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Sample records for activated receptor tyrosine

  1. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  2. Motogenic and morphogenic activity of epithelial receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases play essential roles in morphogenesis and differentiation of epithelia. Here we examined various tyrosine kinase receptors, which are preferentially expressed in epithelia (c-met, c- ros, c-neu, and the keratin growth factor [KGF] receptor), for their capacity to induce cell motility and branching morphogenesis of epithelial cells. We exchanged the ligand-binding domain of these receptors by the ectodomain of trkA and could thus control signaling by the new ligand, NGF. We demonstrate here that the tyrosine kinases of c- met, c-ros, c-neu, the KGF receptor, and trkA, but not the insulin receptor, induced scattering and increased motility of kidney epithelial cells in tissue culture. Mutational analysis suggests that SHC binding is essential for scattering and increased cell motility induced by trkA. The induction of motility in epithelial cells is thus an important feature of various receptor tyrosine kinases, which in vivo play a role in embryogenesis and metastasis. In contrast, only the c-met receptor promoted branching morphogenesis of kidney epithelial cells in three-dimensional matrices, which resemble the formation of tubular epithelia in development. Interestingly, the ability of c-met to induce morphogenesis could be transferred to trkA, when in a novel receptor hybrid COOH-terminal sequences of c-met (including Y14 to Y16) were fused to the trkA kinase domain. These data demonstrate that tubulogenesis of epithelia is a restricted activity of tyrosine kinases, as yet only demonstrated for the c-met receptor. We predict the existence of specific substrates that mediate this morphogenesis signal. PMID:8655582

  3. Activation of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ALK by zinc.

    PubMed

    Bennasroune, Aline; Mazot, Pierre; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Vigny, Marc

    2010-08-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development of the central and peripheral nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in Vertebrates is still a matter of debate. During synaptic transmission the release of ionic zinc found in vesicles of certain glutamatergic and gabaergic terminals may act as a neuromodulator by binding to pre- or post-synaptic receptors. Recently, zinc has been shown to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, independently of neurotrophins. This activation occurs via increasing the Src family kinase activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the ALK activity could be modulated by extracellular zinc. We first showed that zinc alone rapidly activates ALK. This activation is dependent of ALK tyrosine kinase activity and dimerization of the receptor but is independent of Src family kinase activity. In contrast, addition of sodium pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, led to a further activation of ALK. This stronger activation is dependent of Src family kinase but independent of ALK activity and dimerization. In conclusion, zinc could constitute an endogenous ligand of ALK in vertebrates.

  4. Receptor for bombesin with associated tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, D M; Gaudino, G; Naldini, L; Comoglio, P M

    1986-01-01

    The neuropeptide bombesin is known for its potent mitogenic activity on murine 3T3 fibroblasts and other cells. Recently it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of small cell lung carcinoma, in which it acts through an autocrine loop of growth stimulation. Phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) antibodies have been successfully used to recognize the autophosphorylated receptors for known growth factors. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, phosphotyrosine antibodies identified a 115,000-Mr cell surface protein (p115) that became phosphorylated on tyrosine as a specific response to bombesin stimulation of quiescent cells. The extent of phosphorylation was dose dependent and correlated with the mitogenic effect induced by bombesin, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p115 was detectable minutes after the addition of bombesin, and its time course paralleled that described for the binding of bombesin to its receptor. Immunocomplexes of phosphorylated p115 and phosphotyrosine antibodies bound 125I-labeled [Tyr4]bombesin in a specific and saturable manner and displayed an associated tyrosine kinase activity enhanced by bombesin. Furthermore, the 125I-labeled bombesin analog gastrin-releasing peptide, bound to intact live cells, was coprecipitated with p115. These data strongly suggest that p115 participates in the structure and function of the surface receptor for bombesin, a new member of the family of growth factor receptors with associated tyrosine kinase activity. Images PMID:2432404

  5. Asymmetrical phosphorylation and function of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines in B cell antigen receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Pao, L I; Famiglietti, S J; Cambier, J C

    1998-04-01

    CD79a and CD79b function as transducers of B cell antigen receptor signals via a cytoplasmic sequence, termed the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). ITAMs contain two conserved tyrosines that may become phosphorylated upon receptor aggregation and bind distinct effectors by virtue of the distinct preference of phosphotyrosyl-containing sequences for SH2 domains. To explore the function of CD79a and CD79b ITAM tyrosines, we created membrane molecules composed of MHC class II I-Ak extracellular and transmembrane domains, and CD79a or CD79b cytoplasmic domains in which one or both of the ITAM tyrosines were mutated to phenylalanine. Functional analysis revealed that both ITAM tyrosines are required for ligand-induced Syk phosphorylation. However CD79a-ITAM and CD79b-ITAM tyrosine phosphorylations were asymmetrical, with >80% of phosphorylation occurring on the N-terminal tyrosine (Y-E-G-L). Thus, these findings suggest that following receptor ligation, only a minor proportion of phosphorylated ITAMs are doubly phosphorylated and thus can engage Syk. Only the N-terminal ITAM tyrosine of CD79a was required for ligand-mediated phosphorylation of the receptor and a subset of downstream substrates, including p62, p110, and Shc, and for Ca2+ mobilization. However, responses mediated through CD79b exhibited a greater dependence on the presence of both tyrosines. Neither tyrosine in CD79a or CD79b appeared absolutely essential for Src family kinase phosphorylation. These results indicate that phosphorylations of the tyrosines in CD79a and CD79b occur with very different stoichiometry, and the respective tyrosyl residues have distinct functions.

  6. Exploiting receptor tyrosine kinase co-activation for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Aik-Choon; Vyse, Simon; Huang, Paul H

    2017-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have shown that Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK) co-activation is prevalent in many cancer types. Compelling data demonstrates that cancers are likely to have evolved RTK co-activation as a generic means for driving tumour growth and providing a buffering system to limit the lethal effects of microenvironmental insults including therapy. In this review, we summarise the general principles of RTK co-activation gleaned from key studies over the last decade. We discuss direct and indirect approaches to exploit RTK co-activation for cancer therapy and describe recent developments in computational approaches to predict kinase co-dependencies by integrating drug screening data and kinase inhibitor selectivity profiles. We offer a perspective on the outstanding questions in the field focusing on the implications of RTK co-activation on tumour heterogeneity and cancer evolution and conclude by surveying emerging computational and experimental approaches that will provide further insights into the biology of RTK co-activation and deliver new developments in effective cancer therapies. PMID:27452454

  7. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  8. A semisynthetic Eph receptor tyrosine kinase provides insight into ligand-induced kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nikhil; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Himanen, Juha P.; Muir, Tom W.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a methodology for generating milligram amounts of functional Eph tyrosine kinase receptor using the protein engineering approach of expressed protein ligation. Stimulation with ligand induces efficient autophosphorylation of the semisynthetic Eph construct. The in vitro phosphorylation of key Eph tyrosine residues upon ligand-induced activation was monitored via time-resolved, quantitative phosphoproteomics, suggesting a precise and unique order of phosphorylation of the Eph tyrosines in the kinase activation process. To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported semisynthesis of a receptor tyrosine kinase and provides a potentially general method for producing single-pass membrane proteins for structural and biochemical characterization. PMID:21439481

  9. Activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor by gintonin inhibits Kv1.2 channel activity: involvement of tyrosine kinase and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Rhee, Jeehae; Chung, Chihye; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2013-08-26

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. The primary action of gintonin is to elicit a transient increase in [Ca(2+)]i via activation of LPA receptor subtypes. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels play important roles in synaptic transmission in nervous systems. The previous reports have shown that Kv channels can be regulated by Gαq/11 protein-coupled receptor ligands. In the present study, we examined the effects of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of RNA encoding the human Kv1.2 α subunit. Gintonin treatment inhibited Kv1.2 channel activity in reversible and concentration-dependent manners. The inhibitory effect of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity was blocked by active phospholipase C inhibitor, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor antagonist, and intracellular Ca(2+) chelator. The co-expression of active receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα) with Kv1.2 channel greatly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity, but attenuation was not observed with catalytically inactive RPTPα. Furthermore, neither genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nor site-directed mutation of a tyrosine residue (Y132 to Y132F), which is phosphorylated by tyrosine kinase of the N-terminal of the Kv1.2 channel α subunit, significantly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity. These results indicate that the gintonin-mediated Kv1.2 channel regulation involves the dual coordination of both tyrosine kinase and RPTPα coupled to this receptor. Finally, gintonin-mediated regulation of Kv1.2 channel activity might explain one of the modulations of gintonin-mediated neuronal activities in nervous systems.

  10. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  11. Phorbol ester-induced serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor decreases its tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Takayama, S; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1988-03-05

    The effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the function of the insulin receptor was examined in intact hepatoma cells (Fao) and in solubilized extracts purified by wheat germ agglutinin chromatography. Incubation of ortho[32P]phosphate-labeled Fao cells with TPA increased the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor 2-fold after 30 min. Analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides from the beta-subunit of the receptor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and determination of their phosphoamino acid composition suggested that TPA predominantly stimulated phosphorylation of serine residues in a single tryptic peptide. Incubation of the Fao cells with insulin (100 nM) for 1 min stimulated 4-fold the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Prior treatment of the cells with TPA inhibited the insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation by 50%. The receptors extracted with Triton X-100 from TPA-treated Fao cells and purified on immobilized wheat germ agglutinin retained the alteration in kinase activity and exhibited a 50% decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphotransferase activity toward exogenous substrates. This was due primarily to a decrease in the Vmax for these reactions. TPA treatment also decreased the Km of the insulin receptor for ATP. Incubation of the insulin receptor purified from TPA-treated cells with alkaline phosphatase decreased the phosphate content of the beta-subunit to the control level and reversed the inhibition, suggesting that the serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit was responsible for the decreased tyrosine kinase activity. Our results support the notion that the insulin receptor is a substrate for protein kinase C in the Fao cell and that the increase in serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the receptor produced by TPA treatment inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vivo and in vitro. These data suggest that protein kinase C may regulate the function

  12. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D.; Corson, Timothy W.; Crews, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects. PMID:23674677

  13. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D; Corson, Timothy W; Crews, Craig M

    2013-05-28

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects.

  14. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localised pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) is a key component of plant innate immunity. Most known plant PRRs are receptor kinases and initiation of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) signalling requires phosphorylation of the PR...

  15. Activation of oncogenic tyrosine kinase signaling promotes insulin receptor-mediated cone photoreceptor survival

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Ammaji; Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, daylight vision is primarily mediated by cone photoreceptors. These cells die in age-related retinal degenerations. Prolonging the life of cones for even one decade would have an enormous beneficial effect on usable vision in an aging population. Photoreceptors are postmitotic, but shed 10% of their outer segments daily, and must synthesize the membrane and protein equivalent of a proliferating cell each day. Although activation of oncogenic tyrosine kinase and inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase signaling is known to be essential for tumor progression, the cellular regulation of this signaling in postmitotic photoreceptor cells has not been studied. In the present study, we report that a novel G-protein coupled receptor–mediated insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway is regulated by non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src through the inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase IB (PTP1B). We demonstrated the functional significance of this pathway through conditional deletion of IR and PTP1B in cones, in addition to delaying the death of cones in a mouse model of cone degeneration by activating the Src. This is the first study demonstrating the molecular mechanism of a novel signaling pathway in photoreceptor cells, which provides a window of opportunity to save the dying cones in retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27391439

  16. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  17. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E; Zompetta, C; Pelicci, G; Salcini, A E; Falini, B; Pelicci, P G; Torrisi, M R

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular localization of Shc proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in normal cells and cells expressing the epidermal growth factor receptor or the EGFR/erbB2 chimera. In unstimulated cells, the immunolabeling was localized in the central perinuclear area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and endocytic structures, such as coated pits and endosomes, and with the peripheral cytosol. Receptor activation in cells expressing phosphorylation-defective mutants of Shc and erbB-2 kinase showed that receptor autophosphorylation, but not Shc phosphorylation, is required for redistribution of Shc proteins. The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein. PMID:8628261

  18. Tyrosine kinase activation in breast carcinoma with correlation to HER-2/neu gene amplification and receptor overexpression.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, R; Naeem, R; Marconi, S; Luszcz, J; Garb, J; Gasparini, R; Otis, C N

    2001-12-01

    The HER-2/neu oncogene encodes a transmembrane receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. A pilot study was performed to investigate downstream effects of HER-2/neu (or related growth factor receptor) activation by identifying phosphorylated tyrosine. Fifty-four breast carcinomas were evaluated for HER-2/neu overexpression by the HercepTest (Dako, Carpinteria, CA) and the monoclonal CB11 antibody (Ventana, Tucson, AZ). Phosphotyrosine (an indication of tyrosine kinase activity) was detected by an antiphosphotyrosine mouse monoclonal antibody (Upstate Biotechnology, Lake Placid, NY). The gene amplification status was evaluated in 50 of the 54 cases by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Ventana gene probe. The HER-2/neu oncogene amplification was detected in 28% (14 of 50) of cases. Of the 14 cases showing oncogene amplification, tyrosine kinase activity was detected in 9 (64.2%) cases. There was moderate agreement between HER-2/neu gene amplification and tyrosine kinase activity (kappa = 0.43). Immunohistochemical staining of 3+ (with both HercepTest and CB11) showed better agreement with HER-2/neu oncogene amplification and increased tyrosine kinase activity than 2+ immunohistochemical staining. Overall, oncogene amplification and overexpression correlated with increased tyrosine kinase activity, supporting the mechanism of tyrosine kinase activation by HER-2/neu amplification and overexpression. However, 7 cases showing increased tyrosine kinase activity did not show gene amplification or 3+ receptor expression (by either HercepTest or CB11), raising the possibility of other growth factor receptors operating via the tyrosine kinase pathway. There was no apparent correlation between tyrosine kinase activity and hormone receptor status (estrogen or progesterone). Increased tyrosine kinase activity is more commonly associated with higher-grade tumors and thus may correlate with aggressive biologic behavior in breast carcinoma. The results of

  19. Distinct Pathways Regulate Syk Protein Activation Downstream of Immune Tyrosine Activation Motif (ITAM) and hemITAM Receptors in Platelets*

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Dangelmaier, Carol; Eble, Johannes A.; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Kahn, Mark; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase pathways are known to play an important role in the activation of platelets. In particular, the GPVI and CLEC-2 receptors are known to activate Syk upon tyrosine phosphorylation of an immune tyrosine activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM, respectively. However, unlike GPVI, the CLEC-2 receptor contains only one tyrosine motif in the intracellular domain. The mechanisms by which this receptor activates Syk are not completely understood. In this study, we identified a novel signaling mechanism in CLEC-2-mediated Syk activation. CLEC-2-mediated, but not GPVI-mediated, platelet activation and Syk phosphorylation were abolished by inhibition of PI3K, which demonstrates that PI3K regulates Syk downstream of CLEC-2. Ibrutinib, a Tec family kinase inhibitor, also completely abolished CLEC-2-mediated aggregation and Syk phosphorylation in human and murine platelets. Furthermore, embryos lacking both Btk and Tec exhibited cutaneous edema associated with blood-filled vessels in a typical lymphatic pattern similar to CLEC-2 or Syk-deficient embryos. Thus, our data show, for the first time, that PI3K and Tec family kinases play a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation and Syk phosphorylation downstream of the CLEC-2 receptor. PMID:25767114

  20. Lyn tyrosine kinase regulates androgen receptor expression and activity in castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zardan, A; Nip, K M; Thaper, D; Toren, P; Vahid, S; Beraldi, E; Fazli, L; Lamoureux, F; Gust, K M; Cox, M E; Bishop, J L; Zoubeidi, A

    2014-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) progression is a complex process by which prostate cells acquire the ability to survive and proliferate in the absence or under very low levels of androgens. Most CRPC tumors continue to express the androgen receptor (AR) as well as androgen-responsive genes owing to reactivation of AR. Protein tyrosine kinases have been implicated in supporting AR activation under castrate conditions. Here we report that Lyn tyrosine kinase expression is upregulated in CRPC human specimens compared with hormone naive or normal tissue. Lyn overexpression enhanced AR transcriptional activity both in vitro and in vivo and accelerated CRPC. Reciprocally, specific targeting of Lyn resulted in a decrease of AR transcriptional activity in vitro and in vivo and prolonged time to castration. Mechanistically, we found that targeting Lyn kinase induces AR dissociation from the molecular chaperone Hsp90, leading to its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. This work indicates a novel mechanism of regulation of AR stability and transcriptional activity by Lyn and justifies further investigation of the Lyn tyrosine kinase as a therapeutic target for the treatment of CRPC. PMID:25133482

  1. DDR1 receptor tyrosine kinase promotes prosurvival pathway through Notch1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Gu; Hwang, So-Young; Aaronson, Stuart A; Mandinova, Anna; Lee, Sam W

    2011-05-20

    DDR1 (discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 1) kinase s highly expressed in a variety of human cancers and occasionally mutated in lung cancer and leukemia. It is now clear that aberrant signaling through the DDR1 receptor is closely associated with various steps of tumorigenesis, although little is known about the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the role of DDR1 in cancer. Besides the role of DDR1 in tumorigenesis, we previously identified DDR1 kinase as a transcriptional target of tumor suppressor p53. DDR1 is functionally activated as determined by its tyrosine phosphorylation, in response to p53-dependent DNA damage. In this study, we report the characterization of the Notch1 protein as an interacting partner of DDR1 receptor, as determined by tandem affinity protein purification. Upon ligand-mediated DDR1 kinase activation, Notch1 was activated, bound to DDR1, and activated canonical Notch1 targets, including Hes1 and Hey2. Moreover, DDR1 ligand (collagen I) treatment significantly increased the active form of Notch1 receptor in the nuclear fraction, whereas DDR1 knockdown cells show little or no increase of the active form of Notch1 in the nuclear fraction, suggesting a novel intracellular mechanism underlying autocrine activation of wild-type Notch signaling through DDR1. DDR1 activation suppressed genotoxic-mediated cell death, whereas Notch1 inhibition by a γ-secretase inhibitor, DAPT, enhanced cell death in response to stress. Moreover, the DDR1 knockdown cancer cells showed the reduced transformed phenotypes in vitro and in vivo xenograft studies. The results suggest that DDR1 exerts prosurvival effect, at least in part, through the functional interaction with Notch1.

  2. Purified human platelet-derived growth factor receptor has ligand-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, S; Ross, A H; Womer, R; Scher, C D

    1986-01-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R), a 180-kDa single-chain polypeptide, was purified from membranes of the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line MG-63. Purification was achieved by treatment of membranes with PDGF and ATP, followed by solubilization with nonionic detergent and successive chromatography on solid-phase anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody and DEAE-cellulose. The PDGF-R, which was estimated to be 50-80% pure by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 32P-labeled preparations, was free of contaminating epidermal growth factor receptor and had no detectable phosphatase activity. It specifically bound 125I-labeled PDGF, a reaction quantified by binding of the ligand-PDGF-R complex to the anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. The purified receptor displayed PDGF-stimulatable tyrosine kinase activity, assayed by autophosphorylation of PDGF-R at tyrosine residues and by phosphorylation of angiotensin II. The Km for ATP in the autophosphorylation reaction was 7.5 microM. Addition of PDGF did not change the Km but increased the Vmax 1.7-fold. Images PMID:3018745

  3. Activation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase by divalent metal ions: comparison of holoreceptor and isolated kinase domain properties.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1990-05-22

    The activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase activity is thought to represent a key initial step in EGF-mediated mitogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity were examined through comparisons of the holoreceptor, purified from human placenta, and a soluble 42 kDa tyrosine kinase domain (TKD), generated by the limited trypsin proteolysis of the holoreceptor. The results of these studies highlight the importance of divalent metal ions (Me2+), i.e., Mn2+ and Mg2+, as activators of the tyrosine kinase activity. Manganese is an extremely effective activator of the holoreceptor tyrosine kinase, and under some conditions (low ionic strength) it completely alleviates the need for EGF to stimulate activity. In contrast, Mg2+ only weakly stimulates the holoreceptor tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of EGF, but promotes essentially full activity in the presence of the growth factor. Like the holoreceptor, the soluble TKD is highly active in the presence of Mn2+. However, the isolated TKD is completely inactive in the presence of Mg2+, and, in fact, Mg2+ inhibits the Mn2(+)-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity. The differences in the effects of Mn2+ and Mg2+ on the isolated TKD were further demonstrated by monitoring the effects of Me2+ on the modification of a reactive cysteine residue(s) on the TKD. While Mn2+ potentiates the inhibition by cysteine-directed reagents of the tyrosine kinase activity, Mg2+ has no effect on either the rate or the extent of the inhibition. Both the regulation by Mn2+ of the kinase activity of the TKD and the potentiation by Mn2+ of the cysteine reactivity of the TKD occur over a millimolar concentration range, which implicates a direct binding interaction by the metal ion. Overall, these results demonstrate that there are two key activator sites on the EGF receptor, i.e., the EGF binding site on the extracellular domain and a Me2+ binding site on the

  4. Separate domains of the insulin receptor contain sites of autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, H.J.; White, M.F.; Khan, C.R.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the solubilized insulin receptor before and after partial proteolytic digestion to define domains in the ..beta..-subunit that undergo autophosphorylation and contain the tyrosine kinase activity. Wheat germ agglutinin purified insulin receptor from Fao cells was digested briefly at 22/sup 0/C with low concentrations of trypsin, staphylococcal V8 protease, or elastase. Autophosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit was carried out before and after digestion, and the (/sup 32/P)phosphoproteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, detected by autoradiography, and analyzed by tryptic peptide mapping by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The 85-kDa fragment was not immunoprecipitated by an antibody directed against the C-terminal domain of the ..beta..-subunit (..cap alpha..Pep-1), indicating that this region of the receptor was lost. The 85-kDa fragment contained about half of the (/sup 32/P)phosphate originally found in the ..beta..-subunit, and tryptic peptide mapping showed that two major tryptic phosphopeptides (previously called pY2 and pY3) were removed. Three other tryptic phosphopeptides (pY1, pY1a, and pY4) were found in the 85- and 70-kDa fragments. To determined the structural requirements for kinase activity, the insulin receptor was subjected to tryptic digestion for 30 s-30 min, such that the receptor was composed exclusively of 85- and 70-kDa fragments of the ..beta..-subunit. The 85-kDa fragment exhibited autophosphorylation at pY1, pY1a, and pY4. Both the 85- and 70-kDa fragments phosphorylated tyrosine residues in a synthetic decapeptide that has the sequence of the C-terminal domain of the ..beta..-subunit of human insulin rare in the receptor.

  5. Molecular docking studies of banana flower flavonoids as insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activators as a cure for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ganugapati, Jayasree; Baldwa, Aashish; Lalani, Sarfaraz

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder caused due to insulin deficiency. Banana flower is a rich source of flavonoids that exhibit anti diabetic activity. Insulin receptor is a tetramer that belongs to a family of receptor tyrosine kinases. It contains two alpha subunits that form the extracellular domain and two beta subunits that constitute the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Insulin binds to the extracellular region of the receptor and causes conformational changes that lead to the activation of the tyrosine kinase. This leads to autophosphorylation, a step that is crucial in insulin signaling pathway. Hence, compounds that augment insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity would be useful in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The 3D structure of IR tyrosine kinase was obtained from PDB database. The list of flavonoids found in banana flower was obtained from USDA database. The structures of the flavonoids were obtained from NCBI Pubchem. Docking analysis of the flavonoids was performed using Autodock 4.0 and Autodock Vina. The results indicate that few of the flavonoids may be potential activators of IR tyrosine kinase.

  6. The insect neuropeptide PTTH activates receptor tyrosine kinase torso to initiate metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, Kim F; Yamanaka, Naoki; Gilbert, Lawrence I; O'Connor, Michael B

    2009-12-04

    Holometabolous insects undergo complete metamorphosis to become sexually mature adults. Metamorphosis is initiated by brain-derived prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH), which stimulates the production of the molting hormone ecdysone via an incompletely defined signaling pathway. Here we demonstrate that Torso, a receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates embryonic terminal cell fate in Drosophila, is the PTTH receptor. Trunk, the embryonic Torso ligand, is related to PTTH, and ectopic expression of PTTH in the embryo partially rescues trunk mutants. In larvae, torso is expressed specifically in the prothoracic gland (PG), and its loss phenocopies the removal of PTTH. The activation of Torso by PTTH stimulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, and the loss of ERK in the PG phenocopies the loss of PTTH and Torso. We conclude that PTTH initiates metamorphosis by activation of the Torso/ERK pathway.

  7. Spatio-temporally precise activation of engineered receptor tyrosine kinases by light

    PubMed Central

    Grusch, Michael; Schelch, Karin; Riedler, Robert; Reichhart, Eva; Differ, Christopher; Berger, Walter; Inglés-Prieto, Álvaro; Janovjak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a large family of cell surface receptors that sense growth factors and hormones and regulate a variety of cell behaviours in health and disease. Contactless activation of RTKs with spatial and temporal precision is currently not feasible. Here, we generated RTKs that are insensitive to endogenous ligands but can be selectively activated by low-intensity blue light. We screened light-oxygen-voltage (LOV)-sensing domains for their ability to activate RTKs by light-activated dimerization. Incorporation of LOV domains found in aureochrome photoreceptors of stramenopiles resulted in robust activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and rearranged during transfection (RET). In human cancer and endothelial cells, light induced cellular signalling with spatial and temporal precision. Furthermore, light faithfully mimicked complex mitogenic and morphogenic cell behaviour induced by growth factors. RTKs under optical control (Opto-RTKs) provide a powerful optogenetic approach to actuate cellular signals and manipulate cell behaviour. PMID:24986882

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation by diesel particles is mediated by tyrosine phosphatase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tamara L.; Bromberg, Philip A.; Kim, Yumee; Samet, James M.

    2008-12-15

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major component of ambient PM and may contribute to PM-induced pulmonary inflammation. Proinflammatory signaling is mediated by phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways whose activation is opposed by the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) which thereby function to maintain signaling quiescence. PTPases contain an invariant catalytic cysteine that is susceptible to electrophilic attack. DEP contain electrophilic oxy-organic compounds that may contribute to the oxidant effects of PM. Therefore, we hypothesized that exposure to DEP impairs PTPase activity allowing for unopposed basal kinase activity. Here we report that exposure to 30 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} DEP for 4 h induces differential activation of signaling in primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells (HAEC), a primary target cell in PM inhalation. In-gel kinase activity assay of HAEC exposed to DEPs of low (L-DEP), intermediate (I-DEP) or high (H-DEP) organic content showed differential activation of intracellular kinases. Exposure to these DEP also induced varying levels of phosphorylation of the receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR in a manner that requires EGFR kinase activity but does not involve receptor dimerization. We demonstrate that treatment with DEP results in an impairment of total and EGFR-directed PTPase activity in HAEC with a potency that is independent of the organic content of these particles. These data show that DEP-induced EGFR phosphorylation in HAEC is the result of a loss of PTPase activities which normally function to dephosphorylate EGFR in opposition to baseline EGFR kinase activity.

  9. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), a unique module linking antigen and Fc receptors to their signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Isakov, N

    1997-01-01

    Signal transduction by the T cell and B cell antigen receptors and by receptors for a variety of immunoglobulins' Fc region is strictly dependent on a receptor subunit cytoplasmic module termed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This module exists in one or more copies in each of the receptor-associated signal-transducing molecules and it possesses two repeats of the consensus sequence Tyr-X-X-Leu/Ile spaced by six to eight amino acids. Receptor engagement is followed by a rapid and transient phosphorylation of tyrosine residues within their ITAMs, thereby creating temporary binding sites for Src homology 2 (SH2)-containing signaling molecules operating downstream of the activated receptor. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent findings on the functional role of ITAMs in antigen and Fc receptor-mediated signal transduction, with a particular emphasis on kinases operating upstream and downstream of the ITAMs.

  10. Activating mutations for the Met tyrosine kinase receptor in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jeffers, Michael; Schmidt, Laura; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Webb, Craig P.; Weirich, Gregor; Kishida, Takeshi; Zbar, Berton; Vande Woude, George F.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the Met tyrosine kinase receptor have been identified in both hereditary and sporadic forms of papillary renal carcinoma. We have introduced the corresponding mutations into the met cDNA and examined the effect of each mutation in biochemical and biological assays. We find that the Met mutants exhibit increased levels of tyrosine phosphorylation and enhanced kinase activity toward an exogenous substrate when compared with wild-type Met. Moreover, NIH 3T3 cells expressing mutant Met molecules form foci in vitro and are tumorigenic in nude mice. Enzymatic and biological differences were evident among the various mutants examined, and the somatic mutations were generally more active than those of germ-line origin. A strong correlation between the enzymatic and biological activity of the mutants was observed, indicating that tumorigenesis by Met is quantitatively related to its level of activation. These results demonstrate that the Met mutants originally identified in human papillary renal carcinoma are oncogenic and thus are likely to play a determinant role in this disease, and these results raise the possibility that activating Met mutations also may contribute to other human malignancies. PMID:9326629

  11. Substrate recognition by the Lyn protein-tyrosine kinase. NMR structure of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling region of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Gaul, B S; Harrison, M L; Geahlen, R L; Burton, R A; Post, C B

    2000-05-26

    The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) plays a central role in transmembrane signal transduction in hematopoietic cells by mediating responses leading to proliferation and differentiation. An initial signaling event following activation of the B cell antigen receptor is phosphorylation of the CD79a (Ig-alpha) ITAM by Lyn, a Src family protein-tyrosine kinase. To elucidate the structural basis for recognition between the ITAM substrate and activated Lyn kinase, the structure of an ITAM-derived peptide bound to Lyn was determined using exchange-transferred nuclear Overhauser NMR spectroscopy. The bound substrate structure has an irregular helix-like character. Docking based on the NMR data into the active site of the closely related Lck kinase strongly favors ITAM binding in an orientation similar to binding of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase rather than that of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. The model of the complex provides a rationale for conserved ITAM residues, substrate specificity, and suggests that substrate binds only the active conformation of the Src family tyrosine kinase, unlike the ATP cofactor, which can bind the inactive form.

  12. Structural Basis for Activation of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase KIT by Stem Cell Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa,S.; Opatowsky, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Mandiyan, V.; Lax, I.; Schlessinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Stem Cell Factor (SCF) initiates its multiple cellular responses by binding to the ectodomain of KIT, resulting in tyrosine kinase activation. We describe the crystal structure of the entire ectodomain of KIT before and after SCF stimulation. The structures show that KIT dimerization is driven by SCF binding whose sole role is to bring two KIT molecules together. Receptor dimerization is followed by conformational changes that enable lateral interactions between membrane proximal Ig-like domains D4 and D5 of two KIT molecules. Experiments with cultured cells show that KIT activation is compromised by point mutations in amino acids critical for D4-D4 interaction. Moreover, a variety of oncogenic mutations are mapped to the D5-D5 interface. Since key hallmarks of KIT structures, ligand-induced receptor dimerization, and the critical residues in the D4-D4 interface, are conserved in other receptors, the mechanism of KIT stimulation unveiled in this report may apply for other receptor activation.

  13. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  14. Microglial activatory (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif)- and inhibitory (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif)-signaling receptors for recognition of the neuronal glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bettina; Neumann, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Microglia sense intact or lesioned cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and respond accordingly. To fulfill this task, microglia express a whole set of recognition receptors. Fc receptors and DAP12 (TYROBP)-associated receptors such as microglial triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2) and the complement receptor-3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18) trigger the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-signaling cascade, resulting in microglial activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Those receptors are counter-regulated by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-signaling receptors, such as sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin superfamily lectins (Siglecs). Siglecs recognize the sialic acid cap of healthy neurons thus leading to an ITIM signaling that turns down microglial immune responses and phagocytosis. In contrast, desialylated neuronal processes are phagocytosed by microglial CR3 signaling via an adaptor protein containing an ITAM. Thus, the aberrant terminal glycosylation of neuronal surface glycoproteins and glycolipids could serve as a flag for microglia, which display a multitude of diverse carbohydrate-binding receptors that monitor the neuronal physical condition and respond via their ITIM- or ITAM-signaling cascade accordingly.

  15. A high-content EMT screen identifies multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with activity on TGFβ receptor.

    PubMed

    Lotz-Jenne, Carina; Lüthi, Urs; Ackerknecht, Sabine; Lehembre, François; Fink, Tobias; Stritt, Manuel; Wirth, Matthias; Pavan, Simona; Bill, Ruben; Regenass, Urs; Christofori, Gerhard; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie

    2016-05-03

    An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) enables epithelial tumor cells to break out of the primary tumor mass and to metastasize. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EMT in more detail will provide important tools to interfere with the metastatic process. To identify pharmacological modulators and druggable targets of EMT, we have established a novel multi-parameter, high-content, microscopy-based assay and screened chemical compounds with activities against known targets. Out of 3423 compounds, we have identified 19 drugs that block transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced EMT in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG). The active compounds include inhibitors against TGFβ receptors (TGFBR), Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK), myosin II, SRC kinase and uridine analogues. Among the EMT-repressing compounds, we identified a group of inhibitors targeting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, and biochemical profiling of these multi-kinase inhibitors reveals TGFBR as a thus far unknown target of their inhibitory spectrum. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-parameter, high-content microscopy screen to identify modulators and druggable targets of EMT. Moreover, the newly discovered "off-target" effects of several receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have important consequences for in vitro and in vivo studies and might beneficially contribute to the therapeutic effects observed in vivo.

  16. A single tyrosine of the interleukin-9 (IL-9) receptor is required for STAT activation, antiapoptotic activity, and growth regulation by IL-9.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, J B; Uyttenhove, C; Van Roost, E; DeLestré, B; Donckers, D; Van Snick, J; Renauld, J C

    1996-09-01

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9), a T-cell-derived cytokine, interacts with a specific receptor associated with the IL-2 receptor gamma chain. In this report, we analyze the functional domains of the human IL-9 receptor transfected into mouse lymphoid cell lines. Three different functions were examined: growth stimulation in factor-dependent pro-B Ba/F3 cells, protection against dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, and Ly-6A2 induction in BW5147 lymphoma cells. The results indicated that a single tyrosine, at position 116 in the cytoplasmic domain, was required for all three activities. In addition, we observed that human IL-9 reduced the proliferation rate of transfected BW5147 cells, an effect also dependent on the same tyrosine. This amino acid was necessary for IL-9-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and for STAT activation but not for IRS-2/4PS activation or for JAK1 phosphorylation, which depended on a domain closer to the plasma membrane. We also showed that JAK1 was constitutively associated with the IL-9 receptor. Activated STAT complexes induced by IL-9 were found to contain STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 transcription factors. Moreover, sequence homologies between human IL-9 receptor tyrosine 116 and tyrosines (of other receptors activating STAT3 and STAT5 were observed. Taken together, these data indicate that a single tyrosine of the IL-9 receptor, required for activation of three different STAT proteins, is necessary for distinct activities of this cytokine, including proliferative responses.

  17. Regulation of ERBB Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activities in Breast Cancer by the KEK Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    can also inhibit transformation in mouse mammary tumor cells with deregulated expression of receptors and ligands of the ErbB family. 14. SUBJECT...Reportable outcomes Conclusions References Appendices 7 4 5. INTRODUCTION: In 20-30% of breast tumors , ErbB2, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the...inhibit transformation in mouse mammary tumor cells with deregulated expression of receptors and ligands of the ErbB family. In the second year of

  18. Extracellular assembly and activation principles of oncogenic class III receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Savvides, Savvas N

    2012-11-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades initiated by class III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK-IIIs) and their cytokine ligands contribute to haematopoiesis and mesenchymal tissue development. They are also implicated in a wide range of inflammatory disorders and cancers. Recent snapshots of RTK-III ectodomains in complex with cognate cytokines have revealed timely insights into the structural determinants of RTK-III activation, evolution and pathology. Importantly, candidate 'driver' and 'passenger' mutations that have been identified in RTK-IIIs can now be collectively mapped for the first time to structural scaffolds of the corresponding RTK-III ectodomains. Such insights will generate a renewed interest in dissecting the mechanistic effects of such mutations and their therapeutic relevance.

  19. Syk-coupled C-type lectin receptors that mediate cellular activation via single tyrosine based activation motifs.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Ann M; Brown, Gordon D

    2010-03-01

    Different dendritic cell (DC) subsets have distinct specialized functions contributed in part by their differential expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are a group of PRRs expressed by DCs and other myeloid cells that can recognize endogenous ligands as well as a wide range of exogenous structures present on pathogens. Dual roles in homeostasis and immunity have been demonstrated for some members of this receptor family. Largely due to their endocytic ability and subset specific expression, DC-expressed CLRs have been the focus of significant antigen-targeting studies. A number of CLRs function on the basis of signaling via association with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing adapter proteins. Others contain ITAM-related motifs or immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in their cytoplasmic tails. Here we review CLRs that induce intracellular signaling via a single tyrosine-based ITAM-like motif and highlight their relevance in terms of DC function.

  20. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptors influence tyrosine hydroxylase activity in retinal dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Iuvone, P M; Rauch, A L

    1983-12-12

    Dopamine (DA) is a putative neurotransmitter in a population of interneurons in the mammalian retina that are activated by photic stimulation. Pharmacological studies were conducted to determine if alpha 2-adrenergic receptors influence the activity of retinal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a biochemical indicator of changes in the activity of the DA-containing neurons. TH activity was low in dark-adapted retinas and high in light-exposed retinas. Systemic administration of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists, yohimbine and piperoxane, to dark-adapted rats significantly stimulated TH activity. This effect was apparently mediated locally within the retina because the response could also be elicited by direct injection of yohimbine into the vitreous. The dose-response relationships for the effects of alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists on retinal TH activity were similar to those for the effects on brain noradrenergic neurons, where alpha 2-adrenoceptors have been shown to be involved in the autoregulation of neuronal activity. Clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, had no effect when administered alone to dark-adapted rats, but it attenuated the stimulatory effect of yohimbine. In contrast, clonidine decreased TH activity of light-exposed retinas, an effect that was reversed by yohimbine. These observations suggest that alpha 2-adrenoceptors influence the activity of retinal DA-containing neurons.

  1. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  2. PDGF-BB-mediated activation of p42(MAPK) is independent of PDGF beta-receptor tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cartel, N J; Liu, J; Wang, J; Post, M

    2001-10-01

    Herein, we investigated the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), a key component of downstream signaling events, which is activated subsequent to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulation. Specifically, p42(MAPK) activity peaked 60 min after addition of PDGF-BB, declined thereafter, and was determined not to be a direct or necessary component of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. PDGF-BB also activated MAPK kinase 2 (MAPKK2) but had no effect on MAPKK1 and Raf-1 activity. Chemical inhibition of Janus kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src kinase, or tyrosine phosphorylation inhibition of the PDGF beta-receptor (PDGFR-beta) did not abrogate PDGF-BB-induced p42(MAPK) activation or its threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation. A dominant negative cytoplasmic receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility variant 4 (RHAMMv4), a regulator of MAPKK-MAPK interaction and activation, did not inhibit PDGF-BB-induced p42(MAPK) activation nor did a construct expressing PDGFR-beta with cytoplasmic tyrosines mutated to phenylalanine. However, overexpression of a dominant negative PDGFR-beta lacking the cytoplasmic signaling domain abrogated p42(MAPK) activity. These results suggest that PDGF-BB-mediated activation of p42(MAPK) requires the PDGFR-beta but is independent of its tyrosine phosphorylation.

  3. Tyrosine kinase activity is essential for the association of phospholipase C-gamma with the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, B; Bellot, F; Honegger, A M; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J; Zilberstein, A

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment of NIH 3T3 cells transfected with wild-type EGF receptor induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma). The EGF receptor and PLC-gamma were found to be physically associated such that antibodies directed against PLC-gamma or the EGF receptor coimmunoprecipitated both proteins. The association between PLC-gamma and wild-type EGF receptor was dependent on the concentration of EGF, but EGF did not enhance the association between PLC-gamma and a kinase-negative mutant of the EGF receptor. Oligomerization of the EGF receptor was not sufficient to induce association of the EGF receptor with PLC-gamma, since the kinase-negative mutant receptor underwent normal dimerization in response to EGF yet did not associate with PLC-gamma. The form of PLC-gamma associated with the EGF receptor appeared to be primarily the non-tyrosine-phosphorylated form. It is concluded that the kinase activity of the EGF receptor is essential for association of PLC-gamma with the EGF receptor, possibly by stimulating receptor autophosphorylation. Images PMID:2153914

  4. Hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor RHAMM promote focal adhesion turnover and transient tyrosine kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms whereby hyaluronan (HA) stimulates cell motility was investigated in a C-H-ras transformed 10T 1/2 fibroblast cell line (C3). A significant (p < 0.001) stimulation of C3 cell motility with HA (10 ng/ml) was accompanied by an increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation as detected by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies using immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins was found to be both rapid and transient with phosphorylation occurring within 1 min of HA addition and dissipating below control levels 10-15 min later. These responses were also elicited by an antibody generated against a peptide sequence within the HA receptor RHAMM. Treatment of cells with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein, 10 micrograms/ml or herbimycin A, 0.5 micrograms/ml) or microinjection of anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies inhibited the transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to HA as well as prevented HA stimulation of cell motility. To determine a link between HA-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation and the resulting cell locomotion, cytoskeletal reorganization was examined in C3 cells plated on fibronectin and treated with HA or anti-RHAMM antibody. These agents caused a rapid assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions as revealed by immunofluorescent localization of vinculin. The time course with which HA and antibody induced focal adhesion turnover exactly paralleled the induction of transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, phosphotyrosine staining colocalized with vinculin within structures in the lamellapodia of these cells. Notably, the focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, was rapidly phosphorylated and dephosphorylated after HA stimulation. These results suggest that HA stimulates locomotion via a rapid and transient protein tyrosine kinase signaling event mediated by RHAMM. They also provide a possible molecular basis for focal adhesion turnover, a process that is

  5. δ-Tocopherol inhibits receptor tyrosine kinase-induced AKT activation in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hong, Jungil; Yang, Chung S

    2016-11-01

    The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E is suggested by epidemiological studies and supported by animal studies with vitamin E forms, γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol (δ-T). Several recent large-scale cancer prevention trials with high dose of α-tocopherol, however, yielded disappointing results. Whether vitamin E prevents or promotes cancer is a serious concern. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of the different forms of tocopherols would enhance our understanding of this topic. In this study, we demonstrated that δ-T was the most effective tocopherol form in inhibiting prostate cancer cell growth, by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. By profiling the effects of δ-T on the cell signaling using the phospho-kinase array, we found that the most inhibited target was the phosphorylation of AKT on T308. Further study on the activation of AKT by EGFR and IGFR revealed that δ-T attenuated the EGF/IGF-induced activation of AKT (via the phosphorylation of AKT on T308 induced by the activation of PIK3). Expression of dominant active PIK3 and AKT in prostate cancer cell line DU145 in which PIK3, AKT, and PTEN are wild type caused the cells to be reflectory to the inhibition of δ-T, supporting that δ-T inhibits the PIK3-mediated activation of AKT. Our data also suggest that δ-T interferes with the EGF-induced EGFR internalization, which leads to the inhibition of the receptor tyrosine kinase-dependent activation of AKT. In summary, our results revealed a novel mechanism of δ-T in inhibiting prostate cancer cell growth, supporting the cancer preventive activity δ-T. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer L.; Kuntz, Steven G.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Ror proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes, including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement, and cell polarity. While Ror (receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor) proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species now establish that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity (PCP), an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and in particular we focus on their function as Wnt receptors. PMID:18848778

  7. Activation of the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the bombesin receptor complex in small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudino, G; Cirillo, D; Naldini, L; Rossino, P; Comoglio, P M

    1988-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that bombesin-like peptides produced by small cell lung carcinomas may sustain deregulated proliferation through an autocrine mechanism. We have shown that the neuropeptide bombesin leads to the activation of a protein-tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates a 115-kDa protein (p115) associated with the bombesin receptor complex in mouse Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We now report that phosphotyrosine antibodies recognize a 115-kDa protein, phosphorylated on tyrosine, in four human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines producing bombesin but not in a nonproducer "variant" line. p115 from detergent-treated small cell lung carcinoma cells binds to bombesin-Sepharose and can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in the presence of radiolabeled ATP and Mn2+. As for the p115 immunoprecipitated from mouse fibroblast, the small cell lung carcinoma p115 can be phosphorylated in an immunocomplex kinase assay. However, the latter does not require the presence of exogenous bombesin for activity. Binding data, obtained by using radiolabeled ligand, suggest receptor occupancy in the cell lines producing bombesin. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that proliferation in some human small cell lung carcinoma lines is under autocrine control, regulated through activation of bombesin receptors. Images PMID:2451242

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors by non-receptor tyrosine kinases: roles in depression-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q.

    2016-01-01

    Several key members of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase (nRTK) family are abundantly present within excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. These neuron-enriched nRTKs interact with glutamate receptors and phosphorylate the receptors at tyrosine sites. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor is a direct substrate of nRTKs and has been extensively investigated in its phosphorylation responses to nRTKs. The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor is the other glutamate receptor subtype that is subject to nRTK-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation. Recently, group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/5) were found to be sensitive to nRTKs. Robust tyrosine phosphorylation may occur in C-terminal tails of mGluR5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors is either constitutive or induced activity-dependently by changing cellular and/or synaptic input. Through inducing tyrosine phosphorylation, nRTKs regulate trafficking, subcellular distribution, and function of modified receptors. Available data show that nRTK-glutamate receptor interactions and tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptors undergo drastic adaptations in mood disorders such as major depressive disorder. The remodeling of the nRTK-glutamate receptor interplay contributes to the long-lasting pathophysiology and symptomology of depression. This review summarizes the recent progress in tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of nRTKs in regulating glutamate receptors and depression-like behavior. PMID:26942227

  9. Tyrosine dephosphorylation enhances the therapeutic target activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by disrupting its interaction with estrogen receptor (ER)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shao; Yin, Ning; Qi, Xiaomei; Pfister, Sandra L.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Ma, Rong; Chen, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions can increase or decrease its therapeutic target activity and the determining factors involved, however, are largely unknown. Here, we report that tyrosine-dephosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) increases its therapeutic target activity by disrupting its interaction with estrogen receptor (ER). Protein tyrosine phosphatase H1 (PTPH1) dephosphorylates the tyrosine kinase EGFR, disrupts its interaction with the nuclear receptor ER, and increases breast cancer sensitivity to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). These effects require PTPH1 catalytic activity and its interaction with EGFR, suggesting that the phosphatase may increase the sensitivity by dephosphorylating EGFR leading to its dissociation with ER. Consistent with this notion, a nuclear-localization defective ER has a higher EGFR-binding activity and confers the resistance to TKI-induced growth inhibition. Additional analysis show that PTPH1 stabilizes EGFR, stimulates the membranous EGFR accumulation, and enhances the growth-inhibitory activity of a combination therapy of TKIs with an anti-estrogen. Since EGFR and ER both are substrates for PTPH1 in vitro and in intact cells, these results indicate that an inhibitory EGFR-ER protein complex can be switched off through a competitive enzyme-substrate binding. Our results would have important implications for the treatment of breast cancer with targeted therapeutics. PMID:26079946

  10. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  11. Protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) enhances Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Luan, Yi-Fei; Guo, Peng; Li, Yi-Hang; Liu, Yong; Qi, Su-Hua

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Src could modulate NMDA receptor, and PAR1 could also affect NMDAR signaling. However, whether PAR1 could regulate NMDAR through Src under ICH has not yet been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling cascades in rat ICH model and in vitro thrombin challenged model. Using the PAR1 agonist SFLLR, antagonist RLLFS and Src inhibitor PP2, electrophysiological analysis showed that PAR1 regulated NMDA-induced whole-cell currents (INMDA) though Src in primary cultured neurons. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed the elevated phosphorylation of tyrosine in Src and GluN2A and enhanced interaction of the Src-PSD95-GluN2A under model conditions. Treatment with the PAR1 antagonist RLLFS, AS-PSD95 (Antisense oligonucleotide against PSD95) and Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A, and p-Src, p-GluN2A. Co-application of SFLLR and AS-PSD95, PP2, or MK801 (NMDAR inhibitor) abolished the effect of SF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that activated thrombin receptor PAR1 induced Src activation, enhanced the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling modules, and up-regulated GluN2A phosphorylation after ICH injury. Elucidation of such signaling cascades would possibly provide novel targets for ICH treatment. PMID:27385592

  12. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  13. Androgen Receptor Activation in Castration-Recurrent Prostate Cancer: The Role of Src-Family and Ack1 Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Irwin H.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing appreciation that castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CR-CaP) is driven by the continued expression of androgen receptor (AR). AR activation in CR-CaP through various mechanisms, including AR overexpression, expression of AR splice variants or mutants, increased expression of co-regulator proteins, and by post-translational modification, allows for the induction of AR-regulated genes in response to very low levels of tissue-expressed, so-called intracrine androgens, resulting in pathways that mediate CaP proliferation, anti-apoptosis and oncogenic aggressiveness. The current review focuses on the role played by Src-family (SFK) and Ack1 non-receptor tyrosine kinases in activating AR through direct phosphorylation, respectively, on tyrosines 534 or 267, and how these modifications facilitate progression to CR-CaP. The fact that SFK and Ack1 are central mediators for multiple growth factor receptor signaling pathways that become activated in CR-CaP, especially in the context of metastatic growth in the bone, has contributed to recent therapeutic trials using SFK/Ack1 inhibitors in monotherapy or in combination with antagonists of the AR activation axis. PMID:24948875

  14. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor activates the receptor tyrosine kinase RET and promotes kidney morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Q C; Worby, C A; Lechner, M S; Dixon, J E; Dressler, G R

    1996-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET functions during the development of the kidney and the enteric nervous system, yet no ligand has been identified to date. This report demonstrates that the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) activates RET, as measured by tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular catalytic domain. GDNF also binds RET with a dissociation constant of 8 nM, and 125I-labeled GDNF can be coimmunoprecipitated with anti-RET antibodies. In addition, exogenous GDNF stimulates both branching and proliferation of embryonic kidneys in organ culture, whereas neutralizing antibodies against GDNF inhibit branching morphogenesis. These data indicate that RET and GDNF are components of a common signaling pathway and point to a role for GDNF in kidney development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855235

  15. Identification of Canonical Tyrosine-dependent and Non-canonical Tyrosine-independent STAT3 Activation Sites in the Intracellular Domain of the Interleukin 23 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Doreen M.; Mrotzek, Simone; Klöcker, Tobias; Schröder, Jutta; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Signaling of interleukin 23 (IL-23) via the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) and the shared IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) controls innate and adaptive immune responses and is involved in the differentiation and expansion of IL-17-producing CD4+ T helper (TH17) cells. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) appears to be the major signaling pathway of IL-23, and STAT binding sites were predicted in the IL-23R but not in the IL-12Rβ1 chain. Using site-directed mutagenesis and deletion variants of the murine and human IL-23R, we showed that the predicted STAT binding sites (pYXXQ; including Tyr-504 and Tyr-626 in murine IL-23R and Tyr-484 and Tyr-611 in human IL-23R) mediated STAT3 activation. Furthermore, we identified two uncommon STAT3 binding/activation sites within the murine IL-23R. First, the murine IL-23R carried the Y542PNFQ sequence, which acts as an unusual Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding protein activation site of STAT3. Second, we identified a non-canonical, phosphotyrosine-independent STAT3 activation motif within the IL-23R. A third predicted site, Tyr-416 in murine and Tyr-397 in human IL-23R, is involved in the activation of PI3K/Akt and the MAPK pathway leading to STAT3-independent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells upon stimulation with IL-23. In contrast to IL-6-induced short term STAT3 phosphorylation, cellular activation by IL-23 resulted in a slower but long term STAT3 phosphorylation, indicating that the IL-23R might not be a major target of negative feedback inhibition by suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins. In summary, we characterized IL-23-dependent signal transduction with a focus on STAT3 phosphorylation and identified canonical tyrosine-dependent and non-canonical tyrosine-independent STAT3 activation sites in the IL-23R. PMID:23673666

  16. VCP, the mammalian homolog of cdc48, is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell antigen receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Egerton, M; Ashe, O R; Chen, D; Druker, B J; Burgess, W H; Samelson, L E

    1992-01-01

    Activation of T cells through the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) results in the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of cellular proteins, one of the earliest being a 100 kDa protein. We have sought to identify this 100 kDa substrate by partially purifying the protein by antiphosphotyrosine (APT) affinity purification, in order to obtain amino acid sequence data and, using this information, to isolate the cDNA clone encoding the molecule. We report here that the amino acid sequence data showed pp100 to be the murine equivalent of porcine valosin containing protein (VCP), a finding confirmed from the cloning and sequencing of the murine pp100 cDNA. Sequence analysis has shown VCP to be a member of a family of ATP binding, homo-oligomeric proteins, and the mammalian homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cdc48p, a protein essential to the completion of mitosis in yeast. We also provide proof that both endogenous and expressed murine VCP are tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell activation. Thus we have identified a novel component of the TCR mediated tyrosine kinase activation pathway that may provide a link between TCR ligation and cell cycle control. Images PMID:1382975

  17. Src kinases and ERK activate distinct responses to Stitcher receptor tyrosine kinase signaling during wound healing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tsarouhas, Vasilios; Yao, Liqun; Samakovlis, Christos

    2014-04-15

    Metazoans have evolved efficient mechanisms for epidermal repair and survival following injury. Several cellular responses and key signaling molecules that are involved in wound healing have been identified in Drosophila, but the coordination of cytoskeletal rearrangements and the activation of gene expression during barrier repair are poorly understood. The Ret-like receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Stitcher (Stit, also known as Cad96Ca) regulates both re-epithelialization and transcriptional activation by Grainy head (Grh) to induce restoration of the extracellular barrier. Here, we describe the immediate downstream effectors of Stit signaling in vivo. Drk (Downstream of receptor kinase) and Src family tyrosine kinases bind to the same docking site in the Stit intracellular domain. Drk is required for the full activation of transcriptional responses but is dispensable for re-epithelialization. By contrast, Src family kinases (SFKs) control both the assembly of a contractile actin ring at the wound periphery and Grh-dependent activation of barrier-repair genes. Our analysis identifies distinct pathways mediating injury responses and reveals an RTK-dependent activation mode for Src kinases and their central functions during epidermal wound healing in vivo.

