras, resulting in the tumor growth. Putative biomarkers such as cell cycle related genes (Cdc37), cancer cell adhesion (Glycam 1, integrin alpha8, integrin alphaX and Clec4n), signal transduction (Tlr2, IL-33, and Ccbp2), migration (Ccr1, Ccl6, and diaphorase 1 (Cyb5r3) and cancer development (epiregulin) can be useful for diagnosis and as

  12. Approach for targeting Ras with small molecules that activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange.

    PubMed

    Burns, Michael C; Sun, Qi; Daniels, R Nathan; Camper, DeMarco; Kennedy, J Phillip; Phan, Jason; Olejniczak, Edward T; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2014-03-01

    Aberrant activation of the small GTPase Ras by oncogenic mutation or constitutively active upstream receptor tyrosine kinases results in the deregulation of cellular signals governing growth and survival in ∼30% of all human cancers. However, the discovery of potent inhibitors of Ras has been difficult to achieve. Here, we report the identification of small molecules that bind to a unique pocket on the Ras:Son of Sevenless (SOS):Ras complex, increase the rate of SOS-catalyzed nucleotide exchange in vitro, and modulate Ras signaling pathways in cells. X-ray crystallography of Ras:SOS:Ras in complex with these molecules reveals that the compounds bind in a hydrophobic pocket in the CDC25 domain of SOS adjacent to the Switch II region of Ras. The structure-activity relationships exhibited by these compounds can be rationalized on the basis of multiple X-ray cocrystal structures. Mutational analyses confirmed the functional relevance of this binding site and showed it to be essential for compound activity. These molecules increase Ras-GTP levels and disrupt MAPK and PI3K signaling in cells at low micromolar concentrations. These small molecules represent tools to study the acute activation of Ras and highlight a pocket on SOS that may be exploited to modulate Ras signaling.

  13. Detection of K-Ras oncogene using magnetic beads-quantum dots in microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Noh, Han Na; Kim, Jong Sung

    2013-08-01

    Recently quantum dots (QDs) have been extensively used in the field of biotechnology. QDs have merits of wide selection of emission wavelength and exceptional stability against photo bleaching over conventional organic fluorophores and are used in cell imaging, biomarker, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor. Magnetic beads have been used as solid support in microfluidic devices to trace bio-molecules. In this study, Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic chips were prepared for the detection of K-Ras oncogene by using QDs-DNA conjugate. K-Ras oncogene can be detected by fluorescence quenching in microfluidic chip. Carboxylated CdSe/ZnS QDs (emission wavelength: 605 nm) could bind to magnetic beads of polystyrene/divinyl benzene via EDC/NHS crosslinking reaction. The fluorescence from QDs could be quenched by intercalating dye (thiazol orange dimers: TOTO-3) after hybridization with target DNA and probe DNA in the channel of microfluidic chip. The fluorescence intensity change of QDs after hybridization in microfluidic chip has been studied. PMID:23882748

  14. Characterization and immunotherapeutic potential of a monoclonal antibody against a ras oncogene transformed cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Transformed cells express cell surface antigens not present, or present in diminished amounts on normal cells. Monoclonal antibodies can be used to identify and biochemically characterize tumor-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 45-2D9 was produced by immunization of BALB/c mice with a transformed cell line (45-2D9) induced by transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a c-H-ras oncogene in DNA isolated from a human lung carcinoma. By immunoperoxidase staining, this antibody binds to the 45-342 cells as well as to the ras transformed primary and 3 secondary transfectants, including the one used to induce 45-342, but not to other ras transformed cell lines. Murine tumors as well as human fetal and most normal adult tissues are not stained. This antibody does bind to a variety of human tumors, including lung adenocarcinomas, as well as breast, colon and esophageal carcinomas. The ability of MoAb 45-2D9 to target ricin toxin A chain (RTA) and radio-isotopes to gp74 expressing cells was investigated. An immunotoxin generated by conjugating RTA to MoAb 45-2D9 inhibits protein and DNA synthesis by the 45-342 cells. Radiolabeled antibody specifically localizes to and can be used to image subcutaneous and pulmonary gp74 expressing tumors in nu/nu mice. Monoclonal antibodies against oncogene transformed cell lines may be useful for the detection and characterization of tumor-associated antigens as well as for the development of new tumor therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  15. A novel oncogenic BTK isoform is overexpressed in colon cancers and required for RAS-mediated transformation

    PubMed Central

    Grassilli, E; Pisano, F; Cialdella, A; Bonomo, S; Missaglia, C; Cerrito, M G; Masiero, L; Ianzano, L; Giordano, F; Cicirelli, V; Narloch, R; D'Amato, F; Noli, B; Ferri, G L; Leone, B E; Stanta, G; Bonin, S; Helin, K; Giovannoni, R; Lavitrano, M

    2016-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is essential for B-cell proliferation/differentiation and it is generally believed that its expression and function are limited to bone marrow-derived cells. Here, we report the identification and characterization of p65BTK, a novel isoform abundantly expressed in colon carcinoma cell lines and tumour tissue samples. p65BTK protein is expressed, through heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK)-dependent and internal ribosome entry site-driven translation, from a transcript containing an alternative first exon in the 5′-untranslated region, and is post-transcriptionally regulated, via hnRNPK, by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. p65BTK is endowed with strong transforming activity that depends on active signal-regulated protein kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2) and its inhibition abolishes RAS transforming activity. Accordingly, p65BTK overexpression in colon cancer tissues correlates with ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, p65BTK inhibition affects growth and survival of colon cancer cells. Our data reveal that BTK, via p65BTK expression, is a novel and powerful oncogene acting downstream of the RAS/MAPK pathway and suggest that its targeting may be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:26804170

  16. Multiple tumor types appear in a transgenic mouse with the ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, R. D.; Leder, A.; Kuo, A.; Pattengale, P. K.; Leder, P.

    1993-01-01

    A transgenic mouse strain with the zeta-globin promoter and the vHa-ras oncogene develops an array of mesenchymal and epithelial neoplasms described here. The predominate mesenchymal tumors were dermal spindle cell tumors, which resembled malignant fibrous histiocytomas found in humans. They were associated with hepatosplenomegaly and developed beneath squamous papillomas. The hepatosplenomegaly was associated with infiltrates of cells that tended toward myelocytic or monocytic differentiation. Other epithelial tumors included keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Squamous cysts, some with squamous cell carcinomas, of the salivary glands and mammary carcinomas were also found. Odontogenic tumors, which sometimes differentiated into ameloblastomas, were one of the more unusual tumor types observed. Other, less frequent tumors were also noted. The tumors described here are a potentially valuable experimental resource that may lead to an understanding of malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like lesions, odontogenic tumors, and tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8475993

  17. Downregulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor function and cytochrome P450 1A1 induction by expression of Ha-ras oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Reiners, J J; Jones, C L; Hong, N; Clift, R E; Elferink, C

    1997-06-01

    The immortalized human epithelial cell line MCF10A has the phenotypic characteristics of normal breast cells. Exposure of MCF10A cultures to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) stimulated the transcriptional activation of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), and CYP1B1, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase. Northern blot hybridization and nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that transcriptional activation of these genes was suppressed in stably transfected cultures expressing an Ha-ras oncogene (the MCF10A-NeoT line). Similar suppression did not occur in stably transfected lines carrying the expression vector or a normal c-Ha-ras protooncogene. Western blot analyses and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the lack of inducibility in MDF10A-NeoT cells reflected neither reductions in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator protein nor prevention of TCDD-induced AHR translocation to the nucleus. Suppression did correlate with reductions in DNA-AHR complex formation, as analyzed by gel retardation assays of soluble cell extracts treated in vitro with TCDD. The induction of Cyp1a-1 by TCDD was also analyzed in transgenic mice that expressed a v-Ha-ras oncogene exclusively in their keratinocytes. Relative to littermates lacking the transgene, the induction of Cyp1a-1 by TCDD was partially suppressed (about 50%) in the epidermises of v-Ha-ras-positive transgenic mice. However, normal levels of Cyp1a-1 induction occurred in the livers of the same mice. induction of Cyp1a-1 by TCDD was also suppressed (more than 98%) in chemically induced skin papillomas having Ha-ras mutations, relative to uninvolved surrounding skin. These studies suggest that the p21-ras protein controls signal transduction pathways capable of modulating AHR function.

  18. Inhibition of carcinogen induced c-Ha-ras and c-fos proto-oncogenes expression by dietary curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Limtrakul, Porn-ngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Lipigorngoson, Suwiwek; Dunn, Floyd W

    2001-01-01

    Background We investigated the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin tumor formation in Swiss albino mice. Curcumin, a yellow coloring matter isolated from roots of Curcuma longa Linn, is a phenolic compound possessing antioxidant, free radical scavenger, and antiinflammatory properties. It has been shown by previously reported work that TPA-induced skin tumors were inhibited by topical application of curcumin, and curcumin has been shown to inhibit a variety of biological activities of TPA. Topical application of curcumin was reported to inhibit TPA-induced c-fos, c-jun and c-myc gene expression in mouse skin. This paper reports the effects of orally administered curcumin, which was consumed as a dietary component at concentrations of 0.2 % or 1 %, in ad libitum feeding. Results Animals in which tumors had been initiated with DMBA and promoted with TPA experienced significantly fewer tumors and less tumor volume if they ingested either 0.2% or 1% curcumin diets. Also, the dietary consumption of curcumin resulted in a significantly decreased expression of ras and fos proto-oncogenes in the tumorous skin, as measured by enhanced chemiluminesence Western blotting detection system (Amersham). Conclusions Whereas earlier work demonstrated that topical application of curcumin to mouse skin inhibited TPA-induced expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc oncogenes, our results are the first to show that orally consumed curcumin significantly inhibited DMBA- and TPA-induced ras and fos gene expression in mouse skin. PMID:11231886

  19. Activation of intracellular kinases in Xenopus oocytes by p21ras and phospholipases: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Carnero, A; Lacal, J C

    1995-02-01

    Signal transduction induced by generations of second messengers from membrane phospholipids is a major regulatory mechanism in the control of cell proliferation. Indeed, oncogenic p21ras alters the intracellular levels of phospholipid metabolites in both mammalian cells and Xenopus oocytes. However, it is still controversial whether this alteration it is biologically significant. We have analyzed the ras-induced signal transduction pathway in Xenopus oocytes and have correlated its mechanism of activation with that of the three most relevant phospholipases (PLs). After microinjection, ras-p21 induces a rapid PLD activation followed by a late PLA2 activation. By contrast, phosphatidylcholine-specific PLC was not activated under similar conditions. When each of these PLs was studied for its ability to activate intracellular signalling kinases, all of them were found to activate maturation-promoting factor efficiently. However, only PLD was able to activate MAP kinase and S6 kinase II, a similar pattern to that induced by p21ras proteins. Thus, the comparison of activated enzymes after microinjection of p21ras or PLs indicated that only PLD microinjection mimetized p21ras signalling. Finally, inhibition of the endogenous PLD activity by neomycin substantially reduced the biological activity of p21ras. All these results suggest that PLD activation may constitute a relevant step in ras-induced germinal vesicle breakdown in Xenopus oocytes.

  20. Repression of CD24 surface protein expression by oncogenic Ras is relieved by inhibition of Raf but not MEK or PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Pallegar, Nikitha K.; Ayre, D. Craig; Christian, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    CD24 is a dynamically regulated cell surface protein. High expression of CD24 leads to progression of lung, prostrate, colon, and pancreatic cancers, among others. In contrast, low expression of CD24 leads to cell proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Activating mutations in Ras are found in 30% of all human cancers. Oncogenic Ras constitutively stimulates the Raf, PI3K, and Ral GDS signaling pathways, leading to cellular transformation. Previous studies have shown that expression of oncogenic Ras in breast cancer cells generates CD24− cells from CD24+ cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of CD24− cells were not determined. Here, we demonstrate that oncogenic Ras (RasV12) expression suppresses CD24 mRNA, protein, and promoter levels when expressed in NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, activation of only the Raf pathway was sufficient to downregulate CD24 mRNA and protein expression to levels similar to those seen in with RasV12 expression. In contrast, activation of the PI3K pathway downregulated mRNA expression with a partial effect on protein expression whereas activation of the RalGDS pathway only partially affected protein expression. Surprisingly, inhibition of MEK with U0126 only partially restored CD24 mRNA expression but not surface protein expression. In contrast, inhibition of Raf with sorafenib did not restore CD24 mRNA expression but significantly increased the proportion of RasV12 cells expressing CD24. Therefore, the Raf pathway is the major repressor of CD24 mRNA and protein expression, with PI3K also able to substantially inhibit CD24 expression. Moreover, these data indicate that the levels of CD24 mRNA and surface protein are independently regulated. Although inhibition of Raf by sorafenib only partially restored CD24 expression, sorafenib should still be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy to alter CD24 expression in CD24− cells, such as BCSCs. PMID:26301220

  1. NF2 loss promotes oncogenic RAS-induced thyroid cancers via YAP-dependent transactivation of RAS proteins and sensitizes them to MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Untch, Brian R.; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E.; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S.; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H.; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation are insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacological disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling, and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. PMID:26359368

  2. The mucin MUC4 is a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras oncogene in pancreatic cancer. Implication of MAPK/AP-1, NF-κB and RalB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Romain; Skrypek, Nicolas; Duchêne, Belinda; Renaud, Florence; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Vincent, Audrey; Porchet, Nicole; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-bound mucinMUC4 is a high molecularweight glycoprotein frequently deregulated in cancer. In pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, MUC4 is neo-expressed in the preneoplastic stages and thereafter is involved in cancer cell properties leading to cancer progression and chemoresistance. K-ras oncogene is a small GTPase of the RAS superfamily, highly implicated in cancer. K-ras mutations are considered as an initiating event of pancreatic carcinogenesis and K-ras oncogenic activities are necessary components of cancer progression. However, K-ras remains clinically undruggable. Targeting early downstream K-ras signaling in cancer may thus appear as an interesting strategy and MUC4 regulation by K-ras in pancreatic carcinogenesis remains unknown. Using the Pdx1-Cre; LStopL-K-rasG12D mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we show that the in vivo early neo-expression of the mucin Muc4 in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (PanINs) induced by mutated K-ras is correlated with the activation of ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In vitro, transfection of constitutively activated K-rasG12V in pancreatic cancer cells led to the transcriptional upregulation of MUC4. This activation was found to be mediated at the transcriptional level by AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors via MAPK, JNK and NF-κB pathways and at the posttranscriptional level by a mechanism involving the RalB GTPase. Altogether, these results identify MUC4 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras in pancreatic cancer. This opens avenues in developing new approaches to target the early steps of this deadly cancer.

  3. The cell cycle regulator ecdysoneless cooperates with H-Ras to promote oncogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Zhang, Ying; Ahmad Mir, Riyaz; Lin, Simon; Kim, Jun Hyun; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; West, William; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian ortholog of Drosophila ecdysoneless (Ecd) gene product regulates Rb-E2F interaction and is required for cell cycle progression. Ecd is overexpressed in breast cancer and its overexpression predicts shorter survival in patients with ErbB2-positive tumors. Here, we demonstrate Ecd knock down (KD) in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) induces growth arrest, similar to the impact of Ecd Knock out (KO) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, whole-genome mRNA expression analysis of control vs. Ecd KD in hMECs demonstrated that several of the top 40 genes that were down-regulated were E2F target genes. To address the role of Ecd in mammary oncogenesis, we overexpressed Ecd and/or mutant H-Ras in hTERT-immortalized hMECs. Cell cycle analyses revealed hMECs overexpressing Ecd+Ras showed incomplete arrest in G1 phase upon growth factor deprivation, and more rapid cell cycle progression in growth factor-containing medium. Analyses of cell migration, invasion, acinar structures in 3-D Matrigel and anchorage-independent growth demonstrated that Ecd+Ras-overexpressing cells exhibit substantially more dramatic transformed phenotype as compared to cells expressing vector, Ras or Ecd. Under conditions of nutrient deprivation, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs exhibited better survival, with substantial upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3 both at the mRNA and protein levels. Significantly, while hMECs expressing Ecd or mutant Ras alone did not form tumors in NOD/SCID mice, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs formed tumors, clearly demonstrating oncogenic cooperation between Ecd and mutant Ras. Collectively, we demonstrate an important co-oncogenic role of Ecd in the progression of mammary oncogenesis through promoting cell survival. PMID:25616580

  4. Ras gene activation in gastric adenocarcinoma of Chinese patients in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, C.C.; Lee, W.Y.; Jin, Y.T.

    1994-09-01

    In order to assess the implication of mutational activation of members of the ras family of cellular proto-oncogenes in the development of gastric cancers in Chinese patients, a series of 55 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma in Taiwan was studied. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tumor tissue was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and then analyzed by dot blot hybridation assay with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes to detect mutations at codons 12, 13, and 61 of c-Ki-ras, c-Ha-ras, and c-N-ras. Twelve (12.8%) of the 55 carcinomas examined harbored a point mutation. Of the 12 mutations, 8 (66.6%) were detected in Ha-ras codon 12. Our result is consistent with reports from mainland China and Korea, but different from those of Japan and the United States. This difference is probably attributable to different eating and drinking habits.

  5. Neoplastic transformation of a human prostate epithelial cell line by the v-Ki-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Parda, D S; Thraves, P J; Kuettel, M R; Lee, M S; Arnstein, P; Kaighn, M E; Rhim, J S; Dritschilo, A

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of mechanisms of human prostate carcinogenesis are limited by the unavailability of a suitable in vitro model system. We have demonstrated that an immortal, but nontumorigenic, human epithelial cell line (267B1) established from fetal prostate tissue can be malignantly transformed by a biological carcinogen, and can serve as a useful model for investigations of the progression steps of carcinogenesis. Activated Ki-ras was introduced into 267B1 cells by infection with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. Morphological alterations and anchorage-independent growth were observed; when cells were injected into nude mice, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas developed. These findings represent the first evidence of malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in culture, and support a role for Ki-ras activation in a multistep process for prostate neoplastic transformation.

  6. The human Rgr oncogene is overexpressed in T cell malignancies and induces transformation by acting as a GEF for Ras and Ral

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Martello, Laura; Ibrahim, Sherif; Pellicer, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The Ras superfamily of GTPases is involved in the modification of many cellular processes including cellular motility, proliferation and differentiation. Our laboratory has previously identified the RalGDS related (Rgr) oncogene in a DMBA-induced rabbit squamous cell carcinoma and its human orthologue, hRgr. In the present study, we analyzed the expression levels of the human hRgr transcript in a panel of human hematopoietic malignancies and found that a truncated form (diseased-truncated; Dtr-hrgr) was significantly overexpressed in many T-cell derived neoplasms. Although the Rgr proto-oncogene belongs to the RalGDS family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), we show that upon the introduction of hRgr into fibroblast cell lines it is able to elicit the activation of both Ral and Ras GTPases. Moreover, in vitro guanine nucleotide exchange assays confirm that hRgr promotes Ral and Ras activation through GDP dissociation, which is a critical characteristic of GEF proteins. hRgr has guanine nucleotide exchange activity for both small GTPases and this activity was reduced when a point mutation within the catalytic domain (CDC25) of the protein, (cd) Dtr-hRgr, was utilized. These observations prompted the analysis of the biological effects of hRgr and (cd) hRgr expression in cultured cells. Here, we show that hRgr increases proliferation in low serum, increases invasion, reduces anchorage dependence, and promotes the progression into S phase of the cell cycle; properties that are abolished or severely reduced in the presence of the catalytic dead mutant. We conclude that the ability of hRgr to activate both Ral and Ras is responsible for its transformation-inducing phenotype and it could be an important contributor in the development of some T cell malignancies. PMID:21441953

  7. Fendiline Inhibits K-Ras Plasma Membrane Localization and Blocks K-Ras Signal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, Dharini; Cho, Kwang-jin; Ma, Xiaoping; Chigurupati, Sravanthi; Parton, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Ras proteins regulate signaling pathways important for cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Oncogenic mutant Ras proteins are commonly expressed in human tumors, with mutations of the K-Ras isoform being most prevalent. To be active, K-Ras must undergo posttranslational processing and associate with the plasma membrane. We therefore devised a high-content screening assay to search for inhibitors of K-Ras plasma membrane association. Using this assay, we identified fendiline, an L-type calcium channel blocker, as a specific inhibitor of K-Ras plasma membrane targeting with no detectable effect on the localization of H- and N-Ras. Other classes of L-type calcium channel blockers did not mislocalize K-Ras, suggesting a mechanism that is unrelated to calcium channel blockade. Fendiline did not inhibit K-Ras posttranslational processing but significantly reduced nanoclustering of K-Ras and redistributed K-Ras from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, endosomes, and cytosol. Fendiline significantly inhibited signaling downstream of constitutively active K-Ras and endogenous K-Ras signaling in cells transformed by oncogenic H-Ras. Consistent with these effects, fendiline blocked the proliferation of pancreatic, colon, lung, and endometrial cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic mutant K-Ras. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibitors of K-Ras plasma membrane localization may have utility as novel K-Ras-specific anticancer therapeutics. PMID:23129805

  8. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hun; Koh, Minsoo; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactive Ras promotes proliferation and malignant phenotypic conversion of cells in cancer. Ras protein must be associated with cellular membranes for its oncogenic activities through post-translational modifications, including farnesylation. Farnesyltransferase (FTase) is essential for H-Ras membrane targeting, and H-Ras, but not N-Ras, has been demonstrated to cause an invasive phenotype in MCF10A breast epithelial cells. In the present study, it was observed that an FTase inhibitor (FTI), FTI-277, blocked epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced H-Ras activation, but not N-Ras activation in MDA-MB-231 cells, which express wild-type H-Ras and N-Ras. FTI-277 exerted a more potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of H-Ras-MCF10A cells and Hs578T breast cancer cells expressing an active mutant of H-Ras than that of MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasive/migratory phenotypes of the H-Ras-MCF10A and Hs578T cells were effectively inhibited by FTI-277 treatment. By contrast, FTI-277 did not affect the invasive/migratory phenotypes of MDA-MB-231 cells. However, the EGF-induced invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased by FTI-277, implicating that FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that FTase inhibition by FTI-277 may be an effective strategy for targeting H-Ras-mediated proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells. PMID:27602167

  9. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hun; Koh, Minsoo; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactive Ras promotes proliferation and malignant phenotypic conversion of cells in cancer. Ras protein must be associated with cellular membranes for its oncogenic activities through post-translational modifications, including farnesylation. Farnesyltransferase (FTase) is essential for H-Ras membrane targeting, and H-Ras, but not N-Ras, has been demonstrated to cause an invasive phenotype in MCF10A breast epithelial cells. In the present study, it was observed that an FTase inhibitor (FTI), FTI-277, blocked epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced H-Ras activation, but not N-Ras activation in MDA-MB-231 cells, which express wild-type H-Ras and N-Ras. FTI-277 exerted a more potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of H-Ras-MCF10A cells and Hs578T breast cancer cells expressing an active mutant of H-Ras than that of MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasive/migratory phenotypes of the H-Ras-MCF10A and Hs578T cells were effectively inhibited by FTI-277 treatment. By contrast, FTI-277 did not affect the invasive/migratory phenotypes of MDA-MB-231 cells. However, the EGF-induced invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased by FTI-277, implicating that FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that FTase inhibition by FTI-277 may be an effective strategy for targeting H-Ras-mediated proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells.

  10. EGFR phosphorylates FAM129B to promote Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haitao; Lee, Jong-Ho; Wang, Yugang; Pang, Yilin; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Yan; Zhong, Lianjin; Lyu, Jianxin; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are important regulators for Ras activation, which is instrumental in tumor development. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation remains elusive. We demonstrate here that activated EGFR phosphorylates the Y593 residue of the protein known as family with sequence similarity 129, member B (FAM129B), which is overexpressed in many types of human cancer. FAM129B phosphorylation increased the interaction between FAM129B and Ras, resulting in reduced binding of p120-RasGAP to Ras. FAM129B phosphorylation promoted Ras activation, increasing ERK1/2- and PKM2-dependent β-catenin transactivation and leading to the enhanced glycolytic gene expression and the Warburg effect; promoting tumor cell proliferation and invasion; and supporting brain tumorigenesis. Our studies unearthed a novel and important mechanism underlying EGFR-mediated Ras activation in tumor development. PMID:26721396

  11. Activation of cellular oncogenes by chemical carcinogens in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, R.; Reiss, E.; Roellich, G.; Schiffmann, D. ); Barrett, J.C.; Wiseman, R.W. ); Pechan, R.

    1990-08-01

    Carcinogen-induced point mutations resulting in activation of ras oncogenes have been demonstrated in various experimental systems such as skin carcinogenesis, mammary, and liver carcinogenesis. In many cases, the data support the conclusion that these point mutations are critical changes in the initiation of these tumors. The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation model system has been widely used to study the multistep process of chemically induced neoplastic transformation. Recent data suggest that activation of the Ha-ras gene via point mutation is one of the crucial events in the transformation of these cells. The authors have now cloned the c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene from SHE cDNA-libraries, and we have performed polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing to analyze tumor cell lines induced by different chemical carcinogens for the presence of point mutations. No changes were detectable at codons 12, 13, 59, 61, and 117 or adjacent regions in tumor cell lines induced by diethylstilbestrol, asbestos, benzo(a)pyrene, trenbolone, or aflatoxin B{sub 1}. Thus, it is not known whether point mutations in the Ha-ras proto-oncogene are essential for the acquisition of the neoplastic phenotype of SHE cells. Activation of other oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes may be responsible for the neoplastic progression of these cells. However, in SHE cells neoplastically transformed by diethylstilbestrol or trenbolone, a significant elevation of the c-Ha-ras expression was observed. Enhanced expression of c-myc was detected in SHE cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene or trenbolone.

  12. PATZ1 is a target of miR-29b that is induced by Ha-Ras oncogene in rat thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Michela; Valentino, Teresa; De Menna, Marta; Crescenzi, Elvira; Francesca, Paola; Rea, Domenica; Arra, Claudio; Fusco, Alfredo; De Vita, Gabriella; Cerchia, Laura; Fedele, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory transcriptional factor PATZ1 is constantly downregulated in human thyroid cancer where it acts as a tumour suppressor by targeting p53-dependent genes involved in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and cell migration. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the upstream signalling mechanisms regulating PATZ1 expression in thyroid cancer cells. The bioinformatics search for microRNAs able to potentially target PATZ1 led to the identification of several miRNAs. Among them we focused on the miR-29b since it was found upregulated in rat thyroid differentiated cells transformed by the Ha-Ras oncogene towards a high proliferating and high migratory phenotype resembling that of anaplastic carcinomas. Functional assays confirmed PATZ1 as a target of miR-29b, and, consistently, an inverse correlation between miR-29b and PATZ1 protein levels was found upon induction of Ha-Ras oncogene expression in these cells. Interestingly, restoration of PATZ1 expression in rat thyroid cells stably expressing the Ha-Ras oncogene decreased cell proliferation and migration, indicating a key role of PATZ1 in Ras-driven thyroid transformation. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism regulating PATZ1 expression based on the upregulation of miR-29b expression induced by Ras oncogene. PMID:27125250

  13. TC21 and Ras share indistinguishable transforming and differentiating activities.

    PubMed

    Graham, S M; Oldham, S M; Martin, C B; Drugan, J K; Zohn, I E; Campbell, S; Der, C J

    1999-03-25

    Constitutively activated mutants of the Ras-related protein TC21/R-Ras2 cause tumorigenic transformation of NIH3T3 cells. However, unlike Ras, TC21 fails to bind to and activate the Raf-1 serine-threonine kinase. Thus, whereas Ras transformation is critically dependent on Raf-1 TC21 activity is promoted by activation of Raf-independent signaling pathways. In the present study, we have further compared the functions of Ras and TC21. First we determined the basis for the inability of TC21 to activate Raf-1. Whereas Ras can interact with the two distinct Ras-binding sequences in NH2-terminus of Raf-1, designated RBS1 and Raf-Cys, TC21 could only bind Raf-Cys. Thus, the inability of TC21 to bind to RBS1 may prevent it from promoting the translocation of Raf-1 to the plasma membrane. Second, we found that TC21 is an activator of the JNK and p38, but not ERK, mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades and that TC21 transforming activity was dependent on Rac function. Thus, like Ras, TC21 may activate a Rac/JNK pathway. Third, we determined if TC21 could cause the same biological consequences as Ras in three distinct cell types. Like Ras, activated TC21 caused transformation of RIE-1 rat intestinal epithelial cells and terminal differentiation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. Finally, activated TC21 blocked serum starvation-induced differentiation of C2 myoblasts, whereas dominant negative TC21 greatly accelerated this differentiation process. Therefore, TC21 and Ras share indistinguishable biological activities in all cell types that we have evaluated. These results support the importance of Raf-independent pathways in mediating the actions of Ras and TC21.

  14. INDUCTION OF DNA ADDUCTS, TUMORS, AND KI-RAS ONCOGENE MUTATIONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG BY IP. ADMINISTRATION OF DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of DNA adducts, tumors, and Ki-ras oncogene mutations in strain AlJ mouse lung by ip. administration of dibenz[a,h]anthracene

    Previous studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) induced lung tumors in the strain NJ mouse model system have demonstrated qua...

  15. Ras regulates SCF(β-TrCP) protein activity and specificity via its effector protein NORE1A.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M Lee; Donninger, Howard; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-11-01

    Ras is the most frequently activated oncogene found in human cancer, but its mechanisms of action remain only partially understood. Ras activates multiple signaling pathways to promote transformation. However, Ras can also exhibit a potent ability to induce growth arrest and death. NORE1A (RASSF5) is a direct Ras effector that acts as a tumor suppressor by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Expression of NORE1A is frequently lost in human tumors, and its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that NORE1A forms a direct, Ras-regulated complex with β-TrCP, the substrate recognition component of the SCF(β-TrCP) ubiquitin ligase complex. This interaction allows Ras to stimulate the ubiquitin ligase activity of SCF(β-TrCP) toward its target β-catenin, resulting in degradation of β-catenin by the 26 S proteasome. However, the action of Ras/NORE1A/β-TrCP is substrate-specific because IκB, another substrate of SCF(β-TrCP), is not sensitive to NORE1A-promoted degradation. We identify a completely new signaling mechanism for Ras that allows for the specific regulation of SCF(β-TrCP) targets. We show that the NORE1A levels in a cell may dictate the effects of Ras on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Moreover, because NORE1A expression is frequently impaired in tumors, we provide an explanation for the observation that β-TrCP can act as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene in different cell systems.

  16. Ras activation and symmetry breaking during Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kortholt, Arjan; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kataria, Rama; Van Haastert, Peter J M

    2013-10-01

    Central to chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which a shallow spatial gradient of chemoattractant induces symmetry breaking of activated signaling molecules. Previously, we have used Dictyostelium mutants to investigate the minimal requirements for chemotaxis, and identified a basal signaling module providing activation of Ras and F-actin at the leading edge. Here, we show that Ras activation after application of a pipette releasing the chemoattractant cAMP has three phases, each depending on specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Initially a transient activation of Ras occurs at the entire cell boundary, which is proportional to the local cAMP concentrations and therefore slightly stronger at the front than in the rear of the cell. This transient Ras activation is present in gα2 (gpbB)-null cells but not in gβ (gpbA)-null cells, suggesting that Gβγ mediates the initial activation of Ras. The second phase is symmetry breaking: Ras is activated only at the side of the cell closest to the pipette. Symmetry breaking absolutely requires Gα2 and Gβγ, but not the cytoskeleton or four cAMP-induced signaling pathways, those dependent on phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3], cGMP, TorC2 and PLA2. As cells move in the gradient, the crescent of activated Ras in the front half of the cell becomes confined to a small area at the utmost front of the cell. Confinement of Ras activation leads to cell polarization, and depends on cGMP formation, myosin and F-actin. The experiments show that activation, symmetry breaking and confinement of Ras during Dictyostelium chemotaxis uses different G-protein subunits and a multitude of Ras GEFs and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs).

  17. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  18. Differential Regulation of N-Myc and c-Myc Synthesis, Degradation, and Transcriptional Activity by the Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kapeli, Katannya; Hurlin, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Myc transcription factors are important regulators of proliferation and can promote oncogenesis when deregulated. Deregulated Myc expression in cancers can result from MYC gene amplification and translocation but also from alterations in mitogenic signaling pathways that affect Myc levels through both transcriptional and post-transcription mechanisms. For example, mutations in Ras family GTPase proteins that cause their constitutive activation can increase cellular levels of c-Myc by interfering with its rapid proteasomal degradation. Although enhanced protein stability is generally thought to be applicable to other Myc family members, here we show that c-Myc and its paralog N-Myc respond to oncogenic H-Ras (H-RasG12V) in very different ways. H-RasG12V promotes accumulation of both c-Myc and N-Myc, but although c-Myc accumulation is achieved by enhanced protein stability, N-Myc accumulation is associated with an accelerated rate of translation that overcomes a surprising H-RasG12V-mediated destabilization of N-Myc. We show that H-RasG12V-mediated degradation of N-Myc functions independently of key phosphorylation sites in the highly conserved Myc homology box I region that controls c-Myc protein stability by oncogenic Ras. Finally, we found that N-Myc and c-Myc transcriptional activity is associated with their proteasomal degradation but that N-Myc may be uniquely dependent on Ras-stimulated proteolysis for target gene expression. Taken together, these studies provide mechanistic insight into how oncogenic Ras augments N-Myc levels in cells and suggest that enhanced N-Myc translation and degradation-coupled transactivation may contribute to oncogenesis. PMID:21908617

  19. Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase and Rac/Rho does not duplicate the effects of activated Ras on skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramocki, M B; Johnson, S E; White, M A; Ashendel, C L; Konieczny, S F; Taparowsky, E J

    1997-07-01

    The ability of basic helix-loop-helix muscle regulatory factors (MRFs), such as MyoD, to convert nonmuscle cells to a myogenic lineage is regulated by numerous growth factor and oncoprotein signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown that H-Ras 12V inhibits differentiation to a skeletal muscle lineage by disrupting MRF function via a mechanism that is independent of the dimerization, DNA binding, and inherent transcriptional activation properties of the proteins. To investigate the intracellular signaling pathway(s) that mediates the inhibition of MRF-induced myogenesis by oncogenic Ras, we tested two transformation-defective H-Ras 12V effector domain variants for their ability to alter terminal differentiation. H-Ras 12V,35S retains the ability to activate the Raf/MEK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade, whereas H-Ras 12V,40C is unable to interact directly with Raf-1 yet still influences other signaling intermediates, including Rac and Rho. Expression of each H-Ras 12V variant in C3H10T1/2 cells abrogates MyoD-induced activation of the complete myogenic program, suggesting that MAP kinase-dependent and -independent Ras signaling pathways individually block myogenesis in this model system. However, additional studies with constitutively activated Rac1 and RhoA proteins revealed no negative effects on MyoD-induced myogenesis. Similarly, treatment of Ras-inhibited myoblasts with the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 revealed that elevated MAP kinase activity is not a significant contributor to the H-Ras 12V effect. These data suggest that an additional Ras pathway, distinct from the well-characterized MAP kinase and Rac/Rho pathways known to be important for the transforming function of activated Ras, is primarily responsible for the inhibition of myogenesis by H-Ras 12V.

  20. Transforming but not immortalizing oncogenes activate the transcription factor PEA1.

    PubMed Central

    Wasylyk, C; Imler, J L; Wasylyk, B

    1988-01-01

    The transcription factor PEA1 (a homologue of AP1 and c-jun) is highly active in several fibroblast cell lines, compared to its low activity in a myeloma and an embryo-carcinoma (EC) cell line. Serum components are essential to attain these high levels of PEA1 activity in fibroblasts. This serum requirement is abrogated by transformation with the oncogenes c-Ha-ras, v-src and polyoma middle T (Py-MT) but not by immortalization with polyoma large T (Py-LT), v-myc, c-myc or SV40 large T (SV40T). Expression in myeloma cells of the same transforming oncogenes, as well as v-mos and c-fos, activates PEA1, whereas expression of the same immortalizing oncogenes and EIA does not. These results suggest that a common target for transforming oncogenes is PEA1. Serum components have no effect on PEA1 activity in the myeloma and EC cell lines. In contrast, retinoic acid treatment of F9 EC cells augments PEA1 activity. These results suggest that transforming oncogene expression compensates for the absence of cell type-specific factors which are required to activate PEA1. Activation of PEA1 may lead to altered transcription of a set of transformation-related genes. Images PMID:3142763

  1. TLN-4601, a novel anticancer agent, inhibits Ras signaling post Ras prenylation and before MEK activation.

    PubMed

    Boufaied, Nadia; Wioland, My-Anh; Falardeau, Pierre; Gourdeau, Henriette

    2010-06-01

    TLN-4601 is a structurally novel farnesylated dibenzodiazepinone discovered through DECIPHER, Thallion's proprietary drug discovery platform. The compound was shown to have a broad cytotoxic activity (low micromol/l) when tested in the NCI 60 tumor cell line panel and has shown in-vivo antitumor activity in several xenograft models. Related to its farnesylated moiety, the effect of TLN-4601 on Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was assessed. Downstream Ras signaling events, Raf-1, MEK, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in MCF7 cells were evaluated by western blot analysis. TLN-4601 prevented epidermal growth factor-induced phosphorylation of Raf-1, MEK, and ERK1/2. This effect was time-dependent and dose-dependent with complete inhibition of protein phosphorylation within 4-6 h at 10 micromol/l. The inhibition of Ras signaling was not mediated by the inhibition of protein prenylation, documented by the lack of effect TLN-4601 on the prenylation of HDJ2 (specific substrate of farnesyltransferase), RAP1A (specific substrate of geranylgeranyl transferase-1), or Ras. As TLN-4601 did not inhibit EGFR, Raf-1, MEK or ERK1/2 kinase activities, the inhibitory effect of TLN-4601 on Ras signaling is not mediated by direct kinase inhibition. Using an Elk-1 trans-activation reporter assay, we found that TLN-4601 inhibits the MEK/ERK pathway at the level of Raf-1. Interestingly, TLN-4601 induces Raf-1 proteasomal-dependent degradation. These data indicate that TLN-4601 may inhibit the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway by depleting the Raf-1 protein.

  2. Cribriform adenocarcinoma of minor salivary glands may express galectin-3, cytokeratin 19, and HBME-1 and contains polymorphisms of RET and H-RAS proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Laco, Jan; Kamarádová, Kateřina; Vítková, Pavla; Sehnálková, Eva; Dvořáková, Sárka; Václavíková, Eliška; Sýkorová, Vlasta; Kašpírková, Jana; Skálová, Alena; Ryška, Aleš

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to further elucidate the immunohistochemical and genetic characteristics of cribriform adenocarcinoma of minor salivary glands (CAMSG). The study comprised five CAMSG from two males and three females, aged 21-72 years. Four tumors were localized at the base of tongue and one in the floor of mouth. At the time of diagnosis, four tumors had metastasised to regional lymph nodes. After tumor resection, two patients were treated by radiotherapy and one by chemoradiotherapy. During the follow-up (median 14 months), two patients developed lymph node metastasis. Microscopically, all tumors showed cribriform, papillary, follicular, and microcystic growth patterns. The tumor cells displayed vesicular nuclei with intranuclear grooves. Immunohistochemically, all tumors showed expression of cytokeratin (CK) 7, CK8, CK18, vimentin, smooth muscle actin, calponin, S-100 protein, and p16 protein. In addition, we observed expression of galectin-3, CK19, and HBME-1, but not of thyroglobulin and TTF-1. No mutations of RET, BRAF, K-RAS, H-RAS, and N-RAS proto-oncogenes were detected. However, in RET proto-oncogene, we found polymorphisms Gly691Ser (exon 11) and Ser904Ser (exon 15) in one case, p.Leu769Leu (exon 13) in one case, and variant p.IVS14-24 G/A of intron 14 in two cases, and in H-RAS proto-oncogene we found polymorphism 81 T-C (exon 1) in three cases. Thyroglobulin and TTF-1 are the only useful markers in the differential diagnosis between CAMSG and papillary thyroid carcinoma as both tumors may express galectin-3, CK19, and HBME-1. The RET, H-RAS, and N-RAS proto-oncoogenes are not mutated in CAMSG.

  3. Overexpressed galectin-3 in pancreatic cancer induces cell proliferation and invasion by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Shumei; Ji, Baoan; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Wang, Huamin; Hafley, Margarete; Logsdon, Craig; Bresalier, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) is a lethal disease with a five-year survival of 3-5%. Mutations in K-Ras are found in nearly all cases, but K-Ras mutations alone are not sufficient for the development of PDAC. Additional factors contribute to activation of Ras signaling and lead to tumor formation. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding protein, is highly expressed in PDAC. We therefore investigated the functional role of Gal-3 in pancreatic cancer progression and its relationship to Ras signaling. Expression of Gal-3 was determined by immunohistochemistry, Q-PCR and immunoblot. Functional studies were performed using pancreatic cell lines genetically engineered to express high or low levels of Gal-3. Ras activity was examined by Raf pull-down assays. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence were used to assess protein-protein interactions. In this study, we demonstrate that Gal-3 was highly up-regulated in human tumors and in a mutant K-Ras mouse model of PDAC. Down-regulation of Gal-3 by lentivirus shRNA decreased PDAC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and reduced tumor volume and size in an orthotopic mouse model. Gal-3 bound Ras and maintained Ras activity; down-regulation of Gal-3 decreased Ras activity as well as Ras down-stream signaling including phosphorylation of ERK and AKT and Ral A activity. Transfection of Gal-3 cDNA into PDAC cells with low-level Gal-3 augmented Ras activity and its down-stream signaling. These results suggest that Gal-3 contributes to pancreatic cancer progression, in part, by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling. Gal-3 may therefore be a potential novel target for this deadly disease. PMID:22900040

  4. Calmodulin modulates H-Ras mediated Raf-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Moretó, Jemina; Lladó, Anna; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Calvo, Maria; Pol, Albert; Enrich, Carlos; Tebar, Francesc

    2008-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that, in COS-1 cells, inhibition of calmodulin increases Ras-GTP levels although it decreases Raf-1 activity and consequently MAPK. The present study analyzes the role of calmodulin in the regulation of Raf-1. First we show, using FRET microscopy, that inhibition of Raf-1 was not a consequence of a decreased interaction between H-Ras and Raf-1. Besides, the analysis of the phosphorylation state of Raf-1 showed that calmodulin, through downstream PI3K, is essential to ensure the Ser338-Raf-1 phosphorylation, critical for Raf-1 activation. We also show that the expression of a dominant negative mutant of PI3K impairs the calmodulin-mediated Raf-1 activation; in addition, both calmodulin and PI3K inhibitors decrease phospho-Ser338 and Raf-1 activity from upstream active H-Ras (H-RasG12V) and this effect is dependent on endocytosis. Importantly, in H-Ras depleted COS-1 cells, calmodulin does not modulate MAPK activation. Altogether, the results suggest that calmodulin regulation of MAPK in COS-1 cells relies upon H-Ras control of Raf-1 activity and involves PI3K.

  5. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells.

  6. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling suppresses premature senescence in a p21-dependent manner and promotes oncogenic Ras-mediated metastatic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu; Yang, Junhua; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Wang, Long; Cornell, John E.; Yeh, I-Tien; Agyin, Joseph; Tomlinson, Gail; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive triple-negative, basal-like breast cancer progression are elusive. Few molecular targets have been identified for the prevention or treatment of this disease. Here we developed a series of isogenic basal-like human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) with altered transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) sensitivity and different malignancy, resembling a full spectrum of basal-like breast carcinogenesis, and determined the molecular mechanisms that contribute to oncogene-induced transformation of basal-like HMECs when TGF-β signaling is attenuated. We found that expression of a dominant-negative type II receptor (DNRII) of TGF-β abrogated autocrine TGF-β signaling in telomerase-immortalized HMECs and suppressed H-Ras-V12–induced senescence-like growth arrest (SLGA). Furthermore, coexpression of DNRII and H-Ras-V12 rendered HMECs highly tumorigenic and metastatic in vivo in comparison with H-Ras-V12–transformed HMECs that spontaneously escaped H-Ras-V12–induced SLGA. Microarray analysis revealed that p21 was the major player mediating Ras-induced SLGA, and attenuated or loss of p21 expression contributed to the escape from SLGA when autocrine TGF-β signaling was blocked in HMECs. Furthermore, knockdown of p21 also suppressed H-Ras-V12–induced SLGA. Our results identify that autocrine TGF-β signaling is an integral part of the cellular anti-transformation network by suppressing the expression of a host of genes, including p21-regulated genes, that mediate oncogene-induced transformation in basal-like breast cancer. PMID:22357622

  7. AKT and N-Ras co-activation in the mouse liver promotes rapid carcinogenesis via mTORC1, FOXM1/SKP2, and c-Myc pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Coral; Wang, Chunmei; Mattu, Sandra; Destefanis, Giulia; Ladu, Sara; Delogu, Salvatore; Armbruster, Julia; Fan, Lingling; Lee, Susie A.; Jiang, Lijie; Dombrowski, Frank; Evert, Matthias; Chen, Xin; Calvisi, Diego F.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) and Ras pathways is often implicated in carcinogenesis. However, the oncogenic cooperation between these two cascades in relationship to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development remains undetermined. To investigate this issue, we generated a mouse model characterized by combined overexpression of activated forms of AKT and neuroblastoma Ras viral oncogene homolog (N-Ras) protooncogenes in the liver via hydrodynamic gene transfer. The molecular mechanisms underlying crosstalk between AKT and N-Ras were assessed in the mouse model and further evaluated in human and murine HCC cell lines. We found that co-expression of AKT and N-Ras resulted in a dramatic acceleration of liver tumor development when compared with mice overexpressing AKT alone, whereas N-Ras alone did not lead to tumor formation. At the cellular level, concomitant upregulation of AKT and N-Ras resulted in increased proliferation and microvascularization when compared with AKT injected mice. Mechanistic studies suggested that accelerated hepatocarcinogenesis driven by AKT and N-Ras resulted from a strong activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, elevated expression of FOXM1/SKP2 and c-Myc also contributed to rapid tumor growth in AKT/Ras mice, yet via mTORC1-independent mechanisms. The biological effects of co-activation of AKT and N-Ras were then recapitulated in vitro using HCC cell lines, which supports the functional significance of mTORC1, FOXM1/SKP2 and c-Myc signaling cascades in mediating AKT and N-Ras induced liver tumor development. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the in vivo crosstalk between the AKT and Ras pathways in promoting liver tumor development, and the pivotal role of mTORC1-dependent and independent pathways in mediating AKT and Ras induced hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:21993994

  8. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase is necessary but not sufficient for proliferation of human thyroid epithelial cells induced by mutant Ras.

    PubMed

    Gire, V; Marshall, C J; Wynford-Thomas, D

    1999-08-26

    Given the high frequency of ras oncogene activation in several common human cancers, its signal pathways are an important target for novel therapy. For practical reasons, however, these have been studied mainly in the context of transformation of established fibroblast cell lines, whereas ras acts at an earlier stage in human tumorigenesis and predominantly on epithelial cells. Here we have developed a more directly relevant model - human primary thyroid epithelial cells - which are a major target of naturally-occurring Ras mutation, and in which expression of mutant Ras in culture induces clonal expansion without morphological transformation, closely reproducing the phenotype of the corresponding tumour in vivo. Transient or stable expression of mutant H-ras (by scrapeloading or retroviral infection) at levels which stimulated proliferation induced sustained activation and translocation of MAP kinase (MAPK) in these cells. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway at the level of MAPKK, by expression of a dominant-negative mutant or by the pharmacological inhibitor PD98059, efficiently blocked the proliferative response. Conversely, selective activation of MAPK by a constitutively-active MAPKK1 mutant failed to mimic the action of Ras and, although this was achievable with activated Raf, micro-injection of anti-ras antibodies showed that this still required endogenous wild-type Ras function. In contrast to recent results obtained with a rodent thyroid cell line (WRT), therefore, activation of the MAPK pathway is necessary, but not sufficient, for the proliferogenic action of mutant Ras on primary human thyroid cells. These data emphasize the unreliability of extrapolation from cell lines and establish the feasibility of using a more representative human epithelial model for Ras signalling studies.

  9. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras.

  10. Regulation of Ras proteins by reactive nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael F; Vigil, Dom; Campbell, Sharon L

    2011-08-01

    Ras GTPases have been a subject of intense investigation since the early 1980s, when single point mutations in Ras were shown to cause deregulated cell growth control. Subsequently, Ras was identified as the most prevalent oncogene found in human cancer. Ras proteins regulate a host of pathways involved in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis by cycling between inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound states. Regulation of Ras activity is controlled by cellular factors that alter guanine nucleotide cycling. Oncogenic mutations prevent protein regulatory factors from down-regulating Ras activity, thereby maintaining Ras in a chronically activated state. The central dogma in the field is that protein modulatory factors are the primary regulators of Ras activity. Since the mid-1990s, however, evidence has accumulated that small molecule reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can also influence Ras guanine nucleotide cycling. Herein, we review the basic chemistry behind RNS formation and discuss the mechanism through which various RNS enhance nucleotide exchange in Ras proteins. In addition, we present studies that demonstrate the physiological relevance of RNS-mediated Ras activation within the context of immune system function, brain function, and cancer development. We also highlight future directions and experimental methods that may enhance our ability to detect RNS-mediated activation in cell cultures and in vivo. The development of such methods may ultimately pave new directions for detecting and elucidating how Ras proteins are regulated by redox species, as well as for targeting redox-activated Ras in cancer and other disease states.

  11. A New View of Ras Isoforms in Cancers.

    PubMed

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Jang, Hyunbum

    2016-01-01

    Does small GTPase K-Ras4A have a single state or two states, one resembling K-Ras4B and the other N-Ras? A recent study of K-Ras4A made the remarkable observation that even in the absence of the palmitoyl, K-Ras4A can be active at the plasma membrane. Importantly, this suggests that K-Ras4A may exist in two distinct signaling states. In state 1, K-Ras4A is only farnesylated, like K-Ras4B; in state 2, farnesylated and palmitoylated, like N-Ras. The K-Ras4A hypervariable region sequence is positively charged, in between K-Ras4B and N-Ras. Taken together, this raises the possibility that the farnesylated but nonpalmitoylated state 1, like K-Ras4B, binds calmodulin and is associated with colorectal and other adenocarcinomas like lung cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand, state 2 may be associated with melanoma and other cancers where N-Ras is a major contributor, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Importantly, H-Ras has two, singly and doubly, palmitoylated states that may also serve distinct functional roles. The multiple signaling states of palmitoylated Ras isoforms question the completeness of small GTPase Ras isoform statistics in different cancer types and call for reevaluation of concepts and protocols. They may also call for reconsideration of oncogenic Ras therapeutics. PMID:26659836

  12. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David J H; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary D; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-07-24

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.

  13. Activation of RAS/ERK alone is insufficient to inhibit RXRα function and deplete retinoic acid in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ai-Guo Song, Ya-Nan; Chen, Jun; Li, Hui-Ling; Dong, Jian-Yi; Cui, Hai-Peng; Yao, Liang; Li, Xue-Feng; Gao, Wen-Ting; Qiu, Ze-Wen; Wang, Fu-Jin; Wang, Jing-Yu

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • The activation of RAS/ERK is insufficient to inhibit RXRα function and deplete RA. • The retinoid metabolism-related genes are down-regulated by ras oncogene. • The atRA has no effect on preventing hepatic tumorigenesis or curing the developed hepatic nodules. - Abstract: Activation of RAS/ERK signaling pathway, depletion of retinoid, and phosphorylation of retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) are frequent events found in liver tumors and thought to play important roles in hepatic tumorigenesis. However, the relationships among them still remained to be elucidated. By exploring the transgenic mouse model of hepatic tumorigenesis induced by liver-specific expression of H-ras12V oncogene, the activation of RAS/ERK, the mRNA expression levels of retinoid metabolism-related genes, the contents of retinoid metabolites, and phosphorylation of RXRα were determined. RAS/ERK signaling pathway was gradually and significantly activated in hepatic tumor adjacent normal liver tissues (P) and hepatic tumor tissues (T) of H-ras12V transgenic mice compared with normal liver tissues (Wt) of wild type mice. On the contrary, the mRNA expression levels of retinoid metabolism-related genes were significantly reduced in P and T compared with Wt. Interestingly, the retinoid metabolites 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) and all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the well known ligands for nuclear transcription factor RXR and retinoic acid receptor (RAR), were significantly decreased only in T compared with Wt and P, although the oxidized polar metabolite of atRA, 4-keto-all-trans-retinoic-acid (4-keto-RA) was significantly decreased in both P and T compared with Wt. To our surprise, the functions of RXRα were significantly blocked only in T compared with Wt and P. Namely, the total protein levels of RXRα were significantly reduced and the phosphorylation levels of RXRα were significantly increased only in T compared with Wt and P. Treatment of H-ras12V transgenic mice at 5-week

  14. Depletion of c-myc with specific antisense sequences reverses the transformed phenotype in ras oncogene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sklar, M D; Thompson, E; Welsh, M J; Liebert, M; Harney, J; Grossman, H B; Smith, M; Prochownik, E V

    1991-01-01

    ras oncogene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells expressing glucocorticoid-inducible antisense c-myc cDNA transcripts at levels sufficient to deplete c-myc protein lost their transformed morphology and the ability to grow in soft agar; their ability to form tumors in nude mice was also impaired. These changes were dependent on the continuous expression of the antisense sequences. No major effects on plating efficiencies, growth rates in monolayer culture, or immortalization were observed in the revertant cells, indicating that the observed effects were not a toxic consequence of c-myc protein depletion. Transfection with the same vector expressing c-myc in the sense orientation or other control vectors had no effect on transformation. These results suggest that a certain minimum level of expression of c-myc is required for the maintenance of ras transformation in NIH 3T3 cells. Images PMID:2046673

  15. Regulation of Na+-H+ exchange in normal NIH-3T3 cells and in NIH-3T3 cells expressing the ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, N.E.; Knapik, J.; Strebel, F.; Tarpley, W.G.; Gorman, R.R.

    1989-04-01

    Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that Na+-H+ exchange can be regulated by two different pathways; one that is mediated by an inositol trisphosphate-stimulated increase in intracellular calcium activity, and one that is mediated by an increase in protein kinase C activity. To determine whether one of these pathways is more important than the other, or whether one pathway is physiologically relevant, we employed normal NIH-3T3 cells (3T3 cells) and NIH-3T3 cells expressing the EJ human bladder ras oncogene (EJ cells). The EJ cells were chosen because they provide a genetic model that does not exhibit serum- or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated inositol trisphosphate release or Ca2+ mobilization. It was found that serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange was more pronounced in EJ cells than in control 3T3 cells. As expected, serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in 3T3 cells was inhibited by chelating intracellular Ca2+ with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator quin2, by the intracellular Ca2+ antagonist 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), and by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine. In contrast, these agents did not inhibit serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells. Activators of protein kinase C (e.g., 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol or biologically active phorbol esters) were found to stimulate Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells to the same extent as serum. However, these agents were considerably less effective than serum in control 3T3 cells. Despite these findings, PDGF did not stimulate diacylglycerol levels in EJ cells.

  16. Interferon-β Signaling Contributes to Ras Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Chen; Pestka, Sidney; Wang, Lu-Hai; Runnels, Loren W.; Wan, Shan; Lyu, Yi Lisa; Liu, Leroy F.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence has pointed to activated type I interferon signaling in tumors. However, the molecular basis for such activation and its role in tumorigenesis remain unclear. In the current studies, we report that activation of type I interferon (IFN) signaling in tumor cells is primarily due to elevated secretion of the type I interferon, IFN-β. Studies in oncogene-transformed cells suggest that oncogenes such as Ras and Src can activate IFN-β signaling. Significantly, elevated IFN-β signaling in Ras-transformed mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells was shown to contribute to Ras transformation as evidenced by morphological changes, anchorage-independent growth, and migratory properties. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the type I IFN, IFN-β, contributes to Ras transformation and support the notion that oncogene-induced cytokines play important roles in oncogene transformation. PMID:21897875

  17. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes.

    PubMed

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García-Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  18. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García- Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  19. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes.

    PubMed

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García-Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-07-28

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment.

  20. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  1. Two types of RAS mutants that dominantly interfere with activators of RAS.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, V; Wei, W; Ballester, R; Camonis, J; Mi, S; Van Aelst, L; Wigler, M; Broek, D

    1994-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ras1 regulates both sexual development (conjugation and sporulation) and cellular morphology. Two types of dominant interfering mutants were isolated in a genetic screen for ras1 mutants that blocked sexual development. The first type of mutation, at Ser-22, analogous to the H-rasAsn-17 mutant (L. A. Feig and G. M. Cooper, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:3235-3243, 1988), blocked only conjugation, whereas a second type of mutation, at Asp-62, interfered with conjugation, sporulation, and cellular morphology. Analogous mutations at position 64 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAS2 or position 57 of human H-ras also resulted in dominant interfering mutants that interfered specifically and more profoundly than mutants of the first type with RAS-associated pathways in both S. pombe or S. cerevisiae. Genetic evidence indicating that both types of interfering mutants function upstream of RAS is provided. Biochemical evidence showing that the mutants are altered in their interaction with the CDC25 class of exchange factors is presented. We show that both H-rasAsn-17 and H-rasTyr-57, compared with wild-type H-ras, are defective in their guanine nucleotide-dependent release from human cdc25 and that this defect is more severe for the H-rasTyr-57 mutant. Such a defect would allow the interfering mutants to remain bound to, thereby sequestering RAS exchange factors. The more severe interference phenotype of this novel interfering mutant suggests that it functions by titrating out other positive regulators of RAS besides those encoded by ste6 and CDC25. Images PMID:8196614

  2. Basic Calcium Phosphate Crystals Activate c-fos Expression Through a Ras/ERK Dependent Signaling Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Major, Michael L.; Cheung, Herman S.; Misra, Ravi P.

    2007-01-01

    Diseases caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals occur frequently in osteoarthritic joints. Both crystals induce mitogenesis, metalloproteinase synthesis and secretion by fibroblasts and chondrocytes, promoting degradation of articular tissue. We investigated the mechanism by which BCP activates the c-fos proto-oncogene, which has been shown to activate various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We demonstrate that BCP crystals induce c-fos expression primarily through a Ras/ERK dependent signaling mechanism targeting two highly conserved regulatory binding sites, the serum response element (SRE) and the cAMP response element (CRE). These results establish a calcium crystal induced, calcium/Calmodulin independent, signaling pathway in which BCP crystals activate Ras/MAPK, which can directly target an SRF-containing transcription factor complex, to induce fibroblasts to secrete metalloproteinases. PMID:17307136

  3. Matrix adhesion and Ras transformation both activate a phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase and protein kinase B/Akt cellular survival pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, A; Rodriguez-Viciana, P; Wennström, S; Warne, P H; Downward, J

    1997-01-01

    Upon detachment from the extracellular matrix, epithelial cells enter into programmed cell death, a phenomenon known as anoikis, ensuring that they are unable to survive in an inappropriate location. Activated ras oncogenes protect cells from this form of apoptosis. The nature of the survival signals activated by integrin engagement and usurped by oncogenic Ras are unknown: here we show that in both cases phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase (PI 3-kinase), but not Raf, mediates this protection, acting through protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt). Constitutively activated PI 3-kinase or PKB/Akt block anoikis, while inhibition of PI 3-kinase abrogates protection by Ras, but not PKB/Akt. Inhibition of either PI 3-kinase or PKB/Akt induces apoptosis in adherent epithelial cells. Attachment of cells to matrix leads to rapid elevation of the levels of PI 3-kinase lipid products and PKB/Akt activity, both of which remain high in Ras-transformed cells even in suspension. PI 3-kinase acting through PKB/Akt is therefore implicated as a key mediator of the aberrant survival of Ras-transformed epithelial cells in the absence of attachment, and mediates matrix-induced survival of normal epithelial cells. PMID:9184223

  4. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  5. Ras-GTP dimers activate the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li-Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors. PMID:26080442

  6. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  7. K-ras oncogene DNA sequences in pink salmon in streams impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill: no evidence of oil-induced heritable mutations.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Matthew A; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Dunina, Yelena; Baker, Robert J

    2002-08-01

    It was hypothesized in previous studies that the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, induced heritable mutations and resulted in mortality of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) embryos. In one of these studies, laboratory exposure of pink salmon embryos to crude oil resulted in apparent mutation-induction in exon 1 and exon 2 of the K-ras oncogene, but no fish from the area impacted by the oil spill were analyzed. We assessed K-ras exon 1 and exon 2 DNA sequences in pink salmon from five streams that were oiled and five streams that were not oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, and two streams with natural oil seeps and one stream without seeps on the Alaska Peninsula. Of the 79 fish analyzed for exon 1 and the 89 fish analyzed for exon 2, none had the nucleotide substitutions representing the mutations induced in the laboratory study. Other variable nucleotides occurred in similar proportions in oiled and non-oiled streams and probably represent natural allelic variation. These data do not support the hypothesis that heritable mutations in the K-ras gene were induced by the Exxon Valdez oil spill or oil seeps. PMID:12211696

  8. K-ras oncogene DNA sequences in pink salmon in streams impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill: no evidence of oil-induced heritable mutations.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Matthew A; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Dunina, Yelena; Baker, Robert J

    2002-08-01

    It was hypothesized in previous studies that the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, induced heritable mutations and resulted in mortality of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) embryos. In one of these studies, laboratory exposure of pink salmon embryos to crude oil resulted in apparent mutation-induction in exon 1 and exon 2 of the K-ras oncogene, but no fish from the area impacted by the oil spill were analyzed. We assessed K-ras exon 1 and exon 2 DNA sequences in pink salmon from five streams that were oiled and five streams that were not oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, and two streams with natural oil seeps and one stream without seeps on the Alaska Peninsula. Of the 79 fish analyzed for exon 1 and the 89 fish analyzed for exon 2, none had the nucleotide substitutions representing the mutations induced in the laboratory study. Other variable nucleotides occurred in similar proportions in oiled and non-oiled streams and probably represent natural allelic variation. These data do not support the hypothesis that heritable mutations in the K-ras gene were induced by the Exxon Valdez oil spill or oil seeps.

  9. Ras Regulates Rb via NORE1A.

    PubMed

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Donninger, Howard; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in the Ras oncogene are one of the most frequent events in human cancer. Although Ras regulates numerous growth-promoting pathways to drive transformation, it can paradoxically promote an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as oncogene-induced senescence. Although senescence has clearly been implicated as a major defense mechanism against tumorigenesis, the mechanisms by which Ras can promote such a senescent phenotype remain poorly defined. We have shown recently that the Ras death effector NORE1A plays a critical role in promoting Ras-induced senescence and connects Ras to the regulation of the p53 tumor suppressor. We now show that NORE1A also connects Ras to the regulation of a second major prosenescent tumor suppressor, the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. We show that Ras induces the formation of a complex between NORE1A and the phosphatase PP1A, promoting the activation of the Rb tumor suppressor by dephosphorylation. Furthermore, suppression of Rb reduces NORE1A senescence activity. These results, together with our previous findings, suggest that NORE1A acts as a critical tumor suppressor node, linking Ras to both the p53 and the Rb pathways to drive senescence.

  10. The Ras oncogene signals centrosome amplification in mammary epithelial cells through cyclin D1/Cdk4 and Nek2

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, X; Shaikh, FY; Harrison, MK; Adon, AM; Trimboli, AJ; Carroll, KA; Sharma, N; Timmers, C; Chodosh, LA; Leone, G; Saavedra, HI

    2010-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA) contributes to carcinogenesis by generating aneuploidy. Elevated frequencies of CA in most benign breast lesions and primary tumors suggest a causative role for CA in breast cancers. Clearly, identifying which and how altered signal transduction pathways contribute to CA is crucial to breast cancer control. Although a causative and cooperative role for c-Myc and Ras in mammary tumorigenesis is well documented, their ability to generate CA during mammary tumor initiation remains unexplored. To answer that question, K-RasG12D and c-Myc were induced in mouse mammary glands. Although CA was observed in mammary tumors initiated by c-Myc or K-RasG12D, it was detected only in premalignant mammary lesions expressing K-RasG12D. CA, both in vivo and in vitro, was associated with increased expression of the centrosome-regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and Nek2. Abolishing the expression of cyclin D1, Cdk4 or Nek2 in MCF10A human mammary epithelial cells expressing H-RasG12V abrogated Ras-induced CA, whereas silencing cyclin E1 or B2 had no effect. Thus, we conclude that CA precedes mammary tumorigenesis, and interfering with centrosome-regulatory targets suppresses CA. PMID:20581865

  11. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  12. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Hanson, Gregory R; Sexton, Angela Kay; Jones Jr, J P; Freer, Eva B; Sjoreen, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  13. Muscarinic receptors transform NIH 3T3 cells through a Ras-dependent signalling pathway inhibited by the Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, R R; Sorisky, A; Brann, M R; Macara, I G

    1994-01-01

    Expression of certain subtypes of human muscarinic receptors in NIH 3T3 cells provides an agonist-dependent model of cellular transformation by formation of foci in response to carbachol. Although focus formation correlates with the ability of the muscarinic receptors to activate phospholipase C, the actual mitogenic signal transduction pathway is unknown. Through cotransfection experiments and measurement of the activation state of native and epitope-tagged Ras proteins, the contributions of Ras and Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras-GAP) to muscarinic receptor-dependent transformation were defined. Transforming muscarinic receptors were able to activate Ras, and such activation was required for transformation because focus formation was inhibited by coexpression of either Ras with a dominant-negative mutation or constructs of Ras-GAP that include the catalytic domain. Coexpression of the N-terminal region of GAP or of its isolated SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, but not its SH2 domain, was also sufficient to suppress muscarinic receptor-dependent focus formation. Point mutations at conserved residues in the Ras-GAP SH3 domain reversed its action, leading to an increase in carbachol-dependent transformation. The inhibitory effect of expression of the Ras-GAP SH3 domain occurs proximal to Ras activation and is selective for the mitogenic pathway activated by carbachol, as cellular transformation by either v-Ras or trkA/nerve growth factor is unaffected. Images PMID:7969134

  14. Identification of a farnesol analog as a Ras function inhibitor using both an in vivo Ras activation sensor and a phenotypic screening approach

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Subramanian, Thangaiah; Spielmann, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in Ras isoforms such as K-Ras, N-Ras, and H-Ras contribute to roughly 85, 15, and 1 % of human cancers, respectively. Proper membrane targeting of these Ras isoforms, a prerequisite for Ras activity, requires farnesylation or geranylgeranylation at the C-terminal CAAX box. We devised an in vivo screening strategy based on monitoring Ras activation and phenotypic physiological outputs for assaying synthetic Ras function inhibitors (RFI). Ras activity was visualized by the trans-location of RBDRaf1-GFP to activated Ras at the plasma membrane. By using this strategy, we screened one synthetic farnesyl substrate analog (AGOH) along with nine putative inhibitors and found that only m-CN-AGOH inhibited Ras activation. Phenotypic analysis of starving cells could be used to monitor polarization, motility, and the inability of these treated cells to aggregate properly during fruiting body formation. Incorporation of AGOH and m-CN-AGOH to cellular proteins was detected by western blot. These screening assays can be incorporated into a high throughput screening format using Dictyostelium discoideum and automated microscopy to determine effective RFIs. These RFI candidates can then be further tested in mammalian systems. PMID:24194124

  15. A Small Molecule RAS-Mimetic Disrupts RAS Association with Effector Proteins to Block Signaling.

    PubMed

    Athuluri-Divakar, Sai Krishna; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Dutta, Kaushik; Baker, Stacey J; Cosenza, Stephen C; Basu, Indranil; Gupta, Yogesh K; Reddy, M V Ramana; Ueno, Lynn; Hart, Jonathan R; Vogt, Peter K; Mulholland, David; Guha, Chandan; Aggarwal, Aneel K; Reddy, E Premkumar

    2016-04-21

    Oncogenic activation of RAS genes via point mutations occurs in 20%-30% of human cancers. The development of effective RAS inhibitors has been challenging, necessitating new approaches to inhibit this oncogenic protein. Functional studies have shown that the switch region of RAS interacts with a large number of effector proteins containing a common RAS-binding domain (RBD). Because RBD-mediated interactions are essential for RAS signaling, blocking RBD association with small molecules constitutes an attractive therapeutic approach. Here, we present evidence that rigosertib, a styryl-benzyl sulfone, acts as a RAS-mimetic and interacts with the RBDs of RAF kinases, resulting in their inability to bind to RAS, disruption of RAF activation, and inhibition of the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway. We also find that ribosertib binds to the RBDs of Ral-GDS and PI3Ks. These results suggest that targeting of RBDs across multiple signaling pathways by rigosertib may represent an effective strategy for inactivation of RAS signaling. PMID:27104980

  16. Coexpression of MMTV/v-Ha-ras and MMTV/c-myc genes in transgenic mice: synergistic action of oncogenes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sinn, E; Muller, W; Pattengale, P; Tepler, I; Wallace, R; Leder, P

    1987-05-22

    We have derived and mated separate strains of transgenic mice that carry either the v-Ha-ras or the c-myc gene driven by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter/enhancer. Mice carrying the MMTV/v-Ha-ras transgene manifest two distinct disturbances of cell growth. The first, a benign hyperplasia of the Harderian lacrimal gland, is diffuse, involves the entire gland, and likely requires only the abnormal action of the v-Ha-ras gene. The second involves the focal development of malignancies of mammary, salivary, and lymphoid tissue and likely requires additional somatic events. When the MMTV/v-Ha-ras and MMTV/c-myc strains are crossed to yield hybrid mice, their joint action results in a dramatic and synergistic acceleration of tumor formation. Since these tumors arise stochastically and are apparently monoclonal in origin, additional somatic events appear necessary for their full malignant progression, even in the presence of activated v-Ha-ras and c-myc transgenes.

  17. Intrinsically active variants of Erk oncogenically transform cells and disclose unexpected autophosphorylation capability that is independent of TEY phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smorodinsky-Atias, Karina; Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Shir, Alexei; Mooshayef, Navit; Beenstock, Jonah; Karamansha, Yael; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Livnah, Oded; Ahn, Natalie G.; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-01-01

    The receptor-tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras/Raf pathway is an essential cascade for mediating growth factor signaling. It is abnormally overactive in almost all human cancers. The downstream targets of the pathway are members of the extracellular regulated kinases (Erk1/2) family, suggesting that this family is a mediator of the oncogenic capability of the cascade. Although all oncogenic mutations in the pathway result in strong activation of Erks, activating mutations in Erks themselves were not reported in cancers. Here we used spontaneously active Erk variants to check whether Erk’s activity per se is sufficient for oncogenic transformation. We show that Erk1(R84S) is an oncoprotein, as NIH3T3 cells that express it form foci in tissue culture plates, colonies in soft agar, and tumors in nude mice. We further show that Erk1(R84S) and Erk2(R65S) are intrinsically active due to an unusual autophosphorylation activity they acquire. They autophosphorylate the activatory TEY motif and also other residues, including the critical residue Thr-207 (in Erk1)/Thr-188 (in Erk2). Strikingly, Erk2(R65S) efficiently autophosphorylates its Thr-188 even when dually mutated in the TEY motif. Thus this study shows that Erk1 can be considered a proto-oncogene and that Erk molecules possess unusual autoregulatory properties, some of them independent of TEY phosphorylation. PMID:26658610

  18. Detection of K-ras oncogene mutations & DNA adducts in the lungs of strain A/J mice exposed to benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F)

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shakra, A.; Roop, B.C.; Nelson, G.

    1995-11-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F) has been shown in our laboratories to induce adenomas in strain A/J mouse lungs using i.p. doses above 50 mg/kg body weight. B[b]F appears to be less potent than benzo[a]pyrene on a mg/kg basis in this tumor model. We measured the formation of B[b]F-DNA adducts in mice exposed to B[b]F after 1-21 days and analyzed B[b]F-induced tumors for K-ras oncogene mutations approximately 8 months later. The major B[b]F-DNA adduct comigrated with an adduct seen after application of 5-hydroxy-B[b]F-9,10-dihydrodiol-11,12-oxide to mouse skin. Tumor DNA was extracted and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers flanking the 111 bp region of exon 1. Samples were sequenced using the dideoxy method; those samples that failed to show a clear sequence after repetitive sequencing were subjected to single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP). B[b]F-induced tumors with K-ras mutations in codon 12, had the following distribution: GGT {yields}GTT, 50%; GGT{yields}TGT, 40%; GGT{yields} 10%. Further characterization of these mutations and their relationship to B[b]F-DNA adducts is in progress

  19. Coherence and frequency in the reticular activating system (RAS).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Urbano, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit (1) electrical coupling mainly in GABAergic cells, and (2) gamma band activity in virtually all of the cells. Specifically, cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) (1) show electrical coupling, and (2) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanism behind electrical coupling is important because the stimulant modafinil was shown to increase electrical coupling. We also provide recent findings demonstrating that all cells in the PPN and Pf have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential to gamma band activity. On the other hand, all SubCD, and some PPN, cells manifested sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. We speculate that continuous sensory input will modulate coupling and induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions.

  20. Cyclic AMP suppresses expression of v-rasH oncogene linked to the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed

    Najam, N; Clair, T; Bassin, R H; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1986-01-14

    Clone 433.3 of NIH 3T3 cells is a stable carrier of the MMTV LTR:v-rasH chimeric DNA. Only in the presence of dexamethasone (a synthetic glucocorticoid), 433.3 cells exhibit an induced level of p21 transforming protein and phenotypic transformation. N6,O2'-dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) antagonized the effect of dexamethasone in a time - and concentration - dependent manner. DBcAMP (5 X 10(-4)M) added 18 hr prior to the addition of dexamethasone (10(-7)M) almost completely blocked the hormone effect: cells contained levels of p21 20% of that in the cells treated with dexamethasone alone, and formed flat, contact inhibited monolayers. On the basis of these results together with our previous data on mammary carcinomas in vivo, we postulate that cAMP may be an intracellular suppressor acting at a regulatory locus of both cellular and viral ras genes.

  1. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David JH; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David TW; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimlmg, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Paragraph Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoural heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and Group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for the majority of paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to Groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family protooncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1/GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate ‘enhancer hijacking’ as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer. PMID:25043047

  2. S6K1 alternative splicing modulates its oncogenic activity and regulates mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hur, Vered; Denichenko, Polina; Siegfried, Zahava; Maimon, Avi; Krainer, Adrian; Davidson, Ben; Karni, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) is a major mTOR downstream signaling molecule which regulates cell size and translation efficiency. Here we report that short isoforms of S6K1 are over-produced in breast cancer cell lines and tumors. Overexpression of S6K1 short isoforms induces transformation of human breast epithelial cells. The long S6K1 variant (Iso-1) induced opposite effects: It inhibits Ras-induced transformation and tumor formation, while its knockdown or knockout induced transformation, suggesting that Iso-1 has a tumor suppressor activity. We further found that S6K1 short isoforms bind and activate mTORC1, elevating 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, cap-dependent translation and Mcl-1 protein levels. Both a phosphorylation-defective 4E-BP1 mutant and the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin partially blocked the oncogenic effects of S6K1 short isoforms, suggesting that these are mediated by mTORC1 and 4E-BP1. Thus, alternative splicing of S6K1 acts as a molecular switch in breast cancer cells elevating oncogenic isoforms that activate mTORC1. PMID:23273915

  3. Requirement of the NF-κB Subunit p65/RelA for K-Ras-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Basseres, Daniela S.; Ebbs, Aaron; Levantini, Elena; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2010-01-01

    K-Ras-induced lung cancer is a very common disease, for which there are currently no effective therapies. Because therapy directly targeting the activity of oncogenic Ras has been unsuccessful, a different approach for novel therapy design is to identify critical Ras downstream oncogenic targets. Given that oncogenic Ras proteins activate the transcription factor NF-κB, and the importance of NF-κB in oncogenesis, we hypothesized that NF-κB would be an important K-Ras target in lung cancer. To address this hypothesis, we generated an NF-κB-EGFP reporter mouse model of K-Ras-induced lung cancer and determined that K-Ras activates NF-κB in lung tumors in situ. Furthermore, a mouse model was generated where activation of oncogenic K-Ras in lung cells was coupled with inactivation of the NF-κB subunit p65/RelA. In this model, deletion of p65/RelA reduces the number of K-Ras-induced lung tumors both in the presence and absence of the tumor suppressor p53. Lung tumors with loss of p65/RelA have higher numbers of apoptotic cells, reduced spread and lower grade. Using lung cell lines expressing oncogenic K-Ras, we show that NF-κB is activated in these cells in a K-Ras-dependent manner and that NF-κB activation by K-Ras requires IKKβ kinase activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of the NF-κB subunit p65/RelA in K-Ras induced lung transformation and identify IKKβ as a potential therapeutic target for K-Ras-induced lung cancer. PMID:20406971

  4. The role of autophagy in cytotoxicity induced by new oncogenic B-Raf inhibitor UI-152 in v-Ha-ras transformed fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Jun-Ho; Ahn, Soon Kil; Lee, Michael

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We recently discovered a potent and selective B-Raf inhibitor, UI-152. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UI-152 displayed a selective cytotoxicity toward v-Ha-ras transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UI-152-induced growth inhibition was largely meditated by autophagy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UI-152 induced paradoxical activation of Raf-1. -- Abstract: In human cancers, B-Raf is the most frequently mutated protein kinase in the MAPK signaling cascade, making it an important therapeutic target. We recently discovered a potent and selective B-Raf inhibitor, UI-152, by using a structure-based drug design strategy. In this study, we examined whether B-Raf inhibition by UI-152 may be an effective therapeutic strategy for eliminating cancer cells transformed with v-Ha-ras (Ras-NIH 3T3). UI-152 displayed selective cytotoxicity toward Ras-NIH 3T3 cells while having little to no effect on non-transformed NIH 3T3 cells. We found that treatment with UI-152 markedly increased autophagy and, to a lesser extent, apoptosis. However, inhibition of autophagy by addition of 3-MA failed to reverse the cytotoxic effects of UI-152 on Ras-NIH 3T3 cells, demonstrating that apoptosis and autophagy can act as cooperative partners to induce growth inhibition in Ras-NIH 3T3 cells treated with UI-152. Most interestingly, cell responses to UI-152 appear to be paradoxical. Here, we showed that although UI-152 inhibited ERK, it induced B-Raf binding to Raf-1 as well as Raf-1 activation. This paradoxical activation of Raf-1 by UI-152 is likely to be coupled with the inhibition of the mTOR pathway, an intracellular signaling pathway involved in autophagy. We also showed for the first time that, in multi-drug resistant cells, the combination of UI-152 with verapamil significantly decreased cell proliferation and increased autophagy. Thus, our findings suggest that the inhibition of autophagy, in combination with UI-152, offers a more effective

  5. [Antiapoptotic oncogene bcl-2 induces a program of senescence in E1A + c-Ha-ras-transformants treated with adriamycin].

    PubMed

    Neliudova, A M; Zubova, S G; Aksenov, N D; Pospelov, V A; Pospelova, T V

    2005-01-01

    Introduction of bcl-2 gene in EIA + c-Ha-ras-transformed rat embryo fibroblasts, which are unable to be arrested after damaging influences and possess high proapoptotic sensitivity, results not only in suppression of cell death but also in re-establishment of cell cycle block following DNA damage and serum starvation. Flow cytometry showed that E1A + c-Ha-ras + bcl-2-transformants treated with DNA-intercalator adriamycin are capable of being arrested at G1/S boundary for a long time (for less than 5 days). According to the growth curve data, the number of Bcl-2-overexpressing cells remanins constant for a week of cultivation with adriamycin. Clonogenic efficacy of E1A + c-Ha-ras + bcl-2-cells is brought to no already in 16 h after adriamycin addition. Apoptotic death, revealed by oligonucleosomic fragmentation of DNA, as well as cell death, occurring due to mitotic catastrophe, after adriamycin treatment are almost absent in Bcl-2-overexpressing transformants, as compared with parental E1A + c-Ha-ras-transformants. Bcl-2 introduction in E1A + c-Ha-ras-transformants is accompanied by a rise of SA beta-Gal (Senescence Associated beta-Galactosidase) activity, which is commonly considered to be a marker of cell senescence. Adriamycin treatment of E1A + c-Ha-ras + bcl-2-transformants results in a much higher rise in SA beta-Gal activity, as compared with untreated cells. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated the introduction of Bcl-2 to result in formation of Bcl-2 complexes with early region E1A oncoproducts, which are thought to be responsible for proapoptotic susceptibility of E1A-expressing transformants. The data obtained lead to suggestion that bcl-2 transfer to E1A + c-Ha-ras-transformants may induce a switch from the cell death program on the program of senescence after DNA damage, due, presumably, to Bcl-2 interaction with the apoptosis activator the viral oncoprotein E1A. PMID:16711390

  6. The Thyroid Hormone Receptor Is a Suppressor of ras-Mediated Transcription, Proliferation, and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    García-Silva, Susana; Aranda, Ana

    2004-01-01

    The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) has a profound effect on growth, differentiation, and metabolism in higher organisms. Here we demonstrate that T3 inhibits ras-induced proliferation in neuroblastoma cells and blocks induction of cyclin D1 expression by the oncogene. The hormone, at physiological concentrations, strongly antagonizes the transcriptional response mediated by the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ribosomal-S6 subunit kinase (Rsk) signaling pathway in cells expressing thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). T3 blocks the response to the oncogenic forms of the three ras isoforms (H-, K-, and N-ras) and both TRα and TRβ can mediate this action. The main target for induction of cyclin D1 transcription by oncogenic ras in neuroblastoma cells is a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) located in proximal promoter sequences, and T3 represses the transcriptional activity of b-Zip transcription factors such as CREB (CRE-binding protein) or ATF-2 (activation transcription factor 2) that are direct targets of Rsk2 and bind to this sequence. The hormone also blocks fibroblast transformation by oncogenic ras when TR is expressed. Furthermore, TRs act as suppressors of tumor formation by the oncogene in vivo in nude mice. The TRβ isoform has stronger antitransforming properties than the α isoform and can inhibit tumorigenesis even in hypothyroid mice. These results show the existence of a previously unrecognized transcriptional cross talk between the TRs and the ras oncogene which influences relevant processes such as cell proliferation, transformation, or tumorigenesis. PMID:15314161

  7. Regulation of Ras Proteins by Reactive Nitrogen Species†

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael F.; Vigil, Dom; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Ras GTPases have been a subject of intense investigation since the early-80’s, when single point mutations in Ras were shown to cause deregulated cell growth control. Subsequently, Ras was identified as the most prevalent oncogene found in human cancer. Ras proteins regulate a host of pathways involved in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis by cycling between inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound states. Regulation of Ras activity is controlled by cellular factors that alter guanine nucleotide cycling. Oncogenic mutations prevent protein regulatory factors from down-regulating Ras activity, thereby maintaining Ras in a chronically activated state. The central dogma in the field is that protein modulatory factors are the primary regulators of Ras activity. Since the mid-90’s, however, evidence has accumulated that small molecule reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can also influence Ras guanine nucleotide cycling. Herein, we review the basic chemistry behind RNS formation and discuss the mechanism through which various RNS enhance nucleotide exchange in Ras proteins. In addition, we present studies that demonstrate the physiological relevance of RNS-mediated Ras activation within the context of immune system function, brain function, and cancer development. We also highlight future directions and experimental methods that may enhance our ability to detect RNS-mediated activation in cell cultures and in vivo. The development of such methods may ultimately pave new directions for detecting and elucidating how Ras proteins are regulated by redox species, as well as for targeting redox-activated Ras in cancer and other disease states. PMID:21616138

  8. GILZ mediates the antiproliferative activity of glucocorticoids by negative regulation of Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ayroldi, Emira; Zollo, Ornella; Bastianelli, Alessandra; Marchetti, Cristina; Agostini, Massimiliano; Di Virgilio, Rosa; Riccardi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Tsc22d3 coding for glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) was initially identified as a dexamethasone-responsive gene involved in the control of T lymphocyte activation and apoptosis. However, the physiological role of this molecule and its function in the biological activity of glucocorticoids (GCs) has not been clarified. Here, we demonstrate that GILZ interacts directly with Ras in vitro and in vivo as shown by GILZ and Ras coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization upon PMA activation in primary mouse spleen T lymphocytes and thymus cells. The analysis of GILZ mutants showed that they bound Ras through the tuberous sclerosis complex box (TSC) and, depending on the Ras activation level, formed a trimeric complex with Ras and Raf, which we previously identified as a GILZ binder. As a consequence of these interactions, GILZ diminished the activation of Ras and Raf downstream targets including ERK1/2, AKT/PKB serine/threonine kinase, and retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression, leading to inhibition of Ras- and Raf-dependent cell proliferation and Ras-induced NIH-3T3 transformation. GILZ silencing resulted in an increase in concanavalin A–induced T cell proliferation and, most notably, inhibition of dexamethasone antiproliferative effects. Together, these findings indicate that GILZ serves as a negative regulator of Ras- and Raf-induced proliferation and is an important mediator of the antiproliferative effect of GCs. PMID:17492054

  9. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  10. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  11. Nitric oxide mediates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-induced activation of p21ras.

    PubMed

    Yun, H Y; Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    1998-05-12

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor-mediated increases in intracellular calcium are thought to play a critical role in synaptic plasticity. The mechanisms by which changes in cytoplasmic calcium transmit the glutamate signal to the nucleus, which is ultimately important for long-lasting neuronal responses, are poorly understood. We show that NMDA receptor stimulation leads to activation of p21(ras) (Ras) through generation of nitric oxide (NO) via neuronal NO synthase. The competitive NO synthase inhibitor, L-nitroarginine methyl ester, prevents Ras activation elicited by NMDA and this effect is competitively reversed by the NO synthase substrate, L-arginine. NMDA receptor stimulation fails to activate Ras in neuronal cultures from mice lacking neuronal NO synthase. NMDA-induced Ras activation occurs through a cGMP-independent pathway as 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a potent and selective inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase, has no effect on NMDA receptor-induced activation of Ras, and the cell-permeable cGMP analog, 8Br-cGMP, does not activate Ras. Furthermore, NO directly activates immunoprecipitated Ras from neurons. NMDA also elicits tyrosine phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, a downstream effector pathway of Ras, through a NO/non-cGMP dependent mechanism, thus supporting the physiologic relevance of endogenous NO regulation of Ras. These results suggest that Ras is a physiologic target of endogenously produced NO and indicates a signaling pathway for NMDA receptor activation that may be important for long-lasting neuronal responses.

  12. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26260012

  13. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R

    2015-11-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  14. Study Illuminates K-Ras4B Activation, Which May Help Predict Drug Resistance | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Until recently, researchers studying RAS, a family of proteins involved in transmitting signals within cells, believed that the exchange of guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP) by guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was sufficient to activate the protein. Once activated, RAS can cause unintended and overactive signaling in cells, which can lead to cell division and, ultimately, cancer.

  15. TRAIL induces apoptosis in oral squamous carcinoma cells: a crosstalk with oncogenic Ras regulated cell surface expression of death receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-jie; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Zhang, Yaqin; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Zhang, Baolin

    2013-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its death receptors (DRs) 4 and/or 5 expressed on the surface of target cells. The selectivity of TRAIL towards cancer cells has promoted clinical evaluation of recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) and its agonistic antibodies in treating several major human cancers including colon and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, little is known about their ability in killing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we tested the apoptotic responses of a panel of seven human OSCC cell lines (HN31, HN30, HN12, HN6, HN4, Cal27, and OSCC3) to rhTRAIL and monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5. We found that rhTRAIL is a potent inducer of apoptosis in most of the oral cancer cell lines tested both in vitro and in vivo. We also showed that DR5 was expressed on the surface of the tested cell lines which correlated with the cellular susceptibility to apoptosis induced by rhTRAIL and anti-DR5 antibody. By contrast, little or no DR4 was detected on the surface of OSCC3 and HN6 cells rendering cellular resistance to DR4 antibody and a reduced sensitivity to rhTRAIL. Notably, the overall TRAIL sensitivity correlated well with the levels of endogenous active Ras in the cell lines tested. Expression of a constitutively active Ras mutant (RasV12) in OSCC3 cells selectively upregulated surface expression of DR5, but not DR4, and restored TRAIL sensitivity. Our findings could have implications for the use of TRAIL receptor targeted therapies in the treatment of human OSCC tumors particularly the ones harboring constitutively active Ras mutant. PMID:23470485

  16. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells toward the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected cells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. Progress is described. 121 refs.

  17. Cell of origin determines tumor phenotype in an oncogenic Ras/p53 knockout transgenic model of high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Sabah O; Stark, Michelle; Zhao, Zhiguo; Mobley, Bret C; Munden, Alex; Hover, Laura; Abel, Ty William

    2012-08-01

    Human high-grade gliomas (HGGs) are known for their histologic diversity. To address the role of cell of origin in glioma phenotype, transgenic mice were generated in which oncogenic Ras and p53 deletion were targeted to neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) and mature astrocytes. The hGFAP-Cre/Kras/p53 mice develop multifocal HGGs that vary histopathologically and with respect to the expression of markers associated with NSPCs. One HGG pattern strongly expressed markers of NSPCs and arose near the subventricular zone. Additional nonoverlapping patterns that recapitulate human HGG variants were present simultaneously in the same brain. These neoplastic foci were more often cortical or leptomeningeal based, and the neoplastic cells lacked expression of NSPC markers. To determine whether cell of origin determines tumor phenotype, astrocytes and NSPCs were harvested from neonatal mutant pups. Onorthotopic transplantation, early-passage astrocytes and NSPCs formed tumors that differed in engraftment rates, latency to clinical signs, histopathology, and protein expression. Astrocyte-derivedtumors were more aggressive, had giant-cell histology, and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression. The NSPC-derived tumors retained NSPC markers and showed evidence of differentiation along astrocytic, oligodendroglial, and neuronal lineages. These results indicate that identical tumorigenic stimuli produce markedly different glioma phenotypes, depending on the differentiation status of the transformed cell.

  18. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  19. ASPP2 Is a Novel Pan-Ras Nanocluster Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Posada, Itziar M. D.; Serulla, Marc; Zhou, Yong; Oetken-Lindholm, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Ras-induced senescence mediated through ASPP2 represents a barrier to tumour formation. It is initiated by ASPP2’s interaction with Ras at the plasma membrane, which stimulates the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade. Ras to Raf signalling requires Ras to be organized in nanoscale signalling complexes, called nanocluster. We therefore wanted to investigate whether ASPP2 affects Ras nanoclustering. Here we show that ASPP2 increases the nanoscale clustering of all oncogenic Ras isoforms, H-ras, K-ras and N-ras. Structure-function analysis with ASPP2 truncation mutants suggests that the nanocluster scaffolding activity of ASPP2 converges on its α-helical domain. While ASPP2 increased effector recruitment and stimulated ERK and AKT phosphorylation, it did not increase colony formation of RasG12V transformed NIH/3T3 cells. By contrast, ASPP2 was able to suppress the transformation enhancing ability of the nanocluster scaffold Gal-1, by competing with the specific effect of Gal-1 on H-rasG12V- and K-rasG12V-nanoclustering, thus imposing ASPP2’s ERK and AKT signalling signature. Similarly, ASPP2 robustly induced senescence and strongly abrogated mammosphere formation irrespective of whether it was expressed alone or together with Gal-1, which by itself showed the opposite effect in Ras wt or H-ras mutant breast cancer cells. Our results suggest that Gal-1 and ASPP2 functionally compete in nanocluster for active Ras on the plasma membrane. ASPP2 dominates the biological outcome, thus switching from a Gal-1 supported growth-promoting setting to a senescence inducing and stemness suppressive program in cancer cells. Our results support Ras nanocluster as major integrators of tumour fate decision events. PMID:27437940

  20. The RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF linear signaling cascade mediates the motile and mitogenic phenotype of thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guarino, Valentina; De Falco, Valentina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Salvatore, Giuliana; Caiazzo, Fiorina; Basolo, Fulvio; Giannini, Riccardo; Kruhoffer, Mogens; Orntoft, Torben; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    In papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), rearrangements of the RET receptor (RET/PTC) and activating mutations in the BRAF or RAS oncogenes are mutually exclusive. Here we show that the 3 proteins function along a linear oncogenic signaling cascade in which RET/PTC induces RAS-dependent BRAF activation and RAS- and BRAF-dependent ERK activation. Adoptive activation of the RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF axis induced cell proliferation and Matrigel invasion of thyroid follicular cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the 3 oncogenes activate a common transcriptional program in thyroid cells that includes upregulation of the CXCL1 and CXCL10 chemokines, which in turn stimulate proliferation and invasion. Thus, motile and mitogenic properties are intrinsic to transformed thyroid cells and are governed by an epistatic oncogenic signaling cascade. PMID:15761501

  1. Hyperglycemia Promotes K-Ras-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis through BASCs Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Micucci, Carla; Orciari, Silvia; Catalano, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic K-Ras represents the most common molecular change in human lung adenocarcinomas, the major histologic subtype of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The presence of K-Ras mutation is associated with a poor prognosis, but no effective treatment strategies are available for K-Ras -mutant NSCLC. Epidemiological studies report higher lung cancer mortality rates in patients with type 2 diabetes. Here, we use a mouse model of K-Ras-mediated lung cancer on a background of chronic hyperglycemia to determine whether elevated circulating glycemic levels could influence oncogenic K-Ras-mediated tumor development. Inducible oncogenic K-Ras mouse model was treated with subtoxic doses of streptozotocin (STZ) to induce chronic hyperglycemia. We observed increased tumor mass and higher grade of malignancy in STZ treated diabetic mice analyzed at 4, 12 and 24 weeks, suggesting that oncogenic K-Ras increased lung tumorigenesis in hyperglycemic condition. This promoting effect is achieved by expansion of tumor-initiating lung bronchio-alveolar stem cells (BASCs) in bronchio-alveolar duct junction, indicating a role of hyperglycemia in the activity of K-Ras-transformed putative lung stem cells. Notably, after oncogene K-Ras activation, BASCs show upregulation of the glucose transporter (Glut1/Slc2a1), considered as an important player of the active control of tumor cell metabolism by oncogenic K-Ras. Our novel findings suggest that anti-hyperglycemic drugs, such as metformin, may act as therapeutic agent to restrict lung neoplasia promotion and progression. PMID:25144301

  2. CARD9 mediates Dectin-1–induced ERK activation by linking Ras-GRF1 to H-Ras for antifungal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bing; Zhu, Le-Le; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Gorjestani, Sara; Hsu, Yen-Michael S.; Yang, Long; Guan, Jian-Hong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-1 functions as a pattern recognition receptor for sensing fungal infection. It has been well-established that Dectin-1 induces innate immune responses through caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9)–mediated NF-κB activation. In this study, we find that CARD9 is dispensable for NF-κB activation induced by Dectin-1 ligands, such as curdlan or Candida albicans yeast. In contrast, we find that CARD9 regulates H-Ras activation by linking Ras-GRF1 to H-Ras, which mediates Dectin-1–induced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation and proinflammatory responses when stimulated by their ligands. Mechanistically, Dectin-1 engagement initiates spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk)–dependent Ras-GRF1 phosphorylation, and the phosphorylated Ras-GRF1 recruits and activates H-Ras through forming a complex with CARD9, which leads to activation of ERK downstream. Finally, we show that inhibiting ERK activation significantly accelerates the death of C. albicans–infected mice, and this inhibitory effect is dependent on CARD9. Together, our studies reveal a molecular mechanism by which Dectin-1 induces H-Ras activation that leads to ERK activation for host innate immune responses against fungal infection. PMID:25267792

  3. Crosstalk of Ras and Rho: activation of RhoA abates Kras-induced liver tumorigenesis in transgenic zebrafish models.

    PubMed

    Chew, T W; Liu, X J; Liu, L; Spitsbergen, J M; Gong, Z; Low, B C

    2014-05-22

    RAS and Rho small GTPases are key molecular switches that control cell dynamics, cell growth and tissue development through their distinct signaling pathways. Although much has been learnt about their individual functions in both cell and animal models, the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of their signaling crosstalk in multi-cellular context in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in liver development and liver tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the roles of RhoA in RAS-mediated transformation and their crosstalk in vitro remain highly controversial. When challenged with carcinogens, zebrafish developed liver cancer that resembles the human liver cancer both molecularly and histopathologically. Capitalizing on the growing importance and relevance of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an alternate cancer model, we have generated liver-specific, Tet-on-inducible transgenic lines expressing oncogenic Kras(G12V), RhoA, constitutively active RhoA(G14V) or dominant-negative RhoA(T19N). Double-transgenic lines expressing Kras(G12V) with one of the three RhoA genes were also generated. Based on quantitative bioimaging and molecular markers for genetic and signaling aberrations, we showed that the induced expression of oncogenic Kras during early development led to liver enlargement and hepatocyte proliferation, associated with elevated Erk phosphorylation, activation of Akt2 and modulation of its two downstream targets, p21Cip and S6 kinase. Such an increase in liver size and Akt2 expression was augmented by dominant-negative RhoA(T19N), but was abrogated by the constitutive-active RhoA(G14V). Consequently, induced expression of the oncogenic Kras in adult transgenic fish led to the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. Survival studies further revealed that the co-expression of dominant-negative RhoA(T19N) with oncogenic Kras increased the mortality rate compared with the other single or double-transgenic lines. This study provides evidence of the previously

  4. Activated neu oncogene sequences in primary tumors of the peripheral nervous system induced in rats by transplacental exposure to ethylnitrosourea

    SciTech Connect

    Perantoni, A.O.; Rice, J.M.; Reed, C.D.; Watatani, M.; Wenk, M.L.