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the BRI1 receptor kinase occurs via a posttranslational modification and is activated by the juxtamembrane domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In metazoans, receptor kinases control many essential processes related to growth and development and response to the environment. The receptor kinases in plants and animals are structurally similar but evolutionarily distinct from one another, and thus while most animal receptor kinases are tyrosin...

  19. Autophagy induced by AXL receptor tyrosine kinase alleviates acute liver injury via inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jihye; Bae, Joonbeom; Choi, Chang-Yong; Choi, Sang-Pil; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Young Sik; Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Park, Chung-Gyu; Lee, Myung-Shik; Chun, Taehoon

    2016-12-01

    Severe hepatic inflammation is a common cause of acute or chronic liver disease. Macrophages are one of the key mediators which regulate the progress of hepatic inflammation. Increasing evidence shows that the TAM (TYRO3, AXL and MERTK) family of RTKs (receptor tyrosine kinases), which is expressed in macrophages, alleviates inflammatory responses through a negative feedback loop. However, the functional contribution of each TAM family member to the progression of hepatic inflammation remains elusive. In this study, we explore the role of individual TAM family proteins during autophagy induction and evaluate their contribution to hepatic inflammation. Among the TAM family of RTKs, AXL (AXL receptor tyrosine kinase) only induces autophagy in macrophages after interaction with its ligand, GAS6 (growth arrest specific 6). Based on our results, autophosphorylation of 2 tyrosine residues (Tyr815 and Tyr860) in the cytoplasmic domain of AXL in mice is required for autophagy induction and AXL-mediated autophagy induction is dependent on MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)14 activity. Furthermore, induction of AXL-mediated autophagy prevents CASP1 (caspase 1)-dependent IL1B (interleukin 1, β) and IL18 (interleukin 18) maturation by inhibiting NLRP3 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome activation. In agreement with these observations, axl(-/-) mice show more severe symptoms than do wild-type (Axl(+/+)) mice following acute hepatic injury induced by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Hence, GAS6-AXL signaling-mediated autophagy induction in murine macrophages ameliorates hepatic inflammatory responses by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

  20. The Non-receptor Tyrosine Kinase Tec Controls Assembly and Activity of the Noncanonical Caspase-8 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Zwolanek, Florian; Riedelberger, Michael; Stolz, Valentina; Jenull, Sabrina; Istel, Fabian; Köprülü, Afitap Derya; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Tec family kinases are intracellular non-receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in numerous functions, including T cell and B cell regulation. However, a role in microbial pathogenesis has not been described. Here, we identified Tec kinase as a novel key mediator of the inflammatory immune response in macrophages invaded by the human fungal pathogen C. albicans. Tec is required for both activation and assembly of the noncanonical caspase-8, but not of the caspase-1 inflammasome, during infections with fungal but not bacterial pathogens, triggering the antifungal response through IL-1β. Furthermore, we identify dectin-1 as the pathogen recognition receptor being required for Syk-dependent Tec activation. Hence, Tec is a novel innate-specific inflammatory kinase, whose genetic ablation or inhibition by small molecule drugs strongly protects mice from fungal sepsis. These data demonstrate a therapeutic potential for Tec kinase inhibition to combat invasive microbial infections by attenuating the host inflammatory response. PMID:25474208

  1. Investigating Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Mutation of the HER2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase through Computational Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Telesco, Shannon E; Shih, Andrew; Liu, Yingting; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/ErbB2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the EGFR/ErbB family and is overexpressed in 20-30% of human breast cancers. Since there is a growing effort to develop pharmacological inhibitors of the HER2 kinase for the treatment of breast cancer, it is clinically valuable to rationalize how specific mutations impact the molecular mechanism of receptor activation. Although several crystal structures of the ErbB kinases have been solved, the precise mechanism of HER2 activation remains unknown, and it has been suggested that HER2 is unique in its requirement for phosphorylation of Y877, a key tyrosine residue located in the activation loop (A-loop). In our studies, discussed here, we have investigated the mechanisms that are important in HER2 kinase domain regulation and compared them with the other ErbB family members, namely EGFR and ErbB4, to determine the molecular basis for HER2's unique mode of activation. We apply computational simulation techniques at the atomic level and at the electronic structure (quantum mechanical) level to elucidate details of the mechanisms governing the kinase domains of these ErbB members. Through analysis of our simulation results, we have discovered potential regulatory mechanisms common to EGFR, HER2, and ErbB4, including a tight coupling between the A-loop and catalytic loop that may contribute to alignment of residues required for catalysis in the active kinase. We further postulate an autoinhibitory mechanism whereby the inactive kinase is stabilized through sequestration of catalytic residues. In HER2, we also predict a role for phosphorylated Y877 in bridging a network of hydrogen bonds that fasten the A-loop in its active conformation, suggesting that HER2 may be unique among the ErbB members in requiring A-loop tyrosine phosphorylation for functionality. In EGFR, HER2, and ErbB4, we discuss the possible effects of activating mutations. Delineation of the activation

  2. The Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase negatively regulates Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis through immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing phagocytic receptors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Malykhin, Alexander; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2002-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms by which the Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulates phagocytosis in macrophages are unclear. We addressed the issue using bone marrow-derived macrophages from FcgammaR- or SHIP-deficient mice. Phagocytic activities of macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) and SHIP(-/-) mice were enhanced to a similar extent, relative to those from wild type. However, calcium influx was only marginally affected in FcgammaRII(b)(-/-), but greatly enhanced in SHIP(-/-) macrophages. Furthermore, SHIP was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon FcgammaR aggregation even in macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) mice or upon clustering of a chimeric receptor containing CD8 and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing gamma-chain or human-restricted FcgammaRIIa. These findings indicate that, unlike B cells, SHIP is efficiently phosphorylated in the absence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-bearing receptor. We further demonstrate that SHIP directly bound to phosphorylated peptides derived from FcgammaRIIa with a high affinity, comparable to that of FcgammaRII(b). Lastly, FcgammaRIIa-mediated phagocytosis was significantly enhanced in THP-1 cells overexpressing dominant-negative form of SHIP in the absence of FcgammaRII(b). These results indicate that SHIP negatively regulates FcgammaR-mediated phagocytosis through all ITAM-containing IgG receptors using a molecular mechanism distinct from that in B cells.

  3. Negative Suppressors of Oncogenic Activation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    progesterone (PR) receptor positive), basal ( triple negative : ER/PER/Her2 negative ) and the Her2 (ER/PR negative , Her2 amplification and/or overexpression...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0392 TITLE: Negative Suppressors of Oncogenic...CONTRACT NUMBER Negative Suppressors of Oncogenic Activation of the Met Receptor 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0392 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  4. The Activating C-type Lectin-like Receptor NKp65 Signals through a Hemi-immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motif (hemITAM) and Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Björn; Wotapek, Tanja; Zöller, Tobias; Rutkowski, Emilia; Steinle, Alexander

    2017-02-24

    NKp65 is an activating human C-type lectin-like receptor (CTLR) triggering cellular cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion upon high-affinity interaction with the cognate CTLR keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin (KACL) selectively expressed by human keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that NKp65-mediated cellular cytotoxicity depends on tyrosine 7, located in a cytoplasmic sequence motif of NKp65 resembling a hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). HemITAMs have been reported for a few activating myeloid-specific CTLRs, including Dectin-1 and CLEC-2, and consist of a single tyrosine signaling unit preceded by a triacidic motif. Upon receptor engagement, the hemITAM undergoes phosphotyrosinylation and specifically recruits spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), initiating cellular activation. In this study, we addressed the functionality of the putative hemITAM of NKp65. We show that NKp65 forms homodimers and is phosphorylated at the hemITAM-embedded tyrosine 7 upon engagement by antibodies or KACL homodimers. HemITAM phosphotyrosinylation initiates a signaling pathway involving and depending on Syk, leading to cellular activation and natural killer (NK) cell degranulation. However, although NKp65 utilizes Syk for NK cell activation, a physical association of Syk with the NKp65 hemITAM could not be detected, unlike shown previously for the hemITAM of myeloid CTLR. Failure of NKp65 to recruit Syk is not due to an alteration of the triacidic motif, which rather affects the efficiency of hemITAM phosphotyrosinylation. In summary, NKp65 utilizes a hemITAM-like motif for cellular activation that requires Syk, although Syk appears not to be recruited to NKp65.

  5. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  6. Analysis of Somatic Mutations in Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms of Activation in the ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Andrew J.; Telesco, Shannon E.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    The ErbB/EGFR/HER family of kinases consists of four homologous receptor tyrosine kinases which are important regulatory elements in many cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Somatic mutations in, or over-expression of, the ErbB family is found in many cancers and is correlated with a poor prognosis; particularly, clinically identified mutations found in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of ErbB1 have been shown to increase its basal kinase activity and patients carrying these mutations respond remarkably to the small tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib. Here, we analyze the potential effects of the currently catalogued clinically identified mutations in the ErbB family kinase domains on the molecular mechanisms of kinase activation. Recently, we identified conserved networks of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions characteristic to the active and inactive conformation, respectively. Here, we show that the clinically identified mutants influence the kinase activity in distinctive fashion by affecting the characteristic interaction networks. PMID:21701703

  7. The signal peptide of the IgE receptor alpha-chain prevents surface expression of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-free receptor pool.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Fiebiger, Edda

    2010-05-14

    The high affinity receptor for IgE, Fc epsilon receptor I (FcepsilonRI), is an activating immune receptor and key regulator of allergy. Antigen-mediated cross-linking of IgE-loaded FcepsilonRI alpha-chains induces cell activation via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in associated signaling subunits, such as FcepsilonRI gamma-chains. Here we show that the human FcepsilonRI alpha-chain can efficiently reach the cell surface by itself as an IgE-binding receptor in the absence of associated signaling subunits when the endogenous signal peptide is swapped for that of murine major histocompatibility complex class-I H2-K(b). This single-chain isoform of FcepsilonRI exited the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), trafficked to the Golgi and, subsequently, trafficked to the cell surface. Mutational analysis showed that the signal peptide regulates surface expression in concert with other described ER retention signals of FcepsilonRI-alpha. Once the FcepsilonRI alpha-chain reached the cell surface by itself, it formed a ligand-binding receptor that stabilized upon IgE contact. Independently of the FcepsilonRI gamma-chain, this single-chain FcepsilonRI was internalized after receptor cross-linking and trafficked into a LAMP-1-positive lysosomal compartment like multimeric FcepsilonRI. These data suggest that the single-chain isoform is capable of shuttling IgE-antigen complexes into antigen loading compartments, which plays an important physiologic role in the initiation of immune responses toward allergens. We propose that, in addition to cytosolic and transmembrane ER retention signals, the FcepsilonRI alpha-chain signal peptide contains a negative regulatory signal that prevents expression of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-free IgE receptor pool, which would fail to induce cell activation.

  8. The structural role of receptor tyrosine sulfation in chemokine recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ludeman, Justin P; Stone, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification of secreted and transmembrane proteins, including many GPCRs such as chemokine receptors. Most chemokine receptors contain several potentially sulfated tyrosine residues in their extracellular N-terminal regions, the initial binding site for chemokine ligands. Sulfation of these receptors increases chemokine binding affinity and potency. Although receptor sulfation is heterogeneous, insights into the molecular basis of sulfotyrosine (sTyr) recognition have been obtained using purified, homogeneous sulfopeptides corresponding to the N-termini of chemokine receptors. Receptor sTyr residues bind to a shallow cleft defined by the N-loop and β3-strand elements of cognate chemokines. Tyrosine sulfation enhances the affinity of receptor peptides for cognate chemokines in a manner dependent on the position of sulfation. Moreover, tyrosine sulfation can alter the selectivity of receptor peptides among several cognate chemokines for the same receptor. Finally, binding to receptor sulfopeptides can modulate the oligomerization state of chemokines, thereby influencing the ability of a chemokine to activate its receptor. These results increase the motivation to investigate the structural basis by which tyrosine sulfation modulates chemokine receptor activity and the biological consequences of this functional modulation. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24116930

  9. Cigarette smoke induces aberrant EGF receptor activation that mediates lung cancer development and resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Filosto, Simone; Becker, Cathleen R; Goldkorn, Tzipora

    2012-04-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream signaling are implicated in lung cancer development. Therefore, much effort was spent in developing specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that bind to the EGFR ATP-pocket, blocking EGFR phosphorylation/signaling. Clinical use of TKIs is effective in a subset of lung cancers with mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, rendering the receptor highly susceptible to TKIs. However, these benefits are limited, and emergence of additional EGFR mutations usually results in TKI resistance and disease progression. Previously, we showed one mechanism linking cigarette smoke to EGFR-driven lung cancer. Specifically, exposure of lung epithelial cells to cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress stimulates aberrant EGFR phosphorylation/activation with impaired receptor ubiquitination/degradation. The abnormal stabilization of the activated receptor leads to uncontrolled cell growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we describe for the first time a novel posttranslational mechanism of EGFR resistance to TKIs. Exposure of airway epithelial cells to cigarette smoke causes aberrant phosphorylation/activation of EGFR, resulting in a conformation that is different from that induced by the ligand EGF. Unlike EGF-activated EGFR, cigarette smoke-activated EGFR binds c-Src and caveolin-1 and does not undergo canonical dimerization. Importantly, the cigarette smoke-activated EGFR is not inhibited by TKIs (AG1478; erlotinib; gefitinib); in fact, the cigarette smoke exposure induces TKI-resistance even in the TKI-sensitive EGFR mutants. Our findings show that cigarette smoke exposure stimulates not only aberrant EGFR phosphorylation impairing receptor degradation, but also induces a different EGFR conformation and signaling that are resistant to TKIs. Together, these findings offer new insights into cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer development and TKI resistance.

  10. Activation of HER3 Interferes with Antitumor Effects of Axl Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Suggestion of Combination Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Torka, Robert; Pénzes, Kinga; Gusenbauer, Simone; Baumann, Christine; Szabadkai, István; Őrfi, Lászlȯ; Kéri, György; Ullrich, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has been established as a strong candidate for targeted therapy of cancer. However, the benefits of targeted therapies are limited due to acquired resistance and activation of alternative RTKs. Therefore, we asked if cancer cells are able to overcome targeted Axl therapies. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of Axl by short interfering RNA or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) BMS777607 induces the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) and the neuregulin 1(NRG1)–dependent phosphorylation of HER3 in MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Moreover, analysis of 20 Axl-expressing cancer cell lines of different tissue origin indicates a low basal phosphorylation of RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) as a general requirement for HER3 activation on Axl inhibition. Consequently, phosphorylation of AKT arises as an independent biomarker for Axl treatment. Additionally, we introduce phosphorylation of HER3 as an independent pharmacodynamic biomarker for monitoring of anti-Axl therapy response. Inhibition of cell viability by BMS777607 could be rescued by NRG1-dependent activation of HER3, suggesting an escape mechanism by tumor microenvironment. The Axl-TKI MPCD84111 simultaneously blocked Axl and HER2/3 signaling and thereby prohibited HER3 feedback activation. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 using BMS777607 and lapatinib led to a significant inhibition of cell viability in Axl-expressing MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Therefore, we conclude that, in patient cohorts with expression of Axl and low basal activity of AKT, a combined inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 kinase would be beneficial to overcome acquired resistance to Axl-targeted therapies. PMID:24862757

  11. {delta}-Opioid receptor-stimulated Akt signaling in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells involves receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated PI3K activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, Anika; Ammer, Hermann; Eisinger, Daniela A.

    2009-07-15

    {delta}-Opioid receptor (DOR) agonists possess cytoprotective properties, an effect associated with activation of the 'pro-survival' kinase Akt. Here we delineate the signal transduction pathway by which opioids induce Akt activation in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells. Exposure of the cells to both [D-Pen{sup 2,5}]enkephalin and etorphine resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in Akt activity, as measured by means of an activation-specific antibody recognizing phosphoserine-473. DOR-mediated Akt signaling is blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone and involves inhibitory G{sub i/o} proteins, because pre-treatment with pertussis toxin, but not over-expression of the G{sub q/11} scavengers EBP50 and GRK2-K220R, prevented this effect. Further studies with Wortmannin and LY294002 revealed that phophoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) plays a central role in opioid-induced Akt activation. Opioids stimulate Akt activity through transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), because pre-treatment of the cells with inhibitors for neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases (AG879) and the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1 (AG1024), but not over-expression of the G{beta}{gamma} scavenger phosducin, abolished this effect. Activated Akt translocates to the nuclear membrane, where it promotes GSK3 phosphorylation and prevents caspase-3 cleavage, two key events mediating inhibition of cell apoptosis and enhancement of cell survival. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in NG108-15 hybrid cells DOR agonists possess cytoprotective properties mediated by activation of the RTK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  12. In situ autoradiography and ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity reveal insulin receptors and insulin-like growth factor I receptors in prepancreatic chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Girbau, M; Bassas, L; Alemany, J; de Pablo, F

    1989-01-01

    We previously reported specific cross-linking of 125I-labeled insulin and 125I-labeled insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the alpha subunit of their respective receptors in chicken embryos of 20 somites and older. To achieve adequate sensitivity and localize spatially the receptors in younger embryos, we adapted an autoradiographic technique using whole-mounted chicken blastoderms. Insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors were expressed and could be localized as early as gastrulation, before the first somite is formed. Relative density was analyzed by a computer-assisted image system, revealing overall slightly higher binding of IGF-I than of insulin. Structures rich in both types of receptors were predominantly of ectodermal origin: Hensen's node in gastrulating embryos and neural folds, neural tube and optic vesicles during neurulation. The signal transduction capability of the receptors in early organogenesis was assessed by their ability to phosphorylate the exogenous substrate poly(Glu80Tyr20). Ligand-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation was demonstrable with both insulin and IGF-I in glycoprotein-enriched preparations from embryos at days 2 through 6 of embryogenesis. There was a developmentally regulated change in ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, with a sharp increase from day 2 to day 4, in contrast with a small increase in the ligand binding. Binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I was, with the solubilized receptors, severalfold higher than binding of 125I-labeled insulin. However, the insulin-dependent phosphorylation was as high as the IGF-I-dependent phosphorylation at each developmental stage. Images PMID:2548191

  13. Downstream signaling molecules bind to different phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) peptides of the high affinity IgE receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Kihara, H; Bhattacharyya, S; Sakamoto, H; Appella, E; Siraganian, R P

    1996-11-01

    The cytoplasmic tails of both the beta and gamma subunits of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) contain a consensus sequence termed the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This motif plays a critical role in receptor-mediated signal transduction. Synthetic peptides based on the ITAM sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of FcepsilonRI were used to investigate which proteins associate with these motifs. Tyrosine-phosphorylated beta and gamma ITAM peptides immobilized on beads precipitated Syk, Lyn, Shc, Grb2, and phospholipase C-gamma1 from lysates of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. Syk was precipitated predominantly by the tyrosine-diphosphorylated gamma ITAM peptide, but much less by the diphosphorylated beta ITAM peptide or by the monophosphorylated peptides. Phospholipase C-gamma1, Shc, and Grb2 were precipitated only by the diphosphorylated beta ITAM peptide. Non-phosphorylated ITAM peptides did not precipitate these proteins. In membrane binding assays, fusion proteins containing the Src homology 2 domains of phospholipase C-gamma1, Shc, Syk, and Lyn directly bound the tyrosine-phosphorylated ITAM peptides. Although the ITAM sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of FcepsilonRI are similar, once they are tyrosine-phosphorylated they preferentially bind different downstream signaling molecules. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the ITAM of the gamma subunit recruits and activates Syk, whereas the beta subunit may be important for the Ras signaling pathway.

  14. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif-bearing receptors regulate the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-induced activation of immune competent cells.

    PubMed

    Gergely, J; Pecht, I; Sármay, G

    1999-05-03

    ITIM-bearing receptors, a family which only recently has been recognized, play a key role in the regulation of the ITAM-induced activation of immune competent cells. The mechanism of ITM-mediated regulation in various cells was recently clarified. The present review focuses on ITIM bearing membrane proteins that negatively regulate the activation of cells when co-crosslinked with ITAM containing receptors, illustrates the inhibitory processes by the negative regulation of B-, NK-, T-cells and mast cells and summarizes current views on the mechanism of ITIM-mediated inhibition.

  15. Ras-independent activation of ERK signaling via the torso receptor tyrosine kinase is mediated by Rap1.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Snigdha; Smolik, Sarah M; Forte, Michael A; Stork, Philip J S

    2005-02-22

    In Drosophila embryos, the Torso receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activates the small G protein Ras (D-Ras1) and the protein kinase Raf (D-Raf) to activate ERK to direct differentiation of terminal structures . However, genetic studies have demonstrated that Torso, and by extension other RTKs, can activate Raf and ERK independently of Ras . In mammalian cells, the small G protein Rap1 has been proposed to couple RTKs to ERKs. However, the ability of Rap1 to activate ERKs remains controversial, in part because direct genetic evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. Here, we present biochemical and genetic evidence that D-Rap1, the Drosophila homolog of Rap1, can activate D-Raf and ERK. We show that D-Rap1 binds D-Raf and activates ERKs in a GTP- and D-Raf-dependent manner. Targeted disruption of D-Rap1 expression decreased both Torso-dependent ERK activation and the ERK-dependent expression of the zygotic genes tailless and huckebein to levels similar to those achieved in D-Ras1 null embryos. Furthermore, combined deficiencies of D-Ras1 and D-Rap1 completely abolished expression of these genes, mimicking the phenotype observed in embryos lacking D-Raf. These studies provide the first direct genetic evidence of Rap1-mediated activation of the MAP kinase cascade in eukaryotic organisms.

  16. SRC-DEPENDENT PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 IS REQUIRED FOR ZINC-INDUCED RAS ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Src-dependent Phosphorylation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor on Tyrosine 845 Is Required for Zinc-induced Ras Activation
    Weidong Wu 1 , Lee M. Graves 2 , Gordon N. Gill 3 , Sarah J. Parsons 4 , and James M. Samet 5
    1 Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biolo...

  17. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  18. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  19. CB₁ cannabinoid receptors promote maximal FAK catalytic activity by stimulating cooperative signaling between receptor tyrosine kinases and integrins in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Dalton, George D; Peterson, Lynda J; Howlett, Allyn C

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P) of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates FAK activation. Phosphorylated FAK Tyr 397 binds Src family kinases (Src), which in turn directly phosphorylate FAK Tyr 576/577 to produce maximal FAK enzymatic activity. CB₁ cannabinoid receptors (CB₁) are abundantly expressed in the nervous system and influence FAK activation by presently unknown mechanisms. The current investigation determined that CB₁-stimulated maximal FAK catalytic activity is mediated by Gi/o proteins in N18TG2 neuronal cells, and that G12/13 regulation of Rac1 and RhoA occurs concomitantly. Immunoblotting analyses using antibodies against FAK phospho-Tyr 397 and phospho-Tyr 576/577 demonstrated that the time-course of CB₁-stimulated FAK 576/577 Tyr-P occurred in three phases: Phase I (0-2 min) maximal Tyr-P, Phase II (5-20 min) rapid decline in Tyr-P, and Phase III (>20 min) plateau in Tyr-P at submaximal levels. In contrast, FAK 397 Tyr-P was monophasic and significantly lower in magnitude. FAK 397 Tyr-P and Phase I FAK 576/577 Tyr-P involved protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B and Shp1/Shp2)-mediated Src activation, Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibition, and integrin activation. Phase I maximal FAK 576/577 Tyr-P also required cooperative signaling between receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and integrins. The integrin antagonist RGDS peptide, Flk-1 vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) antagonist SU5416, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonist AG 1478 blocked Phase I FAK 576/577 Tyr-P. CB₁ agonists failed to stimulate FAK Tyr-P in the absence of integrin activation upon suspension in serum-free culture media. In contrast, cells grown on the integrin ligands fibronectin and laminin displayed increased FAK 576/577 Tyr-P that was augmented by CB₁ agonists and blocked by the Src inhibitor PP2 and Flk-1 VEGFR antagonist SU5416. Taken together, these studies have identified a complex integrative pathway utilized by CB₁ to stimulate

  20. 1,2-Naphthoquinone activates vanilloid receptor 1 through increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to contraction of guinea pig trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuno, Shota; Taguchi, Keiko; Iwamoto, Noriko; Yamano, Shigeru; Cho, Arthur K.; Froines, John R.; Kumagai, Yoshito . E-mail: yk-em-tu@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-01-15

    1,2-Naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) has recently been identified as an environmental quinone in diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and atmospheric PM{sub 2.5}. We have found that this quinone is capable of causing a concentration-dependent contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in guinea pigs with EC{sub 5} value of 18.7 {mu}M. The contraction required extracellular calcium and was suppressed by L-type calcium channel blockers nifedipine and diltiazem. It was found that 1,2-NQ activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2)/lipoxygenase (LO)/vanilloid receptor (VR1) signaling. Additionally, 1,2-NQ was capable of transactivating protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in guinea pig trachea, suggesting that phosphorylation of PTKs contributes to 1,2-NQ-induced tracheal contraction. Consistent with this notion, this action was blocked by the PTKs inhibitor genistein and the EGFR antagonist PD153035, indicating that contraction was, at least in part, attributable to PTKs phosphorylation that activates VR1, resulting in increased intracellular calcium content in the smooth muscle cells.

  1. R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases: conserved regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and tubular organ development.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mili; Zinn, Kai

    2015-01-01

    R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are characterized by extracellular domains composed solely of long chains of fibronectin type III repeats, and by the presence of a single phosphatase domain. There are five proteins in mammals with this structure, two in Drosophila and one in Caenorhabditis elegans. R3 RPTPs are selective regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, and a number of different RTKs have been shown to be direct targets for their phosphatase activities. Genetic studies in both invertebrate model systems and in mammals have shown that R3 RPTPs are essential for tubular organ development. They also have important functions during nervous system development. R3 RPTPs are likely to be tumor suppressors in a number of types of cancer.

  2. R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases: conserved regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and tubular organ development

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mili; Zinn, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Summary R3 receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are characterized by extracellular domains composed solely of long chains of fibronectin type III repeats, and by the presence of a single phosphatase domain. There are five proteins in mammals with this structure, two in Drosophila, and one in Caenorhabditis elegans. R3 RPTPs are selective regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, and a number of different RTKs have been shown to be direct targets for their phosphatase activities. Genetic studies in both invertebrate model systems and in mammals have shown that R3 RPTPs are essential for tubular organ development. They also have important functions during nervous system development. R3 RPTPs are likely to be tumor suppressors in a number of types of cancer. PMID:25242281

  3. The pseudo-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of CD5 mediates its inhibitory action on B-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gary-Gouy, H; Bruhns, P; Schmitt, C; Dalloul, A; Daëron, M; Bismuth, G

    2000-01-07

    Genetic studies revealed that CD5 could be a negative regulator of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR). We explore here the effect of human CD5 on BCR-triggered responses. B cells were obtained expressing a chimera composed of extracellular and transmembrane domains of Fcgamma type IIB receptor fused to CD5 cytoplasmic domain (CD5cyt). Coligation of the chimera with the BCR induces CD5cyt tyrosine phosphorylation. A rapid inhibition of BCR-induced calcium response is observed, as well as a partial but delayed inhibition of phospholipase Cgamma-1 phosphorylation. Activation of extracellular regulated kinase-2 is also severely impaired. Moreover, at the functional level, interleukin-2 production is abolished. Src homology 2 domain-bearing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 and Src homology 2 domain-bearing inositol 5'-phosphatase SHIP usually participate in negative regulation of the BCR. We show that they do not associate with the phosphorylated CD5 chimera. We finally demonstrate that the pseudo-immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif present in CD5cyt is involved because its deletion eliminates the inhibitory effect of the chimera, both at biochemical and functional levels. These results demonstrate the inhibitory role of CD5 pseudo-immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif tyrosine phosphorylation on BCR signaling. They further support the idea that CD5 uses mechanisms different from those already described to negatively regulate the BCR pathway.

  4. Importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in receptor kinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that is known to regulate receptor kinase (RK)-mediated signaling in animals. Plant RKs are annotated as serine/threonine kinases, but recent work has revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation is also crucial for the activation of RK-mediated signaling in plants. These initial observations have paved the way for subsequent detailed studies on the mechanism of activation of plant RKs and the biological relevance of tyrosine phosphorylation for plant growth and immunity. In this Opinion article we review recent reports on the contribution of RK tyrosine phosphorylation in plant growth and immunity; we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a major regulatory role in the initiation and transduction of RK-mediated signaling in plants.

  5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Kir3 following kappa-opioid receptor activation of p38 MAPK causes heterologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Cecilea C; Xu, Mei; Chavkin, Charles

    2009-11-13

    Prior studies showed that tyrosine 12 phosphorylation in the N-terminal, cytoplasmic domain of the G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel, K(ir)3.1 facilitates channel deactivation by increasing intrinsic GTPase activity of the channel. Using a phosphoselective antibody directed against this residue (pY12), we now report that partial sciatic nerve ligation increased pY12-K(ir)3.1-immunoreactivity (ir) in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of wild-type mice, but not in mice lacking the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) or lacking the G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) genes. Treatment of AtT-20 cells stably expressing KOR-GFP with the selective KOR agonist U50,488 increased both phospho-p38-ir and pY12-K(ir)3.1-ir. The U50,488-induced increase in pY12-K(ir)3.1-ir was blocked by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. Cells expressing KOR(S369A)-GFP did not increase either phospho-p38-ir or pY12-K(ir)3.1-ir following U50,488 treatment. Whole cell voltage clamp of AtT-20 cells expressing KOR-GFP demonstrated that p38 activation by U50,488 reduced somatostatin-evoked K(ir)3 currents. This heterologous desensitization was blocked by SB203580 and was not evident in cells expressing KOR(S369A)-GFP. Tyrosine phosphorylation of K(ir)3.1 was likely mediated by p38 MAPK activation of Src kinase. U50,488 also increased (pY418)Src-ir; this increase was blocked by SB203580 and not evident in KOR(S369A)-GFP expressing AtT20 cells; the Src inhibitor PP2 blocked the U50,488-induced increase in pY12-K(ir)3.1-ir; and the heterologous desensitization of K(ir)3 currents was blocked by PP2. These results suggest that KOR causes phosphorylation of Y12-K(ir)3.1 and channel inhibition through a GRK3-, p38 MAPK- and Src-dependent mechanism. Reduced inward potassium current following nerve ligation would increase dorsal horn neuronal excitability and may contribute to the neuropathic pain response.

  6. Two distinct but convergent groups of cells trigger Torso receptor tyrosine kinase activation by independently expressing torso-like.

    PubMed

    Furriols, Marc; Ventura, Gemma; Casanova, Jordi

    2007-07-10

    Cell fate determination is often the outcome of specific interactions between adjacent cells. However, cells frequently change positions during development, and thus signaling molecules might be synthesized far from their final site of action. Here, we analyze the regulation of the torso-like gene, which is required to trigger Torso receptor tyrosine kinase activation in the Drosophila embryo. Whereas torso is present in the oocyte, torso-like is expressed in the egg chamber, at the posterior follicle cells and in two separated groups of anterior cells, the border cells and the centripetal cells. We find that JAK/STAT signaling regulates torso-like expression in the posterior follicle cells and border cells but not in the centripetal cells, where torso-like is regulated by a different enhancer. The border and centripetal cells, which are originally apart, converge at the anterior end of the oocyte, and we find that both groups contribute to trigger Torso activation. Our results illustrate how independently acquired expression of a signaling molecule can constitute a mechanism by which distinct groups of cells act together in the activation of a signaling pathway.

  7. Angiotensin II stimulates calcineurin activity in proximal tubule epithelia through AT-1 receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-gamma1 isoform.

    PubMed

    Lea, Janice P; Jin, Shao G; Roberts, Brian R; Shuler, Michael S; Marrero, Mario B; Tumlin, James A

    2002-07-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) contributes to the maintenance of extracellular fluid volume by regulating sodium transport in the nephron. In nonepithelial cells, activation of phospholipase C (PLC) by AT-1 receptors stimulates the generation of 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and the release of intracellular calcium. Calcineurin, a serine-threonine phosphatase, is activated by calcium and calmodulin, and both PLC and calcineurin have been linked to sodium transport in the proximal tubule. An examination of whether AngII activates calcineurin in a model of proximal tubule epithelia (LLC-PK1 cells) was performed; AngII increased calcineurin activity within 30 s. An examination of whether AngII activates PLC in proximal tubule epithelia was also performed after first showing that all three families of PLC isoforms are present in LLC-PK1 cells. Application of AngII increased IP(3) generation by 60% within 15 s, which coincided with AngII-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-gamma1 isoform also observed at 15 s. AngII-induced tyrosine phosphorylation was blocked by the AT-1 receptor antagonist, Losartan. Subsequently, an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphorylation blocked the AngII-induced activation of calcineurin, as did coincubation with an inhibitor of PLC activity and with an antagonist of the AT-1 receptor. It is therefore concluded that AngII stimulates calcineurin phosphatase activity in proximal tubule epithelial cells through a mechanism involving AT-1 receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC isoform.

  8. Involvement of c-Src tyrosine kinase in SHP-1 phosphatase activation by Ang II AT2 receptors in rat fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Sergio E; Seguin, Leonardo R; Villarreal, Rodrigo S; Nahmias, Clara; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2008-10-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) AT(2) receptors are abundantly expressed in rat fetal tissues where they probably contribute to development. In the present study we examine the effects of Ang II type 2 receptor stimulation on SHP-1 activation. Ang II (10(-7) M) elicits a rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-1, maximal at 1 min, in a dose-dependent form, blocked by the AT(2) antagonist, PD123319. SHP-1 phosphorylation is followed in time by tyrosine dephosphorylation of different proteins, suggesting a sequence of events. Ang II induces association of SHP-1 to AT(2) receptors as shown by co-immunoprecipitation, Western blot and binding assays. SHP-1 activity was determined in immunocomplexes obtained with either anti-AT(2) or anti-SHP-1 antibodies, after Ang II stimulation (1 min), in correlation with the maximal level of SHP-1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, following receptor stimulation (1 min) c-Src was associated to AT(2) or SHP-1 immunocomplexes. Preincubation with the c-Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited SHP-1 activation and c-Src association, thus confirming the participation of c-Src in this pathway. We demonstrated here for the first time the involvement of c-Src in SHP-1 activation via AT(2) receptors present in an ex vivo model expressing both receptor subtypes. In this model, AT(2) receptors are not constitutively associated to SHP-1 and SHP-1 is not constitutively activated. Thus, we clearly establish that SHP-1 activation, mediated by the AT(2) subtype, involves c-Src and precedes protein tyrosine dephosphorylation, in rat fetal membranes.

  9. Negative Suppressors of Oncogenic Activation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    plasma membrane compartment where receptors and various Gab1 binding signaling molecules become concentrated. Disruption of this signaling DR...sites for signalling molecules such as p85, Crk, PLCγ and Shp2 (8), which propagate growth factor signalling to induce changes in the actin...required for dorsal ruffle formation (21, 22). Recently, a genetic screen by Affolter’s group identified another endocytic adaptor molecule , STAM (Signal

  10. Oligomerization of epidermal growth factor receptors on A431 cells studied by time-resolved fluorescence imaging microscopy. A stereochemical model for tyrosine kinase receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation states of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on single A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were assessed with two new techniques for determining fluorescence resonance energy transfer: donor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (pbFRET) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Fluorescein-(donor) and rhodamine-(acceptor) labeled EGF were bound to the cells and the extent of oligomerization was monitored by the spatially resolved FRET efficiency as a function of the donor/acceptor ratio and treatment conditions. An average FRET efficiency of 5% was determined after a low temperature (4 degrees C) incubation with the fluorescent EGF analogs for 40 min. A subsequent elevation of the temperature for 5 min caused a substantial increase of the average FRET efficiency to 14% at 20 degrees C and 31% at 37 degrees C. In the context of a two-state (monomer/dimer) model for the EGFR, these FRET efficiencies were consistent with minimal average receptor dimerizations of 13, 36, and 69% at 4, 20, and 37 degrees C, respectively. A431 cells were pretreated with the monoclonal antibody mAb 2E9 that specifically blocks EGF binding to the predominant population of low affinity EGFR (15). The average FRET efficiency increased dramatically to 28% at 4 degrees C, indicative of a minimal receptor dimerization of 65% for the subpopulation of high affinity receptors. These results are in accordance with prior studies indicating that binding of EGF leads to a fast and temperature- dependent microclustering of EGFR, but suggest in addition that the high affinity functional subclass of receptors on quiescent A431 cells are present in a predimerized or oligomerized state. We propose that the transmission of the external ligand-binding signal to the cytoplasmic domain is effected by a concerted relative rotational rearrangement of the monomeric units comprising the dimeric receptor, thereby potentiating a mutual activation of

  11. RTKdb: database of receptor tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Grassot, Julien; Mouchiroud, Guy; Perrière, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK) are transmembrane receptors specifically found in metazoans. They represent an excellent model for studying evolution of cellular processes in metazoans because they encompass large families of modular proteins and belong to a major family of contingency generating molecules in eukaryotic cells: the protein kinases. Because tyrosine kinases have been under close scrutiny for many years in various species, they are associated with a wealth of information, mainly in mammals. Presently, most categories of RTK were identified in mammals, but in a near future other model species will be sequenced, and will bring us RTKs from other metazoan clades. Thus, collecting RTK sequences would provide a good starting point as a new model for comparative and evolutionary studies applying to multigene families. In this context, we are developing the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase database (RTKdb), which is the only database on tyrosine kinase receptors presently available. In this database, protein sequences from eight model metazoan species are organized under the format previously used for the HOVERGEN, HOBACGEN and NUREBASE systems. RTKdb can be accessed through the PBIL (Pôle Bioinformatique Lyonnais) World Wide Web server at http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/RTKdb/, or through the FamFetch graphical user interface available at the same address. PMID:12520021

  12. The carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor exert different regulatory effects on intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase function and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, P P; Segatto, O; Lonardo, F; Fazioli, F; Pierce, J H; Aaronson, S A

    1990-01-01

    The erbB-2 gene product, gp185erbB-2, displays a potent transforming effect when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells. In addition, it possesses constitutively high levels of tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of exogenously added ligand. In this study, we demonstrate that its carboxy-terminal domain exerts an enhancing effect on erbB-2 kinase and transforming activities. A premature termination mutant of the erbB-2 protein, lacking the entire carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2 delta 1050), showed a 40-fold reduction in transforming ability and a lowered in vivo kinase activity for intracellular substrates. When the carboxy-terminal domain of erbB-2 was substituted for its analogous region in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (EGFR/erbB-2COOH chimera), it conferred erbB-2-like properties to the EGFR, including transforming ability in the absence of epidermal growth factor, elevated constitutive autokinase activity in vivo and in vitro, and constitutive ability to phosphorylate phospholipase C-gamma. Conversely, a chimeric erbB-2 molecule bearing an EGFR carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2/EGFRCOOH chimera) showed reduced transforming and kinase activity with respect to the wild-type erbB-2 and was only slightly more efficient than the erbB-2 delta 1050 mutant. Thus, we conclude that the carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and EGFR exert different regulatory effects on receptor kinase function and biological activity. The up regulation of gp185erbB-2 enzymatic activity exerted by its carboxy-terminal domain can explain, at least in part, its constitutive level of kinase activity. Images PMID:2188097

  13. Homooligomerization of the cytoplasmic domain of the T cell receptor zeta chain and of other proteins containing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Alexander; Aivazian, Dikran; Stern, Lawrence

    2004-02-24

    Antigen receptors on T cells, B cells, mast cells, and basophils all have cytoplasmic domains containing one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor engagement in an early and obligatory event in the signaling cascade. How clustering of receptor extracellular domains leads to phosphorylation of cytoplasmic domain ITAMs is not known, and little structural or biochemical information is available for the ITAM-containing cytoplasmic domains. Here we investigate the conformation and oligomeric state of several immune receptor cytoplasmic domains, using purified recombinant proteins and a variety of biophysical and biochemical techniques. We show that all of the cytoplasmic domains of ITAM-containing signaling subunits studied are oligomeric in solution, namely, T cell antigen receptor zeta, CD3epsilon, CD3delta, and CD3gamma, B cell antigen receptor Igalpha and Igbeta, and Fc receptor FcepsilonRIgamma. For zeta(cyt), the oligomerization behavior is best described by a two-step monomer-dimer-tetramer fast dynamic equilibrium with dissociation constants in the order of approximately 10 microM (monomer-dimer) and approximately 1 mM (dimer-tetramer). In contrast to the other ITAM-containing proteins, Igalpha(cyt) forms stable dimers and tetramers even below 10 microM. Circular dichroic analysis reveals the lack of stable ordered structure of the cytoplasmic domains studied, and oligomerization does not change the random-coil-like conformation observed. The random-coil nature of zeta(cyt) was also confirmed by heteronuclear NMR. Phosphorylation of zeta(cyt) and FcepsilonRIgamma(cyt) does not significantly alter their oligomerization behavior. The implications of these results for transmembrane signaling and cellular activation by immune receptors are discussed.

  14. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif phosphorylation during engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d) receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Schneider, Jutta; Liao, Edward H; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Gonorrhea is characterized by a purulent urethral or cervical discharge consisting primarily of neutrophils associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These interactions are facilitated by gonococcal colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein binding to host cellular CEACAM receptors. Of these, CEACAM3 is restricted to neutrophils and contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) reminiscent of that found within certain phagocytic Fc receptors. CEACAM3 was tyrosine phosphorylated by a Src family kinase-dependent process upon infection by gonococci expressing CEACAM-specific Opa proteins. This phosphorylation was necessary for efficient bacterial uptake; however, a less efficient uptake process became evident when kinase inhibitors or mutagenesis of the ITAM were used to prevent phosphorylation. Ligated CEACAM3 was recruited to a cytoskeleton-containing fraction, intense foci of polymerized actin were evident where bacteria attached to HeLa-CEACAM3, and disruption of polymerized actin by cytochalasin D blocked all bacterial uptake by these cells. These data support a model whereby CEACAM3 can mediate the Opa-dependent uptake of N. gonorrhoeae via either an efficient, ITAM phosphorylation-dependent process that resembles phagocytosis or a less efficient, tyrosine phosphorylation-independent mechanism.

  15. Negative regulation of ErbB family receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, C; Carraway, K L

    2004-01-26

    Receptors of the EGF receptor or ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases are frequently overexpressed in a variety of solid tumours, and the aberrant activation of their tyrosine kinase activities is thought to contribute to tumour growth and progression. Much effort has been put into developing inhibitors of ErbB receptors, and both antibody and small-molecule approaches have exhibited clinical success. Recently, a number of endogenous negative regulatory proteins have been identified that suppress the signalling activity of ErbB receptors in cells. These include intracellular RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligases such as cbl and Nrdp1 that mediate ErbB receptor degradation, and may include a wide variety of secreted and transmembrane proteins that suppress receptor activation by growth factor ligands. It will be of interest to determine the extent to which tumour cells suppress these pathways to promote their progression, and whether restoration of endogenous receptor-negative regulatory pathways may be exploited for therapeutic benefit.

  16. The activity and stability of the intrinsically disordered Cip/Kip protein family are regulated by non-receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Steve; Lelli, Moreno; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors includes p21Cip1, p27Kip1 and p57Kip2. Their kinase inhibitory activities are mediated by a homologous N-terminal kinase-inhibitory domain (KID). The Cdk inhibitory activity and stability of p27 have been shown to be regulated by a two-step phosphorylation mechanism involving a tyrosine residue within the KID and a threonine residue within the flexible C-terminus. We show that these residues are conserved in p21 and p57, suggesting that a similar phosphorylation cascade regulates these Cdk inhibitors. However, the presence of a cyclin binding motif within its C-terminus alters the regulatory interplay between p21 and Cdk2/cyclin A, and its responses to tyrosine phosphorylation and altered p21:Cdk2/cyclin A stoichiometry. We also show that the Cip/Kip proteins can be phosphorylated in vitro by representatives of many non-receptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) sub-families, suggesting that NRTKs may generally regulate the activity and stability of these Cdk inhibitors. Our results further suggest that the Cip/Kip proteins integrate signals from various NRTK pathways and cell cycle regulation. PMID:25463440

  17. Inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump by CD44 receptor activation of tyrosine kinases increases the action potential afterhyperpolarization in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Biswarup; Li, Yan; Thayer, Stanley A

    2011-02-16

    The cytoplasmic Ca(2+) clearance rate affects neuronal excitability, plasticity, and synaptic transmission. Here, we examined the modulation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) by tyrosine kinases. In rat sensory neurons grown in culture, the PMCA was under tonic inhibition by a member of the Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs). Ca(2+) clearance accelerated in the presence of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Tonic inhibition of the PMCA was attenuated in cells expressing a dominant-negative construct or shRNA directed to message for the SFKs Lck or Fyn, but not Src. SFKs did not appear to phosphorylate the PMCA directly but instead activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Expression of constitutively active FAK enhanced and dominant-negative or shRNA knockdown of FAK attenuated tonic inhibition. Antisense knockdown of PMCA isoform 4 removed tonic inhibition of Ca(2+) clearance, indicating that FAK acts on PMCA4. The hyaluronan receptor CD44 activates SFK-FAK signaling cascades and is expressed in sensory neurons. Treating neurons with a CD44-blocking antibody or short hyaluronan oligosaccharides, which are produced during injury and displace macromolecular hyaluronan from CD44, attenuated tonic PMCA inhibition. Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels mediate a slow afterhyperpolarization in sensory neurons that was inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors and enhanced by knockdown of PMCA4. Thus, we describe a novel kinase cascade in sensory neurons that enables the extracellular matrix to alter Ca(2+) signals by modulating PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) clearance. This signaling pathway may influence the excitability of sensory neurons following injury.

  18. Small Molecule Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) Ligands That Inhibit Phosphatase Activity via Perturbation of the Tryptophan-Proline-Aspartate (WPD) Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sheriff, Steven; Beno, Brett R; Zhai, Weixu; Kostich, Walter A; McDonnell, Patricia A; Kish, Kevin; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Kiefer, Susan E; Yanchunas, Joseph; Huang, Yanling; Shi, Shuhao; Zhu, Shirong; Dzierba, Carolyn; Bronson, Joanne; Macor, John E; Appiah, Kingsley K; Westphal, Ryan S; O’Connell, Jonathan; Gerritz, Samuel W

    2012-11-09

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) catalyze the dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues, a process that involves a conserved tryptophan-proline-aspartate (WPD) loop in catalysis. In previously determined structures of PTPs, the WPD-loop has been observed in either an 'open' conformation or a 'closed' conformation. In the current work, X-ray structures of the catalytic domain of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) revealed a ligand-induced 'superopen' conformation not previously reported for PTPs. In the superopen conformation, the ligand acts as an apparent competitive inhibitor and binds in a small hydrophobic pocket adjacent to, but distinct from, the active site. In the open and closed WPD-loop conformations of RPTPγ, the side chain of Trp1026 partially occupies this pocket. In the superopen conformation, Trp1026 is displaced allowing a 3,4-dichlorobenzyl substituent to occupy this site. The bound ligand prevents closure of the WPD-loop over the active site and disrupts the catalytic cycle of the enzyme.

  19. Antitumor Activity of Lenvatinib (E7080): An Angiogenesis Inhibitor That Targets Multiple Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Preclinical Human Thyroid Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Tohyama, Osamu; Matsui, Junji; Kodama, Kotaro; Hata-Sugi, Naoko; Kimura, Takayuki; Iwata, Masao; Funahashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by blockading the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy for thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib mesilate (lenvatinib) is a potent inhibitor of VEGF receptors (VEGFR1–3) and other prooncogenic and prooncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1–4), platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα), KIT, and RET. We examined the antitumor activity of lenvatinib against human thyroid cancer xenograft models in nude mice. Orally administered lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in 5 differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), 5 anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), and 1 medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) xenograft models. Lenvatinib also showed antiangiogenesis activity against 5 DTC and 5 ATC xenografts, while lenvatinib showed in vitro antiproliferative activity against only 2 of 11 thyroid cancer cell lines: that is, RO82-W-1 and TT cells. Western blot analysis showed that cultured RO82-W-1 cells overexpressed FGFR1 and that lenvatinib inhibited the phosphorylation of FGFR1 and its downstream effector FRS2. Lenvatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of RET with the activated mutation C634W in TT cells. These data demonstrate that lenvatinib provides antitumor activity mainly via angiogenesis inhibition but also inhibits FGFR and RET signaling pathway in preclinical human thyroid cancer models. PMID:25295214

  20. Antitumor activity of lenvatinib (e7080): an angiogenesis inhibitor that targets multiple receptor tyrosine kinases in preclinical human thyroid cancer models.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Osamu; Matsui, Junji; Kodama, Kotaro; Hata-Sugi, Naoko; Kimura, Takayuki; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Minoshima, Yukinori; Iwata, Masao; Funahashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by blockading the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy for thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib mesilate (lenvatinib) is a potent inhibitor of VEGF receptors (VEGFR1-3) and other prooncogenic and prooncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1-4), platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα), KIT, and RET. We examined the antitumor activity of lenvatinib against human thyroid cancer xenograft models in nude mice. Orally administered lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in 5 differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), 5 anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), and 1 medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) xenograft models. Lenvatinib also showed antiangiogenesis activity against 5 DTC and 5 ATC xenografts, while lenvatinib showed in vitro antiproliferative activity against only 2 of 11 thyroid cancer cell lines: that is, RO82-W-1 and TT cells. Western blot analysis showed that cultured RO82-W-1 cells overexpressed FGFR1 and that lenvatinib inhibited the phosphorylation of FGFR1 and its downstream effector FRS2. Lenvatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of RET with the activated mutation C634W in TT cells. These data demonstrate that lenvatinib provides antitumor activity mainly via angiogenesis inhibition but also inhibits FGFR and RET signaling pathway in preclinical human thyroid cancer models.