    1987-09-01

    Neurogenic tumors were selectively induced in high incidence in F344 rats by a single transplacental exposure to the direct-acting alkylating agent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNU). The authors prepared DNA for transfection of NIH 3T3 cells from primary glial tumors of the brain and form schwannomas of the cranial and spinal nerves that developed in the transplacentally exposed offspring between 20 and 40 weeks after birth. DNA preparations from 6 of 13 schwannomas, but not from normal liver, kidney, or intestine of tumor-bearing rats, transformed NIH 3T3 cells. NIH 3T3 clones transformed by schwannoma DNA contained rat repetitive DNA sequences, and all isolates contained rat neu oncogene sequences. A point mutation in the transmembrane region of the putative protein product of neu was identified in all six transformants and in the primary tumors from which they were derived as well as in 5 of 6 schwannomas tested that did not transform NIH 3T3 cells. Of 59 gliomas, only one yielded transforming DNA, and an activated N-ras oncogen was identified. The normal cellular neu sequence for the transmembrane region, but not the mutated sequence, was identified in DNA from all 11 gliomas surveyed by oligonucleotide hybridization. Activation of the neu oncogene, originally identified in cultured cell lines derived from EtNU-induced neurogenic tumors appears specifically associated with tumors of the peripheral nervous system in the F344 inbred strain.

  5. Oncogenic H-ras reprograms Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell-derived exosomal proteins following epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Bow J; Mathias, Rommel A; Greening, David W; Gopal, Shashi K; Ji, Hong; Kapp, Eugene A; Coleman, Bradley M; Hill, Andrew F; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Hallows, Janice L; Shteynberg, David; Moritz, Robert L; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenic process defined by the loss of epithelial characteristics and the acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype. EMT is associated with increased aggressiveness, invasiveness, and metastatic potential in carcinoma cells. To assess the contribution of extracellular vesicles following EMT, we conducted a proteomic analysis of exosomes released from Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and MDCK cells transformed with oncogenic H-Ras (21D1 cells). Exosomes are 40-100 nm membranous vesicles originating from the inward budding of late endosomes and multivesicular bodies and are released from cells on fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. Exosomes from MDCK cells (MDCK-Exos) and 21D1 cells (21D1-Exos) were purified from cell culture media using density gradient centrifugation (OptiPrep™), and protein content identified by GeLC-MS/MS proteomic profiling. Both MDCK- and 21D1-Exos populations were morphologically similar by cryo-electron microscopy and contained stereotypical exosome marker proteins such as TSG101, Alix, and CD63. In this study we show that the expression levels of typical EMT hallmark proteins seen in whole cells correlate with those observed in MDCK- and 21D1-Exos, i.e. reduction of characteristic inhibitor of angiogenesis, thrombospondin-1, and epithelial markers E-cadherin, and EpCAM, with a concomitant up-regulation of mesenchymal makers such as vimentin. Further, we reveal that 21D1-Exos are enriched with several proteases (e.g. MMP-1, -14, -19, ADAM-10, and ADAMTS1), and integrins (e.g. ITGB1, ITGA3, and ITGA6) that have been recently implicated in regulating the tumor microenvironment to promote metastatic progression. A salient finding of this study was the unique presence of key transcriptional regulators (e.g. the master transcriptional regulator YBX1) and core splicing complex components (e.g. SF3B1, SF3B3, and SFRS1) in mesenchymal 21D1-Exos. Taken

  6. Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 Kinase Activity Is Controlled by Multiple Inputs from Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuemin; Regufe da Mota, Sergio; Liu, Rui; Moore, Claire E.; Xie, Jianling; Lanucara, Francesco; Agarwala, Usha; Pyr dit Ruys, Sébastien; Vertommen, Didier; Rider, Mark H.; Eyers, Claire E.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K), an atypical calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, phosphorylates and inhibits eEF2, slowing down translation elongation. eEF2K contains an N-terminal catalytic domain, a C-terminal α-helical region and a linker containing several regulatory phosphorylation sites. eEF2K is expressed at high levels in certain cancers, where it may act to help cell survival, e.g., during nutrient starvation. However, it is a negative regulator of protein synthesis and thus cell growth, suggesting that cancer cells may possess mechanisms to inhibit eEF2K under good growth conditions, to allow protein synthesis to proceed. We show here that the mTORC1 pathway and the oncogenic Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway cooperate to restrict eEF2K activity. We identify multiple sites in eEF2K whose phosphorylation is regulated by mTORC1 and/or ERK, including new ones in the linker region. We demonstrate that certain sites are phosphorylated directly by mTOR or ERK. Our data reveal that glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling also regulates eEF2 phosphorylation. In addition, we show that phosphorylation sites remote from the N-terminal calmodulin-binding motif regulate the phosphorylation of N-terminal sites that control CaM binding. Mutations in the former sites, which occur in cancer cells, cause the activation of eEF2K. eEF2K is thus regulated by a network of oncogenic signaling pathways. PMID:25182533

  7. Evidence for long-range oncogene activation by hepadnavirus insertion.

    PubMed Central

    Fourel, G; Couturier, J; Wei, Y; Apiou, F; Tiollais, P; Buendia, M A

    1994-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis of host genes, a common oncogenic strategy of slow transforming retroviruses, has recently been described for a DNA virus of the hepadnavirus group: the woodchuck hepatitis virus. This virus causes insertional activation of myc genes, mainly the intronless N-myc2 oncogene, in > 50% of woodchuck liver tumours. In most remaining tumours, N-myc2 is overexpressed without any apparent genetic alteration. To elucidate the role of the virus in such cases, we have cloned and analysed single integration sites in four woodchuck tumours carrying wild-type myc alleles. All sites were clustered within < 20 kb in a single locus, in which scarce unique sequences showed no detectable transcriptional activity. By fluorescent in situ hybridization, N-myc2 and the new locus (win) were localized to the same region of the long arm of the woodchuck X chromosome, and a 150-180 kb intervening distance was deduced from pulse-field gel analysis. The detection of viral integrations in win in additional tumours that produced abundant N-myc2 transcripts further substantiates the link between these two loci in woodchuck tumorigenesis. We propose that efficient activation of the N-myc2 promoter by the hepadnavirus enhancer acting over a long distance might operate in liver cell transformation. Images PMID:8013453

  8. KRAS insertion mutations are oncogenic and exhibit distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    White, Yasmine; Bagchi, Aditi; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Inguva, Anagha; Bollag, Gideon; Zhang, Chao; Carias, Heidi; Dickens, David; Loh, Mignon; Shannon, Kevin; Firestone, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations introduce discrete amino acid substitutions that reduce intrinsic Ras GTPase activity and confer resistance to GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Here we discover a partial duplication of the switch 2 domain of K-Ras encoding a tandem repeat of amino acids G60_A66dup in a child with an atypical myeloproliferative neoplasm. K-Ras proteins containing this tandem duplication or a similar five amino acid E62_A66dup mutation identified in lung and colon cancers transform the growth of primary myeloid progenitors and of Ba/F3 cells. Recombinant K-RasG60_A66dup and K-RasE62_A66dup proteins display reduced intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates, accumulate in the GTP-bound conformation and are resistant to GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Remarkably, K-Ras proteins with switch 2 insertions are impaired for PI3 kinase binding and Akt activation, and are hypersensitive to MEK inhibition. These studies illuminate a new class of oncogenic KRAS mutations and reveal unexpected plasticity in oncogenic Ras proteins that has diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26854029

  9. Molecular kinetics. Ras activation by SOS: allosteric regulation by altered fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen; Christensen, Sune M; Abel, Steven M; Iwig, Jeff; Wu, Hung-Jen; Gureasko, Jodi; Rhodes, Christopher; Petit, Rebecca S; Hansen, Scott D; Thill, Peter; Yu, Cheng-Han; Stamou, Dimitrios; Chakraborty, Arup K; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T

    2014-07-01

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual SOS molecules catalyzing nucleotide exchange in H-Ras. Single-molecule kinetic traces revealed that SOS samples a broad distribution of turnover rates through stochastic fluctuations between distinct, long-lived (more than 100 seconds), functional states. The expected allosteric activation of SOS by Ras-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was conspicuously absent in the mean rate. However, fluctuations into highly active states were modulated by Ras-GTP. This reveals a mechanism in which functional output may be determined by the dynamical spectrum of rates sampled by a small number of enzymes, rather than the ensemble average.

  10. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'. PMID:24780858

  11. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'.

  12. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Keyata N.; Whipple, Rebecca A.; Yoon, Jennifer R.; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S.; Boggs, Amanda E.; Chakrabarti, Kristi R.; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K.; Martin, Stuart S.; Vitolo, Michele I.

    2015-01-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN−/−KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  13. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keyata N; Whipple, Rebecca A; Yoon, Jennifer R; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S; Boggs, Amanda E; Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K; Martin, Stuart S; Vitolo, Michele I

    2015-11-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN-/-KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  14. Lin28-let7 Modulates Radiosensitivity of Human Cancer Cells With Activation of K-Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jee-Sun.; Kim, Jae-Jin; Byun, Ju-Yeon; Kim, In-Ah

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of targeting Lin28-let7 microRNA regulatory network for overcoming the radioresistance of cancer cells having activated K-Ras signaling. Methods and Materials: A549 lung carcinoma cells and ASPC1 pancreatic cancer cells possessing K-RAS mutation were transfected with pre-let7a microRNA or Lin28 siRNA, respectively. Clonogenic assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western analysis were performed. The effects of Lin28 on SQ20B cells having wild-type K-RAS, and a normal fibroblast were also assessed. Results: The overexpression of let-7a decreased expression of K-Ras and radiosensitized A549 cells. Inhibition of Lin28, a repressor of let-7, attenuated K-Ras expression and radiosensitized A549 and ASPC1 cells. Neither SQ20B cells expressing wild-type K-RAS nor HDF, the normal human fibroblasts, were radiosensitized by this approach. Conclusions: The Lin28-let7 regulatory network may be a potentially useful therapeutic target for overcoming the radioresistance of human cancers having activated K-Ras signaling.

  15. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Suvà, Mario L.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas1,2. Mutant IDH protein produces a novel onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), that interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5′-methylcytosine hydroxylases3–7. TET enzymes catalyze a key step in the removal of DNA methylation8,9. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP)10,11, though the functional significance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hyper-methylation at CTCF binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to aberrantly interact with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and down-regulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wildtype gliomaspheres up-regulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  16. Biochemical similarity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe ras1 protein with RAS2 protein of Saccharomyces cervisiae.

    PubMed

    Onozawa, T; Danjoh, I; Fujiyama, A

    1995-07-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains single ras oncogene homologue, ras1, that functions in the signal transduction pathway conducting the cell's mating processes. To understand the biochemical basis of yeast ras proteins, we have purified the ras1 protein and compared the major biochemical constants with those of RAS2 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian ras proteins. The purified ras1 protein showed a remarkably high Kd value for GDP binding (178 nM) and for binding with ATP. In contrast, the Kd value for GTP binding and the rate of GTPase activity were 64 nM and 77 x 10(-6) s-1 at 37 degrees C, respectively; both were higher than normal p21ras protein, but at the same level as the RAS2 protein. We directly measured rate of GTP binding and GDP binding which were 3.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and 1.8 x 10(-3) s-1 at 30 degrees C, respectively. On the other hand, exchange rates between bound and free nucleotides remained almost constant throughout the tested combination of GTP and GDP, and were several-fold lower than the binding rate. These results suggest that the release of the guanine nucleotide is the rate-limiting step in the ras-GTP/GDP cycle. As a whole, the biochemical properties of the ras1 protein are close to those of the RAS2 protein, although these two proteins function differently in the signal transduction pathway in the cells. PMID:7483844

  17. Ras history

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although the roots of Ras sprouted from the rich history of retrovirus research, it was the discovery of mutationally activated RAS genes in human cancer in 1982 that stimulated an intensive research effort to understand Ras protein structure, biochemistry and biology. While the ultimate goal has been developing anti-Ras drugs for cancer treatment, discoveries from Ras have laid the foundation for three broad areas of science. First, they focused studies on the origins of cancer to the molecular level, with the subsequent discovery of genes mutated in cancer that now number in the thousands. Second, elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms by which Ras facilitates signal transduction established many of our fundamental concepts of how a normal cell orchestrates responses to extracellular cues. Third, Ras proteins are also founding members of a large superfamily of small GTPases that regulate all key cellular processes and established the versatile role of small GTP-binding proteins in biology. We highlight some of the key findings of the last 28 years. PMID:21686117

  18. Casein kinase 1α–dependent feedback loop controls autophagy in RAS-driven cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Zhang, Fuquan; Chua, Pei Jou; Bay, Boon Huat; Thorburn, Andrew; Virshup, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in the RAS oncogene are common in cancer but are difficult to therapeutically target. RAS activation promotes autophagy, a highly regulated catabolic process that metabolically buffers cells in response to diverse stresses. Here we report that casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinase, is a key negative regulator of oncogenic RAS–induced autophagy. Depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CK1α enhanced autophagic flux in oncogenic RAS–driven human fibroblasts and multiple cancer cell lines. FOXO3A, a master longevity mediator that transcriptionally regulates diverse autophagy genes, was a critical target of CK1α, as depletion of CK1α reduced levels of phosphorylated FOXO3A and increased expression of FOXO3A-responsive genes. Oncogenic RAS increased CK1α protein abundance via activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. In turn, elevated levels of CK1α increased phosphorylation of nuclear FOXO3A, thereby inhibiting transactivation of genes critical for RAS-induced autophagy. In both RAS-driven cancer cells and murine xenograft models, pharmacologic CK1α inactivation synergized with lysosomotropic agents to inhibit growth and promote tumor cell death. Together, our results identify a kinase feedback loop that influences RAS-dependent autophagy and suggest that targeting CK1α-regulated autophagy offers a potential therapeutic opportunity to treat oncogenic RAS–driven cancers. PMID:25798617

  19. Transgenic activation of Ras in neurons increases synapse formation in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Seeger, G; Gärtner, U; Arendt, Th

    2005-06-01

    The small G protein Ras, which is a molecular switch in neurotrophic signal transduction, is implicated in synaptic plasticity and synapse development during ontogeny and in the adult nervous system. To characterise the involvement of Ras-dependent signaling in synaptogenesis, the cortical synapse-to-neuron ratio was investigated in synRas mice overexpressing Val12-Ha-Ras in postmitotic neurons (introduced by Heumann, 2000). The number of synapses per neuron was analysed in cortical layers II/III of the somatosensory cortex at different stages of postnatal development by stereological methods. The synapse-to-neuron ratio was still identical in wild-type and synRas mice at postnatal day 4 before the onset of transgene expression. At P12, P47 and in the adult, analyses revealed a significant increase in the synapse-to-neuron ratio in synRas mice which correlated with the strength of transgene expression. The data presented here provide evidence that Ras activity might be profoundly involved in synaptogenesis by reinforcing the formation or maintenance of synapses during the development and in the adult.

  20. K-Ras(G12C) inhibitors allosterically control GTP affinity and effector interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrem, Jonathan M.; Peters, Ulf; Sos, Martin L.; Wells, James A.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2013-11-01

    Somatic mutations in the small GTPase K-Ras are the most common activating lesions found in human cancer, and are generally associated with poor response to standard therapies. Efforts to target this oncogene directly have faced difficulties owing to its picomolar affinity for GTP/GDP and the absence of known allosteric regulatory sites. Oncogenic mutations result in functional activation of Ras family proteins by impairing GTP hydrolysis. With diminished regulation by GTPase activity, the nucleotide state of Ras becomes more dependent on relative nucleotide affinity and concentration. This gives GTP an advantage over GDP and increases the proportion of active GTP-bound Ras. Here we report the development of small molecules that irreversibly bind to a common oncogenic mutant, K-Ras(G12C). These compounds rely on the mutant cysteine for binding and therefore do not affect the wild-type protein. Crystallographic studies reveal the formation of a new pocket that is not apparent in previous structures of Ras, beneath the effector binding switch-II region. Binding of these inhibitors to K-Ras(G12C) disrupts both switch-I and switch-II, subverting the native nucleotide preference to favour GDP over GTP and impairing binding to Raf. Our data provide structure-based validation of a new allosteric regulatory site on Ras that is targetable in a mutant-specific manner.

  1. Differential requirement of RasGRP1 for γδ T cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ci, Xinxin; Gorentla, Balachandra; Sullivan, Sarah A.; Stone, James C.; Zhang, Weiguo; Pereira, Pablo; Lu, Jianxin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    γδ T cells (γδT) belong to a distinct T cell lineage that performs immune functions different from αβ T cells (αβT). Previous studies have established that Erk1/2 MAPKs are critical for positive selection of αβT cells. Additional evidence also suggests that elevated Erk1/2 activity promotes γδT cell generation. RasGRP1, a guanine nucleotide releasing factor for Ras, plays an important role in positive selection of αβT cells by activating the Ras-Erk1/2 pathway. In this report, we demonstrate that RasGRP1 is critical for TCR-induced Erk1/2 activation in γδT cells but exerts different roles for γδT cell generation and activation. Deficiency of RasGRP1 does not obviously affect γδT cell numbers in the thymus but leads to increased γδT cells, particularly CD4−CD8+ γδT cells, in the peripheral lymphoid organs. The virtually unhindered γδT cell development in the RasGRP1−/− thymus proved to be cell intrinsic, while the increase in CD8+ γδT cells is caused by non-cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Our data provides genetic evidence that decreased Erk1/2 activation in the absence of RasGRP1 is compatible for γδT cell generation. Although RasGRP1 is dispensable for γδT cell generation, RasGRP1-deficient γδT cells are defective in proliferation following TCR stimulation. Additionally, RasGRP1-deficient γδT cells are impaired to produce IL-17 but not IFNγ. Together, these observations have revealed that RasGRP1 plays differential roles for γδ and αβ T cell development but is critical for γδT cell proliferation and production of IL-17. PMID:22623331

  2. Quantification of oxidative post-translational modifications of cysteine thiols of p21ras associated with redox modulation of activity using isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Mahadevan; Clavreul, Nicolas; Huang, Hua; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    p21ras GTPase is the protein product of the most commonly mutated human oncogene and has been identified as a target for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Post-translational modification of reactive thiols, by reversible S-glutathiolation and S-nitrosation, and potentially also by irreversible oxidation, may have significant effects on p21ras activity. Here we used an isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) and mass spectrometry to quantitate the reversible and irreversible oxidative post-translational thiol modifications of p21ras caused by peroxynitrite (ONOO−) or glutathione disulfide (GSSG). The activity of p21ras was significantly increased following exposure to GSSG, but not to ONOO−. The results of LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of p21ras treated with ONOO− showed that ICAT labeling of Cys118 was decreased by 47%, whereas Cys80 was not significantly affected and was thereby shown to be less reactive. The extent of S-glutathiolation of Cys118 by GSSG was 53%, and that of the terminal cysteines was 85%, as estimated by the decrease in ICAT labeling. The changes in ICAT labeling caused by GSSG were reversible by chemical reduction, but those caused by peroxynitrite were irreversible. The quantitative changes in thiol modification caused by GSSG associated with increased activity demonstrate the potential importance of redox modulation of p21ras. PMID:17320764

  3. Inhibiting oncogenic signaling by sorafenib activates PUMA via GSK3β and NF-κB to suppress tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Dudgeon, C; Peng, R; Wang, P; Sebastiani, A; Yu, J; Zhang, L

    2012-11-15

    Aberrant Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling is one of the most prevalent oncogenic alterations and confers survival advantage to tumor cells. Inhibition of this pathway can effectively suppress tumor cell growth. For example, sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor targeting c-Raf and other oncogenic kinases, has been used clinically for treating advanced liver and kidney tumors, and also has shown efficacy against other malignancies. However, how inhibition of oncogenic signaling by sorafenib and other drugs suppresses tumor cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we found that sorafenib kills cancer cells by activating PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a p53 target and a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein. Sorafenib treatment induces PUMA in a variety of cancer cells irrespective of their p53 status. Surprisingly, the induction of PUMA by sorafenib is mediated by IκB-independent activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which directly binds to the PUMA promoter to activate its transcription. NF-κB activation by sorafenib requires glycogen synthase kinase 3β activation, subsequent to ERK inhibition. Deficiency in PUMA abrogates sorafenib-induced apoptosis and caspase activation, and renders sorafenib resistance in colony formation and xenograft tumor assays. Furthermore, the chemosensitization effect of sorafenib is dependent on PUMA, and involves concurrent PUMA induction through different pathways. BH3 mimetics potentiate the anti-cancer effects of sorafenib, and restore sorafenib sensitivity in resistant cells. Together, these results demonstrate a key role of PUMA-dependent apoptosis in therapeutic inhibition of Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. They provide a rationale for manipulating the apoptotic machinery to improve sensitivity and overcome resistance to the therapies that target oncogenic kinase signaling.

  4. A Mouse Strain Defective in Both T Cells and NK Cells Has Enhanced Sensitivity to Tumor Induction by Plasmid DNA Expressing Both Activated H-Ras and c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Sheng-Fowler, Li; Tu, Wei; Fu, Haiqing; Murata, Haruhiko; Lanning, Lynda; Foseh, Gideon; Macauley, Juliete; Blair, Donald; Hughes, Stephen H.; Coffin, John M.; Lewis, Andrew M.; Peden, Keith

    2014-01-01

    As part of safety studies to evaluate the risk of residual cellular DNA in vaccines manufactured in tumorigenic cells, we have been developing in vivo assays to detect and quantify the oncogenic activity of DNA. We generated a plasmid expressing both an activated human H-ras gene and murine c-myc gene and showed that 1 µg of this plasmid, pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc, was capable of inducing tumors in newborn NIH Swiss mice. However, to be able to detect the oncogenicity of dominant activated oncogenes in cellular DNA, a more sensitive system was needed. In this paper, we demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon transgenic mouse, which is defective in both T-cell and NK-cell functions, can detect the oncogenic activity of 25 ng of the circular form of pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc. When this plasmid was inoculated as linear DNA, amounts of DNA as low as 800 pg were capable of inducing tumors. Animals were found that had multiple tumors, and these tumors were independent and likely clonal. These results demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon mouse is highly sensitive for the detection of oncogenic activity of DNA. To determine whether it can detect the oncogenic activity of cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-cell lines (HeLa, A549, HT-1080, and CEM), DNA (100 µg) was inoculated into newborn CD3 epsilon mice both in the presence of 1 µg of linear pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc as positive control and in its absence. While tumors were induced in 100% of mice with the positive-control plasmid, no tumors were induced in mice receiving any of the tumor DNAs alone. These results demonstrate that detection of oncogenes in cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-derived cell lines in this mouse system was not possible; the results also show the importance of including a positive-control plasmid to detect inhibitory effects of the cellular DNA. PMID:25302710

  5. Mitochondrial Activity and Cyr1 Are Key Regulators of Ras1 Activation of C. albicans Virulence Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grahl, Nora; Demers, Elora G.; Lindsay, Allia K.; Harty, Colleen E.; Willger, Sven D.; Piispanen, Amy E.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a major fungal pathogen and a member of the commensal human microflora. The morphological switch from yeast to hyphal growth is associated with disease and many environmental factors are known to influence the yeast-to-hyphae switch. The Ras1-Cyr1-PKA pathway is a major regulator of C. albicans morphogenesis as well as biofilm formation and white-opaque switching. Previous studies have shown that hyphal growth is strongly repressed by mitochondrial inhibitors. Here, we show that mitochondrial inhibitors strongly decreased Ras1 GTP-binding and activity in C. albicans and similar effects were observed in other Candida species. Consistent with there being a connection between respiratory activity and GTP-Ras1 binding, mutants lacking complex I or complex IV grew as yeast in hypha-inducing conditions, had lower levels of GTP-Ras1, and Ras1 GTP-binding was unaffected by respiratory inhibitors. Mitochondria-perturbing agents decreased intracellular ATP concentrations and metabolomics analyses of cells grown with different respiratory inhibitors found consistent perturbation of pyruvate metabolism and the TCA cycle, changes in redox state, increased catabolism of lipids, and decreased sterol content which suggested increased AMP kinase activity. Biochemical and genetic experiments provide strong evidence for a model in which the activation of Ras1 is controlled by ATP levels in an AMP kinase independent manner. The Ras1 GTPase activating protein, Ira2, but not the Ras1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Cdc25, was required for the reduction of Ras1-GTP in response to inhibitor-mediated reduction of ATP levels. Furthermore, Cyr1, a well-characterized Ras1 effector, participated in the control of Ras1-GTP binding in response to decreased mitochondrial activity suggesting a revised model for Ras1 and Cyr1 signaling in which Cyr1 and Ras1 influence each other and, together with Ira2, seem to form a master-regulatory complex necessary to integrate

  6. A primary cardiac leiomyosarcoma with mutation at H-ras codon 12.

    PubMed

    Parissis, J; Arvanitis, D; Sourvinos, G; Spandidos, D

    1997-01-01

    The presence of activating ras mutations in a cardiac leiomyosarcoma which occurred in the right atrium of the heart of a female patient was examined. The tumor had the appearance of leiomyosarcoma in rutine histopathological examination and the definite diagnosis was confirmed by a positive immunohistochemical reaction to smooth muscle actin. Molecular analysis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique showed a point mutation of H-ras gene at codon 12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing ras gene mutation in a cardiac leiomyosarcoma implying a role for the ras oncogenes in the development of this tumor.

  7. MDMX exerts its oncogenic activity via suppression of retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Hu, L; Qiu, W; Deng, T; Zhang, Y; Bergholz, J; Xiao, Z-X

    2015-10-29

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) has a major role in the development of human malignancies. We have previously shown that MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase and major negative regulator of p53, binds to and promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of RB. MDMX, a homolog of MDM2, also binds to and inhibits p53 transactivation activity, yet it does not possess intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Here, we show that MDMX binds to and promotes RB degradation in an MDM2-dependent manner. Specifically, the MDMX C-terminal ring domain binds to the RB C-pocket and enhances MDM2-RB interaction. Silencing MDMX induces RB accumulation, cell cycle arrest and senescence-like phenotypes, which are reverted by simultaneous RB knockdown. Furthermore, MDMX ablation leads to significant retardation of xenograft tumor growth, concomitant with RB accumulation. These results demonstrate that MDMX exerts oncogenic activity via suppression of RB, and suggest that both MDM2 and MDMX could be chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:25703327

  8. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  9. NMR characterization of full-length farnesylated and non-farnesylated H-Ras and its implications for Raf activation.

    PubMed

    Thapar, Roopa; Williams, Jason G; Campbell, Sharon L

    2004-11-01

    The C terminus, also known as the hypervariable region (residues 166-189), of H-, N-, and K-Ras proteins has sequence determinants necessary for full activation of downstream effectors such as Raf kinase and PI-3 kinase as well as for the correct targeting of Ras proteins to lipid rafts and non-raft membranes. There is considerable interest in understanding how residues in the extreme C terminus of the different Ras proteins and farnesylation of the CaaX box cysteine affect Ras membrane localization and allosteric activation of Raf kinase. To provide insights into the structural and dynamic changes that occur in Ras upon farnesylation, we have used NMR spectroscopy to compare the properties of truncated H-Ras (1-166), to non-processed full-length H-Ras (residues 1-185) and full-length (1-189) farnesylated H-Ras. We report that the C-terminal helix alpha-5 extends to residue N172, and the remaining 17 amino acid residues in the C terminus are conformationally averaged in solution. Removal of either 23 or 18 amino acid residues from the C terminus of full length H-Ras generates truncated H-Ras (1-166) and H-Ras (1-171) proteins, respectively, that have been structurally characterized and are biochemical active. Here we report that C-terminal truncation of H-Ras results in minor structural and dynamic perturbations that are propagated throughout the H-Ras protein including increased flexibility of the central beta-sheet and the C-terminal helix alpha-5. Ordering of residues in loop-2, which is involved in Raf CRD binding is also observed. Farnesylation of full-length H-Ras at C186 does not result in detectable conformational changes in H-Ras. Chemical shift mapping studies of farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of H-Ras with the Raf-CRD show that the farnesyl moiety, the extreme H-Ras C terminus and residues 23-30, contribute to H-Ras:Raf-CRD interactions, thereby increasing the affinity of H-Ras for the Raf-CRD.

  10. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A.; Víctor, Víctor M.; Esplugues, Juan V.; Rojas, José M.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys118, suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys118 contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  11. RalA, a GTPase targeted by miR-181a, promotes transformation and progression by activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaochuang; Yang, Juhua; Li, Yumin; Li, Tianfu; Wang, Ruirui; Fei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    BCR/ABL is a well-known activator of multiple signaling pathways. RalA, a Ras downstream signaling molecule and a small GTPase, plays an important role in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemogenesis but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here, we show that RalA GTPase activity is commonly high in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines and patient samples. Overexpression of RalA results in malignant transformation and progression, and induces resistance to imatinib (IM) in BaF3 and K562 cell lines. RalA reduced survival and led to IM resistance in a xenografted mouse model. Ablation of RalA by either siRNA or miR-181a, a RalA targeting microRNA, attenuated the malignant phenotypes in K562 cells. RBC8, a selective Ral inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of IM in K562, KCL22 and BaF3-P210 cells. Interestingly, the phospho-specific protein microarray assay revealed that multiple phosphorylation signal proteins were decreased by RalA inhibition, including SAPK, JNK, SRC, VEGFR2, P38 MAPK, c-Kit, JunB, and Keratin18. Among them, P38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK are Ras downstream signaling kinases. Taken together, RalA GTPase might be an important oncogene activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in CML. PMID:26967392

  12. RGS6 Suppresses Ras-induced Cellular Transformation by Facilitating Tip60-mediated Dnmt1 Degradation and Promoting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jie; Stewart, Adele; Maity, Biswanath; Hagen, Jussara; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Yang, Jianqi; Quelle, Dawn E.; Brenner, Charles; Fisher, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    The RAS protooncogene plays a central role in regulation of cell proliferation, and point mutations leading to oncogenic activation of Ras occur in a large number of human cancers. Silencing of tumor suppressor genes by DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is essential for oncogenic cellular transformation by Ras, and Dnmt1 is over-expressed in numerous human cancers. Here we provide new evidence that the pleiotropic Regulator of G protein Signaling (RGS) family member RGS6 suppresses Ras-induced cellular transformation by facilitating Tip60-mediated degradation of Dmnt1 and promoting apoptosis. Employing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild type (WT) and RGS6−/− mice, we found that oncogenic Ras induced up-regulation of RGS6, which in turn blocked Ras-induced cellular transformation. RGS6 functions to suppress cellular transformation in response to oncogenic Ras by down regulating Dnmt1 protein expression leading to inhibition of Dnmt1-mediated anti-apoptotic activity. Further experiments showed that RGS6 functions as a scaffolding protein for both Dnmt1 and Tip60 and is required for Tip60-mediated acetylation of Dnmt1 and subsequent Dnmt1 ubiquitylation and degradation. The RGS domain of RGS6, known only for its GAP activity toward Gα subunits, was sufficient to mediate Tip60 association with RGS6. This work demonstrates a novel signaling action for RGS6 in negative regulation of oncogene-induced transformation and provides new insights into our understanding of the mechanisms underlying Ras-induced oncogenic transformation and regulation of Dnmt1 expression. Importantly, these findings identify RGS6 as an essential cellular defender against oncogenic stress and a potential therapeutic target for developing new cancer treatments. PMID:23995786

  13. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed

    Downward, Julian

    2015-04-15

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacologic approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be "undruggable." This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS-mutant but not wild-type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS-mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a reevaluation of the approaches taken. On the basis of experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS-mutant cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1802-9. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878361

  14. RNF4-Dependent Oncogene Activation by Protein Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jane J; Abed, Mona; Heuberger, Julian; Novak, Rostislav; Zohar, Yaniv; Beltran Lopez, Angela P; Trausch-Azar, Julie S; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G; Benhamou, David; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kopan, Raphael; Birchmeier, Walter; Schwartz, Alan L; Orian, Amir

    2016-09-20

    Ubiquitylation regulates signaling pathways critical for cancer development and, in many cases, targets proteins for degradation. Here, we report that ubiquitylation by RNF4 stabilizes otherwise short-lived oncogenic transcription factors, including β-catenin, Myc, c-Jun, and the Notch intracellular-domain (N-ICD) protein. RNF4 enhances the transcriptional activity of these factors, as well as Wnt- and Notch-dependent gene expression. While RNF4 is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, protein stabilization requires the substrate's phosphorylation, rather than SUMOylation, and binding to RNF4's arginine-rich motif domain. Stabilization also involves generation of unusual polyubiquitin chains and docking of RNF4 to chromatin. Biologically, RNF4 enhances the tumor phenotype and is essential for cancer cell survival. High levels of RNF4 mRNA correlate with poor survival of a subgroup of breast cancer patients, and RNF4 protein levels are elevated in 30% of human colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, RNF4-dependent ubiquitylation translates transient phosphorylation signal(s) into long-term protein stabilization, resulting in enhanced oncoprotein activation. PMID:27653698

  15. Role of neuronal ras activity in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition.

    PubMed

    Manns, Martina; Leske, Oliver; Gottfried, Sebastian; Bichler, Zoë; Lafenêtre, Pauline; Wahle, Petra; Heumann, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is modulated by various signals like growth factors, hormones, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters. All of these factors can (but not necessarily do) converge on the activation of the G protein Ras. We used a transgenic mouse model (synRas mice) expressing constitutively activated G12V-Harvey Ras selectively in differentiated neurons to investigate the possible effects onto neurogenesis. H-Ras activation in neurons attenuates hippocampal precursor cell generation at an early stage of the proliferative cascade before neuronal lineage determination occurs. Therefore it is unlikely that the transgenically activated H-Ras in neurons mediates this effect by a direct, intracellular signaling mechanism. Voluntary exercise restores neurogenesis up to wild type level presumably mediated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Reduced neurogenesis is linked to impairments in spatial short-term memory and object recognition, the latter can be rescued by voluntary exercise, as well. These data support the view that new cells significantly increase complexity that can be processed by the hippocampal network when experience requires high demands to associate stimuli over time and/or space.

  16. Ras and GTPase-activating protein (GAP) drive GTP into a precatalytic state as revealed by combining FTIR and biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Rudack, Till; Xia, Fei; Schlitter, Jürgen; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2012-09-18

    Members of the Ras superfamily regulate many cellular processes. They are down-regulated by a GTPase reaction in which GTP is cleaved into GDP and P(i) by nucleophilic attack of a water molecule. Ras proteins accelerate GTP hydrolysis by a factor of 10(5) compared to GTP in water. GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) accelerate hydrolysis by another factor of 10(5) compared to Ras alone. Oncogenic mutations in Ras and GAPs slow GTP hydrolysis and are a factor in many cancers. Here, we elucidate in detail how this remarkable catalysis is brought about. We refined the protein-bound GTP structure and protein-induced charge shifts within GTP beyond the current resolution of X-ray structural models by combining quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics simulations with time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The simulations were validated by comparing experimental and theoretical IR difference spectra. The reactant structure of GTP is destabilized by Ras via a conformational change from a staggered to an eclipsed position of the nonbridging oxygen atoms of the γ- relative to the β-phosphates and the further rotation of the nonbridging oxygen atoms of α- relative to the β- and γ-phosphates by GAP. Further, the γ-phosphate becomes more positive although two of its oxygen atoms remain negative. This facilitates the nucleophilic attack by the water oxygen at the phosphate and proton transfer to the oxygen. Detailed changes in geometry and charge distribution in the ligand below the resolution of X-ray structure analysis are important for catalysis. Such high resolution appears crucial for the understanding of enzyme catalysis.

  17. Activated Ras Induces Cytoplasmic Vacuolation and Non-Apoptotic Death in Glioblastoma Cells via Novel Effector Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Expression of activated H-Ras induces a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death in human glioblastoma cells and other specific tumor cell lines. The major cytopathological features of this form of death are the accumulation of large phase-lucent, LAMP1-positive, cytoplasmic vacuoles and increased autophagic activity. In this study we sought to determine if induction of cytoplasmic vacuolation a) depends on Ras farnesylation, b) is specific to H-Ras, and c) is mediated by signaling through the major known Ras effector pathways. We find that the unusual effects of activated H-Ras depend on farnesylation and membrane association of the GTPase. Both H-Ras(G12V) and K-Ras4B(G12V) stimulate vacuolation, but activated forms of Cdc42 and RhoA do not. Amino acid substitutions in the Ras effector domain, which are known to selectively impair its interactions with Raf kinase, class-I phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), or Ral nucleotide exchange factors, initially pointed to Raf as a possible mediator of cell vacuolation. However, the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, did not block the induction of vacuoles, and constitutively active Raf-Caax did not mimic the effects of Ras(G12V). Introduction of normal PTEN together with H-Ras(G12V) into U251 glioblastoma cells reduced the PI3K-dependent activation of Akt, but had no effect on vacuolation. Finally, co-expression of H-Ras(G12V) with a dominant-negative form of RalA did not suppress vacuolation. Taken together, the observations indicate that Ras activates non-conventional and perhaps unique effector pathways to induce cytoplasmic vacuolation in glioblastoma cells. Identification of the relevant signaling pathways may uncover specific molecular targets that can be manipulated to activate non-apoptotic cell death in this type of cancer. PMID:17210246

  18. RAS - Screens & Assays

    Cancer.gov

    A primary goal of the RAS Initiative is to develop assays for RAS activity, localization, and signaling and adapt those assays so they can be used for finding new drug candidates. Explore the work leading to highly validated screening protocols.

  19. RAS Mutations and Oncogenesis: Not all RAS Mutations are Created Equally

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark Steven; Miller, Lance D.

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in RAS proteins is one of the most common genetic alterations observed in human and experimentally induced rodent cancers. In vivo, oncogenic mutations have been shown to occur at exons 12, 13, and 61, resulting in any 1 of 19 possible point mutations in a given tumor for a specific RAS isoform. While some studies have suggested a possible role of different mutant alleles in determining tumor severity and phenotype, no general consensus has emerged on the oncogenicity of different mutant alleles in tumor formation and progression. Part of this may be due to a lack of a single, signature pathway that shows significant alterations between different mutations. Rather, it is likely that subtle differences in the activation, or lack thereof, of downstream effectors by different RAS mutant alleles may determine the eventual outcome in terms of tumor phenotype. This paper reviews our current understanding of the potential role of different RAS mutations on tumorigenesis, highlights studies in model cell culture and in vivo systems, and discusses the potential of expression array and computational network modeling to dissect out differences in activated RAS genes in conferring a transforming phenotype. PMID:22303394

  20. N-terminally myristoylated Ras proteins require palmitoylation or a polybasic domain for plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Cadwallader, K A; Paterson, H; Macdonald, S G; Hancock, J F

    1994-07-01

    Plasma membrane targeting of Ras requires CAAX motif modifications together with a second signal from an adjacent polybasic domain or nearby cysteine palmitoylation sites. N-terminal myristoylation is known to restore membrane binding to H-ras C186S (C-186 is changed to S), a mutant protein in which all CAAX processing is abolished. We show here that myristoylated H-ras C186S is a substrate for palmitoyltransferase, despite the absence of C-terminal farnesylation, and that palmitoylation is absolutely required for plasma membrane targeting of myristoylated H-ras. Similarly, the polybasic domain is required for specific plasma membrane targeting of myristoylated K-ras. In contrast, the combination of myristoylation plus farnesylation results in the mislocalization of Ras to numerous intracellular membranes. Ras that is only myristoylated does not bind with a high affinity to any membrane. The specific targeting of Ras to the plasma membrane is therefore critically dependent on signals that are contained in the hypervariable domain but can be supported by N-terminal myristoylation or C-terminal prenylation. Interestingly, oncogenic Ras G12V that is localized correctly to the plasma membrane leads to mitogen-activated protein kinase activation irrespective of the combination of targeting signals used for localization, whereas Ras G12V that is mislocalized to the cytosol or to other membranes activates mitogen-activated protein kinase only if the Ras protein is farnesylated.

  1. Imaging of Ras/Raf activity induced by low energy laser irradiation in living cell using FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Xing, Da

    2005-01-01

    Ras/Raf signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway that governs cell proliferation, differential and apoptosis. Low-energy laser irradiation (LELI) was found to modulate various processes. Generally, cell proliferation is induced by low doses LELI and apoptosis is induced by high doses LELI. Mechanism of biological effect of LELI has not been clear. Recently, activation of MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), which are downstream protein kinases of Ras/Raf, are observed during LELI-induced cell proliferation by immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. RaichuRas reporter consisting of fusions of H-ras, the Ras-binding domain of Raf (RafRBD), a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Therefore, intramolecular binding of GTP-Ras to RafRBD brings CFP close to YFP and increases FRET between CFP and YFP. Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (ASTC-a-1) was transfected with the plasmid (pRaichuRas) and then treated with LELI at dose of 60J/cm2. Effect of LELI on Ras/Raf in physiological condition of living cells was observed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique during lung adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis induced by high dose (60J/cm2) LELI. Experimental results showed that after high dose LELI treatment, the binding of Ras and Raf decreases obviously, Ras/Raf signaling pathway deregulates and cell apoptosis occurs.

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Pamela Y.; Johnson, Christian W.; Fang, Cong; Cao, Xiaoqing; Graeber, Thomas G.; Mattos, Carla; Colicelli, John

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins are signal transduction gatekeepers that mediate cell growth, survival, and differentiation through interactions with multiple effector proteins. The RAS effector RAS- and RAB-interacting protein 1 (RIN1) activates its own downstream effectors, the small GTPase RAB5 and the tyrosine kinase Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase (ABL), to modulate endocytosis and cytoskeleton remodeling. To identify ABL substrates downstream of RAS-to-RIN1 signaling, we examined human HEK293T cells overexpressing components of this pathway. Proteomic analysis revealed several novel phosphotyrosine peptides, including Harvey rat sarcoma oncogene (HRAS)-pTyr137. Here we report that ABL phosphorylates tyrosine 137 of H-, K-, and NRAS. Increased RIN1 levels enhanced HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation by nearly 5-fold, suggesting that RAS-stimulated RIN1 can drive ABL-mediated RAS modification in a feedback circuit. Tyr137 is well conserved among RAS orthologs and is part of a transprotein H-bond network. Crystal structures of HRASY137F and HRASY137E revealed conformation changes radiating from the mutated residue. Although consistent with Tyr137 participation in allosteric control of HRAS function, the mutations did not alter intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates in vitro. HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation enhanced HRAS signaling capacity in cells, however, as reflected by a 4-fold increase in the association of phosphorylated HRASG12V with its effector protein RAF proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase 1 (RAF1). These data suggest that RAS phosphorylation at Tyr137 allosterically alters protein conformation and effector binding, providing a mechanism for effector-initiated modulation of RAS signaling.—Ting, P. Y., Johnson, C. W., Fang, C., Cao, X., Graeber, T. G., Mattos, C., Colicelli, J. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding. PMID:25999467

  3. Nonradioactive methods for detecting activation of Ras-related small G proteins.

    PubMed

    Andres, Douglas A

    2004-01-01

    Ras-related small GTPases serve as critical regulators for a wide range of cellular signaling pathways and are activated by the conversion of the GDP-bound state to the GTP-bound conformation. Until recently, measurement of the GTP-bound active form of Ras-related G proteins involved immunoprecipitation of 32P-labeled protein followed by separation of the labeled GTP/GDP bound to GTPase. A new method based on the large affinity difference of the GTP- and GDP-bound form of Ras proteins for specific binding domains of effector proteins in vitro has been developed. By using glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins containing these binding domains, the GTP-bound form of the GTPase can be precipitated from cell lysates. In principle, this method can be used for all members of the Ras superfamily. Here we describe a general procedure to monitor the GTP-bound form of Ras-related GTPases. PMID:15173615

  4. Identification of murine homologues of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene: potential activators of ras.

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, D; Fu, P; Simon, M; Senior, P

    1992-01-01

    Several findings suggest that signals from tyrosine kinases are transduced, at least in part, through ras proteins. These findings include (i) blockage of the transforming activity of constitutively active tyrosine kinases by inhibiting ras function and (ii) genetic screens in Caenorhabditis elegans and in Drosophila that identified ras genes as downstream effectors of tyrosine kinases. The recently isolated Drosophila gene Son of sevenless (Sos) is postulated to act as a positive regulatory link between tyrosine kinase and ras proteins by catalyzing exchange of GDP for GTP on ras protein. Such exchange proteins have been reported in extracts of mammalian cells but have not been previously characterized at a molecular level. As Sos appears to function in this role in Drosophila, we sought to isolate a vertebrate counterpart(s). We have characterized two widely expressed murine genes with a high degree of homology to Sos. Hybridization with human DNA and RNA indicates a high degree of conservation of these genes in other vertebrates. Images PMID:1631150

  5. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases in activated c-ras-Ha-transfected immortalized human keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Meade-Tollin, L. C.; Boukamp, P.; Fusenig, N. E.; Bowen, C. P.; Tsang, T. C.; Bowden, G. T.

    1998-01-01

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of secreted proteinases that degrade matrix components of basement membranes and connective tissues, is strongly correlated with malignant expression in various human epithelial cancers and epithelial cancer cell lines. We have tested whether elevated levels of MMP expression are also associated with malignant progression in human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Constitutive levels of expression of steady-state mRNA and of secreted protein encoded by three MMP genes (matrilysin, gelatinases A and B) were compared in a unique in vitro model of human skin carcinogenesis. This model is composed of the parental immortalized non-tumorigenic human keratinocyte line (HaCaT), and three activated c-Harvey-ras-oncogene transfected variants (A-4, I-7 and II-4). Although clone A-4 is non-tumorigenic, clones I-7 and II-4 exhibit benign and malignant tumorigenic phenotypes, respectively, after subcutaneous injection into athymic nude mice. Northern blot, Western blot, and zymogram analyses revealed three MMP-specific patterns of expression. Constitutive matrilysin mRNA expression was markedly increased in the I-7 cells compared with HaCaT, A-4 or II-4 cells. Secreted promatrilysin was distinctly increased in the tumorigenic I-7 and II-4 cells compared with the non-tumorigenic HaCaT and A-4 cells. Gelatinase A mRNA and secreted gelatinase A protein levels were increased in each transfectant compared with HaCaT. Both active and inactive forms of gelatinase A were detected. Gelatinase B transcripts were not detected, but an EDTA-inhibitable gelatinase activity comigrating with gelatinase B was moderately enhanced in both tumorigenic variants compared with the non-tumorigenic cells. Because promatrilysin and 92-kDa gelatinase secretion were increased in both benign and malignant tumorigenic cells, and not related to invasiveness in this model, it is concluded that enhanced constitutive expression of these two MMPs

  6. K-Ras Promotes Tumorigenicity through Suppression of Non-canonical Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-Tzu; Holderfield, Matthew; Galeas, Jacqueline; Delrosario, Reyno; To, Minh D; Balmain, Allan; McCormick, Frank

    2015-11-19

    K-Ras and H-Ras share identical effectors and have similar properties; however, the high degree of tumor-type specificity associated with K-Ras and H-Ras mutations suggests that they have unique roles in oncogenesis. Here, we report that oncogenic K-Ras, but not H-Ras, suppresses non-canonical Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling, an effect that contributes strongly to its tumorigenic properties. K-Ras does this by binding to calmodulin and so reducing CaMKii activity and expression of Fzd8. Restoring Fzd8 in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cells suppresses malignancy, whereas depletion of Fzd8 in H-Ras(V12)-transformed cells enhances their tumor initiating capacity. Interrupting K-Ras-calmodulin binding using genetic means or by treatment with an orally active protein kinase C (PKC)-activator, prostratin, represses tumorigenesis in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer cells. These findings provide an alternative way to selectively target this "undruggable" protein.

  7. RasGRP1 Transgenic Mice Develop Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Response to Skin Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Federico R.; Garrido, Ann A.; Sharma, Amrish; Luke, Courtney T.; Stone, James C.; Dower, Nancy A.; Cline, J. Mark; Lorenzo, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Models of epidermal carcinogenesis have demonstrated that Ras is a critical molecule involved in tumor initiation and progression. Previously, we have shown that RasGRP1 increases the susceptibility of mice to skin tumorigenesis when overexpressed in the epidermis by a transgenic approach, related to its ability to activate Ras. Moreover, RasGRP1 transgenic mice develop spontaneous papillomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, some of which appear to originate in sites of injury, suggesting that RasGRP1 may be responding to signals generated during the wound-healing process. In this study, we examined the response of the RasGRP1 transgenic animals to full-thickness incision wounding of the skin, and demonstrated that they respond by developing tumors along the wounded site. The tumors did not present mutations in the H-ras gene, but Rasgrp1 transgene dosage correlated with tumor susceptibility and size. Analysis of serum cytokines showed increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in transgenic animals after wounding. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with primary keratinocytes showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulated Ras activation, although RasGRP1 was dispensable for this effect. Since granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has been recently associated with proliferation of skin cancer cells, our results may help in the elucidation of pathways that activate Ras in the epidermis during tumorigenesis in the absence of oncogenic ras mutations. PMID:19497993

  8. Elevated levels of a specific class of nuclear phosphoproteins in cells transformed with v-ras and v-mos oncogenes and by cotransfection with c-myc and polyoma middle T genes.

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, V; Pani, B; D'Andrea, P; Berlingieri, M T; Di Fiore, P P; Fusco, A; Vecchio, G; Philp, R; Crane-Robinson, C; Nicolas, R H

    1987-01-01

    Transformation of a rat thyroid epithelial cell line (FRTL5-C12) with Kirsten and Harvey murine sarcoma viruses (carrying the ras oncogenes) results in elevated levels of three perchloric acid-soluble nuclear phosphoproteins. These three proteins are also induced to high levels in the PC-C13 thyroid epithelial cell line when transformed by the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (carrying the v-mos oncogene) and when transformed by transfection with the c-myc proto-oncogene followed by infection with the polyoma leukaemia virus (PyMuLV) carry the polyoma middle T antigen gene. Neither c-myc or PyMuLV alone induced high levels of the three nuclear proteins. Untransformed thyroid fibroblasts have high levels of two of the three proteins and can be transformed by PyMuLV alone resulting in the appearance of the third protein. Transformation with Harvey sarcoma virus also results in the induction of the third protein. The three phosphoproteins have been purified by h.p.l.c. and shown to be related to the HeLa protein HMGI already described. The results of these studies indicate that elevated levels of these HMGI-like proteins are associated with neoplastic transformation and/or with an undifferentiated phenotype. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2820715

  9. H-ras oncogene-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single metalloprotease capable of degrading basement membrane collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, I.E.; Wilhelm, S.M.; Eisen, A.Z.; Marmer, B.L.; Grant, G.A.; Seltzer, J.L.; Kronberger, A.; He, C.; Bauer, E.A.; Goldberg, G.I.

    1988-05-15

    H-ras transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single major extracellular matrix metalloprotease which is not found in the normal parental cells. The enzyme is secreted in a latent form which can be activated to catalyze the cleavage of the basement membrane macromolecule type IV collagen. The substrates in their order of preference are: gelatin, type IV collagen, type V collagen, fibronectin, and type VII collagen; but the enzyme does not cleave the interstitial collagens or laminin. This protease is identical to gelatinase isolated from normal human skin explants, normal human skin fibroblasts, and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts. Based on this ability to initiate the degradation of type IV collagen in a pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule, it will be referred to as type IV collagenase. This enzyme is most likely the human analog of type IV collagenase detected in several rodent tumors. Type IV collagenase consists of three domains. Type IV collagenase represents the third member of a newly recognized gene family coding for secreted extracellular matrix metalloproteases, which includes interstitial fibroblast collagenase and stromelysin.

  10. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Direct Attack on RAS: Intramolecular Communication and Mutation-Specific Effects.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Kendra; Mattos, Carla

    2015-04-15

    The crystal structure of RAS was first solved 25 years ago. In spite of tremendous and sustained efforts, there are still no drugs in the clinic that directly target this major driver of human cancers. Recent success in the discovery of compounds that bind RAS and inhibit signaling has fueled renewed enthusiasm, and in-depth understanding of the structure and function of RAS has opened new avenues for direct targeting. To succeed, we must focus on the molecular details of the RAS structure and understand at a high-resolution level how the oncogenic mutants impair function. Structural networks of intramolecular communication between the RAS active site and membrane-interacting regions on the G-domain are disrupted in oncogenic mutants. Although conserved across the isoforms, these networks are near hot spots of protein-ligand interactions with amino acid composition that varies among RAS proteins. These differences could have an effect on stabilization of conformational states of interest in attenuating signaling through RAS. The development of strategies to target these novel sites will add a fresh direction in the quest to conquer RAS-driven cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1810-8. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878362

  12. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed Central

    Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacological approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be “undruggable.” This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS mutant but not wild type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a re-evaluation of the approaches taken. Based on experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS mutant cancers. PMID:25878361

  13. Active Ras Triggers Death in Glioblastoma Cells Through Hyperstimulation of Macropinocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Overmeyer, Jean H.; Kaul, Aparna; Johnson, Erin E.; Maltese, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of activated Ras in glioblastoma cells induces accumulation of large phase-lucent cytoplasmic vacuoles, followed by cell death. This was previously described as autophagic cell death. However, unlike autophagosomes, the Ras-induced vacuoles are not bounded by a double membrane and do not sequester organelles or cytoplasm. Moreover, they are not acidic and do not contain the autophagosomal membrane protein, LC3-II. Here we show that the vacuoles are enlarged macropinosomes. They rapidly incorporate extracellular fluid-phase tracers, but do not sequester transferrin or the endosomal protein, EEA1. Ultimately, the cells expressing activated Ras detach from the substratum and rupture, coincident with the displacement of cytoplasm with huge macropinosome-derived vacuoles. These changes are accompanied by caspase activation, but the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, z-VAD, does not prevent cell death. Moreover, the majority of degenerating cells do not exhibit chromatin condensation typical of apoptosis. These observations provide evidence for a necrosis-like form of cell death initiated by dysregulation of macropinocytosis, which we have dubbed ‘methuosis’. An activated form of the Rac1 GTPase induces a similar form of cell death, suggesting that Ras acts through Rac-dependent signaling pathways to hyperstimulate macropinocytosis in glioblastoma. Further study of these signaling pathways may lead to the identification of other chemical and physiological triggers for this unusual form of cell death. PMID:18567800

  14. Cooperative interactions of PTEN deficiency and RAS activation in melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjung

    2010-11-01

    Melanoma displays frequent activation of RAS/RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways as well as inactivation of CDKN2A (INK4a/ARF) and PTEN tumor suppressors via genetic and epigenetic alterations. Pathogenetic roles of these melanoma-prone mutations and their genetic interactions have been established in genetically engineered mouse models. Here, we catalog frequent genetic alterations observed in human melanomas and describe mouse models of melanoma initiation and progression, including our recent study that investigated the genetic interactions of RAS activation and PTEN loss in a CDKN2A (INK4a/ARF) null melanoma prone genetic background. We showed that loss of PTEN cooperates with HRAS activation, leading to increased development of melanoma and emergence of metastasis. Moreover, we observed that RNA i-mediated PTEN inactivation in RAS-driven melanomas enhanced migration and invasion with concomitant downregulation of E-cadherin, the major regulator of epithelial and mesenchymal transition, and enhanced AKT2 phosphorylation, which has been previously linked to invasion and metastasis of several cancer types, including breast and ovary. These data show that activated RAS cooperates with PTEN loss in melanoma genesis and progression.

  15. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis. PMID:27501536

  16. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis.

  17. Interferon gamma activation of Raf-1 is Jak1-dependent and p21ras-independent.

    PubMed

    Sakatsume, M; Stancato, L F; David, M; Silvennoinen, O; Saharinen, P; Pierce, J; Larner, A C; Finbloom, D S

    1998-01-30

    Signal transduction through the interferongamma (IFNgamma) receptor involves the formation of a ligand-dependent multimolecular association of receptor chains (alpha and beta), Janus tyrosine kinases (Jak1 and Jak2), and the transcription factor (signal transducers and activators of transcription 1alpha (STAT1alpha)) in addition to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Interactions between components of the Jak/STAT cascade and the p21(ras)/Raf-1/MAPK cascade are unexplored. Treatment of HeLa cells with IFNgamma resulted in the rapid and transient activation of Raf-1 and MAPK. Parallel activation of cells resulted in essentially no enhancement of p21(ras) activation despite marked enhancement after treatment with epidermal growth factor. In HeLa (E1C3) and fibrosarcoma (U4A) cell lines, both of which are deficient in Jak1 kinase, Raf-1 activation by IFNgamma was absent. Reconstitution of Raf-1 activity was observed only with kinase active Jak1 in both cell lines. In COS cells, transient expression of wild type or kinase-inactive Jak1 coimmunoprecipitated with Raf-1, but activation of Raf-1 activity was only observed in cells expressing kinase-active Jak1. These observations suggest that a kinase-active Jak1 is required for IFNgamma activation of Raf-1 that is p21(ras)-independent.

  18. Effect of cellular determination on oncogenic transformation by chemicals and oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, M A; Gonzales, F; Jones, P A

    1988-01-01

    Three developmentally determined myogenic cell lines derived from C3H 10T1/2 C18 (10T1/2) mouse embryo cells treated with 5-azacytidine were compared with the parental 10T1/2 line for their susceptibility to oncogenic transformation by 3-methylcholanthrene or the activated human c-Ha-ras oncogene. Neither the 10T1/2 cells nor the myogenic derivatives grew in soft agar or formed tumors in nude mice. In contrast to 10T1/2 cells, the three myogenic derivatives were not susceptible to transformation by 3-methylcholanthrene, so that cellular determination altered the response of 10T1/2 cells to chemical carcinogen. On the other hand, all cell types were transformed to a tumorigenic phenotype following transfection with the activated c-Ha-ras gene. The transfected myogenic cells expressed both the c-Ha-ras gene and the muscle determination gene MyoD1. In contrast to other reports, the presence of as many as six copies of the c-Ha-ras gene per genome did not prevent the formation of striated muscle cells which expressed immunologically detectable muscle-specific myosin. The expression of the c-Ha-ras gene does not therefore necessarily preclude the expression of the determination gene for myogenesis or prevent end-stage myogenic differentiation. Images PMID:2460742

  19. Increased expression of the Ras suppressor Rsu-1 enhances Erk-2 activation and inhibits Jun kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Masuelli, L; Cutler, M L

    1996-10-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the effect of the Ras suppressor Rsu-1 on Ras signal transduction pathways in two different cell backgrounds. An expression vector containing the mouse rsu-1 cDNA under the control of a mouse mammary tumor virus promoter was introduced into NIH 3T3 cells and the pheochromocytoma cell line PC12. Cell lines developed in the NIH 3T3 background expressed p33rsu-1 at approximately twice the normal endogenous level. However, PC12 cell clones which expressed p33rsu-1 at an increased level in a regulatable fashion in response to dexamethasone were isolated. Analysis of proteins involved in regulation of Ras and responsive to Ras signal transduction revealed similar changes in the two cell backgrounds in the presence of elevated p33rsu-1. There was an increase in the level of SOS, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and an increase in the percentage of GTP-bound Ras. In addition, there was an increase in the amount of p120 Ras-specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GAP-associated p190. However, a decrease in Ras GTPase-activating activity was detected in lysates of the Rsu-1 transfectants, and immunoprecipitated p120 GAP from the Rsu-1 transfectants showed less Ras GTPase-activating activity than GAP from control cells. Activation of Erk-2 kinase by growth factor and tetradecanyol phorbol acetate was greater in the Rsu-1 transfectants than in control cells. However, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase activity (Jun kinase) was not activatable by epidermal growth factor in Rsu-1 PC12 cell transfectants, in contrast to the PC12 vector control cell line. Transient expression of p33rsu-1 in Cos1 cells following cotransfection with either hemagglutinin-tagged Jun kinase or hemagglutinin-tagged Erk-2 revealed that Rsu-1 expression inhibited constitutive Jun kinase activity while enhancing Erk-2 activity. Detection of in vitro binding of Rsu-1 to Raf-1 suggested that in Rsu-1 transfectants, increased activation of the Raf-1 pathway occurred

  20. Inhibition of SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation of Ras suppresses oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Burrell, Kelly; Heir, Pardeep; Zeng, Lifan; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Kano, Yoshihito; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Zadeh, Gelareh; Ohh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ras is phosphorylated on a conserved tyrosine at position 32 within the switch I region via Src kinase. This phosphorylation inhibits the binding of effector Raf while promoting the engagement of GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GTP hydrolysis. Here we identify SHP2 as the ubiquitously expressed tyrosine phosphatase that preferentially binds to and dephosphorylates Ras to increase its association with Raf and activate downstream proliferative Ras/ERK/MAPK signalling. In comparison to normal astrocytes, SHP2 activity is elevated in astrocytes isolated from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-prone H-Ras(12V) knock-in mice as well as in glioma cell lines and patient-derived GBM specimens exhibiting hyperactive Ras. Pharmacologic inhibition of SHP2 activity attenuates cell proliferation, soft-agar colony formation and orthotopic GBM growth in NOD/SCID mice and decelerates the progression of low-grade astrocytoma to GBM in a spontaneous transgenic glioma mouse model. These results identify SHP2 as a direct activator of Ras and a potential therapeutic target for cancers driven by a previously ‘undruggable' oncogenic or hyperactive Ras. PMID:26617336

  1. The cytokine-activated tyrosine kinase JAK2 activates Raf-1 in a p21ras-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xia, K; Mukhopadhyay, N K; Inhorn, R C; Barber, D L; Rose, P E; Lee, R S; Narsimhan, R P; D'Andrea, A D; Griffin, J D; Roberts, T M

    1996-10-15

    JAK2, a member of the Janus kinase superfamily was found to interact functionally with Raf-1, a central component of the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway. Interferon-gamma and several other cytokines that are known to activate JAK2 kinase were also found to stimulate Raf-1 kinase activity toward MEK-1 in mammalian cells. In the baculovirus coexpression system, Raf-1 was activated by JAK2 in the presence of p21ras. Under these conditions, a ternary complex of p21ras, JAK2, and Raf-1 was observed. In contrast, in the absence of p21ras, coexpression of JAK2 and Raf-1 resulted in an overall decrease in the Raf-1 kinase activity. In addition, JAK2 phosphorylated Raf-1 at sites different from those phosphorylated by pp60v-src. In mammalian cells treated with either erythropoietin or interferon-gamma, a small fraction of Raf-1 coimmunoprecipitated with JAK2 in lysates of cells in which JAK2 was activated as judged by its state of tyrosine phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest that JAK2 and p21ras cooperate to activate Raf-1.

  2. A WXW motif is required for the anticancer activity of the TAT-RasGAP317-326 peptide.

    PubMed

    Barras, David; Chevalier, Nadja; Zoete, Vincent; Dempsey, Rosemary; Lapouge, Karine; Olayioye, Monilola A; Michielin, Olivier; Widmann, Christian

    2014-08-22

    TAT-RasGAP317-326, a cell-permeable 10-amino acid-long peptide derived from the N2 fragment of p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis induced by various anticancer therapies. This RasGAP-derived peptide, by targeting the deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC1) tumor suppressor, also hampers cell migration and invasion by promoting cell adherence and by inhibiting cell movement. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each amino acid within the RasGAP317-326 sequence for the anticancer activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326. We report here that the first three amino acids of this sequence, tryptophan, methionine, and tryptophan (WMW), are necessary and sufficient to sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and to reduce cell migration. The WMW motif was found to be critical for the binding of fragment N2 to DLC1. These results define the interaction mode between the active anticancer sequence of RasGAP and DLC1. This knowledge will facilitate the design of small molecules bearing the tumor-sensitizing and antimetastatic activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326.

  3. Ras-dependent and -independent pathways target the mitogen-activated protein kinase network in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, D; Hipskind, R A; Krautwald, S; Reimann, T; Baccarini, M

    1995-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are activated upon a variety of extracellular stimuli in different cells. In macrophages, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) stimulates proliferation, while bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits cell growth and causes differentiation and activation. Both CSF-1 and LPS rapidly activate the MAPK network and induce the phosphorylation of two distinct ternary complex factors (TCFs), TCF/Elk and TCF/SAP. CSF-1, but not LPS, stimulated the formation of p21ras. GTP complexes. Expression of a dominant negative ras mutant reduced, but did not abolish, CSF-1-mediated stimulation of MEK and MAPK. In contrast, activation of the MEK kinase Raf-1 was Ras independent. Treatment with the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor D609 suppressed LPS-mediated, but not CSF-1-mediated, activation of Raf-1, MEK, and MAPK. Similarly, down-regulation or inhibition of protein kinase C blocked MEK and MAPK induction by LPS but not that by CSF-1. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate pretreatment led to the sustained activation of the Raf-1 kinase but not that of MEK and MAPK. Thus, activated Raf-1 alone does not support MEK/MAPK activation in macrophages. Phosphorylation of TCF/Elk but not that of TCF/SAP was blocked by all treatments that interfered with MAPK activation, implying that TCF/SAP was targeted by a MAPK-independent pathway. Therefore, CSF-1 and LPS target the MAPK network by two alternative pathways, both of which induce Raf-1 activation. The mitogenic pathway depends on Ras activity, while the differentiation signal relies on protein kinase C and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation. PMID:7799956

  4. Approaching real-time molecular diagnostics: single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) detection for the analysis of low abundant point mutations in K-ras oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Wabuyele, Musundi B; Farquar, Hannah; Stryjewski, Wieslaw; Hammer, Robert P; Soper, Steven A; Cheng, Yu-Wei; Barany, Francis

    2003-06-11

    The aim of this study was to develop new strategies for analyzing molecular signatures of disease states approaching real-time using single pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) to rapidly detect point mutations in unamplified genomic DNA. In addition, the detection process was required to discriminate between normal and mutant (minority) DNAs in heterogeneous populations. The discrimination was carried out using allele-specific primers, which flanked the point mutation in the target gene and were ligated using a thermostable ligase enzyme only when the genomic DNA carried this mutation. The allele-specific primers also carried complementary stem structures with end-labels (donor/acceptor fluorescent dyes, Cy5/Cy5.5, respectively), which formed a molecular beacon following ligation. We coupled ligase detection reaction (LDR) with spFRET to identify a single base mutation in codon 12 of a K-ras oncogene that has high diagnostic value for colorectal cancers. A simple diode laser-based fluorescence system capable of interrogating single fluorescent molecules undergoing FRET was used to detect photon bursts generated from the molecular beacon probes formed upon ligation. LDR-spFRET provided the necessary specificity and sensitivity to detect single-point mutations in as little as 600 copies of human genomic DNA directly without PCR at a level of 1 mutant per 1000 wild type sequences using 20 LDR thermal cycles. We also demonstrate the ability to rapidly discriminate single base differences in the K-ras gene in less than 5 min at a frequency of 1 mutant DNA per 10 normals using only a single LDR thermal cycle of genomic DNA (600 copies). Real-time LDR-spFRET detection of point mutations in the K-ras gene was accomplished in PMMA microfluidic devices using sheath flows.

  5. Oncogenic and tumor-promoting Spermatophytes and Pteridophytes and their active principles.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, N R; Bingel, A S; Fong, H H; Saleh, A A; Christenson, G M; Saufferer, S M

    1976-08-01

    A survey and discussion are presented of plants classified as Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta, extracts of which have been shown to be oncogenic or tumor-promoting in animals. The active oncogenic and tumor-promoting principles, where known, have been identified. They represent tannins; pyrrolizidine, indole, tropolone, quinoline, purine, and benzophenanthridine alkaloids; nitroso compounds; triterpene glycosides; lignans; isoflavans; allyl benzenoids; simple (nu-pyrenes; and carbocyclic hydroxy acids. A total of 28 compounds of known structure have been identified as oncogens and several phorbol esters as tumor-promoters. Plants known to contain any of the 28 oncogens (excluding shikimic acid and caffeine) have been tabulated; they represent at least 454 species, 110 genera, and 34 families of Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta.

  6. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  7. Activation of c-Jun-NH2-kinase by UV irradiation is dependent on p21ras.

    PubMed

    Adler, V; Pincus, M R; Polotskaya, A; Montano, X; Friedman, F K; Ronai, Z

    1996-09-20

    We have demonstrated previously that Jun-NH2-kinase (JNK) activation in vitro is potentiated by association with the p21(ras) protein. To determine if in vivo activation of JNK also depends on p21(ras), we have used M1311 cells that carry the cDNA for the neutralizing antibody to p21(ras), Y13-259, under a dexamethasone-inducible promoter. The ability of UV to activate JNK gradually decreased over a 4-day period of cell growth in dexamethasone. This decrease coincides with weaker transcriptional activation measured via gel shift and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays. Peptides corresponding to amino acids 96-110 on p21(ras), which were shown to block Ras-JNK association, inhibited UV-mediated JNK activation in mouse fibroblast 3T3-4A cells as well as in M1311 cells, further supporting the role of p21(ras) in UV-mediated JNK activation. Overall, the present studies provide in vivo confirmation of the role p21(ras) plays in JNK activation by UV irradiation.

  8. Persistent nicotine treatment potentiates amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in rat lung epithelial cells as a consequence of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinjin; Chu, Michelle; Abbeyquaye, Tetteh; Chen, Chang-Yan

    2005-08-26

    Although nicotine has been suggested to promote lung carcinogenesis, the mechanism of its action in this process remains unknown. The present investigation demonstrates that the treatment of rat lung epithelial cells with nicotine for various periods differentially mobilizes multiple intracellular pathways. Protein kinase C and phosphoinositide 3-OH-kinase are transiently activated after the treatment. Also, Ras and its downstream effector ERK1/2 are activated after long term exposure to nicotine. The activation of Ras by nicotine treatment is responsible for the subsequent perturbation of the methotrexate (MTX)-mediated G1 cell cycle restriction as well as an increase in production of reactive oxygen species. When p53 expression is suppressed by introducing E6, persistent exposure to nicotine enables dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification in the presence of methotrexate (MTX) and the formation of the MTX-resistant colonies. Altering the activity of phosphoinositide 3-OH-kinase has no effect on dihydrofolate reductase amplification. However, the suppression of protein kinase C dramatically affects the colony formation in soft agar. Thus, our data suggest that persistent exposure to nicotine perturbs the G1 checkpoint and causes DNA damage through the increase of the production of reactive oxygen species. However, a third element rendered by loss of p53 is required for the initiation of the process of gene amplification. Under p53-deficient conditions, the establishment of a full oncogenic transformation, in response to long term nicotine exposure, is achieved through the cooperation of multiple signaling pathways. PMID:15983034

  9. Oncogenic activation of the human trk proto-oncogene by recombination with the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.

    PubMed Central

    Ziemiecki, A; Müller, R G; Fu, X C; Hynes, N E; Kozma, S

    1990-01-01

    The trk-2h oncogene, isolated from the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB 231 by genomic DNA-transfection into NIH3T3 cells, consists of the trk proto-oncogene receptor kinase domain fused to a N-terminal 41 amino acid activating sequence (Kozma, S.C., Redmond, S.M.S., Xiao-Chang, F., Saurer, S.M., Groner, B. and Hynes, N.E. (1988) EMBO J., 7, 147-154). Antibodies raised against a bacterially produced beta gal-trk receptor kinase fusion protein recognized a 44 kd phosphoprotein phosphorylated on serine, threonine and tyrosine in extracts of trk-2h transformed NIH3T3 cells. In vitro, in the presence of Mn2+/gamma ATP, this protein became phosphorylated extensively on tyrosine. Cells transformed by trk-2h did not, however, show an elevation in total phosphotyrosine. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA encoding the amino terminal activating sequences of trk-2h (Kozma et al., 1988). The encoded protein has a high basic amino acid content and the gene is expressed as an abundant 1.2 kb mRNA in human, rat and mouse cells. Antipeptide antibodies raised against a C-terminal peptide recognized specifically a 30 kd protein on Western blots of human, rat and mouse cell extracts. Immunofluorescence revealed, in addition to granular cytoplasmic fluorescence, intense nucleolar staining. The high basic amino acid content and nucleolar staining prompted us to investigate whether the 30 kd protein could be a ribosomal protein. Western immunoblotting analysis of 2D-electrophoretically resolved ribosomal proteins indicated that the 30 kd protein is the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. PMID:2403926

  10. GTPase domains of ras p21 oncogene protein and elongation factor Tu: analysis of three-dimensional structures, sequence families, and functional sites.

    PubMed

    Valencia, A; Kjeldgaard, M; Pai, E F; Sander, C

    1991-06-15

    GTPase domains are functional and structural units employed as molecular switches in a variety of important cellular functions, such as growth control, protein biosynthesis, and membrane traffic. Amino acid sequences of more than 100 members of different subfamilies are known, but crystal structures of only mammalian ras p21 and bacterial elongation factor Tu have been determined. After optimal superposition of these remarkably similar structures, careful multiple sequence alignment, and calculation of residue-residue interactions, we analyzed the two subfamilies in terms of structural conservation, sequence conservation, and residue contact strength. There are three main results. (i) A structure-based alignment of p21 and elongation factor Tu. (ii) The definition of a common conserved structural core that may be useful as the basis of model building by homology of the three-dimensional structure of any GTPase domain. (iii) Identification of sequence regions, other than the effector loop and the nucleotide binding site, that may be involved in the functional cycle: they are loop L4, known to change conformation after GTP hydrolysis; helix alpha 2, especially Arg-73 and Met-67 in ras p21; loops L8 and L10, including ras p21 Arg-123, Lys-147, and Leu-120; and residues located spatially near the N and C termini. These regions are candidate sites for interaction either with the GTP/GDP exchange factor, with a GTPase-affected function, or with a molecule delivered to a destination site with the aid of the GTPase domain.

  11. Suppression of Myc oncogenic activity by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Barna, Maria; Pusic, Aya; Zollo, Ornella; Costa, Maria; Kondrashov, Nadya; Rego, Eduardo; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Ruggero, Davide

    2008-12-18

    The Myc oncogene regulates the expression of several components of the protein synthetic machinery, including ribosomal proteins, initiation factors of translation, RNA polymerase III and ribosomal DNA. Whether and how increasing the cellular protein synthesis capacity affects the multistep process leading to cancer remains to be addressed. Here we use ribosomal protein heterozygote mice as a genetic tool to restore increased protein synthesis in Emu-Myc/+ transgenic mice to normal levels, and show that the oncogenic potential of Myc in this context is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate that the ability of Myc to increase protein synthesis directly augments cell size and is sufficient to accelerate cell cycle progression independently of known cell cycle targets transcriptionally regulated by Myc. In addition, when protein synthesis is restored to normal levels, Myc-overexpressing precancerous cells are more efficiently eliminated by programmed cell death. Our findings reveal a new mechanism that links increases in general protein synthesis rates downstream of an oncogenic signal to a specific molecular impairment in the modality of translation initiation used to regulate the expression of selective messenger RNAs. We show that an aberrant increase in cap-dependent translation downstream of Myc hyperactivation specifically impairs the translational switch to internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-dependent translation that is required for accurate mitotic progression. Failure of this translational switch results in reduced mitotic-specific expression of the endogenous IRES-dependent form of Cdk11 (also known as Cdc2l and PITSLRE), which leads to cytokinesis defects and is associated with increased centrosome numbers and genome instability in Emu-Myc/+ mice. When accurate translational control is re-established in Emu-Myc/+ mice, genome instability is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate how perturbations in translational control provide a highly specific outcome

  12. Immunomodulatory activity of Āmalaki Rasāyana: An experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Jignesh; Ashok, B.K.; Galib; Patgiri, B.J.; Prajapati, P.K.; Ravishankar, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ayurvedic system of medicine holds a number of drugs that improves the immunity. Āmalaki (Emblica officinalis) is one such drug. Researches with crude extracts of Āmalaki have proven the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. But, works on Āmalaki Rasāyana are not found reported. Aims: Considering this, two samples of Āmalaki Rasāyana (AR7 and AR21) were studied to evaluate comparative immunomodulatory activity against the cyclophosphamide immunosuppression in rats. Materials and Methods: Test drugs were prepared by following classical guidelines. Wistar strain albino rats of either sex were used in the study. Statistical Analysis: For comparison of data from cyclophosphamide control group with remaining cyclophosphamide plus test drug administered groups one way ANOVA with Dunnett's multiple t-test (DMTT) was employed. Results and Conclusions: Āmalaki Rasāyana possesses significant immunostimulant activity and moderate cytoprotective activity. AR21 was found to have better activity profile in terms of both immunostimulant as well as cytoprotective activity. PMID:24167334

  13. Combined rational design and a high throughput screening platform for identifying chemical inhibitors of a Ras-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Evelyn, Chris R; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-05-15

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions.

  14. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  15. Negative feedback regulation and desensitization of insulin- and epidermal growth factor-stimulated p21ras activation.

    PubMed

    Langlois, W J; Sasaoka, T; Saltiel, A R; Olefsky, J M

    1995-10-27

    Insulin and epidermal growth factor receptors transmit signals for cell proliferation and gene regulation through formation of active GTP-bound p21ras mediated by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sos. Sos is constitutively bound to the adaptor protein Grb2 and growth factor stimulation induces association of the Grb2/Sos complex with Shc and movement of Sos to the plasma membrane location of p21ras. Insulin or epidermal growth factor stimulation induces a rapid increase in p21ras levels, but after several minutes levels decline toward basal despite ongoing hormone stimulation. Here we show that deactivation of p21ras correlates closely with phosphorylation of Sos and dissociation of Sos from Grb2, and that inhibition of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase (also known as extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) kinase, or MEK) blocks both events, resulting in prolonged p21ras activation. These data suggest that a negative feedback loop exists whereby activation of the Raf/MEK/MAP kinase cascade by p21ras causes Sos phosphorylation and, therefore, Sos/Grb2 dissociation, limiting the duration of p21ras activation by growth factors. A serine/threonine kinase downstream of MEK (probably MAP kinase) mediates this desensitization feedback pathway.

  16. XRP44X, an Inhibitor of Ras/Erk Activation of the Transcription Factor Elk3, Inhibits Tumour Growth and Metastasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Henry; Tourrette, Yves; Maas, Peter; Schalken, Jack A; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have an important role in cancer but are difficult targets for the development of tumour therapies. These factors include the Ets family, and in this study Elk3 that is activated by Ras oncogene /Erk signalling, and is involved in angiogenesis, malignant progression and epithelial-mesenchymal type processes. We previously described the identification and in-vitro characterisation of an inhibitor of Ras / Erk activation of Elk3 that also affects microtubules, XRP44X. We now report an initial characterisation of the effects of XRP44X in-vivo on tumour growth and metastasis in three preclinical models mouse models, subcutaneous xenografts, intra-cardiac injection-bone metastasis and the TRAMP transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer progression. XRP44X inhibits tumour growth and metastasis, with limited toxicity. Tumours from XRP44X-treated animals have decreased expression of genes containing Elk3-like binding motifs in their promoters, Elk3 protein and phosphorylated Elk3, suggesting that perhaps XRP44X acts in part by inhibiting the activity of Elk3. Further studies are now warranted to develop XRP44X for tumour therapy. PMID:27427904

  17. Constitutive asymmetric dimerization drives oncogenic activation of epidermal growth factor receptor carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Park, Angela K.J.; Francis, Joshua M.; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Joon-Oh; Cho, Jeonghee

    2015-01-01

    Genomic alterations targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene have been strongly associated with cancer pathogenesis. The clinical effectiveness of EGFR targeted therapies, including small molecules directed against the kinase domain such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib, have been proven successful in treating non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors harboring EGFR kinase domain mutations. Recent large-scale genomic studies in glioblastoma and lung cancer have identified an additional class of oncogenic mutations caused by the intragenic deletion of carboxy-terminal coding regions. Here, we report that combinations of exonic deletions of exon 25 to 28 lead to the oncogenic activation of EGF receptor in the absence of ligand and consequent cellular transformation, indicating a significant role of C-terminal domain in modulating EGFR activation. Furthermore, we show that the oncogenic activity of the resulting C-terminal deletion mutants are efficiently inhibited by EGFR-targeted drugs including erlotinib, afatinib, dacomitinib as well as cetuximab, expanding the therapeutic rationale of cancer genome-based EGFR targeted approaches. Finally, in vivo and in vitro preclinical studies demonstrate that constitutive asymmetric dimerization in mutant EGFR is a key mechanism for oncogenic activation and tumorigenesis by C-terminal deletion mutants. Therefore, our data provide compelling evidence for oncogenic activation of C-terminal deletion mutants at the molecular level and we propose that C-terminal deletion status of EGFR can be considered as a potential genomic marker for EGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:25826094

  18. M-Ras induces Ral and JNK activation to regulate MEK/ERK-independent gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ariel F.; Campos, Tania; Babcock, Justin T.; Armijo, Marisol E.; Martinez-Conde, Alfonso; Pincheira, Roxana; Quilliam, Lawrence A.

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive activation of M-Ras has previously been reported to cause morphologic and growth transformation of murine cells, suggesting that M-Ras plays a role in tumorigenesis. Cell transformation by M-Ras correlated with weak activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, although contributions from other downstream effectors were suggested. Recent studies indicate that signaling events distinct from the Raf/MEK/ERK cascade are critical for human tumorigenesis. However, it is unknown what signaling events M-Ras triggers in human cells. Using constitutively active M-Ras (Q71L) containing additional mutations within its effector binding loop, we found that M-Ras induces MEK/ERK-dependent and -independent Elk1 activation as well as PI3K/Akt and JNK/cJun activation in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Among several human cell lines examined, M-Ras-induced MEK/ERK-independent Elk1 activation was only detected in MCF-7 cells, and correlated with Rlf /M-Ras interaction and Ral /JNK activation. Supporting a role for M-Ras signaling in breast cancer, EGF activated M-Ras and promoted its interaction with endogenous Rlf. In addition, constitutive activation of M-Ras induced estrogen-independent growth of MCF-7 cells that was dependent on PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK and JNK activation. Thus, our studies demonstrate that M-Ras signaling activity differs between human cells, highlighting the importance of defining Ras protein signaling within each cell type, especially when designing treatments for Ras-induced cancer. These findings also demonstrate that M-Ras activity may be important for progression of EGFR-dependent tumors. PMID:22121046

  19. Ras-activated Dsor1 promotes Wnt signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric T; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-12-15

    Wnt/Wingless (Wg) and Ras-MAPK signaling both play fundamental roles in growth and cell fate determination, and when dysregulated, can lead to tumorigenesis. Several conflicting modes of interaction between Ras-MAPK and Wnt signaling have been identified in specific cellular contexts, causing synergistic or antagonistic effects on target genes. We find novel evidence that the Drosophila homolog of the dual specificity kinases MEK1/2 (also known as MAP2K1/2), Downstream of Raf1 (Dsor1), is required for Wnt signaling. Knockdown of Dsor1 results in loss of Wg target gene expression, as well as reductions in stabilized Armadillo (Arm; Drosophila β-catenin). We identify a close physical interaction between Dsor1 and Arm, and find that catalytically inactive Dsor1 causes a reduction in active Arm. These results suggest that Dsor1 normally counteracts the Axin-mediated destruction of Arm. We find that Ras-Dsor1 activity is independent of upstream activation by EGFR, and instead it appears to be activated by the insulin-like growth factor receptor to promote Wg signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a new crosstalk pathway between insulin and Wg signaling that is mediated by Dsor1. PMID:26542023

  20. c-Myc inhibits Ras-mediated differentiation of pheochromocytoma cells by blocking c-Jun up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Vaqué, José P; Fernández-García, Belén; García-Sanz, Pablo; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Bretones, Gabriel; Calvo, Fernando; Crespo, Piero; Marín, María C; León, Javier

    2008-02-01

    Although mutant Ras proteins were originally described as transforming oncoproteins, they induce growth arrest, senescence, and/or differentiation in many cell types. c-Myc is an oncogenic transcription factor that cooperates with Ras in cellular transformation and oncogenesis. However, the Myc-Ras relationship in cellular differentiation is largely unknown. Here, we have analyzed the effects of c-Myc on PC12-derived cells (UR61 cell line), harboring an inducible N-Ras oncogene. In these cells, Ras activation induces neuronal-like differentiation by a process involving c-Jun activation. We found that c-Myc inhibited Ras-mediated differentiation by a mechanism that involves the blockade of c-Jun induction in response to Ras signal. Accordingly, ectopically expressed c-Jun could bypass c-Myc impediment of Ras-induced differentiation and activator protein 1 activation. Interestingly, it did not rescue the proliferative arrest elicited by Ras and did not enhance the differentiation-associated apoptosis. The blockade of Ras-mediated induction of c-Jun takes place at the level of c-Jun proximal promoter. Mutational analysis revealed that c-Myc regions involved in DNA binding and transactivation are required to block differentiation and c-Jun induction. c-Myc does not seem to require Miz-1 to inhibit differentiation and block c-Jun induction. Furthermore, Max is not required for c-Myc activity, as UR61 cells lack a functional Max gene. c-Myc-inhibitory effect on the Ras/c-Jun connection is not restricted to UR61 cells as it can occur in other cell types as K562 or HEK293. In conclusion, we describe a novel interplay between c-Myc and c-Jun that controls the ability of Ras to trigger the differentiation program of pheochromocytoma cells.

  1. Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK Pathway Activation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Thomas; Irving, Julie Anne Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway is a common event in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is caused by point mutation, gene deletion, and chromosomal translocation of a vast array of gene types, highlighting its importance in leukemia biology. Pathway activation can be therapeutically exploited and may guide new therapies needed for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and other high risk subgroups. PMID:25009801

  2. Activation of c-Ki-ras gene in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Prassolov, V S; Sakamoto, H; Nishimura, S; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1985-09-01

    DNA isolated from a lymph node with metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a Japanese male patient transformed NIH3T3 cells upon transfection by the calcium-phosphate precipitation technique. Analysis of DNA from the transformant revealed the presence of an activated human c-Ki-ras gene, which is considered to be responsible for the transformation of the NIH3T3 cells.

  3. p21ras initiates Rac-1 but not phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase/PKB, mediated signaling pathways in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Genot, E; Reif, K; Beach, S; Kramer, I; Cantrell, D

    1998-10-01

    p21ras is activated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and then co-ordinates important signaling pathways for T lymphocyte activation. Effector pathways for this guanine nucleotide binding protein in T cells are mediated by the serine/threonine kinase Raf-1 and the Ras-related GTPase Rac-1. In fibroblasts, an important effector for the Ras oncogene is Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns 3-kinase). Activation of this lipid kinase is able to induce critical Rac-1 signaling pathways and can couple p21ras to cell survival mechanisms via the serine/threonine kinase Akt/PKB. The role of PtdIns 3-kinase in Ras signaling in T cells has not been explored. In the present study, we examined the ability of PtdIns 3-kinase to initiate the Rac-1 signaling pathways important for T cell activation. We also examined the possibility that Akt/PKB is regulated by Ras signaling pathways in T lymphocytes. The results show that Ras can initiate a Rac-1 mediated pathway that regulates the transcriptional function of AP-1 complexes. PtdIns 3-kinase signals cannot mimic p21ras and induce the Rac mediated responses of AP-1 transcriptional activation. Moreover, neither TCR or Ras activation of AP-1 is dependent on PtdIns 3-kinase. PKB is activated in response to triggering of the T cell antigen receptor; PtdIns 3-kinase activity is both required and sufficient for this TCR response. In contrast, p21ras signals are unable to induce Akt/PKB activity in T cell nor is Ras function required for Akt/PKB activation in response to the TCR. The present data thus highlight that PtdIns 3-kinase and Akt/PKB are not universal Ras effector molecules. Ras can initiate Rac-1 regulated signaling pathways in the context of T cell antigen receptor function independently of PtdIns 3-kinase activity.

  4. Oncogenic transformation by vrel requires an amino-terminal activation domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kamens, J.; Brent, R. . Dept. of Molecular Biology); Richardson, P.; Gilmore, T. . Dept. of Biology); Mosialos, G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-06-01

    The mechanism by which the products of the v-{ital rel} oncogene, the corresponding c-{ital rel} proto-oncogene, and the related {ital dorsal} gene of {ital Drosophila melanogaster} exert their effects is not clear. The authors show that the v-{ital rel}, chicken c-{ital rel}, and {ital dorsal} proteins activated gene expression when fused to LexA sequences and bound to DNA upstream of target genes in {ital Saccharomyces cerevisiae}. They have defined two distinct activation regions in the c-{ital rel} protein. Region I, located in the amino-terminal half of {ital rel} and {ital dorsal} proteins, contains no stretches of glutamines, prolines, or acidic amino acids and therefore may be a novel activation domain. Lesions in the v-{ital rel} protein that diminished or abolished oncogenic transformation of avian spleen cells correspondingly affected transcription activation by region I. Region II, located in the carboxy terminus of the c-{ital rel} protein, is highly acidic. Region II is not present in the v-{ital rel} protein or in a transforming mutant derivative of the c-{ital rel} protein. The authors' results show that the oncogenicity of Rel proteins requires activation region I and suggest that the biological function of {ital rel} and {ital dorsal} proteins depends on transcription activation by this region.

  5. PEA-15 potentiates H-Ras mediated epithelial cell transformation through Phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Sulzmaier, Florian J.; Valmiki, Mohana K. Gudur; Nelson, Deirdre A.; Caliva, Maisel J.; Geerts, Dirk; Matter, Michelle L.; White, Eileen P.; Ramos, Joe W.

    2011-01-01

    The small GTPase H-Ras is a proto-oncogene that activates a variety of different pathways including the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway. H-Ras is mutated in many human malignancies and these mutations cause the protein to be constitutively active. PEA-15 blocks ERK-dependent gene transcription and inhibits proliferation by sequestering ERK in the cytoplasm. We therefore investigated whether PEA-15 influences H-Ras mediated transformation. We found that PEA-15 does not block H-Ras activated proliferation when H-Ras is constitutively active. We show instead that in H-Ras transformed mouse kidney epithelial cells, co-expression of PEA-15 resulted in enhanced soft agar colony growth and increased tumor growth in vivo. Overexpression of both H-Ras and PEA-15 resulted in accelerated G1/S cell cycle transition and increased activation of the ERK signaling pathway. PEA-15 mediated these effects through activation of its binding partner phospholipase D1 (PLD1). Inhibition of PLD1 or interference with PEA-15/PLD1 binding blocked PEA-15’s ability to increase ERK activation. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which PEA-15 positively regulates Ras/ERK signaling and increases the proliferation of H-Ras transformed epithelial cells through enhanced PLD1 expression and activation. Thus, our work provides a surprising mechanism by which PEA-15 augments H-Ras driven transformation. These data reveal that PEA-15 not only suppresses ERK signaling and tumorigenesis but can alternatively enhance tumorigenesis in the context of active Ras. PMID:22105357

  6. TLN-4601 suppresses growth and induces apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells through inhibition of Ras-ERK MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background TLN-4601 is a structurally novel farnesylated dibenzodiazepinone discovered using Thallion's proprietary DECIPHER® technology, a genomics and bioinformatics platform that predicts the chemical structures of secondary metabolites based on gene sequences obtained by scanning bacterial genomes. Our recent studies suggest that TLN-4601 inhibits the Ras-ERK MAPK pathway post Ras prenylation and prior to MEK activation. The Ras-ERK MAPK signaling pathway is a well-validated oncogenic cascade based on its central role in regulating the growth and survival of cells from a broad spectrum of human tumors. Furthermore, RAS isoforms are the most frequently mutated oncogenes, occurring in approximately 30% of all human cancers, and KRAS is the most commonly mutated RAS gene, with a greater than 90% incidence of mutation in pancreatic cancer. Results To evaluate whether TLN-4601 interferes with K-Ras signaling, we utilized human pancreatic epithelial cells and demonstrate that TLN-4601 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of Ras-ERK MAPK signaling. The compound also reduced Ras-GTP levels and induced apoptosis. Finally, treatment of MIA PaCa-2 tumor-bearing mice with TLN-4601 resulted in antitumor activity and decreased tumor Raf-1 protein levels. Conclusion These data, together with phase I/II clinical data showing tolerability of TLN-4601, support conducting a clinical trial in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:21044336

  7. Insights into K-Ras 4B regulation by post-translational lysine acetylation.

    PubMed

    Knyphausen, Philipp; Lang, Franziska; Baldus, Linda; Extra, Antje; Lammers, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Ras is a molecular switch cycling between an active, GTP-bound and an inactive, GDP-bound state. Mutations in Ras, mostly affecting the off-switch, are found in many human tumours. Recently, it has been shown that K-Ras 4B is targeted by lysine acetylation at K104. Based on results obtained for an acetylation mimetic Ras mutant (K104Q), it was hypothesised that K104-acetylation might interfere with its oncogenicity by impairing SOS-catalysed guanine-nucleotide exchange. We prepared site-specifically K104-acetylated K-Ras 4B and the corresponding oncogenic mutant protein G12V using the genetic-code expansion concept. We found that SOS-catalysed nucleotide exchange, also of allosterically activated SOS, was neither affected by acetylation of K104 in wildtype K-Ras 4B nor in the G12V mutant, suggesting that glutamine is a poor mimetic for acetylation at this site. In vitro, the lysine-acetyltransferases CBP and p300 were able to acetylate both, wildtype and G12V K-Ras 4B. In addition to K104 we identified further acetylation sites in K-Ras 4B, including K147, within the important G5/SAK-motif. However, the intrinsic and the SOS-catalysed nucleotide exchange was not affected by K147-acetylation of K-Ras 4B. Finally, we show that Sirt2 and HDAC6 do neither deacetylate K-Ras 4B if acetylated at K104 nor if acetylated at K147 in vitro.