  1. Identification of a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing molecule, STAM2, by mass spectrometry and its involvement in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Fernandez, M M; Steen, H; Blagoev, B; Nielsen, M M; Roche, S; Mann, M; Lodish, H F

    2000-12-08

    In an effort to clone novel tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates of the epidermal growth factor receptor, we have initiated an approach coupling affinity purification using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to mass spectrometry-based identification. Here, we report the identification of a signaling molecule containing a Src homology 3 domain as well as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This molecule is 55% identical to a previously isolated molecule designated signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM) that was identified as an interleukin (IL)-2-induced phosphoprotein and is therefore designated STAM2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of STAM2 is induced by growth factors such as epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor as well as by cytokines like IL-3. Several of the deletion mutants tested except the one containing only the amino-terminal region underwent tyrosine phosphorylation upon growth factor stimulation, implying that STAM2 is phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues. STAM2 is downstream of the Jak family of kinases since coexpression of STAM2 with Jak1 or Jak2 but not an unrelated Tec family kinase, Etk, resulted in its tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast to epidermal growth factor receptor-induced phosphorylation, this required the ITAM domain since mutants lacking this region did not undergo tyrosine phosphorylation. Finally, overexpression of wild type STAM2 led to an increase in IL-2-mediated induction of c-Myc promoter activation indicating that it potentiates cytokine receptor signaling.

  2. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Expression in Canine Liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Avallone, G; Pellegrino, V; Roccabianca, P; Lepri, E; Crippa, L; Beha, G; De Tolla, L; Sarli, G

    2017-03-01

    The expression of tyrosine kinase receptors is attracting major interest in human and veterinary oncological pathology because of their role as targets for adjuvant therapies. Little is known about tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression in canine liposarcoma (LP), a soft tissue sarcoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of the TKRs fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ); their ligands, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB); and c-kit in canine LP. Immunohistochemical labeling was categorized as high or low expression and compared with the mitotic count and MIB-1-based proliferation index. Fifty canine LPs were examined, classified, and graded. Fourteen cases were classified as well differentiated, 7 as myxoid, 25 as pleomorphic, and 4 as dedifferentiated. Seventeen cases were grade 1, 26 were grade 2, and 7 were grade 3. A high expression of FGF2, FGFR1, PDGFB, and PDGFRβ was identified in 62% (31/50), 68% (34/50), 81.6% (40/49), and 70.8% (34/48) of the cases, respectively. c-kit was expressed in 12.5% (6/48) of the cases. Mitotic count negatively correlated with FGF2 ( R = -0.41; P < .01), being lower in cases with high FGF2 expression, and positively correlated with PDGFRβ ( R = 0.33; P < .01), being higher in cases with high PDGFRβ expression. No other statistically significant correlations were identified. These results suggest that the PDGFRβ-mediated pathway may have a role in the progression of canine LP and may thus represent a promising target for adjuvant cancer therapies.

  3. Critical Role for an acidic amino acid region in platelet signaling by the HemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) containing receptor CLEC-2 (C-type lectin receptor-2).

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Sinha, Uma; Pandey, Anjali; Eble, Johannes A; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Watson, Steve P

    2013-02-15

    CLEC-2 is a member of new family of C-type lectin receptors characterized by a cytosolic YXXL downstream of three acidic amino acids in a sequence known as a hemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif). Dimerization of two phosphorylated CLEC-2 molecules leads to recruitment of the tyrosine kinase Syk via its tandem SH2 domains and initiation of a downstream signaling cascade. Using Syk-deficient and Zap-70-deficient cell lines we show that hemITAM signaling is restricted to Syk and that the upstream triacidic amino acid sequence is required for signaling. Using surface plasmon resonance and phosphorylation studies, we demonstrate that the triacidic amino acids are required for phosphorylation of the YXXL. These results further emphasize the distinct nature of the proximal events in signaling by hemITAM relative to ITAM receptors.

  4. MD-2 interacts with Lyn kinase and is tyrosine phosphorylated following LPS-induced activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Pearl; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Michelsen, Kathrin S.; Brikos, Constantinos; Rentsendorj, Altan; Town, Terrence; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation with LPS induces tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins involved in the TLR signaling pathway. In this study, we demonstrate that MD-2 is also tyrosine phosphorylated following LPS stimulation. LPS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of MD-2 is specific, it is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Herbimycin A, and by an inhibitor of endocytosis, Cytochalsin-D, suggesting that MD-2 phosphorylation occurs during trafficking of MD2 and not on cell surface. Furthermore, we identify two possible phospho-accepting tyrosine residues at positions 22 and 131. Mutant proteins in which these tyrosines were changed to phenylalanine have reduced phosphorylation and significantly diminished ability to activate NF-κB in response to LPS. In addition, MD2 co-precipitates and colocalizes with Lyn kinase, most likely in ER. A Lyn-binding peptide inhibitor abolished MD2 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that Lyn is a likely candidate to be the kinase required for MD-2 tyrosine phophorylation. Our study demonstrates that tyrosine phosphorylation of MD-2 is important for signaling following exposure to LPS and underscores the importance of this event in mediating an efficient and prompt immune response. PMID:21918188

  5. Direct interaction of Syk and Lyn protein tyrosine kinases in rat basophilic leukemia cells activated via type I Fc epsilon receptors.

    PubMed

    Amoui, M; Dráberová, L; Tolar, P; Dráber, P

    1997-01-01

    Activation of rat mast cells through the receptor with high affinity for IgE (Fc epsilonRI) requires a complex set of interactions involving transmembrane subunits of the Fc epsilonRI and two classes of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase (PTK). the Src family PTK p53/p56(lyn) (Lyn) and the Syk/ZAP-family PTK p72(syk) (Syk). Early activation events involve increased activity of Lyn and Syk kinases and their translocation into membrane domains containing aggregated Fc epsilonRI, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes have remained largely unclear. To determine the role of Fc epsilonRI subunits in this process, we have analyzed Syk- and Lyn-associated proteins in activated rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells and their variants deficient in the expression of Fc epsilonRI beta or gamma subunits. Sepharose 4B gel chromatography of postnuclear supernatants from Nonidet-P40-solubilized antigen (Ag)- or pervanadate-activated RBL cells revealed extensive changes in the size of complexes formed by Lyn and Syk kinases and other cellular components. A fusion protein containing Src homology 2 (SH2) and SH3 domains of Lyn bound Syk from lysates of nonactivated RBL cells; an increased binding was observed when lysates from Ag- or pervanadate-activated cells were used. A similar amount of Syk was bound when lysates from pervanadate-activated variant cells deficient in the expression of Fc epsilonRI beta or gamma subunits were used, suggesting that Fc epsilonRI does not function as the only intermediate in the formation of the Syk-Lyn complexes. Further experiments have indicated that Syk-Lyn interactions occur in Ag-activated RBL cells under in vivo conditions and that these interactions could involve direct binding of the Lyn SH2 domain with phosphorylated tyrosine of Syk. The physical association of Lyn and Syk during mast-like cell activation supports the recently proposed functional cooperation of these two tyrosine kinases in Fc epsilonRI signaling.

  6. TrkA receptor ectodomain cleavage generates a tyrosine-phosphorylated cell-associated fragment

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The extracellular domain of several membrane-anchored proteins can be released as a soluble fragment by the action of a cell surface endoproteolytic system. This cleavage results in the generation of a soluble and a cell-bound fragment. In the case of proteins with signaling capability, such as tyrosine kinase receptors, the cleavage process may have an effect on the kinase activity of the cell-bound receptor fragment. By using several cell lines that express the TrkA neurotrophin receptor, we show that this receptor tyrosine kinase is cleaved by a proteolytic system that mimics the one that acts at the cell surface. TrkA cleavage is regulated by protein kinase C and several receptor agonists (including the TrkA ligand NGF), occurs at the ectodomain in a membrane-proximal region, and is independent of lysosomal function. TrkA cleavage results in the generation of a cell- associated fragment that is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Tyrosine phosphorylation of this fragment is not detected in TrkA mutants devoid of kinase activity, suggesting that phosphorylation requires an intact TrkA kinase domain, and is not due to activation of an intermediate intracellular tyrosine kinase. The increased phosphotyrosine content of the cell-bound fragment may thus reflect higher catalytic activity of the truncated fragment. We postulate that cleavage of receptor tyrosine kinases by this naturally occurring cellular mechanism may represent an additional mean for the regulation of receptor activity. PMID:8636219

  7. A novel N-aryl tyrosine activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma reverses the diabetic phenotype of the Zucker diabetic fatty rat.

    PubMed

    Brown, K K; Henke, B R; Blanchard, S G; Cobb, J E; Mook, R; Kaldor, I; Kliewer, S A; Lehmann, J M; Lenhard, J M; Harrington, W W; Novak, P J; Faison, W; Binz, J G; Hashim, M A; Oliver, W O; Brown, H R; Parks, D J; Plunket, K D; Tong, W Q; Menius, J A; Adkison, K; Noble, S A; Willson, T M

    1999-07-01

    The discovery that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma was the molecular target of the thiazolidinedione class of antidiabetic agents suggested a key role for PPAR-gamma in the regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Through the use of high-throughput biochemical assays, GW1929, a novel N-aryl tyrosine activator of human PPAR-gamma, was identified. Chronic oral administration of GW1929 or troglitazone to Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats resulted in dose-dependent decreases in daily glucose, free fatty acid, and triglyceride exposure compared with pretreatment values, as well as significant decreases in glycosylated hemoglobin. Whole body insulin sensitivity, as determined by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique, was significantly increased in treated animals. Comparison of the magnitude of glucose lowering as a function of serum drug concentrations showed that GW1929 was 2 orders of magnitude more potent than troglitazone in vivo. These data were consistent with the relative in vitro potencies of GW1929 and troglitazone. Isolated perfused pancreas studies performed at the end of the study confirmed that pancreata from vehicle-treated rats showed no increase in insulin secretion in response to a step change in glucose from 3 to 10 mmol/l. In contrast, pancreata from animals treated with GW1929 showed a first- and second-phase insulin secretion pattern. Consistent with the functional data from the perfusion experiments, animals treated with the PPAR-gamma agonist had more normal islet architecture with preserved insulin staining compared with vehicle-treated ZDF rats. This is the first demonstration of in vivo efficacy of a novel nonthiazolidinedione identified as a high-affinity ligand for human PPAR-gamma. The increased potency of GW1929 compared with troglitazone both in vitro and in vivo may translate into improved clinical efficacy when used as monotherapy in type 2 diabetic patients. In addition, the significant

  8. Activation of the Non-receptor Tyrosine Kinase cSrc in Macrophage-rich Atherosclerotic Plaques of Human Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Toi, Sono; Shibata, Noriyuki; Sawada, Tatsuo; Kobayashi, Makio; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    To determine the involvement of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase cSrc in plaque destabilization in carotid atherosclerosis (CAS), which is responsible for cerebral infarction, we performed quantitative and morphological detection of phosphorylated active cSrc (p-cSrc) and histopathological examination in CAS lesions. We examined carotid endarterectomy specimens obtained from 32 CAS patients. Each specimen was used for immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses of p-cSrc, histopathological analysis, and image analysis of macrophage content. There was a strong positive correlation between cSrc activation on blots and macrophage content on sections. When we defined the macrophage-rich plaque (MRP) and the macrophage-poor plaque (MPP) as having macrophage content more and less than 5%, respectively, the p-cSrc density and the occurrence of plaque hemorrhage and thrombus formation were significantly increased in the MRP group (n=18) compared to the MPP group (n=14). p-cSrc immunoreactivity was localized in lesional endothelial cells, macrophages, and smooth muscle cells, which contained proinflammatory substances: the upstream oxidized low density lipoprotein, tissue factor and osteopontin, and the downstream active forms of extracellular signal-activated kinase and p38 and nuclear factor-κB. Our results suggest that cSrc activation in lesional cells contributes to plaque destabilization in CAS via persistent inflammation. PMID:18224247

  9. Canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma tyrosine kinase receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression and activation in canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (cpAC) biospecimens. As histological similarities exist between human and cpAC, we hypothesized that cpACs will have increased TKR mRNA and protein expression as well as TKR phosphorylation. The molecular profile of cpAC has not been well characterized making the selection of therapeutic targets that would potentially have relevant biological activity impossible. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to define TKR expression and their phosphorylation state in cpAC as well as to evaluate the tumors for the presence of potential epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activating mutations in exons 18–21. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for TKR expression was performed using a tissue microarray (TMA) constructed from twelve canine tumors and companion normal lung samples. Staining intensities of the IHC were quantified by a veterinary pathologist as well as by two different digitalized algorithm image analyses software programs. An antibody array was used to evaluate TKR phosphorylation of the tumor relative to the TKR phosphorylation of normal tissues with the resulting spot intensities quantified using array analysis software. Each EGFR exon PCR product from all of the tumors and non-affected lung tissues were sequenced using sequencing chemistry and the sequencing reactions were run on automated sequencer. Sequence alignments were made to the National Center for Biotechnology Information canine EGFR reference sequence. Results The pro-angiogenic growth factor receptor, PDGFRα, had increased cpAC tumor mRNA, protein expression and phosphorylation when compared to the normal lung tissue biospecimens. Similar to human pulmonary adenocarcinoma, significant increases in cpAC tumor mRNA expression and receptor phosphorylation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine receptor were present when compared to the

  10. Neuromedin B receptors regulate EGF receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Terry W.; Berna, Marc J.; Mantey, Samuel; Sancho, Veronica; Ridnour, Lisa; Wink, David A.; Chan, Daniel; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromedin B (NMB), a member of the bombesin family of peptides, is an autocrine growth factor for many lung cancer cells. The present study investigated the ability of NMB to cause transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in lung cancer cells. By Western blot, addition of NMB or related peptides to NCI-H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, caused phosphorylation of Tyr1068 of the EGF receptor. The signal was amplified using NCI-H1299 cells stably transected with NMB receptors. The transactivation of the EGF receptor or the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by AG1478 or gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitors) and NMB receptor antagonist PD168368 but not the GRP receptor antagonist, BW2258U89. The transactivation of the EGF receptor caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by GM6001 (matrix metalloprotease inhibitor), PP2 (Src inhibitor), or transforming growth factor (TGF)α antibody. The transactivation of the EGF receptor and the increase in reactive oxygen species caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or Tiron. Gefitinib inhibited the proliferation of NCI-H1299 cells and its sensitivity was increased by the addition of PD168368. The results indicate that the NMB receptor regulates EGF receptor transactivation by a mechanism dependent on Src as well as metalloprotease activation and generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:20388507

  11. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mili; Scott, Matthew P; Zinn, Kai

    2012-06-15

    The respiratory (tracheal) system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) tyrosine kinase (TK). Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways.

  12. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mili; Scott, Matthew P.; Zinn, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Summary The respiratory (tracheal) system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) tyrosine kinase (TK). Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways. PMID:23213447

  13. Co-expression modules of NF1, PTEN and sprouty enable distinction of adult diffuse gliomas according to pathway activities of receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Wu, Chenxing; Yao, Kun; Zhang, Chuanbao; Jin, Qiang; Huang, Rong; Li, Jiuyi; Sun, Yingyu; Su, Xiaodong; Jiang, Tao; Fan, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Inter-individual variability causing elevated signaling of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) may have hampered the efficacy of targeted therapies. We developed a molecular signature for clustering adult diffuse gliomas based on the extent of RTK pathway activities. Glioma gene modules co-expressed with NF1 (NF1-M), Sprouty (SPRY-M) and PTEN (PTEN-M) were identified, their signatures enabled robust clustering of adult diffuse gliomas of WHO grades II-IV from five independent data sets into two subtypes with distinct activities of RAS-RAF-MEK-MAPK cascade and PI3K-AKT pathway (named RMPAhigh and RMPAlow subtypes) in a morphology-independent manner. The RMPAhigh gliomas were associated with poor prognosis compared to the RMPAlow gliomas. The RMPAhigh and RMPAlow glioma subtypes harbored unique sets of genomic alterations in the RTK signaling-related genes. The RMPAhigh gliomas were enriched in immature vessel cells and tumor associated macrophages, and both cell types expressed high levels of pro-angiogenic RTKs including MET, VEGFR1, KDR, EPHB4 and NRP1. In gliomas with major genomic lesions unrelated to RTK pathway, high RMPA signature was associated with short survival. Thus, the RMPA signatures capture RTK activities in both glioma cells and glioma microenvironment, and RTK signaling in the glioma microenvironment contributes to glioma progression. PMID:27385209

  14. OSI-930: a novel selective inhibitor of Kit and kinase insert domain receptor tyrosine kinases with antitumor activity in mouse xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Garton, Andrew J; Crew, Andrew P A; Franklin, Maryland; Cooke, Andrew R; Wynne, Graham M; Castaldo, Linda; Kahler, Jennifer; Winski, Shannon L; Franks, April; Brown, Eric N; Bittner, Mark A; Keily, John F; Briner, Paul; Hidden, Chris; Srebernak, Mary C; Pirrit, Carrie; O'Connor, Matthew; Chan, Anna; Vulevic, Bojana; Henninger, Dwight; Hart, Karen; Sennello, Regina; Li, An-Hu; Zhang, Tao; Richardson, Frank; Emerson, David L; Castelhano, Arlindo L; Arnold, Lee D; Gibson, Neil W

    2006-01-15

    OSI-930 is a novel inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases Kit and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), which is currently being evaluated in clinical studies. OSI-930 selectively inhibits Kit and KDR with similar potency in intact cells and also inhibits these targets in vivo following oral dosing. We have investigated the relationships between the potency observed in cell-based assays in vitro, the plasma exposure levels achieved following oral dosing, the time course of target inhibition in vivo, and antitumor activity of OSI-930 in tumor xenograft models. In the mutant Kit-expressing HMC-1 xenograft model, prolonged inhibition of Kit was achieved at oral doses between 10 and 50 mg/kg and this dose range was associated with antitumor activity. Similarly, prolonged inhibition of wild-type Kit in the NCI-H526 xenograft model was observed at oral doses of 100 to 200 mg/kg, which was the dose level associated with significant antitumor activity in this model as well as in the majority of other xenograft models tested. The data suggest that antitumor activity of OSI-930 in mouse xenograft models is observed at dose levels that maintain a significant level of inhibition of the molecular targets of OSI-930 for a prolonged period. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic evaluation of the plasma exposure levels of OSI-930 at these effective dose levels provides an estimate of the target plasma concentrations that may be required to achieve prolonged inhibition of Kit and KDR in humans and which would therefore be expected to yield a therapeutic benefit in future clinical evaluations of OSI-930.

  15. Tannic acid, a potent inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Er Bin; Wei, Liu; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yu Zong; Chen, Wei Ning

    2006-03-01

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that tannic acid, a plant polyphenol, exerts anticarcinogenic activity in chemically induced cancers. In the present study, tannic acid was found to strongly inhibit tyrosine kinase activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) in vitro (IC50 = 323 nM). In contrast, the inhibition by tannic acid of p60(c-src) tyrosine kinase (IC50 = 14 microM) and insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IC50 = 5 microM) was much weaker. The inhibition of EGFr tyrosine kinase by tannic acid was competitive with respect to ATP and non-competitive with respect to peptide substrate. In cultured cells, growth factor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of growth factor receptors, including EGFr, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and basic fibroblast growth factor receptor, was inhibited by tannic acid. No inhibition of insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin-receptor substrate-1 was observed. EGF-stimulated growth of HepG2 cells was inhibited in the presence of tannic acid. The inhibition of serine/threonine-specific protein kinases, including cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase, by tannic acid was only detected at relatively high concentration, IC50 being 3, 325 and 142 microM respectively. The molecular modeling study suggested that tannic acid could be docked into the ATP binding pockets of either EGFr or insulin receptor. These results demonstrate that tannic acid is an in vitro potent inhibitor of EGFr tyrosine kinase.

  16. A promiscuous liaison between IL-15 receptor and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in cell death control

    PubMed Central

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Orinska, Zane; Thon, Lutz; Mamat, Uwe; Bellosta, Paola; Basilico, Claudio; Adam, Dieter; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Discrimination between cytokine receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways is a central paradigm in signal transduction research. Here, we report a ‘promiscuous liaison' between both receptors that enables interleukin (IL)-15 to transactivate the signaling pathway of a tyrosine kinase. IL-15 protects murine L929 fibroblasts from tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced cell death, but fails to rescue them upon targeted depletion of the RTK, Axl; however, Axl-overexpressing fibroblasts are TNFα-resistant. IL-15Rα and Axl colocalize on the cell membrane and co-immunoprecipitate even in the absence of IL-15, whereby the extracellular part of Axl proved to be essential for Axl/IL-15Rα interaction. Most strikingly, IL-15 treatment mimics stimulation by the Axl ligand, Gas6, resulting in a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of both Axl and IL-15Rα, and activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. This is also seen in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from wild-type but not Axl−/− or IL-15Rα−/− mice. Thus, IL-15-induced protection from TNFα-mediated cell death involves a hitherto unknown IL-15 receptor complex, consisting of IL-15Rα and Axl RTK, and requires their reciprocal activation initiated by ligand-induced IL-15Rα. PMID:16308569

  17. A promiscuous liaison between IL-15 receptor and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in cell death control.

    PubMed

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Orinska, Zane; Thon, Lutz; Mamat, Uwe; Bellosta, Paola; Basilico, Claudio; Adam, Dieter; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-12-21

    Discrimination between cytokine receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways is a central paradigm in signal transduction research. Here, we report a 'promiscuous liaison' between both receptors that enables interleukin (IL)-15 to transactivate the signaling pathway of a tyrosine kinase. IL-15 protects murine L929 fibroblasts from tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced cell death, but fails to rescue them upon targeted depletion of the RTK, Axl; however, Axl-overexpressing fibroblasts are TNFalpha-resistant. IL-15Ralpha and Axl colocalize on the cell membrane and co-immunoprecipitate even in the absence of IL-15, whereby the extracellular part of Axl proved to be essential for Axl/IL-15Ralpha interaction. Most strikingly, IL-15 treatment mimics stimulation by the Axl ligand, Gas6, resulting in a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of both Axl and IL-15Ralpha, and activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. This is also seen in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from wild-type but not Axl-/- or IL-15Ralpha-/- mice. Thus, IL-15-induced protection from TNFalpha-mediated cell death involves a hitherto unknown IL-15 receptor complex, consisting of IL-15Ralpha and Axl RTK, and requires their reciprocal activation initiated by ligand-induced IL-15Ralpha.

  18. Teaching resources. Growth factor and receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Stuart

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a graduate-level class on ligand regulation of signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases and receptors involved in the Wnt canonical pathway. It is part of a series of lectures that constitute the Cell Signaling Systems course. A description of the lecture, along with a set of slides used to present this information, is provided.

  19. Co-active receptor tyrosine kinases mitigate the effect of FGFR inhibitors in FGFR1-amplified lung cancers with low FGFR1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kotani, H; Ebi, H; Kitai, H; Nanjo, S; Kita, K; Huynh, T G; Ooi, A; Faber, A C; Mino-Kenudson, M; Yano, S

    2016-07-07

    Targeted therapies are effective in subsets of lung cancers with EGFR mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations. Large-scale genomics have recently expanded the lung cancer landscape with FGFR1 amplification found in 10-20% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, the response rates have been low for biomarker-directed fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor therapy in SCC, which contrasts to the relatively high rates of response seen in EGFR mutant and ALK-translocated lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and ALK inhibitors, respectively. In order to better understand the low response rates of FGFR1-amplified lung cancers to FGFR inhibitors, relationships between gene copy number, mRNA expression and protein expression of FGFR1 were assessed in cell lines, tumor specimens and data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The importance of these factors for the sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors was determined by analyzing drug screen data and conducting in vitro and in vivo experiments. We report that there was a discrepancy between FGFR1 amplification level and FGFR1 protein expression in a number of these cell lines, and the cancers with unexpectedly low FGFR1 expression were uniformly resistant to the different FGFR inhibitors. Further interrogation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity in these discordant cell lines revealed co-activation of HER2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) caused by gene amplification or ligand overexpression maintained phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and MEK/ERK signaling even in the presence of FGFR inhibitor. Accordingly, co-inhibition of FGFR1 and HER2 or PDGFRα led to enhanced drug responses. In contrast, FGFR1-amplified high FGFR1 protein-expressing lung cancers are sensitive to FGFR inhibitor monotherapy by downregulating ERK signaling. Addition of a PI3K inhibitor to these high FGFR1 protein-expressing cancers further sensitized them to FGFR

  20. The EGFR Family: Not So Prototypical Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was among the first receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for which ligand binding was studied and for which the importance of ligand-induced dimerization was established. As a result, EGFR and its relatives have frequently been termed “prototypical” RTKs. Many years of mechanistic studies, however, have revealed that—far from being prototypical—the EGFR family is quite unique. As we discuss in this review, the EGFR family uses a distinctive “receptor-mediated” dimerization mechanism, with ligand binding inducing a dramatic conformational change that exposes a dimerization arm. Intracellular kinase domain regulation in this family is also unique, being driven by allosteric changes induced by asymmetric dimer formation rather than the more typical activation-loop phosphorylation. EGFR family members also distinguish themselves from other RTKs in having an intracellular juxtamembrane (JM) domain that activates (rather than autoinhibits) the receptor and a very large carboxy-terminal tail that contains autophosphorylation sites and serves an autoregulatory function. We discuss recent advances in mechanistic aspects of all of these components of EGFR family members, attempting to integrate them into a view of how RTKs in this important class are regulated at the cell surface. PMID:24691965

  1. SGX523 is an exquisitely selective, ATP-competitive inhibitor of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase with antitumor activity in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, Sean G.; Hendle, Jorg; Lee, Patrick S.; Smith, Christopher R.; Bounaud, Pierre-Yves; Jessen, Katti A.; Tang, Crystal M.; Huser, Nanni H.; Felce, Jeremy D.; Froning, Karen J.; Peterman, Marshall C.; Aubol, Brandon E.; Gessert, Steve F.; Sauder, J. Michael; Schwinn, Kenneth D.; Russell, Marijane; Rooney, Isabelle A.; Adams, Jason; Leon, Barbara C.; Do, Tuan H.; Blaney, Jeff M.; Sprengeler, Paul A.; Thompson, Devon A.; Smyth, Lydia; Pelletier, Laura A.; Atwell, Shane; Holme, Kevin; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Emtage, Spencer; Burley, Stephen K.; Reich, Siegfried H.

    2010-01-12

    The MET receptor tyrosine kinase has emerged as an important target for the development of novel cancer therapeutics. Activation of MET by mutation or gene amplification has been linked to kidney, gastric, and lung cancers. In other cancers, such as glioblastoma, autocrine activation of MET has been demonstrated. Several classes of ATP-competitive inhibitor have been described, which inhibit MET but also other kinases. Here, we describe SGX523, a novel, ATP-competitive kinase inhibitor remarkable for its exquisite selectivity for MET. SGX523 potently inhibited MET with an IC{sub 50} of 4 nmol/L and is >1,000-fold selective versus the >200-fold selectivity of other protein kinases tested in biochemical assays. Crystallographic study revealed that SGX523 stabilizes MET in a unique inactive conformation that is inaccessible to other protein kinases, suggesting an explanation for the selectivity. SGX523 inhibited MET-mediated signaling, cell proliferation, and cell migration at nanomolar concentrations but had no effect on signaling dependent on other protein kinases, including the closely related RON, even at micromolar concentrations. SGX523 inhibition of MET in vivo was associated with the dose-dependent inhibition of growth of tumor xenografts derived from human glioblastoma and lung and gastric cancers, confirming the dependence of these tumors on MET catalytic activity. Our results show that SGX523 is the most selective inhibitor of MET catalytic activity described to date and is thus a useful tool to investigate the role of MET kinase in cancer without the confounding effects of promiscuous protein kinase inhibition.

  2. The high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcepsilonRI) regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake and a dihydropyridine receptor-mediated calcium influx in mast cells: Role of the FcepsilonRIbeta chain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Inoue, Toshio; Nunomura, Satoshi; Ra, Chisei

    2008-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondria take up calcium upon receptor (agonist) stimulation and that this contributes to the dynamics of spatiotemporal calcium signaling. We have previously shown that engagement of the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (FcepsilonRI) stimulates mitochondrial calcium ([Ca2+]m) uptake in mast cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms and biological significance of FcepsilonRI regulation of [Ca2+]m. Antigen stimulated [Ca2+]m uptake in a dose-dependent manner with a minimal effective dose of 0.03-3 ng/ml. This [Ca2+]m uptake took place immediately, reaching its peak within minutes and was inhibited by the src family kinase inhibitor PP1 and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Analyses using mast cells expressing the wild-type or the mutated type of the FcepsilonRIbeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in which all tyrosine residues were replaced by phenylalanine revealed that the FcepsilonRIbeta ITAM is essential for a sustained [Ca2+]m uptake. The FcepsilonRIbeta ITAM was essential for overall calcium response upon weak FcepsilonRI stimulation (at low antigen concentration), while upon strong stimulation (at high antigen concentration) it appeared necessary selectively to an immediate calcium response that was sensitive to the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) antagonist nifedipine and wortmannin but not to the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) antagonists such as 2-aminoethoxyphenyl borate and SK&F96365. These data demonstrate that the FcepsilonRIbeta regulates [Ca2+]m uptake in mast cells via the ITAM and suggest that this plays a key role in regulating calcium influx especially that induced via a DHPR-mediated calcium channel.

  3. Receptor tyrosine kinases and schistosome reproduction: new targets for chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Hahnel, Steffen; Grevelding, Christoph G.; Dissous, Colette

    2014-01-01

    Schistosome parasites still represent a serious public health concern and a major economic problem in developing countries. Pathology of schistosomiasis is mainly due to massive egg production by these parasites and to inflammatory responses raised against the eggs which are trapped in host tissues. Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are key molecules that control cell differentiation and proliferation and they already represent important targets in cancer therapy. During recent years, it has been shown that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) signaling was active in reproductive organs and that it could regulate sexual maturation of schistosomes and egg production. This opens interesting perspectives for the control of transmission and pathogenesis of schistosomiasis based on new therapies targeting schistosome RTKs. This review relates the numerous data showing the major roles of kinase signaling in schistosome reproduction. It describes the conserved and particular features of schistosome RTKs, their implication in gametogenesis and reproduction processes and summarizes recent works indicating that RTKs and their signaling partners are interesting chemotherapeutical targets in new programs of control. PMID:25101117

  4. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis can be induced in different renal diseases, but ultimately progresses to end stage renal disease. Although the pathophysiologic process of renal fibrosis have not been fully elucidated, it is characterized by glomerulosclerosis and/or tubular interstitial fibrosis, and is believed to be caused by the proliferation of renal inherent cells, including glomerular epithelial cells, mesangial cells, and endothelial cells, along with defective kidney repair, renal interstitial fibroblasts activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate a variety of cell physiological processes, including metabolism, growth, differentiation, and survival. Many studies from in vitro and animal models have provided evidence that RTKs play important roles in the pathogenic process of renal fibrosis. It is also showed that tyrosine kinases inhibitors (TKIs) have anti-fibrotic effects in basic research and clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the evidence for involvement of specific RTKs in renal fibrosis process and the employment of TKIs as a therapeutic approach for renal fibrosis. PMID:27331812

  5. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    PubMed

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-07-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions with signaling pathways involving SRC family kinases, which result from their ability to control phosphorylation of both activating and inhibitory sites in these kinases and possibly also their substrates. Similarly, integrin signaling illustrates how phosphorylation of a single protein, or the activity of a pathway, can be controlled by multiple tyrosine phosphatases, attesting to the intricate integration of these enzymes in cellular regulation. Lastly, we are starting to appreciate the roles of intracellular topology, tyrosine phosphorylation and oligomerization among the many mechanisms regulating tyrosine phosphatase activity.

  6. Increasing the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB2 Prevents Amyloid-β-induced Depletion of Cell Surface Glutamate Receptors by a Mechanism That Requires the PDZ-binding Motif of EphB2 and Neuronal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takashi; Kim, Daniel; Knox, Joseph A.; Johnson, Erik; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Diverse lines of evidence suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides causally contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. However, the mechanisms by which Aβ impairs neuronal functions remain to be fully elucidated. Previous studies showed that soluble Aβ oligomers interfere with synaptic functions by depleting NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) from the neuronal surface and that overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 can counteract this process. Through pharmacological treatments and biochemical analyses of primary neuronal cultures expressing wild-type or mutant forms of EphB2, we demonstrate that this protective effect of EphB2 depends on its PDZ-binding motif and the presence of neuronal activity but not on its kinase activity. We further present evidence that the protective effect of EphB2 may be mediated by the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2, which can become associated with the PDZ-binding motif of EphB2 through PDZ domain-containing proteins and can promote the retention of NMDARs in the membrane. In addition, we show that the Aβ-induced depletion of surface NMDARs does not depend on several factors that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction, including aberrant neuronal activity, tau, prion protein (PrPC), and EphB2 itself. Thus, although EphB2 does not appear to be directly involved in the Aβ-induced depletion of NMDARs, increasing its expression may counteract this pathogenic process through a neuronal activity- and PDZ-dependent regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. PMID:26589795

  7. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling – A Proteomic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Biarc, Jordane; Chalkley, Robert J.; Burlingame, A. L.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    The stimulation of various cellular processes through extracellular signals is of paramount importance in biological systems and is a central focus in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease. The information transfer is accomplished in a variety of ways by the interaction of soluble, matrix-associated and cell bound ligands that either bind specifically to plasma membrane-associated proteins that act as receptors, or penetrate to the cytoplasmic/nuclear compartments to bind and activate receptors located there. The former class of entities generates intracellular signals that are transmitted and amplified by chemical modifications that are manifested as protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). These are both reversible and irreversible and range from phosphorylation of tyrosine, threonine and serine residues to endoproteolytic cleavages. Although the PTMs alter the activity and functions of many of the proteins in these cascades, the major outcomes of most of the signaling pathways are the activation/deactivation of transcriptional regulators with the concomitant changes in gene expression that generally underlie biological responses. PMID:21056590

  8. Tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation associated to G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Almendro, Vanessa; García-Recio, Susana; Gascón, Pedro

    2010-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors involved in signal transduction. These receptors are linked to a variety of physiological and biological processes such as regulation of neurotransmission, growth, cell differentiation and oncogenesis among others. Some of the effects of GPCRs are known to be mediated by the activation of MAPK pathways. Several GPCRs are also able to transactivate receptors with tyrosine kinase activity (TKR) such as EGFR and HER2 and thus to control DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. The interaction between these receptors not only plays an important physiological role but its disregulation can induce pathological states such as cancer. For this reason, the crosstalk between these two types of receptors can be considered a possible mechanism for cell transformation, tumor progression, reactivation of the metastatic disease, and the acquisition of resistance to therapies targeting TKR receptors. The transactivation of some TKRs by GPCRs is related to the lost of response of TKRs to inhibitors of TK activity, mainly by the activation of the c-Src protein which can directly phosphorylate and activate the cytoplasmic domain of a TKR. For these reason, the dual inhibition of GPCRs and TKRs in some types of cancer has been proposed as a better strategy to kill tumor cells. Increased understanding of the mechanisms that interconnect the two pathways regulated by GPCRs and TKRs may facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies.

  9. Expression of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB2 on Dendritic Cells Is Modulated by Toll-Like Receptor Ligation but Is Not Required for T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Mimche, Patrice N; Brady, Lauren M; Keeton, Shirley; Fenne, David S J; King, Thayer P; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, Lauren E; Lamb, Tracey J

    2015-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases interact with their ephrin ligands on adjacent cells to facilitate contact-dependent cell communication. Ephrin B ligands are expressed on T cells and have been suggested to act as co-stimulatory molecules during T cell activation. There are no detailed reports of the expression and modulation of EphB receptors on dendritic cells, the main antigen presenting cells that interact with T cells. Here we show that mouse splenic dendritic cells (DC) and bone-marrow derived DCs (BMDC) express EphB2, a member of the EphB family. EphB2 expression is modulated by ligation of TLR4 and TLR9 and also by interaction with ephrin B ligands. Co-localization of EphB2 with MHC-II is also consistent with a potential role in T cell activation. However, BMDCs derived from EphB2 deficient mice were able to present antigen in the context of MHC-II and produce T cell activating cytokines to the same extent as intact DCs. Collectively our data suggest that EphB2 may contribute to DC responses, but that EphB2 is not required for T cell activation. This result may have arisen because DCs express other members of the EphB receptor family, EphB3, EphB4 and EphB6, all of which can interact with ephrin B ligands, or because EphB2 may be playing a role in another aspect of DC biology such as migration.

  10. Expression of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB2 on Dendritic Cells Is Modulated by Toll-Like Receptor Ligation but Is Not Required for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mimche, Patrice N.; Brady, Lauren M.; Keeton, Shirley; Fenne, David S. J.; King, Thayer P.; Quicke, Kendra M.; Hudson, Lauren E.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases interact with their ephrin ligands on adjacent cells to facilitate contact-dependent cell communication. Ephrin B ligands are expressed on T cells and have been suggested to act as co-stimulatory molecules during T cell activation. There are no detailed reports of the expression and modulation of EphB receptors on dendritic cells, the main antigen presenting cells that interact with T cells. Here we show that mouse splenic dendritic cells (DC) and bone-marrow derived DCs (BMDC) express EphB2, a member of the EphB family. EphB2 expression is modulated by ligation of TLR4 and TLR9 and also by interaction with ephrin B ligands. Co-localization of EphB2 with MHC-II is also consistent with a potential role in T cell activation. However, BMDCs derived from EphB2 deficient mice were able to present antigen in the context of MHC-II and produce T cell activating cytokines to the same extent as intact DCs. Collectively our data suggest that EphB2 may contribute to DC responses, but that EphB2 is not required for T cell activation. This result may have arisen because DCs express other members of the EphB receptor family, EphB3, EphB4 and EphB6, all of which can interact with ephrin B ligands, or because EphB2 may be playing a role in another aspect of DC biology such as migration. PMID:26407069

  11. Stimulation of phosphatidylcholine breakdown by thrombin and carbachol but not by tyrosine kinase receptor ligands in cells transfected with M1 muscarinic receptors. Rapid desensitization of phosphocholine-specific (PC) phospholipase D but sustained activity of PC-phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, F R; Seuwen, K; Pouysségur, J

    1992-11-15

    In order to evaluate the possible contribution of phospholipase D (PLD) stimulation to the mitogenic response, a screening of a variety of different compounds, some of which are known to be potent mitogens, was performed using the well characterized Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (CCL39) cell line. In wild type CCL39 cells, or derivatives expressing high levels of either the human M1 muscarinic receptor (Hm1) or the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (39M1-81 and 39ER22 clones, respectively), thrombin, a potent mitogen for all three cell types, elicited the rapid activation of PLD (t1/2 activation, 30 s). Carbachol-mediated activation of the Hm1 receptor in the 39M1-81 clone, which is not a mitogenic signal, produced a similarly rapid although greater activation of PLD. Addition of EGF to the 39ER22 clone was able to provoke both a mitogenic response and stimulate PLD, albeit a comparatively small effect. In each case, the stimulation of PLD correlated closely with the ability to stimulate inositol phospholipid breakdown and was entirely dependent on the activation of protein kinase C. Moreover, the ability of both thrombin and carbachol to stimulate PLD was found to be rapidly desensitized, with a similar time course of desensitization (t1/2 desensitization, 90 s). It has recently been reported that an increase in phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated phosphocholine (PC) hydrolysis by either addition of agonist or by extracellular addition of PC-specific PLC enzyme constitutes a mitogenic signal. In this regard, in addition to stimulation of PLD, thrombin and carbachol were both able to stimulate the activity of a phosphocholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), which did not appear to desensitize within the time course employed. By contrast, EGF was unable to elicit the stimulation of PC-PLC. Ligands such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), which bind to and activate receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity

  12. DISCOIDIN DOMAIN RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES: NEW PLAYERS IN CANCER PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Valiathan, Rajeshwari R.; Marco, Marta; Leitinger, Birgit; Kleer, Celina G.; Fridman, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Almost all human cancers display dysregulated expression and/or function of one or more receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). The strong causative association between altered RTK function and cancer progression has translated into novel therapeutic strategies that target these cell surface receptors in the treatment of cancer. Yet, the full spectrum of RTKs that may alter the oncogenic process is not completely understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that a unique set of RTKs known as the Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs) play a role in cancer progression by regulating the interactions of tumor cells with their surrounding collagen matrix. The DDRs are the only RTKs that specifically bind to, and are activated by collagen. Hence, the DDRs are part of the signaling networks that translate information from the extracellular matrix thereby acting as key regulators of cell-matrix interactions. Under physiological conditions, DDRs control cell and tissue homeostasis by acting as collagen sensors, transducing signals that regulate cell polarity, tissue morphogenesis, and cell differentiation. In cancer, DDRs are hijacked by tumor cells to disrupt normal cell-matrix communication and initiate pro-migratory and pro-invasive programs. Importantly, several cancer types exhibit DDR mutations, which are thought to alter receptor function and contribute to cancer progression. Other evidence suggests that the actions of DDRs in cancer are complex, either promoting or suppressing tumor cell behavior in a DDR type/isoform specific and context dependent manner. Thus, there is still a considerable gap in our knowledge of DDR actions in cancer tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on DDR expression and function in cancer and discusses the potential implications of DDRs in cancer biology. It is hoped that this effort will encourage more research into these poorly understood but unique RTKs, which have the potential of becoming novel therapeutics targets in cancer. PMID

  13. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling: a view from quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2009-10-01

    Growth factor receptor signaling via receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is one of the basic cellular communication principals found in all metazoans. Extracellular signals are transferred via membrane spanning receptors into the cytoplasm, reversible tyrosine phosphorylation being the hallmark of all RTKs. In recent years proteomic approaches have yielded detailed descriptions of cellular signaling events. Quantitative proteomics is able to characterize the exact position and strength of post-translational modifications (PTMs) providing essential information for understanding the molecular basis of signal transduction. Numerous new post-translational modification sites have been identified by quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In addition, plentiful new players in signal transduction have been identified underlining the complexity and the modular architecture of most signaling networks. In this review, we outline the principles of signal transduction via RTKs and highlight some of the new insights obtained from proteomic approaches such as protein microarrays and quantitative mass spectrometry.

  14. Distinct tyrosine residues within the interleukin-2 receptor beta chain drive signal transduction specificity, redundancy, and diversity.

    PubMed

    Gaffen, S L; Lai, S Y; Ha, M; Liu, X; Hennighausen, L; Greene, W C; Goldsmith, M A

    1996-08-30

    To explore the basis for interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling specificity, the roles of tyrosine-based sequences located within the cytoplasmic tails of the beta and gammac chains were examined in the murine helper T cell line HT-2. Activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, cellular proliferation, and the induction of various genes were monitored. All four of the cytoplasmic tyrosine residues as well as the distal portion of the gammac proved dispensable for the entire spectrum of IL-2R signaling responses studied. Conversely, select tyrosine residues within the beta chain were essential and differentially required for various signaling events. Specifically, activation of c-fos gene expression was found to occur exclusively through the most membrane proximal tyrosine, Tyr-338, whereas proliferation and the activation of STAT-5 were induced either through Tyr-338 or through the two C-terminal tyrosine residues, Tyr-392 and Tyr-510. These tyrosine residues mediated the induction of two different STAT-5 isoforms, which were found to form heterodimers upon receptor activation. In contrast to the tyrosine dependence of c-fos and STAT-5 induction, bcl-2 gene induction proceeded independently of all IL-2Rbeta tyrosine residues. Thus, the tyrosine-based modules present within the IL-2Rbeta cytoplasmic tail play a critical role in IL-2R signaling, mediating specificity, redundancy, and multifunctionality.

  15. Ligand-independent activation of the arylhydrocarbon receptor by ETK (Bmx) tyrosine kinase helps MCF10AT1 breast cancer cells to survive in an apoptosis-inducing environment.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Yasuko; Li, Wen; Wu, Dalei; Wong, Patrick; Vogel, Christoph; Dong, Bin; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Matsumura, Fumio

    2011-10-01

    It has been reported that the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is overexpressed in certain types of breast tumors. However, so far no concrete evidence has been provided yet as to why and how the overexpressed AHR in those cancer cells is functionally activated without exogenous ligands. Here we show that the AHR was functionally activated when estrogen receptor-negative, AHR overexpressing MCF10AT1 human breast cancer cells (designated P20E) were subjected to serum starvation. Transfection of cells with ETK-KQ, a plasmid for kinase-dead epithelial and endothelial tyrosine kinase (ETK), attenuated this AHR activation. Artificial over-expression of ETK in P20E cells through transfection with wild-type ETK plasmid (ETK-wt) caused up-regulation of cytochrome P4501a1 (CYP1A1; a marker of functional activation of AHR). Furthermore, ablation of ETK expression by a specific antisense oligonucleotide or AG879, a specific inhibitor of ETK kinase suppressed activation of AHR induced by omeprazole, a strong ligand-independent activator of AHR. Activation of ETK in those cells conferred them resistance to UVB- as well as doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, both of which were reversed by ETK-KQ. Together, these findings support our conclusion that ETK is the tyrosine kinase responsible for the functional activation of the AHR in these mammary epithelial cells.

  16. Dephosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinases as target of regulation by radiation, oxidants or alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Knebel, A; Rahmsdorf, H J; Ullrich, A; Herrlich, P

    1996-01-01

    Several non-physiologic agents such as radiation, oxidants and alkylating agents induce ligand-independent activation of numerous receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and of protein tyrosine kinases at the inner side of the plasma membrane (e.g. Dévary et al., 1992; Sachsenmaier et al., 1994; Schieven et al., 1994; Coffer et al., 1995). Here we show additional evidence for the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and we show activation of v-ErbB, ErbB2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. As a common principle of action the inducing agents such as UVC, UVB, UVA, hydrogen peroxide and iodoacetamide inhibit receptor tyrosine dephosphorylation in a thiol-sensitive and, with the exception of the SH-alkylating agent, reversible manner. EGFR dephosphorylation can also be modulated by these non-physiologic agents in isolated plasma membranes in the presence of Triton X-100. Further, substrate (EGFR) and phosphatase have been separated: a membrane preparation of cells that have been treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and whose dephosphorylating enzymes have been permanently destroyed by iodoacetamide can be mixed with a membrane preparation from untreated cells which re-establishes EGFR dephosphorylation. This dephosphorylation can be modulated in vitro by UV and thiol agents. We conclude that RTKs exhibit significant spontaneous protein kinase activity; several adverse agents target (an) essential SH-group(s) carried by (a) membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase(s). Images PMID:8895576

  17. Catalytically defective receptor protein tyrosine kinase PTK7 enhances invasive phenotype by inducing MMP-9 through activation of AP-1 and NF-κB in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Won-Sik; Hong, Yuri; Lee, Hae Won; Lee, Seung-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7), a member of the catalytically defective receptor protein tyrosine kinase family, is upregulated in various cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here, we have explored the molecular mechanism of PTK7-dependent invasiveness in ESCC cells. PTK7 knockdown reduced gelatin degradation and MMP-9 secretion in cultures of ESCC TE-10 cells, and showed reduced levels of MMP9 mRNA using real-time RT-PCR and luciferase reporter assays. PTK7 knockdown decreased not only phosphorylation of NF-κB, IκB, ERK, and JNK, but also nuclear localization of NF-κB and AP-1 consisting of c-Fos and c-Jun. Activation of AP-1 and NF-κB requires PTK7-mediated activation of tyrosine kinases, including Src. In addition, NF-κB activation by PTK7 involves the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PTK7-mediated upregulation of MMP9 was also observed in other ESCC cell lines and in three-dimensional cultures of TE-10 cells. Moreover, MMP-9 expression positively correlated with PTK7 expression in ESCC tumor tissue. These findings demonstrate that PTK7 upregulates MMP9 through activation of AP-1 and NF-κB and, thus increases invasive properties of ESCC cells. PMID:27689325

  18. Ligand-induced IFN gamma receptor tyrosine phosphorylation couples the receptor to its signal transduction system (p91).

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, A C; Farrar, M A; Viviano, B L; Schreiber, R D

    1994-01-01

    Herein we report that interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) induces the rapid and reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of the IFN gamma receptor. Using a panel of receptor intracellular domain mutants, we show that a membrane-proximal LPKS sequence (residues 266-269) is required for ligand-induced tyrosine kinase activation and/or kinase-receptor association and biological responsiveness, and a functionally critical membrane-distal tyrosine residue (Y440) is a target of the activated enzyme. The biological significance of Y440 phosphorylation was demonstrated by showing that a receptor-derived nonapeptide corresponding to receptor residues 436-444 and containing phosphorylated Y440 bound specifically to p91, blocked p91 phosphorylation and inhibited the generation of an active p91-containing transcription factor complex. In contrast, nonphosphorylated wild-type, phosphorylated mutant, or phosphorylated irrelevant peptides did not. Moreover, the phosphorylated Y440-containing peptide did not interact with a related but distinct latent transcription factor (p113) which is activatible by IFN alpha but not IFN gamma. These results thus document the specific and inducible association of p91 with the phosphorylated IFN gamma receptor and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which ligand couples the IFN gamma receptor to its signal transduction system. Images PMID:8156998

  19. SH2 domain proteins as high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Koland, J G

    1993-09-28

    Activation of a growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is accompanied by a rapid autophosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine residues. Receptor activation has been shown to promote the association of signal-transducing proteins containing SH2 domains (second domain of src homology). These receptor-associated proteins can, in turn, be phosphorylated by the RTK, an event which presumably regulates their activities. It has been suggested that SH2 domains in signal-transducing proteins target these proteins as substrates of the activated RTK. To test this hypothesis, recombinant proteins were generated that contained tyrosine phosphorylation sites of the erbB3 receptor and/or the SH2 domain of c-src. Incorporation of the SH2 domain led to a decrease in KM and an increase in Vmax for the substrate. The KM determined for one chimeric SH2/erbB3 substrate was among the lowest reported for epidermal growth factor RTK substrates. Experiments with a truncated kinase lacking C-terminal autophosphorylation sites indicated that the reduction in KM for these substrates was mediated by interactions between the substrate SH2 domain and phosphotyrosine residues of the RTK. These interactions could also inhibit RTK activity. These results demonstrate that the SH2 domain can effectively target substrates to a RTK and that SH2 domain proteins can regulate RTK activity.

  20. Regulation of therapeutic resistance in cancers by receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    In response to DNA damage lesions due to cellular stress, DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are activated to promote cell survival and genetic stability or unrepaired lesion-induced cell death. Current cancer treatments predominantly utilize DNA damaging agents, such as irradiation and chemotherapy drugs, to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce cell death through the activation of DDR. However, a portion of cancer patients is reported to develop therapeutic resistance to these DDR-inducing agents. One significant resistance mechanism in cancer cells is oncogenic kinase overexpression, which promotes cell survival by enhancing DNA damage repair pathways and evading cell cycle arrest. Among the oncogenic kinases, overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is reported in many of solid tumors, and numerous clinical trials targeting RTKs are currently in progress. As the emerging trend in cancer treatment combines DNA damaging agents and RTK inhibitors, it is important to understand the substrates of RTKs relative to the DDR pathways. In addition, alteration of RTK expression and their phosphorylated substrates can serve as biomarkers to stratify patients for combination therapies. In this review, we summarize the deleterious effects of RTKs on the DDR pathways and the emerging biomarkers for personalized therapy. PMID:27186434

  1. Perspective: Dynamics of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Bruce J

    2012-08-14

    Textbook descriptions of signal transduction complexes provide a static snapshot view of highly dynamic events. Despite enormous strides in identifying the key components of signaling complexes and the underlying mechanisms of signal transduction, our understanding of the dynamic behavior of these complexes has lagged behind. Using the example of receptor tyrosine kinases, this perspective takes a fresh look at the dynamics of the system and their potential impact on signal processing.