  8. Up-regulation of IGF-1R by mutant RAS in leukemia and potentiation of RAS signaling inhibitors by small molecule inhibition of IGF-1R

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Nonami, Atsushi; Chen, Zhao; Nelson, Erik; Chen, Yongfei; Liu, Feiyang; Cho, Haeyeon; Zhang, Jianming; Sattler, Martin; Mitsiades, Constantine; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael; Griffin, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Activating mutations in the RAS oncogene occur frequently in human leukemias. Direct targeting of RAS has proven to be challenging, although targeting of downstream RAS mediators, such as MEK, is currently being tested clinically. Given the complexity of RAS signaling, it is likely that combinations of targeted agents will be more effective than single agents. Experimental Design A chemical screen using RAS-dependent leukemia cells was developed to identify compounds with unanticipated activity in the presence of a MEK inhibitor, and led to identification of inhibitors of IGF-1R. Results were validated using cell-based proliferation assays and apoptosis, cell cycle, and gene knockdown assays, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and a non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Results Mechanistically, IGF-1R protein expression/activity was substantially increased in mutant RAS-expressing cells, and suppression of RAS led to decreases in IGF-1R. Synergy between MEK and IGF-1R inhibitors correlated with induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell cycle progression, and decreased phospho-S6 and phospho-4E-BP1. In vivo, NSG mice tail vein-injected with OCI-AML3-luc+ cells showed significantly lower tumor burden following one week of daily oral administration of 50 mg/kg NVP-AEW541 (IGF-1R inhibitor) combined with 25 mg/kg AZD6244 (MEK inhibitor), as compared to mice treated with either agent alone. Drug combination effects observed in cell-based assays were generalized to additional mutant RAS-positive neoplasms. Conclusions The finding that downstream inhibitors of RAS signaling and IGF-1R inhibitors have synergistic activity warrants further clinical investigation of IGF-1R and RAS signaling inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for RAS-driven malignancies. PMID:25186968

  9. Repeat-element driven activation of proto-oncogenes in human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Björn; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    Recent data demonstrated that the aberrant activity of endogenous repetitive elements of the DNA in humans can drive the expression of proto-oncogenes. This article summarizes these results and gives an outlook on the impact of these findings on the pathogenesis and therapy of human cancer.

  10. Interaction of activated Ras with Raf-1 alone may be sufficient for transformation of rat2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stang, S; Bottorff, D; Stone, J C

    1997-01-01

    v-H-ras effector mutants have been assessed for transforming activity and for the ability of the encoded proteins to interact with Raf-1-, B-Raf-, byr2-, ralGDS-, and CDC25-encoded proteins in the yeast two-hybrid system. Transformation was assessed in rat2 cells as well as in a mutant cell line, rv68BUR, that affords a more sensitive transformation assay. Selected mutant Ras proteins were also examined for their ability to interact with an amino-terminal fragment of Raf-1 in vitro. Finally, possible cooperation between different v-H-ras effector mutants and between effector mutants and overexpressed Raf-1 was assessed. Ras transforming activity was shown to correlate best with the ability of the encoded protein to interact with Raf-1. No evidence for cooperation between v-H-ras effector mutants was found. Signaling through the Raf1-MEK-mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade may be the only effector pathway contributing to RAS transformation in these cells. PMID:9154803

  11. PEA-15 is inhibited by adenovirus E1A and plays a role in ERK nuclear export and Ras-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Gaumont-Leclerc, Marie-France; Mukhopadhyay, Uptal Kumar; Goumard, Stéphane; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2004-11-01

    Oncogenic ras activates multiple signaling pathways to enforce cell proliferation in tumor cells. The ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is required for the transforming effects of ras, and its activation is often sufficient to convey mitogenic stimulation. However, in some settings oncogenic ras triggers a permanent cell cycle arrest with features of cellular senescence. How the Ras/ERK1/2 pathway activates different cellular programs is not well understood. Here we show that ERK1/2 localize predominantly in the cytoplasm during ras-induced senescence. This cytoplasmic localization seems to be dependent on an active nuclear export mechanism and can be rescued by the viral oncoprotein E1A. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that E1A dramatically down-regulated the expression of the ERK1/2 nuclear export factor PEA-15. Also, RNA interference against PEA-15 restored the nuclear localization of phospho-ERK1/2 in Ras-expressing primary murine embryo fibroblasts and stimulated their escape from senescence. Because senescence prevents the transforming effect of oncogenic ras, our results suggest a tumor suppressor function for PEA-15 that operates by means of controlling the localization of phospho-ERK1/2.

  12. Ras in Cancer and Developmental Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Medarde, Alberto; Santos, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Somatic, gain-of-function mutations in ras genes were the first specific genetic alterations identified in human cancer about 3 decades ago. Studies during the last quarter century have characterized the Ras proteins as essential components of signaling networks controlling cellular proliferation, differentiation, or survival. The oncogenic mutations of the H-ras, N-ras, or K-ras genes frequently found in human tumors are known to throw off balance the normal outcome of those signaling pathways, thus leading to tumor development. Oncogenic mutations in a number of other upstream or downstream components of Ras signaling pathways (including membrane RTKs or cytosolic kinases) have been detected more recently in association with a variety of cancers. Interestingly, the oncogenic Ras mutations and the mutations in other components of Ras/MAPK signaling pathways appear to be mutually exclusive events in most tumors, indicating that deregulation of Ras-dependent signaling is the essential requirement for tumorigenesis. In contrast to sporadic tumors, separate studies have identified germline mutations in Ras and various other components of Ras signaling pathways that occur in specific association with a number of different familial, developmental syndromes frequently sharing common phenotypic cardiofaciocutaneous features. Finally, even without being a causative force, defective Ras signaling has been cited as a contributing factor to many other human illnesses, including diabetes and immunological and inflammatory disorders. We aim this review at summarizing and updating current knowledge on the contribution of Ras mutations and altered Ras signaling to development of various tumoral and nontumoral pathologies. PMID:21779504

  13. Ras-Guanine Nucleotide-Releasing Factor 1 (Ras-GRF1) Controls Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) Signaling in the Striatum and Long-Term Behavioral Responses to Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Stefania; D’Antoni, Angela; Orban, Paul C.; Valjent, Emmanuel; Putignano, Elena; Vara, Hugo; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Giustetto, Maurizio; Yoon, Bongjune; Soloway, Paul; Maldonado, Rafael; Caboche, Jocelyne; Brambilla, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Ras-ERK) signaling is central to the molecular machinery underlying cognitive functions. In the striatum, ERK1/2 kinases are co-activated by glutamate and dopamine D1/5 receptors, but the mechanisms providing such signaling integration are still unknown. The Ras-guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 1 (Ras-GRF1), a neuronal specific activator of Ras-ERK signaling, is a likely candidate for coupling these neurotransmitter signals to ERK kinases in the striatonigral medium spiny neurons (MSN) and for modulating behavioral responses to drug abuse such as cocaine. Methods We used genetically modified mouse mutants for Ras-GRF1 as a source of primary MSN cultures and organotypic slices, to perform both immunoblot and immunofluorescence studies in response to glutamate and dopamine receptor agonists. Mice were also subjected to behavioral and immunohistochemical investigations upon treatment with cocaine. Results Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in response to glutamate, dopamine D1 agonist, or both stimuli simultaneously is impaired in Ras-GRF1– deficient striatal cells and organotypic slices of the striatonigral MSN compartment. Consistently, behavioral responses to cocaine are also affected in mice deficient for Ras-GRF1 or overexpressing it. Both locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference are significantly attenuated in Ras-GRF1– deficient mice, whereas a robust facilitation is observed in overexpressing transgenic animals. Finally, we found corresponding changes in ERK1/2 activation and in accumulation of FosB/ΔFosB, a well-characterized marker for long-term responses to cocaine, in MSN from these animals. Conclusions These results strongly implicate Ras-GRF1 in the integration of the two main neurotransmitter inputs to the striatum and in the maladaptive modulation of striatal networks in response to cocaine. PMID:19446794

  14. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Tian, Lin; Bu, Wen; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Liao, Yi-Hua; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Edwards, Dean; Zwaka, Thomas P; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Medina, Daniel; Perou, Charles M; Creighton, Chad J; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chang, Eric C

    2015-07-21

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  15. Ras transformation results in cleavage of reticulon protein Nogo-B that is associated with impairment of IFN response

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Sharif, Tanveer; Chisholm, Kenneth; Pinto, Devanand M; Gujar, Shashi A; Lee, Patrick WK

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of Ras signaling is the major cause of various cancers. Aberrant Ras signaling, however, provides a favorable environment for many viruses, making them suitable candidates as cancer-killing therapeutic agents. Susceptibility of cancer cells to such viruses is mainly due to impaired type I interferon (IFN) response, often as a result of activated Ras/ERK signaling in these cells. In this study, we searched for cellular factors modulated by Ras signaling and their potential involvement in promoting viral oncolysis. We found that upon Ras transformation of NIH-3T3 cells, the N-terminus of Nogo-B (reticulon 4) was proteolytically cleaved. Interestingly, Nogo knockdown (KD) in non-transformed and Ras-transformed cells both enhanced virus-induced IFN response, suggesting that both cleaved and uncleaved Nogo can suppress IFN response. However, pharmacological blockade of Nogo cleavage in Ras-transformed cells significantly enhanced virus-induced IFN response, suggesting that cleaved Nogo contributes to enhanced IFN suppression in these cells. We further showed that IFN suppression associated with Ras-induced Nogo-B cleavage was distinct from but synergistic with that associated with an activated Ras/ERK pathway. Our study therefore reveals an important and novel role of Nogo-B and its cleavage in the suppression of anti-viral immune responses by oncogenic Ras transformation. PMID:25946643

  16. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  17. H-Ras-specific activation of Rac-MKK3/6-p38 pathway: its critical role in invasion and migration of breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ilchung; Kim, Seonhoe; Song, Hyun; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi; Moon, Aree

    2005-04-15

    Human tumors frequently exhibit constitutively activated Ras signaling, which contributes to the malignant phenotype. Mounting evidence suggests unique roles of the Ras family members, H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras, in normal and pathological conditions. In an effort to dissect distinct Ras isoform-specific functions in malignant phenotypic changes, we previously established H-Ras- and N-Ras-activated MCF10A human breast epithelial cell lines. Using these, we showed that p38 kinase is a key signaling molecule differentially regulated between H-Ras and N-Ras, leading to H-Ras-specific induction of invasive and migrative phenotypes. The present study is to further investigate H-Ras- and N-Ras-mediated signaling pathways and to unveil how these pathways are integrated for regulation of invasive/migrative phenotypic conversion of human breast epithelial cells. Here we report that the Rac-MAPK kinase (MKK)3/6-p38 pathway is a unique signaling pathway activated by H-Ras, leading to the invasive/migrative phenotype. In contrast, Raf-MEK-ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathways, which are fundamental to proliferation and differentiation, are activated by both H-Ras and N-Ras. A significant role for p38 in cell invasion is further supported by the observation that p38 activation by MKK6 transfection is sufficient to induce invasive and migrative phenotypes in MCF10A cells. Activation of the MKK6-p38 pathway results in a marked induction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, whereas it had little effect on MMP-9, suggesting MMP-2 up-regulation by MKK6-p38 pathway as a key step for H-Ras-induced invasion and migration. We also provide evidence for cross-talk among the Rac, Raf, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways critical for regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and invasive phenotype. Taken together, the present study elucidated the role of the Rac-MKK3/6-p38 pathway leading to H-Ras-specific induction of malignant progression in breast epithelial cells

  18. Netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activities through enhancing Yes-associated protein stability.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Li, Dean Y; Luo, Hongbo R; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-06-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is the major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size control and cancer development. However, how YAP is regulated by extracellular stimuli in tumorigenesis remains incompletely understood. Netrin-1, a laminin-related secreted protein, displays proto-oncogenic activity in cancers. Nonetheless, the downstream signaling mediating its oncogenic effects is not well defined. Here we show that netrin-1 via its transmembrane receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer and uncoordinated-5 homolog, up-regulates YAP expression, escalating YAP levels in the nucleus and promoting cancer cell proliferation and migration. Inactivating netrin-1, deleted in colorectal cancer, or uncoordinated-5 homolog B (UNC5B) decreases YAP protein levels, abrogating cancer cell progression by netrin-1, whereas knockdown of mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) or large tumor suppressor kinase 1/2 (Lats1/2), two sets of upstream core kinases of the Hippo pathway, has no effect in blocking netrin-1-induced up-regulation of YAP. Netrin-1 stimulates phosphatase 1A to dephosphorylate YAP, which leads to decreased ubiquitination and degradation, enhancing YAP accumulation and signaling. Hence, our findings support that netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activity through YAP signaling, providing a mechanism coupling extracellular signals to the nuclear YAP oncogene.

  19. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  20. Activated Ras Signals Developmental Progression of Recombinase-activating Gene (RAG)-deficient Pro-B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Albert C.; Swat, Wojciech; Ferrini, Roger; Davidson, Laurie; Alt, Frederick W.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the intracellular pathways that mediate early B cell development, we directed expression of activated Ras to the B cell lineage in the context of the recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1)-deficient background (referred to as Ras–RAG). Similar to the effects of an immunoglobulin (Ig) μ heavy chain (HC) transgene, activated Ras caused progression of RAG1–deficient progenitor (pro)-B cells to cells that shared many characteristics with precursor (pre)-B cells, including downregulation of surface CD43 expression plus expression of λ5, RAG2, and germline κ locus transcripts. However, these Ras–RAG pre-B cells also upregulated surface markers characteristic of more mature B cell stages and populated peripheral lymphoid tissues, with an overall phenotype reminiscent of B lineage cells generated in a RAG- deficient background as a result of expression of an Ig μ HC together with a Bcl-2 transgene. Taken together, these findings suggest that activated Ras signaling in pro-B cells induces developmental progression by activating both differentiation and survival signals. PMID:9874569

  1. Involvement of RAGE, NADPH oxidase, and Ras/Raf-1 pathway in glycated LDL-induced expression of heat shock factor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sangle, Ganesh V; Zhao, Ruozhi; Mizuno, Tooru M; Shen, Garry X

    2010-09-01

    Atherothrombotic cardiovascular diseases are the predominant causes of mortality of diabetic patients. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the major physiological inhibitor for fibrinolysis, and it is also implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling. Increased levels of PAI-1 and glycated low-density lipoprotein (glyLDL) were detected in patients with diabetes. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that heat shock factor-1 (HSF1) is involved in glyLDL-induced PAI-1 overproduction in vascular endothelial cells (EC). The present study investigated transmembrane signaling mechanisms involved in glyLDL-induced HSF1 and PAI-1 up-regulation in cultured human vascular EC and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) antibody prevented glyLDL-induced increase in the abundance of PAI-1 in EC. GlyLDL significantly increased the translocation of V-Ha-Ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (H-Ras) from cytoplasm to membrane compared with LDL. Farnesyltransferase inhibitor-277 or small interference RNA against H-Ras inhibited glyLDL-induced increases in HSF1 and PAI-1 in EC. Treatment with diphenyleneiodonium, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, blocked glyLDL-induced translocation of H-Ras, elevated abundances of HSF1 and PAI-1 in EC, and increased release of hydrogen peroxide from EC. Small interference RNA for p22(phox) prevented glyLDL-induced expression of NOX2, HSF1, and PAI-1 in EC. GlyLDL significantly increased V-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (Raf-1) phosphorylation. Treatment with Raf-1 inhibitor blocked glyLDL-induced increase of PAI-1 mRNA in EC. The levels of RAGE, H-Ras, NOX4, HSF1, and PAI-1 were increased in hearts of streptozotocin-diabetic mice and positively correlated with plasma glucose. The results suggest that RAGE, NOX, and H-Ras/Raf-1 are implicated in the up-regulation of HSF1 or PAI-1 in vascular EC under diabetes

  2. The Ras/Rap GTPase activating protein RASA3: from gene structure to in vivo functions.

    PubMed

    Schurmans, Stéphane; Polizzi, Séléna; Scoumanne, Ariane; Sayyed, Sufyan; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    RASA3 (or GTPase Activating Protein III, R-Ras GTPase-activating protein, GAP1(IP4BP)) is a GTPase activating protein of the GAP1 subfamily which targets Ras and Rap1. RASA3 was originally purified from pig platelet membranes through its intrinsic ability to bind inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (I(1,3,4,5)P4) with high affinity, hence its first name GAP1(IP4BP) (for GAP1 subfamily member which binds I(1,3,4,5)P4). RASA3 was thus the first I(1,3,4,5)P4 receptor identified and cloned. The in vitro and in vivo functions of RASA3 remained somewhat elusive for a long time. However, recently, using genetically-modified mice and cells derived from these mice, the function of RASA3 during megakaryopoiesis, megakaryocyte adhesion and migration as well as integrin signaling has been reported. The goal of this review is thus to summarize and comment recent and less recent data in the literature on RASA3, in particular on the in vivo function of this specific GAP1 subfamily member.

  3. Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses Activate the Tumor-Associated Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic. PMID:24604027

  4. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF) gene.

    PubMed

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-03-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  5. Insulin stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase by a Ras-independent pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Carel, K; Kummer, J L; Schubert, C; Leitner, W; Heidenreich, K A; Draznin, B

    1996-11-29

    To characterize tissue-specific differences in insulin signaling, we compared the mechanisms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation by insulin in the mitogenically active 3T3-L1 fibroblasts with the metabolically active 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In both cell lines, insulin significantly increased p21(ras).GTP loading (1.5-2-fold) and MAP kinase activity (5-8-fold). Inhibition of Ras farnesylation with lovastatin blocked activation of p21(ras) and Raf-1 kinase in both 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In 3T3-L1 fibroblasts, this was accompanied by an inhibition of the stimulatory effect of insulin on MAP kinase. In contrast, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, despite an inhibition of activation of p21(ras) and Raf-1 by lovastatin, insulin continued to stimulate MAP kinase activity. Fractionation of the cell lysates on the FPLC Mono-Q column revealed that lovastatin inhibited insulin stimulation of ERK2 (and, to a lesser extent, ERK1) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and had no effect on the insulin-stimulated ERK2 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results demonstrate an important distinction between the mechanism of insulin signaling in the metabolically and mitogenically active cells. Insulin activates MAP kinase by the Ras-dependent pathway in the 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and by the Ras-independent pathway in the 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  6. K-Ras Activation Induces Differential Sensitivity to Sulfur Amino Acid Limitation and Deprivation and to Oxidative and Anti-Oxidative Stress in Mouse Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Gaia; Spinelli, Michela; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells have an increased demand for amino acids and require transport even of non-essential amino acids to support their increased proliferation rate. Besides their major role as protein synthesis precursors, the two proteinogenic sulfur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine, play specific biological functions. In humans, methionine is essential for cell growth and development and may act as a precursor for cysteine synthesis. Cysteine is a precursor for the biosynthesis of glutathione, the major scavenger for reactive oxygen species. Methodology and Principal Findings We study the effect of K-ras oncogene activation in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts on transport and metabolism of cysteine and methionine. We show that cysteine limitation and deprivation cause apoptotic cell death (cytotoxic effect) in both normal and K-ras-transformed fibroblasts, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in reduced glutathione. Anti-oxidants glutathione and MitoTEMPO inhibit apoptosis, but only cysteine-containing glutathione partially rescues the cell growth defect induced by limiting cysteine. Methionine limitation and deprivation has a cytostatic effect on mouse fibroblasts, unaffected by glutathione. K-ras-transformed cells–but not their parental NIH3T3—are extremely sensitive to methionine limitation. This fragility correlates with decreased expression of the Slc6a15 gene—encoding the nutrient transporter SBAT1, known to exhibit a strong preference for methionine—and decreased methionine uptake. Conclusions and Significance Overall, limitation of sulfur-containing amino acids results in a more dramatic perturbation of the oxido-reductive balance in K-ras-transformed cells compared to NIH3T3 cells. Growth defects induced by cysteine limitation in mouse fibroblasts are largely–though not exclusively–due to cysteine utilization in the synthesis of glutathione, mouse fibroblasts requiring an exogenous cysteine source for

  7. A gene expression signature associated with “K-Ras addiction” reveals regulators of EMT and tumor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anurag; Greninger, Patricia; Rhodes, Daniel; Koopman, Louise; Violette, Sheila; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Settleman, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY K-Ras mutations occur frequently in epithelial cancers. Using shRNAs to deplete K-Ras in lung and pancreatic cancer cell lines harboring K-Ras mutations, two classes were identified—lines that do or do not require K-Ras to maintain viability. Comparing these two classes of cancer cells revealed a gene expression signature in K-Ras-dependent cells, associated with a well-differentiated epithelial phenotype, which was also seen in primary tumors. Several of these genes encode pharmacologically tractable proteins, such as Syk and Ron kinases and integrin beta6, depletion of which induces epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and apoptosis specifically in K-Ras-dependent cells. These findings indicate that epithelial differentiation and tumor cell viability are associated, and that EMT regulators in “K-Ras-addicted” cancers represent candidate therapeutic targets. SIGNIFICANCE K-Ras is the most frequently mutated oncogene in solid tumors and when aberrantly activated, is a potent tumor initiator. However, the identification of the critical effectors of K-Ras-mediated tumorigenesis and the development of clinically effective therapeutic strategies in this setting remain challenging. We have found that cancer cell lines harboring K-Ras mutations can be broadly classified into K-Ras-dependent and K-Ras-independent groups. By establishing a gene expression signature that can distinguish these two groups, we identified genes that are specifically up-regulated in K-Ras-dependent cells and are required for their viability. Therefore, the K-Ras dependency signature has revealed several potential therapeutic targets in a subset of otherwise pharmacologically intractable human cancers. PMID:19477428

  8. Chimeric proteins define variable and essential regions of Ha-ras-encoded protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D.G.; Ricketts, M.; Levinson, A.D.; Goeddel, D.V.

    1988-02-01

    The biological role of amino acid differences between the human 21-kDa Ha-ras protein (p21) and the human 23-kDa R-ras protein (p23) was investigated by engineering mutant Ha-ras p21 molecules containing divergent amino acid sequences from R-ras p23. Variant amino acids from R-ras p23 regions 1-30, 52-57, 67-78, 1-30 and 67-78 together, and 112-124 were substituted for the corresponding Ha-ras p21 amino acid regions 1-4, 26-31, 41-52, 1-4 and 41-52 together, and 86-98, respectively. Rat fibroblasts transfected with genes encoding these position-12 valine-substituted chimeric Ha-ras proteins displayed the same properties of morphological transformation and anchorage-independent growth as Ha-ras T24 oncogene-transformed fibroblasts. However, substitution of variant amino acids from the 80 C-terminal residues (amino acids 138-218) of R-ras p23 for the corresponding p21 amino acids (residues 112-189) inactivated the transforming activity of position-12 valine-substituted p21. The converse substitution of Ha-ras p21 C-terminal residues into R-ras p23 did not result in transformation by position-38 valine-substituted p232. These data are discussed in terms of the structure of ras proteins and the nature of interactions determining the specificity of effector function.

  9. Oncogenes and growth control

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, P.; Graf, T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: A Role for Proto-Oncogenes in Differentiation.; The ras Gene Family; Regulation of Human Globin Gene Expression; Regulation of Gene Expression by Steroid Hormones; The Effect of DNA Methylation on DNA-Protein Interactions and on the Regulation of Gene Expression; and Trans-Acting Elements Encoded in Immediate Early Genes of DNA Tumor Viruses.

  10. Cellular senescence checkpoint function determines differential Notch1-dependent oncogenic and tumor suppressor activities

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Shingo; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Whelan, Kelly A.; Facompre, Nicole; Naganuma, Seiji; Ohashi, Shinya; Kinugasa, Hideaki; Egloff, Ann Marie; Basu, Devraj; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Bass, Adam; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Diehl, J. Alan; Rustgi, Anil K.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Notch activity regulates tumor biology in a context-dependent and complex manner. Notch may act as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor gene even within the same tumor type. Recently, Notch signaling has been implicated in cellular senescence. Yet, it remains unclear as to how cellular senescence checkpoint functions may interact with Notch-mediated oncogenic and tumor suppressor activities. Herein, we used genetically engineered human esophageal keratinocytes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to delineate the functional consequences of Notch activation and inhibition along with pharmacological intervention and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments. When expressed in a tetracycline-inducible manner, the ectopically expressed activated form of Notch1 (ICN1) displayed oncogene-like characteristics inducing cellular senescence corroborated by the induction of G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, Rb dephosphorylation, flat and enlarged cell morphology and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Notch-induced senescence involves canonical CSL/RBPJ-dependent transcriptional activity and the p16INK4A-Rb pathway. Loss of p16INK4A or the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene products not only prevented ICN1 from inducing senescence, but permitted ICN1 to facilitate anchorage-independent colony formation and xenograft tumor growth with increased cell proliferation and reduced squamous-cell differentiation. Moreover, Notch1 appears to mediate replicative senescence as well as TGF-β-induced cellular senescence in non-transformed cells and that HPV E6/E7 targets Notch1 for inactivation to prevent senescence, revealing a tumor suppressor attribute of endogenous Notch1. In aggregate, cellular senescence checkpoint functions may influence dichotomous Notch activities in the neoplastic context. PMID:24931169

  11. Cellular senescence checkpoint function determines differential Notch1-dependent oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, S; Natsuizaka, M; Whelan, K A; Facompre, N; Naganuma, S; Ohashi, S; Kinugasa, H; Egloff, A M; Basu, D; Gimotty, P A; Klein-Szanto, A J; Bass, A J; Wong, K-K; Diehl, J A; Rustgi, A K; Nakagawa, H

    2015-04-30

    Notch activity regulates tumor biology in a context-dependent and complex manner. Notch may act as an oncogene or a tumor-suppressor gene even within the same tumor type. Recently, Notch signaling has been implicated in cellular senescence. Yet, it remains unclear as to how cellular senescence checkpoint functions may interact with Notch-mediated oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities. Herein, we used genetically engineered human esophageal keratinocytes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to delineate the functional consequences of Notch activation and inhibition along with pharmacological intervention and RNA interference experiments. When expressed in a tetracycline-inducible manner, the ectopically expressed activated form of Notch1 (ICN1) displayed oncogene-like characteristics inducing cellular senescence corroborated by the induction of G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, Rb dephosphorylation, flat and enlarged cell morphology and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Notch-induced senescence involves canonical CSL/RBPJ-dependent transcriptional activity and the p16(INK4A)-Rb pathway. Loss of p16(INK4A) or the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene products not only prevented ICN1 from inducing senescence but permitted ICN1 to facilitate anchorage-independent colony formation and xenograft tumor growth with increased cell proliferation and reduced squamous-cell differentiation. Moreover, Notch1 appears to mediate replicative senescence as well as transforming growth factor-β-induced cellular senescence in non-transformed cells and that HPV E6/E7 targets Notch1 for inactivation to prevent senescence, revealing a tumor-suppressor attribute of endogenous Notch1. In aggregate, cellular senescence checkpoint functions may influence dichotomous Notch activities in the neoplastic context.

  12. Centrosomal targeting of tyrosine kinase activity does not enhance oncogenicity in chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Bochtler, T; Kirsch, M; Maier, B; Bachmann, J; Klingmüller, U; Anderhub, S; Ho, A D; Krämer, A

    2012-04-01

    Constitutive tyrosine kinase activation by reciprocal chromosomal translocation is a common pathogenetic mechanism in chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Since centrosomal proteins have been recurrently identified as translocation partners of tyrosine kinases FGFR1, JAK2, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ in these diseases, a role for the centrosome in oncogenic transformation has been hypothesized. In this study, we addressed the functional role of centrosomally targeted tyrosine kinase activity. First, centrosomal localization was not routinely found for all chimeric fusion proteins tested. Second, targeting of tyrosine kinases to the centrosome by creating artificial chimeric fusion kinases with the centrosomal targeting domain of AKAP450 failed to enhance the oncogenic transforming potential in both Ba/F3 and U2OS cells, although phospho-tyrosine-mediated signal transduction pathways were initiated at the centrosome. We conclude that the centrosomal localization of constitutively activated tyrosine kinases does not contribute to disease pathogenesis in chronic myeloproliferative disorders. PMID:22015771

  13. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  14. Oncogene activation in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors: implications for risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Stowers, S.J.; Patterson, R.M.; Maronpot, R.R.; Anderson, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    The validity of rodent tumor end points in assessing the potential hazards of chemical exposure to humans is a somewhat controversial but very important issue since most chemicals are classified as potentially hazardous to humans on the basis of long-term carcinogenesis studies in rodents. The ability to distinguish between genotoxic, cytotoxic, or receptor-mediated promotion effects of chemical treatment would aid in the interpretation of rodent carcinogenesis data. Activated oncogenes in spontaneously occurring and chemically induced rodent tumors were examined and compared as one approach to determine the mechanism by which chemical treatment caused an increased incidence of rodent tumors. Different patterns of activated oncogenes were found not only in spontaneous versus chemically induced mouse liver tumors but also in a variety of spontaneous rat tumors versus chemically induced rat lung tumors. In the absence of cytotoxic effects, it could be argued that the chemicals in question activated protooncogenes by a direct genotoxic mechanism. These results provided a basis for the analysis of activated oncogenes in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors to provide information at a molecular level to aid in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to human risk assessment.

  15. Menin-MLL inhibitors reverse oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grembecka, Jolanta; He, Shihan; Shi, Aibin; Purohit, Trupta; Muntean, Andrew G; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Murai, Marcelo J; Belcher, Amalia M; Hartley, Thomas; Hess, Jay L; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2012-03-01

    Translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene result in human acute leukemias with very poor prognosis. The leukemogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins is critically dependent on their direct interaction with menin, a product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) gene. Here we present what are to our knowledge the first small-molecule inhibitors of the menin-MLL fusion protein interaction that specifically bind menin with nanomolar affinities. These compounds effectively reverse MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemic transformation by downregulating the expression of target genes required for MLL fusion protein oncogenic activity. They also selectively block proliferation and induce both apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells harboring MLL translocations. Identification of these compounds provides a new tool for better understanding MLL-mediated leukemogenesis and represents a new approach for studying the role of menin as an oncogenic cofactor of MLL fusion proteins. Our findings also highlight a new therapeutic strategy for aggressive leukemias with MLL rearrangements.

  16. Tumor suppression by miR-26 overrides potential oncogenic activity in intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeitels, Lauren R.; Acharya, Asha; Shi, Guanglu; Chivukula, Divya; Chivukula, Raghu R.; Anandam, Joselin L.; Abdelnaby, Abier A.; Balch, Glen C.; Mansour, John C.; Yopp, Adam C.; Richardson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Down-regulation of miR-26 family members has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple malignancies. In some settings, including glioma, however, miR-26-mediated repression of PTEN promotes tumorigenesis. To investigate the contexts in which the tumor suppressor versus oncogenic activity of miR-26 predominates in vivo, we generated miR-26a transgenic mice. Despite measureable repression of Pten, elevated miR-26a levels were not associated with malignancy in transgenic animals. We documented reduced miR-26 expression in human colorectal cancer and, accordingly, showed that miR-26a expression potently suppressed intestinal adenoma formation in Apcmin/+ mice, a model known to be sensitive to Pten dosage. These studies reveal a tumor suppressor role for miR-26 in intestinal cancer that overrides putative oncogenic activity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of miR-26 delivery to this tumor type. PMID:25395662

  17. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  18. Vitamin D/Vitamin D Receptor Axis Regulates DNA Repair During Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Simona; Johnston, Rachel; Deng, Ou; Zhang, Junran; Gonzalo, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras expression is associated with activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, as evidenced by elevated DNA damage, primarily DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and activation of DNA damage checkpoints, which in primary human cells leads to entry into senescence. DDR activation is viewed as a physiological barrier against uncontrolled proliferation in oncogenic Ras-expressing cells, and arises in response to genotoxic stress due to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage DNA, and to hyper-replication stress. Although oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is considered a tumor suppressor mechanism, the accumulation of DNA damage in senescent cells is thought to cause genomic instability, eventually allowing secondary hits in the genome that promote tumorigenesis. To date, the molecular mechanisms behind DNA repair defects during OIS remain poorly understood. Here, we show that oncogenic Ras expression in human primary cells results in down-regulation of BRCA1 and 53BP1, two key factors in DNA DSBs repair by homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), respectively. As a consequence, Ras-induced senescent cells are hindered in their ability to recruit BRCA1 and 53BP1 to DNA damage sites. While BRCA1 is down-regulated at transcripts levels, 53BP1 loss is caused by activation of cathepsin L (CTSL)-mediated degradation of 53BP1 protein. Moreover, we discovered a marked down-regulation of vitamin D receptor (VDR) during OIS, and a role for the vitamin D/VDR axis regulating the levels of these DNA repair factors during OIS. This study reveals a new functional relationship between the oncogene Ras, the vitamin D/VDR axis, and the expression of DNA repair factors, in the context of OIS. The observed deficiencies in DNA repair factors in senescent cells could contribute to the genomic instability that allows senescence bypass and tumorigenesis. PMID:27041576

  19. A RAS renaissance: emerging targeted therapies for KRAS-mutated non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Neil; Boyer, Julie L; Herbst, Roy S

    2014-08-01

    Of the numerous oncogenes implicated in human cancer, the most common and perhaps the most elusive to target pharmacologically is RAS. Since the discovery of RAS in the 1960s, numerous studies have elucidated the mechanism of activity, regulation, and intracellular trafficking of the RAS gene products, and of its regulatory pathways. These pathways yielded druggable targets, such as farnesyltransferase, during the 1980s to 1990s. Unfortunately, early clinical trials investigating farnesyltransferase inhibitors yielded disappointing results, and subsequent interest by pharmaceutical companies in targeting RAS waned. However, recent advances including the identification of novel regulatory enzymes (e.g., Rce1, Icmt, Pdeδ), siRNA-based synthetic lethality screens, and fragment-based small-molecule screens, have resulted in a "Ras renaissance," signified by new Ras and Ras pathway-targeted therapies that have led to new clinical trials of patients with Ras-driven cancers. This review gives an overview of KRas signaling pathways with an emphasis on novel targets and targeted therapies, using non-small cell lung cancer as a case example.

  20. RAS/MAPK activation drives resistance to Smo inhibition, metastasis and tumor evolution in Shh pathway-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway-dependency, drives tumor growth and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together these findings reveal a critical role of RAS/MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  1. TRIM24 Is an Oncogenic Transcriptional Activator in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Groner, Anna C; Cato, Laura; de Tribolet-Hardy, Jonas; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Janouskova, Hana; Melchers, Diana; Houtman, René; Cato, Andrew C B; Tschopp, Patrick; Gu, Lei; Corsinotti, Andrea; Zhong, Qing; Fankhauser, Christian; Fritz, Christine; Poyet, Cédric; Wagner, Ulrich; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi; Garraway, Levi A; Wild, Peter J; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Myles

    2016-06-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a key driver of prostate cancer (PC). While androgen-deprivation therapy is transiently effective in advanced disease, tumors often progress to a lethal castration-resistant state (CRPC). We show that recurrent PC-driver mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) stabilize the TRIM24 protein, which promotes proliferation under low androgen conditions. TRIM24 augments AR signaling, and AR and TRIM24 co-activated genes are significantly upregulated in CRPC. Expression of TRIM24 protein increases from primary PC to CRPC, and both TRIM24 protein levels and the AR/TRIM24 gene signature predict disease recurrence. Analyses in CRPC cells reveal that the TRIM24 bromodomain and the AR-interacting motif are essential to support proliferation. These data provide a rationale for therapeutic TRIM24 targeting in SPOP mutant and CRPC patients.

  2. Ras-activated RSK1 phosphorylates EBP50 to regulate its nuclear localization and promote cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hooi Cheng; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh

    2016-03-01

    Differential subcellular localization of EBP50 leads to its controversial role in cancer biology either as a tumor suppressor when it resides at the membrane periphery, or a tumor facilitator at the nucleus. However, the mechanism behind nuclear localization of EBP50 remains unclear. A RNA interference screening identified the downstream effector of the Ras-ERK cascade, RSK1, as the molecule unique for nuclear transport of EBP50. RSK1 binds to EBP50 and phosphorylates it at a conserved threonine residue at position 156 (T156) under the regulation of growth factor. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed the significance of T156 residue in nuclear localization of EBP50, cellular proliferation, and oncogenic transformation. Our study sheds light on a possible therapeutic strategy targeting at this aberrant nuclear expression of EBP50 without affecting the normal physiological function of EBP50 at other subcellular localization.

  3. Human type II Fcgamma receptors inhibit B cell activation by interacting with the p21(ras)-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Sármay, G; Koncz, G; Gergely, J

    1996-11-29

    Co-ligation of antigen receptors and type II Fcgamma receptors (FcgammaRIIb) on B cells interrupts signal transduction and ultimately inhibits antibody production. We have identified p52 Shc in the FcgammaRIIb1-specific immunoprecipitates isolated from the membrane fraction of BL41 Burkitt lymphoma cells following B cell receptor-FcgammaRIIb1 co-ligation. The insolubilized synthetic peptide representing the phosphorylated form of the tyrosine-based inhibitory motif of FcgammaRIIb also binds Shc from the lysates of activated but not from resting BL41 cells. This suggests that the binding does not depend on the interaction of FcgammaRIIb1-phosphotyrosine with the SH2 domain of Shc. Tyr phosphorylation of FcgammaRIIb1-associated Shc is low, indicating an impaired function. Shc is implicated in regulating p21(ras) activation; thus, we have compared p21(ras) activities in BL41 cells treated in different ways. p21(ras) activity is reduced when B cell receptor and FcgammaRIIb1 are co-ligated. p21(ras) couples protein-tyrosine kinase-dependent events to the Ser/Thr kinase-mediated signaling pathway leading to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Our results show that B cell receptor-FcgammaRIIb1 co-cross-linking partially inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. We conclude that FcgammaRIIb1-dependent inhibition of human B cell activation may be based on interrupting signal transduction between protein-tyrosine kinases and the p21(ras)/mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent activation pathway.

  4. Pin1 is required for sustained B cell proliferation upon oncogenic activation of Myc

    PubMed Central

    D'Artista, Luana; Bisso, Andrea; Piontini, Andrea; Doni, Mirko; Verrecchia, Alessandro; Kress, Theresia R.; Morelli, Marco J.; Del Sal, Giannino; Amati, Bruno; Campaner, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is activated by translocation in Burkitt's lymphoma and substitutions in codon 58 stabilize the Myc protein or augment its oncogenic potential. In wild-type Myc, phosphorylation of Ser 62 and Thr 58 provides a landing pad for the peptidyl prolyl-isomerase Pin1, which in turn promotes Ser 62 dephosphorylation and Myc degradation. However, the role of Pin1 in Myc-induced lymphomagenesis remains unknown. We show here that genetic ablation of Pin1 reduces lymphomagenesis in Eμ-myc transgenic mice. In both Pin1-deficient B-cells and MEFs, the proliferative response to oncogenic Myc was selectively impaired, with no alterations in Myc-induced apoptosis or mitogen-induced cell cycle entry. This proliferative defect wasn't attributable to alterations in either Ser 62 phosphorylation or Myc-regulated transcription, but instead relied on the activity of the ARF-p53 pathway. Pin1 silencing in lymphomas retarded disease progression in mice, making Pin1 an attractive therapeutic target in Myc-driven tumors. PMID:26943576

  5. Involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in Ras-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, S; Büscher, D; Kummer, V; Buder, S; Baccarini, M

    1996-11-01

    Ubiquitously expressed SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatases interact physically with tyrosine kinase receptors or their substrates and relay positive mitogenic signals via the activation of the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Conversely, the structurally related phosphatase SHP-1 is predominantly expressed in hemopoietic cells and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon colony-stimulating factor 1 treatment of macrophages without associating with the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor tyrosine kinase. Mice lacking functional SHP-1 (me/me and me(v)/me(v)) develop systemic autoimmune disease with accumulation of macrophages, suggesting that SHP-1 may be a negative regulator of hemopoietic cell growth. By using macrophages expressing dominant negative Ras and the me(v)/me(v) mouse mutant, we show that SHP-1 is activated in the course of mitogenic signal transduction in a Ras-dependent manner and that its activity is necessary for the Ras-dependent activation of the MAPK pathway but not of the Raf-1 kinase. Consistent with a role for SHP-1 as an intermediate between Ras and the MEK-MAPK pathway, Ras-independent activation of the latter kinases by bacterial lipopolysaccharide occurred normally in me(v)/me(v) cells. Our results sharply accentuate the diversity of signal transduction in mammalian cells, in which the same signaling intermediates can be rearranged to form different pathways. PMID:8887625

  6. Involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in Ras-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Krautwald, S; Büscher, D; Kummer, V; Buder, S; Baccarini, M

    1996-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatases interact physically with tyrosine kinase receptors or their substrates and relay positive mitogenic signals via the activation of the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Conversely, the structurally related phosphatase SHP-1 is predominantly expressed in hemopoietic cells and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon colony-stimulating factor 1 treatment of macrophages without associating with the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor tyrosine kinase. Mice lacking functional SHP-1 (me/me and me(v)/me(v)) develop systemic autoimmune disease with accumulation of macrophages, suggesting that SHP-1 may be a negative regulator of hemopoietic cell growth. By using macrophages expressing dominant negative Ras and the me(v)/me(v) mouse mutant, we show that SHP-1 is activated in the course of mitogenic signal transduction in a Ras-dependent manner and that its activity is necessary for the Ras-dependent activation of the MAPK pathway but not of the Raf-1 kinase. Consistent with a role for SHP-1 as an intermediate between Ras and the MEK-MAPK pathway, Ras-independent activation of the latter kinases by bacterial lipopolysaccharide occurred normally in me(v)/me(v) cells. Our results sharply accentuate the diversity of signal transduction in mammalian cells, in which the same signaling intermediates can be rearranged to form different pathways. PMID:8887625

  7. RasGRP Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ksionda, Olga; Limnander, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Summary RasGRP proteins are activators of Ras and other related small GTPases by the virtue of functioning as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In vertebrates, four RasGRP family members have been described. RasGRP-1 through −4 share many structural domains but there are also subtle differences between each of the different family members. Whereas SOS RasGEFs are ubiquitously expressed, RasGRP proteins are expressed in distinct patterns, such as in different cells of the hematopoietic system and in the brain. Most studies have concentrated on the role of RasGRP proteins in the development and function of immune cell types because of the predominant RasGRP expression profiles in these cells and the immune phenotypes of mice deficient for Rasgrp genes. However, more recent studies demonstrate that RasGRPs also play an important role in tumorigenesis. Examples are skin- and hematological-cancers but also solid malignancies such as melanoma or prostate cancer. These novel studies bring up many new and unanswered questions related to the molecular mechanism of RasGRP-driven oncogenesis, such as new receptor systems that RasGRP appears to respond to as well as regulatory mechanism for RasGRP expression that appear to be perturbed in these cancers. Here we will review some of the known aspects of RasGRP biology in lymphocytes and will discuss the exciting new notion that RasGRP Ras exchange factors play a role in oncogenesis downstream of various growth factor receptors. PMID:24744772

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Trim7 mediates c-Jun/AP-1 activation by Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Diefenbacher, Markus E.; Mylona, Anastasia; Kassel, Olivier; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun/AP-1 transcription factor controls key cellular behaviours, including proliferation and apoptosis, in response to JNK and Ras/MAPK signalling. While the JNK pathway has been well characterised, the mechanism of activation by Ras was elusive. Here we identify the uncharacterised ubiquitin ligase Trim7 as a critical component of AP-1 activation via Ras. We found that MSK1 directly phosphorylates Trim7 in response to direct activation by the Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK pathway, and this modification stimulates Trim7 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Trim7 mediates Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the AP-1 coactivator RACO-1, leading to RACO-1 protein stabilisation. Consequently, Trim7 depletion reduces RACO-1 levels and AP-1-dependent gene expression. Moreover, transgenic overexpression of Trim7 increases lung tumour burden in a Ras-driven cancer model, and knockdown of Trim7 in established xenografts reduces tumour growth. Thus, phosphorylation-ubiquitination crosstalk between MSK1, Trim7 and RACO-1 completes the long sought-after mechanism linking growth factor signalling and AP-1 activation. PMID:25851810

  9. Genetic analysis of the Kirsten-ras-revertant 1 gene: Potentiation of its tumor suppressor activity by specific point mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayama, Hitoshi Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki ); Matsuzaki, Tomoko; Ikawa, Yoji; Noda, Makoto )

    1990-06-01

    Kirsten-ras-revertant 1 (Krev-1) cDNA encodes a ras-related protein and exhibits an activity of inducing flat revertants at certain frequencies (2-5% of total transfectants) when introduced into a v-K-ras-transformed mouse NIH 3T3 cell line, DT. Toward understanding the mechanism of action of Krev-1 protein, the authors constructed a series of point mutants of Krev-1 cDNA and tested their biological activities in DT cells and HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells harboring the activated N-ras gene. Substitutions of the amino acid residues in the putative guanine nucleotide-binding regions (Asp{sup 17} and Asn{sup 116}), in the putative effector-binding domain (residue 38), at the putative acylation site (Cys{sup 181}), and at the unique Thr{sup 61} all decreased the transformation suppressor activity. On the other hand, substitutions such as Gly{sup 12} to Val{sup 12} and Gln{sup 63} to Glu{sup 63} were found to significantly increase the transformation suppressor/tumor suppressor activity of Krev-1. These findings are consistent with the idea that Krev-1 protein is regulated like many other G proteins by the guanine triphosphate/guanine diphosphate-exchange mechanism probably in response to certain negative growth-regulatory signals.

  10. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Cornelia; Teichler, Sabine; Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  11. K-ras activation occurs frequently in mucinous adenocarcinomas and rarely in other common epithelial tumors of the human ovary.

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, T.; Weghorst, C. M.; Inoue, M.; Tanizawa, O.; Rice, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    To explore the role of mutational activation of members of the ras family of cellular protooncogenes in the development of human ovarian neoplasms, a series of 37 ovarian tumors from Japanese patients was studied. These included 30 common epithelial tumors (1 mucinous tumor of borderline malignancy, 7 mucinous adenocarcinomas, and 22 nonmucinous carcinomas: 10 serous, 3 clear cell, 8 endometrioid, and 1 undifferentiated), 5 tumors of germ cell origin, and 2 sex cord/stromal cell tumors. Polymerase chain reaction was performed from selected areas of deparaffinized sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and the presence of activating point mutations in codons 12, 13, and 61 of the H-, N-, and K-ras genes was probed by dot-blot hybridization analysis with mutation specific oligonucleotides. Mutations in K-ras were also looked for by direct genomic sequencing. The overall frequency of ras gene mutations was 10/37 (27%). Mutations were detected only in K-ras, and were found in most of the mucinous tumors, including the one such tumor of borderline malignancy (6/8; 75%). In one mucinous adenocarcinoma, two mutations were detected in paraffin-embedded material that had not previously been found in high molecular weight DNA isolated from frozen tissue from the same case. K-ras mutations occurred significantly more frequently in mucinous tumors (6/8, 75%) than in serous carcinomas (2/10, 20%; P = 0.031) or in all nonmucinous types of epithelial ovarian tumors combined (3/22, 14%; P = 0.0031). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1656759

  12. A role for RalGDS and a novel Ras effector in the Ras-mediated inhibition of skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramocki, M B; White, M A; Konieczny, S F; Taparowsky, E J

    1998-07-10

    Oncogenic Ras inhibits the differentiation of skeletal muscle cells through the activation of multiple downstream signaling pathways, including a Raf-dependent, mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK/MAPK)-independent pathway. Here we report that a non-Raf binding Ras effector-loop variant (H-Ras G12V,E37G), which retains interaction with the Ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RalGDS), inhibits the conversion of MyoD-expressing C3H10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts to skeletal muscle. We show that H-Ras G12V,E37G, RalGDS, and the membrane-localized RalGDS CAAX protein inhibit the activity of alpha-actin-Luc, a muscle-specific reporter gene containing a necessary E-box and serum response factor (SRF) binding site, while a RalGDS protein defective for Ras interaction has no effect on alpha-actin-Luc transcription. H-Ras G12V,E37G does not activate endogenous MAPK, but does increase SRF-dependent transcription. Interestingly, RalGDS, RalGDS CAAX, and RalA G23V inhibit H-Ras G12V, E37G-induced expression of an SRF-regulated reporter gene, demonstrating that signaling through RalGDS does not duplicate the action of H-Ras G12V,E37G in this system. As additional evidence for this, we show that H-Ras G12V,E37G inhibits the expression of troponin I-Luc, an SRF-independent muscle-specific reporter gene, whereas RalGDS and RalGDS CAAX do not. Although our studies show that signaling through RalGDS can interfere with the expression of reporter genes dependent on SRF activity (including alpha-actin-Luc), our studies also provide strong evidence that an additional signaling molecule(s) activated by H-Ras G12V,E37G is required to achieve the complete inhibition of the myogenic differentiation program.