  2. Replacement of insulin receptor tyrosine residues 1162 and 1163 does not alter the mitogenic effect of the hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Debant, A.; Clauser, E.; Ponzio, G.; Filloux, C.; Auzan, C.; Contreres, J.O.; Rossi, B. )

    1988-11-01

    Chinese hamster ovary transfectants that express insulin receptors in which tyrosine residues 1162 and 1163 were replaced by phenylalanine exhibit a total inhibition of the insulin-mediated tyrosine kinase activity toward exogenous substrates; this latter activity is associated with total inhibition of the hypersensitivity reported for insulin in promoting 2-deoxyglucose uptake. The authors now present evidence that the twin tyrosines also control the insulin-mediated stimulation of glycogen synthesis. Surprisingly, this type of Chinese hamster ovary transfectant is as hypersensitive to insulin for its mitogenic effect as are Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing many intact insulin receptors. Such data suggest that (i) the insulin mitogenic effect routes through a different pathway than insulin uses to activate the transport and metabolism of glucose and (ii) the mitogenic effect of insulin is not controlled by the twin tyrosines. At the molecular level, the solubilized mutated receptor has not insulin-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, whereas this receptor displays measurable insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of its {beta} subunit in {sup 32}P-labeled cells. The authors therefore propose that the autocatalytic phosphorylating activity of the receptor reports a cryptic tyrosine kinase activity that cannot be visualized by the use of classical exogenous substrates.

  3. Escape from Cbl-mediated downregulation: a recurrent theme for oncogenic deregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Peschard, Pascal; Park, Morag

    2003-06-01

    Deregulation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is linked to a large number of malignancies. This occurs through a variety of mechanisms that result in enhanced activity of the receptor. Considerable evidence now supports the idea that loss of negative regulation plays an important role in receptor deregulation. RTKs are removed from the cell surface via endocytosis and many are subsequently degraded in the lysosome. Lysosomal targeting has recently been linked with receptor ubiquitination. We review here molecular alterations that uncouple RTKs from ubiquitination and implicate loss of ubiquitination as a process that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of cancer.

  4. Differential dephosphorylation of the FcRgamma immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines with dissimilar potential for activating Syk.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Ryo; Backlund, Peter S; Yamashita, Yumi; Yergey, Alfred L; Rivera, Juan

    2008-10-17

    The cell surface-expressed gamma chain of the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI) can be phosphorylated on two tyrosine residues of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), leading to recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a kinase that is essential for mast cell signaling and allergic responses. However, it is not known whether preferential phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the two individual FcRgamma tyrosines (the N-terminal Tyr47 and C-terminal Tyr58) could regulate Syk activation. Herein we report that phosphorylation of only Tyr58 was able to elicit Syk phosphorylation and a weak rise in intracellular calcium, suggesting that Tyr58 phosphorylation may be distinctively important for Syk activation. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that both Tyr47 and Tyr58 could be similarly phosphorylated. However, mass spectrometric analysis of the phosphorylated FcepsilonRgamma from bone marrow-derived mast cells showed that phosphorylation at Tyr47 was at least 2-fold greater than at Tyr58. This suggested that, once phosphorylated, Tyr58 is preferentially dephosphorylated. In vitro studies demonstrated more efficient dephosphorylation of Tyr58 (by the receptor-associated phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2) than of Tyr47. Analysis of Syk binding to wild type and mutant phosphorylated FcepsilonRI revealed that mutation at Tyr58 almost completely ablated Syk binding, whereas mutation at Tyr47 moderately reduced Syk binding. The findings argue for a novel regulatory mechanism, where dephosphorylation of phospho-Tyr58 is likely to promote the down-regulation of Syk activation and suppression of mast cell responses.

  5. Signal transduction in podocytes—spotlight on receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Jochen; Sever, Sanja; Faul, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian kidney filtration barrier is a complex multicellular, multicomponent structure that maintains homeostasis by regulating electrolytes, acid–base balance, and blood pressure (via maintenance of salt and water balance). To perform these multiple functions, podocytes—an important component of the filtration apparatus—must process a series of intercellular signals. Integrating these signals with diverse cellular responses enables a coordinated response to various conditions. Although mature podocytes are terminally differentiated and cannot proliferate, they are able to respond to growth factors. It is possible that the initial response of podocytes to growth factors is beneficial and protective, and might include the induction of hypertrophic cell growth. However, extended and/or uncontrolled growth factor signalling might be maladaptive and could result in the induction of apoptosis and podocyte loss. Growth factors signal via the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) on their target cells and around a quarter of the 58 RTK family members that are encoded in the human genome have been identified in podocytes. Pharmacological inhibitors of many RTKs exist and are currently used in experimental and clinical cancer therapy. The identification of pathological RTK-mediated signal transduction pathways in podocytes could provide a starting point for the development of novel therapies for glomerular disorders. PMID:24394191

  6. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling and vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Hess, Paul R; Kahn, Mark L; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2014-03-28

    Platelets are well-known for their critical role in hemostasis, that is, the prevention of blood loss at sites of mechanical vessel injury. Inappropriate platelet activation and adhesion, however, can lead to thrombotic complications, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. To fulfill its role in hemostasis, the platelet is equipped with various G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to soluble agonists such as thrombin, ADP, and thromboxane A2. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, platelets express 3 glycoproteins that belong to the family of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors: Fc receptor γ chain, which is noncovalently associated with the glycoprotein VI collagen receptor, C-type lectin 2, the receptor for podoplanin, and Fc receptor γII A, a low-affinity receptor for immune complexes. Although both genetic and chemical approaches have documented a critical role for platelet G protein-coupled receptors in hemostasis, the contribution of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors to this process is less defined. Studies performed during the past decade, however, have identified new roles for platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in vascular integrity in utero and at sites of inflammation. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on how platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling controls vascular integrity, both in the presence and absence of mechanical injury.

  7. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  8. Signal transduction pathway regulating prostaglandin EP3 receptor-induced neurite retraction: requirement for two different tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, J; Katoh, H; Yasui, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Nakamura, K; Hasegawa, H; Ichikawa, A; Negishi, M

    1999-01-01

    We reported previously that activation of the prostaglandin E receptor EP3 subtype triggered neurite retraction through the small GTPase Rho-, and its target, RhoA-binding kinase alpha (ROKalpha)-, dependent pathway in EP3 receptor-expressing PC12 cells. Here we examined the involvement of tyrosine kinases in this pathway in nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells. Tyrphostin A25, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by activation of the EP3 receptor, however, it failed to block neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by microinjection of constitutively active RhoA, RhoAV14, indicating that a tyrphostin-sensitive tyrosine kinase was involved in the pathway from the EP3 receptor to Rho activation. On the other hand, genistein, another tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by both activation of the EP3 receptor and microinjection of RhoAV14. However, genistein did not block neuronal morphological changes induced by microinjection of a constitutively active mutant of ROKalpha. These results indicate that two different tyrosine kinases, tyrphostin A25-sensitive and genistein-sensitive kinases, are involved in the EP3 receptor-mediated neurite retraction acting upstream and downstream of Rho, respectively. PMID:10333476

  9. Effects of the activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway via the c-ros receptor tyrosine kinase on the T47D breast cancer cell line following alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Tae; Kim, Se Kye; Choi, Mi Ran; Park, Ji Hyun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2013-03-01

    Compared to other cancers affecting women, breast cancer is significantly associated with alcohol consumption. However, the principles underlying the carcinogenesis of alcohol-induced breast cancer and the related metastatic mechanisms have yet to be established. To observe the effect of alcohol on the growth regulation in breast cancer cells, we identified differentially expressed proteins in alcohol-exposed human breast cancer T47D cells using gel-based proteomics analysis. The expression of c-ros receptor tyrosine kinase (ROS1) was increased and activated by autophosphorylation, thereby activating mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1) through the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway; activated MSK1, in turn, phosphorylated histone 3 serine 10 (H3S10p) residues in the nucleus. The increase in H3S10 phosphorylation consequently increased the level of expression of immediate-early gene such as c-fos. This study demonstrated that when breast cancer cells are exposed to alcohol, phosphorylated ROS1 activates MSK1 via Erk1/2 in the MAPK pathway, which then induces modifications to histone residues that regulate gene expression by 14-3-3 protein recruitment, leading to a lack of control of breast cancer cell proliferation.

  10. Platelets activated by collagen through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in the Fc receptor gamma-chain play a pivotal role in the development of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Norihide; Katoh, Youichi; Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa; Hayashi, Ichiro; Konishi, Hakuoh; Itoh, Seigo; Okumura, Ko; Ra, Chisei; Nagaoka, Isao; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2005-12-01

    Platelet activation and the formation of platelet microaggregates in coronary vessels play pivotal roles in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. The Fc receptor gamma-chain (FcR gamma) is coexpressed with glycoprotein (GP) VI, forming a platelet collagen receptor, and the activation of platelets by collagen is closely coupled with tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcRgamma. To examine the functional significance of platelet FcR gamma/GPVI complex in the early phase of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in mice, we performed coronary occlusion and reperfusion experiments using wild type mice and FcRgamma-deficient (FcRgamma(-/-)) mice that lack GPVI. The infarct size was significantly smaller in FcRgamma(-/-) mice subjected to occlusion and reperfusion of the coronary artery than in control FcR gamma(+/+) mice. Twenty-four hours after the reperfusion, electron microscopy of the injured tissue showed substantially more platelet aggregation and occlusive platelet microthrombi in the capillaries of the damaged areas of the wild type mice than in those of the FcR gamma(-/-) mice. Platelet Syk was scarcely activated in the FcR gamma(-/-) mice after myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, but significantly activated in the FcR gamma(+/+) mice. CD11b expression on neutrophils was elevated after myocardial ischemia and reperfusion in both mouse groups, whereas myeloperoxidase activity in the injured areas was significantly lower in the FcRgamma(-/-) mice than in the FcRgamma(+/+) mice. These results suggest that the collagen-induced activation of platelets through the FcR gamma plays a pivotal role in the extension of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. FcRgamma and GPVI may be important therapeutic targets for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  11. Elucidation of a four-site allosteric network in fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaibin; Marsiglia, William M; Cho, Min-Kyu; Huang, Zhifeng; Deng, Jingjing; Blais, Steven P; Gai, Weiming; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Neubert, Thomas A; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is tightly regulated by protein allostery within the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. Yet the molecular determinants of allosteric connectivity in tyrosine kinase domain are incompletely understood. By means of structural (X-ray and NMR) and functional characterization of pathogenic gain-of-function mutations affecting the FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase domain, we elucidated a long-distance allosteric network composed of four interconnected sites termed the ‘molecular brake’, ‘DFG latch’, ‘A-loop plug’, and ‘αC tether’. The first three sites repress the kinase from adopting an active conformation, whereas the αC tether promotes the active conformation. The skewed design of this four-site allosteric network imposes tight autoinhibition and accounts for the incomplete mimicry of the activated conformation by pathogenic mutations targeting a single site. Based on the structural similarity shared among RTKs, we propose that this allosteric model for FGFR kinases is applicable to other RTKs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21137.001 PMID:28166054

  12. Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Clement, Christian A; Satir, Peter; Pedersen, Lotte B

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that coordinate signalling pathways in cell-cycle control, migration, differentiation and other cellular processes critical during development and for tissue homeostasis. Accordingly, defects in assembly or function of primary cilia lead to a plethora of developmental disorders and pathological conditions now known as ciliopathies. In this review, we summarize the current status of the role of primary cilia in coordinating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling pathways. Further, we present potential mechanisms of signalling crosstalk and networking in the primary cilium and discuss how defects in ciliary RTK signalling are linked to human diseases and disorders.

  13. Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Søren T; Clement, Christian A; Satir, Peter; Pedersen, Lotte B

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that coordinate signalling pathways in cell-cycle control, migration, differentiation and other cellular processes critical during development and for tissue homeostasis. Accordingly, defects in assembly or function of primary cilia lead to a plethora of developmental disorders and pathological conditions now known as ciliopathies. In this review, we summarize the current status of the role of primary cilia in coordinating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling pathways. Further, we present potential mechanisms of signalling crosstalk and networking in the primary cilium and discuss how defects in ciliary RTK signalling are linked to human diseases and disorders. PMID:21956154

  14. EphB4 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Hassanieh  L,   Ley  EJ,  Scehnet  J,  Kumar  NG,   Hawes  D,  Press  MF,  Weaver  FA,  Gill  PS.  Receptor  tyrosine...J. Pathol. 174 (2009) 1492. [33] T.D. Bartley, R.W. Hunt, A.A. Welcher, W.J. Boyle , V.P. Parker, R.A. Lindberg, H.S. Lu, A.M. Colombero, R.L

  15. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity mediates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in human airway epithelial cells exposed to Zn{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, T.L.; Graves, L.M.; Silbajoris, R.; Bromberg, P.A.; Wu, W.; Samet, J.M. . E-mail: samet.james@epa.gov

    2006-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads to Src-dependent activation of EGFR signaling in B82 and A431 cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism of Zn{sup 2+}-induced EGFR activation in HAEC, we treated HAEC with 500 {mu}M ZnSO{sub 4} for 5-20 min and measured the state of activation of EGFR, c-Src and PTPs. Western blots revealed that exposure to Zn{sup 2+} results in increased phosphorylation at both trans- and autophosphorylation sites in the EGFR. Zn{sup 2+}-mediated EGFR phosphorylation did not require ligand binding and was ablated by the EGFR kinase inhibitor PD153035, but not by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2. Src activity was inhibited by Zn{sup 2+} treatment of HAEC, consistent with Src-independent EGFR transactivation in HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. The rate of exogenous EGFR dephosphorylation in lysates of HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+} or V{sup 4+} was significantly diminished. Moreover, exposure of HAEC to Zn{sup 2+} also resulted in a significant impairment of dephosphorylation of endogenous EGFR. These data show that Zn{sup 2+}-induced activation of EGFR in HAEC involves a loss of PTP activities whose function is to dephosphorylate EGFR in opposition to baseline EGFR kinase activity. These findings also suggest that there are marked cell-type-specific differences in the mechanism of EGFR activation induced by Zn{sup 2+} exposure.

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Fate Is Controlled by Hrs Tyrosine Phosphorylation Sites That Regulate Hrs Degradation▿

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Kathryn A.; Visser Smit, Gina D.; Place, Trenton L.; Winistorfer, Stanley; Piper, Robert C.; Lill, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is an endosomal protein essential for the efficient sorting of activated growth factor receptors into the lysosomal degradation pathway. Hrs undergoes ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation on residues Y329 and Y334 downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. It has been difficult to investigate the functional roles of phosphoHrs, as only a small proportion of the cellular Hrs pool is detectably phosphorylated. Using an HEK 293 model system, we found that ectopic expression of the protein Cbl enhances Hrs ubiquitination and increases Hrs phosphorylation following cell stimulation with EGF. We exploited Cbl's expansion of the phosphoHrs pool to determine whether Hrs tyrosine phosphorylation controls EGFR fate. In structure-function studies of Cbl and EGFR mutants, the level of Hrs phosphorylation and rapidity of apparent Hrs dephosphorylation correlated directly with EGFR degradation. Differential expression of wild-type versus Y329,334F mutant Hrs in Hrs-depleted cells revealed that one or both tyrosines regulate ligand-dependent Hrs degradation, as well as EGFR degradation. By modulating Hrs ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and protein levels, Cbl may control the composition of the endosomal sorting machinery and its ability to target EGFR for lysosomal degradation. PMID:17101784

  17. Targeting tyrosine-kinases and estrogen receptor abrogates resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuying; Meng, Xiaolong; Chen, Huiqin; Liu, Wenbin; Miller, Todd; Murph, Mandi; Lu, Yiling; Zhang, Fan; Gagea, Mihai; Arteaga, Carlos L; Mills, Gordon B; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; González-Angulo, Ana M

    2014-10-15

    Despite numerous therapies that effectively inhibit estrogen signaling in breast cancer, a significant proportion of patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive malignancy will succumb to their disease. Herein we demonstrate that long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED) therapy among ER-positive breast cancer cells results in the adaptive increase in ER expression and subsequent activation of multiple tyrosine kinases. Combination therapy with the ER down-regulator fulvestrant and dasatinib, a broad kinase inhibitor, exhibits synergistic activity against LTED cells, by reduction of cell proliferation, cell survival, cell invasion and mammary acinar formation. Screening kinase phosphorylation using protein arrays and functional proteomic analysis demonstrates that the combination of fulvestrant and dasatinib inhibits multiple tyrosine kinases and cancer-related pathways that are constitutively activated in LTED cells. Because LTED cells display increased insulin receptor (InsR)/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling, we added an ant-IGF-1 antibody to the combination with fulvestrant and dasatinib in an effort to further increase the inhibition. However, adding MK0646 only modestly increased the inhibition of cell growth in monolayer culture, but neither suppressed acinar formation nor inhibited cell migration in vitro and invasion in vivo. Therefore, combinations of fulvestrant and dasatinib, but not MK0646, may benefit patients with tyrosine-kinase-activated, endocrine therapy-resistant breast cancer.

  18. Structural Basis of Neurohormone Perception by the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Torso.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Simon; Goyal, Yogesh; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Klein, Daryl E

    2015-12-17

    In insects, brain-derived Prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) activates the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Torso to initiate metamorphosis through the release of ecdysone. We have determined the crystal structure of silkworm PTTH in complex with the ligand-binding region of Torso. Here we show that ligand-induced Torso dimerization results from the sequential and negatively cooperative formation of asymmetric heterotetramers. Mathematical modeling of receptor activation based upon our biophysical studies shows that ligand pulses are "buffered" at low receptor levels, leading to a sustained signal. By contrast, high levels of Torso develop the signal intensity and duration of a noncooperative system. We propose that this may allow Torso to coordinate widely different functions from a single ligand by tuning receptor levels. Phylogenic analysis indicates that Torso is found outside arthropods, including human parasitic roundworms. Together, our findings provide mechanistic insight into how this receptor system, with roles in embryonic and adult development, is regulated.

  19. Functional interaction of vascular endothelial-protein-tyrosine phosphatase with the angiopoietin receptor Tie-2.

    PubMed

    Fachinger, G; Deutsch, U; Risau, W

    1999-10-21

    During development of the vertebrate vascular system essential signals are transduced via protein-tyrosine phosphorylation. Null-mutations of receptor-tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) display early lethal vascular phenotypes. We aimed to identify endothelial protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which should have similar importance in EC-biology. A murine receptor-type PTP was identified by a degenerated PCR cloning approach from endothelial cells (VE-PTP). By in situ hybridization this phosphatase was found to be specifically expressed in vascular ECs throughout mouse development. In experiments using GST-fusion proteins, as well as in transient transfections, trapping mutants of VE-PTP co-precipitated with the Angiopoietin receptor Tie-2, but not with the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2/Flk-1). In addition, VE-PTP dephosphorylates Tie-2 but not VEGFR-2. We conclude that VE-PTP is a Tie-2 specific phosphatase expressed in ECs, and VE-PTP phosphatase activity serves to specifically modulate Angiopoietin/Tie-2 function. Based on its potential role as a regulator of blood vessel morphogenesis and maintainance, VE-PTP is a candidate gene for inherited vascular malformations similar to the Tie-2 gene.

  20. Nitric oxide reversibly inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, C; Gómez, C; Martín-Nieto, J; De Frutos, T; Jiménez, A; Villalobo, A

    1997-01-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that NO inhibits the proliferation of different cell types, the mechanisms of its anti-mitotic action are not well understood. In this work we have studied the possible interaction of NO with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), using transfected fibroblasts which overexpress the human EGFR. The NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), 1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazine (DEA-NO) and N-¿4-[1-(3-aminopropyl)-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazino]butyl¿propane -1, 3-diamine (DETA-NO) inhibited DNA synthesis of fibroblasts growing in the presence of fetal calf serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or EGF plus insulin, as assessed by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation. Neither 8-bromo-cGMP nor the cGMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast mimicked this effect, suggesting that NO is unlikely to inhibit cell proliferation via a cGMP-dependent pathway. SNAP, DEA-NO and DETA-NO also inhibited the transphosphorylation of the EGFR and its tyrosine kinase activity toward the exogenous substrate poly-l-(Glu-Tyr), as measured in permeabilized cells using [gamma-32P]ATP as phosphate donor. In contrast, 3-[morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride] (SIN-1), a peroxynitrite-forming compound, did not significantly inhibit either DNA synthesis or the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGFR tyrosine kinase was prevented by haemoglobin, an NO scavenger, but not by superoxide dismutase, and was reversed by dithiothreitol. The binding of EGF to its receptor was unaffected by DEA-NO. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGF-dependent transphosphorylation of the receptor was also demonstrated in intact cells by immunoblot analysis using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Taken together, these results suggest that NO, but not peroxynitrite, inhibits in a reversible manner the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by S-nitrosylation of the receptor. PMID:9291107

  1. Quantity control of the ErbB3 receptor tyrosine kinase at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Fry, William H D; Simion, Catalina; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L

    2011-07-01

    The ErbB3 receptor tyrosine kinase contributes to a variety of developmental processes, and its overexpression and aberrant activation promote tumor progression and therapeutic resistance. Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor overexpression may be mediated by the loss of posttranscriptional negative regulatory mechanisms, such as protein degradation, that normally keep receptor levels in check. Our previous studies indicate that the RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1, a protein lost in breast and other tumor types, suppresses ErbB3 levels by mediating ligand-independent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Here we demonstrate that Nrdp1 preferentially associates with the nascent form of ErbB3 to accelerate its degradation, and we show that the two proteins colocalize at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Blocking the exit of ErbB3 from the ER does not affect the ability of Nrdp1 to mediate receptor ubiquitination or degradation, while functional disruption of the conserved ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway ATPase VCP/p97 leads to the Nrdp1-dependent accumulation of ubiquitinated ErbB3 but blocks receptor degradation. Further evidence indicates that the ErbB3 targeted by Nrdp1 for degradation is properly folded and fully functional. Collectively, these observations point to a novel mechanism of receptor tyrosine kinase quantity control wherein steady-state levels of signaling-competent receptor are dictated by an ER-localized degradation pathway.

  2. Quantity Control of the ErbB3 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase at the Endoplasmic Reticulum▿

    PubMed Central

    Fry, William H. D.; Simion, Catalina; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L.

    2011-01-01

    The ErbB3 receptor tyrosine kinase contributes to a variety of developmental processes, and its overexpression and aberrant activation promote tumor progression and therapeutic resistance. Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor overexpression may be mediated by the loss of posttranscriptional negative regulatory mechanisms, such as protein degradation, that normally keep receptor levels in check. Our previous studies indicate that the RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1, a protein lost in breast and other tumor types, suppresses ErbB3 levels by mediating ligand-independent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Here we demonstrate that Nrdp1 preferentially associates with the nascent form of ErbB3 to accelerate its degradation, and we show that the two proteins colocalize at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Blocking the exit of ErbB3 from the ER does not affect the ability of Nrdp1 to mediate receptor ubiquitination or degradation, while functional disruption of the conserved ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway ATPase VCP/p97 leads to the Nrdp1-dependent accumulation of ubiquitinated ErbB3 but blocks receptor degradation. Further evidence indicates that the ErbB3 targeted by Nrdp1 for degradation is properly folded and fully functional. Collectively, these observations point to a novel mechanism of receptor tyrosine kinase quantity control wherein steady-state levels of signaling-competent receptor are dictated by an ER-localized degradation pathway. PMID:21576364

  3. Differential interaction of Crkl with Cbl or C3G, Hef-1, and gamma subunit immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in signaling of myeloid high affinity Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI).

    PubMed

    Kyono, W T; de Jong, R; Park, R K; Liu, Y; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Durden, D L

    1998-11-15

    Cbl-Crkl and Crkl-C3G interactions have been implicated in T cell and B cell receptor signaling and in the regulation of the small GTPase, Rap1. Recent evidence suggests that Rap1 plays a prominent role in the regulation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling. To gain insight into the role of Crkl in myeloid ITAM signaling, we investigated Cbl-Crkl and Crkl-C3G interactions following Fc gamma RI aggregation in U937IF cells. Fc gamma RI cross-linking of U937IF cells results in the tyrosine phosphorylation of Cbl, Crkl, and Hef-1, an increase in the association of Crkl with Cbl via direct SH2 domain interaction and increased Crkl-Hef-1 binding. Crkl constitutively binds to the guanine nucleotide-releasing protein, C3G, via direct SH3 domain binding. Our data show that distinct Cbl-Crkl and Crkl-C3G complexes exist in myeloid cells, suggesting that these complexes may modulate distinct signaling events. Anti-Crkl immunoprecipitations demonstrate that the ITAM-containing gamma subunit of Fc gamma RI is induced to form a complex with the Crkl protein, and Crkl binds to the cytoskeletal protein, Hef-1. The induced association of Crkl with Cbl, Hef-1, and Fc gamma RI gamma after Fc gamma RI activation and the constitutive association between C3G and Crkl provide the first evidence that a Fc gamma RI gamma-Crkl-C3G complex may link ITAM receptors to the activation of Rap1 in myeloid cells.

  4. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  5. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications.

  6. Role of the Non-Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ACK2 in EGF Receptor Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13 . ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Tyrosine kinase, EGF receptor; ErbB-2/Neu, signaling, small 13 molecules 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...12 References ...................................................................................... 13 Appendices

  7. Tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of calmodulin by the insulin receptor kinase purified from human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D B; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y; Gale, R D; McDonald, J M

    1989-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that calmodulin can be phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by both tyrosine-specific and serine/threonine protein kinase. We demonstrate here that the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase purified from human placenta phosphorylates calmodulin. The highly purified receptors (prepared by insulin-Sepharose chromatography) were 5-10 times more effective in catalysing the phosphorylation of calmodulin than an equal number of partially purified receptors (prepared by wheat-germ agglutinin-Sepharose chromatography). Phosphorylation occurred exclusively on tyrosine residues, up to a maximum of 1 mol [0.90 +/- 0.14 (n = 5)] of phosphate incorporated/mol of calmodulin. Phosphorylation of calmodulin was dependent on the presence of certain basic proteins and divalent cations. Some of these basic proteins, i.e. polylysine, polyarginine, polyornithine, protamine sulphate and histones H1 and H2B, were also able to stimulate the phosphorylation of calmodulin via an insulin-independent activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase. Addition of insulin further increased incorporation of 32P into calmodulin. The magnitude of the effect of insulin was dependent on the concentration and type of basic protein used, ranging from 0.5- to 9.0-fold stimulation. Maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was obtained at an insulin concentration of 10(-10) M, with half-maximal effect at 10(-11) M. Either Mg2+ or Mn2+ was necessary to obtain phosphorylation, but Mg2+ was far more effective than Mn2+. In contrast, maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was observed in the absence of Ca2+. Inhibition of phosphorylation was observed as free Ca2+ concentration exceeded 0.1 microM, with almost complete inhibition at 30 microM free Ca2+. The Km for calmodulin was approx. 0.1 microM. To gain further insight into the effects of basic proteins in this system, we examined the binding of calmodulin to the insulin receptor and the polylysine. Calmodulin binds to the insulin

  8. The transcription factor RUNX2 regulates receptor tyrosine kinase expression in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Boregowda, Rajeev K.; Medina, Daniel J.; Markert, Elke; Bryan, Michael A.; Chen, Wenjin; Chen, Suzie; Rabkin, Anna; Vido, Michael J.; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Chekmareva, Marina; Foran, David J.; Lasfar, Ahmed; Goydos, James S.; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases-based autocrine loops largely contribute to activate the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways in melanoma. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in generating these autocrine loops are still largely unknown. In the present study, we examine the role of the transcription factor RUNX2 in the regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) expression in melanoma. We have demonstrated that RUNX2-deficient melanoma cells display a significant decrease in three receptor tyrosine kinases, EGFR, IGF-1R and PDGFRβ. In addition, we found co-expression of RUNX2 and another RTK, AXL, in both melanoma cells and melanoma patient samples. We observed a decrease in phosphoAKT2 (S474) and phosphoAKT (T308) levels when RUNX2 knock down resulted in significant RTK down regulation. Finally, we showed a dramatic up regulation of RUNX2 expression with concomitant up-regulation of EGFR, IGF-1R and AXL in melanoma cells resistant to the BRAF V600E inhibitor PLX4720. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that RUNX2 might be a key player in RTK-based autocrine loops and a mediator of resistance to BRAF V600E inhibitors involving RTK up regulation in melanoma. PMID:27102439

  9. syk protein tyrosine kinase regulates Fc receptor gamma-chain-mediated transport to lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnerot, C; Briken, V; Brachet, V; Lankar, D; Cassard, S; Jabri, B; Amigorena, S

    1998-01-01

    B- and T-cell receptors, as well as most Fc receptors (FcR), are part of a large family of membrane proteins named immunoreceptors and are expressed on all cells of the immune system. Immunoreceptors' biological functions rely on two of their fundamental attributes: signal transduction and internalization. The signals required for these two functions are present in the chains associated with immunoreceptors, within conserved amino acid motifs called immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). We have examined the role of the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) syk, a critical effector of immunoreceptor-mediated cell signalling through ITAMs, in FcR-associated gamma-chain internalization and lysosomal targeting. A point mutation in the immunoreceptor-associated gamma-chain ITAM affecting syk activation, as well as overexpression of a syk dominant negative mutant, inhibited signal transduction without affecting receptor coated-pit localization or internalization. In contrast, blocking of gamma-chain-mediated syk activation impaired FcR transport from endosomes to lysosomes and selectively inhibited the presentation of certain T-cell epitopes. Therefore, activation of the PTK syk is dispensable for receptor internalization, but necessary for cell signalling and for gamma-chain-mediated FcR delivery to lysosomes. PMID:9707420

  10. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Kundi, Sarina; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration. PMID:22848811

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor–Resistant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kadoaki; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Michor, Franziska; Pao, William

    2013-01-01

    Purpose EGFR-mutant lung cancer was first described as a new clinical entity in 2004. Here, we present an update on new controversies and conclusions regarding the disease. Methods This article reviews the clinical implications of EGFR mutations in lung cancer with a focus on epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance. Results The discovery of EGFR mutations has altered the ways in which we consider and treat non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients whose metastatic tumors harbor EGFR mutations are expected to live longer than 2 years, more than double the previous survival rates for lung cancer. Conclusion The information presented in this review can guide practitioners and help them inform their patients about EGFR mutations and their impact on the treatment of NSCLC. Efforts should now concentrate on making EGFR-mutant lung cancer a chronic rather than fatal disease. PMID:23401451

  12. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Quintanal-Villalonga, A.; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as “omics” has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed. PMID:27528792

  13. The Receptor Tyrosine Kinase AXL in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Erinn B.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2016-01-01

    The AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Recent studies have revealed a central role of AXL signaling in tumor proliferation, survival, stem cell phenotype, metastasis, and resistance to cancer therapy. Moreover, AXL is expressed within cellular components of the tumor microenvironment where AXL signaling contributes to the immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotypes. A variety of AXL inhibitors have been developed and are efficacious in preclinical studies. These agents offer new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in the prevention and treatment of advanced disease. Here we review the literature that has illuminated the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which AXL signaling promotes tumor progression and we will discuss the therapeutic potential of AXL inhibition for cancer therapy. PMID:27834845

  14. Insect cell-expressed p180erbB3 possesses an impaired tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, P M; Platko, J V; Cantley, L C; Cerione, R A; Carraway, K L

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinases share a number of highly conserved or invariant amino acid residues in their catalytic domains, suggesting that these residues are necessary for kinase activity. In p180erbB3, a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor subfamily, three of these residues are altered, suggesting that this protein might have an impaired protein tyrosine kinase activity. To test this hypothesis, we have expressed human EGF receptor and bovine p180erbB3 in insect cells via baculovirus infection and have compared their autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation activities. We have found that, while the EGF receptor readily undergoes EGF-stimulated autophosphorylation and catalyzes the incorporation of phosphate into the model substrates (E4Y1)n (random 4:1 copolymer of glutamic acid and tyrosine) and GST-p85 (glutathione S-transferase fusion protein with the 85-kDa subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase), p180erbB3 autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation are at least 2 orders of magnitude less efficient. However, p180erbB3 is capable of binding the ATP analog 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine, indicating that the lack of observed kinase activity is probably not due to nonfunctional or denatured receptors expressed by the insect cells. On the basis of these results, we propose that p180erbB3 possesses an impaired intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Images PMID:8058768

  15. Tetrahydrobiopterin shows chaperone activity for tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Thöny, Beat; Calvo, Ana C; Scherer, Tanja; Svebak, Randi M; Haavik, Jan; Blau, Nenad; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. Primary inherited defects in TH have been associated with l-DOPA responsive and non-responsive dystonia and infantile parkinsonism. In this study, we show that both the cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the feedback inhibitor and catecholamine product dopamine increase the kinetic stability of human TH isoform 1 in vitro. Activity measurements and synthesis of the enzyme by in vitro transcription-translation revealed a complex regulation by the cofactor including both enzyme inactivation and conformational stabilization. Oral BH(4) supplementation to mice increased TH activity and protein levels in brain extracts, while the Th-mRNA level was not affected. All together our results indicate that the molecular mechanisms for the stabilization are a primary folding-aid effect of BH(4) and a secondary effect by increased synthesis and binding of catecholamine ligands. Our results also establish that orally administered BH(4) crosses the blood-brain barrier and therapeutic regimes based on BH(4) supplementation should thus consider the effect on TH. Furthermore, BH(4) supplementation arises as a putative therapeutic agent in the treatment of brain disorders associated with TH misfolding, such as for the human TH isoform 1 mutation L205P.

  16. Design of a selective insulin receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and its effect on glucose uptake and metabolism in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saperstein, R.; Vicario, P.P.; Strout, H.V.; Brady, E.; Slater, E.E.; Greenlee, W.J.; Onedyka, D.L.; Patchett, A.A.; Hangauer, D.G. )

    1989-06-27

    An inhibitor of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK), (hydroxy-2-napthalenylmethyl)phosphonic acid, was designed and synthesized and was shown to be an inhibitor of the biological effects of insulin in vitro. With a wheat germ purified human placental insulin receptor preparation, this compound inhibited the insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the 95-kDa {beta}-subunit of the insulin receptor. The ability of the kinase to phosphorylate an exogenous peptide substrate, angiotensin II, was also inhibited. Half-maximal inhibition of basal and insulin-stimulated human placental IRTK activity was found at concentrations of 150 and 100 {mu}M, respectively, with 2 mM angiotensin II as the peptide substrate. The inhibitor was found to be specific for tyrosine kinases over serine kinases and noncompetitive with ATP. The inhibitor was converted into various (acyloxy)methyl prodrugs in order to achieve permeability through cell membranes. These prodrugs inhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor 95-kDa {beta}-subunit in intact CHO cells transfected with human insulin receptor. Inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation in isolated rat adipocytes and 2-deoxyglucose uptake into CHO cells was observed with these prodrugs. The data provide additional evidence for the involvement of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase in the regulation of glucose uptake and metabolism. These results and additional data reported herein suggest that this class of prodrugs and inhibitors will be useful for modulating the activity of a variety of tyrosine kinases.

  17. Biochemical characterization of the protein tyrosine kinase homology domain of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Cheng, K; Kim, H H; Koland, J G

    1997-03-15

    The putative protein tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein was generated as a histidine-tagged recombinant protein (hisTKD-B3) and characterized enzymologically. CD spectroscopy indicated that the hisTKD-B3 protein assumed a native conformation with a secondary structure similar to that of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor TKD. However, when compared with the EGF receptor-derived protein, hisTKD-B3 exhibited negligible intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity. Immune complex kinase assays of full-length ErbB3 proteins also yielded no evidence of catalytic activity. A fluorescence assay previously used to characterize the nucleotide-binding properties of the EGF receptor indicated that the ErbB3 protein was unable to bind nucleotide. The hisTKD-B3 protein was subsequently found to be an excellent substrate for the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase, which suggested that in vivo phosphorylation of ErbB3 in response to EGF could be attributed to a direct cross-phosphorylation by the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase.

  18. Biochemical characterization of the protein tyrosine kinase homology domain of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sierke, S L; Cheng, K; Kim, H H; Koland, J G

    1997-01-01

    The putative protein tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein was generated as a histidine-tagged recombinant protein (hisTKD-B3) and characterized enzymologically. CD spectroscopy indicated that the hisTKD-B3 protein assumed a native conformation with a secondary structure similar to that of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor TKD. However, when compared with the EGF receptor-derived protein, hisTKD-B3 exhibited negligible intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity. Immune complex kinase assays of full-length ErbB3 proteins also yielded no evidence of catalytic activity. A fluorescence assay previously used to characterize the nucleotide-binding properties of the EGF receptor indicated that the ErbB3 protein was unable to bind nucleotide. The hisTKD-B3 protein was subsequently found to be an excellent substrate for the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase, which suggested that in vivo phosphorylation of ErbB3 in response to EGF could be attributed to a direct cross-phosphorylation by the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase. PMID:9148746

  19. Protein kinase Calpha activation by RET: evidence for a negative feedback mechanism controlling RET tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Francesco; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Carlomagno, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Miele, Claudia; Fiory, Francesca; Santopietro, Stefania; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Beguinot, Francesco; Santoro, Massimo; Formisano, Pietro

    2003-05-15

    We have studied the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in signaling of the RET tyrosine kinase receptor. By using a chimeric receptor (E/R) in which RET kinase can be tightly controlled by the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF), we have found that RET triggering induces a strong increase of PKCalpha, PKCdelta and PKCzeta activity and that PKCalpha, not PKCdelta and PKCzeta, forms a ligand-dependent protein complex with E/R. We have identified tyrosine 1062 in the RET carboxyl-terminal tail as the docking site for PKCalpha. Block of PKC activity by bisindolylmaleimide or chronic phorbol esters treatment decreased EGF-induced serine/threonine phosphorylation of E/R, while it caused a similarly sized increase of EGF-induced E/R tyrosine kinase activity and mitogenic signaling. Conversely, acute phorbol esters treatment, which promotes PKC activity, increased the levels of E/R serine/threonine phosphorylation and significantly decreased its phosphotyrosine content. A threefold reduction of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of the constitutively active RET/MEN2A oncoprotein was observed upon coexpression with PKCalpha. We conclude that RET binds to and activates PKCalpha. PKCalpha, in turn, causes RET phosphorylation and downregulates RET tyrosine kinase and downstream signaling, thus functioning as a negative feedback loop to modulate RET activity.

  20. PTEN controls immunoreceptor (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) signaling and the activation of Rac.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Suk; Peng, Xiaodong; De, Pradip K; Geahlen, Robert L; Durden, Donald L

    2002-01-15

    Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis is a model for the study of immunoreceptor (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif [ITAM]) signaling and involves the activation of protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases, and downstream effectors including phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase. Relatively little is known of the role of lipid phosphatases in the control of ITAM signaling and inflammation. A heterologous COS7 cell system was used to examine the roles played by PI-3 kinase and the dual-specificity phosphatase, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), in the signal transduction pathway leading to Fcgamma receptor IIA-mediated phagocytosis and the activation of Rac. The expression of wildtype PTEN completely abrogated the phagocytosis of immunoglobulin-G-sensitized sheep red blood cells, as compared with the catalytically inactive mutant of PTEN, which had no effect. This is the first direct evidence that PTEN, an inositol 3' phosphatase, regulates Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis, an ITAM-based signaling event. The data suggest that PTEN exerts control over phagocytosis potentially by controlling the downstream conversion of guanosine diphosphate-Rac to guanosine triphosphate-Rac following ITAM stimulation.

  1. Regulation of CD3-induced phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) tyrosine phosphorylation by CD4 and CD45 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kanner, S B; Deans, J P; Ledbetter, J A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of the signal transduction cascade in T cells through the T-cell receptor (CD3) coincides with activation of the phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) pathway. activation of phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) occurs through tyrosine phosphorylation in T cells following surface ligation of CD3 receptors with CD3-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Here we show that cross-linking of CD4 molecules with CD3 augments the tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma 1, while co-ligation of CD3 with CD45 (a receptor tyrosine phosphatase) results in reduced PLC gamma 1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Mobilization of intracellular calcium correlated with the extent of PLC gamma 1 tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that PLC gamma 1 enzymatic activity in T cells may be regulated by its phosphorylation state. The time-course of PLC gamma 1 tyrosine phosphorylation in cells stimulated by soluble anti-CD3 was transient and closely paralleled that of calcium mobilization, while the kinetics in cells stimulated by immobilized anti-CD3 were prolonged. The PI-PLC pathway in T cells was not stimulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma 2, a homologue of PLC gamma 1, demonstrating the strict regulation of PLC gamma isoform usage in CD3-stimulated T cells. A 35,000/36,000 MW tyrosine phosphorylated protein in T cells formed stable complexes with PLC gamma 1, and its tyrosine phosphorylation was co-regulated with that of PLC gamma 1 by CD4 and CD45 receptors. Enzymatic activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma 1 occurs during growth factor stimulation of fibroblasts, where PLC gamma 1 exists in multi-component complexes. The observation that PLC gamma 1 exists in complexes with unique tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in T cells suggests that haematopoietic lineage-specific proteins associated with PLC gamma 1 may play roles in cellular signalling. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:1533389

  2. Enhancement of cytosolic tyrosine kinase activity by propylthiouracil-induced hyperplasia in the rat thyroid.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R; Fantus, I G

    1989-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thyroid gland induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) is a well established model of rapid cell proliferation in vivo. Recent evidence indicates that tyrosine kinase activity is associated with growth factor receptors and oncogene protein products and may have an important regulatory action in the control of cell growth. Thus, we examined tyrosine kinase activity in rat thyroid membrane and cytosol preparations at rest and during PTU-induced hyperplasia. Although kinase activity was present in a crude microsomal membrane preparation, no change was observed during thyroid growth. In contrast, tyrosine kinase activity assayed with the artificial substrate poly(Glu,Na:Tyr) 4:1 was present in normal rat thyroid cytosol and increased 2- to 6-fold during the rapid phase of hyperplasia in the first 5-10 days of PTU treatment. It declined to control values by day 15, when the size and DNA content of the thyroid reached a plateau. Preincubation of the cytosolic preparations with several peptides known to bind to and activate growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases failed to enhance the activity, suggesting, along with the cytosolic localization, that the activity was distinct from these receptors. By gel filtration chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, tyrosine kinase activity was associated with a 55 kDa protein. Partial purification over a poly(Glu,Na:Tyr)4:1-Sepharose column, yielded a protein that appeared capable of autophosphorylation. It is suggested that this tyrosine kinase plays a role in mediating the growth-promoting effects of this model of thyroid cell hyperplasia.

  3. Discovery of a functional immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif in a 7-transmembrane-spanning receptor: role in the orexin receptor OX1R-driven apoptosis.

    PubMed

    El Firar, Aadil; Voisin, Thierry; Rouyer-Fessard, Christiane; Ostuni, Mariano A; Couvineau, Alain; Laburthe, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The orexin neuropeptides promote robust apoptosis in cancer cells. We have recently shown that the 7-transmembrane-spanning orexin receptor OX1R mediates apoptosis through an original mechanism. OX1R is equipped with a tyrosine-based inhibitory motif ITIM, which is tyrosine-phosphorylated on receptor activation, allowing the recruitment and activation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, leading to apoptosis. We show here that another motif, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM), is present in OX1R and is mandatory for OX1R-mediated apoptosis. This conclusion is based on the following observations: 1) a canonical ITSM sequence is present in the first intracellular loop of OX1R; 2) mutation of Y(83) to F within ITSM abolished OX1R-mediated apoptosis but did not alter orexin-induced inositol phosphate formation or calcium transient via coupling of OX1R to G(q) protein; 3) mutation of Y(83) to F further abolished orexin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in ITSM and subsequent recruitment of SHP-2 by the receptor. Finally, we developed a structural model of OX1R showing that the spatial localization of phosphotyrosines in ITSM and ITIM in OX1R is compatible with their interaction with the two SH2 domains of SHP-2. These data represent the first evidence for a functional role of an ITSM in a 7-transmembrane-spanning receptor.

  4. Role of Chondroitin Sulfate (CS) Modification in the Regulation of Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor Type Z (PTPRZ) Activity: PLEIOTROPHIN-PTPRZ-A SIGNALING IS INVOLVED IN OLIGODENDROCYTE DIFFERENTIATION.

    PubMed

    Kuboyama, Kazuya; Fujikawa, Akihiro; Suzuki, Ryoko; Tanga, Naomi; Noda, Masaharu

    2016-08-26

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor type Z (PTPRZ) is predominantly expressed in the developing brain as a CS proteoglycan. PTPRZ has long (PTPRZ-A) and short type (PTPRZ-B) receptor forms by alternative splicing. The extracellular CS moiety of PTPRZ is required for high-affinity binding to inhibitory ligands, such as pleiotrophin (PTN), midkine, and interleukin-34; however, its functional significance in regulating PTPRZ activity remains obscure. We herein found that protein expression of CS-modified PTPRZ-A began earlier, peaking at approximately postnatal days 5-10 (P5-P10), and then that of PTN peaked at P10 at the developmental stage corresponding to myelination onset in the mouse brain. Ptn-deficient mice consistently showed a later onset of the expression of myelin basic protein, a major component of the myelin sheath, than wild-type mice. Upon ligand application, PTPRZ-A/B in cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells exhibited punctate localization on the cell surface instead of diffuse distribution, causing the inactivation of PTPRZ and oligodendrocyte differentiation. The same effect was observed with the removal of CS chains with chondroitinase ABC but not polyclonal antibodies against the extracellular domain of PTPRZ. These results indicate that the negatively charged CS moiety prevents PTPRZ from spontaneously clustering and that the positively charged ligand PTN induces PTPRZ clustering, potentially by neutralizing electrostatic repulsion between CS chains. Taken altogether, these data indicate that PTN-PTPRZ-A signaling controls the timing of oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation in vivo, in which the CS moiety of PTPRZ receptors maintains them in a monomeric active state until its ligand binding.

  5. Production of recombinant insulin-like androgenic gland hormones from three decapod species: In vitro testicular phosphorylation and activation of a newly identified tyrosine kinase receptor from the Eastern spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Chandler, Jennifer C; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Sagi, Amir; Battaglene, Stephen C; Elizur, Abigail; Ventura, Tomer

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans the insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) is responsible for male sexual differentiation. To date, the biochemical pathways through which IAG exerts its effects are poorly understood and could be elucidated through the production of a functional recombinant IAG (rIAG). We have successfully expressed glycosylated, biologically active IAG using the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. We co-expressed recombinant single-chain precursor molecules consisting of the B and A chains (the mature hormone) tethered by a flexible linker, producing rIAGs of the following commercially important species: Eastern spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi (Sv), redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq) and giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). We then tested the biological activity of each, through the ability to increase phosphorylation in the testis; both Sv and Cq rIAGs significantly elevated phosphorylation specific to their species, and in a dose-dependent manner. Mr rIAG was tested on Macrobrachium australiense (Ma), eliciting a similar response. Moreover, using bioinformatics analyses of the de novo assembled spiny lobster transcriptome, we identified a spiny lobster tyrosine kinase insulin receptor (Sv-TKIR). We validated this discovery with a receptor activation assay in COS-7 cells expressing Sv-TKIR, using a reporter SRE-LUC system designed for RTKs, with each of the rIAG proteins acting as the activation ligand. Using recombinant proteins, we aim to develop specific tools to control sexual development through the administration of IAG within the critical sexual differentiation time window. The biologically active rIAGs generated might facilitate commercially feasible solutions for the long sought techniques for sex-change induction and monosex population culture in crustaceans and shed new light on the physiological mode of action of IAG in crustaceans.

  6. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity by hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan-Guo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important signaling event triggered by the activation of various cell surface receptors. Major targets of H(2)O(2) include protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Oxidation of the active site Cys by H(2)O(2) abrogates PTP catalytic activity, thereby potentially furnishing a mechanism to ensure optimal tyrosine phosphorylation in response to a variety of physiological stimuli. Unfortunately, H(2)O(2) is poorly reactive in chemical terms and the second order rate constants for the H(2)O(2)-mediated PTP inactivation are ~10M(-1)s(-1), which is too slow to be compatible with the transient signaling events occurring at the physiological concentrations of H(2)O(2). We find that hydroxyl radical is produced from H(2)O(2) solutions in the absence of metal chelating agent by the Fenton reaction. We show that the hydroxyl radical is capable of inactivating the PTPs and the inactivation is active site directed, through oxidation of the catalytic Cys to sulfenic acid, which can be reduced by low molecular weight thiols. We also show that hydroxyl radical is a kinetically more efficient oxidant than H(2)O(2) for inactivating the PTPs. The second-order rate constants for the hydroxyl radical-mediated PTP inactivation are at least 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those mediated by H(2)O(2) under the same conditions. Thus, hydroxyl radical generated in vivo may serve as a more physiologically relevant oxidizing agent for PTP inactivation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chemistry and mechanism of phosphatases, diesterases and triesterases.

  7. Receptor tyrosine kinase mutations in developmental syndromes and cancer: two sides of the same coin

    PubMed Central

    McDonell, Laura M.; Kernohan, Kristin D.; Boycott, Kym M.; Sawyer, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a family of ligand-binding cell surface receptors that regulate a wide range of essential cellular activities, including proliferation, differentiation, cell-cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. As such, these proteins play an important role during development and throughout life; germline mutations in genes encoding RTKs cause several developmental syndromes, while somatic alterations contribute to the pathogenesis of many aggressive cancers. This creates an interesting paradigm in which mutation timing, type and location in a gene leads to different cell signaling and biological responses, and ultimately phenotypic outcomes. In this review, we highlight the roles of RTKs in developmental disorders and cancer. The multifaceted roles of these receptors, their genetic signatures and their signaling during developmental morphogenesis and oncogenesis are discussed. Additionally, we propose that comparative analysis of RTK mutations responsible for developmental syndromes may shed light on those driving tumorigenesis. PMID:26152202

  8. Role of Non-receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinases During Phospholipase C-γ1 Related Uterine Contractions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Phillippe, Mark; Sweet, Leigh M.; Bradley, Diana F.; Engle, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Activated phospholipase Cγ1 (PLC-γ1), produced in response to tyrosine phosphorylation, appears to play an important role during uterine contractions. These studies sought to determine which non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are involved in the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of PLC-γ1 in uterine tissue from the rat. In vitro uterine contraction studies were performed utilizing isoform specific PTK inhibitors. Western blots were performed utilizing antibodies to phosphotyrosine-PLC-γ1, total PLC-γ1, c-Src kinase and Lck kinase. Spontaneous, stretch-stimulated, and bpV(phen) (a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) enhanced uterine contractions were significantly suppressed in response to Damnacanthal (a Lck kinase inhibitor) and PP1 (a c-Src kinase inhibitor); whereas, several other PTK isoform inhibitors had no significant effect. Damnacanthal and PP1 also significantly suppressed bpV(phen)-enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 compared to other PTK isoform inhibitors. Western blots confirmed expression of the Lck and c-Src kinases in uterine tissue. In conclusion, the Lck and c-Src kinases appear to play an important role in regulating tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 and contractile activity in the rat uterus. PMID:19208792

  9. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitylation Involves the Dynamic Regulation of Cbl-Spry2 by Intersectin 1 and the Shp2 Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Okur, Mustafa Nazir; Russo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitylation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulates their trafficking and lysosomal degradation. The multidomain scaffolding protein intersectin 1 (ITSN1) is an important regulator of this process. ITSN1 stimulates ubiquitylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through enhancing the activity of the Cbl E3 ubiquitin ligase. However, the precise mechanism through which ITSN1 enhances Cbl activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ITSN1 interacts with and recruits the Shp2 tyrosine phosphatase to Spry2 to enhance its dephosphorylation, thereby disrupting the inhibitory effect of Spry2 on Cbl and enhancing EGFR ubiquitylation. In contrast, expression of a catalytically inactive Shp2 mutant reversed the effect of ITSN1 on Spry2 dephosphorylation and decreased Cbl-mediated EGFR ubiquitylation. In addition, disruption of ITSN1 binding to Spry2 through point mutation of the Pro-rich ITSN1 binding site in Spry2 resulted in decreased Shp2-Spry2 interaction and enhanced Spry2 tyrosine phosphorylation. This study demonstrates that ITSN1 enhances Cbl activity, in part, by modulating the interaction of Cbl with Spry2 through recruitment of Shp2 phosphatase to the Cbl-Spry2 complex. These findings reveal a new level of complexity in the regulation of RTKs by Cbl through ITSN1 binding with Shp2 and Spry2. PMID:24216759

  10. A mechanistic basis for converting a receptor tyrosine kinase agonist to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, W. David; Daugherty, Jennifer; Gao, ChongFeng; Xie, Qian; Miranti, Cindy; Gherardi, Ermanno; Vande Woude, George; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activates the Met receptor tyrosine kinase by binding and promoting receptor dimerization. Here we describe a mechanistic basis for designing Met antagonists based on NK1, a natural variant of HGF containing the N-terminal and the first kringle domain. Through detailed biochemical and structural analyses, we demonstrate that both mouse and human NK1 induce Met dimerization via a conserved NK1 dimer interface. Mutations designed to alter the NK1 dimer interface abolish its ability to promote Met dimerization but retain full Met-binding activity. Importantly, these NK1 mutants act as Met antagonists by inhibiting HGF-mediated cell scattering, proliferation, branching, and invasion. The ability to separate the Met-binding activity of NK1 from its Met dimerization activity thus provides a rational basis for designing Met antagonists. This strategy of antagonist design may be applicable for other growth factor receptors by selectively abolishing the receptor activation ability but not the receptor binding of the growth factors.