  13. CONTRIBUTION OF INSPIRATORY FLOW TO ACTIVATION OF EGFR, RAS, MAPK, ATF-2 AND C-JUN DURING LUNG STRETCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contribution of Inspiratory Flow to Activation of EGFR, Ras, MAPK, ATF-2 and c-Jun during Lung Stretch

    R. Silbajoris 1, Z. Li 2, J. M. Samet 1 and Y. C. Huang 1. 1 NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC and 2 CEMALB, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC .

    Mechanical ventilation with larg...

  14. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor represses cytokine-induced activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway in embryonic neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Kazuo; Taga, Tetsuya

    2005-09-01

    Neuronal and glial cells in the central nervous system are generated from common neural precursor cells during development. To evaluate the functions of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in neural precursor cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) were prepared from mouse embryos (E14.5), and the effects of an inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthesis, D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP), on NECs was investigated. In PDMP-treated NECs, the expression of GD3, a major ganglioside of NECs, disappeared. We found that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation were repressed in PDMP-treated NECs. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-induced ERK activation was also abolished in PDMP-treated NECs, suggesting that PDMP specifically represses the Ras-MAPK pathway. bFGF-induced activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway in NECs is dependent on GSL-enriched microdomains, lipid rafts. The organization of lipid rafts and the distribution of Ras and Grb2-SOS in the microdomains were not affected. However, Ras activation was repressed in PDMP-treated NECs. In PDMP-treated NECs, some neuronal genes were up-regulated and glial genes were down-regulated. These results suggest that GSLs might be involved in the proliferation, survival, signal transduction and differentiation of NECs.

  15. IRF1 Downregulation by Ras/MEK Is Independent of Translational Control of IRF1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yumiko; Derwish, Leena; Hirasawa, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of Ras/MEK downregulates the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), which is a prerequisite for oncolytic viruses to replicate in cancer cells [1]. Moreover, restoration of IRF1 expression is essential to induce apoptosis of cancer cells treated with a MEK inhibitor [2]. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie IRF1 downregulation by Ras/MEK remain unclear. In this study, we determined whether Ras/MEK activation modulates IRF1 expression at its translational level. MEK inhibition increased the activity of IRF1 promoter construct in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells and wild type MEF, but not in IRF1 deficient MEF, indicating that IRF1 protein is required for the transcriptional activation of IRF1. By conducting reporter analysis using IRF1 5'- and 3'- UTR constructs, we determined that cis elements on 5'- and 3'-UTR of IRF1 mRNA are not involved in the IRF1 regulation by Ras/MEK. We further compared the recruitment of ribosomes to IRF1 mRNA in RasV12 cells treated with or without the MEK inhibitor by conducting polysome analysis. No difference was observed in the polysomal distribution of IRF1 mRNA between RasV12 cells treated with and without the MEK inhibitor. These results suggest that regulation of IRF1 translation is independent of IRF1 downregulation by Ras/MEK. PMID:27508303

  16. IRF1 Downregulation by Ras/MEK Is Independent of Translational Control of IRF1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yumiko; Derwish, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of Ras/MEK downregulates the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), which is a prerequisite for oncolytic viruses to replicate in cancer cells [1]. Moreover, restoration of IRF1 expression is essential to induce apoptosis of cancer cells treated with a MEK inhibitor [2]. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie IRF1 downregulation by Ras/MEK remain unclear. In this study, we determined whether Ras/MEK activation modulates IRF1 expression at its translational level. MEK inhibition increased the activity of IRF1 promoter construct in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells and wild type MEF, but not in IRF1 deficient MEF, indicating that IRF1 protein is required for the transcriptional activation of IRF1. By conducting reporter analysis using IRF1 5’- and 3’- UTR constructs, we determined that cis elements on 5’- and 3’-UTR of IRF1 mRNA are not involved in the IRF1 regulation by Ras/MEK. We further compared the recruitment of ribosomes to IRF1 mRNA in RasV12 cells treated with or without the MEK inhibitor by conducting polysome analysis. No difference was observed in the polysomal distribution of IRF1 mRNA between RasV12 cells treated with and without the MEK inhibitor. These results suggest that regulation of IRF1 translation is independent of IRF1 downregulation by Ras/MEK. PMID:27508303

  17. Ras activation in response to phorbol ester proceeds independently of the EGFR via an unconventional nucleotide-exchange factor system in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Ignacio; Rennert, Knut; Wittig, Ute; Beer, Katrin; Dürst, Matthias; Stang, Stacey L; Stone, Jim; Wetzker, Reinhard

    2006-09-01

    Ras is a major mediator of PE (phorbol ester) effects in mammalian cells. Various mechanisms for PE activation of Ras have been reported [Downward, Graves, Warne, Rayter and Cantrell (1990) Nature (London) 346, 719-723; Shu, Wu, Mosteller and Broek (2002) Mol. Cell. Biol. 22, 7758-7768; Roose, Mollenauer, Gupta, Stone and Weiss (2005) Mol. Cell. Biol. 25, 4426-4441; Grosse, Roelle, Herrlich, Höhn and Gudermann (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 12251-12260], including pathways that target GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) for inactivation and those that result in activation of GEFs (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors) Sos (son of sevenless homologue) or RasGRP (RAS guanyl releasing protein). However, a biochemical link between PE and GAP inactivation is missing and GEF stimulation is hard to reconcile with the observation that dominant-negative S17N-Ras does not compromise Ras-dependent ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) activation by PE. We have addressed this controversy and carried out an in-depth biochemical study of PE-induced Ras activation in COS-7 cells. Using a cell-permeabilization approach to monitor nucleotide exchange on Ras, we demonstrate that PE-induced Ras-GTP accumulation results from GEF stimulation. Nucleotide exchange stimulation by PE is prevented by PKC (protein kinase C) inhibition but not by EGFR [EGF (epidermal growth factor) receptor] blockade, despite the fact that EGFR inhibition aborts basal and PE-induced Shc (Src homology and collagen homology) phosphorylation and Shc-Grb2 (growth-factor-receptor-bound protein 2) association. In fact, EGFR inhibition ablates basal nucleotide exchange on Ras in growth-arrested COS-7 cells. These data disclose the existence of two separate GEF systems that operate independently from each other to accomplish PE-dependent formation of Ras-GTP and to maintain resting Ras-GTP levels respectively. We document that COS-7 cells do not express RasGRP and present evidence that the PE-responsive GEF system

  18. Targeting Ras-RAF-ERK and its Interactive Pathways as a Novel Therapy for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lo, H.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and the deadliest brain malignancies in adults. Despite the lack of a complete understanding of the biology of these tumors, significant advances have been made in the past decades. One of the key discoveries made in the area of malignant gliomas is that these tumors can be induced and maintained by aberrant signaling networks. In this context, the Ras pathway has been extensively exploited, from both basic and translational perspectives. Although somatic oncogenic mutations of Ras genes are frequent in several cancer types, early investigations on gliomas revealed disappointing facts that the Ras mutations are nearly absent in malignant gliomas and that the BRAF mutations are present in a very small percentage of gliomas. Therefore, the observed deregulation of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway in gliomas is attributed to its upstream positive regulators, including, EGFR and PDGFR known to be highly active in the majority of malignant gliomas. In contrast to the initial negative results on the somatic mutations of H-Ras, K-Ras and BRAF, recent breakthrough studies on pediatric low-grade astrocytomas uncovered genetic alterations of the BRAF gene involving copy number gains and rearrangements. The 7q34 rearrangements result in a novel in-frame KIAA1549:BRAF fusion gene that possesses constitutive BRAF kinase activity resembling oncogenic BRAF (V600E). In light of the earlier findings and recent breakthroughs, this review summarizes our current understanding of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway in gliomas and the outcome of preclinical and clinical studies that evaluated the efficacy of Ras-targeted therapy in malignant gliomas. PMID:20718706

  19. Metabolic Dependencies in RAS-Driven Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Alec C

    2015-04-15

    The ability to inhibit the RAS oncogene has been the holy grail of oncology because of the critical role of this gene in a multitude of tumor types. In addition, RAS-mutant tumors are among the most aggressive and refractory to treatment. Although directly targeting the RAS oncogene has proven challenging, an alternative approach for treating RAS-driven cancers is to inhibit critical downstream events that are required for tumor maintenance. Indeed, much focus has been put on inhibiting signaling cascades downstream of RAS. Recent studies have shown that oncogenic RAS promotes a metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells, shifting them toward an anabolic metabolism necessary to produce biomass to support unconstrained proliferation. These cancers also use a diverse set of fuel sources to meet their metabolic needs and have even developed a variety of mechanisms to act as metabolic scavengers to obtain necessary metabolic substrates from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Collectively, these adaptations can create "metabolic bottlenecks" whereby tumor cells rely on particular pathways or rate-limiting metabolites. In this regard, inhibiting individual or combinations of these metabolic pathways can attenuate growth in preclinical models. Because these dependencies are tumor selective and downstream of oncogenic RAS, there is the opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Although targeting tumor metabolism is still in the early days of translation to patients, our continued advances in understanding critical metabolic adaptations in RAS-driven cancers, as well as the ability to study this altered metabolism in relevant tumor models, will accelerate the development of new therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1828-34. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878364

  20. K-RAS(V12) Induces Autocrine Production of EGFR Ligands and Mediates Radioresistance Through EGFR-Dependent Akt Signaling and Activation of DNA-PKcs

    SciTech Connect

    Minjgee, Minjmaa; Toulany, Mahmoud; Kehlbach, Rainer; Giehl, Klaudia; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: It is known that postirradiation survival of tumor cells presenting mutated K-RAS is mediated through autocrine activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study the molecular mechanism of radioresistance of cells overexpressing mutated K-RAS(V12) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Head-and-neck cancer cells (FaDu) presenting wild-type K-RAS were transfected with empty vector or vector expressing mutated K-RAS(V12). The effect of K-RAS(V12) on autocrine production of EGFR ligands, activation of EGFR downstream pathways, DNA damage repair, and postirradiation survival was analyzed. Results: Conditioned medium collected from K-RAS(V12)-transfected cells enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt pathway and increased postirradiation survival of wild-type K-RAS parental cells when compared with controls. These effects were reversed by amphiregulin (AREG)-neutralizing antibody. In addition, secretion of the EGFR ligands AREG and transforming growth factor {alpha} was significantly increased upon overexpression of K-RAS(V12). Expression of mutated K-RAS(V12) resulted in an increase in radiation-induced DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation at S2056. This increase was accompanied by increased repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Abrogation of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation by serum depletion or AREG-neutralizing antibody underscored the role of autocrine production of EGFR ligands, namely, AREG, in regulating DNA-PKcs activation in K-RAS mutated cells. Conclusions: These data indicate that radioresistance of K-RAS mutated tumor cells is at least in part due to constitutive production of EGFR ligands, which mediate enhanced repair of DNA double-strand breaks through the EGFR-phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt cascade.

  1. Post-translational modification of H-Ras is required for activation of, but not for association with, B-Raf.

    PubMed

    Okada, T; Masuda, T; Shinkai, M; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1996-03-01

    B-Raf is regulated by Ras protein and acts as a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase kinase in PC12 cells and brain. Ras protein undergoes a series of post-translational modifications on its C-terminal CAAX motif, and the modifications are critical for its function. To elucidate the role of the post-translational modifications in interaction with, and activation of, B-Raf, we have analyzed a direct association between H-Ras and B-Raf, and constructed an in vitro system for B-Raf activation by H-Ras. By using methods based on inhibition of yeast adenylyl cyclase or RasGAP activity and by in vitro binding assays, we have shown that the segment of B-Raf corresponding to amino acid 1-326 binds directly to H-Ras with a dissociation constant (Kd) comparable to that of Raf-1 and that the binding is not significantly affected by the post-translational modifications. However, when the activity of B-Raf to stimulate MAP kinase was measured by using a cell-free system derived from rat brain cytosol, we observed that the unmodified form of H-Ras possesses an almost negligible activity to activate B-Raf in vitro compared to the fully modified form. H-RasSer-181,184 mutant, which was farnesylated but not palmitoylated, was equally active as the fully modified form. These results indicate that the post-translational modifications, especially farnesylation, are required for H-Ras to activate B-Raf even though they have no apparent effect on the binding properties of H-Ras to B-Raf.

  2. OSBP-related protein 3 (ORP3) coupling with VAMP-associated protein A regulates R-Ras activity.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Lilja, Johanna; Vihervaara, Terhi; Hanninen, Raisa; Zhou, You; Peränen, Johan; Nyman, Tuula A; Ivaska, Johanna; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-02-15

    ORP3 is an R-Ras interacting oxysterol-binding protein homolog that regulates cell adhesion and is overexpressed in several cancers. We investigated here a novel function of ORP3 dependent on its targeting to both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). Using biochemical and cell imaging techniques we demonstrate the mechanistic requirements for the subcellular targeting and function of ORP3 in control of R-Ras activity. We show that hyperphosphorylated ORP3 (ORP3-P) selectively interacts with the ER membrane protein VAPA, and ORP3-VAPA complexes are targeted to PM sites via the ORP3 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. A novel FFAT (two phenylalanines in an acidic tract)-like motif was identified in ORP3; only disruption of both the FFAT-like and canonical FFAT motif abolished the phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulated interaction of ORP3-P with VAPA. Co-expression of ORP3 and VAPA induced R-Ras activation, dependent on the interactions of ORP3 with VAPA and the PM. Consistently, downstream AktS473 phosphorylation and β1-integrin activity were enhanced by ORP3-VAPA. To conclude, phosphorylation of ORP3 controls its association with VAPA. Furthermore, we present evidence that ORP3-VAPA complexes stimulate R-Ras signaling.

  3. The RafC1 cysteine-rich domain contains multiple distinct regulatory epitopes which control Ras-dependent Raf activation.

    PubMed

    Daub, M; Jöckel, J; Quack, T; Weber, C K; Schmitz, F; Rapp, U R; Wittinghofer, A; Block, C

    1998-11-01

    Activation of c-Raf-1 (referred to as Raf) by Ras is a pivotal step in mitogenic signaling. Raf activation is initiated by binding of Ras to the regulatory N terminus of Raf. While Ras binding to residues 51 to 131 is well understood, the role of the RafC1 cysteine-rich domain comprising residues 139 to 184 has remained elusive. To resolve the function of the RafC1 domain, we have performed an exhaustive surface scanning mutagenesis. In our study, we defined a high-resolution map of multiple distinct functional epitopes within RafC1 that are required for both negative control of the kinase and the positive function of the protein. Activating mutations in three different epitopes enhanced Ras-dependent Raf activation, while only some of these mutations markedly increased Raf basal activity. One contiguous inhibitory epitope consisting of S177, T182, and M183 clearly contributed to Ras-Raf binding energy and represents the putative Ras binding site of the RafC1 domain. The effects of all RafC1 mutations on Ras binding and Raf activation were independent of Ras lipid modification. The inhibitory mutation L160A is localized to a position analogous to the phorbol ester binding site in the protein kinase C C1 domain, suggesting a function in cofactor binding. Complete inhibition of Ras-dependent Raf activation was achieved by combining mutations K144A and L160A, which clearly demonstrates an absolute requirement for correct RafC1 function in Ras-dependent Raf activation.

  4. Interactions between Ras1, dMyc, and dPI3K signaling in the developing Drosophila wing

    PubMed Central

    Prober, David A.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2002-01-01

    The Ras GTPase links extracellular signals to intracellular mechanisms that control cell growth, the cell cycle, and cell identity. An activated form of Drosophila Ras (RasV12) promotes these processes in the developing wing, but the effector pathways involved are unclear. Here, we present evidence indicating that RasV12 promotes cell growth and G1/S progression by increasing dMyc protein levels and activating dPI3K signaling, and that it does so via separate effector pathways. We also show that endogenous Ras is required to maintain normal levels of dMyc, but not dPI3K signaling during wing development. Finally, we show that induction of dMyc and regulation of cell identity are separable effects of Raf/MAPK signaling. These results suggest that Ras may only affect PI3K signaling when mutationally activated, such as in RasV12-transformed cells, and provide a basis for understanding the synergy between Ras and other growth-promoting oncogenes in cancer. PMID:12208851

  5. Assessment of the chemosensitizing activity of TAT-RasGAP317-326 in childhood cancers.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nadja; Gross, Nicole; Widmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Although current anti-cancer protocols are reasonably effective, treatment-associated long-term side effects, induced by lack of specificity of the anti-cancer procedures, remain a challenging problem in pediatric oncology. TAT-RasGAP317-326 is a RasGAP-derived cell-permeable peptide that acts as a sensitizer to various anti-cancer treatments in adult tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the effect of TAT-RasGAP317-326 in several childhood cancer cell lines. The RasGAP-derived peptide-induced cell death was analyzed in several neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma and leukemia cell lines (as well as in normal lymphocytes). Cell death was evaluated using flow cytometry methods in the absence or in the presence of the peptide in combination with various genotoxins used in the clinics (4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin). All tested pediatric tumors, in response to at least one genotoxin, were sensitized by TAT-RasGAP317-326. The RasGAP-derived peptide did not increase cell death of normal lymphocytes, alone or in combination with the majority of the tested chemotherapies. Consequently, TAT-RasGAP317-326 may benefit children with tumors by increasing the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies notably by allowing reductions in anti-cancer drug dosage and the associated drug-induced side effects.

  6. Involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but not RalGDS, in TC21/R-Ras2-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gretchen A; Graham, Suzanne M; Morita, Staeci; Reks, Sarah E; Rogers-Graham, Kelley; Vojtek, Anne; Kelley, Grant G; Der, Channing J

    2002-03-22

    Oncogenic Ras and activated forms of the Ras-related protein TC21/R-Ras2 share similar abilities to alter cell proliferation. However, in contrast to Ras, we found previously that TC21 fails to activate the Raf-1 serine/threonine kinase. Thus, TC21 must utilize non-Raf effectors to regulate cell function. In this study, we determined that TC21 interacts strongly with some (RalGDS, RGL, RGL2/Rlf, AF6, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit p110delta), and weakly with other Ras small middle dotGTP-binding proteins. In addition, library screening identified novel TC21-interacting proteins. We also determined that TC21, similar to Ras, mediates activation of phospholipase Cepsilon. We then examined if RalGDS, a RalA guanine nucleotide exchange factor, or PI3K are effectors for TC21-mediated signaling and cell proliferation in murine fibroblasts. We found that overexpression of full-length RalGDS reduced the focus forming activity of activated TC21. Furthermore, expression of activated Ras, but not TC21, enhanced GTP loading on RalA. In fact, TC21 attenuated insulin-stimulated RalA small middle dotGTP formation. In contrast, like Ras, expression of activated TC21 resulted in membrane translocation and an increase in the PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of Akt, and inhibition of PI3K activity interfered with TC21 focus formation. Finally, unlike Ras, TC21 did not activate the Rac small GTPase, indicating that Ras may not activate Rac by PI3K. Taken together, these results suggest that PI3K, but not RalGDS, is an important mediator of cell proliferation by TC21.

  7. The complexities and versatility of the RAS-to-ERK signalling system in normal and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fey, Dirk; Matallanas, David; Rauch, Jens; Rukhlenko, Oleksii S; Kholodenko, Boris N

    2016-10-01

    The intricate dynamic control and plasticity of RAS to ERK mitogenic, survival and apoptotic signalling has mystified researches for more than 30 years. Therapeutics targeting the oncogenic aberrations within this pathway often yield unsatisfactory, even undesired results, as in the case of paradoxical ERK activation in response to RAF inhibition. A direct approach of inhibiting single oncogenic proteins misses the dynamic network context governing the network signal processing. In this review, we discuss the signalling behaviour of RAS and RAF proteins in normal and in cancer cells, and the emerging systems-level properties of the RAS-to-ERK signalling network. We argue that to understand the dynamic complexities of this control system, mathematical models including mechanistic detail are required. Looking into the future, these dynamic models will build the foundation upon which more effective, rational approaches to cancer therapy will be developed. PMID:27350026

  8. Choline phosphate potentiates sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced Raf-1 kinase activation dependent of Ras--phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael; Han, Sang Seop

    2002-04-01

    In NIH3T3 cells, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) caused a significant increase of Raf-1 kinase activity as early as 2 min. Interestingly, choline phosphate (ChoP) produced synergistic increase of S1P-stimulated Raf-1 kinase activation in the presence of ATP while showing additive effect in the absence of ATP. However, Raf-1 kinase activation induced by S1P decreased in the presence of ATP when applied alone. The overexpression of N-terminal fragment of Raf-1 (RfI) to inhibit Raf--Ras interaction caused the inhibition of S1P-induced Raf-1 kinase activation. Also, wortmannin, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, exhibited inhibitory effects on S1P-induced activation of Raf-1 kinase. In addition, we demonstrated that the chemical antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine attenuated Raf-1 activation induced by S1P, suggesting that H(2)O(2) may be required for the signalling pathway leading to Raf-1 activation. This H(2)O(2)-induced Raf-1 kinase activation was also blocked by inhibition of Ras--PI3K signalling pathway using alpha-hydroxyfarnesylphosphonic acid and wortmannin. Taken together, these results indicate that S1P-induced Raf-1 kinase activation is mediated by H(2)O(2) stimulation of Ras--PI3K pathway, and is enhanced by ChoP in the presence of ATP.

  9. Specific cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region of Ras increase tumorigenicity by nanocluster augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blaževitš, Olga; Jaiswal, Alok; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Lectez, Benoit; Kopra, Kari; Guzmán, Camilo; Härmä, Harri; Hancock, John F; Aittokallio, Tero; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hotspot mutations of Ras drive cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Less frequent mutations in Ras are poorly characterized for their oncogenic potential. Yet insight into their mechanism of action may point to novel opportunities to target Ras. Here, we show that several cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region moderately increase Ras activity in all isoforms. Mutants are biochemically inconspicuous, while their clustering into nanoscale signaling complexes on the plasma membrane, termed nanocluster, is augmented. Nanoclustering dictates downstream effector recruitment, MAPK-activity, and tumorigenic cell proliferation. Our results describe an unprecedented mechanism of signaling protein activation in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08905.001 PMID:26274561

  10. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  11. A novel LKB1 isoform enhances AMPK metabolic activity and displays oncogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Dahmani, R; Just, P-A; Delay, A; Canal, F; Finzi, L; Prip-Buus, C; Lambert, M; Sujobert, P; Buchet-Poyau, K; Miller, E; Cavard, C; Marmier, S; Terris, B; Billaud, M; Perret, C

    2015-04-30

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene encodes a master kinase that coordinates the regulation of energetic metabolism and cell polarity. We now report the identification of a novel isoform of LKB1 (named ΔN-LKB1) that is generated through alternative transcription and internal initiation of translation of the LKB1 mRNA. The ΔN-LKB1 protein lacks the N-terminal region and a portion of the kinase domain. Although ΔN-LKB1 is catalytically inactive, it potentiates the stimulating effect of LKB1 on the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) metabolic sensor through a direct interaction with the regulatory autoinhibitory domain of AMPK. In contrast, ΔN-LKB1 negatively interferes with the LKB1 polarizing activity. Finally, combining in vitro and in vivo approaches, we showed that ΔN-LKB1 has an intrinsic oncogenic property. ΔN-LKB1 is expressed solely in the lung cancer cell line, NCI-H460. Silencing of ΔN-LKB1 decreased the survival of NCI-H460 cells and inhibited their tumorigenicity when engrafted in nude mice. In conclusion, we have identified a novel LKB1 isoform that enhances the LKB1-controlled AMPK metabolic activity but inhibits LKB1-induced polarizing activity. Both the LKB1 tumor suppressor gene and the oncogene ΔN-LKB1 are expressed from the same locus and this may account for some of the paradoxical effects of LKB1 during tumorigenesis.

  12. Activated conformations of the ras-gene-encoded p21 protein. 1. An energy-refined structure for the normal p21 protein complexed with GDP.

    PubMed

    Dykes, D C; Brandt-Rauf, P; Luster, S M; Chung, D; Friedman, F K; Pincus, M R

    1992-06-01

    A complete three-dimensional structure for the ras-gene-encoded p21 protein with Gly 12 and Gln 61, bound to GDP, has been constructed in four stages using the available alpha-carbon coordinates as deposited in the Brookhaven National Laboratories Protein Data Bank. No all-atom structure has been made available despite the fact that the first crystallographic structure for the p21 protein was reported almost four years ago. In the p21 protein, if amino acid substitutions are made at any one of a number of different positions in the amino acid sequence, the protein becomes permanently activated and causes malignant transformation of normal cells or, in some cell lines, differentiation and maturation. For example, all amino acids except Gly and Pro at position 12 result in an oncogenic protein; all amino acids except Gln, Glu and Pro at position 61 likewise cause malignant transformation of cells. We have constructed our all-atom structure of the non-oncogenic protein from the x-ray structure in order to determine how oncogenic amino acid substitutions affect the three-dimensional structure of this protein. In Stage 1 we generated a poly-alanine backbone (except at Gly and Pro residues) through the alpha-carbon structure, requiring the individual Ala, Pro or Gly residues to conform to standard amino acid geometry and to form trans-planar peptide bonds. Since no alpha-carbon coordinates for residues 60-65 have been determined, these residues were modeled by generating them in the extended conformation and then subjecting them to molecular dynamics using the computer application DISCOVER and energy minimization using DISCOVER and the ECEPP (Empirical Conformational Energies for Peptides Program). In Stage 2, the positions of residues that are homologous to corresponding residues of bacterial elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) to which p21 bears an overall 40% sequence homology, were determined from their corresponding positions in a high-resolution structure of EF-Tu. Non

  13. K-Ras mutation-mediated IGF-1-induced feedback ERK activation contributes to the rapalog resistance in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Liu, Yan; Bellail, Anita C; Olson, Jeffrey J; Sun, Shi-Yong; Lu, Guoyue; Ding, Lijuan; Yuan, Changji; Wang, Guangyi; Hao, Chunhai

    2012-09-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is frequently activated in human cancers; however, clinical trials of rapalog (the mTORC1 inhibitors) have shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) resist to the treatment. Rapalog treatment activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in K-Ras mt PDAC cells. K-Ras knockdown abolished the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-induced ERK pathway in the K-Ras mt PDAC cells and enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of everolimus in treating K-Ras mt PDAC cells-derived mouse xenografts. The results indicate that targeting of K-Ras mutation may lead to the development of therapies that overcome rapalog resistance in PDAC.

  14. PAI-1 Expression Is Required for HDACi-Induced Proliferative Arrest in ras-Transformed Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Stephen P.; Higgins, Craig E.; Higgins, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant transformation of mammalian cells with ras family oncogenes results in dramatic changes in cellular architecture and growth traits. The generation of flat revertants of v-K-ras-transformed renal cells by exposure to the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB) was previously found to be dependent on transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 (SERPINE1) gene (encoding the type-1 inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activators). NaB-initiated PAI-1 expression preceded induced cell spreading and entry into G1 arrest. To assess the relevance of PAI-1 induction to growth arrest in this cell system more critically, two complementary approaches were used. The addition of a stable, long half-life, recombinant PAI-1 mutant to PAI-1-deficient v-K-ras-/c-Ha-ras-transformants or to PAI-1 functionally null, NaB-resistant, 4HH cells (engineered by antisense knockdown of PAI-1 mRNA transcripts) resulted in marked cytostasis in the absence of NaB. The transfection of ras-transformed cells with the Rc/CMVPAI expression construct, moreover, significantly elevated constitutive PAI-1 synthesis (10- to 20-fold) with a concomitant reduction in proliferative rate. These data suggest that high-level PAI-1 expression suppresses growth of chronic ras-oncogene transformed cells and is likely a major cytostatic effector of NaB exposure. PMID:21912547

  15. Renoprotective effect of renal liver-type fatty acid binding protein and angiotensin II type 1a receptor loss in renal injury caused by RAS activation.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Shibagaki, Yugo; Yasuda, Takashi; Katayama, Kimie; Hoshino, Seiko; Igarashi-Migitaka, Junko; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the renoprotective effect of renal human liver-type fatty acid binding protein (hL-FABP) and angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1A receptor (AT1a) loss in renal injury caused by renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation. We established hL-FABP chromosomal transgenic mice (L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)), crossed the L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+) with AT1a knockdown homo mice (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-)), and generated L-FABP(+/-)AT1a hetero mice (L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-)). After the back-cross of these cubs, L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-) were obtained. To activate the renal RAS, wild-type mice (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)), L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+), L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/-), L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-), L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-), and L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-) were administered high-dose systemic ANG II infusion plus a high-salt diet for 28 days. In the L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+), RAS activation (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS) caused hypertension and tubulointerstitial damage. In the L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS, tubulointerstitial damage was significantly attenuated compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS. In the AT1a partial knockout (AT1a(+/-)) or complete knockout (AT1a(-/-)) mice, reduction of AT1a expression led to a significantly lower degree of renal injury compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS or L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS mice. Renal injury in L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-)RAS mice was significantly attenuated compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/-)RAS mice. In both L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-)RAS and L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-)RAS mice, renal damage was rarely found. The degrees of renal hL-FABP expression and urinary hL-FABP levels increased by RAS activation and gradually decreased along with reduction of AT1a expression levels. In conclusion, in this mouse model, renal hL-FABP expression and a decrease in AT1a expression attenuated tubulointerstitial damage due to RAS activation.

  16. Photochemical Modulation of Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction using Caged Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors: Activation via One- and Two-Photon Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Warmka, Janel K.; Dore, Timothy M.; Blank, David A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates, and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase, Bhc-FTI, is described. The inhibitor was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol functional group with a Bhc moiety; while Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryls. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor (FTI) that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies. PMID:22492666

  17. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  18. Activation of H-Ras and Rac1 correlates with epidermal growth factor-induced invasion in Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Min-Soo; Moon, Aree

    2011-03-01

    There is considerable experimental evidence that hyperactive Ras proteins promote breast cancer growth and development including invasiveness, despite the low frequency of mutated forms of Ras in breast cancer. We have previously shown that H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces an invasive phenotype mediated by small GTPase Rac1 in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays an important role in aberrant growth and metastasis formation of many tumor types including breast cancer. The present study aims to investigate the correlation between EGF-induced invasiveness and Ras activation in four widely used breast cancer cell lines. Upon EGF stimulation, invasive abilities and H-Ras activation were significantly increased in Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 cell lines, but not in MDA-MB-453 and T47D cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target H-Ras, we showed a crucial role of H-Ras in the invasive phenotype induced by EGF in Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, siRNA-knockdown of Rac1 significantly inhibited the EGF-induced invasiveness in these cells. Taken together, this study characterized human breast cancer cell lines with regard to the relationship between H-Ras activation and the invasive phenotype induced by EGF. Our data demonstrate that the activation of H-Ras and the downstream molecule Rac1 correlates with EGF-induced breast cancer cell invasion, providing important information on the regulation of malignant progression in mammary carcinoma cells.

  19. RasGRP3 limits Toll-like receptor-triggered inflammatory response in macrophages by activating Rap1 small GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Songqing; Chen, Taoyong; Yu, Zhou; Zhu, Xuhui; Yang, Mingjin; Xie, Bin; Li, Nan; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Jianli

    2014-01-01

    Host immune cells can detect and destruct invading pathogens via pattern-recognition receptors. Small Rap GTPases act as conserved molecular switches coupling extracellular signals to various cellular responses, but their roles as regulators in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling have not been fully elucidated. Here we report that Ras guanine nucleotide-releasing protein 3 (RasGRP3), a guanine nucleotide-exchange factor activating Ras and Rap1, limits production of proinflammatory cytokines (especially IL-6) in macrophages by activating Rap1 on activation by low levels of TLR agonists. We demonstrate that RasGRP3, a dominant member of RasGRPs in macrophages, impairs TLR3/4/9-induced IL-6 production and relieves dextrane sulphate sodium-induced colitis and collagen-induced arthritis. In RasGRP3-deficient RAW264.7 cells obtained by CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, TLR3/4/9-induced activation of Rap1 was inhibited while ERK1/2 activation was enhanced. Our study suggests that RasGRP3 limits inflammatory response by activating Rap1 on low-intensity pathogen infection, setting a threshold for preventing excessive inflammatory response. PMID:25118589

  20. Activation Mechanism of Oncogenic Deletion Mutations in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2.

    PubMed

    Foster, Scott A; Whalen, Daniel M; Özen, Ayşegül; Wongchenko, Matthew J; Yin, JianPing; Yen, Ivana; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mayfield, John D; Chmielecki, Juliann; Stephens, Philip J; Albacker, Lee A; Yan, Yibing; Song, Kyung; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Eigenbrot, Charles; Yu, Christine; Shaw, Andrey S; Manning, Gerard; Skelton, Nicholas J; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Malek, Shiva

    2016-04-11

    Activating mutations in protein kinases drive many cancers. While how recurring point mutations affect kinase activity has been described, the effect of in-frame deletions is not well understood. We show that oncogenic deletions within the β3-αC loop of HER2 and BRAF are analogous to the recurrent EGFR exon 19 deletions. We identify pancreatic carcinomas with BRAF deletions mutually exclusive with KRAS mutations. Crystal structures of BRAF deletions reveal the truncated loop restrains αC in an active "in" conformation, imparting resistance to inhibitors like vemurafenib that bind the αC "out" conformation. Characterization of loop length explains the prevalence of five amino acid deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 and highlights the importance of this region for kinase activity and inhibitor efficacy. PMID:26996308

  1. Activation of Ras, Raf-1 and protein kinase C in differentiating human neuroblastoma cells after treatment with phorbolester and NGF.

    PubMed

    Söderholm, H; Olsson, A; Lavenius, E; Rönnstrand, L; Nånberg, E

    2001-02-01

    The human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y/TrkA differentiates in vitro and acquires a sympathetic phenotype in response to phorbolester (activator of protein kinase C, PKC) in the presence of serum or growth factors, or nerve growth factor (NGF). We have now investigated to what extent phorbolester and NGF cause activation of Ras and Raf-1 and the involvement of PKC in this response in differentiating SH-SY5Y/TrkA cells. NGF stimulated increased accumulation of Ras-GTP and a threefold activation of Raf-1. In contrast, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) had no effect on the amount of Ras-GTP but led to a smaller activation of Raf-1. NGF caused a limited increase in phosphorylation of Raf-1 compared with TPA, and NGF-induced Raf activity was independent of PKC. Analysis of phosphorylation of the endogenous PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), and of subcellular distribution of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon revealed that NGF only caused a very small activation of PKC in SH-SY5Y/TrkA cells. The results identify Raf-1 as a target for both TPA- and NGF-induced signals in differentiating SH-SY5Y/TrkA cells and demonstrate that signalling to Raf-1 was mediated via distinct mechanisms.

  2. Enhancement of inositol phospholipid metabolism and activation of protein kinase C in ras-transformed rat fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.; Chida, K.; Kamata, N.; Nose, K.; Kato, M.; Homma, Y.; Takenawa, T.; Kuroki, T.

    1988-12-05

    The inositol phospholipid metabolism is one of the main pathways of signal transduction in cells. We measured the activities of its key enzymes in v-Ha-ras-transformed 208F rat fibroblasts. In the ras-transformed clones, incorporation of (TSP)Pi into intermediates of the inositol phospholipid metabolism was stimulated. The activities of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate kinases in the transformed clones were about 35-50% more than in untransformed cells, indicating increased inositol phospholipid metabolism. However, the activity of diacylglycerol kinase in their membrane fraction was 25-35% less than that of untransformed cells, although the total diacylglycerol kinase activity did not change. The imbalance of these kinases could constitute one of the main reasons leading to the increased level of inositol phosphates and the accumulation of diacylglycerol to 2-2.2 times that in control 208F cells. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate-phospholipase C activity did not change on the transformation when assayed under various conditions. The increased level of diacylglycerol caused intracellular translocation, activation, and down-regulation of protein kinase C changes which may be one of the essential events in transformation by the v-Ha-ras gene.

  3. Reciprocal actions of NCAM and tPA via a Ras-dependent MAPK activation in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeon; Seuk Kim, Jin; Mogg Kim, Jung; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Yong-Sung

    2002-10-25

    In an attempt to identify the functions of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, we investigated the relationship between the two molecules by focusing on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), an essential enzyme in this process. NCAM clustering in cultured hippocampal neurons transiently induced MAPK within 10min. Moreover, soluble NCAM also induced a Ras-dependent MAPK activation. Conversely, MAPK activation led to an increase in the expressions of all three isoforms of NCAM. Treatment of neurons with tPA and plasminogen induced a Ras-dependent MAPK activation and tPA-plasmin degradation of NCAM was mediated in a MAPK-dependent manner. Soluble NCAM transiently inhibited tPA mRNA expression levels in a MAPK-dependent manner, while stimulation of MAPK alone induced tPA reduction in cells. These results collectively indicate that NCAM and tPA reciprocally act as important regulators in the modulation of synaptic plasticity via a Ras-MAPK-involved signaling pathway. In turn, MAPK activation may cause tPA degradation or a decrease in expression to promote synaptic plasticity.

  4. Ras enhances Myc protein stability.

    PubMed

    Sears, R; Leone, G; DeGregori, J; Nevins, J R

    1999-02-01

    Various experiments have demonstrated a collaborative action of Myc and Ras, both in normal cell growth control as well as during oncogenesis. We now show that Ras enhances the accumulation of Myc activity by stabilizing the Myc protein. Whereas Myc has a very short half-life when produced in the absence of mitogenic signals, due to degradation by the 26S proteasome, the half-life of Myc increases markedly in growth-stimulated cells. This stabilization is dependent on the Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway and is not augmented by proteasome inhibition, suggesting that Ras inhibits the proteasome-dependent degradation of Myc. We propose that one aspect of Myc-Ras collaboration is an ability of Ras to enhance the accumulation of transcriptionally active Myc protein.

  5. A Small Ras-like protein Ray/Rab1c modulates the p53-regulating activity of PRPK

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Yasuhito . E-mail: yasuhito@m.ehime-u.ac.jp; Takeuchi, Takashi; Imai, Yoshinori; Murase, Ryuichi; Kamei, Yoshiaki; Fujibuchi, Taketsugu; Matsumoto, Suguru; Ueda, Norifumi; Kito, Katsumi; Ogasawara, Masahito; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-05-26

    PRPK phosphorylates serine-15 residue of p53 and enhances transcriptional activity. PRPK possesses a bipartite nuclear localization signal and localizes in nucleus when over-expressed in cells. However, intrinsic PRPK localizes mainly in the cytosol in situ. While studying the mechanisms in the distribution of intrinsic PRPK, we identified a PRPK binding protein, an ubiquitously expressed Small Ras-like GTPase, Rab1c, also named Ray or Rab35. The over-expressed Ray was distributed in the nucleus, cytosol, and cell membrane. Both Ray wild type and GTP-restrictively binding mutant Ray-Q67L, but not guanine nucleotide unstable binding mutant Ray-N120I, partially distributed the over-expressed PRPK to the cytosol and also suppressed the PRPK-induced p53-transcriptional activity profoundly. A Small Ras-like GTPase protein Ray was thus indicated to modulate p53 transcriptional activity of PRPK.

  6. RLIP76 regulates Arf6-dependent cell spreading and migration by linking ARNO with activated R-Ras at recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Lee, Seunghyung; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay; Ginsberg, Mark H; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2015-11-27

    R-Ras small GTPase enhances cell spreading and motility via RalBP1/RLIP76, an R-Ras effector that links GTP-R-Ras to activation of Arf6 and Rac1 GTPases. Here, we report that RLIP76 performs these functions by binding cytohesin-2/ARNO, an Arf GTPase guanine exchange factor, and connecting it to R-Ras at recycling endosomes. RLIP76 formed a complex with R-Ras and ARNO by binding ARNO via its N-terminus (residues 1-180) and R-Ras via residues 180-192. This complex was present in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes and the presence of ARNO in recycling endosomes required RLIP76, and was not supported by RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192). Spreading and migration required RLIP76(1-180), and RLIP76(Δ1-180) blocked ARNO recruitment to recycling endosomes, and spreading. Arf6 activation with an ArfGAP inhibitor overcame the spreading defects in RLIP76-depleted cells or cells expressing RLIP76(Δ1-180). Similarly, RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192) suppressed Arf6 activation. Together these results demonstrate that RLIP76 acts as a scaffold at recycling endosomes by binding activated R-Ras, recruiting ARNO to activate Arf6, thereby contributing to cell spreading and migration.

  7. Effects of apicidin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on the regulation of apoptosis in H-ras-transformed breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeyoung; Im, Ji Young; Kim, Jeonga; Choi, Wahn Soo; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2008-03-01

    The cellular susceptibility of cancer cells to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is increased by the etopic expression of oncogenic Ras. However, the ability of HDAC inhibitors to regulate the apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells is still not completely understood. In this study, the anti-proliferative effects of apicidin were compared in H-ras-transformed human breast epithelial (MCF10A-ras) and non-transformed epithelial (MCF10A) cells. MCF10A-ras cells showed a significantly higher growth rate than MCF10A cells. Apicidin significantly increased the levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 in both cell lines. Western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to determine if the anti-proliferative effects of apicidin in MCF10A and MCF10A-ras cells could be mediated by modulating the cell cycle. Apicidin attenuated the expression of cyclin E and CDK2 in MCF10A cells, decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin E levels in MCF10A-ras cells, and increased the levels of CDK inhibitors, p21WAF1/Cip1 and p27Kip1, in both cell lines. Notably, the levels of hyperphosphorylation of the Rb protein levels were lower in the MCF10A-ras cells after apicidin treatment. Studies on the regulation of apoptosis showed that apicidin induces the up-regulation of p53 and the downstream activation of ERK in MCF10A-ras cells. The up-regulation of p53 promoted Bax expression leading to activation of caspases-9 and -6, and eventually to apoptosis in MCF10A-ras cells. In addition, apicidin significantly increased the levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in MCF10A-ras cells. Therefore, the apicidin-mediated ERK pathway appears to play an important role in modulating the pro-apoptotic pathway in MCF10A-ras cells.

  8. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is activated by B-Raf in response to nerve growth factor through interaction with p21ras.

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, R K; Moodie, S A; Wolfman, A; Landreth, G E

    1994-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) activates the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade through a p21ras-dependent signal transduction pathway in PC12 cells. The linkage between p21ras and MEK1 was investigated to identify those elements which participate in the regulation of MEK1 activity. We have screened for MEK activators using a coupled assay in which the MAP kinase cascade has been reconstituted in vitro. We report that we have detected a single NGF-stimulated MEK-activating activity which has been identified as B-Raf. PC12 cells express both B-Raf and c-Raf1; however, the MEK-activating activity was found only in fractions containing B-Raf. c-Raf1-containing fractions did not exhibit a MEK-activating activity. Gel filtration analysis revealed that the B-Raf eluted with an apparent M(r) of 250,000 to 300,000, indicating that it is present within a stable complex with other unidentified proteins. Immunoprecipitation with B-Raf-specific antisera quantitatively precipitated all MEK activator activity from these fractions. We also demonstrate that B-Raf, as well as c-Raf1, directly interacted with activated p21ras immobilized on silica beads. NGF treatment of the cells had no effect on the ability of B-Raf or c-Raf1 to bind to activated p21ras. These data indicate that this interaction was not dependent upon the activation state of these enzymes; however, MEK kinase activity was found to be associated with p21ras following incubation with NGF-treated samples at levels higher than those obtained from unstimulated cells. These data provide direct evidence that NGF-stimulated B-Raf is responsible for the activation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells, whereas c-Raf1 activity was not found to function within this pathway. Images PMID:7935411

  9. K-Ras(V14I) -induced Noonan syndrome predisposes to tumour development in mice.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Garcia-Medina, Raquel; Jiménez, Beatriz; Cañamero, Marta; de Martino, Alba; Guerra, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and congenital heart defects. A significant proportion of NS patients may also develop myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML). Surprisingly, scarce information is available in relation to other tumour types in these patients. We have previously developed and characterized a knock-in mouse model that carries one of the most frequent KRAS-NS-related mutations, the K-Ras(V14I) substitution, which recapitulates most of the alterations described in NS patients, including MPDs. The K-Ras(V14I) mutation is a mild activating K-Ras protein; thus, we have used this model to study tumour susceptibility in comparison with mice expressing the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene. Interestingly, our studies have shown that these mice display a generalized tumour predisposition and not just MPDs. In fact, we have observed that the K-Ras(V14I) mutation is capable of cooperating with the p16Ink4a/p19Arf and Trp53 tumour suppressors, as well as with other risk factors such as pancreatitis, thereby leading to a higher cancer incidence. In conclusion, our results illustrate that the K-Ras(V14I) activating protein is able to induce cancer, although at a much lower level than the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene, and that it can be significantly modulated by both genetic and non-genetic events. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27174785

  10. K-Ras(V14I) -induced Noonan syndrome predisposes to tumour development in mice.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Garcia-Medina, Raquel; Jiménez, Beatriz; Cañamero, Marta; de Martino, Alba; Guerra, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and congenital heart defects. A significant proportion of NS patients may also develop myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML). Surprisingly, scarce information is available in relation to other tumour types in these patients. We have previously developed and characterized a knock-in mouse model that carries one of the most frequent KRAS-NS-related mutations, the K-Ras(V14I) substitution, which recapitulates most of the alterations described in NS patients, including MPDs. The K-Ras(V14I) mutation is a mild activating K-Ras protein; thus, we have used this model to study tumour susceptibility in comparison with mice expressing the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene. Interestingly, our studies have shown that these mice display a generalized tumour predisposition and not just MPDs. In fact, we have observed that the K-Ras(V14I) mutation is capable of cooperating with the p16Ink4a/p19Arf and Trp53 tumour suppressors, as well as with other risk factors such as pancreatitis, thereby leading to a higher cancer incidence. In conclusion, our results illustrate that the K-Ras(V14I) activating protein is able to induce cancer, although at a much lower level than the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene, and that it can be significantly modulated by both genetic and non-genetic events. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Rck1 up-regulates pseudohyphal growth by activating the Ras2 and MAP kinase pathways independently in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Miwha; Kang, Chang-Min; Park, Yong-Sung; Yun, Cheol-Won

    2014-02-21

    Previously, we reported that Rck1 regulates Hog1 and Slt2 activities and affects MAP kinase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, we found that Rck1 up-regulates phospho-Kss1 and phospho-Fus3. Kss1 has been known as a component in the pseudohyphal growth pathway, and we attempted to identify the function of Rck1 in pseudohyphal growth. Rck1 up-regulated Ras2 at the protein level, not the transcriptional level. Additionally, FLO11 transcription was up-regulated by RCK1 over-expression. RCK1 expression was up-regulated during growth on SLAD+1% butanol medium. On nitrogen starvation agar plates, RCK1 over-expression induced pseudohyphal growth of colonies, and cells over-expressing RCK1 showed a filamentous morphology when grown in SLAD medium. Furthermore, 1-butanol greatly induced filamentous growth when RCK1 was over-expressed. Moreover, invasive growth was activated in haploid cells when RCK1 was over-expressed. The growth defect of cells observed on 1-butanol medium was recovered when RCK1 was over-expressed. Interestingly, Ras2 and phospho-Kss1 were up-regulated by Rck1 independently. Together, these results suggest that Rck1 promotes pseudohyphal growth by activating Ras2 and Kss1 via independent pathways in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24491552

  12. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics with novel pairwise abundance normalization reveals synergistic RAS and CIP2A signaling.