  11. Intricate regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kumer, S C; Vrana, K E

    1996-08-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the catecholamines dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Therefore, the regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme number and intrinsic enzyme activity represents the central means for controlling the synthesis of these important biogenic amines. An intricate scheme has evolved whereby tyrosine hydroxylase activity is modulated by nearly every documented form of regulation. Beginning with the genomic DNA, evidence exists for the transcriptional regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels, alternative RNA processing, and the regulation of RNA stability. There is also experimental support for the role of both translational control and enzyme stability in establishing steady-state levels of active tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Finally, mechanisms have been proposed for feedback inhibition of the enzyme by catecholamine products, allosteric modulation of enzyme activity, and phosphorylation-dependent activation of the enzyme by various different kinase systems. Given the growing literature suggesting that different tissues regulate tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels and activity in different ways, regulatory mechanisms provide not only redundancy but also diversity in the control of catecholamine biosynthesis.

  12. Mefloquine neurotoxicity is mediated by non-receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Milatovic, Dejan; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Yu, Yingchun; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Among several available antimalarial drugs, mefloquine has proven to be effective against drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and remains the drug of choice for both therapy and chemoprophylaxis. However, mefloquine is known to cause adverse neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms, which offset its therapeutic advantage. The exact mechanisms leading to the adverse neurological effects of mefloquine are poorly defined. Alterations in neurotransmitter release and calcium homeostasis, the inhibition of cholinesterases and the interaction with adenosine A(2A) receptors have been hypothesized to play prominent roles in mediating the deleterious effects of this drug. Our recent data have established that mefloquine can also trigger oxidative damage and subsequent neurodegeneration in rat cortical primary neurons. Furthermore, we have utilized a system biology-centered approach and have constructed a pathway model of cellular responses to mefloquine, identifying non-receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) as a critical target in mediating mefloquine neurotoxicity. In this study, we sought to establish an experimental validation of Pyk2 using gene-silencing techniques (siRNA). We have examined whether the downregulation of Pyk2 in primary rat cortical neurons alters mefloquine neurotoxicity by evaluating cell viability, apoptosis and oxidative stress. Results from our study have confirmed that mefloquine neurotoxicity is associated with apoptotic response and oxidative injury, and we have demonstrated that mefloquine affects primary rat cortical neurons, at least in part, via Pyk2. The implication of these findings may prove beneficial in suppressing the neurological side effects of mefloquine and developing effective therapeutic modalities to offset its adverse effects.

  13. Crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptor (TXR) in the heart after morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Almela, Pilar; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors involved in signal transduction. These receptors are linked to a variety of physiological and biological processes such as regulation of neurotransmission, growth, and cell differentiation among others. Some of the effects of GPCRs are known to be mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated extracellular kinase (MAPK) pathways. Cross-talk among various signal pathways plays an important role in activation of intracellular and intranuclear signal transduction cascades. Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal leads to an up-regulation of adenyl cyclase-mediated signaling, resulting in high expression of protein kinase (PK) A. In addition, there is also an increased expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), one member of MAPK. For this reason, the crosstalk between these GPCRs and receptors with tyrosine kinase activity (TKR) can be considered a possible mechanism for adaptive changes that occurs after morphine withdrawal. Morphine withdrawal activates ERK1/2 and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) at Ser31 in the right and left ventricle. When N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), a PKA inhibitor was infused, the ability of morphine withdrawal to activate ERK, which phosphorylates TH at Ser31, was reduced. The present finding demonstrated that the enhancement of ERK1/2 expression and the phosphorylation state of TH at Ser31 during morphine withdrawal are dependent on PKA and suggest cross-talk between PKA and ERK1/2 transduction pathway mediating morphine withdrawal-induced activation of TH. Increasing understanding of the mechanisms that interconnect the two pathway regulated by GPCRs and TKRs may facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies.

  14. Crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptor (TXR) in the heart after morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Almela, Pilar; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors involved in signal transduction. These receptors are linked to a variety of physiological and biological processes such as regulation of neurotransmission, growth, and cell differentiation among others. Some of the effects of GPCRs are known to be mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated extracellular kinase (MAPK) pathways. Cross-talk among various signal pathways plays an important role in activation of intracellular and intranuclear signal transduction cascades. Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal leads to an up-regulation of adenyl cyclase-mediated signaling, resulting in high expression of protein kinase (PK) A. In addition, there is also an increased expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), one member of MAPK. For this reason, the crosstalk between these GPCRs and receptors with tyrosine kinase activity (TKR) can be considered a possible mechanism for adaptive changes that occurs after morphine withdrawal. Morphine withdrawal activates ERK1/2 and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) at Ser31 in the right and left ventricle. When N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), a PKA inhibitor was infused, the ability of morphine withdrawal to activate ERK, which phosphorylates TH at Ser31, was reduced. The present finding demonstrated that the enhancement of ERK1/2 expression and the phosphorylation state of TH at Ser31 during morphine withdrawal are dependent on PKA and suggest cross-talk between PKA and ERK1/2 transduction pathway mediating morphine withdrawal-induced activation of TH. Increasing understanding of the mechanisms that interconnect the two pathway regulated by GPCRs and TKRs may facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24409147

  15. Cardiovascular and sympathetic effects of disrupting tyrosine 985 of the leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Shannon M; Morgan, Donald A; Dellsperger, David J; Myers, Martin G; Mark, Allyn L; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2011-03-01

    Leptin acts in the brain to regulate food intake and energy expenditure. Leptin also increases renal sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure. The divergent signaling capacities of the leptin receptor (ObRb) mediate the stimulation of various intracellular pathways that are important for leptin control of physiological processes. We evaluated the cardiovascular and sympathetic consequences of disrupting the signal emanating from tyrosine985 of ObRb. For this, we used Lepr(L985) (l/l) mice, which carry a loss of function mutation replacing tyrosine985 of ObRb with leucine. Body weight of l/l mice was not significantly different from wild-type controls. In contrast, radiotelemetry measurements revealed that the l/l mice had higher arterial pressure and heart rate as compared with controls. Ganglionic blockade caused a greater arterial pressure fall in the l/l mice relative to controls. In addition, leptin treatment induced a larger increase in arterial pressure and heart rate in the l/l versus wild-type mice. Finally, we compared the response of renal and brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity to intracerebroventricular injection of leptin (2 μg) between l/l and control mice. Leptin-induced increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity was greater in l/l mice relative to controls. In contrast, the brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity response to leptin was attenuated in the l/l mice relative to controls. These data indicate that selective loss of leptin receptor signaling emanating from tyrosine985 enhances the cardiovascular and renal sympathetic effects of leptin. These findings provide important insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying leptin's effects on the sympathetic cardiovascular function and arterial pressure.

  16. Differential Receptor Tyrosine Kinase PET Imaging for Therapeutic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Wehrenberg-Klee, Eric; Turker, N. Selcan; Heidari, Pedram; Larimer, Benjamin; Juric, Dejan; Baselga, José; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway hold promise for the treatment of breast cancer, but resistance to these treatments can arise via feedback loops that increase surface expression of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), leading to persistent growth pathway signaling. We developed PET probes that provide a method of imaging this response in vivo, determining which tumors may use this escape pathway while avoiding the need for repeated biopsies. Methods: Anti-EGFR-F(ab′)2 and anti-HER3-F(ab′)2 were generated from monoclonal antibodies by enzymatic digestion, conjugated to DOTA, and labeled with 64Cu. A panel of breast cancer cell lines was treated with increasing concentrations of the AKT inhibitor GDC-0068 or the PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941. Pre- and posttreatment expression of EGFR and HER3 was compared using Western blot and correlated to probe accumulation with binding studies. Nude mice xenografts of HCC-70 or MDA-MB-468 were treated with either AKT inhibitor or PI3K inhibitor and imaged with either EGFR or HER3 PET probe. Results: Changes in HER3 and EGFR PET probe accumulation correlate to RTK expression change as assessed by Western blot (R2 of 0.85–0.98). EGFR PET probe PET/CT imaging of HCC70 tumors shows an SUV of 0.32 ± 0.03 for vehicle-, 0.50 ± 0.01 for GDC-0941–, and 0.62 ± 0.01 for GDC-0068–treated tumors, respectively (P < 0.01 for both comparisons to vehicle). HER3 PET probe PET/CT imaging of MDAMB468 tumors shows an SUV of 0.35 ± 0.02 for vehicle- and 0.73 ± 0.05 for GDC-0068–treated tumors (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our imaging studies, using PET probes specific to EGFR and HER3, show that changes in RTK expression indicative of resistance to PI3K and AKT inhibitors can be seen within days of therapy initiation and are of sufficient magnitude as to allow reliable

  17. Coexpression of receptor tyrosine kinase AXL and EGFR in human primary lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenzhou; Bai, Fan; Fan, Liyun; Pang, Wenshuai; Han, Ruiyu; Wang, Juan; Liu, Yueping; Yan, Xia; Duan, Huijun; Xing, Lingxiao

    2015-12-01

    AXL has been identified as a tyrosine kinase switch that causes resistance to inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the relationship between 2 receptor tyrosine kinases, AXL and EGFR, and the relevance of AXL expression with EGFR mutation status in treatment-naive human NSCLCs remain uncertain. In this study, we evaluated the coexpression pattern of AXL, EGFR, and pEGFR(1068) in 109 lung adenocarcinoma patients with or without an EGFR mutation. There were 68 (62.4%) patients with tumors harboring EGFR mutations such as 19 del and/or L858R; 2 patients were T790M positive. The expression of AXL, EGFR, and pEGFR(1068) was detected in 60 (55%), 68 (62.4%), and 57 (52.3%) of 109 patients, respectively. The positive rates of EGFR and pEGFR(1068) were associated with the L858R mutation alone or with the 19 del and L858R mutation status. Further analysis indicated that the percentage of AXL(+)/EGFR(+)/pEGFR(1068) coexpression in 68 EGFR-activating mutations patients was significantly higher than that in 39 EGFR wild-type patients (30.9% versus 10.3%, P=.015). Furthermore, in the subgroup of AXL(+) patients (35 mutation(+) and 23 wild-type patients), the coexpression rates of AXL(+)/pEGFR(1068+) and AXL(+)/EGFR(+)/pEGFR(1068+) in patients with EGFR mutations were significantly higher compared with those in wild-type patients (both P<.05). Our study emphasized that the AXL and EGFR receptor tyrosine kinases were coexpressed in a subgroup of treatment-naive lung adenocarcinomas with or without EGFR mutations. Anti-AXL therapeutics delivered up front in combination with an EGFR inhibitor might prevent or delay resistance in patients with AXL-positive, EGFR-mutant, or wild-type NSCLC.

  18. Bmx Tyrosine Kinase Has a Redundant Function Downstream of Angiopoietin and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors in Arterial Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Rajantie, Iiro; Ekman, Niklas; Iljin, Kristiina; Arighi, Elena; Gunji, Yuji; Kaukonen, Jaakko; Palotie, Aarno; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter; Alitalo, Kari

    2001-01-01

    The Bmx gene, a member of the Tec tyrosine kinase gene family, is known to be expressed in subsets of hematopoietic and endothelial cells. In this study, mice were generated in which the first coding exon of the Bmx gene was replaced with the lacZ reporter gene by a knock-in strategy. The homozygous mice lacking Bmx activity were fertile and had a normal life span without an obvious phenotype. Staining of their tissues using β-galactosidase substrate to assess the sites of Bmx expression revealed strong signals in the endothelial cells of large arteries and in the endocardium starting between days 10.5 and 12.5 of embryogenesis and continuing in adult mice, while the venular endothelium showed a weak signal only in the superior and inferior venae cavae. Of the five known endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases tested, activated Tie-2 induced tyrosyl phosphorylation of the Bmx protein and both Tie-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) stimulated Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. Thus, the Bmx tyrosine kinase has a redundant role in arterial endothelial signal transduction downstream of the Tie-2 and VEGFR-1 growth factor receptors. PMID:11416142

  19. EGF receptor-ligand interaction generates extracellular hydrogen peroxide that inhibits EGFR-associated protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    DeYulia, Garrett J; Cárcamo, Juan M

    2005-08-19

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) has been shown to be an important modulator of intracellular phosphatase activity involved in cell signaling pathways, including signaling by members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family of receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Intracellular H(2)O(2) can be generated by mitochondria-dependent pathways, whereas we recently showed that H(2)O(2) could be generated extracellularly by receptor-ligand interaction. Here, we show that H(2)O(2) produced by EGF-EGFR interaction can modulate the activity of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Using purified proteins, we found that EGFR-ligand interaction generates H(2)O(2) that is capable of inhibiting the activity of PTP1B in vitro. Furthermore, the addition of catalase rescued phosphatase inhibition consequent to EGF-EGFR interaction. Using cells that overexpress EGFR, we found that the addition of extracellular catalase prevented EGF-induced inhibition of EGFR-associated phosphatase activity. Our findings suggest that extracellular H(2)O(2) generated by EGFR-ligand interaction permeates the plasma membrane and inhibits EGFR-associated tyrosine phosphatase activity, thereby modulating downstream signal transduction pathways.

  20. Different structural alterations upregulate in vitro tyrosine kinase activity and transforming potency of the erbB-2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, O; King, C R; Pierce, J H; Di Fiore, P P; Aaronson, S A

    1988-01-01

    Compared with normal erbB-2 gp185, mutant erbB-2 proteins generated by mutations either in the transmembrane domain or by NH2-terminal deletion are able to transform NIH 3T3 cells at a 10- to 100-fold greater efficiency. Mutant proteins of both classes show increased tyrosine kinase activity, suggesting that an abnormal level of receptor-associated tyrosine kinase activity is a major determinant of erbB-2 oncogenic potential. Images PMID:2907606

  1. Toward the semisynthesis of multidomain transmembrane receptors: Modification of Eph tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nikhil; Himanen, Juha Pekka; Muir, Tom W.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2008-01-01

    Expressed protein ligation (EPL) is a protein engineering approach that allows the modification or assembly of a target protein from multiple recombinant and synthetic polypeptides. EPL has been previously used to modify intracellular proteins and small integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies. Here we describe the semisynthetic site-specific modification of the complete, multidomain extracellular regions of both A and B classes of Eph receptor tyrosine kinases. We show that the ectodomains of these receptors can be ligated to different peptides under carefully established experimental conditions, while their biological activity is retained. This work extends the boundaries of the EPL technique for semisynthesis of multidomain, extracellular, disulfide-bonded, and glycosylated proteins and highlights its potential application for reconstituting entire single-pass transmembrane proteins. PMID:18628240

  2. Effect of ghrelin receptor agonist and antagonist on the activity of arcuate nucleus tyrosine hydroxylase containing neurons in C57BL/6 male mice exposed to normal or high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Pirnik, Z; Majercikova, Z; Holubova, M; Pirnik, R; Zelezna, B; Maletinska, L; Kiss, A

    2014-08-01

    Catecholamines participate in the food intake regulation, however, there are no literature data available, dealing with the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons in response to stimulation or inhibition of GHS-R (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). The present study was focused to reveal whether [Dpr(N-octanoyl) 3ghrelin], a stable GHS-R agonist, itself in doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg (s.c.) or in combination with GHS-R receptor antagonist ([DLys3]GHRP-6) in dose of 10 mg/kg (s.c.), may affect the activity of ARC TH-containing neurons in C57BL/6 male mice fed either with standard (SD) or high fat diet (HFD) that developed a diet-induced obesity (DIO). The data of the present study clearly indicate that both doses of GHS-R agonist stimulated food intake in SD mice and GHS-R antagonist significantly reduced GHS-R agonist orexinergic effect in SD mice and suppressed the voluntary food intake in HFD mice. Both doses of the GHS-R agonist stimulated Fos expression in ARC neurons in both diet groups of mice which was not abolished by GHS-R antagonist pretreatment. Moreover, both doses of the GHS-R agonist significantly influenced the activation of TH neurons in the ARC of SD mice. The GHS-R antagonist also significantly increased TH neurons activation after GHS-R agonist although this effect was less powerful in HFD mice. This is the first study demonstrating response of local ARC TH neurons to peripherally applied GHS-R agonist and antagonist. The present data point out that the response of TH neurons to GHS-R agonist and antagonist is different in normal and DIO mice and extend our knowledge about the further ARC neuronal phenotype responding to peripheral ghrelin. To bring insight into the understanding of the functional significance of the activated TH neurons in ARC, in the context of the ghrelin peripheral increase, further studies are required.

  3. The insulin receptor juxtamembrane region contains two independent tyrosine/beta-turn internalization signals

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the role of tyrosine residues in the insulin receptor cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region (Tyr953 and Tyr960) during endocytosis. Analysis of the secondary structure of the juxtamembrane region by the Chou-Fasman algorithms predicts that both the sequences GPLY953 and NPEY960 form tyrosine-containing beta-turns. Similarly, analysis of model peptides by 1-D and 2-D NMR show that these sequences form beta-turns in solution, whereas replacement of the tyrosine residues with alanine destabilizes the beta-turn. CHO cell lines were prepared expressing mutant receptors in which each tyrosine was mutated to phenylalanine or alanine, and an additional mutant contained alanine at both positions. These mutations had no effect on insulin binding or receptor autophosphorylation. Replacements with phenylalanine had no effect on the rate of [125I]insulin endocytosis, whereas single substitutions with alanine reduced [125I]insulin endocytosis by 40-50%. Replacement of both tyrosines with alanine reduced internalization by 70%. These data suggest that the insulin receptor contains two tyrosine/beta-turns which contribute independently and additively to insulin-stimulated endocytosis. PMID:1500426

  4. Activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) at fertilization in Rhinella arenarum eggs.

    PubMed

    Mouguelar, Valeria S; Coux, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have provided evidence for the involvement of a cytosolic tyrosine-phosphorylatable 70 kDa oocyte protein in Rhinella arenarum (Anura: Bufonidae) fertilization. The aim of the present work was to characterize its phosphorylation, determine the identity of this protein and establish its biological role during the fertilization process. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the 70 kDa protein was not observed in eggs activated with the calcium ionophore A23187. Pretreatment of oocytes with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein effectively blocked the fertilization-dependent phosphorylation of the 70 kDa protein. In order to identify this protein, we examined the presence in amphibian oocytes of non-receptor 70 kDa tyrosine kinase members of the Syk/Zap70 and Tec families by RT-PCR using degenerate primers. We found that R. arenarum oocytes contain the transcripts coding for Syk and Tec kinases. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of Syk protein in unfertilized oocytes and eggs. Studies using phospho-Syk specific antibodies showed that fertilization rapidly (less than 10 minutes) induces phosphorylation on Syk tyrosine residues (352 and 525/526) that are necessary for the activation of the enzyme. Finally, specific inhibition of Syk with the R406 compound provoked a diminished fertilization score, thereby confirming a functional role of the Syk protein during R. arenarum fertilization. To our knowledge this is the first time that Syk is described as a player in the signaling cascade activated after fertilization.

  5. The Drosophila Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase LAR Is Required for Development of Circadian Pacemaker Neuron Processes That Support Rhythmic Activity in Constant Darkness But Not during Light/Dark Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Parul

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, a transcriptional feedback loop that is activated by CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes and repressed by PERIOD-TIMELESS (PER-TIM) complexes keeps circadian time. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated post-translationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Although kinases that control PER, TIM, and CLK levels, activity, and/or subcellular localization have been identified, less is known about phosphatases that control clock protein dephosphorylation. To identify clock-relevant phosphatases, clock-cell-specific RNAi knockdowns of Drosophila phosphatases were screened for altered activity rhythms. One phosphatase that was identified, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase leukocyte-antigen-related (LAR), abolished activity rhythms in constant darkness (DD) without disrupting the timekeeping mechanism in brain pacemaker neurons. However, expression of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), which mediates pacemaker neuron synchrony and output, is eliminated in the dorsal projections from small ventral lateral (sLNv) pacemaker neurons when Lar expression is knocked down during development, but not in adults. Loss of Lar function eliminates sLNv dorsal projections, but PDF expression persists in sLNv and large ventral lateral neuron cell bodies and their remaining projections. In contrast to the defects in lights-on and lights-off anticipatory activity seen in flies that lack PDF, Lar RNAi knockdown flies anticipate the lights-on and lights-off transition normally. Our results demonstrate that Lar is required for sLNv dorsal projection development and suggest that PDF expression in LNv cell bodies and their remaining projections mediate anticipation of the lights-on and lights-off transitions during a light/dark cycle. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In animals, circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. Because key circadian

  6. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of Fc gamma RIIa to modulate signaling events in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Latha P; Fang, Huiqing; Marsh, Clay B; Tridandapani, Susheela

    2003-09-12

    Fc gamma RIIa is a low affinity IgG receptor uniquely expressed in human cells that promotes phagocytosis of immune complexes and induces inflammatory cytokine gene transcription. Recent studies have revealed that phagocytosis initiated by Fc gamma RIIa is tightly controlled by the inositol phosphatase SHIP-1, and the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Whereas the molecular nature of SHIP-1 involvement with Fc gamma RIIa has been well studied, it is not clear how SHP-1 is activated by Fc gamma RIIa to mediate its regulatory effect. Here we report that Fc gamma RIIa clustering induces SHP-1 phosphatase activity in THP-1 cells. Using synthetic phosphopeptides, and stable transfectants expressing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) tyrosine mutants of Fc gamma RIIa, we demonstrate that SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated amino-terminal ITAM tyrosine of Fc gamma RIIa, whereas the tyrosine kinase Syk associates with the carboxyl-terminal ITAM tyrosine. Association of SHP-1 with Fc gamma RIIa ITAM appears to suppress total cellular tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, Fc gamma RIIa clustering results in the association of SHP-1 with key signaling molecules such as Syk, p85 subunit of PtdIns 3-kinase, and p62dok, suggesting that these molecules may be substrates of SHP-1 in this system. Finally, overexpression of wild-type SHP-1 but not catalytically deficient SHP-1 led to a down-regulation of NF kappa B-dependent gene transcription in THP-1 cells activated by clustering Fc gamma RIIa.

  7. Quantitative analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase-effector coupling at functionally relevant stimulus levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Simin; Bhave, Devayani; Chow, Jennifer M; Riera, Thomas V; Schlee, Sandra; Rauch, Simone; Atanasova, Mariya; Cate, Richard L; Whitty, Adrian

    2015-04-17

    A major goal of current signaling research is to develop a quantitative understanding of how receptor activation is coupled to downstream signaling events and to functional cellular responses. Here, we measure how activation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase on mouse neuroblastoma cells by the neurotrophin artemin (ART) is quantitatively coupled to key downstream effectors. We show that the efficiency of RET coupling to ERK and Akt depends strongly on ART concentration, and it is highest at the low (∼100 pM) ART levels required for neurite outgrowth. Quantitative discrimination between ERK and Akt pathway signaling similarly is highest at this low ART concentration. Stimulation of the cells with 100 pM ART activated RET at the rate of ∼10 molecules/cell/min, leading at 5-10 min to a transient peak of ∼150 phospho-ERK (pERK) molecules and ∼50 pAkt molecules per pRET, after which time the levels of these two signaling effectors fell by 25-50% while the pRET levels continued to slowly rise. Kinetic experiments showed that signaling effectors in different pathways respond to RET activation with different lag times, such that the balance of signal flux among the different pathways evolves over time. Our results illustrate that measurements using high, super-physiological growth factor levels can be misleading about quantitative features of receptor signaling. We propose a quantitative model describing how receptor-effector coupling efficiency links signal amplification to signal sensitization between receptor and effector, thereby providing insight into design principles underlying how receptors and their associated signaling machinery decode an extracellular signal to trigger a functional cellular outcome.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Effector Coupling at Functionally Relevant Stimulus Levels*♦

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simin; Bhave, Devayani; Chow, Jennifer M.; Riera, Thomas V.; Schlee, Sandra; Rauch, Simone; Atanasova, Mariya; Cate, Richard L.; Whitty, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of current signaling research is to develop a quantitative understanding of how receptor activation is coupled to downstream signaling events and to functional cellular responses. Here, we measure how activation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase on mouse neuroblastoma cells by the neurotrophin artemin (ART) is quantitatively coupled to key downstream effectors. We show that the efficiency of RET coupling to ERK and Akt depends strongly on ART concentration, and it is highest at the low (∼100 pm) ART levels required for neurite outgrowth. Quantitative discrimination between ERK and Akt pathway signaling similarly is highest at this low ART concentration. Stimulation of the cells with 100 pm ART activated RET at the rate of ∼10 molecules/cell/min, leading at 5–10 min to a transient peak of ∼150 phospho-ERK (pERK) molecules and ∼50 pAkt molecules per pRET, after which time the levels of these two signaling effectors fell by 25–50% while the pRET levels continued to slowly rise. Kinetic experiments showed that signaling effectors in different pathways respond to RET activation with different lag times, such that the balance of signal flux among the different pathways evolves over time. Our results illustrate that measurements using high, super-physiological growth factor levels can be misleading about quantitative features of receptor signaling. We propose a quantitative model describing how receptor-effector coupling efficiency links signal amplification to signal sensitization between receptor and effector, thereby providing insight into design principles underlying how receptors and their associated signaling machinery decode an extracellular signal to trigger a functional cellular outcome. PMID:25635057

  9. JAK tyrosine kinases promote hierarchical activation of Rho and Rap modules of integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Alessio; Bolomini-Vittori, Matteo; Toffali, Lara; Rossi, Barbara; Constantin, Gabriela; Laudanna, Carlo

    2013-12-23

    Lymphocyte recruitment is regulated by signaling modules based on the activity of Rho and Rap small guanosine triphosphatases that control integrin activation by chemokines. We show that Janus kinase (JAK) protein tyrosine kinases control chemokine-induced LFA-1- and VLA-4-mediated adhesion as well as human T lymphocyte homing to secondary lymphoid organs. JAK2 and JAK3 isoforms, but not JAK1, mediate CXCL12-induced LFA-1 triggering to a high affinity state. Signal transduction analysis showed that chemokine-induced activation of the Rho module of LFA-1 affinity triggering is dependent on JAK activity, with VAV1 mediating Rho activation by JAKs in a Gαi-independent manner. Furthermore, activation of Rap1A by chemokines is also dependent on JAK2 and JAK3 activity. Importantly, activation of Rap1A by JAKs is mediated by RhoA and PLD1, thus establishing Rap1A as a downstream effector of the Rho module. Thus, JAK tyrosine kinases control integrin activation and dependent lymphocyte trafficking by bridging chemokine receptors to the concurrent and hierarchical activation of the Rho and Rap modules of integrin activation.

  10. Sunitinib: a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor in the era of molecular cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Papaetis, Georgios S; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2009-01-01

    Sunitinib is an oral oxindole multitargeted kinase inhibitor that inhibits certain receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). These include vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR type 1 and 2), platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFR-alpha and PDGFR-beta), stem cell factor receptor (KIT), FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3), glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor receptor (RET) and the receptor of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF1R). Examination of the antitumor effect of sunitinib in a variety of cell lines in vitro suggested an antiproliferative activity that is dependent on the presence of constitutively active RTK targets. The use of sunitinib as first-line therapy in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has improved the overall survival compared with that observed after cytokine therapy, while its administration in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) after progression or intolerance to imatinib achieved an objective response of 7%. Sunitinib is currently approved for the treatment of GISTs in this setting, and as first-line therapy for the treatment of advanced RCC. The relatively long half-life of sunitinib and its major metabolite allow for a once-daily dosing schedule. An interesting antitumor activity of sunitinib was reported in phase II studies of patients with a variety of malignancies, such as hepatocellular cancer, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and non-small cell lung cancer; results of phase III studies are urgently anticipated. Fatigue is one of the most common adverse effects of sunitinib, as 50-70% of patients with advanced RCC and GIST complained of this adverse effect. Other adverse effects are diarrhea, anorexia, nausea and vomiting, oral changes and bleeding events. Most toxicities are reversible and should not result in discontinuation of sunitinib. If necessary, dose adjustments or interruptions should be made. Hypothyroidism has been described in the first 2 weeks of sunitinib therapy and its

  11. NR2B-NMDA receptor mediated modulation of the tyrosine phosphatase STEP regulates glutamate induced neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Deb, Ishani; Mukherjee, Saibal; Paul, Surojit

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the role of a neuron-specific tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in excitotoxic cell death. Our findings demonstrate that p38 MAPK, a stress-activated kinase that is known to play a role in the etiology of excitotoxic cell death is a substrate of STEP. Glutamate-mediated NMDA receptor stimulation leads to rapid but transient activation of p38 MAPK, which is primarily dependent on NR2A-NMDA receptor activation. Conversely, activation of NR2B-NMDA receptors leads to dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of STEP, which in turn leads to inactivation of p38 MAPK. Thus during transient NMDA receptor stimulation, increases in STEP activity appears to limit the duration of activation of p38 MAPK and improves neuronal survival. However, if NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation is sustained, protective effects of STEP activation are lost, as these stimuli cause significant degradation of active STEP, leading to secondary activation of p38 MAP kinase. Consistent with this observation, a cell transducible TAT-STEP peptide that constitutively binds to p38 MAPK attenuated neuronal cell death caused by sustained NMDA receptor stimulation. The findings imply that the activation and levels of STEP are dependent on the duration and magnitude of NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation and STEP serves as a modulator of NMDA receptor dependent neuronal injury, through its regulation of p38 MAPK. PMID:21029094

  12. ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES SRC-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES Src-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)
    Weidong Wu1, Lee M. Graves2, Gordon N. Gill3 and James M. Samet4 1Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology; 2Department of Pharmacology, University o...

  13. Microglial immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation and inhibition motif signaling in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bettina; Wang, Yiner; Neumann, Harald

    2010-06-22

    Elimination of extracellular aggregates and apoptotic neural membranes without inflammation is crucial for brain tissue homeostasis. In the mammalian central nervous system, essential molecules in this process are the Fc receptors and the DAP12-associated receptors which both trigger the microglial immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif- (ITAM-) Syk-signaling cascade. Microglial triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2), signal regulatory protein-beta1, and complement receptor-3 (CD11b/CD18) signal via the adaptor protein DAP12 and activate phagocytic activity of microglia. Microglial ITAM-signaling receptors are counter-regulated by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif- (ITIM-) signaling molecules such as sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin superfamily lectins (Siglecs). Siglecs can suppress the proinflammatory and phagocytic activity of microglia via ITIM signaling. Moreover, microglial neurotoxicity is alleviated via interaction of Siglec-11 with sialic acids on the neuronal glycocalyx. Thus, ITAM- and ITIM-signaling receptors modulate microglial phagocytosis and cytokine expression during neuroinflammatory processes. Their dysfunction could lead to impaired phagocytic clearance and neurodegeneration triggered by chronic inflammation.

  14. Viral Interference with Functions of the Cellular Receptor Tyrosine Phosphatase CD45

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Nadine; Zischke, Jasmin; Elbasani, Endrit; Kay-Fedorov, Penelope; Messerle, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is expressed on the surface of almost all cells of hematopoietic origin. CD45 functions are central to the development of T cells and determine the threshold at which T and B lymphocytes can become activated. Given this pivotal role of CD45 in the immune system, it is probably not surprising that viruses interfere with the activity of CD45 in lymphocytes to dampen the immune response and that they also utilize this molecule to accomplish their replication cycle. Here we report what is known about the interaction of viral proteins with CD45. Moreover, we debate putative interactions of viruses with CD45 in myeloid cells and the resulting consequences—subjects that remain to be investigated. Finally, we summarize the evidence that pathogens were the driving force for the evolution of CD45. PMID:25807057

  15. The TAM family: phosphatidylserine sensing receptor tyrosine kinases gone awry in cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, Douglas K; DeRyckere, Deborah; Davies, Kurtis D; Earp, H Shelton

    2014-12-01

    The TYRO3, AXL (also known as UFO) and MERTK (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are aberrantly expressed in multiple haematological and epithelial malignancies. Rather than functioning as oncogenic drivers, their induction in tumour cells predominately promotes survival, chemoresistance and motility. The unique mode of maximal activation of this RTK family requires an extracellular lipid–protein complex. For example, the protein ligand, growth arrest-specific protein 6 (GAS6), binds to phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) that is externalized on apoptotic cell membranes, which activates MERTK on macrophages. This triggers engulfment of apoptotic material and subsequent anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. In tumours, autocrine and paracrine ligands and apoptotic cells are abundant, which provide a survival signal to the tumour cell and favour an anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive microenvironment. Thus, TAM kinase inhibition could stimulate antitumour immunity, reduce tumour cell survival, enhance chemosensitivity and diminish metastatic potential.

  16. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor sequences as E. coli fusion proteins: applications in the study of tyrosine kinase function.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; O'Brien, K M; Cerione, R A

    1990-01-15

    To investigate the functions of key domains of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), various EGFR-derived peptide sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. The purified fusion proteins (GST-TK0-8) were tested as substrates for the tyrosine kinase activities of the EGFR and c-src. Both the GST-TK4 fusion protein, which contains the major C-terminal tyrosine autophosphorylation sites of the EGFR, and GST-TK7, which contains the connecting sequence between the EGFR kinase domain and the C-terminal autophosphorylation domain, were strongly phosphorylated by the EGFR and c-src. Hence the candidate tyrosine phosphorylation sites present in the connecting sequences of the EGFR, as well as the known autophosphorylation sites of the EGFR, can be phosphorylated by the two tyrosine kinases. The protein GST-TK7 was phosphorylated by c-src with a KM of 5-10 microM, which indicated a potential interaction between the connecting segment of the EGFR and the c-src kinase. The GST fusion proteins were also used to map the sites recognized by two anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies and a polyclonal serum raised against an EGFR tyrosine kinase domain fragment. The recognition site of one monoclonal antibody was determined to be in a short sequence surrounding tyr1068, a primary site of autophosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of the receptor. The anti-peptide polyclonal serum recognized only sequences in the GST-TK7 fusion protein, and hence binds to the connecting sequence between the kinase core and the C-terminal domain. These antibodies will therefore be useful reagents for studying the function of two key structural elements of the EGFR tyrosine kinase. The GST-TK fusion proteins should have many other applications in the study of EGFR catalysis and mitogenic signalling.

  17. Receptor tyrosine kinase amplification is predictive of distant metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yu; Morita, Kei-Ichi; Kayamori, Kou; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Sakamoto, Kei; Katoh, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Inazawa, Johji; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to clarify the genomic factors associated with the diagnosis and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma via next-generation sequencing. We evaluated data from 220 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Genomic DNA was eluted using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, and targeted resequencing of 50 cancer-related genes was performed. In total, 311 somatic mutations were detected in 220 patients, consisting of 68 synonymous mutations and 243 non-synonymous mutations. Genes carrying mutations included TP53, CDKN2A, and PIK3CA in 79 (35.9%), 35 (15.9%), and 19 patients (8.6%), respectively. Copy number analysis detected amplification of PIK3CA and AKT1 in 38 (17.3%) and 11 patients (5.0%), respectively. Amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases was found in 37 patients (16.8%). Distant metastasis was noted in nine of 37 patients (24%) with receptor tyrosine kinase amplification, accounting for 43% of the 21 cases of distant metastasis. The cumulative 5-year survival rate was 64.6% in the receptor tyrosine kinase amplification group vs 85.2% in the no receptor tyrosine kinase amplification group. Moreover, we identified significantly poorer prognosis in the TP53 mutation/receptor tyrosine kinase amplification group, for which the cumulative 5-year survival rate was 41.6%. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrated that receptor tyrosine kinase amplification is a prognostic factor for distant metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma, indicating the necessity of using next-generation sequencing in clinical sequencing.

  18. Class III Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Acute Leukemia – Biological Functions and Modern Laboratory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berenstein, Rimma

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex disease caused by deregulation of multiple signaling pathways. Mutations in class III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have been implicated in alteration of cell signals concerning the growth and differentiation of leukemic cells. Point mutations, insertions, or deletions of RTKs as well as chromosomal translocations induce constitutive activation of the receptor, leading to uncontrolled proliferation of undifferentiated myeloid blasts. Aberrations can occur in all domains of RTKs causing either the ligand-independent activation or mimicking the activated conformation. The World Health Organization recommended including RTK mutations in the AML classification since their detection in routine laboratory diagnostics is a major factor for prognostic stratification of patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–based methods are well-validated for the detection of fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) mutations and can easily be applied for other RTKs. However, when methodological limitations are reached, accessory techniques can be applied. For a higher resolution and more quantitative approach compared to agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR fragments can be separated by capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore, high-resolution melting and denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography are reliable presequencing screening methods that reduce the sample amount for Sanger sequencing. Because traditional DNA sequencing is time-consuming, next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an innovative modern possibility to analyze a high amount of samples simultaneously in a short period of time. At present, standardized procedures for NGS are not established, but when this barrier is resolved, it will provide a new platform for rapid and reliable laboratory diagnostic of RTK mutations in patients with AML. In this article, the biological and physiological role of RTK mutations in AML as well as possible laboratory methods for their detection will be

  19. Analysis of in vitro interactions of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Bergdahl, K; Heijbel, A; Liljebris, C; Bleasdale, J E

    2001-02-28

    One strategy to treat the insulin resistance that is central to type II diabetes mellitus may be to maintain insulin receptors (IR) in the active (tyrosine phosphorylated) form. Because protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) binds and subsequently dephosphorylates IR, inhibitors of PTP1B-IR binding are potential insulin 'sensitizers.' A Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) was developed to characterize and quantitate PTP1B-IR binding. Human IR were solubilized and captured on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coated SPA beads. Subsequent binding of human, catalytically inactive [35S] PTP1B Cys(215)/Ser (PTP1B(C215S)) to the lectin-anchored IR results in scintillation from the SPA beads that can be quantitated. Binding of PTP1B to IR was pH- and divalent cation-sensitive. Ca(2+) and Mn(2+), but not Mg(2+), dramatically attenuated the loss of PTP1B-IR binding observed when pH was raised from 6.2 to 7.8. PTP1B binding to IR from insulin-stimulated cells was much greater than to IR from unstimulated cells and was inhibited by either an antiphosphotyrosine antibody or treatment of IR with alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of IR is required for PTP1B binding. Phosphopeptides modeled after various IR phosphotyrosine domains each only partially inhibited PTP1B-IR binding, indicating that multiple domains of IR are likely involved in binding PTP1B. However, competitive displacement of [35S]PTP1B(C215S) by PTP1B(C215S) fitted best to a single binding site with a K(d) in the range 100-1000 nM, depending upon pH and divalent cations. PNU-200898, a potent and selective inhibitor of PTP1B whose orientation in the active site of PTP1B has been solved, competitively inhibited catalysis and PTP1B-IR binding with equal potency. The results of this novel assay for PTP1B-IR binding suggest that PTP1B binds preferentially to tyrosine phosphorylated IR through its active site and that binding may be susceptible to therapeutic disruption by small molecules.

  20. The ROR2 tyrosine kinase receptor regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Iván E; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-07-01

    Wnt signaling regulates synaptic development and function and contributes to the fine-tuning of the molecular and morphological differentiation of synapses. We have shown previously that Wnt5a activates non-canonical Wnt signaling to stimulate postsynaptic differentiation in excitatory hippocampal neurons promoting the clustering of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 and the development of dendritic spines. At least three different kinds of Wnt receptors have been associated with Wnt5a signaling: seven trans-membrane Frizzled receptors and the tyrosine kinase receptors Ryk and ROR2. We report here that ROR2 is distributed in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons in close proximity to synaptic contacts and it is contained in dendritic spine protrusions. We demonstrate that ROR2 is necessary to maintain dendritic spine number and morphological distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. ROR2 overexpression increased dendritic spine growth without affecting the density of dendritic spine protrusions in a form dependent on its extracellular Wnt binding cysteine rich domain (CRD) and kinase domain. Overexpression of dominant negative ROR2 lacking the extracellular CRD decreased spine density and the proportion of mushroom like spines, while ROR2 lacking the C-terminal and active kinase domains only affected spine morphology. Our results indicate a crucial role of the ROR2 in the formation and maturation of the postsynaptic dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons.

  1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 by the insulin receptor is necessary for insulin metabolic signaling.

    PubMed

    Fiory, Francesca; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Miele, Claudia; Oriente, Francesco; Esposito, Iolanda; Corbo, Vincenzo; Ruvo, Menotti; Tizzano, Barbara; Rasmussen, Thomas E; Gammeltoft, Steen; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2005-12-01

    In L6 myoblasts, insulin receptors with deletion of the C-terminal 43 amino acids (IR(Delta43)) exhibited normal autophosphorylation and IRS-1/2 tyrosine phosphorylation. The L6 cells expressing IR(Delta43) (L6(IRDelta43)) also showed no insulin effect on glucose uptake and glycogen synthase, accompanied by a >80% decrease in insulin induction of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK-1) activity and tyrosine phosphorylation and of protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation at Thr(308). Insulin induced the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent coprecipitation of PDK-1 with wild-type IR (IR(WT)), but not IR(Delta43). Based on overlay blotting, PDK-1 directly bound IR(WT), but not IR(Delta43). Insulin-activated IR(WT), and not IR(Delta43), phosphorylated PDK-1 at tyrosines 9, 373, and 376. The IR C-terminal 43-amino-acid peptide (C-terminal peptide) inhibited in vitro PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation by the IR. Tyr-->Phe substitution prevented this inhibitory action. In the L6(hIR) cells, the C-terminal peptide coprecipitated with PDK-1 in an insulin-stimulated fashion. This peptide simultaneously impaired the insulin effect on PDK-1 coprecipitation with IR(WT), on PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, on PKB phosphorylation at Thr(308), and on glucose uptake. Upon insulin exposure, PDK-1 membrane persistence was significantly reduced in L6(IRDelta43) compared to control cells. In L6 cells expressing IR(WT), the C-terminal peptide also impaired insulin-dependent PDK-1 membrane persistence. Thus, PDK-1 directly binds to the insulin receptor, followed by PDK-1 activation and insulin metabolic effects.

  2. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; ...

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lungmore » cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.« less

  3. Retinal axon target selection in Drosophila is regulated by a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Garrity, P A; Lee, C H; Salecker, I; Robertson, H C; Desai, C J; Zinn, K; Zipursky, S L

    1999-04-01

    Different Drosophila photoreceptors (R cells) connect to neurons in different optic lobe layers. R1-R6 axons project to the lamina; R7 and R8 axons project to separate layers of the medulla. We show a receptor tyrosine phosphatase, PTP69D, is required for lamina target specificity. In Ptp69D mutants, R1-R6 project through the lamina, terminating in the medulla. Genetic mosaics, transgene rescue, and immunolocalization indicate PTP69D functions in R1-R6 growth cones. PTP69D overexpression in R7 and R8 does not respecify their connections, suggesting PTP69D acts in combination with other factors to determine target specificity. Structure-function analysis indicates the extracellular fibronectin type III domains and intracellular phosphatase activity are required for targeting. We propose PTP69D promotes R1-R6 targeting in response to extracellular signals by dephosphorylating substrate(s) in R1-R6 growth cones.

  4. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  5. Rare SNPs in receptor tyrosine kinases are negative outcome predictors in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Christian; Knop, Stefan; Pischimarov, Jordan; Kull, Miriam; Stühmer, Thorsten; Steinbrunn, Torsten; Bargou, Ralf; Einsele, Hermann; Rosenwald, Andreas; Leich, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell disorder that is characterized by a great genetic heterogeneity. Recent next generation sequencing studies revealed an accumulation of tumor-associated mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) which may also contribute to the activation of survival pathways in MM. To investigate the clinical role of RTK-mutations in MM, we deep-sequenced the coding DNA-sequence of EGFR, EPHA2, ERBB3, IGF1R, NTRK1 and NTRK2 which were previously found to be mutated in MM, in 75 uniformly treated MM patients of the “Deutsche Studiengruppe Multiples Myelom”. Subsequently, we correlated the detected mutations with common cytogenetic alterations and clinical parameters. We identified 11 novel non-synonymous SNVs or rare patient-specific SNPs, not listed in the SNP databases 1000 genomes and dbSNP, in 10 primary MM cases. The mutations predominantly affected the tyrosine-kinase and ligand-binding domains and no correlation with cytogenetic parameters was found. Interestingly, however, patients with RTK-mutations, specifically those with rare patient-specific SNPs, showed a significantly lower overall, event-free and progression-free survival. This indicates that RTK SNVs and rare patient-specific RTK SNPs are of prognostic relevance and suggests that MM patients with RTK-mutations could potentially profit from treatment with RTK-inhibitors. PMID:27246973

  6. Human RON receptor tyrosine kinase induces complete epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but causes cellular senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Marceline; Miller, A. Dusty; Liu, Shan-Lu . E-mail: shan-lu.liu@mcgill.ca

    2007-08-17

    The RON receptor tyrosine kinase is a member of the MET proto-oncogene family and is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and cancer development. Here, we created a series of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell clones that express different levels of RON, and have investigated their biological properties. While low levels of RON correlated with little morphological change in MDCK cells, high levels of RON expression constitutively led to morphological scattering or complete and stabilized epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Unexpectedly, MDCK clones expressing higher levels of RON exhibited retarded proliferation and senescence, despite increased motility and invasiveness. RON was constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in MDCK cells expressing high levels of RON and undergoing EMT, and the MAPK signaling pathway was activated. This study reveals for the first time that RON alone is sufficient to induce complete and stabilized EMT in MDCK cells, and overexpression of RON does not cause cell transformation but rather induces cell cycle arrest and senescence, leading to impaired cell proliferation.

  7. The receptor tyrosine kinase ROR1--an oncofetal antigen for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Moshfegh, Ali; Daneshmanesh, Amir Hossein; Khan, Abdul Salam; Mikaelsson, Eva; Osterborg, Anders; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2014-12-01

    Targeted cancer therapies have emerged as new treatment options for various cancer types. Among targets, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are among the most promising. ROR1 is a transmembrane RTK of importance during the normal embryogenesis for the central nervous system, heart, lung and skeletal systems, but is not expressed in normal adult tissues. However, ROR1 is overexpressed in several human malignancies and may act as a survival factor for tumor cells. Its unique expression by malignant cells may provide a target for novel therapeutics including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and small molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (TKI) for the treatment of cancer. Promising preclinical results have been reported in e.g. chronic lymphocytic leukemia, pancreatic carcinoma, lung and breast cancer. ROR1 might also be an interesting oncofetal antigen for active immunotherapy. In this review, we provide an overview of the ROR1 structure and functions in cancer and highlight emerging therapeutic options of interest for targeting ROR1 in tumor therapy.

  8. SYNAPTIC TRANSLATION OF STRIATAL-ENRICHED TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE (STEP) AFTER β1-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaer; Zhang, Yang; Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The β-adrenergic system is implicated in long-term synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, a process that requires protein synthesis. To identify proteins that are translated in response to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation and the pathways that regulate this process, we investigated the effects of isoproterenol on the translation of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in both cortico-striatal slices and primary neuronal cultures. Isoproterenol stimulation induced a rapid dose-dependent increase in STEP expression. Anisomycin blocked the increase in STEP expression while actinomycin D had no effect, suggesting a translation-dependent mechanism. Isoproterenol-induced STEP translation required activation of β1 receptors. Application of the MEK inhibitor SL327 blocked both isoproterenol-induced activation of pERK and subsequent STEP translation. Inhibitors of PI3K (LY294002) or mTOR (rapamycin) also completely blocked STEP translation. These results suggest that co-activation of both the ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways are required for STEP translation. As the substrates of STEP include ERK itself, these results suggest that STEP is translated upon β-adrenergic activation as part of a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:17623046

  9. Role of macrophage-stimulating protein and its receptor, RON tyrosine kinase, in ciliary motility.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, O; Iwama, A; Amitani, R; Takehara, T; Yamaguchi, N; Yamamoto, T; Masuyama, K; Yamanaka, T; Ando, M; Suda, T

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) is an 80-kD serum protein with homology to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Its receptor, RON tyrosine kinase, is a new member of the HGF receptor family. The MSP-RON signaling pathway has been implicated in the functional regulation of mononuclear phagocytes. However, the function of this pathway in other types of cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that in contrast to the HGF receptor, which was expressed at the basolateral surface, RON was localized at the apical surface of ciliated epithelia in the airways and oviduct. In addition, MSP was found in the bronchoalveolar space at biologically significant concentrations. MSP bound to RON on normal human bronchial epithelial cells with a high affinity (Kd = 0.5 nM) and induced autophosphorylation of RON. Activation of RON by MSP led to a significant increase in ciliary beat frequency of human nasal cilia. These findings indicate that the ciliated epithelium of the mucociliary transport apparatus is a novel target of MSP. Ciliary motility is critical for mucociliary transport. Our findings suggest that the MSP-RON signaling pathway is a novel regulatory system of mucociliary function and might be involved in the host defense and fertilization. PMID:9045873

  10. Analysis of aminoacids pattern in receptor tyrosine kinase using Boolean association rule.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Pranjal; Kumar, Brindha Senthil; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Nachimuthu, Senthil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Cancers are characterized by unrestricted cell division and independency of growth factor and other external signal responsiveness. Eukaryotic parental cells of tumors, on the other hand, constitute tissues and other higher structures like organs and systems and are capable of performing various functions in a highly co-ordinated fashion. Hence, cancer cells may be considered as entities capable of incessant growth and cell division but lacking any evolutionarily advanced intracellular or intercellular regulation. Since receptor tyrosine kinases are highly altered and exist in deregulated/constitutively active forms in cancer cells - achieved through various epigenetic mechanisms - we hypothesize the functional RTKs in cancer cells to resemble their counterparts in more primitive species. Analysis of RTK sequences of various species and of cancer is, therefore, expected to prove this hypothesis. Association rule in data mining can reveal the hidden biological information. This study utilizes the Boolean association rule to mine the occurrence pattern of glycine, arginine and alanine in receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) of invertebrates, vertebrates and cancer related vertebrate RTKs based on protein sequence informations. The results reveal that vertebrate cancer RTKs resembles prokaryotes and invertebrate RTKs showing an increasing trend of glycine, alanine and decreasing trend in arginine composition. The aminoacid compositions of vertebrates: invertebrates: prokaryotes: vertebrate cancer with respect to Glycine (>=6.1) were 42.86: 50.0: 85.71: 100%, Alanine (>=6.2) were 10.72: 66.67: 85.71: 100%, whereas Arginine (>=5.9) were 21.43: 16.67: 14.29: 0%, respectively. In conclusion, results from this study supports our hypothesis that cancer cells may resemble lower organisms since functionally cancer cells are unresponsive to external signals and various regulatory mechanisms typically found in higher eukaryotes are largely absent.