    PubMed

    Kauko, Otto; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Jumppanen, Mikael; Hintsanen, Petteri; Suni, Veronika; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Corthals, Garry; Aittokallio, Tero; Westermarck, Jukka; Imanishi, Susumu Y

    2015-08-17

    Hyperactivated RAS drives progression of many human malignancies. However, oncogenic activity of RAS is dependent on simultaneous inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Although PP2A is known to regulate some of the RAS effector pathways, it has not been systematically assessed how these proteins functionally interact. Here we have analyzed phosphoproteomes regulated by either RAS or PP2A, by phosphopeptide enrichment followed by mass-spectrometry-based label-free quantification. To allow data normalization in situations where depletion of RAS or PP2A inhibitor CIP2A causes a large uni-directional change in the phosphopeptide abundance, we developed a novel normalization strategy, named pairwise normalization. This normalization is based on adjusting phosphopeptide abundances measured before and after the enrichment. The superior performance of the pairwise normalization was verified by various independent methods. Additionally, we demonstrate how the selected normalization method influences the downstream analyses and interpretation of pathway activities. Consequently, bioinformatics analysis of RAS and CIP2A regulated phosphoproteomes revealed a significant overlap in their functional pathways. This is most likely biologically meaningful as we observed a synergistic survival effect between CIP2A and RAS expression as well as KRAS activating mutations in TCGA pan-cancer data set, and synergistic relationship between CIP2A and KRAS depletion in colony growth assays.

  13. CDK4 coexpression with Ras generates malignant human epidermal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Mirella; Kubo, Yoshiaki; Cai, Ti; Dajee, Maya; Tarutani, Masahito; Lin, Qun; Fang, Min; Tao, Shiying; Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2002-10-01

    Ras acts with other proteins to induce neoplasia. By itself, however, strong Ras signaling can suppress proliferation of normal cells. In primary epidermal cells, we found that oncogenic Ras transiently decreases cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 expression in association with cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. CDK4 co-expression circumvents Ras growth suppression and induces invasive human neoplasia resembling squamous cell carcinoma. Tumorigenesis is dependent on CDK4 kinase function, with cyclin D1 required but not sufficient for this process. In facilitating escape from G1 growth restraints, Ras and CDK4 alter the composition of cyclin D and cyclin E complexes and promote resistance to growth inhibition by INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. These data identify a new role for oncogenic Ras in CDK4 regulation and highlight the functional importance of CDK4 suppression in preventing uncontrolled growth.

  14. Ras activation mediates WISP-1-induced increases in cell motility and matrix metalloproteinase expression in human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Lin; Tsai, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Zhen-Wei; Wu, Chi-Ming; Li, Te-Mao; Fong, Yi-Chin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-12-01

    WISP-1 is a cysteine-rich protein that belongs to the CCN (Cyr61, CTGF, Nov) family of matrix cellular proteins. Osteosarcoma is a type of highly malignant tumor with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis. However, the effect of WISP-1 on migration activity in human osteosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. In this study, we first found that the expression of WISP-1 in osteosarcoma patients was significantly higher than that in normal bone and corrected with tumor stage. Exogenous treatment of osteosarcoma cells with WISP-1 promoted cell motility and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. In addition, the Ras and Raf-1 inhibitor or siRNA abolished WISP-1-induced cell migration and MMP expression. On the other hand, activation of the Ras, Raf-1, MEK, ERK, and NF-κB signaling pathway after WISP-1 treatment was demonstrated, and WISP-1-induced expression of MMPs and migration activity were inhibited by the specific inhibitor, and mutant of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB cascades. Taken together, our results indicated that WISP-1 enhances the migration of osteosarcoma cells by increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression through the integrin receptor, Ras, Raf-1, MEK, ERK, and NF-κB signal transduction pathway.

  15. Ras activation of a Rac1 exchange factor, Tiam1, mediates neurotrophin-3-induced Schwann cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Junji; Miyamoto, Yuki; Tanoue, Akito; Shooter, Eric M.; Chan, Jonah R.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous neurotrophins positively and negatively regulate migration of premyelinating Schwann cells before the initiation of myelination. Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) acting through the TrkC receptor tyrosine kinase stimulates Schwann cell migration via the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. We previously demonstrated that TrkC directly phosphorylates and activates Dbs, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42, to partially mediate Schwann cell migration. Here, we identify T lymphoma invasion and metastasis (Tiam) 1 as the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide exchange factor involved in NT3-induced Schwann cell migration. Furthermore, the interaction between the small GTPase Ras and Tiam1 plays an essential role in the activation of Rac1. Taken together, these results suggest that NT3 activation of TrkC stimulates Schwann cell migration through two parallel signaling units, Ras/Tiam1/Rac1 and Dbs/Cdc42, and that Schwann cell migration is uniquely regulated in the case of Ras and Rac1, by two different types of small GTPases. PMID:16203995

  16. The heterotrimeric G q protein-coupled angiotensin II receptor activates p21 ras via the tyrosine kinase-Shc-Grb2-Sos pathway in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sadoshima, J; Izumo, S

    1996-01-01

    p21 ras plays as important role in cell proliferation, transformation and differentiation. Recently, the requirement of p21 ras has been suggested for cellular responses induced by stimulation of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors. However, it remains to be determined how agonists for G protein-coupled receptors activate p21 ras in metazoans. We show here that stimulation of the G q protein-coupled angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor causes activation of p21 ras in cardiac myocytes. The p21 ras activation by Ang II is mediated by an increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity, but not by an inhibition of the GTPase-activating protein. Ang II causes rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and its association with Grb2 and mSos-1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of p21 ras. This leads to translocation of mSos-1 to the membrane fraction. Shc associates with the SH3 domain of Fyn whose tyrosine kinase activity is activated by Ang II with a similar time course as that of tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc. Ang II-induced increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity was inhibited by a peptide ligand specific to the SH3 domain of the Src family tyrosine kinases. These results suggest that an agonist for a pertussis toxin-insensitive G protein-coupled receptor may initiate the cross-talk with non-receptor-type tyrosine kinases, thereby activating p21 ras using a similar mechanism as receptor tyrosine kinase-induced p21 ras activation. Images PMID:8631299

  17. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  18. Synthesis, biological, and biophysical studies of DAG-indololactones designed as selective activators of RasGRP.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lia C; Donadío, Lucia Gandolfi; Mann, Ella; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Hill, Colin S; Kelsey, Jessica S; Yang, Jing; Esch, Timothy E; Santos, Marina; Peach, Megan L; Kelley, James A; Blumberg, Peter M; Jelinek, Raz; Marquez, Victor E; Comin, Maria J

    2014-06-15

    The development of selective agents capable of discriminating between protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms and other diacylglycerol (DAG)-responsive C1 domain-containing proteins represents an important challenge. Recent studies have highlighted the role that Ras guanine nucleotide-releasing protein (RasGRP) isoforms play both in immune responses as well as in the development of prostate cancer and melanoma, suggesting that the discovery of selective ligands could have potential therapeutic value. Thus far, the N-methyl-substituted indololactone 1 is the agonist with the highest reported potency and selectivity for RasGRP relative to PKC. Here we present the synthesis, binding studies, cellular assays and biophysical analysis of interactions with model membranes of a family of regioisomers of 1 (compounds 2-5) that differ in the position of the linkage between the indole ring and the lactone moiety. These structural variations were studied to explore the interaction of the active complex (C1 domain-ligand) with cellular membranes, which is believed to be an important factor for selectivity in the activation of DAG-responsive C1 domain containing signaling proteins. All compounds were potent and selective activators of RasGRP when compared to PKCα with selectivities ranging from 6 to 65 fold. However, the parent compound 1 was appreciably more selective than any of the other isomers. In intact cells, modest differences in the patterns of translocation of the C1 domain targets were observed. Biophysical studies using giant vesicles as model membranes did show substantial differences in terms of molecular interactions impacting lipid organization, dynamics and membrane insertion. However, these differences did not yield correspondingly large changes in patterns of biological response, at least for the parameters examined.

  19. High p21RAS expression levels correlate with chromosome 8 rearrangements in benign human mixed salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Stenman, G; Sandros, J; Mark, J; Nordkvist, A

    1989-09-01

    The expression of RAS oncogenes in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors was studied by immunohistochemistry and by immunoblotting using monoclonal antibodies recognizing the HRAS and KRAS gene products. Twenty-eight out of 29 benign pleomorphic adenomas overexpressed p21RAS, whereas only 12 out of 18 malignant salivary gland tumors expressed the p21 protein. The expression levels were also substantially higher in the adenomas than in the malignant tumors, indicating that RAS gene activation appears to be more frequent and of greater importance for benign than for malignant salivary gland tumors. Comparisons of the p21 expression levels with the karyotypes of the pleomorphic adenomas revealed a novel correlation between high p21 expression and chromosome 8 rearrangements. As a hypothesis, it is suggested that a novel gene located on the proximal long arm of chromosome 8, most likely at band q12, is involved in the regulation of RAS gene expression.

  20. Mutant N-RAS Induces Erythroid Lineage Dysplasia in Human CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Darley, Richard L.; Hoy, Terence G.; Baines, Paul; Padua, Rose Ann; Burnett, Alan K.

    1997-01-01

    RAS mutations arise at high frequency (20–40%) in both acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (which is considered to be a manifestation of preleukemic disease). In each case, mutations arise predominantly at the N-RAS locus. These observations suggest a fundamental role for this oncogene in leukemogenesis. However, despite its obvious significance, little is known of how this key oncogene may subvert the process of hematopoiesis in human cells. Using CD34+ progenitor cells, we have modeled the preleukemic state by infecting these cells with amphotropic retrovirus expressing mutant N-RAS together with the selectable marker gene lacZ. Expression of the lacZ gene product, β-galactosidase, allows direct identification and study of N-RAS–expressing cells by incubating infected cultures with a fluorogenic substrate for β-galactosidase, which gives rise to a fluorescent signal within the infected cells. By using multiparameter flow cytometry, we have studied the ability of CD34+ cells expressing mutant N-RAS to undergo erythroid differentiation induced by erythropoietin. By this means, we have found that erythroid progenitor cells expressing mutant N-RAS exhibit a proliferative defect resulting in an increased cell doubling time and a decrease in the proportion of cells in S + G2M phase of the cell cycle. This is linked to a slowing in the rate of differentiation as determined by comparative cell-surface marker analysis and ultimate failure of the differentiation program at the late-erythroblast stage of development. The dyserythropoiesis was also linked to an increased tendency of the RAS-expressing cells to undergo programmed cell death during their differentiation program. This erythroid lineage dysplasia recapitulates one of the most common features of myelodysplastic syndrome, and for the first time provides a causative link between mutational activation of N-RAS and the pathogenesis of preleukemia. PMID:9104820

  1. Anti-tumour activity in RAS-driven tumours by blocking AKT and MEK

    PubMed Central

    Tolcher, Anthony W.; Khan, Khurum; Ong, Michael; Banerji, Udai; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Gandara, David R.; Patnaik, Amita; Baird, Richard D.; Olmos, David; Garrett, Christopher R.; Skolnik, Jeffrey M.; Rubin, Eric H.; Smith, Paul D.; Huang, Pearl; Learoyd, Maria; Shannon, Keith A.; Morosky, Anne; Tetteh, Ernestina; Jou, Ying-Ming; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P.; Moreno, Victor; Kaiser, Brianne; Yap, Timothy A.; Yan, Li; de Bono, Johann S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human tumours. KRAS-mutant cells may exhibit resistance to the allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244; ARRY-142886) and allosteric AKT inhibitors (such as MK-2206), the combination of which may overcome resistance to both monotherapies. Experimental Design We conducted a dose/schedule-finding study evaluating MK-2206 and selumetinib in patients with advanced treatment-refractory solid tumours. Recommended dosing schedules were defined as MK-2206 135 mg weekly and selumetinib 100 mg once-daily. Results Grade 3 rash was the most common dose-limiting toxicity (DLT); other DLTs included grade 4 lipase increase, grade 3 stomatitis, diarrhoea, and fatigue, and grade 3 and grade 2 retinal pigment epithelium detachment. There were no meaningful pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Clinical anti-tumour activity included RECIST 1.0-confirmed partial responses in non-small cell lung cancer and low-grade ovarian carcinoma. Conclusion Responses in KRAS-mutant cancers were generally durable. Clinical co-targeting of MEK and AKT signalling may be an important therapeutic strategy in KRAS-driven human malignancies (Trial NCT number NCT01021748). PMID:25516890

  2. The novel RacE-binding protein GflB sharpens Ras activity at the leading edge of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Senoo, Hiroshi; Cai, Huaqing; Wang, Yu; Sesaki, Hiromi; Iijima, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Directional sensing, a process in which cells convert an external chemical gradient into internal signaling events, is essential in chemotaxis. We previously showed that a Rho GTPase, RacE, regulates gradient sensing in Dictyostelium cells. Here, using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify a novel RacE-binding protein, GflB, which contains a Ras GEF domain and a Rho GAP domain. Using biochemical and gene knockout approaches, we show that GflB balances the activation of Ras and Rho GTPases, which enables cells to precisely orient signaling events toward higher concentrations of chemoattractants. Furthermore, we find that GflB is located at the leading edge of migrating cells, and this localization is regulated by the actin cytoskeleton and phosphatidylserine. Our findings provide a new molecular mechanism that connects directional sensing and morphological polarization. PMID:27009206

  3. Induction of p27Kip1 degradation and anchorage independence by Ras through the MAP kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kawada, M; Yamagoe, S; Murakami, Y; Suzuki, K; Mizuno, S; Uehara, Y

    1997-08-01

    While most untransformed cells require substrate attachment for growth (anchorage dependence), the oncogenic transformed cells lack this requirement (anchorage independence) and are often tumorigenic. However, the mechanism of loss of anchorage dependence is not fully understood. When rat normal fibroblasts were cultured in suspension without substrate attachment, the cell cycle arrested in G1 phase and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 protein and its mRNA accumulated. Conditional expression of oncogenic Ras induced the G1-S transition of the cell cycle and significantly shortened the half-life of p27Kip1 protein without altering its mRNA level. Inhibition of the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase by cyclic AMP-elevating agents and a MEK inhibitor prevented the oncogenic Ras-induced degradation of p27Kip1. These results suggest that the loss of substrate attachment induces the cell cycle arrest through the up-regulation of p27Kip1 mRNA, but the oncogenic Ras confers anchorage independence by accelerating p27Kip1 degradation through the activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, we have found that p27Kip1 is phosphorylated by MAP kinase in vitro and the phosphorylated p27Kip1 cannot bind to and inhibit cdk2.

  4. PML suppresses oncogenic transformation of NIH/3T3 cells by activated neu

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The chromosomal translocation t(15;17)(q22;q12) is a consistent feature of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) that results in the disruption of genes for the zinc finger transcription factor PML and the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha). We have previously shown that PML is a growth suppressor and is able to suppress transformation of NIH/3T3 by activated neu oncogene. In the study presented here, the full-length PML cDNA was transfected into B104-1-1 cells (NIH/3T3 cells transformed by the activated neu oncogene) by retrovirally mediated gene transfer. We found that expression of PML could reverse phenotypes of B104-1-1 including morphology, contact-limiting properties, and growth rate in both transient-expression and stable transfectants. We also demonstrated that PML is able to suppress clonogenicity of B104-1-1 in soft agar assay and tumorigenicity in nude mice. These results strongly support our previous finding that PML is a transformation or growth suppressor. Our results further demonstrate that expression of PML in B104-1-1 cells has little effect on cell cycle distribution. Western blot analysis demonstrated that suppression of neu expression in B104-1- 1 by PML was insignificant in the transient transfection experiment but significant in the PML stable transfectants. This study suggests that PML may suppress neu expression and block signaling events associated with activated neu. This study supports our hypothesis that disruption of the normal function of PML, a growth or transformation suppressor, is a critical event in APL leukomogenesis. PMID:7759992

  5. Discovery of a Selective Inhibitor of Oncogenic B-Raf Kinase With Potent Antimelanoma Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.; Lee, J.T.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Cho, H.; Mamo, S.; Bremer, R.; Gillette, S.; Kong, J.; Haass, N.K.; Sproesser, K.; Li, L.; Smalley, K.S.M.; Fong, D.; Zhu, Y.-L.; Marimuthu, A.; Nguyen, H.; Lam, B.; Liu, J.; Cheung, I.; Rice, J.

    2009-05-26

    BRAF{sup V600E} is the most frequent oncogenic protein kinase mutation known. Furthermore, inhibitors targeting 'active' protein kinases have demonstrated significant utility in the therapeutic repertoire against cancer. Therefore, we pursued the development of specific kinase inhibitors targeting B-Raf, and the V600E allele in particular. By using a structure-guided discovery approach, a potent and selective inhibitor of active B-Raf has been discovered. PLX4720, a 7-azaindole derivative that inhibits B-Raf{sup V600E} with an IC{sub 50} of 13 nM, defines a class of kinase inhibitor with marked selectivity in both biochemical and cellular assays. PLX4720 preferentially inhibits the active B-Raf{sup V600E} kinase compared with a broad spectrum of other kinases, and potent cytotoxic effects are also exclusive to cells bearing the V600E allele. Consistent with the high degree of selectivity, ERK phosphorylation is potently inhibited by PLX4720 in B-Raf{sup V600E}-bearing tumor cell lines but not in cells lacking oncogenic B-Raf. In melanoma models, PLX4720 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis exclusively in B-Raf{sup V600E}-positive cells. In B-Raf{sup V600E}-dependent tumor xenograft models, orally dosed PLX4720 causes significant tumor growth delays, including tumor regressions, without evidence of toxicity. The work described here represents the entire discovery process, from initial identification through structural and biological studies in animal models to a promising therapeutic for testing in cancer patients bearing B-Raf{sup V600E}-driven tumors.

  6. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  7. RNA helicase A activity is inhibited by oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Schneider, Jeffrey A.; Sajwan, Kamal; Graham, Garrett T.; Griffin, Brittany; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Youbi, Sarah E.; Kallarakal, Abraham; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Casey, John L.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases impact RNA structure and metabolism from transcription through translation, in part through protein interactions with transcription factors. However, there is limited knowledge on the role of transcription factor influence upon helicase activity. RNA helicase A (RHA) is a DExH-box RNA helicase that plays multiple roles in cellular biology, some functions requiring its activity as a helicase while others as a protein scaffold. The oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1 requires RHA to enable Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncogenesis and growth; a small molecule, YK-4-279 disrupts this complex in cells. Our current study investigates the effect of EWS-FLI1 upon RHA helicase activity. We found that EWS-FLI1 reduces RHA helicase activity in a dose-dependent manner without affecting intrinsic ATPase activity; however, the RHA kinetics indicated a complex model. Using separated enantiomers, only (S)-YK-4-279 reverses the EWS-FLI1 inhibition of RHA helicase activity. We report a novel RNA binding property of EWS-FLI1 leading us to discover that YK-4-279 inhibition of RHA binding to EWS-FLI1 altered the RNA binding profile of both proteins. We conclude that EWS-FLI1 modulates RHA helicase activity causing changes in overall transcriptome processing. These findings could lead to both enhanced understanding of oncogenesis and provide targets for therapy. PMID:25564528

  8. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces activation of Ras, Raf-1, MEK and MAPK in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Reimann, T; Hempel, U; Krautwald, S; Axmann, A; Scheibe, R; Seidel, D; Wenzel, K W

    1997-02-10

    The transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblast-like cells and the proliferation of the transdifferentiated cells are controlled by TGF-beta1. Little is known about the intracellular signal transducers of TGF-beta1. In this paper we show that in cultured hepatic stellate cells TGF-beta1 induces activation of Ras, Raf-1, MEK and MAPK p42 and p44. The activation of MAPK depends on the activation of MEK. Our data exclude that the observed effects are mediated by a bFGF or PDGF autocrine loop. PMID:9038360

  9. The inhibition of the GTPase activating protein-Ha-ras interaction by acidic lipids is due to physical association of the C-terminal domain of the GTPase activating protein with micellar structures.

    PubMed Central

    Serth, J; Lautwein, A; Frech, M; Wittinghofer, A; Pingoud, A

    1991-01-01

    The effects of fatty acids and phospholipids on the interaction of the full-length GTPase activating protein (GAP) as well as its isolated C-terminal domain and the Ha-ras proto-oncogene product p21 were studied by various methods, viz. GTPase activity measurements, fluorescence titrations and gel permeation chromatography. It is shown that all fatty acids and acidic phospholipids tested, provided the critical micellar concentration and the critical micellar temperature are reached, inhibit the GAP stimulated p21 GTPase activity. This is interpreted to mean that it is not the molecular structure of acidic lipid molecules per se but rather their physical state of aggregation which is responsible for the inhibitory effect of lipids on the GTPase activity. The relative inhibitory potency of various lipids was measured under defined conditions with mixed Triton X-100 micelles to follow the order: unsaturated fatty acids greater than saturated acids approximately phosphatidic acids greater than or equal to phosphatidylinositol phosphates much greater than phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine. GTPase experiments with varying concentrations of p21 and constant concentrations of GAP and lipids indicate that the binding of GAP by the lipid micelles is responsible for the inhibition, a finding which was confirmed by fluorescence titrations and gel filtrations which show that the C-terminal domain of GAP is bound by lipid micelles. PMID:2026138

  10. Ras-induced epigenetic inactivation of the RRAD (Ras-related associated with diabetes) gene promotes glucose uptake in a human ovarian cancer model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Guiling; Mao, Fengbiao; Li, Xianfeng; Liu, Qi; Chen, Lin; Lv, Lu; Wang, Xin; Wu, Jinyu; Dai, Wei; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Enfeng; Tang, Kai-Fu; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2014-05-16

    RRAD (Ras-related associated with diabetes) is a small Ras-related GTPase that is frequently inactivated by DNA methylation of the CpG island in its promoter region in cancer tissues. However, the role of the methylation-induced RRAD inactivation in tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, the Ras-regulated transcriptome and epigenome were profiled by comparing T29H (a Ras(V12)-transformed human ovarian epithelial cell line) with T29 (an immortalized but non-transformed cell line) through reduced representation bisulfite sequencing and digital gene expression. We found that Ras(V12)-mediated oncogenic transformation was accompanied by RRAD promoter hypermethylation and a concomitant loss of RRAD expression. In addition, we found that the RRAD promoter was hypermethylated, and its transcription was reduced in ovarian cancer versus normal ovarian tissues. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in demethylation in the RRAD promoter and restored RRAD expression in T29H cells. Additionally, treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI277 resulted in restored RRAD expression and inhibited DNA methytransferase expression and activity in T29H cells. By employing knockdown and overexpression techniques in T29 and T29H, respectively, we found that RRAD inhibited glucose uptake and lactate production by repressing the expression of glucose transporters. Finally, RRAD overexpression in T29H cells inhibited tumor formation in nude mice, suggesting that RRAD is a tumor suppressor gene. Our results indicate that Ras(V12)-mediated oncogenic transformation induces RRAD epigenetic inactivation, which in turn promotes glucose uptake and may contribute to ovarian cancer tumorigenesis.

  11. Ras-induced epigenetic inactivation of the RRAD (Ras-related associated with diabetes) gene promotes glucose uptake in a human ovarian cancer model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Guiling; Mao, Fengbiao; Li, Xianfeng; Liu, Qi; Chen, Lin; Lv, Lu; Wang, Xin; Wu, Jinyu; Dai, Wei; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Enfeng; Tang, Kai-Fu; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2014-05-16

    RRAD (Ras-related associated with diabetes) is a small Ras-related GTPase that is frequently inactivated by DNA methylation of the CpG island in its promoter region in cancer tissues. However, the role of the methylation-induced RRAD inactivation in tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, the Ras-regulated transcriptome and epigenome were profiled by comparing T29H (a Ras(V12)-transformed human ovarian epithelial cell line) with T29 (an immortalized but non-transformed cell line) through reduced representation bisulfite sequencing and digital gene expression. We found that Ras(V12)-mediated oncogenic transformation was accompanied by RRAD promoter hypermethylation and a concomitant loss of RRAD expression. In addition, we found that the RRAD promoter was hypermethylated, and its transcription was reduced in ovarian cancer versus normal ovarian tissues. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in demethylation in the RRAD promoter and restored RRAD expression in T29H cells. Additionally, treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI277 resulted in restored RRAD expression and inhibited DNA methytransferase expression and activity in T29H cells. By employing knockdown and overexpression techniques in T29 and T29H, respectively, we found that RRAD inhibited glucose uptake and lactate production by repressing the expression of glucose transporters. Finally, RRAD overexpression in T29H cells inhibited tumor formation in nude mice, suggesting that RRAD is a tumor suppressor gene. Our results indicate that Ras(V12)-mediated oncogenic transformation induces RRAD epigenetic inactivation, which in turn promotes glucose uptake and may contribute to ovarian cancer tumorigenesis. PMID:24648519

  12. Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Ras Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stephan; Salt, Megan; Young, Amy; McCormick, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Ras genes are frequently activated in cancer. Attempts to develop drugs that target mutant Ras proteins have, so far, been unsuccessful. Tumors bearing these mutations, therefore, remain among the most difficult to treat. Most efforts to block activated Ras have focused on pathways downstream. Drugs that inhibit Raf kinase have shown clinical benefit in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, these drugs have failed to show clinical benefit in Ras mutant tumors. It remains unclear to what extent Ras depends on Raf kinase for transforming activity, even though Raf proteins bind directly to Ras and are certainly major effectors of Ras action in normal cells and in development. Furthermore, Raf kinase inhibitors can lead to paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors block the Ras-MAPK pathway, but often activate the PI3’-kinase, and have shown little clinical benefit as single agents. This activation is mediated by EGF-R and other receptor tyrosine kinases through relief of a negative feedback loop from ERK. Drug combinations that target multiple points within the Ras signaling network are likely to be necessary to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Other effectors may also contribute to Ras signaling and provide a source of targets. In addition, unbiased screens for genes necessary for Ras transformation have revealed new potential targets and have added to our understanding of Ras cancer biology. PMID:21779505

  13. Distinct anti-oncogenic effect of various microRNAs in different mouse models of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Junyan; Ji, Junfang; Li, Xiaolei; Ding, Ning; Wu, Heng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xin Wei; Calvisi, Diego F; Song, Guisheng; Chen, Xin

    2015-03-30

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is a typical feature of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the in vivo relevance of miRNAs along hepatocarcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we show that liver tumors induced in mice by c-Myc overexpression or AKT/Ras co-expression exhibit distinct miRNA expression profiles. Among the downregulated miRNAs, eight (miR-101, miR-107, miR-122, miR-29, miR-365, miR-375, miR-378, and miR-802) were selected and their tumor suppressor activity was determined by overexpressing each of them together with c-Myc or AKT/Ras oncogenes in mouse livers via hydrodynamic transfection. The tumor suppressor activity of these microRNAs was extremely heterogeneous in c-Myc and AKT/Ras mice: while miR-378 had no tumor suppressor activity, miR-107, mir-122, miR-29, miR-365 and miR-802 exhibited weak to moderate tumor suppressor potential. Noticeably, miR-375 showed limited antineoplastic activity against c-Myc driven tumorigenesis, whereas it strongly inhibited AKT/Ras induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Furthermore, miR-101 significantly suppressed both c-Myc and AKT/Ras liver tumor development. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that different oncogenes induce distinct miRNA patterns, whose modulation differently affects hepatocarcinogenesis depending on the driving oncogenes. Finally, our findings support a strong tumor suppressor activity of miR-101 in liver cancer models regardless of the driver oncogenes involved, thus representing a promising therapeutic target in human HCC.

  14. Tumor suppressor role of phospholipase Cε in Ras-triggered cancers

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Marta; McCarthy, Afshan; Baxendale, Rhona; Guichard, Sabrina; Magno, Lorenza; Kessaris, Nicoletta; El-Bahrawy, Mona; Yu, Philipp; Katan, Matilda

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase Cε (PLCε) has been characterized as a direct effector of Ras in vitro and in cellular systems; however, the role of PLCε in tumorigenesis and its link to Ras in this context remain unclear. To assess the role of PLCε in Ras-driven cancers, we generated two new mouse strains: one carrying a targeted deletion of Plce (Plce−/−) and the other carrying mutant alleles of Plce unable to bind to Ras (PlceRAm/RAm). The Plce−/− and, to a lesser degree, PlceRAm/RAm transgenic mice exhibited increased susceptibility to tumor formation in the two-stage skin carcinogenesis protocol, revealing a tumor suppressor function for this PLC. This result also suggests that in this context Ras binding in part regulates functions of PLCε. Although significant differences were not seen in the LSL-KrasG12D nonsmall cell lung carcinoma model, down-regulation of PLCε was found in animal tumors and in cellular systems following expression of the oncogenic Ras. An inhibitory impact of PLCε on cell growth requires intact lipase activity and is likely mediated by protein kinase C enzymes. Further cellular studies suggest involvement of histone deacetylase in the mechanism of PLCε down-regulation. Taken together, our results show a previously unidentified tumor suppressor role for this PLC in animal models and, together with observations of marked down-regulation in colorectal, lung, and skin tumors, suggest its use as a biological marker in cancer. PMID:24591640

  15. Systemic Regulation of RAS/MAPK Signaling by the Serotonin Metabolite 5-HIAA

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Tobias; Snoek, L. Basten; Fröhli, Erika; van der Bent, M. Leontien; Kammenga, Jan; Hajnal, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer is caused by the interplay of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and inherited variations in cancer susceptibility genes. While many of the tumor initiating mutations are well characterized, the effect of genetic background variation on disease onset and progression is less understood. We have used C. elegans genetics to identify genetic modifiers of the oncogenic RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. Quantitative trait locus analysis of two highly diverged C. elegans isolates combined with allele swapping experiments identified the polymorphic monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene amx-2 as a negative regulator of RAS/MAPK signaling. We further show that the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which is a product of MAOA catalysis, systemically inhibits RAS/MAPK signaling in different organs of C. elegans. Thus, MAOA activity sets a global threshold for MAPK activation by controlling 5-HIAA levels. To our knowledge, 5-HIAA is the first endogenous small molecule that acts as a systemic inhibitor of RAS/MAPK signaling. PMID:25978500

  16. Isolation of genes specifically expressed in flat revertant cells derived from activated ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells by treatment with azatyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzosiak, W J; Shindo-Okada, N; Teshima, H; Nakajima, K; Nishimura, S

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that mouse NIH 3T3 cells transformed by transfection of activated human c-Ha-ras become apparently normal upon treatment with the antibiotic azatyrosine. The revertant cells maintain their normal phenotype during prolonged culture in the absence of azatyrosine, although activated p21ras is still expressed. The normal phenotype induced by azatyrosine could be due to activation of expression of some cellular gene(s) in the cells that results in suppression of ras function. To identify the genes with increased expression in the revertant cells, we adopted differential screening of recombinants from a phage cDNA library made from mRNA of the revertant cells, hybridized with 32P-labeled cDNAs made from mRNAs of the ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells and the revertant cells. Two clones thus isolated were found to be almost identical to the ras recision gene (rrg), which was identified as a tumor-suppressor gene by Contente et al. [Contente, S., Kenyon, K., Rimoldi, D. & Friedman, R. M. (1990) Science 249, 796-798]. Other genes identified were the collagen type III and rhoB genes. Approximately half the clones were found to contain a sequence corresponding to that of the murine retrovirus-like intracisternal A particle. We speculate that azatyrosine activates several cellular genes in the ras-transformed cells and that some of these genes, including rrg, act cooperatively to counteract ras function, resulting in reversion of the ras-transformed cells to the normal phenotype. Images PMID:1594588

  17. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  18. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  19. RAS-RAF-MEK-dependent oxidative cell death involving voltage-dependent anion channels.

    PubMed

    Yagoda, Nicholas; von Rechenberg, Moritz; Zaganjor, Elma; Bauer, Andras J; Yang, Wan Seok; Fridman, Daniel J; Wolpaw, Adam J; Smukste, Inese; Peltier, John M; Boniface, J Jay; Smith, Richard; Lessnick, Stephen L; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Stockwell, Brent R

    2007-06-14

    Therapeutics that discriminate between the genetic makeup of normal cells and tumour cells are valuable for treating and understanding cancer. Small molecules with oncogene-selective lethality may reveal novel functions of oncoproteins and enable the creation of more selective drugs. Here we describe the mechanism of action of the selective anti-tumour agent erastin, involving the RAS-RAF-MEK signalling pathway functioning in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Erastin exhibits greater lethality in human tumour cells harbouring mutations in the oncogenes HRAS, KRAS or BRAF. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we discovered that erastin acts through mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs)--a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. We show that erastin treatment of cells harbouring oncogenic RAS causes the appearance of oxidative species and subsequent death through an oxidative, non-apoptotic mechanism. RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of VDAC2 or VDAC3 caused resistance to erastin, implicating these two VDAC isoforms in the mechanism of action of erastin. Moreover, using purified mitochondria expressing a single VDAC isoform, we found that erastin alters the permeability of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Finally, using a radiolabelled analogue and a filter-binding assay, we show that erastin binds directly to VDAC2. These results demonstrate that ligands to VDAC proteins can induce non-apoptotic cell death selectively in some tumour cells harbouring activating mutations in the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway.

  20. Influence of aging and caloric restriction on activation of Ras/MAPK, calcineurin, and CaMK-IV activities in rat T cells.

    PubMed

    Pahlavani, M A; Vargas, D M

    2000-02-01

    The signaling cascade mediated by Ras (p21ras) and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and calcium/calmodulin regulating enzymes, calcineurin (CaN) and CaMK-IV, are considered to be essential for T-cell growth and function. In the present study, the effect of aging and caloric restriction (CR) on the induction of Ras and MAPK activation by concanavalin A (ConA) was studied. Splenic T cells were isolated from young (4-6 months) and old (22-24 months) rats that had free access to food (control group), and from caloric restricted old (22-24 months) rats that beginning at 6 weeks of age were fed 60%(40% caloric restriction) of the diet consumed by the control rats. We found that the induction of Ras activity in T cells isolated from control old rats was lower (P<0.001) than that in control young rats. However, the levels of Ras activity in T cells isolated from CR old rats were similar to the levels in the age-matched control rats. The induction of MAPK activity in T cells isolated from control old rats and CR old rats was significantly less than in T cells isolated from control young rats, and caloric restriction significantly (P<0.05) reduced the age-related decline in MAPK activation. We also measured the induction of CaN and CaMK-IV activities by ConA in T cells from control young and old and CR old rats. The induction of both CaN and CaMK-IV activity decreased with age. Caloric restriction significantly (P<0.05) reduced the age-related decline in CaN activity, but had no significant effect on CaMK-IV activity. The changes in Ras/MAPK activation and in CaN and CaMK-IV activity with age or with CR were not associated with alterations in their corresponding protein levels. Thus, caloric restriction has a differential effect on the activation of the upstream signaling molecules that are altered with age.

  1. Cloning and characterization of Ras-GRF2, a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras.

    PubMed

    Fam, N P; Fan, W T; Wang, Z; Zhang, L J; Chen, H; Moran, M F

    1997-03-01

    Conversion of Ras proteins into an activated GTP-bound state able to bind effector proteins is catalyzed by specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors in response to a large number of extracellular stimuli. Here we report the isolation of mouse cDNAs encoding Ras-GRF2, a multidomain 135-kDa protein containing a COOH-terminal Cdc25-related domain that stimulates release of GDP from Ras but not other GTPases in vitro. Ras-GRF2 bound specifically to immobilized Ras lacking bound nucleotides, suggesting stabilization of the nucleotide-free form of Ras as a mechanism of catalyzing nucleotide exchange. The NH2-terminal region of Ras-GRF2 is predicted to contain features common to various signaling proteins including two pleckstrin homology domains and a Dbl homology region. Ras-GRF2 also contains an IQ motif which was required for its apparent constitutive association with calmodulin in epithelial cells ectopically expressing Ras-GRF2. Transient expression of Ras-GRF2 in kidney epithelial cells stimulated GTP binding by Ras and potentiated calcium ionophore-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1) dependent upon the IQ motif. Calcium influx caused Ras-GRF2 subcellular localization to change from cytosolic to peripheral, suggesting a possible mechanism for controlling Ras-GRF2 interactions with Ras at the plasma membrane. Epithelial cells overexpressing Ras-GRF2 are morphologically transformed and grow in a disorganized manner with minimal intercellular contacts. Northern analysis indicated a 9-kb GRF2 transcript in brain and lung, where p135 Ras-GRF2 is known to be expressed, and RNAs of 12 kb and 2.2 kb were detected in several tissues. Thus, Ras-GRF2 proteins with different domain structures may be widely expressed and couple diverse extracellular signals to Ras activation.

  2. Nucleolus-derived mediators in oncogenic stress response and activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2016-08-01

    Rapid growth and division of cells, including tumor ones, is correlated with intensive protein biosynthesis. The output of nucleoli, organelles where translational machineries are formed, depends on a rate of particular stages of ribosome production and on accessibility of elements crucial for their effective functioning, including substrates, enzymes as well as energy resources. Different factors that induce cellular stress also often lead to nucleolar dysfunction which results in ribosome biogenesis impairment. Such nucleolar disorders, called nucleolar or ribosomal stress, usually affect cellular functioning which in fact is a result of p53-dependent pathway activation, elicited as a response to stress. These pathways direct cells to new destinations such as cell cycle arrest, damage repair, differentiation, autophagy, programmed cell death or aging. In the case of impaired nucleolar functioning, nucleolar and ribosomal proteins mediate activation of the p53 pathways. They are also triggered as a response to oncogenic factor overexpression to protect tissues and organs against extensive proliferation of abnormal cells. Intentional impairment of any step of ribosome biosynthesis which would direct the cells to these destinations could be a strategy used in anticancer therapy. This review presents current knowledge on a nucleolus, mainly in relation to cancer biology, which is an important and extremely sensitive element of the mechanism participating in cellular stress reaction mediating activation of the p53 pathways in order to counteract stress effects, especially cancer development.

  3. Novel small molecules targeting ciliary transport of Smoothened and oncogenic Hedgehog pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Messias, Ana C.; Schorpp, Kenji; Geerlof, Arie; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter; Hadian, Kamyar; Sattler, Michael; Wanker, Erich E.; Hasenöder, Stefan; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Smoothened (Smo) to the primary cilium (PC) is a potential target to inhibit oncogenic Hh pathway activation in a large number of tumors. One drawback is the appearance of Smo mutations that resist drug treatment, which is a common reason for cancer treatment failure. Here, we undertook a high content screen with compounds in preclinical or clinical development and identified ten small molecules that prevent constitutive active mutant SmoM2 transport into PC for subsequent Hh pathway activation. Eight of the ten small molecules act through direct interference with the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2)-SmoM2 ciliary targeting complex, whereas one antagonist of ionotropic receptors prevents intracellular trafficking of Smo to the PC. Together, these findings identify several compounds with the potential to treat drug-resistant SmoM2-driven cancer forms, but also reveal off-target effects of established drugs in the clinics. PMID:26931153

  4. Oncogenes and surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Bartow, S A

    1987-08-01

    The discovery of oncogenes began with identification of genetic material in viruses capable of causing neoplasia in animals. Through processes of "transduction" and "insertional mutagenesis," RNA/retroviruses may (1) alter directly, (2) alter expression of, or (3) move pieces of host cellular genome in ways that they become potential agents of neoplastic transformation. The pieces of host cellular genome, either affected in situ by viral gene insertion or transduced by the virus, are known as oncogenes. Approximately 20 oncogenes have been identified. Although they have yet to be proven to be sufficient or necessary for neoplastic transformation, the evidence for their playing a part in the transformation process is mounting. The functions of the protein products of the various oncogenes are closely related to those of proteins involved in normal cell regulatory and cycle activities. Study of the oncogene products and their functions serves to elucidate the basic character of neoplasia. The functional classes of oncogenes with specific examples of genomic amplification, altered mRNA or protein product expression, or mutational deletion associated with human neoplasia are reviewed herein. Since the techniques for detecting oncogene DNA and mRNA alterations are rapidly becoming a part of our diagnostic armamentarium, surgical pathologists should be prepared for the imminent use of such molecular techniques and information in diagnosis and prognosis of human neoplasia.

  5. A requirement for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) function in the activation of AP-1 by Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Geppert, T D; Cobb, M H; Feramisco, J R

    1994-01-01

    The role of ERK-1 and ERK-2 in wild-type (wt) Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and serum-induced AP-1 activity was studied. Microinjection of ERK-specific substrate peptides inhibited the induction of AP-1 activity by all three stimuli, whereas a control peptide had no effect. By using eukaryotic expression constructs encoding wt ERK-1 and kinase-deficient mutants of ERKs 1 and 2, it was found that ERK-1 and ERK-2 activities are required for AP-1 activation stimulated by either wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. Overexpression of ERK-1 augmented wt Ha-Ras stimulation of AP-1, while having no effect upon PMA or serum stimulation. Overexpression of either kinase-deficient ERK-1 or kinase-deficient ERK-2 partially inhibited AP-1 activation by wt Ha-Ras but had no effect on PMA or serum-induced activation. Coexpression of both interfering mutants abolished AP-1 induction by wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. We conclude that ERKs are necessary components in the pathway leading to the activation of AP-1 stimulated by these agents. Images PMID:8170999

  6. SerpinB3 and Yap Interplay Increases Myc Oncogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Turato, Cristian; Cannito, Stefania; Simonato, Davide; Villano, Gianmarco; Morello, Elisabetta; Terrin, Liliana; Quarta, Santina; Biasiolo, Alessandra; Ruvoletto, Mariagrazia; Martini, Andrea; Fasolato, Silvano; Zanus, Giacomo; Cillo, Umberto; Gatta, Angelo; Parola, Maurizio; Pontisso, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    SerpinB3 has been recently described as an early marker of liver carcinogenesis, but the potential mechanistic role of this serpin in tumor development is still poorly understood. Overexpression of Myc often correlates with more aggressive tumour forms, supporting its involvement in carcinogenesis. Yes-associated protein (Yap), the main effector of the Hippo pathway, is a central regulator of proliferation and it has been found up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinomas. The study has been designed to investigate and characterize the interplay and functional modulation of Myc by SerpinB3 in liver cancer. Results from this study indicate that Myc was up-regulated by SerpinB3 through calpain and Hippo-dependent molecular mechanisms in transgenic mice and hepatoma cells overexpressing human SerpinB3, and also in human hepatocellular carcinomas. Human recombinant SerpinB3 was capable to inhibit the activity of Calpain in vitro, likely reducing its ability to cleave Myc in its non oncogenic Myc-nick cytoplasmic form. SerpinB3 indirectly increased the transcription of Myc through the induction of Yap pathway. These findings provide for the first time evidence that SerpinB3 can improve the production of Myc through direct and indirect mechanisms that include the inhibition of generation of its cytoplasmic form and the activation of Yap pathway. PMID:26634820

  7. STK38 is a Critical Upstream Regulator of MYC’s Oncogenic Activity in Human B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisikirska, Brygida C.; Adam, Stacey J.; Alvarez, Mariano J.; Rajbhandari, Presha; Cox, Rachel; Lefebvre, Celine; Wang, Kai; Rieckhof, Gabrielle E.; Felsher, Dean W.; Califano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The MYC proto-oncogene is associated with the pathogenesis of most human neoplasia. Conversely, its experimental inactivation elicits oncogene addiction. While MYC constitutes a formidable therapeutic target, it also plays an essential role in normal physiology, thus creating the need for context--specific targeting strategies. The analysis of post-translational MYC activity modulation yields novel targets for MYC inactivation. Specifically, following regulatory network analysis in human B cells, we identify a novel role of the STK38 kinase as a regulator of MYC activity and a candidate target for abrogating tumorigenesis in MYC addicted lymphoma. We found that STK38 regulates MYC protein stability and turnover in a kinase-activity-dependent manner. STK38 kinase inactivation abrogates apoptosis following B-cell receptor (BCR) activation, while its silencing significantly decreases MYC levels and increases apoptosis. Moreover, STK38 knockdown suppresses growth of MYC addicted tumors in vivo thus providing a novel viable target for treating these malignancies. PMID:23178486

  8. Contribution of the R-Ras2 GTP-binding protein to primary breast tumorigenesis and late-stage metastatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larive, Romain M.; Moriggi, Giulia; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Cañamero, Marta; Álava, Enrique De; Alarcón, Balbino; Dosil, Mercedes; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2014-05-01

    R-Ras2 is a transforming GTPase that shares downstream effectors with Ras subfamily proteins. However, little information exists about the function of this protein in tumorigenesis and its signalling overlap with classical Ras GTPases. Here we show, by combining loss- and gain-of-function studies in breast cancer cells, mammary epithelial cells and mouse models, that endogenous R-Ras2 has a role in both primary breast tumorigenesis and the late metastatic steps of cancer cells in the lung parenchyma. R-Ras2 drives tumorigenesis in a phosphatidylinostiol-3 kinase (PI3K)-dependent and signalling autonomous manner. By contrast, its prometastatic role requires other priming oncogenic signals and the engagement of several downstream elements. R-Ras2 function is required even in cancer cells exhibiting constitutive activation of classical Ras proteins, indicating that these GTPases are not functionally redundant. Our results also suggest that application of long-term R-Ras2 therapies will result in the development of compensatory mechanisms in breast tumours.

  9. c-Ha-ras down regulates the alpha-fetoprotein gene but not the albumin gene in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, K; Lawless, D; Ohe, Y; Miyao, Y; Nakabayashi, H; Kamiya, H; Miura, K; Ohtsuka, E; Tamaoki, T

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of transfection of the normal c-Ha-ras gene, rasGly-12, and its oncogenic mutant, rasVal-12, on expression of the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin genes in a human hepatoma cell line, HuH-7. The mutant and, to a lesser extent, the normal ras gene caused reduction of the AFP mRNA but not the albumin mRNA level in transfected HuH-7 cells. Cotransfection experiments with a rasVal-12 expression plasmid and a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to AFP regulatory sequences showed that rasVal-12 suppressed the activity of enhancer and promoter regions containing A + T-rich sequences (AT motif). In contrast, rasVal-12 did not affect the promoter activity of the albumin and human hepatitis B virus pre-S1 genes even though these promoters contain homologous A + T-rich elements. ras transfection appeared to induce phosphorylation of nuclear proteins that interact with the AFP AT motif, since gel mobility analysis revealed the formation of slow-moving complexes which was reversed by phosphatase treatment. However, similar changes in complex formation were observed with the albumin and hepatitis B surface antigen pre-S1 promoters. Therefore, this effect alone cannot explain the specific down regulation of the AFP promoter and enhancer activity. ras-mediated suppression of the AFP gene may reflect the process of developmental gene regulation in which AFP gene transcription is controlled by a G-protein-linked signal transduction cascade triggered by external growth stimuli. Images PMID:1690841

  10. MicroRNA-based Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Mutant and Wild Type RAS in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sriganesh B.; Ruppert, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been causally implicated in the progression and development of a wide variety of cancers. miRs modulate the activity of key cell signaling networks by regulating the translation of pathway component proteins. Thus, the pharmacological targeting of miRs that regulate cancer cell signaling networks, either by promoting (using miR-supplementation) or by suppressing (using anti-sense oligonucleotide based strategies) miR activity is an area of intense research. The RAS-Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway represents a major miR-regulated signaling network that endows cells with some of the classical hallmarks of cancer, and is often inappropriately activated in malignancies by somatic genetic alteration through point mutation or alteration of gene copy number. In addition, recent progress indicates that many tumors may be deficient in GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) due to the collaborative action of oncogenic microRNAs. Recent studies also suggest that in tumors harboring a mutant RAS allele there is a critical role for wild type RAS proteins in determining overall RAS-ERK pathway activity. Together, these two advances comprise a new opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we evaluate miR-based therapeutic strategies for modulating RAS-ERK signaling in cancers, in particular for more direct modulation of RAS-GTP levels, with the potential to complement current strategies in order to yield more durable treatment responses. To this end, we discuss the potential for miR-based therapies focused on three prominent miRs including the pan-RAS regulator let-7 and the GAP regulator comprised of miR-206 and miR-21 (miR-206/21). PMID:26284568

  11. An Arf-Egr-C/EBPβ Pathway Linked to Ras-Induced Senescence and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salotti, Jacqueline; Sakchaisri, Krisada; Tourtellotte, Warren G.