  11. Hydroxyindole Carboxylic Acid-Based Inhibitors for Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Beta

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Yunpeng; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play an important role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. Understanding the role of PTPs within these processes has been hampered by a lack of potent and selective PTP inhibitors. Generating potent and selective probes for PTPs remains a significant challenge because of the highly conserved and positively charged PTP active site that also harbors a redox-sensitive Cys residue. Results: We describe a facile method that uses an appropriate hydroxyindole carboxylic acid to anchor the inhibitor to the PTP active site and relies on the secondary binding elements introduced through an amide-focused library to enhance binding affinity for the target PTP and to impart selectivity against off-target phosphatases. Here, we disclose a novel series of hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based inhibitors for receptor-type tyrosine protein phosphatase beta (RPTPβ), a potential target that is implicated in blood vessel development. The representative RPTPβ inhibitor 8b-1 (L87B44) has an IC50 of 0.38 μM and at least 14-fold selectivity for RPTPβ over a large panel of PTPs. Moreover, 8b-1 also exhibits excellent cellular activity and augments growth factor signaling in HEK293, MDA-MB-468, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Innovation: The bicyclic salicylic acid pharmacophore-based focused library approach may provide a potential solution to overcome the bioavailability issue that has plagued the PTP drug discovery field for many years. Conclusion: A novel method is described for the development of bioavailable PTP inhibitors that utilizes bicyclic salicylic acid to anchor the inhibitors to the active site and peripheral site interactions to enhance binding affinity and selectivity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2130–2140. PMID:24180557

  12. Heparin stimulates epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated phosphorylation of tyrosine and threonine residues.

    PubMed

    Revis-Gupta, S; Abdel-Ghany, M; Koland, J; Racker, E

    1991-07-15

    We have described previously that in extracts of A431 cells epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the phosphorylation of tyrosine as well as of threonine residues in the EGF receptor and in lipocortin 1. We now report that heparin at low concentrations also stimulates the autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor and of the recombinant 56-kDa domain of the EGF receptor that lacks the EGF binding site. To study the stimulations of phosphorylation of threonine residues, a fusion protein was prepared with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and an EGF receptor fragment, TK8 (residues 647-688), that contains the threonine phosphorylation site but no tyrosine. We show that the phosphorylation of threonine residues in GST-TK8 by extracts of A431 cells is stimulated by heparin but not by EGF. These and other results suggest that heparin acts as a chaperone, a substrate modulator, that enhances the susceptibility of the substrate to phosphorylation by protein kinases.

  13. The tyrosine phosphatase CD148 is an essential positive regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Senis, Yotis A; Tomlinson, Michael G; Ellison, Stuart; Mazharian, Alexandra; Lim, Jenson; Zhao, Yan; Kornerup, Kristin N; Auger, Jocelyn M; Thomas, Steve G; Dhanjal, Tarvinder; Kalia, Neena; Zhu, Jing W; Weiss, Arthur; Watson, Steve P

    2009-05-14

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis and thrombosis. They are also involved in pathologic conditions resulting from blocked blood vessels, including myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation at sites of vascular injury are regulated by a diverse repertoire of tyrosine kinase-linked and G protein-coupled receptors. Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in initiating and propagating signaling from several platelet surface receptors; however, the underlying mechanism of how SFK activity is regulated in platelets remains unclear. CD148 is the only receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase identified in platelets to date. In the present study, we show that mutant mice lacking CD148 exhibited a bleeding tendency and defective arterial thrombosis. Basal SFK activity was found to be markedly reduced in CD148-deficient platelets, resulting in a global hyporesponsiveness to agonists that signal through SFKs, including collagen and fibrinogen. G protein-coupled receptor responses to thrombin and other agonists were also marginally reduced. These results highlight CD148 as a global regulator of platelet activation and a novel antithrombotic drug target.

  14. The tyrosine phosphatase CD148 is an essential positive regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Michael G.; Ellison, Stuart; Mazharian, Alexandra; Lim, Jenson; Zhao, Yan; Kornerup, Kristin N.; Auger, Jocelyn M.; Thomas, Steve G.; Dhanjal, Tarvinder; Kalia, Neena; Zhu, Jing W.; Weiss, Arthur; Watson, Steve P.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis and thrombosis. They are also involved in pathologic conditions resulting from blocked blood vessels, including myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation at sites of vascular injury are regulated by a diverse repertoire of tyrosine kinase–linked and G protein–coupled receptors. Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in initiating and propagating signaling from several platelet surface receptors; however, the underlying mechanism of how SFK activity is regulated in platelets remains unclear. CD148 is the only receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase identified in platelets to date. In the present study, we show that mutant mice lacking CD148 exhibited a bleeding tendency and defective arterial thrombosis. Basal SFK activity was found to be markedly reduced in CD148-deficient platelets, resulting in a global hyporesponsiveness to agonists that signal through SFKs, including collagen and fibrinogen. G protein–coupled receptor responses to thrombin and other agonists were also marginally reduced. These results highlight CD148 as a global regulator of platelet activation and a novel antithrombotic drug target. PMID:19246339

  15. Attenuated natural killer (NK) cell activation through C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 is due to an anomalous hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (HemITAM) with impaired Syk kinase recruitment capacity.

    PubMed

    Rückrich, Thomas; Steinle, Alexander

    2013-06-14

    Cellular cytotoxicity is the hallmark of NK cells mediating both elimination of virus-infected or malignant cells, and modulation of immune responses. NK cytotoxicity is triggered upon ligation of various activating NK cell receptors. Among these is the C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 which is encoded in the human Natural Killer Gene Complex (NKC) adjacent to its ligand, activation-induced C-type lectin (AICL). NKp80-AICL interaction promotes cytolysis of malignant myeloid cells, but also stimulates the mutual crosstalk between NK cells and monocytes. While many activating NK cell receptors pair with ITAM-bearing adaptors, we recently reported that NKp80 signals via a hemITAM-like sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. Here we molecularly dissect the NKp80 hemITAM and demonstrate that two non-consensus amino acids, in particular arginine 6, critically impair both hemITAM phosphorylation and Syk recruitment. Impaired Syk recruitment results in a substantial attenuation of cytotoxic responses upon NKp80 ligation. Reconstituting the hemITAM consensus or Syk overexpression resulted in robust NKp80-mediated responsiveness. Collectively, our data provide a molecular rationale for the restrained activation potential of NKp80 and illustrate how subtle alterations in signaling motifs determine subsequent cellular responses. They also suggest that non-consensus alterations in the NKp80 hemITAM, as commonly present among mammalian NKp80 sequences, may have evolved to dampen NKp80-mediated cytotoxic responses toward AICL-expressing cells.

  16. Inactivation of PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors by tyrosine nitration may enable rapid inhibition of ABA signaling by nitric oxide in plants.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Mari-Cruz; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; González-Guzmán, Miguel; Rodriguez, Lesia; Rodriguez, Pedro L; León, José

    2015-09-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that inhibits growth and enhances adaptation to stress in plants. ABA perception and signaling rely on its binding to receptors of the pyrabactin resistance1/PYR1-like/regulatory components of ABA receptors (PYR/PYL/RCAR) family, the subsequent inhibition of clade A type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), and the phosphorylation of ion channels and transcription factors by protein kinases of the SnRK2 family. Nitric oxide (NO) may inhibit ABA signaling because NO-deficient plants are hypersensitive to ABA. Regulation by NO often involves posttranslational modification of proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis of ABA receptors expressed in plants and recombinant receptors modified in vitro revealed that the receptors were nitrated at tyrosine residues and S-nitrosylated at cysteine residues. In an in vitro ABA-induced, PP2C inhibition assay, tyrosine nitration reduced receptor activity, whereas S-nitrosylated receptors were fully capable of ABA-induced inhibition of the phosphatase. PYR/PYL/RCAR proteins with nitrated tyrosine, which is an irreversible covalent modification, were polyubiquitylated and underwent proteasome-mediated degradation. We propose that tyrosine nitration, which requires NO and superoxide anions, is a rapid mechanism by which NO limits ABA signaling under conditions in which NO and reactive oxygen species are both produced.

  17. Distinct cellular properties of oncogenic KIT receptor tyrosine kinase mutants enable alternative courses of cancer cell inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiarong; Sousa, Leiliane P.; Mandel-Bausch, Elizabeth M.; Tome, Francisco; Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lax, Irit

    2016-01-01

    Large genomic sequencing analysis as part of precision medicine efforts revealed numerous activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases, including KIT. Unfortunately, a single approach is not effective for inhibiting cancer cells or treating cancers driven by all known oncogenic KIT mutants. Here, we show that each of the six major KIT oncogenic mutants exhibits different enzymatic, cellular, and dynamic properties and responds distinctly to different KIT inhibitors. One class of KIT mutants responded well to anti-KIT antibody treatment alone or in combination with a low dose of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). A second class of KIT mutants, including a mutant resistant to imatinib treatment, responded well to a combination of TKI with anti-KIT antibodies or to anti-KIT toxin conjugates, respectively. We conclude that the preferred choice of precision medicine treatments for cancers driven by activated KIT and other RTKs may rely on clear understanding of the dynamic properties of oncogenic mutants. PMID:27482095

  18. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Advances in mass spectrometry based strategies to study receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Vyse, Simon; Desmond, Howard; Huang, Paul H

    2017-03-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key transmembrane environmental sensors that are capable of transmitting extracellular information into phenotypic responses, including cell proliferation, survival and metabolism. Advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics have been instrumental in providing the foundations of much of our current understanding of RTK signalling networks and activation dynamics. Furthermore, new insights relating to the deregulation of RTKs in disease, for instance receptor co-activation and kinome reprogramming, have largely been identified using phosphoproteomic-based strategies. This review outlines the current approaches employed in phosphoproteomic workflows, including phosphopeptide enrichment and MS data-acquisition methods. Here, recent advances in the application of MS-based phosphoproteomics to bridge critical gaps in our knowledge of RTK signalling are focused on. The current limitations of the technology are discussed and emerging areas such as computational modelling, high-throughput phospho-proteomic workflows and next-generation single-cell approaches to further our understanding in new areas of RTK biology are highlighted.

  20. Advances in mass spectrometry based strategies to study receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Vyse, Simon; Desmond, Howard; Huang, Paul H.

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key transmembrane environmental sensors that are capable of transmitting extracellular information into phenotypic responses, including cell proliferation, survival and metabolism. Advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics have been instrumental in providing the foundations of much of our current understanding of RTK signalling networks and activation dynamics. Furthermore, new insights relating to the deregulation of RTKs in disease, for instance receptor co-activation and kinome reprogramming, have largely been identified using phosphoproteomic-based strategies. This review outlines the current approaches employed in phosphoproteomic workflows, including phosphopeptide enrichment and MS data-acquisition methods. Here, recent advances in the application of MS-based phosphoproteomics to bridge critical gaps in our knowledge of RTK signalling are focused on. The current limitations of the technology are discussed and emerging areas such as computational modelling, high-throughput phospho­proteomic workflows and next-generation single-cell approaches to further our understanding in new areas of RTK biology are highlighted. PMID:28250950

  1. Tyrosine sulfation influences the chemokine binding selectivity of peptides derived from chemokine receptor CCR3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, John Z; Millard, Christopher J; Ludeman, Justin P; Simpson, Levi S; Clayton, Daniel J; Payne, Richard J; Widlanski, Theodore S; Stone, Martin J

    2011-03-08

    The interactions of chemokines with their G protein-coupled receptors play critical roles in the control of leukocyte trafficking in normal homeostasis and in inflammatory responses. Tyrosine sulfation is a common post-translational modification in the amino-terminal regions of chemokine receptors. However, tyrosine sulfation of chemokine receptors is commonly incomplete or heterogeneous. To investigate the possibility that differential sulfation of two adjacent tyrosine residues could bias the responses of chemokine receptor CCR3 to different chemokines, we have studied the binding of three chemokines (eotaxin-1/CCL11, eotaxin-2/CCL24, and eotaxin-3/CCL26) to an N-terminal CCR3-derived peptide in each of its four possible sulfation states. Whereas the nonsulfated peptide binds to the three chemokines with approximately equal affinity, sulfation of Tyr-16 gives rise to 9-16-fold selectivity for eotaxin-1 over the other two chemokines. Subsequent sulfation of Tyr-17 contributes additively to the affinity for eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2 but cooperatively to the affinity for eotaxin-3. The doubly sulfated peptide selectively binds to both eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-3 approximately 10-fold more tightly than to eotaxin-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift mapping indicates that these variations in affinity probably result from only subtle differences in the chemokine surfaces interacting with these receptor peptides. These data support the proposal that variations in sulfation states or levels may regulate the responsiveness of chemokine receptors to their cognate chemokines.

  2. Characterization of a Mn sup 2+ -dependent membrane serine kinase that is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is hypothesized that the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase may directly phosphorylate and activate one or more serine kinases. The identities of such serine kinases as well as their modes of activation are unclear. The authors have described a serine kinase from rat liver membranes that copurifies with the IR on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-sepharose. The kinase is activated after phosphorylation of the WGA-sepharose-purified fraction by casein kinase-1, casein kinase-2, or casein kinase-3. A tyrosine kinase, possibly IR tyrosine kinase, also participates in the activation process since a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor such as vanadate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, or phosphotyrosine is required in reaction mixtures for activation to be observed. By contrast, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine do not support activation. The activated kinase can use IR {beta}-subunit, myelin basic protein (MBP), and histones as substrates. IR {beta}-subunit phosphorylation was stimulated by MBP, histones, and polylysine, and inhibited by heparin and poly(glu, tyr). The kinase prefers Mn{sup 2+} over Mg{sup 2+} as a metal cofactor.

  3. A transforming mutation enhances the activity of the c-Kit soluble tyrosine kinase domain.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L P; Chow, R Y; Berger, S A

    1999-01-01

    An activating mutation (DY814) located in the catalytic domain of the c-Kit receptor has been found in mastocytomas from human, mouse and rat. We evaluated the enzymic properties of purified wild-type (WT) and DY814 tyrosine kinase domains expressed in Pichia pastoris. A linker encoding the Flag epitope was fused to c-Kit cDNA species, enabling affinity purification of the proteins with anti-Flag antibodies. Yeast lysates expressing DY814 contained multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, whereas WT lysates had no detectable tyrosine phosphorylation. Purification of the WT and mutant kinases in the presence of vanadate demonstrated that both enzymes undergo autophosphorylation. Kinetic analyses of WT and DY814 kinases indicated that at 20 nM enzyme concentration the mutation increases the specific activity 10-fold and decreases the apparent Km for ATP 9-fold. WT activity displayed a hyperbolic dependence on enzyme concentration, consistent with a requirement for dimerization or aggregation for activity. This activity was also enhanced by anti-Flag antibodies. In contrast, the dependence of DY814 activity on enzyme concentration was primarily linear and only marginally enhanced by anti-Flag antibodies. Gel-filtration analysis showed that the WT kinase migrated as a monomer, whereas the DY814 mutant migrated as a dimer. These results indicate that this point mutation promotes dimerization of the c-Kit kinase, potentially contributing to its transforming potential in mast cells. PMID:9931308

  4. rse, a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase with homology to Axl/Ufo, is expressed at high levels in the brain.

    PubMed

    Mark, M R; Scadden, D T; Wang, Z; Gu, Q; Goddard, A; Godowski, P J

    1994-04-08

    We have isolated cDNA clones that encode the human and murine forms of a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase termed Rse. Sequence analysis indicates that human Rse contains 890 amino acids, with an extracellular region composed of two immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III domains. Murine Rse contains 880 amino acids and shares 90% amino acid identity with its human counterpart. Rse is structurally similar to the receptor-type tyrosine kinase Axl/Ufo, and the two proteins have 35 and 63% sequence identity in their extracellular and intracellular domains, respectively. To study the synthesis and activation of this putative receptor-type tyrosine kinase, we constructed a version of Rse (termed gD-Rse, where gD represents glycoprotein D) that contains an NH2-terminal epitope tag. NIH3T3 cells were engineered to express gD-Rse, which could be detected at the cell surface by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, gD-Rse was rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon incubation of the cells with an antibody directed against the epitope tag, suggesting that rse encodes an active tyrosine kinase. In the human tissues we examined, the highest level of expression of rse mRNA was observed in the brain; rse mRNA was also detected in the premegakaryocytopoietic cell lines CMK11-5 and Dami. The gene for rse was localized to human chromosome 15.

  5. Tyrosine Kinase Ligand-Receptor Pair Prediction by Using Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Yarimizu, Masayuki; Wei, Cao; Komiyama, Yusuke; Ueki, Kokoro; Nakamura, Shugo; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases are essential proteins involved in cellular differentiation and proliferation in vivo and are heavily involved in allergic diseases, diabetes, and onset/proliferation of cancerous cells. Identifying the interacting partner of this protein, a growth factor ligand, will provide a deeper understanding of cellular proliferation/differentiation and other cell processes. In this study, we developed a method for predicting tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from their amino acid sequences. We collected tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and UniProtKB, filtered them by removing sequence redundancy, and used them as a dataset for machine learning and assessment of predictive performance. Our prediction method is based on support vector machines (SVMs), and we evaluated several input features suitable for tyrosine kinase for machine learning and compared and analyzed the results. Using sequence pattern information and domain information extracted from sequences as input features, we obtained 0.996 of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. This accuracy is higher than that obtained from general protein-protein interaction pair predictions. PMID:26347773

  6. Chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Nam Lee, Mi; Jeong, Byung-Chul; Oh, Sin-Hye; Kook, Min-Suk; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2017-03-16

    The c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase and its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), have been recently introduced to negatively regulate bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced osteogenesis. However, the effect of chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor on osteoblast differentiation process has not been examined, especially the applicability of c-Met chemical inhibitors on in vivo bone regeneration. In this study, we demonstrated that chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase, SYN1143 and SGX523, could potentiate the differentiation of precursor cells to osteoblasts and stimulate regeneration in calvarial bone defects of mice. Treatment with SYN1143 or SGX523 inhibited HGF-induced c-Met phosphorylation in MC3T3-E1 and C3H10T1/2 cells. Cell proliferation of MC3T3-E1 or C3H10T1/2 was not significantly affected by the concentrations of these inhibitors. Co-treatment with chemical inhibitor of c-Met and osteogenic inducing media enhanced osteoblast-specific genes expression and calcium nodule formation accompanied by increased Runx2 expression via c-Met receptor-dependent but Erk-Smad signaling independent pathway. Notably, the administration of these c-Met inhibitors significantly repaired critical-sized calvarial bone defects. Collectively, our results suggest that chemical inhibitors of c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase might be used as novel therapeutics to induce bone regeneration.

  7. Pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta as regulators of angiogenesis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Pantazaka, Evangelia; Castana, Penelope; Tsalios, Thomas; Polyzos, Alexandros; Beis, Dimitris

    2016-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted heparin-binding growth factor that through its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ) has a significant regulatory effect on angiogenesis and cancer. PTN and RPTPβ/ζ are over-expressed in several types of human cancers and regulate important cancer cell functions in vitro and cancer growth in vivo. This review begins with a brief introduction of PTN and the regulation of its expression. PTN receptors are described with special emphasis on RPTPβ/ζ, which also interacts with and/or affects the function of other important targets for cancer therapy, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A, ανβ3 and cell surface nucleolin. PTN biological activities related to angiogenesis and cancer are extensively discussed. Finally, up to date approaches of targeting PTN or RPTPβ/ζ for cancer treatment are presented. Insights into the regulatory role of PTN/RPTPβ/ζ on angiogenesis will be extremely beneficial for future development of alternative anti-angiogenic approaches in cancer therapy.

  8. Slit and Receptor Tyrosine Phosphatase 69D Confer Spatial Specificity to Axon Branching via Dscam1

    PubMed Central

    Dascenco, Dan; Erfurth, Maria-Luise; Izadifar, Azadeh; Song, Minmin; Sachse, Sonja; Bortnick, Rachel; Urwyler, Olivier; Petrovic, Milan; Ayaz, Derya; He, Haihuai; Kise, Yoshiaki; Thomas, Franziska; Kidd, Thomas; Schmucker, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Axonal branching contributes substantially to neuronal circuit complexity. Studies in Drosophila have shown that loss of Dscam1 receptor diversity can fully block axon branching in mechanosensory neurons. Here we report that cell-autonomous loss of the Receptor-Tyrosine-Phosphatase 69D (RPTP69D) and loss of midline-localized Slit inhibit formation of specific axon collaterals through modulation of Dscam1 activity. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which direct binding of Slit to Dscam1 enhances the interaction of Dscam1 with RPTP69D, stimulating Dscam1 dephosphorylation. Single growth cone imaging reveals that Slit/RPTP69D are not required for general branch initiation, but instead promote the extension of specific axon collaterals. Hence, while regulation of intrinsic Dscam1-Dscam1 isoform interactions is essential for formation of all mechanosensory-axon branches, the local ligand-induced alterations of Dscam1 phosphorylation in distinct growth cone compartments enable the spatial specificity of axon collateral formation. PMID:26317474

  9. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  10. Viral immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mediated signaling in cell transformation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2006-08-01

    Viruses frequently co-opt host cell pathways to enhance their propagation or to enable latent infection. Certain receptors expressed by hematopoietic cells have immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) in their cytoplasmic domains that initiate cellular activation, proliferation and differentiation. Some viruses have evolved, or acquired from their host, genes that encode ITAM-bearing proteins. These ITAM-bearing viral proteins have been implicated in cellular transformation in virus-infected hematopoietic cells, typically B cells, but also in non-hematopoietic tissues--including endothelial and epithelial cells.

  11. Tyrosine-based signal mediates LRP6 receptor endocytosis and desensitization of Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Roth, Barbara; Bu, Guojun

    2014-10-03

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling orchestrates a number of critical events including cell growth, differentiation, and cell survival during development. Misregulation of this pathway leads to various human diseases, specifically cancers. Endocytosis and phosphorylation of the LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), an essential co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, play a vital role in mediating Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction. However, its regulatory mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we define the mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytic trafficking regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation. We show that LRP6 mutant with defective tyrosine-based signal in its cytoplasmic tail has an increased cell surface distribution and decreased endocytosis rate. These changes in LRP6 endocytosis coincide with an increased distribution to caveolae, increased phosphorylation, and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We further demonstrate that treatment of Wnt3a ligands or blocking the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of LRP6 leads to a redistribution of wild-type receptor to lipid rafts. The LRP6 tyrosine mutant also exhibited an increase in signaling activation in response to Wnt3a stimulation when compared with wild-type LRP6, and this activation is suppressed when caveolae-mediated endocytosis is blocked. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytosis routes regulate its phosphorylation and the strength of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and have implications on how this pathway can be modulated in human diseases.

  12. Essential role of ubiquitin-specific protease 8 for receptor tyrosine kinase stability and endocytic trafficking in vivo.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Sandra; Oksche, Alexander; Kisser, Agnes; Löhler, Jürgen; Prinz, Marco; Schorle, Hubert; Feller, Stephan; Lewitzky, Marc; Horak, Ivan; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter

    2007-07-01

    Posttranslational modification by ubiquitin controls multiple cellular functions and is counteracted by the activities of deubiquitinating enzymes. UBPy (USP8) is a growth-regulated ubiquitin isopeptidase that interacts with the HRS-STAM complex. Using Cre-loxP-mediated gene targeting in mice, we show that lack of UBPy results in embryonic lethality, whereas its conditional inactivation in adults causes fatal liver failure. The defect is accompanied by a strong reduction or absence of several growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), like epidermal growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-met), and ERBB3. UBPy-deficient cells exhibit aberrantly enlarged early endosomes colocalizing with enhanced ubiquitination and have reduced levels of HRS and STAM2. Congruently immortalized cells gradually stop proliferation upon induced deletion of UBPy. These results unveil a central and nonredundant role of UBPy in growth regulation, endosomal sorting, and the control of RTKs in vivo.

  13. Identification of therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer through active tyrosine kinase profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, Alberto; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of a set of pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases in ovarian cancer patient samples was analyzed to define potential therapeutic targets. Frequent activation of HER family receptor tyrosine kinases, especially HER2, was observed. Studies in ovarian cancer cell lines confirmed the activation of HER2. Moreover, knockdown of HER2 caused a strong inhibition of their proliferation. Analyses of the action of agents that target HER2 indicated that the antibody drug conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine (T-DM1) caused a substantial antitumoral effect in vivo and in vitro, and potentiated the action of drugs used in the therapy of ovarian cancer. T-DM1 provoked cell cycle arrest in mitosis, and caused the appearance of aberrant mitotic spindles in cells treated with the drug. Biochemical experiments confirmed accumulation of the mitotic markers phospho-Histone H3 and phospho-BUBR1 in cells treated with the drug. Prolonged treatment of ovarian cancer cells with T-DM1 provoked the appearance of multinucleated cells which later led to cell death. Together, these data indicate that HER2 represents an important oncogene in ovarian cancer, and suggest that targeting this tyrosine kinase with T-DM1 may be therapeutically effective, especially in ovarian tumors with high content of HER2. PMID:26336133

  14. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B.; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21–amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals. PMID:26601222

  15. Tyrosine 569 in the c-Fms juxtamembrane domain is essential for kinase activity and macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Myles, G M; Brandt, C S; Carlberg, K; Rohrschneider, L R

    1994-01-01

    The receptor (Fms) for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a member of the tyrosine kinase class of growth factor receptors. It maintains survival, stimulates growth, and drives differentiation of the macrophage lineage of hematopoietic cells. Fms accumulates on the cell surface and becomes activated for signal transduction after M-CSF binding and is then internalized via endocytosis for eventual degradation in lysosomes. We have investigated the mechanism of endocytosis as part of the overall signaling process of this receptor and have identified an amino acid segment near the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region surrounding tyrosine 569 that is important for internalization. Mutation of tyrosine 569 to alanine (Y569A) eliminates ligand-induced rapid endocytosis of receptor molecules. The mutant Fms Y569A also lacks tyrosine kinase activity; however, tyrosine kinase activity is not essential for endocytosis because the kinase inactive receptor Fms K614A does undergo ligand-induced endocytosis, albeit at a reduced rate. Mutation of tyrosine 569 to phenylalanine had no effect on the M-CSF-induced endocytosis of Fms, and a four-amino-acid sequence containing Y-569 could support endocytosis when transferred into the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region of a glycophorin A construct. These results indicate that tyrosine 569 within the juxtamembrane region of Fms is part of a signal recognition sequence for endocytosis that does not require tyrosine phosphorylation at this site and that this domain also influences the kinase activity of the receptor. These results are consistent with a ligand-dependent step in recognition of the potential cryptic internalization signal. Images PMID:8007983

  16. Targeting kinases with anilinopyrimidines: discovery of N-phenyl-N’-[4-(pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl]urea derivatives as selective inhibitors of class III receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Gandin, Valentina; Ferrarese, Alessandro; Dalla Via, Martina; Marzano, Cristina; Chilin, Adriana; Marzaro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors are attractive drugs/drug candidates for the treatment of cancer. The most recent literature has highlighted the importance of multi target kinase inhibitors, although a correct balance between specificity and non-specificity is required. In this view, the discovery of multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors with subfamily selectivity is a challenging goal. Herein we present the synthesis and the preliminary kinase profiling of a set of novel 4-anilinopyrimidines. Among the synthesized compounds, the N-phenyl-N’-[4-(pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl]urea derivatives selectively targeted some members of class III receptor tyrosine kinase family. Starting from the structure of hit compound 19 we synthesized a further compound with an improved affinity toward the class III receptor tyrosine kinase members and endowed with a promising antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine solid tumor model. Molecular modeling simulations were used in order to rationalize the behavior of the title compounds. PMID:26568452

  17. Localization of a human receptor tyrosine kinase (ETK1) to chromosome region 3p11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, I.P.; Boyd, A.W. ); Lapsys, N.M.; Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. ); Campbell, L.J. )

    1994-01-01

    The authors have recently described a human receptor tyrosine kinase (hek) that is expressed by some pre-B and thymic T cell lines, but is not detectable on normal adult human tissues. Gene cloning studies established that hek is a new member of the EPH family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The expression of hek may normally be developmentally regulated and inappropriate expression may contribute to oncogenesis. In the present study, they have used Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize the hek gene to human chromosome region 3p11.2. Karyotype analysis of the cell lines that over-express hek showed no cytogenetically visible abnormality involving the hek locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  19. Augmentor α and β (FAM150) are ligands of the receptor tyrosine kinases ALK and LTK: Hierarchy and specificity of ligand–receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Murray, Phillip B.; Shi, Xiarong; Mo, Elizabeth S.; Mohanty, Jyotidarsini; Tome, Francisco; Bai, Hanwen; Gunel, Murat; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a class of cell surface receptors that, upon ligand binding, stimulate a variety of critical cellular functions. The orphan receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is one of very few RTKs that remain without a firmly established protein ligand. Here we present a novel cytokine, FAM150B, which we propose naming augmentor-α (AUG-α), as a ligand for ALK. AUG-α binds ALK with high affinity and activates ALK in cells with subnanomolar potency. Detailed binding experiments using cells expressing ALK or the related receptor leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) demonstrate that AUG-α binds and robustly activates both ALK and LTK. We show that the previously established LTK ligand FAM150A (AUG-β) is specific for LTK and only weakly binds to ALK. Furthermore, expression of AUG-α stimulates transformation of NIH/3T3 cells expressing ALK, induces IL-3 independent growth of Ba/F3 cells expressing ALK, and is expressed in neuroblastoma, a cancer partly driven by ALK. These experiments reveal the hierarchy and specificity of two cytokines as ligands for ALK and LTK and set the stage for elucidating their roles in development and disease states. PMID:26630010

  20. Intimate association of Thy-1 and the T-cell antigen receptor with the CD45 tyrosine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Volarevic, S.; Burns, C.M.; Sussman, J.J.; Ashwell, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Immunoprecipitation of Thy-1 from Triton X-100 detergent lysates of surface-iodinated and chemically cross-linked T cells precipitated at least first major and discrete bands. Four of these bands were identified as Thy-1, CD45 (a trasmembrane tyrosine phosphatase), a major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I molecule, and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin. Similar analyses revealed that CD45 was coprecipitated from lysates of cross-linker-treated cells by antibodies to the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR). The same pattern of coprecipitated bands was observed when digitonin was used to lyse untreated cells. Immunoprecipitation of Thy-1 or the TCR from lysates of cross-linked T cells precipitated CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity. Calculations based upon the amounts of coprecipitated enzymatic activity or TCR {zeta} chain indicate that a substantial fraction of Thy-1 and TCR complexes can be cross-linked to CD45. These data support a model in which the dependence of Thy-1 signaling on TCR coexpression is due to their common interaction with a tyrosine phosphatase and provide a possible structural basis for the influence of CD45 on TCR-mediated signaling.

  1. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  2. The impact of smoking status on radiologic tumor progression patterns and response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung adenocarcinoma with activating EGFR mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Ahn, Jin Seok; Sun, Jong-Mu; Choi, Yoon-La; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of smoking on the treatment outcome of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma, with consideration of other factors including radiologic tumor progression pattern according to patient smoking status. Methods A total of 224 patients with EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinomas that were treated with EGFR-TKIs were retrospectively reviewed. Radiologic tumor progression pattern and treatment outcomes were evaluated according to smoking history. Results There were no significant differences in radiologic tumor progression pattern based on smoking status. There were no significant differences in survival between never-smokers and smokers or among never-, former-, and current-smokers, but there was a trend of shorter progression free survival (PFS) and poorer overall survival (OS) in smokers compared with never-smokers. In multivariate analysis, long-term smokers had shorter PFS and poorer OS than those who had never smoked. Conclusions A history of smoking had no significant effect on radiologic tumor progression pattern; however, smoking history is a negative predictive factor of survival in patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma undergoing EGFR-TKI therapy. PMID:28066597

  3. Dacomitinib (PF-00299804), a second-generation irreversible pan-erbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, demonstrates remarkable activity against HER2-amplified uterine serous endometrial cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liancheng; Lopez, Salvatore; Bellone, Stefania; Black, Jonathan; Cocco, Emiliano; Zigras, Tiffany; Predolini, Federica; Bonazzoli, Elena; Bussi, Beatrice; Stuhmer, Zachary; Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Ratner, Elena; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E; Rutherford, Thomas J; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-07-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is an aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer that carries an extremely poor prognosis. Up to 35 % of USC may overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) at strong (i.e., 3+) level by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or harbor HER2/neu gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this study, we assessed the sensitivity of a panel of USC cell lines with and without HER2/neu gene amplification to dacomitinib (PF-00299804), an irreversible pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Eight primary cell lines (i.e., four harboring HER2/neu gene amplification by FISH and four FISH- cell lines), all demonstrating similar in vitro growth rates, were evaluated in viability/proliferation assays. The effect of dacomitinib on cell growth, cell cycle distribution, and signaling was determined using flow cytometry-based assays. Dacomitinib caused a significantly stronger growth inhibition in HER2/neu FISH+ USC cell lines when compared to FISH- USC (dacomitinib half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) mean ± SEM = 0.02803 ± 0.003355 μM in FISH+ versus 1.498 ± 0.2209 μM in FISH- tumors, P < 0.0001). Dacomitinib growth inhibition was associated with a significant and dose-dependent decline in phosphorylated HER2/neu and S6 transcription factor and a dose-dependent and time-dependent cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 in FISH+ USC. Dacomitinib is remarkably effective against chemotherapy-resistant HER2/neu gene-amplified USC. Clinical studies with dacomitinib in HER2/neu FISH+ USC patients resistant to standard salvage chemotherapy are warranted.

  4. Three Tyrosine Residues in the Erythropoietin Receptor Are Essential for Janus Kinase 2 V617F Mutant-induced Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Fumihito; Tago, Kenji; Tamura, Hiroomi; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi

    2017-02-03

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) regulates development of blood cells, and its full activation normally requires the cytokine erythropoietin (Epo). In the case of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), Epo-independent signaling through EpoR can be caused by a point mutation, V617F, in the EpoR-interacting tyrosine kinase Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). In cells expressing the JAK2 V617F mutant, eight tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of EpoR are phosphorylated, but the functional role of these phosphorylations in oncogenic signaling is incompletely understood. Here, to evaluate the functional consequences of the phosphorylation of these tyrosine residues, we constructed an EpoR-8YF mutant in which we substituted all eight tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Co-expression of EpoR-8YF with the JAK2 V617F mutant failed to induce cytokine-independent cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, indicating that JAK2-mediated EpoR phosphorylation is the reason for JAK2 V617F mutant-induced oncogenic signaling. An exhaustive mutational analysis of the eight EpoR tyrosine residues indicated that three of these residues, Tyr-343, Tyr-460, and Tyr-464, are required for the JAK2 V617F mutant to exhibit its oncogenic activity. We also showed that phosphorylation at these three residues was necessary for full activation of the transcription factor STAT5, which is a critical downstream factor of JAK2 V617F-induced oncogenic signaling. In contrast, Epo stimulation could moderately stimulate the proliferation of cells expressing wild type JAK2 and EpoR-8YF, suggesting that the requirement of the phosphorylation of these three tyrosine residues seems to be specific for the oncogenic proliferation provoked by V617F mutation. Collectively, these results have revealed that phosphorylation of Tyr-343, Tyr-460, and Tyr-464 in EpoR underlies JAK2 V617F mutant-induced tumorigenesis. We propose that the targeted disruption of this pathway has therapeutic utility for managing MPN.

  5. An extended surface of binding to Trk tyrosine kinase receptors in NGF and BDNF allows the engineering of a multifunctional pan-neurotrophin.

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, C F; Ilag, L L; Murray-Rust, J; Persson, H

    1993-01-01

    Neurotrophin-mediated cell survival and differentiation of vertebrate neurons is caused by ligand-specific binding to the Trk family of tyrosine kinase receptors. However, sites in the neurotrophins responsible for the binding to Trk receptors and the mechanisms whereby this interaction results in receptor activation and biological activity are unknown. Here we show that in nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), discontinuous stretches of amino acid residues group together on one side of the neurotrophin dimer forming a continuous surface responsible for binding to and activation of TrkA and TrkB receptors. Two symmetrical surfaces are formed along the two-fold axis of the neurotrophin dimer providing a model for ligand-mediated receptor dimerization. Mutated neurotrophins inducing similar levels of receptor phosphorylation showed different biological activities, suggesting that structural differences in a ligand may result in dissimilar responses in a given tyrosine kinase receptor. Our results allowed us to combine structural elements from NGF, BDNF and neurotrophin-3 to engineer a pan-neurotrophin that efficiently activates all Trk receptors and displays multiple neurotrophic specificities. Images PMID:8508763

  6. Nucleotide binding by the epidermal growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase. Trinitrophenyl-ATP as a spectroscopic probe.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K; Koland, J G

    1996-01-05

    The nucleotide binding properties of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor protein-tyrosine kinase were investigated with the fluorescent nucleotide analog 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP). TNP-ATP was found to be an active substrate for the autophosphorylation reaction of the recombinant EGF receptor protein-tyrosine kinase domain (TKD). Whereas the Vmax for the TNP-ATP-dependent autophosphorylation reaction was approximately 200-fold lower than that of ATP, the Km for this reaction was similar to that observed with ATP. The nucleotide analog was also shown to be an inhibitor of the ATP-dependent autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation reactions of the TKD. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated both a high affinity binding of TNP-ATP to the recombinant TKD and a markedly enhanced fluorescence of the bound nucleotide analog. The fluorescence of enzyme-bound TNP-ATP was attenuated in the presence of ATP, which enabled determination of the dissociation constants for both ATP and the Mn2+ complex of ATP. A truncated form of the EGF receptor TKD lacking the C-terminal autophosphorylation domain exhibited an enhanced affinity for TNP-ATP, which indicated that the autophosphorylation domain occupied the peptide substrate binding site of the TKD and modulated the binding of the nucleotide substrates.

  7. Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream signaling with cell-penetrating peptides in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Wilson, Jamie L; Taylor, Linda; Rahimi, Nader; Mierke, Dale; Polgar, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) intracellular delivery of receptor signaling motifs provides an opportunity to regulate specific receptor tyrosine kinase signal transductions. We targeted tyrosine residues Y740 and Y751 of the PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) and Y1175 of the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The Y740 and Y751 motifs activated ERK and Akt, while the Y1175 motif activated ERK. Targeting either Y740 or Y751 of the PDGFRβ in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) effectively inhibited PDGF activation of ERK or Akt. Interfering with the Y751 region of the PDGFRβ proved more effective than targeting the Y740 region. The phosphorylation of Y751 of the CPP and the length and exact sequence of the mimicking peptide proved crucial. On the other hand, in human pulmonary artery endothelial cell phosphorylation of the VEGFR2 Y1175 CPP was not a determinant in blockage of ERK activation. Likewise, the length of the peptide mimic was not crucial with a very small sequence containing the Y1175 remaining effective. Physiologic proof of concept for the effectiveness of the CPP was confirmed by blockage of HPASMC migration in response to PDGF following culture injury. Thus targeted blockage of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling can be very effective.

  8. Rational Design of a Dephosphorylation-Resistant Reporter Enables Single-Cell Measurement of Tyrosine Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Turner, Abigail H; Lebhar, Michael S; Proctor, Angela; Wang, Qunzhao; Lawrence, David S; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2016-02-19

    Although peptide-based reporters of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity have been used to study PTK enzymology in vitro, the application of these reporters to intracellular conditions is compromised by their dephosphorylation, preventing PTK activity measurements. Nonproteinogenic amino acids may be utilized to rationally design selective peptidic ligands by accessing greater chemical and structural diversity than is available using the native amino acids. We describe a peptidic reporter that, upon phosphorylation by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is resistant to dephosphorylation both in vitro and in cellulo. The reporter contains a conformationally constrained phosphorylatable moiety (7-(S)-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) in the place of L-tyrosine and is efficiently phosphorylated in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. Dephosphorylation of the reporter occurs 3 orders of magnitude more slowly compared with that of the conventional tyrosine-containing reporter.

  9. Tryptophan prenyltransferases showing higher catalytic activities for Friedel-Crafts alkylation of o- and m-tyrosines than tyrosine prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aili; Xie, Xiulan; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-07-21

    Tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2, 5-DMATS, 6-DMATSSv and 7-DMATS catalyse regiospecific C-prenylations on the indole ring, while tyrosine prenyltransferases SirD and TyrPT catalyse the O-prenylation of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In this study, we report the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of L-o-tyrosine by these enzymes. Surprisingly, no conversion was detected with SirD and three tryptophan prenyltransferases showed significantly higher activity than another tyrosine prenyltransferase TyrPT. C5-prenylated L-o-tyrosine was identified as a unique product of these enzymes. Using L-m-tyrosine as the prenylation substrate, product formation was only observed with the tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS. C4- and C6-prenylated derivatives were identified in the reaction mixture of FgaPT2. These results provided additional evidence for the similarities and differences between these two subgroups within the DMATS superfamily in their catalytic behaviours.

  10. LIG Family Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Associated Proteins Modulate Growth Factor Signals During Neural Development

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Kenji; Guo, Ting; Hillaire, Coryse St.; Meabon, James S.; Kanning, Kevin C.; Bothwell, Mark; Ginty, David D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Genome-wide screens were performed to identify transmembrane proteins that mediate axonal growth, guidance and target field innervation of somatosensory neurons. One gene, Linx (alias Islr2), encoding a leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin (LIG) family protein, is expressed in a subset of developing sensory and motor neurons. Domain and genomic structures of Linx and other LIG family members suggest that they are evolutionarily related to Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Several LIGs, including Linx are expressed in subsets of somatosensory and motor neurons and select members interact with TrkA and Ret RTKs. Moreover, axonal projection defects in mice harboring a null mutation in Linx resemble those in mice lacking Ngf, TrkA and Ret. In addition, Linx modulates NGF–TrkA- and GDNF–GFRα1/Ret-mediated axonal extension in cultured sensory and motor neurons, respectively. These findings show that LIGs physically interact with RTKs and modulate their activities to control axonal extension, guidance and branching. PMID:19755105

  11. Addressing epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Noda, Shoko; Kanda, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) have significantly improved the survival of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR activating mutations. However, nearly all EGFR-mutant NSCLC tumors eventually acquire resistance to the currently used EGFR-TKIs and subsequently progress clinically. Acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs is thus a huge issue in the treatment of EGFR-mutant NSCLC at present. On one hand, T790M second-site mutation has been recognized as a key mechanism of EGFR-TKI resistance, and third generation EGFR-TKIs such as osimertinib and rociletinib have been developed to overcome tumor cells harboring the T790M mutation. On the other hand, combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy is also expected as another strategy for preventing the acquired resistance to current EGFR-TKIs and prolonging the survival benefits by EGFR-TKIs. Here, we review updated strategies for preventing or overcoming acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs.

  12. LIG family receptor tyrosine kinase-associated proteins modulate growth factor signals during neural development.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Kenji; Guo, Ting; St Hillaire, Coryse; Meabon, James S; Kanning, Kevin C; Bothwell, Mark; Ginty, David D

    2009-09-10

    Genome-wide screens were performed to identify transmembrane proteins that mediate axonal growth, guidance and target field innervation of somatosensory neurons. One gene, Linx (alias Islr2), encoding a leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin (LIG) family protein, is expressed in a subset of developing sensory and motor neurons. Domain and genomic structures of Linx and other LIG family members suggest that they are evolutionarily related to Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Several LIGs, including Linx, are expressed in subsets of somatosensory and motor neurons, and select members interact with TrkA and Ret RTKs. Moreover, axonal projection defects in mice harboring a null mutation in Linx resemble those in mice lacking Ngf, TrkA, and Ret. In addition, Linx modulates NGF-TrkA- and GDNF-GFRalpha1/Ret-mediated axonal extension in cultured sensory and motor neurons, respectively. These findings show that LIGs physically interact with RTKs and modulate their activities to control axonal extension, guidance and branching.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling is coupled to src family kinase activation, tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins, and opening of the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key mediator in the vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections. LPS opens the paracellular pathway in pulmonary vascular endothelia through protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We now have identified the protein tyrosine kinase (PT...

  14. Targeting glycoprotein VI and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Stegner, David; Haining, Elizabeth J; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery thrombosis and ischemic stroke are often initiated by the disruption of an atherosclerotic plaque and consequent intravascular platelet activation. Thus, antiplatelet drugs are central in the treatment and prevention of the initial, and subsequent, vascular events. However, novel pharmacological targets for platelet inhibition remain an important goal of cardiovascular research because of the negative effect of existing antiplatelet drugs on primary hemostasis. One promising target is the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI. Blockade or antibody-mediated depletion of this receptor in circulating platelets is beneficial in experimental models of thrombosis and thrombo-inflammatory diseases, such as stroke, without impairing hemostasis. In this review, we summarize the importance of glycoprotein VI and (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombo-inflammatory processes and discuss the targeting strategies currently under development for inhibiting glycoprotein VI and its signaling.

  15. Association of the tyrosine phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor with a 55-kD tyrosine phosphorylated protein at the cell surface and in endosomes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    After the intraportal injection of EGF, the EGF receptor (EGFR) is rapidly internalized into hepatic endosomes where it remains largely receptor bound (Lai et al., 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2751-2760). In the present study, we evaluated the phosphotyrosine content of EGFRs at the cell surface and in endosomes in order to assess the consequences of internalization. Quantitative estimates of specific radioactivity of the EGFR in these two compartments revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR was observed at the cell surface within 30 s of ligand administration. However, the EGFR was also highly phosphorylated in endosomes reaching levels of tyrosine phosphorylation significantly higher than those of the cell surface receptor at 5 and 15 min after EGF injection. A 55-kD tyrosine phosphorylated polypeptide (pyp55) was observed in association with the EGFR at the cell surface within 30 s of EGF injection. The protein was also found in association with the EGFR in endosomes as evidenced by coprecipitation studies using a mAb to the EGFR as well as by coelution with the EGR in gel permeation chromatography. Limited proteolysis of isolated endosomes indicated that the tyrosine phosphorylated domains of the EGFR and associated pyp55 were cytosolically oriented while internalized EGF was intraluminal. The identification of pyp55 in association with EGFR in both hepatic plasma membranes and endosomes may be relevant to EGFR function and/or trafficking of the EGFR. PMID:1370492

  16. Structure of macrophage colony stimulating factor bound to FMS: Diverse signaling assemblies of class III receptor tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; He, Xiaolin

    2009-06-12

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), through binding to its receptor FMS, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), regulates the development and function of mononuclear phagocytes, and plays important roles in innate immunity, cancer and inflammation. We report a 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of M-CSF bound to the first 3 domains (D1-D3) of FMS. The ligand binding mode of FMS is surprisingly different from KIT, another class III RTK, in which the major ligand-binding domain of FMS, D2, uses the CD and EF loops, but not the {beta}-sheet on the opposite side of the Ig domain as in KIT, to bind ligand. Calorimetric data indicate that M-CSF cannot dimerize FMS without receptor-receptor interactions mediated by FMS domains D4 and D5. Consistently, the structure contains only 1 FMS-D1-D3 molecule bound to a M-CSF dimer, due to a weak, hydrophilic M-CSF:FMS interface, and probably a conformational change of the M-CSF dimer in which binding to the second site is rendered unfavorable by FMS binding at the first site. The partial, intermediate complex suggests that FMS may be activated in two steps, with the initial engagement step distinct from the subsequent dimerization/activation step. Hence, the formation of signaling class III RTK complexes can be diverse, engaging various modes of ligand recognition and various mechanistic steps for dimerizing and activating receptors.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor induces phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma at tyrosine residues via its receptor 2beta in human epidermoid A-431 cells.

    PubMed

    Kiang, J G; Ding, X Z; Gist, I D; Jones, R R; Tsokos, G C

    1998-12-18

    This laboratory previously reported that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, cellular cAMP, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, protein kinase C activity, and protein phosphorylation in human A-431 cells. The increase was blocked by CRF receptor antagonist. In this study, we identified the type of CRF receptors present and investigated whether CRF induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma via CRF receptors. Using novel primers in reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, we determined the CRF receptor type to be that of 2beta. The levels of the CRF receptor type 2beta were not altered in cells treated with activators of protein kinase C, Ca2+ ionophore, or cells overexpressing heat shock protein 70 kDa. Cells treated with CRF displayed increases in protein tyrosine phosphorylation approximately at 150 kDa as detected by immunoblotting using an antibody against phosphotyrosine. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed against phospholipase C-beta3, -gamma1, or -gamma2 isoforms (which have molecular weights around 150 kDa) followed by Western blotting using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody showed that only phospholipase C-gamma1 and -gamma2 were phosphorylated. The increase in phospholipase C-gamma phosphorylation was concentration-dependent with an EC50 of 4.2+/-0.1 pM. The maximal phosphorylation by CRF at 1 nM occurred by 5 min. The CRF-induced phosphorylation was inhibited by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, suggesting that CRF activates protein tyrosine kinases. Treatment of cells with CRF receptor antagonist, but not pertussis toxin, prior to treatment with CRF inhibited the CRF-induced phosphorylation, suggesting it is mediated by the CRF receptor type 2beta that is not coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. Treatment with 1,2-bis(2iminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid attenuated the phospholipase C-gamma phosphorylation. In summary

  18. A systematic analysis of the resistance and sensitivity of HER2YVMA receptor tyrosine kinase mutant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HER2-positive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaokun; Chen, Beibei; Ma, Zhaosheng; Xie, Bojian; Cao, Xinguang; Yang, Tiejun; Zhao, Yuzhou; Qin, Jianjun; Li, Jicheng; Cao, Feilin; Chen, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has become a well-established target for the treatment of HER2-positive lung cancer. However, a frequently observed in-frame mutation that inserts amino acid quadruplex Tyr776-Val777-Met778-Ala779 at G776 (G776(YVMA)) in HER2 kinase domain can cause drug resistance and sensitivity, largely limiting the application of reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer therapy. A systematic investigation of the intermolecular interactions between the HER2(YVMA) mutant and clinical small-molecule inhibitors would help to establish a complete picture of drug response to HER2 G776(YVMA) insertion in lung cancer, and to design new tyrosine kinase inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target the lung cancer-related HER2(YVMA) mutant. Here, we combined homology modeling, ligand grafting, structure minimization, molecular simulation and binding affinity analysis to profile a number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors against the G776(YVMA) insertion in HER2. It is found that the insertion is far away from HER2 active pocket and thus cannot contact inhibitor ligand directly. However, the insertion is expected to induce marked allosteric effect on some regions around the pocket, including A-loop and hinges connecting between the N- and C-lobes of HER2 kinase domain, which may exert indirect influence to inhibitor binding. Most investigated inhibitors exhibit weak binding strength to both wild-type and mutant HER2, which can be attributed to steric hindrance that impairs ligand compatibility with HER2 active pocket. However, the cognate inhibitor lapatinib and the non-cognate inhibitor bosutinib were predicted to have low affinity for wild-type HER2 but high affinity for HER2(YVMA) mutant, which was confirmed by subsequent kinase assay experiments; the inhibitory potencies of bosutinib against wild-type and mutant HER2 were determined to be IC(50) > 1000 and =27 nM, respectively, suggesting that the bosutinib might be

  19. The discovery of novel vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases inhibitors: pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Liangren; Zhang, Jufeng; Huang, Qian

    2007-03-01

    We have applied pharmacophore generation, database searching and docking methodologies to discover new structures for the design of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, the tyrosine kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors. The chemical function based pharmacophore models were built for kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors from a set of 10 known inhibitors using the algorithm HipHop, which is implemented in the CATALYST software. The highest scoring HipHop model consists of four features: one hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrogen bond donor and one ring aromatic function. Using the algorithm CatShape within CATALYST, the bound conformation of 4-amino-furo [2, 3-d] pyrimidine binding to kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase was used to generate a shape query. A merged shape and hypothesis query that is in an appropriate alignment was then built. The combined shape and hypothesis model was used as a query to search Maybridge database for other potential lead compounds. A total of 39 compounds were retrieved as hits. The hits obtained were docked into kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase active site. One novel potential lead was proposed based on CATALYST fit value, LigandFit docking scores, and examination of how the hit retain key interactions known to be required for kinase binding. This compound inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated kinase insert domain-containing receptor phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

  20. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  1. Identification of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in human Gab-1 protein by EGF receptor kinase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lehr, S; Kotzka, J; Herkner, A; Klein, E; Siethoff, C; Knebel, B; Noelle, V; Brüning, J C; Klein, H W; Meyer, H E; Krone, W; Müller-Wieland, D

    1999-01-05

    Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab-1) has been identified recently in a cDNA library of glioblastoma tumors and appears to play a central role in cellular growth response, transformation, and apoptosis. Structural and functional features indicate that Gab-1 is a multisubstrate docking protein downstream in the signaling pathways of different receptor tyrosine kinases, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize the phosphorylation of recombinant human Gab-1 (hGab-1) protein by EGFR in vitro. Using the pGEX system to express the entire protein and different domains of hGab-1 as glutathione S-transferase proteins, kinetic data for phosphorylation of these proteins by wheat germ agglutinine-purified EGFR and the recombinant EGFR (rEGFR) receptor kinase domain were determined. Our data revealed similar affinities of hGab-1-C for both receptor preparations (KM = 2.7 microM for rEGFR vs 3.2 microM for WGA EGFR) as well as for the different recombinant hGab-1 domains. To identify the specific EGFR phosphorylation sites, hGab-1-C was sequenced by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. The entire protein was phosphorylated by rEGFR at eight tyrosine residues (Y285, Y373, Y406, Y447, Y472, Y619, Y657, and Y689). Fifty percent of the identified radioactivity was incorporated in tyrosine Y657 as the predominant peak in HPLC analysis, a site exhibiting features of a potential Syp (PTP1D) binding site. Accordingly, GST-pull down assays with A431 and HepG2 cell lysates showed that phosphorylated intact hGab-1 was able to bind Syp. This binding appears to be specific, because it was abolished by changing the Y657 of hGab-1 to F657. These results demonstrate that hGab-1 is a high-affinity substrate for the EGFR and the major tyrosine phosphorylation site Y657 in the C terminus is a specific binding site for the tyrosine phosphatase Syp.

  2. Expression of tyrosine kinase receptors in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons in the presence of monosialoganglioside and skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2012-10-01

    The neurotrophic factor-like activity of monosialoganglioside (GM1) has been shown to activate tyrosine kinase receptors (Trk). Targets of neuronal innervation play a vital role in regulating the survival and differentiation of innervating neurotrophin-responsive neurons. Both GM1 and target skeletal muscle (SKM) cells are essential for the maintenance of the function of neurons. However, much less is known about the effects of GM1 or/and target SKM cells on the expression of Trk receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we have tested what extent to the expression of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC receptors in primary cultured of DRG neurons in absence or presence of GM1 or/and SKM cells. In this experiment, we found that: (1) GM1 promoted expression of TrkA and TrkB but not TrkC in primary cultured DRG neurons; (2) target SKM cells promoted expression of TrkC but not TrkA and TrkB in neuromuscular cocultures without GM1 treatment; and (3) GM1 and target SKM cells had additional effects on expression of these three Trk receptors. The results of the present study offered new clues for a better understanding of the association of GM1 and target SKM on the expression of Trk receptors.

  3. Fps/Fes and Fer non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases regulate collagen- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Senis, Y A; Sangrar, W; Zirngibl, R A; Craig, A W B; Lee, D H; Greer, P A

    2003-05-01

    Fps/Fes and Fer proto-oncoproteins are structurally related non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases implicated in signaling downstream from cytokines, growth factors and immune receptors. We show that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in human and mouse platelets, and are activated following stimulation with collagen and collagen-related peptide (CRP), suggesting a role in GPVI receptor signaling. Fer was also activated following stimulation with thrombin and a protease-activated receptor4 (PAR4)-activating peptide, suggesting a role in signaling downstream from the G protein-coupled PAR4. There were no detectable perturbations in CRP-induced activation of Syk, PLCgamma2, cortactin, Erk, Jnk, Akt or p38 in platelets from mice lacking Fps/Fes, Fer, or both kinases. Platelets lacking Fps/Fes, from a targeted fps/fes null strain of mice, showed increased rates and amplitudes of collagen-induced aggregation, relative to wild-type platelets. P-Selectin expression was also elevated on the surface of Fps/Fes-null platelets in response to CRP. Fer-deficient platelets, from mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation, disaggregated more rapidly than wild-type platelets in response to ADP. This report provides the first evidence that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in platelets and become activated downstream from the GPVI collagen receptor, and that Fer is activated downstream from a G-protein coupled receptor. Furthermore, using targeted mouse models we show that deficiency in Fps/Fes or Fer resulted in disregulated platelet aggregation and disaggregation, demonstrating a role for these kinases in regulating platelet functions.

  4. Abelson Family Tyrosine Kinases Regulate the Function of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Nicotinic Synapses on Autonomic NeuronsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jayakar, Selwyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Abelson family kinases (AFKs; Abl1, Abl2) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs) implicated in cancer, but they also have important physiological roles that include regulating synaptic structure and function. Recent studies using Abl-deficient mice and the antileukemia drug STI571 [imatinib mesylate (Gleevec); Novartis], which potently and selectively blocks Abl kinase activity, implicate AFKs in regulating presynaptic neurotransmitter release in hippocampus and postsynaptic clustering of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in muscle. Here, we tested whether AFKs are relevant for regulating nAChRs and nAChR-mediated synapses on autonomic neurons. AFK immunoreactivity was detected in ciliary ganglion (CG) lysates and neurons, and STI571 application blocked endogenous Abl tyrosine kinase activity. With similar potency, STI571 specifically reduced whole-cell current responses generated by both nicotinic receptor subtypes present on CG neurons (α3*- and α7-nAChRs) and lowered the frequency and amplitude of α3*-nAChR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. Quantal analysis indicated that the synaptic perturbations were postsynaptic in origin, and confocal imaging experiments revealed they were unaccompanied by changes in nAChR clustering or alignment with presynaptic terminals. The results indicate that in autonomic neurons, Abl kinase activity normally supports postsynaptic nAChR function to sustain nAChR-mediated neurotransmission. Such consequences contrast with the influence of Abl kinase activity on presynaptic function and synaptic structure in hippocampus and muscle, respectively, demonstrating a cell-specific mechanism of action. Finally, because STI571 potently inhibits Abl kinase activity, the autonomic dysfunction side effects associated with its use as a chemotherapeutic agent may result from perturbed α3*- and/or α7-nAChR function. PMID:21502378

  5. When Good Turns Bad: Regulation of Invasion and Metastasis by ErbB2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Brix, Ditte Marie; Clemmensen, Knut Kristoffer Bundgaard; Kallunki, Tuula

    2014-01-27

    Overexpression and activation of ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase in breast cancer is strongly linked to an aggressive disease with high potential for invasion and metastasis. In addition to inducing very aggressive, metastatic cancer, ErbB2 activation mediates processes such as increased cancer cell proliferation and survival and is needed for normal physiological activities, such as heart function and development of the nervous system. How does ErbB2 activation make cancer cells invasive and when? Comprehensive understanding of the cellular mechanisms leading to ErbB2-induced malignant processes is necessary for answering these questions. Here we present current knowledge about the invasion-promoting function of ErbB2 and the mechanisms involved in it. Obtaining detailed information about the "bad" behavior of ErbB2 can facilitate development of novel treatments against ErbB2-positive cancers.

  6. When Good Turns Bad: Regulation of Invasion and Metastasis by ErbB2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Brix, Ditte Marie; Bundgaard Clemmensen, Knut Kristoffer; Kallunki, Tuula

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression and activation of ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase in breast cancer is strongly linked to an aggressive disease with high potential for invasion and metastasis. In addition to inducing very aggressive, metastatic cancer, ErbB2 activation mediates processes such as increased cancer cell proliferation and survival and is needed for normal physiological activities, such as heart function and development of the nervous system. How does ErbB2 activation make cancer cells invasive and when? Comprehensive understanding of the cellular mechanisms leading to ErbB2-induced malignant processes is necessary for answering these questions. Here we present current knowledge about the invasion-promoting function of ErbB2 and the mechanisms involved in it. Obtaining detailed information about the “bad” behavior of ErbB2 can facilitate development of novel treatments against ErbB2-positive cancers. PMID:24709902

  7. IL-4 function can be transferred to the IL-2 receptor by tyrosine containing sequences found in the IL-4 receptor alpha chain.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Y; Paul, W E; Keegan, A D

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 binds to a cell surface receptor complex that consists of the IL-4 binding protein (IL-4R alpha) and the gamma chain of the IL-2 receptor complex (gamma c). The receptors for IL-4 and IL-2 have several features in common; both use the gamma c as a receptor component, and both activate the Janus kinases JAK-1 and JAK-3. In spite of these similarities, IL-4 evokes specific responses, including the tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS/IRS-2 and the induction of CD23. To determine whether sequences within the cytoplasmic domain of the IL-4R alpha specify these IL-4-specific responses, we transplanted the insulin IL-4 receptor motif (I4R motif) of the huIL-4R alpha to the cytoplasmic domain of a truncated IL-2R beta. In addition, we transplanted a region that contains peptide sequences shown to block Stat6 binding to DNA. We analyzed the ability of cells expressing these IL-2R-IL-4R chimeric constructs to respond to IL-2. We found that IL-4 function could be transplanted to the IL-2 receptor by these regions and that proliferative and differentiative functions can be induced by different receptor sequences.

  8. Differential endocytic routing of homo- and hetero-dimeric ErbB tyrosine kinases confers signaling superiority to receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Lenferink, A E; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; van de Poll, M L; van Vugt, M J; Klapper, L N; Tzahar, E; Waterman, H; Sela, M; van Zoelen, E J; Yarden, Y

    1998-01-01

    Both homo- and hetero-dimers of ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases mediate signaling by a large group of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligands. However, some ligands are more potent than others, although they bind to the same direct receptor. In addition, signaling by receptor heterodimers is superior to homodimers. We addressed the mechanism underlying these two features of signal tuning by using three ligands: EGF; transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha); and their chimera, denoted E4T, which act on cells singly expressing ErbB-1 as a weak, a strong, and a very strong agonist, respectively. Co-expression of ErbB-2, a developmentally important co-receptor whose expression is frequently elevated in human cancers, specifically potentiated EGF signaling to the level achieved by TGFalpha, an effect that was partially mimicked by ErbB-3. Analysis of the mechanism underlying this trans-potentiation implied that EGF-driven homodimers of ErbB-1 are destined for intracellular degradation, whereas the corresponding heterodimers with ErbB-2 or with ErbB-3, dissociate in the early endosome. As a consequence, in the presence of either co-receptor, ErbB-1 is recycled to the cell surface and its signaling is enhanced. This latter route is followed by TGFalpha-driven homodimers of ErbB-1, and also by E4T-bound receptors, whose signaling is further enhanced by repeated cycles of binding and dissociation from the receptors. We conclude that alternative endocytic routes of homo- and hetero-dimeric receptor complexes may contribute to tuning and diversification of signal transduction. In addition, the ability of ErbB-2 to shunt ligand-activated receptors to recycling may explain, in part, its oncogenic potential. PMID:9628875

  9. Antibacterial and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activities of polyhydroxylated xanthones from Garcinia succifolia.

    PubMed

    Duangsrisai, Susawat; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Bessa, Lucinda J; Costa, Paulo M; Amat, Nurmuhammat; Kijjoa, Anake

    2014-11-28

    Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the wood of Garcinia succifolia Kurz (Clusiaceae) led to the isolation of 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1), 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2), 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone (3), 1,5,6-trihydroxyxanthone (4), 1,6,7-trihydroxyxanthone (5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (6). All of the isolated xanthones were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against bacterial reference strains, two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATTC 25923, Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633) and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853), and environmental drug-resistant isolates (S. aureus B1, Enteroccoccus faecalis W1, and E. coli G1), as well as for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity. Only 1,5,6-trihydroxy-(4), 1,6,7-trihydroxy-(5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthones (6) exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, however none was active against vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. Additionally, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) showed synergism with oxacillin, but not with ampicillin. On the other hand, only 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1) and 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) were found to exhibit the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 90.34 and 223 nM, respectively.

  10. Blockade of NMDA receptors in postnatal period decreased density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive axonal arbors in the medial prefrontal cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wedzony, K; Fijał, K; Chocyk, A

    2005-06-01

    Malfunction of glutamatergic neurotransmission in postnatal period is considered to be a risk factor for development of schizophrenia. Thus, the present study investigates the impact of NMDA receptor blockade in the postnatal period on the density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive axonal arbors in the rat medial prefrontal cortex. Behavioral experiments revealed that adult rats (60 days old) treated in the postnatal period with a competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors, CGP 40116 (1.25 mg/kg on days 1, 3, 6, 9; 2.5 mg/kg on days 12, 15, 18; and finally 5 mg/kg on day 21, all injections s.c.), showed enhancement of the locomotor activity stimulated by quinpirole (0.3 mg/kg s.c.) and amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg s.c.), which suggests development of functional supersensitivity of dopaminergic systems. It has been found that CGP 40116, given in postnatal period decreased the density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive axonal arbors in the medial prefrontal cortex of adult animals. The decrease was observed in superficial (II/III) and deep (V/VI) layers of the medial prefrontal cortex, while the average length of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive axonal arbors was increased in both superficial and deep cortical layers. Changes in the density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive axonal arbors have not been followed by a significant decrease in the content of tyrosine hydroxylase protein measured by Western blot. Thus, NMDA receptor blockade in the early period of life evokes changes in architecture of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive axonal arbors and that malfunction of glutamatergic neurotransmission, in early period of life may produce anatomical changes which resemble those observed in the brains of schizophrenics.

  11. MASK, a large ankyrin repeat and KH domain-containing protein involved in Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel K; Carroll, Pamela M; Allard, John D; Simon, Michael A

    2002-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinases Sevenless (SEV) and the Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are required for the proper development of the Drosophila eye. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (CSW) is a common component of many RTK signaling pathways, and is required for signaling downstream of SEV and EGFR. In order to identify additional components of these signaling pathways, mutations that enhanced the phenotype of a dominant negative form of Corkscrew were isolated. This genetic screen identified the novel signaling molecule MASK, a large protein that contains two blocks of ankyrin repeats as well as a KH domain. MASK genetically interacts with known components of these RTK signaling pathways. In the developing eye imaginal disc, loss of MASK function generates phenotypes similar to those generated by loss of other components of the SEV and EGFR pathways. These phenotypes include compromised photoreceptor differentiation, cell survival and proliferation. Although MASK is localized predominantly in the cellular cytoplasm, it is not absolutely required for MAPK activation or nuclear translocation. Based on our results, we propose that MASK is a novel mediator of RTK signaling, and may act either downstream of MAPK or transduce signaling through a parallel branch of the RTK pathway.

  12. Bruton's tyrosine kinase activity is negatively regulated by Sab, the Btk-SH3 domain-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yamadori, T; Baba, Y; Matsushita, M; Hashimoto, S; Kurosaki, M; Kurosaki, T; Kishimoto, T; Tsukada, S

    1999-05-25

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is crucial for human and murine B cell development, and its deficiency causes human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. In this report, we describe the function of the Btk-binding protein Sab (SH3-domain binding protein that preferentially associates with Btk), which we reported previously as a newly identified Src homology 3 domain-binding protein. Sab was shown to inhibit the auto- and transphosphorylation activity of Btk, which prompted us to propose that Sab functions as a transregulator of Btk. Forced overexpression of Sab in B cells led to the reduction of B cell antigen receptor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Btk and significantly reduced both early and late B cell antigen receptor-mediated events, including calcium mobilization, inositol 1, 4,5-trisphosphate production, and apoptotic cell death, where the involvement of Btk activity has been demonstrated previously. Together, these results indicate the negative regulatory role of Sab in the B cell cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase pathway.

  13. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase activity is negatively regulated by Sab, the Btk-SH3 domain-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamadori, Tomoki; Baba, Yoshihiro; Matsushita, Masato; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kurosaki, Mari; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu; Tsukada, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is crucial for human and murine B cell development, and its deficiency causes human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. In this report, we describe the function of the Btk-binding protein Sab (SH3-domain binding protein that preferentially associates with Btk), which we reported previously as a newly identified Src homology 3 domain-binding protein. Sab was shown to inhibit the auto- and transphosphorylation activity of Btk, which prompted us to propose that Sab functions as a transregulator of Btk. Forced overexpression of Sab in B cells led to the reduction of B cell antigen receptor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Btk and significantly reduced both early and late B cell antigen receptor-mediated events, including calcium mobilization, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production, and apoptotic cell death, where the involvement of Btk activity has been demonstrated previously. Together, these results indicate the negative regulatory role of Sab in the B cell cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase pathway. PMID:10339589

  14. Growth inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and by ganglioside GM3: involvement of receptor-directed protein tyrosine phosphatase(s).

    PubMed

    Suarez Pestana, E; Greiser, U; Sánchez, B; Fernández, L E; Lage, A; Perez, R; Böhmer, F D

    1997-01-01

    Growth of the EGF receptor-expressing non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line H125 seems to be at least partially driven by autocrine activation of the resident EGF receptors. Thus, the possibility of an EGF receptor-directed antiproliferative treatment was investigated in vitro using a monoclonal antibody (alpha EGFR ior egf/r3) against the human EGF receptor and gangliosides which are known to possess antiproliferative and anti-tyrosine kinase activity. The moderate growth-inhibitory effect of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 was strongly potentiated by the addition of monosialoganglioside GM3. Likewise, the combination of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 inhibited EGF receptor autophosphorylation activity in H125 cells more strongly than either agent alone. A synergistic inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 was also observed in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. In both cell lines, the inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by GM3 was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pervanadate, a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Also, GM3 accelerated EGF receptor dephosphorylation in isolated A431 cell membranes. These findings indicate that GM3 has the capacity to activate EGF receptor-directed PTPase activity and suggest a novel possible mechanism for the regulation of cellular PTPases.

  15. Growth inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and by ganglioside GM3: involvement of receptor-directed protein tyrosine phosphatase(s).

    PubMed Central

    Suarez Pestana, E.; Greiser, U.; Sánchez, B.; Fernández, L. E.; Lage, A.; Perez, R.; Böhmer, F. D.

    1997-01-01

    Growth of the EGF receptor-expressing non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line H125 seems to be at least partially driven by autocrine activation of the resident EGF receptors. Thus, the possibility of an EGF receptor-directed antiproliferative treatment was investigated in vitro using a monoclonal antibody (alpha EGFR ior egf/r3) against the human EGF receptor and gangliosides which are known to possess antiproliferative and anti-tyrosine kinase activity. The moderate growth-inhibitory effect of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 was strongly potentiated by the addition of monosialoganglioside GM3. Likewise, the combination of alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 inhibited EGF receptor autophosphorylation activity in H125 cells more strongly than either agent alone. A synergistic inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha EGFR ior egf/r3 and GM3 was also observed in the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. In both cell lines, the inhibition of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by GM3 was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pervanadate, a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Also, GM3 accelerated EGF receptor dephosphorylation in isolated A431 cell membranes. These findings indicate that GM3 has the capacity to activate EGF receptor-directed PTPase activity and suggest a novel possible mechanism for the regulation of cellular PTPases. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9010029

  16. Structure-Based Network Analysis of Activation Mechanisms in the ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: The Regulatory Spine Residues Are Global Mediators of Structural Stability and Allosteric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    James, Kevin A.; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2014-01-01

    The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced “superacceptor” activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD) motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not limited to the

  17. Analysis of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) binding to ZAP-70 by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Vély, F; Nunès, J A; Malissen, B; Hedgecock, C J

    1997-11-01

    The signaling function of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is mediated via CD3 polypeptides, the cytoplasmic sequences of which bear conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM). ITAM are defined by two YxxL/I sequences separated by a six-eight amino acid long spacer. Upon antigen recognition, ITAM become phosphorylated on both tyrosine residues, creating a high affinity binding site for the tandem SH2 domains found in the protein tyrosine kinase ZAP-70. Using surface plasmon resonance, we further dissected the sequences required for the binding of ZAP-70 to each TCR-associated ITAM. First, we generated protein tyrosine phosphatase-resistant ITAM peptide analogs, in which difluorophosphonomethyl phenylalanyl (F2p) replaced both phosphotyrosines, and showed that those protein tyrosine phosphatase-resistant analogs bind ZAP-70 with high affinity, establishing a rational strategy for the design of novel pharmacological tools capable of interfering with TCR signaling function. Second, we substituted the five amino acids separating the two YxxL/I sequences of the CD3 zeta 1 ITAM with a non-peptidic linker made up of gamma-amino butyric acid units and demonstrated that the length of this intervening sequence rather than its chemical composition is essential for high affinity binding of phosphorylated ITAM to the ZAP-70 SH2 domains.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  19. Extracellular regulation of type IIa receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases: mechanistic insights from structural analyses

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Charlotte H.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Aricescu, A. Radu

    2016-01-01

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) exhibit a wide repertoire of cellular signalling functions. In particular, type IIa RPTP family members have recently been highlighted as hubs for extracellular interactions in neurons, regulating neuronal extension and guidance, as well as synaptic organisation. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress of structural biology investigations into the architecture of type IIa RPTP ectodomains and their interactions with extracellular ligands. Structural insights, in combination with biophysical and cellular studies, allow us to begin to piece together molecular mechanisms for the transduction and integration of type IIa RPTP signals and to propose hypotheses for future experimental validation. PMID:25234613

  20. No Obvious Abnormality in Mice Deficient in Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β

    PubMed Central

    Harroch, S.; Palmeri, M.; Rosenbluth, J.; Custer, A.; Okigaki, M.; Shrager, P.; Blum, M.; Buxbaum, J. D.; Schlessinger, J.

    2000-01-01

    The development of neurons and glia is governed by a multitude of extracellular signals that control protein tyrosine phosphorylation, a process regulated by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Receptor PTPβ (RPTPβ; also known as PTPζ) is expressed predominantly in the nervous system and exhibits structural features common to cell adhesion proteins, suggesting that this phosphatase participates in cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that the three isoforms of RPTPβ play a role in regulation of neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and gliogenesis. To investigate the biological functions of this PTP, we have generated mice deficient in RPTPβ. RPTPβ-deficient mice are viable, are fertile, and showed no gross anatomical alterations in the nervous system or other organs. In contrast to results of in vitro experiments, our study demonstrates that RPTPβ is not essential for neurite outgrowth and node formation in mice. The ultrastructure of nerves of the central nervous system in RPTPβ-deficient mice suggests a fragility of myelin. However, conduction velocity was not altered in RPTPβ-deficient mice. The normal development of neurons and glia in RPTPβ-deficient mice demonstrates that RPTPβ function is not necessary for these processes in vivo or that loss of RPTPβ can be compensated for by other PTPs expressed in the nervous system. PMID:11003666

  1. Adamantyl-Substituted Retinoid-Derived Molecules That Interact with the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Small Heterodimer Partner: Effects of Replacing the 1-Adamantyl or Hydroxyl Group on Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth, Induction of Cancer Cell Apoptosis, and Inhibition of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin; Jiang, Tao; Ye, Mao; Fontana, Joseph A.; Farhana, Lulu; Patel, Bhaumik; Xue, Li Ping; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Nuti, Roberto; Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Han, Young-Hoon; Tautz, Lutz; Hobbs, Peter D.; Jong, Ling; Waleh, Nahid; Chao, Wan-ru; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Pang, Yuhong; Su, Ying

    2014-01-01

    (E)-4-[3-(1-Adamantyl)-4′-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3-Cl-AHPC) induces the cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia and cancer cells. Studies demonstrated that 3-Cl-AHPC bound to the atypical orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP). Although missing a DNA-binding domain, SHP heterodimerizes with the ligand-binding domains of other nuclear receptors to repress their abilities to induce or inhibit gene expression. 3-Cl-AHPC analogues having the 1-adamantyl and phenolic hydroxyl pharmacophoric elements replaced with isosteric groups were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibition of proliferation and induction of human cancer cell apoptosis. Structure–anticancer activity relationship studies indicated the importance of both groups to apoptotic activity. Docking of 3-Cl-AHPC and its analogues to an SHP computational model that was based on the crystal structure of ultraspiracle complexed with 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoylglycero-3-phosphoethanolamine suggested why these 3-Cl-AHPC groups could influence SHP activity. Inhibitory activity against Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) was also assessed. The most active Shp-2 inhibitor was found to be the 3′-(3,3-dimethylbutynyl) analogue of 3-Cl-AHPC. PMID:18759424

  2. Syk-dependent phosphorylation of CLEC-2: a novel mechanism of hem-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling.

    PubMed

    Séverin, Sonia; Pollitt, Alice Y; Navarro-Nuñez, Leyre; Nash, Craig A; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Eble, Johannes A; Senis, Yotis A; Watson, Steve P

    2011-02-11

    The C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 signals via phosphorylation of a single cytoplasmic YXXL sequence known as a hem-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). In this study, we show that phosphorylation of CLEC-2 by the snake toxin rhodocytin is abolished in the absence of the tyrosine kinase Syk but is not altered in the absence of the major platelet Src family kinases, Fyn, Lyn, and Src, or the tyrosine phosphatase CD148, which regulates the basal activity of Src family kinases. Further, phosphorylation of CLEC-2 by rhodocytin is not altered in the presence of the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2, even though PLCγ2 phosphorylation and platelet activation are abolished. A similar dependence of phosphorylation of CLEC-2 on Syk is also seen in response to stimulation by an IgG mAb to CLEC-2, although interestingly CLEC-2 phosphorylation is also reduced in the absence of Lyn. These results provide the first definitive evidence that Syk mediates phosphorylation of the CLEC-2 hemITAM receptor with Src family kinases playing a critical role further downstream through the regulation of Syk and other effector proteins, providing a new paradigm in signaling by YXXL-containing receptors.

  3. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is a novel target of apigenin for the inhibition of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Lee, Chuhee

    2014-08-01

    The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), along with Tyro 3 and Mer, belongs to the TAM subfamily that promotes survival, stimulates proliferation and/or inhibits apoptosis. In various types of human cancer, including breast, lung and prostate cancer, Axl expression is increased and correlates with an advanced clinical stage. In this study, we examined whether apigenin has an effect on Axl expression, which in turn can affect cell proliferation. The treatment of the non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, A549 and H460, with apigenin decreased Axl mRNA and protein expression in a dose‑dependent manner. Axl promoter activity was also inhibited by apigenin, indicating that apigenin suppressed Axl expression at the transcriptional level. Upon treatment with apigenin, the viability of both the A549 and H460 cells was gradually decreased and the anti-proliferative effects were further confirmed by the dose‑dependent decrease in the clonogenic ability of the apigenin‑treated cells. Subsequently, we found that the viability and clonogenic ability of the cells treated with apigenin was less or more affected by transfection of the cells with a Axl-expressing plasmid or Axl targeting siRNA, compared to transfection with the empty vector or control siRNA, respectively. In addition, apigenin increased the expression of p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, but reduced the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). These cell cycle arrest and pro-apoptotic effects of apigenin were also attenuated or augmented by the up- or downregulation of Axl expression, respectively, which suggests that Axl is a novel target of apigenin through which it exerts its inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Taken together, our data indicate that apigenin downregulates Axl expression, which subsequently results in the inhibition of NSCLC cell proliferation through the increase and decrease of p21 and XIAP expression, respectively.

  4. Quantitative assessment of intragenic receptor tyrosine kinase deletions in primary glioblastomas: their prevalence and molecular correlates.

    PubMed

    Kastenhuber, Edward R; Huse, Jason T; Berman, Samuel H; Pedraza, Alicia; Zhang, Jianan; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Viale, Agnes; Cavatore, Magali; Heguy, Adriana; Szerlip, Nicholas; Ladanyi, Marc; Brennan, Cameron W

    2014-05-01

    Intragenic deletion is the most common form of activating mutation among receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) in glioblastoma. However, these events are not detected by conventional DNA sequencing methods commonly utilized for tumor genotyping. To comprehensively assess the frequency, distribution, and expression levels of common RTK deletion mutants in glioblastoma, we analyzed RNA from a set of 192 glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas for the expression of EGFRvIII, EGFRvII, EGFRvV (carboxyl-terminal deletion), and PDGFRAΔ8,9. These mutations were detected in 24, 1.6, 4.7, and 1.6 % of cases, respectively. Overall, 29 % (55/189) of glioblastomas expressed at least one RTK intragenic deletion transcript in this panel. For EGFRvIII, samples were analyzed by both quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) and single mRNA molecule counting on the Nanostring nCounter platform. Nanostring proved to be highly sensitive, specific, and linear, with sensitivity comparable or exceeding that of RNA seq. We evaluated the prognostic significance and molecular correlates of RTK rearrangements. EGFRvIII was only detectable in tumors with focal amplification of the gene. Moreover, we found that EGFRvIII expression was not prognostic of poor outcome and that neither recurrent copy number alterations nor global changes in gene expression differentiate EGFRvIII-positive tumors from tumors with amplification of wild-type EGFR. The wide range of expression of mutant alleles and co-expression of multiple EGFR variants suggests that quantitative RNA-based clinical assays will be important for assessing the relative expression of intragenic deletions as therapeutic targets and/or candidate biomarkers. To this end, we demonstrate the performance of the Nanostring assay in RNA derived from routinely collected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

  5. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1) into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C.; Yu, Jianqiang; Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Widhopf, George F.; Hurton, Lenka V.; Thokala, Radhika; Singh, Harjeet; Olivares, Simon; Champlin, Richard E.; Wierda, William G.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2015-01-01

    T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1) is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28) or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137) and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC), which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString) and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire. PMID:26030772

  6. Nerve growth factor rapidly stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1 by a kinase activity associated with the product of the trk protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Vetter, M L; Martin-Zanca, D; Parada, L F; Bishop, J M; Kaplan, D R

    1991-07-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes the survival and differentiation of specific populations of neurons. The molecular mechanisms by which cells respond to NGF are poorly understood, but two clues have emerged recently. First, NGF rapidly stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of several unidentified proteins in the NGF-responsive pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 [Maher, P. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 6788-6791]. Second, the protein-tyrosine kinase encoded by the protooncogene trk (p140trk), a member of the receptor class of tyrosine kinases, becomes activated and phosphorylated on tyrosine after NGF treatment of PC12 cells [Kaplan, D. R., Martin-Zanca, D. & Parada, L. F. (1991) Nature (London) 350, 158-160]. We now report that NGF rapidly induces tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC-gamma 1), and we present evidence that the responsible tyrosine kinase is either p140trk or a closely associated protein. Treatment of responsive cells with NGF elicited phosphorylation of PLC-gamma 1 on tyrosine and serine. PLC-gamma 1 immunoprecipitated from NGF-stimulated cells was phosphorylated in vitro by coprecipitating protein kinase activity, and the phosphorylations occurred principally on tyrosine. The responsible kinase could be depleted from cellular lysates by antibodies specific for p140trk. This procedure also depleted a 140-kDa protein that normally coprecipitated with PLC-gamma 1 and became phosphorylated on tyrosine in vivo in response to NGF. Analysis of tryptic peptides from PLC-gamma 1 indicated that the residues phosphorylated in vitro by p140trk-associated kinase activity were largely congruent with those phosphorylated in vivo after NGF treatment. Our findings identify PLC-gamma 1 as a likely substrate for the trk-encoded tyrosine kinase, and they provide a link between NGF-dependent activation of p140trk and the stimulation of intracellular second messenger pathways.

  7. Role of B61, the Ligand for the Eck Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, in TNF- α-Induced Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Akhilesh; Shao, Haining; Marks, Rory M.; Polverini, Peter J.; Dixit, Vishva M.

    1995-04-01

    B61, a cytokine-inducible endothelial gene product, is the ligand for the Eck receptor protein tyrosine kinase (RPTK). Expression of a B61-immunoglobulin chimera showed that B61 could act as an angiogenic factor in vivo and a chemoattractant for endothelial cells in vitro. The Eck RPTK was activated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) through induction of B61, and an antibody to B61 attenuated angiogenesis induced by TNF-α but not by basic fibroblast growth factor. This finding suggests the existence of an autocrine or paracrine loop involving activation of the Eck RPTK by its inducible ligand B61 after an inflammatory stimulus, the net effect of which would be to promote angiogenesis, a hallmark of chronic inflammation.

  8. Identification and regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases Rse and Mer and their ligand Gas6 in testicular somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, M C; Mather, J P; McCray, G; Lee, W M

    2000-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases act to convey extracellular signals to intracellular signaling pathways and ultimately control cell proliferation and differentiation. Rse, Axl, and Mer belong to a newly identified family of cell adhesion molecule-related receptor tyrosine kinase. They bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), which is also structurally related to the anticoagulation factor Protein S. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Rse/Axl/Mer tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligand in regulating testicular functions. Gene expression of Rse, Axl, Mer, and Gas6 in the testis was studied by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot analysis. The results indicated that receptors Rse and Mer and the ligand Gas6 were expressed in the rat endothelial cell line (TR1), mouse Leydig cell line (TM3), rat peritubular myoid cell line (TRM), mouse Sertoli cell line (TM4), and primary rat Sertoli cells. Axl was not expressed in the testicular somatic cells by RT-PCR or Northern blot analysis. The highest level of expression of Gas6 messenger RNA (mRNA) was observed in the Sertoli cells, and its expression was responsive to the addition of forskolin in vitro. The effects of serum, insulin, and transferrin on Gas6 expression by TM4 cells were examined. It was shown that they all exhibited an up-regulating effect on Gas6 expression. The forskolin-stimulated Gas6 expression was accompanied by an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of the Rse receptor in vitro, suggesting that Gas6 may exhibit an autocrine effect in the Sertoli cells through multiple tyrosine kinase receptors. Our studies so far have demonstrated that tyrosine kinase receptors Rse and Mer and their ligand Gas6 are widely expressed in the testicular somatic cell lines and may play a marked role in promoting testicular cell survival.

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation of protein kinase CK2 by Src-related tyrosine kinases correlates with increased catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Donella-Deana, Arianna; Cesaro, Luca; Sarno, Stefania; Ruzzene, Maria; Brunati, Anna Maria; Marin, Oriano; Vilk, Greg; Doherty-Kirby, Amanda; Lajoie, Gilles; Litchfield, David W; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2003-01-01

    Casein kinase-2 (CK2) is a pleiotropic and constitutively active serine/threonine protein kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory beta-subunits, whose regulation is still not well understood. In the present study, we show that the catalytic subunits of human CK2, but not the regulatory beta-subunits, are readily phosphorylated by the Src family protein tyrosine kinases Lyn and c-Fgr to a stoichiometry approaching 2 mol phosphotyrosine/mol CK2alpha with a concomitant 3-fold increase in catalytic activity. We also show that endogenous CK2alpha becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in pervanadate-treated Jurkat cells. Both tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of activity are suppressed by the specific Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4- d ]pyrimidine. By comparison, mutations giving rise to inactive forms of CK2alpha do not abrogate and, in some cases, stimulate Lyn and c-Fgr-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of CK2. Several radiolabelled phosphopeptides could be resolved by HPLC, following tryptic digestion of CK2alpha that had been phosphoradiolabelled by incubation with [(32)P]ATP and c-Fgr. The most prominent phosphopeptide co-migrates with a synthetic peptide encompassing the 248-268 sequence, phosphorylated previously by c-Fgr at Tyr(255) in vitro. The identification of Tyr(255) as a phosphorylated residue was also supported by MS sequencing of both the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated 248-268 tryptic fragments from CK2alpha and by on-target phosphatase treatment. A CK2alpha mutant in which Tyr(255) was replaced by phenylalanine proved less susceptible to phosphorylation and refractory to stimulation by c-Fgr. PMID:12628006

  10. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma regulates synapse structure, function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Katherine E; Xu, Bin; Gobert, Delphine; Hamam, Bassam N; Thompson, Katherine M; Wu, Chia-Lun; Bouchard, Jean-François; Uetani, Noriko; Racine, Ronald J; Tremblay, Michel L; Ruthazer, Edward S; Chapman, C Andrew; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms that regulate synapse formation and maintenance are incompletely understood. In particular, relatively few inhibitors of synapse formation have been identified. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (RPTPσ), a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase, is widely expressed by neurons in developing and mature mammalian brain, and functions as a receptor for chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that inhibits axon regeneration following injury. In this study, we address RPTPσ function in the mature brain. We demonstrate increased axon collateral branching in the hippocampus of RPTPσ null mice during normal aging or following chemically induced seizure, indicating that RPTPσ maintains neural circuitry by inhibiting axonal branching. Previous studies demonstrated a role for pre-synaptic RPTPσ promoting synaptic differentiation during development; however, subcellular fractionation revealed enrichment of RPTPσ in post-synaptic densities. We report that neurons lacking RPTPσ have an increased density of pre-synaptic varicosities in vitro and increased dendritic spine density and length in vivo. RPTPσ knockouts exhibit an increased frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents, and greater paired-pulse facilitation, consistent with increased synapse density but reduced synaptic efficiency. Furthermore, RPTPσ nulls exhibit reduced long-term potentiation and enhanced novel object recognition memory. We conclude that RPTPσ limits synapse number and regulates synapse structure and function in the mature CNS.

  11. The receptor tyrosine phosphatase Lar regulates adhesion between Drosophila male germline stem cells and the niche.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Shrividhya; Mahowald, Anthony P; Fuller, Margaret T

    2012-04-01

    The stem cell niche provides a supportive microenvironment to maintain adult stem cells in their undifferentiated state. Adhesion between adult stem cells and niche cells or the local basement membrane ensures retention of stem cells in the niche environment. Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs) attach to somatic hub cells, a component of their niche, through E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions, and orient their centrosomes toward these localized junctional complexes to carry out asymmetric divisions. Here we show that the transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase Leukocyte-antigen-related-like (Lar), which is best known for its function in axonal migration and synapse morphogenesis in the nervous system, helps maintain GSCs at the hub by promoting E-cadherin-based adhesion between hub cells and GSCs. Lar is expressed in GSCs and early spermatogonial cells and localizes to the hub-GSC interface. Loss of Lar function resulted in a reduced number of GSCs at the hub. Lar function was required cell-autonomously in germ cells for proper localization of Adenomatous polyposis coli 2 and E-cadherin at the hub-GSC interface and for the proper orientation of centrosomes in GSCs. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that in Lar mutants the adherens junctions between hub cells and GSCs lack the characteristic dense staining seen in wild-type controls. Thus, the Lar receptor tyrosine phosphatase appears to polarize and retain GSCs through maintenance of localized E-cadherin-based adherens junctions.

  12. Radiation induction of the receptor tyrosine kinase gene Ptk-3 in normal rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, S.; Hideyuki, S.; Akihiro, I.

    1995-07-01

    Radiation-induced gene expression was examined in rat astrocyte cultures using differential display of mRNA via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. A 0.3-kb cDNA that was consistently observed in irradiated cultures but not in unirradiated cultures was cloned and sequenced. It was found to be identical to Ptk-3, a receptor tyrosine kinase gene identified recently. The protein encoded by Ptk-3 is a member of a novel class of receptor tyrosine kinases whose extracellular domain contains regions of homology with coagulation factors V and VIII and complement component C1. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression of Ptk-3 was increased in rat astrocytes by 0.5 h after exposure to 10 Gy and remained at the same elevated level for at least 24 h. The maximum increase occurred after 5 Gy cloning studies indicated the presence of at least two Ptk-3 mRNA transcripts, which are probable the result of an alternative splicing mechanism. The short isoform lacks a 37 amino acid sequence in the glycine/proline-rich juxtamembrane region. The splicing pattern of the Ptk-3 gene was not altered by radiation. However, the ratios of the longer to the shorter mRNA transcripts differed between adult cortex, neonatal cortex and in vitro astrocyte cultures. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Function of redox-active tyrosine in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-06-01

    Water oxidation at photosystem II Mn-cluster is mediated by the redox-active tyrosine Y(Z). We calculated the redox potential (E(m)) of Y(Z) and its symmetrical counterpart Y(D), by solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The calculated E(m)(Y( )/Y(-)) were +926 mV/+694 mV for Y(Z)/Y(D) with the Mn-cluster in S2 state. Together with the asymmetric position of the Mn-cluster relative to Y(Z/D), differences in H-bond network between Y(Z) (Y(Z)/D1-His(190)/D1-Asn(298)) and Y(D) (Y(D)/D2-His(189)/D2-Arg(294)/CP47-Glu(364)) are crucial for E(m)(Y(Z/D)). When D1-His(190) is protonated, corresponding to a thermally activated state, the calculated E(m)(Y(Z)) was +1216 mV, which is as high as the E(m) for P(D1/D2). We observed deprotonation at CP43-Arg(357) upon S-state transition, which may suggest its involvement in the proton exit pathway. E(m)(Y(D)) was affected by formation of P(D2)(+) (but not P(D1)(+)) and sensitive to the protonation state of D2-Arg(180). This points to an electrostatic link between Y(D) and P(D2).

  14. DDR2 plays a role in fibroblast migration independent of adhesion ligand and collagen activated DDR2 tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Mireya Liliana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto

    2012-12-07

    Discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) is a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that can be activated by soluble collagen and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions including organism growth and wound repair. In the current studies, we used fibronectin and collagen-coated 2D surfaces and collagen matrices in combination with siRNA technology to investigate the role of DDR2 in a range of fibroblast motile activities. Silencing DDR2 with siRNA inhibited cell spreading and migration, and similar inhibition occurred regardless whether cells were interacting with fibronectin or collagen surfaces. Under the assay conditions used, DDR2 tyrosine kinase activation was not observed unless soluble collagen was added to the incubation medium. Finally silencing DDR2 also inhibited human fibroblast migration in 3D collagen matrices but had no effect on 3D collagen matrix remodeling and contraction. Taken together, our findings suggest that DDR2 is required for normal fibroblast spreading and migration independent of adhesion ligand and collagen activation of DDR2 tyrosine kinase.

  15. Intratumoral Heterogeneity for Expression of Tyrosine Kinase Growth Factor Receptors in Human Colon Cancer Surgical Specimens and Orthotopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuwai, Toshio; Nakamura, Toru; Kim, Sun-Jin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Langley, Robert R.; Fan, Dominic; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2008-01-01

    The design of targeted therapy, particularly patient-specific targeted therapy, requires knowledge of the presence and intratumoral distribution of tyrosine kinase receptors. To determine whether the expression of such receptors is constant or varies between and within individual colon cancer neoplasms, we examined the pattern of expression of the ligands, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor-B as well as their respective receptors in human colon cancer surgical specimens and orthotopic human colon cancers growing in the cecal wall of nude mice. The expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor on tumor cells and stromal cells, including tumor-associated endothelial cells, was heterogeneous in surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. In some tumors, the receptor was expressed on both tumor cells and stromal cells, and in other tumors the receptor was expressed only on tumor cells or only on stromal cells. In contrast, the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells in both surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. Examination of receptor expression in both individual surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors revealed that the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells and that the patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression differed between tumor cells. This heterogeneity in receptor expression among different tumor cells suggests that targeting a single tyrosine kinase may not yield eradication of the disease. PMID:18202197

  16. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  17. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  18. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  19. The effect of angiotensin 1-7 on tyrosine kinases activity in rat anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Rebas, Elzbieta . E-mail: elkar@zdn.am.lodz.pl; Zabczynska, Joanna; Lachowicz, Agnieszka

    2006-09-01

    Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) is a peptide originated from Ang II. It is known that in vessels Ang 1-7 shows opposite effects to Ang II. Ang 1-7 can modify processes of proliferation. However, Ang 1-7 action in pituitary gland cells was never studied. Moreover, the specific binding sites for Ang 1-7 are still unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ang 1-7 on tyrosine kinases (PTKs) activity in the anterior pituitary. The reaction of phosphorylation was carrying out in presence of different concentration of Ang 1-7 and losartan (antagonist of AT1 receptor) and PD123319 (antagonist of AT2). Our results show that Ang 1-7 inhibited activity of PTK to 60% of basic activity. Losartan did not change the Ang 1-7-induced changes in PTKs activity. The presence of PD123319 together with Ang 1-7 caused stronger inhibition PTKs activity than Ang 1-7 alone. These observations suggest that Ang 1-7 binds to the novel, unknown, specific for this peptide receptor.

  20. LAR receptor tyrosine phosphatases and HSPGs guide peripheral sensory axons to the skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wolfson, Sean N.; Gharib, Arash; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral axons of somatosensory neurons innervate the skin early in development to detect touch stimuli. Embryological experiments had suggested that the skin produces guidance cues that attract sensory axons, but neither the attractants nor their neuronal receptors had previously been identified. Results To investigate peripheral axon navigation to the skin, we combined live imaging of developing zebrafish Rohon-Beard (RB) neurons with molecular loss-of-function manipulations. Simultaneously knocking down two members of the LAR family of receptor tyrosine phosphatases expressed in RB neurons, or inhibiting their function with dominant negative proteins, misrouted peripheral axons to internal tissues. Time-lapse imaging indicated that peripheral axon guidance, rather than outgrowth or maintenance, was defective in LAR deficient neurons. Peripheral axons displayed a similar misrouting phenotype in mutants defective in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) production and avoided regions in which HSPGs were locally degraded. Conclusions HSPGs and LAR family receptors are required for sensory axon guidance to the skin. Together, our results support a model in which peripheral HSPGs are attractive ligands for LAR receptors on RB neurons. PMID:22326027

  1. Down-Regulation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase by Presenilin-dependent Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Foveau, Bénédicte; Ancot, Frédéric; Leroy, Catherine; Petrelli, Annalisa; Reiss, Karina; Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giordano, Silvia; Fafeur, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) acts through the membrane-anchored Met receptor tyrosine kinase to induce invasive growth. Deregulation of this signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and involves, in most cases, overexpression of the receptor. We demonstrate that Met is processed in epithelial cells by presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis (PS-RIP) independently of ligand stimulation. The proteolytic process involves sequential cleavage by metalloproteases and the γ-secretase complex, leading to generation of labile fragments. In normal epithelial cells, although expression of cleavable Met by PS-RIP is down-regulated, uncleavable Met displayed membrane accumulation and induced ligand-independent motility and morphogenesis. Inversely, in transformed cells, the Met inhibitory antibody DN30 is able to promote Met PS-RIP, resulting in down-regulation of the receptor and inhibition of the Met-dependent invasive growth. This demonstrates the original involvement of a proteolytic process in degradation of the Met receptor implicated in negative regulation of invasive growth. PMID:19297528

  2. A critical role for Syk protein tyrosine kinase in Fc receptor-mediated antigen presentation and induction of dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, Christine; Orbach, Daniel; Veron, Philippe; Schweighoffer, Edina; Colucci, Francesco; Gamberale, Romina; Ioan-Facsinay, Andrea; Verbeek, Sjef; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Bonnerot, Christian; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Di Santo, James; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2003-01-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the only APCs capable of initiating adaptive immune responses. The initiation of immune responses requires that DCs 1) internalize and present Ags; and 2) undergo a differentiation process, called "maturation", which transforms DCs into efficient APCs. DC maturation may be initiated by the engagement of different surface receptors, including certain cytokine receptors (such as TNFR), Toll-like receptors, CD40, and FcRs. The early activation events that link receptor engagement and DC maturation are not well characterized. We found that FcR engagement by immune complexes induced the phosphorylation of Syk, a protein tyrosine kinase acting immediately downstream of FcRs. Syk was dispensable for DC differentiation in vitro and in vivo, but was strictly required for immune complexes internalization and subsequent Ag presentation to T lymphocytes. Importantly, Syk was also required for the induction of DC maturation and IL-12 production after FcR engagement, but not after engagement of other surface receptors, such as TNFR or Toll-like receptors. Therefore, protein tyrosine phosphorylation by Syk represents a novel pathway for the induction of DC maturation.

  3. Novel multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitor ponatinib inhibits bFGF-activated signaling in neuroblastoma cells and suppresses neuroblastoma growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiaxiong; Pan, Jessie; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Yanling; Zhang, Huiyuan; Hu, Ting; Liu, Qing; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is one of the most common pediatric malignancies in children. Abnormal activation of receptor tyrosine kinases contributes to the pathological development of NB. Therefore, targeting tyrosine kinase receptors to cure NB is a promising strategy. Here, we report that a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor ponatinib inhibited NB cell proliferation and induced NB cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ponatinib suppressed the colony formation ability of NB cells. Mechanistically, ponatinib effectively inhibited the FGFR1-activated signaling pathway. Ponatinib also enhanced the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on NB cells. Furthermore, ponatinib demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in vivo by inhibiting tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model. In summary, our results showed that ponatinib inhibited NB growth both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27564113

  4. Small-molecule inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinases: promising tools for targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2014-08-08

    Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK-TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK-TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK-TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1) the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2) the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK-TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3) emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs.

  5. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 is a direct transcriptional and epigenetic target of IL-13 involved in allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rochman, M.; Kartashov, A.V.; Caldwell, J.M.; Collins, M.H.; Stucke, E.M.; Kc, K.; Sherrill, J.D.; Herren, J.; Barski, A.; Rothenberg, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Although IL-13 and neurotrophins are functionally important for the pathogenesis of immune responses, the interaction of these pathways has not been explored. Herein, by interrogating IL-13–induced responses in human epithelial cells we show that neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 1 (NTRK1), a cognate, high-affinity receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF), is an early transcriptional IL-13 target. Induction of NTRK1 was accompanied by accumulation of activating epigenetic marks in the promoter; transcriptional and epigenetic changes were STAT6-dependent. Using eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) as a model for human allergic inflammation, we found that NTRK1 was increased in inflamed tissue, dynamically expressed as a function of disease activity, and the downstream mediator of NTRK1 signaling early growth response 1 (EGR1) protein was elevated in allergic inflammatory tissue compared with control tissue. Unlike NTRK1, its ligand NGF was constitutively expressed in control and disease states, indicating that IL-13–stimulated NTRK1 induction is a limiting factor in pathway activation. In epithelial cells, NGF and IL-13 synergistically induced several target genes, including CCL26 (eotaxin-3). In summary, we have demonstrated that IL-13 confers epithelial cell responsiveness to NGF by regulating NTRK1 levels by a transcriptional and epigenetic mechanism and that this process likely contributes to allergic inflammation. PMID:25389033

  6. Linifanib (ABT-869) Potentiates the Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Agents through the Suppression of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Mediated AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathways in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Guo, Jiawei; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Jieqiong; Liu, Mingyao; Pang, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer, highly dependent on tumor angiogenesis, causes uncontrolled lethality, in part due to chemoresistance. Here, we demonstrate that linifanib (ABT-869), a novel multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, markedly augments cytotoxicity of chemotherapies in human gastric cancer. ABT-869 and chemotherapeutic agents exhibited a strong synergy to inhibit the viability of several gastric cancer cell lines, with combination index values ranging from 0.017 to 0.589. Additionally, the combination of ABT-869 and chemotherapeutic agents led to remarkable suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in a preclinical gastric cancer xenograft mouse model, drug co-treatments led to increased mouse survival as well as a synergistic reduction in tumor size and the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistic studies further revealed that all of the co-treatments containing ABT-869 resulted in decreased activation of the VEGF receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor and the insulin growth factor receptor. Inhibition of these receptor tyrosine kinases consequently attenuated the activation of the downstream AKT/mTOR signaling pathway both in cultured gastric cancer cells and in gastric cancer xenografts. Collectively, our findings suggest that the addition of ABT-869 to traditional chemotherapies may be a promising strategy for the treatment of human gastric cancer. PMID:27387652

  7. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pamela Y; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S; Herbert, De'Broski R; Craft, Joseph E; Flavell, Richard A; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G; Torgerson, Dara G; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-04-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded byTyro3in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell-specificPros1knockouts phenocopied the loss ofTyro3 Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses.