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) protects normal cells from transformation by Ras, whereas cells lacking p14/p19Arf or other tumor suppressors can be transformed. The transcription factor C/EBPβ is required for OIS in primary fibroblasts but is downregulated by H-RasV12 in immortalized NIH 3T3 cells through a mechanism involving p19Arf loss. Here, we report that members of the serum-induced early growth response (Egr) protein family are also downregulated in 3T3Ras cells and directly and redundantly control Cebpb gene transcription. Egr1, Egr2, and Egr3 recognize three sites in the Cebpb promoter and associate transiently with this region after serum stimulation, coincident with Cebpb induction. Codepletion of all three Egrs prevented Cebpb expression, and serum induction of Egrs was significantly blunted in 3T3Ras cells. Egr2 and Egr3 levels were also reduced in RasV12-expressing p19Arf null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and overall Egr DNA-binding activity was suppressed in Arf-deficient but not wild-type (WT) MEFs, leading to Cebpb downregulation. Analysis of human cancers revealed a strong correlation between EGR levels and CEBPB expression, regardless of whether CEBPB was increased or decreased in tumors. Moreover, overexpression of Egrs in tumor cell lines induced CEBPB and inhibited proliferation. Thus, our findings identify the Arf-Egr-C/EBPβ axis as an important determinant of cellular responses (senescence or transformation) to oncogenic Ras signaling. PMID:25535333

  12. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects.

  13. Activation of Raf as a result of recruitment to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Stokoe, D; Macdonald, S G; Cadwallader, K; Symons, M; Hancock, J F

    1994-06-01

    The small guanine nucleotide binding protein Ras participates in a growth promoting signal transduction pathway. The mechanism by which interaction of Ras with the protein kinase Raf leads to activation of Raf was studied. Raf was targeted to the plasma membrane by addition of the COOH-terminal localization signals of K-ras. This modified form of Raf (RafCAAX) was activated to the same extent as Raf coexpressed with oncogenic mutant Ras. Plasma membrane localization rather than farnesylation or the presence of the additional COOH-terminal sequence accounted for the activation of RafCAAX. The activation of RafCAAX was completely independent of Ras; it was neither potentiated by oncogenic mutant Ras nor abrogated by dominant negative Ras. Raf, once recruited to the plasma membrane, was not anchored there by Ras; most activated Raf in cells was associated with plasma membrane cytoskeletal elements, not the lipid bilayer. Thus, Ras functions in the activation of Raf by recruiting Raf to the plasma membrane where a separate, Ras-independent, activation of Raf occurs.

  14. Oncogenic activation of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase fusion protein, Tpr-Met, involves exclusion from the endocytic degradative pathway.

    PubMed

    Mak, H H L; Peschard, P; Lin, T; Naujokas, M A; Zuo, D; Park, M

    2007-11-01

    Multiple mechanisms of dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are observed in human cancers. In addition to gain-of-function, loss of negative regulation also contributes to oncogenic activation of RTKs. Negative regulation of many RTKs involves their internalization and degradation in the lysosome, a process regulated through ubiquitination. RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation, are no longer transmembrane proteins, and are predicted to escape lysosomal degradation. To test this, we used the Tpr-Met oncogene, generated following chromosomal translocation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met). Unlike Met, Tpr-Met is localized in the cytoplasm and also lacks the binding site for Cbl ubiquitin ligases. We determined whether subcellular localization of Tpr-Met, and/or loss of its Cbl-binding site, is important for oncogenic activity. Presence of a Cbl-binding site and ubiquitination of cytosolic Tpr-Met oncoproteins does not alter their transforming activity. In contrast, plasma membrane targeting allows Tpr-Met to enter the endocytic pathway, and Tpr-Met transforming activity as well as protein stability are decreased in a Cbl-dependent manner. We show that transformation by Tpr-Met is in part dependent on its ability to escape normal downregulatory mechanisms. This provides a paradigm for many RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation.

  15. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative uses multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. The resources of the Frederick National Lab allocated to the RAS Hub are organized into seven laboratory groups, each contributing to the collaborative effort.

  16. The RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  17. Conditional expression of K-ras in an epithelial compartment that includes the stem cells is sufficient to promote squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Fisher, Galen; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2004-12-15

    Ras genes are the most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancer. However, the contribution of ras to tumor initiation still is unclear because ras expression in primary cells can cause cell cycle arrest and even cell death by apoptosis. Furthermore, when expressed in the epidermis of mice, mutant ras promotes the formation of benign papillomas, only few of which will progress into carcinomas. However, in these cases, ras-transgene expression often is restricted to suprabasal or follicular epithelial cells that may lack self-renewal capacity. Thus, it still is conceivable that expression of active ras in other epithelial compartments may exert a distinct ability to promote malignant progression. To address this possibility, transgenic mice carrying the tetracycline-inducible system (tet-on receptor) targeted to the basal layer of stratified epithelium, which includes the epithelial stem cells, were engineered and crossed with mice expressing the K-ras(G12D) oncogene under the control of tet-regulated responsive elements. On doxycycline administration, proliferative lesions ranging from hyperplasias, papillomas, and dysplasias to metastatic carcinomas developed in squamous epithelia of the skin, oral mucosa, salivary glands, tongue, esophagus, forestomach, and uterine cervix within just 10 to 20 days. The most noticeable lesions were invasive squamous carcinomas of the skin and oral mucosa. These findings suggest that the expression of oncogenes in an epithelial compartment that includes the stem cells may be sufficient to promote squamous carcinogenesis. They also provide a molecularly defined conditional animal model system in which the mechanisms responsible for cancer initiation, maintenance, and metastatic spread can be readily investigated.

  18. Drosophila actin-Capping Protein limits JNK activation by the Src proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Fernández, B G; Jezowska, B; Janody, F

    2014-04-17

    The Src family kinases c-Src, and its downstream effectors, the Rho family of small GTPases RhoA and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) have a significant role in tumorigenesis. In this report, using the Drosophila wing disc epithelium as a model system, we demonstrate that the actin-Capping Protein (CP) αβ heterodimer, which regulates actin filament (F-actin) polymerization, limits Src-induced apoptosis or tissue overgrowth by restricting JNK activation. We show that overexpressing Src64B drives JNK-independent loss of epithelial integrity and JNK-dependent apoptosis via Btk29A, p120ctn and Rho1. However, when cells are kept alive with the Caspase inhibitor P35, JNK acts as a potent inducer of proliferation via activation of the Yorkie oncogene. Reducing CP levels direct apoptosis of overgrowing Src64B-overexpressing tissues. Conversely, overexpressing capping protein inhibits Src64B and Rho1, but not Rac1-induced JNK signaling. CP requires the actin-binding domain of the α-subunit to limit Src64B-induced apoptosis, arguing that the control of F-actin mediates this effect. In turn, JNK directs F-actin accumulation. Moreover, overexpressing capping protein also prevents apoptosis induced by ectopic JNK expression. Our data are consistent with a model in which the control of F-actin by CP limits Src-induced apoptosis or tissue overgrowth by acting downstream of Btk29A, p120ctn and Rho1, but upstream of JNK. In turn, JNK may counteract the effect of CP on F-actin, providing a positive feedback, which amplifies JNK activation. We propose that cytoskeletal changes triggered by misregulation of F-actin modulators may have a significant role in Src-mediated malignant phenotypes during the early stages of cellular transformation.

  19. Raf/MAPK and rapamycin-sensitive pathways mediate the anti-apoptotic function of p21Ras in IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T; Shirouzu, M; Kamiya, A; Hashimoto, K; Yokoyama, S; Miyajima, A

    1997-08-01

    The Ras signal transduction pathway is activated by a number of hematopoietic cytokines and is implicated in the prevention of apoptotic death in hematopoietic cells. Recent studies have provided evidence that the downstream of Ras is highly divergent and several independent pathways appear to mediate distinct biological functions of Ras. In the present study, we investigated the downstream pathway(s) of Ras responsible for the maintenance of hematopoietic cell survival by using various mutants of signaling molecules. Activation of the Raf/MAPK pathway in interleukin (IL) 3-dependent cells by expression of an oncogenic Raf or a Ras mutant (G12V/T35S) prevented apoptosis following IL-3 deprivation. In contrast, another Ras mutant (G12V/V45E), which is apparently incapable of activating MAPK, efficiently blocked apoptosis as well. It is therefore likely that the activation of the Raf/MAPK pathway is not an absolute requirement for the prevention of apoptosis, and there appears to be a Raf/MAPK-independent pathway that contributes to hematopoietic cell survival. Since Ras(G12V/V45E) was able to cause the phosphorylation of p70/S6 kinase, we inhibited the S6 kinase pathway by rapamycin and by wortmannin, and found that the anti-apoptotic function of Ras(G12V/V45E), but not of Ras(G12V), was critically influenced by both inhibitors. These results indicate that the Raf/MAPK and a rapamycin/wortmannin-sensitive pathways mediate Ras function to prevent apoptotic death in hematopoietic cells.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide signals activation of tumor necrosis factor biosynthesis through the ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Geppert, T. D.; Whitehurst, C. E.; Thompson, P.; Beutler, B.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to activate macrophages, causing the release of toxic cytokines that may provoke inflammation and shock. One of the most important and best studied of these cytokines is tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Details of the signaling pathway leading to TNF biosynthesis remain unclear. The pathway is branched in the sense that TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are both strongly stimulated by LPS. Recent evidence has indicated that MAP kinase homologs become phosphorylated in LPS-stimulated cells, suggesting their possible involvement in signal transduction. We sought to test this hypothesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements of LPS-induced MEK and ERK2 activity were undertaken in LPS-sensitive and LPS-insensitive cells. Transfection studies, in which dominant inhibitors of ras and raf-1 were used to block signaling to the level of MAP kinase, were carried out in order to judge whether the TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are modulated through this pathway. RESULTS: In RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages, both ERK2 and MEK1 activity are induced by LPS treatment. In the same cell line, dominant negative inhibitors of ras and raf-1 block LPS-induced activation of the TNF promoter, as well as derepression of the translational blockade normally imposed by the TNF 3'-untranslated region. A constitutively active form of raf-1 (raf-BXB) was found to augment, but not replace, the LPS signal. In LPS-insensitive cells (RAW 264.7 x NIH 3T3 fusion hybrid cells and primary macrophages derived from C3H/HeJ mice), ERK2 activity was found to be refractory to induction by LPS. CONCLUSIONS: The ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway is chiefly responsible for transduction of the LPS signal to the level of the TNF gene and mRNA. raf and raf-1 lie upstream from (or actually represent) the physical branchpoints of the transcriptional and translation activation signals generated by LPS. The lesions that prevent LPS signaling in macrophages

  1. A non-cell-autonomous role for Ras signaling in C. elegans neuroblast delamination

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Jean M.; Sundaram, Meera V.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling through Ras influences many aspects of normal cell behavior, including epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and aberrant signaling promotes both tumorigenesis and metastasis. Although many such effects are cell-autonomous, here we show a non-cell-autonomous role for RTK-Ras signaling in the delamination of a neuroblast from an epithelial organ. The C. elegans renal-like excretory organ is initially composed of three unicellular epithelial tubes, namely the canal, duct and G1 pore cells; however, the G1 cell later delaminates from the excretory system to become a neuroblast and is replaced by the G2 cell. G1 delamination and G2 intercalation involve cytoskeletal remodeling, interconversion of autocellular and intercellular junctions and migration over a luminal extracellular matrix, followed by G1 junction loss. LET-23/EGFR and SOS-1, an exchange factor for Ras, are required for G1 junction loss but not for initial cytoskeletal or junction remodeling. Surprisingly, expression of activated LET-60/Ras in the neighboring duct cell, but not in the G1 or G2 cells, is sufficient to rescue sos-1 delamination defects, revealing that Ras acts non-cell-autonomously to permit G1 delamination. We suggest that, similarly, oncogenic mutations in cells within a tumor might help create a microenvironment that is permissive for other cells to detach and ultimately metastasize. PMID:25371363

  2. The contribution of tumor and host tissue factor expression to oncogene-driven gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Nathalie; Meehan, Brian; Garnier, Delphine; Hashemi, Maryam; Montermini, Laura; Lee, Tae Hoon; Milsom, Chloe; Pawlinski, Rafal; Ohlfest, John; Anderson, Mark; Mackman, Nigel; Rak, Janusz

    2014-11-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of glial brain tumors, associated with angiogenesis, thrombosis, and upregulation of tissue factor (TF), the key cellular trigger of coagulation and signaling. Since TF is upregulated by oncogenic mutations occurring in different subsets of human brain tumors we investigated whether TF contributes to tumourigenesis driven by oncogenic activation of EGFR (EGFRvIII) and RAS pathways in the brain. Here we show that TF expression correlates with poor prognosis in glioma, but not in GBM. In situ, the TF protein expression is heterogeneously expressed in adult and pediatric gliomas. GBM cells harboring EGFRvIII (U373vIII) grow aggressively as xenografts in SCID mice and their progression is delayed by administration of monoclonal antibodies blocking coagulant (CNTO 859) and signaling (10H10) effects of TF in vivo. Mice in which TF gene is disrupted in the neuroectodermal lineage exhibit delayed progression of spontaneous brain tumors driven by oncogenic N-ras and SV40 large T antigen (SV40LT) expressed under the control of sleeping beauty transposase. Reduced host TF levels in low-TF/SCID hypomorphic mice mitigated growth of glioma subcutaneously but not in the brain. Thus, we suggest that tumor-associated TF may serve as therapeutic target in the context of oncogene-driven disease progression in a subset of glioma.

  3. Yes-Associated Protein 1 Is Activated and Functions as an Oncogene in Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Baia, Gilson S.; Caballero, Otavia L.; Orr, Brent A.; Lal, Anita; Ho, Janelle S.Y.; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Tihan, Tarik; Mawrin, Christian; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is functionally conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and mammals, and its proposed function is to control tissue homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. The core components are composed of a kinase cascade that culminates with the phosphorylation and inhibition of Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1). Phospho-YAP1 is retained in the cytoplasm. In the absence of Hippo signaling, YAP1 translocates to the nucleus, associates with co-activators TEAD1-4, and functions as a transcriptional factor promoting the expression of key target genes. Components of the Hippo pathway are mutated in human cancers, and deregulation of this pathway plays a role in tumorigenesis. Loss of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene is the most common genetic alteration in meningiomas, and the NF2 gene product, Merlin, acts upstream of the Hippo pathway. Here, we show that primary meningioma tumors have high nuclear expression of YAP1. In meningioma cells, Merlin expression is associated with phosphorylation of YAP1. Using an siRNA transient knockdown of YAP1 in NF2-mutant meningioma cells, we show that suppression of YAP1 impaired cell proliferation and migration. Conversely, YAP1 overexpression led to a strong augment of cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth and restriction of cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of YAP1 in nontransformed arachnoidal cells led to the development of tumors in nude mice. Together, these findings suggest that in meningiomas, deregulation of the Hippo pathway is largely observed in primary tumors and that YAP1 functions as an oncogene promoting meningioma tumorigenesis. PMID:22618028

  4. BCL6 is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits pro-oncogenic activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Qin; Xu, Mi-Die; Weng, Wei-Wei; Wei, Ping; Yang, Yu-Si; Du, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysregulation of BCL6 plays critical oncogenic roles and facilitates tumorigenesis in various malignancies. However, whether the aberrant expression of BCL6 in ovarian carcinoma is associated with malignancy, metastasis or prognosis remains unknown. Our study aimed to investigate the expression of BCL6 in ovarian carcinoma and its possible correlation with clinicopathological features as well as patient survival to reveal its biological effects in ovarian tumor progression. Methods: Immunochemistry analysis was performed in 105 cases of ovarian carcinoma covering the histological types of serous, endometrioid and clear cell. Spearman analysis was used to calculate the correlation between pathological parameters and the expression of BCL6. Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazards analysis were used to analyze the disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). We also assessed whether overexpression and knockdown of BCL6 influence in vitro cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, as well as tumor cell invasion and migration. Results: The expression of BCL6 was higher in all three major kinds of ovarian cancer in comparison with paratumorous epithelium. BCL6 expression was tightly correlated with FIGO staging, lymph node metastasis and recurrence. Higher expression of BCL6 led to a significantly poorer DSS and DFS and multivariate analysis revealed that BCL6 was an independent risk factor of DSS and DFS. Enforced overexpression of BCL6 in ovarian tumor cells stimulated proliferation by inducing G1–S transition, and promoted tumor cell invasion and migration. Conversely, RNA interference–mediated silencing BCL6 expression inhibited proliferation by altered cell cycle progression and reduced the ability of the cells to migrate, and invade the extracellular matrix in culture. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the inappropriate activation of BCL6 predicts poor prognosis and promotes tumor progression in ovarian carcinoma

  5. RABEX-5 plays an oncogenic role in breast cancer by activating MMP-9 pathway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RABEX-5, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RAB-5, plays an important role in cell mobility and altered expression associated with tumor metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the role of RABEX-5 in proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer in vitro and ex vivo. Methods RABEX-5 expression was examined in breast cancer, benign tumor and normal breast tissues by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Two stable cell lines were established, the MCF-7/NC negative control cell line and the MCF-7/KD cell line, which stably expressed an RNA interference (RNAi) construct that induced downregulation of RABEX-5 expression. These cell lines were utilized to evaluate the role of RABEX-5 in cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. The possible role of RABEX-5 in the regulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) was evaluated using western blot and real-time PCR. Results RABEX-5 expression was found to be significantly higher in breast cancer tissues compared with benign tumor and normal breast tissues. High levels of RABEX-5 expression were associated with axillary lymph node metastasis. In addition, RABEX-5 silencing significantly reduced cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and migration ability in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. RABEX −5 knockdown also attenuated the migration of breast cancer cells via modulation of MMP-9 transcriptional activity. Conclusions Our results indicate that RABEX-5 plays an oncogenic role in breast cancer by modulating the proliferation and metastasis potential of breast cancer cells. Thus, RABEX-5 is a promising prognostic indicator for patients with breast cancer. PMID:23941575

  6. Dysfunctional telomeres promote genomic instability and metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in oncogene induced mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2013-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres). In normal cells lacking telomerase activity, telomeres shorten with each cell division because of the inability to completely synthesize the lagging strand. Critically shortened telomeres elicit DNA damage responses and limit cellular division and lifespan, providing an important tumor suppressor function. Most human cancer cells express telomerase which contributes significantly to the tumor phenotype. In human breast cancer, telomerase expression is predictive of clinical outcomes such as lymph node metastasis and survival. In mouse models of mammary cancer, telomerase expression is also upregulated. Telomerase overexpression resulted in spontaneous mammary tumor development in aged female mice. Increased mammary cancer also was observed when telomerase deficient mice were crossed with p53 null mutant animals. However, the effects of telomerase and telomere length on oncogene driven mammary cancer have not been completely characterized. To address these issues we characterized neu proto-oncogene driven mammary tumor formation in G1 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with long telomeres), G3 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with short telomeres), and Terc+/+ mice. Telomerase deficiency reduced the number of mammary tumors and increased tumor latency regardless of telomere length. Decreased tumor formation correlated with increased apoptosis in Terc deficient tumors. Short telomeres dramatically increased lung metastasis which correlated with increased genomic instability, and specific alterations in DNA copy number and gene expression. We concluded that short telomeres promote metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in neu oncogene driven mammary tumors.

  7. Nobiletin induces inhibitions of Ras activity and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling to suppress cell proliferation in C6 rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Koichi; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Fukunaga, Kohji; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Ras, a small G-protein, physiologically directs cell proliferation and cell cycle via regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Dysregulation of Ras/MEK/ERK signaling has been reported to cause tumorigenesis and gliomas. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, has been shown to have anti-tumor cells action. However, it remains elusive whether nobiletin could affect Ras activity. In this study, we provide the first evidence that nobiletin suppresses the proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity in C6 glioma cells, a rat glioma cell line. First, Ras pull-down assay showed that nobiletin inhibits Ras activity in a concentration-dependent manner in C6 cells. Second, farnesyltransferase inhibitor I, a Ras inhibitor, and U0126, a MEK inhibitor, induced an inhibition of the cell proliferation in C6 cells, while the cell proliferation was inhibited by nobiletin as well. Third, western blotting revealed that nobiletin showed inhibitory effects on MEK and ERK phopsphorylation levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, such an inhibitory effect on the level of ERK phosphorylation by nobiletin was appreciably prevented by Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of conventional protein kinase Cs (PKCs) showing Ca(2+)-sensitivity, while GF109203X, a general inhibitor for PKCs, and BAPTA, a cell-permeable Ca(2+) chelator, to a lesser extent, suppressed a reduction of the phosphorylation. These findings suggest that the proliferation of C6 cells is Ras- and MEK/ERK signaling-dependent, and that nobiletin suppresses the cell proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity and MEK/ERK signaling cascade probably via a Ca(2+)-sensitive PKC-dependent mechanism. Thus, the natural compound has potential to be a therapeutic agent for glioma.

  8. Long-range oncogenic activation of Igh-c-myc translocations by the Igh 3' regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Gostissa, Monica; Yan, Catherine T; Bianco, Julia M; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Alt, Frederick W

    2009-12-10

    B-cell malignancies, such as human Burkitt's lymphoma, often contain translocations that link c-myc or other proto-oncogenes to the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IgH, encoded by Igh). The nature of elements that activate oncogenes within such translocations has been a long-standing question. Translocations within Igh involve DNA double-strand breaks initiated either by the RAG1/2 endonuclease during variable, diversity and joining gene segment (V(D)J) recombination, or by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, also known as AICDA) during class switch recombination (CSR). V(D)J recombination in progenitor B (pro-B) cells assembles Igh variable region exons upstream of mu constant region (Cmu) exons, which are the first of several sets of C(H) exons ('C(H) genes') within a C(H) locus that span several hundred kilobases (kb). In mature B cells, CSR deletes Cmu and replaces it with a downstream C(H) gene. An intronic enhancer (iEmu) between the variable region exons and Cmu promotes V(D)J recombination in developing B cells. Furthermore, the Igh 3' regulatory region (Igh3'RR) lies downstream of the C(H) locus and modulates CSR by long-range transcriptional enhancement of C(H) genes. Transgenic mice bearing iEmu or Igh3'RR sequences fused to c-myc are predisposed to B lymphomas, demonstrating that such elements can confer oncogenic c-myc expression. However, in many B-cell lymphomas, Igh-c-myc translocations delete iEmu and place c-myc up to 200 kb upstream of the Igh3'RR. Here we address the oncogenic role of the Igh3'RR by inactivating it in two distinct mouse models for B-cell lymphoma with Igh-c-myc translocations. We show that the Igh3'RR is dispensable for pro-B-cell lymphomas with V(D)J recombination-initiated translocations, but is required for peripheral B-cell lymphomas with CSR-associated translocations. As the Igh3'RR is not required for CSR-associated Igh breaks or Igh-c-myc translocations in peripheral B-cell lymphoma progenitors, we conclude that

  9. Regulation of collagen I gene expression by ras.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Parker, M I; Robinson, V R; Bornstein, P

    1992-01-01

    Although transformation of rodent fibroblasts can lead to dramatic changes in expression of extracellular matrix genes, the molecular basis and physiological significance of these changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism(s) by which ras affects expression of the genes encoding type I collagen. Levels of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen mRNAs were markedly reduced in Rat 1 fibroblasts overexpressing either the N-rasLys-61 or the Ha-rasVal-12 oncogene. In fibroblasts conditionally transformed with N-rasLys-61, alpha 1(I) transcript levels began to decline within 8 h of ras induction and reached 1 to 5% of control levels after 96 h. In contrast, overexpression of normal ras p21 had no effect on alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that the transcription rates of both the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) genes were significantly reduced in ras-transformed cells compared with those in parental cells. In addition, the alpha 1(I) transcript was less stable in transformed cells. Chimeric plasmids containing up to 3.6 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking DNA and up to 2.3 kb of the 3'-flanking region were expressed at equivalent levels in both normal and ras-transformed fibroblasts. However, a cosmid clone containing the entire mouse alpha 1(I) gene, including 3.7 kb of 5'- and 4 kb of 3'-flanking DNA, was expressed at reduced levels in fibroblasts overexpressing oncogenic ras. We conclude that oncogenic ras regulates the type I collagen genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and that this effect, at least for the alpha 1(I) gene, may be mediated by sequences located either within the body of the gene itself or in the distal 3'-flanking region. Images PMID:1406656

  10. Inhibitors of Ras-SOS Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-04-19

    Activating Ras mutations are found in about 30 % of human cancers. Ras activation is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors, such as the son of sevenless (SOS), which form protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with Ras and catalyze the exchange of GDP by GTP. This is the rate-limiting step in Ras activation. However, Ras surfaces lack any evident suitable pockets where a molecule might bind tightly, rendering Ras proteins still 'undruggable' for over 30 years. Among the alternative approaches is the design of inhibitors that target the Ras-SOS PPI interface, a strategy that is gaining increasing recognition for treating Ras mutant cancers. Herein we focus on data that has accumulated over the past few years pertaining to the design of small-molecule modulators or peptide mimetics aimed at the interface of the Ras-SOS PPI. We emphasize, however, that even if such Ras-SOS therapeutics are potent, drug resistance may emerge. To counteract this development, we propose "pathway drug cocktails", that is, drug combinations aimed at parallel (or compensatory) pathways. A repertoire of classified cancer, cell/tissue, and pathway/protein combinations would be beneficial toward this goal.

  11. Retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene in a Marek's disease T-lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, E; Perbal, B

    1996-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an avian herpesvirus that causes, in chickens, a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by malignant transformation of T lymphocytes. The rapid onset of polyclonal tumors indicates the existence of MDV-encoded oncogenic products. However, the molecular basis of MDV-induced lymphoproliferative disease and latency remains largely unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that MDV and Rous-associated virus (RAV) might cooperate in the development of B-cell lymphomas induced by RAV. Our present results indicate for the first time that MDV and RAV might also act synergistically in the development of T-cell lymphomas. We report an example of an MDV-transformed T-lymphoblastoid cell line (T9) expressing high levels of a truncated C-MYB protein as a result of RAV integration within one c-myb allele. The chimeric RAV-c-myb mRNA species initiated in the 5' long terminal repeat of RAV are deprived of sequences corresponding to c-myb exons 1 to 3. The attenuation of MDV oncogenicity has been strongly related to structural changes in the MDV BamHI-D and BamHI-H DNA fragments. We have established that both DNA restriction fragments are rearranged in the T9 MDV-transformed cells. Our results suggest that retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is a critical factor involved in the maintenance of the transformed phenotype and the tumorigenic potential of this T-lymphoma cell line. PMID:8892859

  12. [Role of RAS in prehypertension].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Shinji; Iwai, Masaru; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2008-08-01

    Hypertension has long been recognized as a major risk factor of several cardiovascular diseases. It is well known that the renin-angiotensin system(RAS) is involved in the pathogenesis of both hypertension and hypertensive end-organ damage. Untreated hypertension is self-accelerating condition through RAS stimulation. Activation of RAS contributes to the transition from borderline hypertension to established hypertension. Recently, "the Seventh Report of Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7)" proposed a new classification of borderline blood pressure levels, as "prehypertension". The therapeutic focus has begun to shift from the therapy of established hypertension to the prevention of hypertension. This review addressed the relationship between hypertension, prehypertension and the role of RAS. PMID:18700549

  13. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  14. Lead acetate induces EGFR activation upstream of SFK and PKC{alpha} linkage to the Ras/Raf-1/ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, Y.-T.; Tzeng, D.-W.; Yang, J.-L.

    2009-03-01

    Lead acetate (Pb), a probable human carcinogen, can activate protein kinase C (PKC) upstream of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Yet, it remains unclear whether Pb activation of PKC {yields} ERK1/2 involves receptor/non-receptor tyrosine kinases and the Ras signaling transducer. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism elicited by Pb for transmitting ERK1/2 signaling in CL3 human non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma cells. Pb induction of higher steady-state levels of Ras-GTP was essential for increasing phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Pre-treatment of the cells with a conventional PKC inhibitor Goe6976 or depleting PKC{alpha} using specific small interfering RNA blocked Pb induction of Ras-GTP. Pb also activated cellular tyrosine kinases. Specific pharmacological inhibitors, PD153035 for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and SU6656 for Src family tyrosine kinases (SFK), but not AG1296 for platelet-derived growth factor receptor, could suppress the Pb-induced tyrosine kinases, PKC{alpha}, Ras-GTP, phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Furthermore, phosphorylation of tyrosines on the EGFR multiple autophosphorylation sites and the conserved SFK autophosphorylation site occurred during exposure of cells to Pb for 1-5 min and 5-30 min, respectively. Intriguingly, Pb activation of EGFR required the intrinsic kinase activity but not dimerization of the receptor. Inhibition of SFK or PKC{alpha} activities did not affect EGFR phosphorylation, while knockdown of EGFR blocked SFK phosphorylation and PKC{alpha} activation following Pb. Together, these results indicate that immediate activation of EGFR in response to Pb is obligatory for activation of SFK and PKC{alpha} and subsequent the Ras-Raf-1-MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling cascade.

  15. Binding of calcium ions to Ras promotes Ras guanine nucleotide exchange under emulated physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jun-Ming; Mo, Zhong-Ying; Wu, Ling-Jia; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2008-11-01

    Both Ras protein and calcium play significant roles in various cellular processes via complex signaling transduction networks. However, it is not well understood whether and how Ca(2+) can directly regulate Ras function. Here we demonstrate by isothermal titration calorimetry that Ca(2+) directly binds to the H-Ras.GDP.Mg(2+) complex with moderate affinity at the first binding site followed by two weak binding events. The results from limited proteinase degradation show that Ca(2+) protects the fragments of H-Ras from being further degraded by trypsin and by proteinase K. HPLC studies together with fluorescence spectroscopic measurements indicate that binding of Ca(2+) to the H-Ras.GDP.Mg(2+) complex remarkably promotes guanine nucleotide exchange on H-Ras under emulated physiological Ca(2+) concentration conditions. Addition of high concentrations of either of two macromolecular crowding agents, Ficoll 70 and dextran 70, dramatically enhances H-Ras guanine nucleotide exchange extent in the presence of Ca(2+) at emulated physiological concentrations, and the nucleotide exchange extent increases significantly with the concentrations of crowding agents. Together, these results indicate that binding of calcium ions to H-Ras remarkably promotes H-Ras guanine nucleotide exchange under emulated physiological conditions. We thus propose that Ca(2+) may activate Ras signaling pathway by interaction with Ras, providing clues to understand the role of calcium in regulating Ras function in physiological environments.

  16. Activated Ki-Ras suppresses 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, K; Shirasawa, S; Nishioka, M; Sasazuki, T

    1999-05-15

    Although the frequency of activated Ki-ras genes is high in human colorectal tumors, much less is known of activated Ki-ras-mediated signaling pathways. Using gene targeting, we examined HCT116 cells that contain the Gly-13-->Asp mutation of Ki-ras and activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones derived from HCT116. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced immediate early genes, such as c-Jun, c-Fos, and Egr-1 in activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones, whereas c-Jun induction was rare in HCT116. TPA induced both phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (SEK1) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in the activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones but not in HCT116. On the other hand, TPA-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was equally induced between HCT116 and the Ki-ras-disrupted clones. Furthermore, TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation was observed in a DLD-1-derived activated Ki-ras-disrupted clone but not in DLD-1. The TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation in these disrupted clones was completely inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, GF109203X (1 microM), but not by another PKC inhibitor, H7 (50 microM), whereas TPA-induced MEK1/2-ERK activation was partially and completely inhibited by GF109203X (1 microM) and H7 (50 microM), respectively. A phosphoinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, did not inhibit the TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation. Taken together, these results suggest that activated Ki-Ras-mediated signals are involved in the SEK1-JNK pathway through a PKC isotype that is distinct from that involved in MEK1/2-ERK activation in human colon cancer cells and independent of phosphoinositol 3-kinase activation, and the imbalance between ERK and JNK activity caused by activated Ki-Ras may play critical roles in human colorectal tumorigenesis.

  17. Targeting the K-Ras/PDEδ protein-protein interaction: the solution for Ras-driven cancers or just another therapeutic mirage?

    PubMed

    Frett, Brendan; Wang, Yuanxiang; Li, Hong-Yu

    2013-10-01

    The holy grail, finally? After years of unsuccessful attempts at drugging the Ras oncogene, a recent paper by Zimmerman et al. has revealed the possibility of inhibiting Ras signaling on a clinically relevant level by blocking the K-Ras/PDEδ protein-protein interaction. The results, reported in Nature, are highlighted herein with future implications and directions to evaluate the full clinical potential of this research. PMID:23939923

  18. Stimulation of Ebola virus production from persistent infection through activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Strong, James E; Wong, Gary; Jones, Shane E; Grolla, Allen; Theriault, Steven; Kobinger, Gary P; Feldmann, Heinz

    2008-11-18

    Human infections with Ebola virus (EBOV) result in a deadly viral disease known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Up to 90% of infected patients die, and there is no available treatment or vaccine. The sporadic human outbreaks are believed to result when EBOV "jumps" from an infected animal to a person and is subsequently transmitted between persons by direct contact with infected blood or body fluids. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which EBOV can persistently infect and then escape from model cell and animal reservoir systems. We report a model system in which infection of mouse and bat cell lines with EBOV leads to persistence, which can be broken with low levels of lipopolysaccharide or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). This reactivation depends on the Ras/MAPK pathway through inhibition of RNA-dependent protein kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha phosphorylation and occurs at the level of protein synthesis. EBOV also can be evoked from mice 7 days after infection by PMA treatment, indicating that a similar mechanism occurs in vivo. Our findings suggest that EBOV may persist in nature through subclinical infection of a reservoir species, such as bats, and that appropriate physiological stimulation may result in increased replication and transmission to new hosts. Identification of a presumptive mechanism responsible for EBOV emergence from its reservoir underscores the "hit-and-run" nature of the initiation of human and/or nonhuman primate EBOV outbreaks and may provide insight into possible countermeasures to interfere with transmission. PMID:18981410

  19. SRC-DEPENDENT PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 IS REQUIRED FOR ZINC-INDUCED RAS ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Src-dependent Phosphorylation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor on Tyrosine 845 Is Required for Zinc-induced Ras Activation
    Weidong Wu 1 , Lee M. Graves 2 , Gordon N. Gill 3 , Sarah J. Parsons 4 , and James M. Samet 5
    1 Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biolo...

  20. c-myc, ras p21 and p53 expression in pleomorphic adenoma and its malignant form of the human salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, H; Hamano, H; Hayashi, Y

    1993-01-01

    Using an immunohistochemical study and an immunoblot analysis, the expression of cellular oncogenes of the human salivary glands such as c-myc, ras p21, and p53 tumor-suppressor gene in pleomorphic adenomas and its malignant form, carcinoma in pleomorphic adenomas was examined to evaluate a differential biological significance, in comparison with that in normal salivary gland tissues. Immunohistochemically, the c-myc product was detected in 42% of the pleomorphic adenomas and in 56% of the carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma. The ras p21 expression was observed in 24% of pleomorphic adenomas, and in 50% of carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma. The p53 protein was detected in 18% of the pleomorphic adenomas and in 67% of the carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma. Although there was no significant difference between the benign and malignant forms for the expression of c-myc, a statistical significance in ras p21 and p53 expression was found between the pleomorphic adenoma and its malignant form (P < 0.05) and P < 0.001, respectively). An immunoblotting assay clearly demonstrated the expression of c-myc and p53 gene products in both the benign and malignant forms of the pleomorphic adenoma, and that of ras p21 in the malignant form. These results indicate that activation of c-myc and ras p21 proto-oncogenes and the involvement of p53 mutation may play important roles in the malignant transformation of salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma.

  1. Ras-related TC21 is activated by mutation in a breast cancer cell line, but infrequently in breast carcinomas in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, K. T.; Crompton, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    Activating ras mutations are found in many types of human tumour. Mutations in Harvey (H-), Kirsten (K-) and neuronal (N-) ras are, however, rarely found in breast carcinomas. TC21 is a ras family member that shares close homology to H-, K- and N-ras, and activating mutations have been found in ovarian carcinoma and leiomyosarcoma cell lines. We have examined panels of cDNAs from breast, ovarian and cervical cell lines, and primary and metastatic breast tumours for mutations in TC21 using a single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP)-based assay. One breast cancer cell line, CAL51, exhibited an altered SSCP pattern, compared with normal tissue, which was due to an A-T base change in codon 72, causing a predicted Gln-Leu activating mutation. Of nine primary and 15 metastatic breast tumour cDNAs analysed, none exhibited an altered pattern by SSCP. The apparently wild-type pattern by SSCP analysis was confirmed by sequence analysis of some of the cDNAs assayed. Thus, we conclude that mutations in TC21 are uncommon in breast carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9703274

  2. Germline expression of H-Ras(G12V) causes neurological deficits associated to Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Viosca, J; Schuhmacher, A J; Guerra, C; Barco, A

    2009-02-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by germline activation of H-Ras oncogenes. A mouse model of CS generated by introduction of an oncogenic Gly12Val mutation in the mouse H-Ras locus using homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells has been recently described. These mice phenocopied some of the abnormalities observed in patients with CS, including facial dysmorphia and cardiomyopathies. We investigated here their neurological and behavioral phenotype. The analysis of H-Ras(G12V) mice revealed phenotypes that resembled the hyperemotivity, hypersensibility and cognitive impairments observed in children with CS. Stronger neurological deficits were found in the analysis of mice homozygous for this mutation than in the analysis of heterozygous mice, suggesting the existence of a gene dose effect. These mice represent the first mouse model for CS, offering an experimental tool to study the molecular and physiological alterations underlying the neurological manifestations of CS and to test new therapies aimed at preventing or ameliorating the cognitive and emotional impairments associated to this condition. PMID:18823404

  3. Protein kinase A activation inhibits oncogenic Sonic hedgehog signalling and suppresses basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Makinodan, Eri; Marneros, Alexander G

    2012-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin (BCC) is caused by constitutive activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, mainly through mutations either in the Shh receptor Patched (PTCH) or in its co-receptor Smoothened (Smo). Inhibitors of this pathway that are currently in clinical trials inhibit Smo. However, mutations in Smo can result in resistance to these inhibitors. To target most BCCs and avoid acquired resistance because of Smo mutations, inhibiting the Shh-pathway downstream of Smo is critical. Attractive downstream targets would be at the level of Gli proteins, the transcriptional activators of this pathway in BCCs. Previously it has been shown that Gli1 and Gli2, when phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA), are targeted for proteosomal degradation. Here we show that PKA activation via the cAMP agonist forskolin is sufficient to completely abolish oncogenic Smo activity in vitro. In an inducible BCC mouse model due to a Smo mutation that confers resistance to current Smo inhibitors, topical forskolin treatment significantly reduced Gli1 mRNA levels and resulted in strongly suppressed BCC tumor growth. Our data show that forskolin inhibits the growth of even those BCCs that are resistant to Smo inhibitors and provide a proof-of-principle framework for the development of topically applied human skin-permeable novel pharmacologic inhibitors of oncogenic Shh-signaling through PKA activation. PMID:23163650

  4. Transformation by Raf and other oncogenes renders cells differentially sensitive to growth inhibition by a dominant negative c-jun mutant.

    PubMed

    Rapp, U R; Troppmair, J; Beck, T; Birrer, M J

    1994-12-01

    In NIH3T3 cells expressing active Raf-1 protein serine/threonine kinase (PSK) c-jun expression is constitutive while c-fos expression is attenuated. This alteration prompted us to determine whether oncogene transformation would render cells differentially sensitive to growth inhibition by a dominant negative mutant of c-jun, TAM 67. Growth inhibition was observed in three types of assays: (1) transfection of TAM 67 into cells stably transformed by a variety of oncogenes, (2) cotransfection of TAM 67 with oncogene expression plasmids into NIH3T3 cells and (3) titration of oncogene-expressing retroviruses on cells stably expressing TAM 67. The results clearly demonstrate that Raf-1 dependent oncogenes, which include receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs)-, intracellular PTKs- and Ras-derived genes share the Raf phenotype of constitutive c-jun expression, attenuated c-fos induction, and high sensitivity to growth suppression by TAM 67. Additionally, the intracellular PSK oncogene, mos and the nuclear oncogenes c-myc, c-fos, and SV40 T antigen were TAM 67-sensitive for transformation. This universal pattern of altered growth regulation in oncogene transformed fibroblast cell lines highlights the potential usefulness of c-jun based inhibitors for control of tumor cell growth.

  5. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    PubMed

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations.

  6. Oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development and its activation of the MAPK–ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Fan, S; Owonikoko, T K; Khuri, F R; Sun, S-Y; Li, R

    2011-01-01

    Cancer progression involves multiple complex and interdependent steps, including progressive proliferation, angiogenesis and metastases. The complexity of these processes requires a comprehensive elucidation of the integrated signaling networks for better understanding. EAPII interacts with multiple cancer-related proteins, but its biological significance in cancer development remains unknown. In this report we identified the elevated level of EAPII protein in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients and NSCLC cell lines in culture. The oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development was demonstrated using NSCLC cells with genetic manipulations that influence EAPII expression: EAPII overexpression increases proliferation of NSCLC cells with an accelerated transition of cell cycle and facilitates xenograft tumor growth in vivo; EAPII knockdown results in apoptosis of NSCLC cells and reduces xenograft tumor formation. To further explore the mechanism of EAPII's oncogenic role in lung cancer development and to elucidate the potential signaling pathway(s) that EAPII may impact, we employed antibody array to investigate the alternation of the major signaling pathways in NSCLC cells with altered EAPII level. We found that EAPII overexpression significantly activated Raf1 and ERK1/2, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 pathways. Consistently, the protein and mRNA levels of MYC and cyclin D1, which are targets of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK–ERK) pathway, are significantly increased by EAPII overexpression. Taken together, we demonstrated that EAPII is an oncogenic factor and the activation of MAPK–ERK signaling pathway by EAPII may contribute to lung cancer development. PMID:21478903

  7. Resveratrol induces apoptosis by directly targeting Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Oi, N; Yuan, J; Malakhova, M; Luo, K; Li, Y; Ryu, J; Zhang, L; Bode, A M; Xu, Z; Li, Y; Lou, Z; Dong, Z

    2015-05-14

    Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-truhydroxystilbene) possesses a strong anticancer activity exhibited as the induction of apoptosis through p53 activation. However, the molecular mechanism and direct target(s) of resveratrol-induced p53 activation remain elusive. Here, the Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) was identified as a potential target of resveratrol, and in vitro binding assay results using resveratrol-conjugated Sepharose 4B beads confirmed their direct binding. Depletion of G3BP1 significantly diminishes resveratrol-induced p53 expression and apoptosis. We also found that G3BP1 negatively regulates p53 expression by interacting with ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10), a deubiquitinating enzyme of p53. Disruption of the interaction of p53 with USP10 by G3BP1 interference leads to the suppression of p53 deubiquitination. Resveratrol, on the other hand, directly binds to G3BP1 and prevents the G3BP1/USP10 interaction, resulting in enhanced USP10-mediated deubiquitination of p53, and consequently increased p53 expression. These findings disclose a novel mechanism of resveratrol-induced p53 activation and resveratrol-induced apoptosis by direct targeting of G3BP1.

  8. Structural analysis of autoinhibition in the Ras-specific exchange factor RasGRP1

    PubMed Central

    Iwig, Jeffrey S; Vercoulen, Yvonne; Das, Rahul; Barros, Tiago; Limnander, Andre; Che, Yan; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Roose, Jeroen P; Kuriyan, John

    2013-01-01

    RasGRP1 and SOS are Ras-specific nucleotide exchange factors that have distinct roles in lymphocyte development. RasGRP1 is important in some cancers and autoimmune diseases but, in contrast to SOS, its regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Activating signals lead to the membrane recruitment of RasGRP1 and Ras engagement, but it is unclear how interactions between RasGRP1 and Ras are suppressed in the absence of such signals. We present a crystal structure of a fragment of RasGRP1 in which the Ras-binding site is blocked by an interdomain linker and the membrane-interaction surface of RasGRP1 is hidden within a dimerization interface that may be stabilized by the C-terminal oligomerization domain. NMR data demonstrate that calcium binding to the regulatory module generates substantial conformational changes that are incompatible with the inactive assembly. These features allow RasGRP1 to be maintained in an inactive state that is poised for activation by calcium and membrane-localization signals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00813.001 PMID:23908768

  9. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Cox, Adrienne D; Der, Channing J; Philips, Mark R

    2015-04-15

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biologic activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anticancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes, and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated posttranslational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1819-27. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878363

  10. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Cox, Adrienne D; Der, Channing J; Philips, Mark R

    2015-04-15

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biologic activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anticancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes, and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated posttranslational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1819-27. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers."

  11. The Oncogenic Lung Cancer Fusion Kinase CD74-ROS Activates a Novel Invasiveness Pathway Through E-Syt1 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Johnson, Hannah; Bronson, Roderick T.; de Feraudy, Sebastien; White, Forest; Charest, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer often present with metastatic disease and therefore have a very poor prognosis. The recent discovery of several novel ROS receptor tyrosine kinase molecular alterations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents a therapeutic opportunity for the development of new targeted treatment strategies. Here, we report that the NSCLC-derived fusion CD74-ROS, which accounts for 30% of all ROS fusion kinases in NSCLC, is an active and oncogenic tyrosine kinase. We found that CD74-ROS expressing cells were highly invasive in vitro and metastatic in vivo. Pharmacological inhibition of CD74-ROS kinase activity reversed its transforming capacity by attenuating downstrream signaling networks. Using quantitative phosphoproteomics, we uncovered a mechanism by which CD74-ROS activates a novel pathway driving cell invasion. Expression of CD74-ROS resulted in the phosphorylation of the extended synaptotagmin-like protein E-Syt1. Elimination of E-Syt1 expression drastically reduced invasiveness both in vitro and in vivo without modifying the oncogenic activity of CD74-ROS. Furthermore, expression of CD74-ROS in non-invasive NSCLC cell lines readily confered invasive properties that paralleled the acquisition of E-Syt1 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings indicate that E-Syt1 is a mediator of cancer cell invasion and molecularly define ROS fusion kinases as therapeutic targets in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:22659450

  12. The arginine finger of RasGAP helps Gln-61 align the nucleophilic water in GAP-stimulated hydrolysis of GTP.

    PubMed

    Resat, H; Straatsma, T P; Dixon, D A; Miller, J H

    2001-05-22

    The Ras family of GTPases is a collection of molecular switches that link receptors on the plasma membrane to signaling pathways that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. The accessory GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) negatively regulate the cell signaling by increasing the slow intrinsic GTP to GDP hydrolysis rate of Ras. Mutants of Ras are found in 25-30% of human tumors. The most dramatic property of these mutants is their insensitivity to the negative regulatory action of GAPs. All known oncogenic mutants of Ras map to a small subset of amino acids. Gln-61 is particularly important because virtually all mutations of this residue eliminate sensitivity to GAPs. Despite its obvious importance for carcinogenesis, the role of Gln-61 in the GAP-stimulated GTPase activity of Ras has remained a mystery. Our molecular dynamics simulations of the p21ras-p120GAP-GTP complex suggest that the local structure around the catalytic region can be different from that revealed by the x-ray crystal structure. We find that the carbonyl oxygen on the backbone of the arginine finger supplied in trans by p120GAP (Arg-789) interacts with a water molecule in the active site that is forming a bridge between the NH(2) group of the Gln-61 and the gamma-phosphate of GTP. Thus, Arg-789 may play a dual role in generating the nucleophile as well as stabilizing the transition state for PO bond cleavage. PMID:11371635