  8. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 acts in skin cells to promote sensory dendrite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianzhuang; Wang, Xiangming; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    Sensory dendrite morphogenesis is directed by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The extracellular environment plays instructive roles in patterning dendrite growth and branching. However, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the proprioceptive neuron PVD forms highly branched sensory dendrites adjacent to the hypodermis. We report that receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 functions in the hypodermis to pattern the PVD dendritic branches. Mutations in clr-1 lead to loss of quaternary branches, reduced secondary branches and increased ectopic branches. CLR-1 is necessary for the dendrite extension but not for the initial filopodia formation. Its role is dependent on the intracellular phosphatase domain but not the extracellular adhesion domain, indicating that it functions through dephosphorylating downstream factors but not through direct adhesion with neurons. Genetic analysis reveals that clr-1 also functions in parallel with SAX-7/DMA-1 pathway to control PVD primary dendrite development. We provide evidence of a new environmental factor for PVD dendrite morphogenesis.

  9. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pamela Y.; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A.; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D.; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Herbert, De’Broski R.; Craft, Joseph E.; Flavell, Richard A.; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by Tyro3 in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell–specific Pros1 knockouts phenocopied the loss of Tyro3. Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  10. Effects of 4 multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors on regional hemodynamics in conscious, freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Joanne J.; Fretwell, Laurice V.; Woolard, Jeanette

    2017-01-01

    VEGF inhibitors, including receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, are used as adjunct therapies in a number of cancer treatments. An emerging issue with these drugs is that most cause hypertension. To gain insight into the physiological mechanisms involved, we evaluated their regional hemodynamic effects in conscious rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats (350–450 g) were chronically implanted with pulsed Doppler flow probes (renal and mesenteric arteries, and the descending abdominal aorta) and catheters (jugular vein, peritoneal cavity, and distal abdominal aorta). Regional hemodynamics were measured over 4 d, before and after daily administration of cediranib (3 and 6 mg/kg, 3 and 6 mg/kg/h for 1 h, i.v.), sorafenib (10 and 20 mg/kg, 10 and 20 mg kg/h for 1 h, i.v.), pazopanib (30 and100 mg/kg, i.p.), or vandetanib (12.5 and 25 mg/kg, i.p.). All drugs evoked significant increases (P < 0.05; n = 7–8) in mean arterial pressure, which were generally accompanied by significant mesenteric and hindquarters, but not renal, vasoconstrictions. The hypertensive effects of cediranib were unaffected by losartan (10 mg/kg/h), bosentan (20 mg/kg/h), or a combination of phentolamine and propranolol (each 1 mg/kg/h), suggesting a need for new strategies to overcome them.—Carter, J. J., Fretwell, L. V., Woolard, J. Effects of 4 multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors on regional hemodynamics in conscious, freely moving rats. PMID:27986807

  11. Whole Genome Duplications Shaped the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Repertoire of Jawed Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Frédéric G.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family, involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, comprises proteins with a common enzymatic tyrosine kinase intracellular domain adjacent to a transmembrane region. The amino-terminal portion of RTKs is extracellular and made of different domains, the combination of which characterizes each of the 20 RTK subfamilies among mammals. We analyzed a total of 7,376 RTK sequences among 143 vertebrate species to provide here the first comprehensive census of the jawed vertebrate repertoire. We ascertained the 58 genes previously described in the human and mouse genomes and established their phylogenetic relationships. We also identified five additional RTKs amounting to a total of 63 genes in jawed vertebrates. We found that the vertebrate RTK gene family has been shaped by the two successive rounds of whole genome duplications (WGD) called 1R and 2R (1R/2R) that occurred at the base of the vertebrates. In addition, the Vegfr and Ephrin receptor subfamilies were expanded by single gene duplications. In teleost fish, 23 additional RTK genes have been retained after another expansion through the fish-specific third round (3R) of WGD. Several lineage-specific gene losses were observed. For instance, birds have lost three RTKs, and different genes are missing in several fish sublineages. The RTK gene family presents an unusual high gene retention rate from the vertebrate WGDs (58.75% after 1R/2R, 64.4% after 3R), resulting in an expansion that might be correlated with the evolution of complexity of vertebrate cellular communication and intracellular signaling. PMID:27260203

  12. Whole Genome Duplications Shaped the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Repertoire of Jawed Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Frédéric G; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-06-03

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family, involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, comprises proteins with a common enzymatic tyrosine kinase intracellular domain adjacent to a transmembrane region. The amino-terminal portion of RTKs is extracellular and made of different domains, the combination of which characterizes each of the 20 RTK subfamilies among mammals. We analyzed a total of 7,376 RTK sequences among 143 vertebrate species to provide here the first comprehensive census of the jawed vertebrate repertoire. We ascertained the 58 genes previously described in the human and mouse genomes and established their phylogenetic relationships. We also identified five additional RTKs amounting to a total of 63 genes in jawed vertebrates. We found that the vertebrate RTK gene family has been shaped by the two successive rounds of whole genome duplications (WGD) called 1R and 2R (1R/2R) that occurred at the base of the vertebrates. In addition, the Vegfr and Ephrin receptor subfamilies were expanded by single gene duplications. In teleost fish, 23 additional RTK genes have been retained after another expansion through the fish-specific third round (3R) of WGD. Several lineage-specific gene losses were observed. For instance, birds have lost three RTKs, and different genes are missing in several fish sublineages. The RTK gene family presents an unusual high gene retention rate from the vertebrate WGDs (58.75% after 1R/2R, 64.4% after 3R), resulting in an expansion that might be correlated with the evolution of complexity of vertebrate cellular communication and intracellular signaling.

  13. Involvement of tyrosine residues located in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor in agonist-induced down-regulation of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Bonin, H; Hnatowich, M; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Bouvier, M

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure of various cell types to adrenergic agonists leads to a decrease in cell surface beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) number. Sequestration of the receptor away from the cell surface as well as a down-regulation of the total number of cellular receptors are believed to contribute to this agonist-mediated regulation of receptor number. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not well characterized. Recently, tyrosine residues located in the cytoplasmic tails of several membrane receptors, such as the low density lipoprotein and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, have been suggested as playing an important role in the agonist-induced internalization of these receptors. Accordingly, we assessed the potential role of two tyrosine residues in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2AR in agonist-induced sequestration and down-regulation of the receptor. Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 of the human beta 2AR were replaced with alanine residues by site-directed mutagenesis and both wild-type and mutant beta 2AR were stably expressed in transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mutation dramatically decreased the ability of the beta 2AR to undergo isoproterenol-induced down-regulation. However, the substitution of Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 did not affect agonist-induced sequestration of the receptor. These results suggest that tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of human beta 2AR are crucial determinants involved in its down-regulation. PMID:2164220

  14. An unusual receptor tyrosine kinase of Schistosoma mansoni contains a Venus Flytrap module.

    PubMed

    Vicogne, Jérôme; Pin, Jean Philippe; Lardans, Vinca; Capron, Monique; Noël, Christophe; Dissous, Colette

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that successful development of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni must be dependent on an adaptative molecular dialogue with its hosts and on the existence of receptors for growth factors and hormones. Attempts to identify a homolog of the insulin receptor (IR) have led us to characterize a new receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) molecule in S. mansoni. SmRTK-1 is an integral membrane protein with a single membrane-spanning sequence separating an extracellular ligand-binding domain and a cytoplasmic TK domain. Structural and phylogenetic analyses of the kinase domain of SmRTK-1 confirmed its similarity to IR catalytic domains. However, sequence analysis of the extracellular domain of SmRTK-1 revealed similarity with various proteins (such as drug receptors) that share a structure known as the Venus Flytrap (VFT) module. Alignment with other VFT modules for which the structure has been solved was used to generate a 3D model of the putative VFT module of SmRTK-1. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the SmRTK-1 VFT module was closer to that of the GABA(B) receptor. Numerous RTK genes recently discovered in vertebrate and invertebrate species code for large families of modular proteins with diverse structures and ligand-binding specificities. SmRTK-1 probably represents a new class of RTK whose function remains to be determined. RTKs are present in all metazoans and associated with the control of metabolism, growth and development. The preferential localization of SmRTK-1 in sporocyst germinal cells and ovocytes could be in favor of its function in schistosome growth and differentiation.

  15. Dissecting the Roles of Tyrosines 490 and 785 of TrkA Protein in the Induction of Downstream Protein Phosphorylation Using Chimeric Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Biarc, Jordane; Chalkley, Robert J.; Burlingame, A. L.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases generally act by forming phosphotyrosine-docking sites on their own endodomains that propagate signals through cascades of post-translational modifications driven by the binding of adaptor/effector proteins. The pathways that are stimulated in any given receptor tyrosine kinase are a function of the initial docking sites that are activated and the availability of downstream participants. In the case of the Trk receptors, which are activated by nerve growth factor, there are only two established phosphotyrosine-docking sites (Tyr-490 and Tyr-785 on TrkA) that are known to be directly involved in signal transduction. Taking advantage of this limited repertoire of docking sites and the availability of PC12 cell lines stably transfected with chimeric receptors composed of the extracellular domain of the PDGF receptor and the transmembrane and intracellular domains of TrkA, the downstream TrkA-induced phosphoproteome was assessed for the “native” receptor and mutants lacking Tyr-490 or both Tyr-490 and Tyr-785. Basal phosphorylation levels were compared with those formed after 20 min of stimulation with PDGF. Several thousand phosphopeptides were identified after TiO2 enrichment, and many were up- or down-regulated by receptor activation. The modified proteins in the native sample contained many of the well established participants in TrkA signaling. The results from the mutant receptors allowed grouping of these downstream targets by their dependence on the two characterized docking site(s). A clear subset that was not dependent on either Tyr-490 or Tyr-785 emerged, providing direct evidence that there are other sites on TrkA that are involved in downstream signaling. PMID:23589303

  16. Src Tyrosine Kinase Alters Gating of Hyperpolarization-Activated HCN4 Pacemaker Channel through Tyr531

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S. Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2009-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance the HCN4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, PP2, on HCN4 and its mutant channels ex pressed in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole-cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr531 and Tyr554. Substituting HCN4-Tyr531 with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr554 by phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation, but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole-cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr531. PMID:17977941

  17. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  18. Partial purification and characterization of an enzyme from pea nuclei with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y L; Roux, S J

    1995-01-01

    A pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclear enzyme with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity has been partially purified and characterized. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 90 kD as judged by molecular sieve column chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Like animal protein tyrosine phosphatases it can be inhibited by low concentrations of molybdate and vanadate. It is also inhibited by heparin and spermine but not by either the acid phosphatase inhibitors citrate and tartrate or the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. The enzyme does not require Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ for its activity but is stimulated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and by ethyleneglycolbis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. It dephosphorylates phosphotyrosine residues on the four different 32P-tyrosine-labeled peptides tested but not the phosphoserine/threonine residues on casein and histone. Like some animal protein tyrosine phosphatases, it has a variable pH optimum depending on the substrate used: the optimum is 5.5 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled lysozyme, but it is 7.0 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled poly(glutamic acid, tyrosine). It has a Km of 4 microM when the lysozyme protein is used as a substrate. PMID:11536662

  19. N2-Trimethylacetyl substituted and unsubstituted-N4-phenylsubstituted-6-(2-pyridin-2-ylethyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4-diamines: Design, cellular receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitory activities and in vivo evaluation as antiangiogenic, antimetastatic and antitumor agents

    PubMed Central

    Gangjee, Aleem; Namjoshi, Ojas A.; Yu, Jianming; Ihnat, Michael A.; Thorpe, Jessica E.; Bailey-Downs, Lora C.

    2013-01-01

    Six novel N4-phenylsubstituted-6-(2-pyridin-2-ylethyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4-diamines and their N2-trimethylacetyl substituted analogs were synthesized as receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors. A microwave-mediated Sonogashira reaction was used as a key step for the synthesis of these compounds. Biological evaluation, in whole cell assays, showed that some analogs had remarkable inhibitory activity against a variety of RTKs and in particular cytotoxic activity against A431 tumor cells in culture. The inhibitory data against RTKs in this study demonstrated that variation of the 4-anilino substituents of thse analogs dictates both potency and specificity of inhibitory activity against various RTKs. The study also supported the hypothesis that interaction of substituents on the 2-amino group with hydrophobic site-II provides an increase in potency. Compound 8 of this series was selected for evaluation in vivo in a B16-F10 syngeneic mouse tumor model and exhibited significant reduction in tumor growth rate, in tumor vascular density and in metastases to the lung compared to the control. PMID:23375090

  20. Identification of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of K1 transforming protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Guo, J; Li, M; Choi, J K; DeMaria, M; Rosenzweig, M; Jung, J U

    1998-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is consistently identified in Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity-based lymphoma. KSHV encodes a transforming protein called K1 which is structurally similar to lymphocyte receptors. We have found that a highly conserved region of the cytoplasmic domain of K1 resembles the sequence of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). To demonstrate the signal-transducing activity of K1, we constructed a chimeric protein in which the cytoplasmic tail of the human CD8alpha polypeptide was replaced with that of KSHV K1. Expression of the CD8-K1 chimera in B cells induced cellular tyrosine phosphorylation and intracellular calcium mobilization upon stimulation with an anti-CD8 antibody. Mutational analyses showed that the putative ITAM of K1 was required for its signal-transducing activity. Furthermore, tyrosine residues of the putative ITAM of K1 were phosphorylated upon stimulation, and this allowed subsequent binding of SH2-containing proteins. These results demonstrate that the KSHV transforming protein K1 contains a functional ITAM in its cytoplasmic domain and that it can transduce signals to induce cellular activation.

  1. Acidic substitution of the activation loop tyrosines in TrkA supports nerve growth factor-independent cell survival and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gryz, E A; Meakin, S O

    2000-01-20

    TrkA is the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) for nerve growth factor (NGF) and stimulates NGF-dependent cell survival and differentiation in primary neurons. TrkA expression in neuronal tumors also supports NGF-dependent differentiation of neuroblastomas and apoptosis of medulloblastomas. Phosphorylation of the activation loop tyrosines in RTK's are essential to activation as well as allosteric changes that facilitate substrate interaction and phosphorylation. Acidic amino acid substitution of the activation loop tyrosines in TrkA, Tyr683Tyr684, was performed to mimic the negative charges normally induced by ligand activation and receptor phosphorylation. A total of eight independent mutants containing single or double substitutions were generated for comparison. Herein, we demonstrate that acidic substitution of the activation loop tyrosines is sufficient to induce allosteric changes required for constitutive TrkA kinase activity as well as phosphorylation of TrkA signaling proteins such as Shc, PLCgamma-1, FRS-2 and erk1/2. The strongest constitutively active TrkA mutants, GluAsp and AspGlu, support NGF-independent neuritogenesis and cell survival to levels approximately 65 and 80-100%, respectively, of NGF-activated wild type TrkA. Thus, constitutively active TrkA may provide a useful strategy in future therapeutic approaches to limit the development and progression of neuronal tumors.

  2. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Koland, John G

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  3. Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinase Multi-Site Self-Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Koland, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  4. ABT-869, a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor: inhibition of FLT3 phosphorylation and signaling in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Deepa B; Li, Junling; Tapang, Paul; Owen McCall, J; Pease, Lori J; Dai, Yujia; Wei, Ru-Qi; Albert, Daniel H; Bouska, Jennifer J; Osterling, Donald J; Guo, Jun; Marcotte, Patrick A; Johnson, Eric F; Soni, Niru; Hartandi, Kresna; Michaelides, Michael R; Davidsen, Steven K; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Jenny C; Rhodes, Katrin; Shah, Neil; Moore, Theodore B; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; Glaser, Keith B

    2007-04-15

    In 15% to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), aberrant proliferation is a consequence of a juxtamembrane mutation in the FLT3 gene (FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication [FLT3-ITD]), causing constitutive kinase activity. ABT-869 (a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the phosphorylation of FLT3, STAT5, and ERK, as well as Pim-1 expression in MV-4-11 and MOLM-13 cells (IC(50) approximately 1-10 nM) harboring the FLT3-ITD. ABT-869 inhibited the proliferation of these cells (IC(50) = 4 and 6 nM, respectively) through the induction of apoptosis (increased sub-G(0)/G(1) phase, caspase activation, and PARP cleavage), whereas cells harboring wild-type (wt)-FLT3 were less sensitive. In normal human blood spiked with AML cells, ABT-869 inhibited phosphorylation of FLT3 (IC(50) approximately 100 nM), STAT5, and ERK, and decreased Pim-1 expression. In methylcellulose-based colony-forming assays, ABT-869 had no significant effect up to 1000 nM on normal hematopoietic progenitor cells, whereas in AML patient samples harboring both FLT3-ITD and wt-FLT3, ABT-869 inhibited colony formation (IC(50) = 100 and 1000 nM, respectively). ABT-869 dose-dependently inhibited MV-4-11 and MOLM-13 flank tumor growth, prevented tumor formation, regressed established MV-4-11 xenografts, and increased survival by 20 weeks in an MV-4-11 engraftment model. In tumors, ABT-869 inhibited FLT3 phosphorylation, induced apoptosis (transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling [TUNEL]) and decreased proliferation (Ki67). ABT-869 is under clinical development for AML.

  5. IGF-1R modulation of acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling: role of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yujun; Zhang, Yue; Buckels, Ashiya; Paterson, Andrew J; Jiang, Jing; Clemens, Thomas L; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Du, Keyong; Chang, Yingzi; Frank, Stuart J

    2013-11-01

    GH is a potent anabolic and metabolic factor that binds its cell surface receptor (GHR), activating the GHR-associated tyrosine kinase, Janus kinase 2, which phosphorylates and activates the latent transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Some GH actions are mediated by the elaboration of IGF-1, which exerts effects by binding and activating the heterotetrameric tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, IGF-1R. In addition to this GH-GHR-IGF-1-IGF-1R scheme, we have demonstrated in primary osteoblasts and in islet β-cells that then deletion or silencing of IGF-1R results in diminished GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting that the presence of IGF-1R may facilitate GH signaling. In this study, we explore potential roles for protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in modulating GH-induced signaling, comparing conditions in which IGF-1R is present or diminished. We confirm that in mouse primary osteoblasts harboring loxP sites flanking the IGF-1R gene, infection with an adenovirus that expresses the Cre recombinase results in IGF-1R deletion and diminished acute GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we present a new model of IGF-1R silencing, in which expression of short hairpin RNA directed at IGF-1R greatly reduces IGF-1R abundance in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. In both models, treatment with a chemical inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B), but not one of src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphotase-1 (SHP-1) and SHP-2, reverses the loss of GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in cells lacking IGF-1R but has no effect in cells with intact IGF-1R. Furthermore, expression of either a dominant-negative PTP-1B or the PTP-1B-interacting inhibitory protein, constitutive photomorphogenesis 1, also rescues acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling in IGF-1R-deficient cells but has no effect in IGF-1R replete cells. By expressing a substrate-trapping mutant PTP-1B, we demonstrate that tyrosine

  6. Tyrosine-Specific Chemical Modification with in Situ Hemin-Activated Luminol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-20

    Tyrosine-specific chemical modification was achieved using in situ hemin-activated luminol derivatives. Tyrosine residues in peptide and protein were modified effectively with N-methylated luminol derivatives under oxidative conditions in the presence of hemin and H2O2. Both single and double modifications of the tyrosine residue occurred in the reaction of angiotensin II with N-methylated luminol derivative 9. Tyrosine-specific chemical modification of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) revealed that the surface-exposed tyrosine residues were selectively modified with 9. We succeeded in the functionalization of several proteins using azide-conjugated compound 18 using alkyne-conjugated probes by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) or dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-mediated copper-free click chemistry. This tyrosine-specific modification was orthogonal to conventional lysine modification by N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester, and dual functionalization by fluorescence modification of tyrosine residues and PEG modification of lysine residues was achieved without affecting the modification efficiency.

  7. Phosphorylation and recruitment of Syk by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-based phosphorylation of tamalin.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masayuki; Kitano, Jun; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Moriyoshi, Koki; Yanagi, Shigeru; Yamamura, Hirohei; Muto, Takanori; Jingami, Hisato; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2004-07-30

    Tamalin is a scaffold protein that forms a multiple protein assembly including metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and several postsynaptic and protein-trafficking scaffold proteins in distinct mode of protein-protein association. In the present investigation, we report that tamalin possesses a typical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which enables Syk kinase to be recruited and phosphorylated by the Src family kinases. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis of rat brain membrane fractions showed that tamalin is present in a multimolecular protein assembly comprising not only mGluR1 but also c-Src, Fyn, and a protein phosphatase, SHP-2. The protein association of both tamalin and c-Src, as determined by truncation analysis of mGluR1 in COS-7 cells, occurred at the carboxyl-terminal tail of mGluR1. Mutation analysis of tyrosine with phenylalanine in COS-7 cells revealed that paired tyrosines at the ITAM sequence of tamalin are phosphorylated preferentially by c-Src and Fyn, and this phosphorylation can recruit Syk kinase and enables it to be phosphorylated by the Src family kinases. The phosphorylated tyrosines at the ITAM sequence of tamalin were highly susceptible to dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatases in COS-7 cells. Importantly, tamalin was endogenously phosphorylated and associated with Syk in retinoic acid-treated P19 embryonal carcinoma cells that undergo neuron-like differentiation. The present investigation demonstrates that tamalin is a novel signaling molecule that possesses a PDZ domain and a PDZ binding motif and mediates Syk signaling in an ITAM-based fashion.

  8. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Endothelial Cell Receptor Tyrosine Kinase VEGFR-2.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Kevin Brown; Leon, Deborah R; Meyer, Rosana D; Rahimi, Nader; Costello, Catherine E

    2017-02-03

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an important receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that plays critical roles in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. The extracellular domain of VEGFR-2 is composed of seven immunoglobulin-like domains, each with multiple potential N-glycosylation sites (sequons). N-glycosylation plays a central role in RTK ligand binding, trafficking, and stability. However, despite its importance, the functional role of N-glycosylation of VEGFR-2 remains poorly understood. The objectives of the present study were to characterize N-glycosylation sites in VEGFR-2 via enzymatic release of the glycans and concomitant incorporation of (18)O into formerly N-glycosylated sites followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis to determine N-glycosylation site occupancy and the site-specific N-glycan heterogeneity of VEGFR-2 glycopeptides. The data demonstrated that all seven VEGFR-2 immunoglobulin-like domains have at least one occupied N-glycosylation site. MS/MS analyses of glycopeptides and deamidated, deglycosylated (PNGase F-treated) peptides from ectopically expressed VEGFR-2 in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells identified N-glycans at the majority of the 17 potential N-glycosylation sites on VEGFR-2 in a site-specific manner. The data presented here provide direct evidence for site-specific, heterogeneous N-glycosylation and N-glycosylation site occupancy on VEGFR-2. The study has important implications for the therapeutic targeting of VEGFR-2, ligand binding, trafficking, and signaling.

  9. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ binds to neurons in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Yu, Panpan; Lourie, Jacob; Bangayan, Nathanael J.; Symes, Aviva J.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of type IIA receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), which includes LAR, RPTPσ and RPTPδ, in the nervous system is becoming increasingly recognized. Evidence supports a significant role for these RPTPs during the development of the nervous system as well as after injury, and mutations in RPTPs are associated with human disease. However, a major open question is the nature of the ligands that interact with type IIA RPTPs in the adult brain. Candidates include several different proteins as well as the glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans. In order to investigate this problem, we used a receptor affinity probe assay with RPTPσ-AP fusion proteins on sections of adult mouse brain and to cultured neurons. Our results demonstrate that the major binding sites for RPTPσ in adult mouse brain are on neurons and are not proteoglycan GAG chains, as RPTPσ binding overlaps with the neuronal marker NeuN and was not significantly altered by treatments which eliminate chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, or both. We also demonstrate no overlap of binding of RPTPσ with perineuronal nets, and a unique modulation of RPTPσ binding to brain by divalent cations. Our data therefore point to neuronal proteins, rather than CSPGs, as being the ligands for RPTPσ in the adult, uninjured brain. PMID:24530640

  10. The Dtk receptor tyrosine kinase, which binds protein S, is expressed during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Crosier, P S; Freeman, S A; Orlic, D; Bodine, D M; Crosier, K E

    1996-02-01

    Dtk (Tyro 3/Sky/Rse/Brt/Tif) belongs to a recently recognized subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that also includes Ufo (Axl/Ark) and Mer (Eyk). Ligands for Dtk and Ufo have been identified as protein S and the related molecule Gas6, respectively. This study examined expression of Dtk during ontogeny of the hematopoietic system and compared the pattern of expression with that of Ufo. Both receptors were abundantly expressed in differentiating embryonic stem cells, yolk sac blood islands, para-aortic splanchnopleural mesoderm, fractionated AA4+ fetal liver cells, and fetal thymus from day 14 until birth. Although Ufo was expressed at moderate levels in adult bone marrow, expression of Dtk in this tissue was barely detectable. In adult bone marrow subpopulations fractionated using counterflow centrifugal elutriation, immunomagnetic bead selection for lineage-depletion and FACS sorting for c-kit expression, very low levels of Dtk and/or Ufo were detected in some cell fractions. These results suggest that Dtk and Ufo are likely to be involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis, particularly during the embryonic stages of blood cell development.

  11. MicroRNAs: Non-coding fine tuners of receptor tyrosine kinase signalling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Donzelli, Sara; Cioce, Mario; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina; Yarden, Yosef; Blandino, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence point to a crucial role for non-coding RNAs in modulating homeostatic signaling under physiological and pathological conditions. MicroRNAs, the best-characterized non-coding RNAs to date, can exquisitely integrate spatial and temporal signals in complex networks, thereby confer specificity and sensitivity to tissue response to changes in the microenvironment. MicroRNAs appear as preferential partners for Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) in mediating signaling under stress conditions. Stress signaling can be especially relevant to disease. Here we focus on the ability of microRNAs to mediate RTK signaling in cancer, by acting as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes. We will provide a few general examples of microRNAs modulating specific tumorigenic functions downstream of RTK signaling and integrate oncogenic signals from multiple RTKs. A special focus will be devoted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, a system offering relatively rich information. We will explore the role of selected microRNAs as bidirectional modulators of EGFR functions in cancer cells. In addition, we will present the emerging evidence for microRNAs being specifically modulated by oncogenic EGFR mutants and we will discuss how this impinges on EGFRmut driven chemoresistance, which fits into the tumor heterogeneity-driven cancer progression. Finally, we discuss how other non-coding RNA species are emerging as important modulators of cancer progression and why the scenario depicted herein is destined to become increasingly complex in the future.

  12. Mice lacking Axl and Mer tyrosine kinase receptors are susceptible to experimental autoimmune orchitis induction.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Liu, Peng; Cheng, C Yan; Lee, Will M; Chen, Yongmei; Han, Daishu

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian testis is an immunoprivileged organ where male germ cell autoantigens are immunologically ignored. Both systemic immune tolerance to autoantigens and local immunosuppressive milieu contribute to the testicular immune privilege. Testicular immunosuppression has been intensively studied, but information on systemic immune tolerance to autoantigens is lacking. In the present study, we aimed to determine the role of Axl and Mer receptor tyrosine kinases in maintaining the systemic tolerance to male germ cell antigens using the experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) model. Axl and Mer double-knockout (Axl(-/-)Mer(-/-)) mice developed evident EAO after a single immunization with germ cell homogenates emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant. EAO was characterized by the accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in the testis. Damage to the seminiferous epithelium was also observed. EAO induction was associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine upregulation in the testes, impaired permeability of the blood-testis barrier and generation of autoantibodies against germ cell antigens in Axl(-/-)Mer(-/-) mice. Immunization also induced mild EAO in Axl or Mer single-gene-knockout mice. By contrast, a single immunization failed to induce EAO in wild-type mice. The results indicate that Axl and Mer receptors cooperatively regulate the systemic immune tolerance to male germ cell antigens.

  13. Reduced Proteolytic Shedding of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases is a Post-Translational Mechanism of Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Oudin, Madeleine J.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Wang, Stephanie J.; Meyer, Aaron S.; Im, Hyungsoon; Frederick, Dennie T.; Tadros, Jenny; Griffith, Linda G.; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph; Flaherty, Keith T.; Gertler, Frank B.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Kinase inhibitor resistance often involves upregulation of poorly understood “bypass” signaling pathways. Here, we show that extracellular proteomic adaptation is one path to bypass signaling and drug resistance. Proteolytic shedding of surface receptors, which can provide negative feedback on signaling activity, is blocked by kinase inhibitor treatment and enhances bypass signaling. In particular, MEK inhibition broadly decreases shedding of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including HER4, MET, and most prominently AXL, an ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrate, thus increasing surface RTK levels and mitogenic signaling. Progression-free survival of melanoma patients treated with clinical BRAF/MEK inhibitors inversely correlates with RTK shedding reduction following treatment, as measured non-invasively in blood plasma. Disrupting protease inhibition by neutralizing TIMP1 improves MAPK inhibitor efficacy, and combined MAPK/AXL inhibition synergistically reduces tumor growth and metastasis in xenograft models. Altogether, extracellular proteomic rewiring through reduced RTK shedding represents a surprising mechanism for bypass signaling in cancer drug resistance. PMID:26984351

  14. A novel oncogene, v-ryk, encoding a truncated receptor tyrosine kinase is transduced into the RPL30 virus without loss of viral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, R; Mayer, B J; Hanafusa, T; Hanafusa, H

    1992-01-01

    The RPL viruses are acute oncogenic avian retroviruses isolated from chicken tumors. We carried out a genetic analysis of three of the viruses, RPL25, RPL28, and RPL30. While RPL25 and RPL28 were shown to contain the erbB oncogene, RPL30 appeared to contain a novel protein tyrosine kinase oncogene. This gene, v-ryk, was cloned and sequenced. The v-ryk oncogene contains a 1.39-kb nonretroviral sequence that includes a tyrosine kinase domain which was inserted into the viral envelope protein gp37-coding region and fused in frame with upstream gp37 to generate a P69gp37-ryk fusion oncoprotein. Unlike that of other acutely transforming retroviruses, transduction of the v-ryk gene into RPL30 did not result in deletion of viral sequences. Sequence analysis suggested that v-Ryk is more homologous to receptor-type tyrosine kinases than to nonreceptor-type kinases. By reconstitution of a virus from its cDNA, the v-ryk oncogene has been shown to be fully responsible for the transforming activity of the RPL30 virus. Antibodies specific to v-Ryk immunoprecipitated the v-Ryk oncoprotein from cells transformed by the RPL30 virus. The v-Ryk protein was shown to be first synthesized as a 150-kDa precursor and then cleaved into the mature 69-kDa gp37-Ryk fusion protein, both parts of which were found to be localized to the membrane fraction. As expected from the sequence of v-Ryk, immunoprecipitates of v-Ryk from RPL30-transformed cells were found to display a protein tyrosine kinase activity in vitro, and the levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins are elevated in v-ryk-transformed cells. Images PMID:1527848

  15. Identification and Targeting of Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Initiation, Progression, and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Initiation, Progression, and Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Justin Drake CONTRACTING...PROJECT NUMBER Justin Drake and Owen Witte 5e. TASK NUMBER Email: jdrake@mednet.ucla.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...of tyrosine kinase networks during prostate cancer progression Justin M. Drakea, Nicholas A. Grahamb,c, Tanya Stoyanovaa, Amir Sedghia, Andrew S

  16. Interleukins 2, 4, 7, and 15 stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 in T cells. Potential role of JAK kinases.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J A; Wang, L M; Hanson, E P; Sun, X J; White, M F; Oakes, S A; Pierce, J H; O'Shea, J J

    1995-12-01

    The signaling molecules insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and the newly described IRS-2 (4PS) molecule are major insulin and interleukin 4 (IL-4)-dependent phosphoproteins. We report here that IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15, as well as IL-4, rapidly stimulate the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in human peripheral blood T cells, NK cells, and in lymphoid cell lines. In addition, we show that the Janus kinases, JAK1 and JAK3, associate with IRS-1 and IRS-2 in T cells. Coexpression studies demonstrate that these kinases can tyrosine-phosphorylate IRS-2, suggesting a possible mechanism by which cytokine receptors may induce the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2. We further demonstrate that the p85 subunit of phosphoinositol 3-kinase associates with IRS-1 in response to IL-2 and IL-4 in T cells. Therefore, these data indicate that IRS-1 and IRS-2 may have important roles in T lymphocyte activation not only in response to IL-4, but also in response to IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15.

  17. Mechanisms of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistance and Strategies to Overcome Resistance in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Soo; Choi, Chang-Min

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations that lead to hyperactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling are detected in approximately 50% of lung adenocarcinoma in people from the Far East population and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are now the standard first line treatment for advanced disease. They have led to a doubling of progression-free survival and an increase in overall survival by more than 2 years. However, emergence of resistant clones has become the primary cause for treatment failure, and has created a new challenge in the daily management of patients with EGFR mutations. Identification of mechanisms leading to inhibitor resistance has led to new therapeutic modalities, some of which have now been adapted for patients with unsuccessful tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. In this review, we describe mechanisms of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance and the available strategies to overcoming resistance. PMID:27790276

  18. Lck regulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the T cell receptor subunits and ZAP-70 in murine thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The Src-family and Syk/ZAP-70 family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) are required for T cell receptor (TCR) functions. We provide evidence that the Src-family PTK Lck is responsible for regulating the constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the TCR zeta subunit in murine thymocytes. Moreover, ligation of the TCR expressed on thymocytes from Lck-deficient mice largely failed to induce the phosphorylation of TCR- zeta, CD3 epsilon, or ZAP-70. In contrast, we find that the TCR-zeta subunit is weakly constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated in peripheral T cells isolated from Lck-null mice. These data suggest that Lck has a functional role in regulation of TCR signal transduction in thymocytes. In peripheral T cells, other Src-family PTKs such as Fyn may partially compensate for the absence of Lck. PMID:8642247

  19. Central neural regulation by adrenergic nerves of the daily rhythm in hepatic tyrosine transaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Black, Ira B.; Reis, Donald J.

    1971-01-01

    1. In adrenalectomized fasted rats transection of the spinal cord at C7-C8 or placement of bilateral electrolytic lesions in the lateral hypothalamus when performed in the morning interrupted the daily rhythm of hepatic tyrosine transaminase by elevating low (AM) enzyme activities to high (PM) levels; lesions placed in PM did not affect the late afternoon rise in enzyme activity. 2. Bilateral thalamic lesions had no affect on enzyme activity. 3. The activity of hepatic catechol-O-methyl transferase was unaffected by hypothalamic lesions. 4. The lesion-evoked rise of tyrosine transaminase activity was abolished by exogenously administered norepinephrine. 5. Cycloheximide blocked the rise of tyrosine transaminase activity caused by hypothalamic lesions. 6. The results suggest that rhythmic activity of sympathetic nerves governed by lateral hypothalamus contribute to regulation of the daily rhythm in tyrosine transaminase by regulating the release of norepinephrine peripherally; norepinephrine may block the daily rise of enzyme by interfering with protein synthesis, possibly of new enzyme, by competing with pyridoxal co-factor. 7. It is proposed that alternating activity of sympathetic-adrenergic and vagal-cholinergic nerves to liver, controlled by the C.N.S., contribute to rhythmic activity of hepatic tyrosine transaminase. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4400586

  20. Loss of Tyrosine Phosphatase Dependent Inhibition Promotes Activation of Tyrosine Kinase c-Src in Detached Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sarah F.; Isley, Beth A.; Baker, Cheryl H.; Gallick, Gary E.; Summy, Justin M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite an intense focus on novel therapeutic strategies, pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest human malignancies. The frequent and rapid mortality associated with pancreatic cancer may be attributed to several factors, including late diagnosis, rapid tumor invasion into surrounding tissues, and formation of distant metastases. Both local invasion and metastasis require disruption of tumor cell contacts with the extracellular matrix. Detachment of normal cells from the extracellular matrix leads to a form of programmed cell death termed anoikis. Pancreatic cancer cells avert anoikis by activation of signaling pathways that allow for adhesion-independent survival. In the present studies, cellular signaling pathways activated in detached pancreatic cancer cells were examined. We demonstrate a rapid and robust activation of Src kinase in detached pancreatic cancer cells, relative to adherent. Src autophosphorylation rapidly returned to baseline levels upon reattachment to tissue culture plastic, in the presence or absence of specific extracellular matrix proteins. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors increased steady-state Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells and abrogated the detachment-induced increase in Src autophosphorylation. Src was found to co-immunoprecipitate with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting that SHP-2 may participate in regulation of Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells. Src family kinase (SFK) dependent increases in Akt and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation were observed in detached cells, indicating the potential for Src-dependent activation of survival and stress pathways in pancreatic cancer cells that have detached from the extracellular matrix. PMID:20945416

  1. The immunomodulatory adapter proteins DAP12 and Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ) regulate development of functional osteoclasts through the Syk tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mócsai, Attila; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Van Ziffle, Jessica A. G.; Hu, Yongmei; Burghardt, Andrew; Spusta, Steven C.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lanier, Lewis L.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Nakamura, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Osteoclasts, the only bone-resorbing cells, are central to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, yet their development and regulation are incompletely understood. Multiple receptors of the immune system use a common signaling paradigm whereby phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) within receptor-associated adapter proteins recruit the Syk tyrosine kinase. Here we demonstrate that a similar mechanism is required for development of functional osteoclasts. Mice lacking two ITAM-bearing adapters, DAP12 and the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), are severely osteopetrotic. DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- bone marrow cells fail to differentiate into multinucleated osteoclasts or resorb bone in vitro and show impaired phosphorylation of the Syk tyrosine kinase. syk-/- progenitors are similarly defective in osteoclast development and bone resorption. Intact SH2-domains of Syk, introduced by retroviral transduction, are required for functional reconstitution of syk-/- osteoclasts, whereas intact ITAM-domains on DAP12 are required for reconstitution of DAP12-/- FcRγ-/- cells. These data indicate that recruitment of Syk to phosphorylated ITAMs is critical for osteoclastogenesis. Although DAP12 appears to be primarily responsible for osteoclast differentiation in cultures directly stimulated with macrophage-colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand cytokines, DAP12 and FcRγ have overlapping roles in supporting osteoclast development in osteoblast–osteoclast cocultures, which mirrors their overlapping functions in vivo. These results provide new insight into the biology of osteoclasts and suggest novel therapeutic targets in diseases of bony remodeling. PMID:15073337

  2. Tyrosine phosphatase activity in mitochondria: presence of Shp-2 phosphatase in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Stringaro, A; Brunati, A M; Agostinelli, E; Arancia, G; Clari, G; Toninello, A

    2004-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation by unidentified enzymes has been observed in mitochondria, with recent evidence indicating that non-receptorial tyrosine kinases belonging to the Src family, which represent key players in several transduction pathways, are constitutively present in mitochondria. The extent of protein phosphorylation reflects a coordination balance between the activities of specific kinases and phophatases. The present study demonstrates that purified rat brain mitochondria possess endogenous tyrosine phosphatase activity. Mitochondrial phosphatases were found to be capable of dephosphorylating different exogenous substrates, including paranitrophenylphosphate, (32)P-poly(Glu-Tyr)(4:1) and (32)P-angiotensin. These activities are strongly inhibited by peroxovanadate, a well-known inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by inhibitors of alkali or Ser/Thr phosphatases, and mainly take place in the intermembrane space and outer mitochondrial membrane. Using a combination of approaches, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase Shp-2 in mitochondria. Shp-2 plays a crucial role in a number of intracellular signalling cascades and is probably involved in several human diseases. It thus represents the first tyrosine phosphatase shown to be present in mitochondria.

  3. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Modulates MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and β-Catenin Functional Interactions to Enhance Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Eagleson, Kathie L.

    2016-01-01

    MET, a pleiotropic receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in autism risk, influences multiple neurodevelopmental processes. There is a knowledge gap, however, in the molecular mechanism through which MET mediates developmental events related to disorder risk. In the neocortex, MET is expressed transiently during periods of peak dendritic outgrowth and synaptogenesis, with expression enriched at developing synapses, consistent with demonstrated roles in dendritic morphogenesis, modulation of spine volume, and excitatory synapse development. In a recent coimmunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry screen, β-catenin was identified as part of the MET interactome in developing neocortical synaptosomes. Here, we investigated the influence of the MET/β-catenin complex in mouse neocortical synaptogenesis. Western blot analysis confirms that MET and β-catenin coimmunoprecipitate, but N-cadherin is not associated with the MET complex. Following stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), β-catenin is phosphorylated at tyrosine142 (Y142) and dissociates from MET, accompanied by an increase in β-catenin/N-cadherin and MET/synapsin 1 protein complexes. In neocortical neurons in vitro, proximity ligation assays confirmed the close proximity of these proteins. Moreover, in neurons transfected with synaptophysin-GFP, HGF stimulation increases the density of synaptophysin/bassoon (a presynaptic marker) and synaptophysin/PSD-95 (a postsynaptic marker) clusters. Mutation of β-catenin at Y142 disrupts the dissociation of the MET/β-catenin complex and prevents the increase in clusters in response to HGF. The data demonstrate a new mechanism for the modulation of synapse formation, whereby MET activation induces an alignment of presynaptic and postsynaptic elements that are necessary for assembly and formation of functional synapses by subsets of neocortical neurons that express MET/β-catenin complex. PMID:27595133

  4. Clinical definition of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jackman, David; Pao, William; Riely, Gregory J; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Kris, Mark G; Jänne, Pasi A; Lynch, Thomas; Johnson, Bruce E; Miller, Vincent A

    2010-01-10

    Ten percent of North American patients with non-small-cell lung cancer have tumors with somatic mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Approximately 70% of patients whose lung cancers harbor somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR experience significant tumor regressions when treated with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib or erlotinib. However, the overwhelming majority of these patients inevitably acquire resistance to either drug. Currently, the clinical definition of such secondary or acquired resistance is not clear. We propose the following criteria be used to define more precisely acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. All patients should have the following criteria: previous treatment with a single-agent EGFR TKI (eg, gefitinib or erlotinib); either or both of the following: a tumor that harbors an EGFR mutation known to be associated with drug sensitivity or objective clinical benefit from treatment with an EGFR TKI; systemic progression of disease (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] or WHO) while on continuous treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib within the last 30 days; and no intervening systemic therapy between cessation of gefitinib or erlotinib and initiation of new therapy. The relatively simple definition proposed here will lead to a more uniform approach to investigating the problem of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in this unique patient population. These guidelines should minimize reporting of false-positive and false-negative activity in these clinical trials and would facilitate the identification of agents that truly overcome acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib.

  5. The Mertk receptor tyrosine kinase promotes T-B interaction stimulated by IgD B-cell receptor cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wen-Hai; Zhen, Yuxuan; Finkelman, Fred D; Cohen, Philip L

    2014-09-01

    The Mertk receptor tyrosine kinase facilitates macrophage and DC apoptotic-cell clearance and regulates immune tolerance. Mertk may also contribute to B-cell activation, because Mertk-KO mice fail to develop autoantibodies when allo-activated by T cells. We investigated this possibility with a well-characterized model in which injection of mice with goat anti-IgD antibody causes membrane IgD cross-linking that induces T-independent B cell activation and antigen presentation to T cells. Goat anti-mouse IgD antibody-injected C57BL/6 Mertk-KO mice had normal initial B cell activation and proliferation, but significantly lower T cell activation and proliferation, as well as lower IgE and IgG anti-goat IgG responses, as compared to C57BL/6 WT controls. B cell antigen processing, analyzed by evaluating B cell fluorescence following injection of monoclonal anti-IgD antibody labeled with biotin or FITC, was comparable between Mertk-KO mice and WT mice. IgD Ab primed B cells from Mertk-KO mice exhibited significantly lower ability in activating memory T cells isolated from WT mice injected with the same antigen 10 days before. These observations suggest that Mertk expression is required for optimal B-cell antigen presentation, which is, in turn, required in this model for optimal T cell activation and subsequent T cell-dependent B cell differentiation.

  6. Asymmetric evolution in two fish-specifically duplicated receptor tyrosine kinase paralogons involved in teleost coloration.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Ingo; Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    2006-06-01

    The occurrence of a fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD) in the lineage leading to teleost fishes is widely accepted, but the consequences of this event remain elusive. Teleosts, and the cichlid fishes from the species flocks in the East African Great Lakes in particular, evolved a unique complexity and diversity of body coloration and color patterning. Several genes involved in pigment cell development have been retained in duplicate copies in the teleost genome after the FSGD. Here we investigate the evolutionary fate of one of these genes, the type III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (csf1r). We isolated and shotgun sequenced two paralogous csf1r genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library of the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni that are both linked to paralogs of the pdgfr beta gene, another type III RTK. Two pdgfr beta-csf1r paralogons were also identified in the genomes of pufferfishes and medaka, and our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pdgfr beta-csf1r locus was duplicated during the course of the FSGD. Comparisons of teleosts and tetrapods suggest asymmetrical divergence at different levels of genomic organization between the teleost-specific pdgfr beta-csf1r paralogons, which seem to have evolved as coevolutionary units. The high-evolutionary rate in the teleost B-paralogon, consisting of csf1rb and pdgfr betab, further suggests neofunctionalization by functional divergence of the extracellular, ligand-binding region of these cell-surface receptors. Finally, we hypothesize that genome duplications and the associated expansion of the RTK family might be causally linked to the evolution of coloration in vertebrates and teleost fishes in particular.

  7. Ror family receptor tyrosine kinases regulate the maintenance of neural progenitor cells in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Endo, Mitsuharu; Doi, Ryosuke; Nishita, Michiru; Minami, Yasuhiro

    2012-04-15

    The Ror family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Ror1 and Ror2, have been shown to play crucial roles in developmental morphogenesis by acting as receptors or co-receptors to mediate Wnt5a-induced signaling. Although Ror1, Ror2 and Wnt5a are expressed in the developing brain, little is known about their roles in the neural development. Here we show that Ror1, Ror2 and their ligand Wnt5a are highly expressed in neocortical neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated suppression of Ror1, Ror2 or Wnt5a in cultured NPCs isolated from embryonic neocortex results in the reduction of βIII-tubulin-positive neurons that are produced from NPCs possibly through the generation of T-box brain 2 (Tbr2)-positive intermediate progenitors. BrdU-labeling experiments further reveal that the proportion of proliferative and neurogenic NPCs, which are positive for neural progenitor cell marker (Pax6) but negative for glial cell marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), is reduced within a few days in culture following knockdown of these molecules, suggesting that Ror1, Ror2 and Wnt5a regulate neurogenesis through the maintenance of NPCs. Moreover, we show that Dishevelled 2 (Dvl2) is involved in Wnt5a-Ror1 and Wnt5a-Ror2 signaling in NPCs, and that suppressed expression of Dvl2 indeed reduces the proportion of proliferative and neurogenic NPCs. Interestingly, suppressed expression of either Ror1 or Ror2 in NPCs in the developing neocortex results in the precocious differentiation of NPCs into neurons, and their forced expression results in delayed differentiation. Collectively, these results indicate that Wnt5a-Ror1 and Wnt5a-Ror2 signaling pathways play roles in maintaining proliferative and neurogenic NPCs during neurogenesis of the developing neocortex.

  8. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  9. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β: its role in breast cancer and associations with receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zahnow, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of leucine-zipper transcription factors that regulate gene expression to control cellular proliferation, differentiation, inflammation and metabolism. Encoded by an intronless gene, C/EBPβ is expressed as several distinct protein isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, LIP) whose expression is regulated by the differential use of several in-frame translation start sites. LAP1 and LAP2 are transcriptional activators and are associated with differentiation, whereas LIP is frequently elevated in proliferative tissue and acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of transcription. However, emerging evidence suggests that LIP can serve as a transcriptional activator in some cellular contexts, and that LAP1 and LAP2 might also have unique actions. The LIP:LAP ratio is crucial for the maintenance of normal growth and development, and increases in this ratio lead to aggressive forms of breast cancer. This review discusses the regulation of C/EBPβ activity by post-translational modification, the individual actions of LAP1, LAP2 and LIP, and the functions and downstream targets that are unique to each isoform. The role of the C/EBPβ isoforms in breast cancer is discussed and emphasis is placed on their interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:19351437

  10. Tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin inhibits tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Teraoka, K.; Azuma, M.; Oka, M.; Hamano, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of the tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin on both the secretion of endogenous catecholamines and the formation of 14C-catecholamines from (14C)tyrosine were examined using cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Palytoxin was shown to cause the stimulation of catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. However, this toxin caused the reduction rather than the stimulation of 14C-catecholamine formation at the same concentrations. Palytoxin failed to cause any alteration in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. Furthermore, the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells was shown to be inhibited by this toxin under the conditions in which the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation was observed, and this inhibitory action on tyrosine uptake was closely correlated with that on catecholamine formation. The inhibitory action of palytoxin on tyrosine uptake into the cells was observed to be noncompetitive, and this effect was not altered by the removal of Na+ from the incubation mixture. These results suggest that palytoxin may be able to inhibit the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells, resulting in the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation, probably through its direct action on the plasma membranes of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

  11. The tyrosine kinase Stitcher activates Grainy head and epidermal wound healing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenqiu; Tsarouhas, Vasilios; Xylourgidis, Nikos; Sabri, Nafiseh; Tiklová, Katarína; Nautiyal, Naumi; Gallio, Marco; Samakovlis, Christos

    2009-07-01

    Epidermal injury initiates a cascade of inflammation, epithelial remodelling and integument repair at wound sites. The regeneration of the extracellular barrier and damaged tissue repair rely on the precise orchestration of epithelial responses triggered by the injury. Grainy head (Grh) transcription factors induce gene expression to crosslink the extracellular barrier in wounded flies and mice. However, the activation mechanisms and functions of Grh factors in re-epithelialization remain unknown. Here we identify stitcher (stit), a new Grh target in Drosophila melanogaster. stit encodes a Ret-family receptor tyrosine kinase required for efficient epidermal wound healing. Live imaging analysis reveals that Stit promotes actin cable assembly during wound re-epithelialization. Stit activation also induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation along with the Grh-dependent expression of stit and barrier repair genes at the wound sites. The transcriptional stimulation of stit on injury triggers a positive feedback loop increasing the magnitude of epithelial responses. Thus, Stit activation upon wounding coordinates cytoskeletal rearrangements and the level of Grh-mediated transcriptional wound responses.

  12. The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of Epstein-Barr virus LMP2A is essential for blocking BCR-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Fruehling, S; Longnecker, R

    1997-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) blocks B-cell receptor (BCR) signal transduction in EBV-immortalized B lymphocytes in vitro. The cytoplasmic amino-terminal domain of LMP2A contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motif (ITAM). ITAMs consist of paired tyrosine and leucine residues and play a central role in signal transduction of the BCR and the T-cell receptor (TCR). To investigate the importance of the LMP2A ITAM, two EBV recombinants were constructed, each containing a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutation at amino acid 74 or 85 within the ITAM of LMP2A. Tyrosine phosphorylation, calcium mobilization, and induction of BZLF1 expression were no longer blocked in the LMP2A ITAM mutant LCLs following BCR cross-linking. In addition, the Syk protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was unable to bind LMP2A in unstimulated LCLs infected with either of the LMP2A ITAM mutants. Analysis of Syk phosphorylation before and after BCR cross-linking in the LMP2A mutant ITAM LCLs compared with wild-type EBV LCLs indicates a specific role of the LMP2A ITAM on the LMP2A-mediated negative effect on the Syk PTK. These data indicate the importance of the LMP2A ITAM motif in the LMP2A-mediated block on BCR signal transduction and position the role of the Syk PTK as being central to the function of LMP2A.

  13. Cloning of three human tyrosine phosphatases reveals a multigene family of receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatases expressed in brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, R; Morse, B; Huebner, K; Croce, C; Howk, R; Ravera, M; Ricca, G; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    A human brainstem cDNA library in bacteriophage lambda gt11 was screened under conditions of reduced hybridization stringency with a leukocyte common antigen (LCA) probe that spanned both conserved cytoplasmic domains. cDNA encoding a receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48), RPTPase alpha, has been cloned and sequenced. Human RPTPase alpha consists of 802 amino acids. The extracellular domain of 150 residues includes a hydrophobic signal peptide and eight potential N-glycosylation sites. This is followed by a transmembrane region and two tandemly repeated conserved domains characteristic of all RPTPases identified thus far. The gene for RPTPase alpha has been localized to human chromosome region 20pter-20q12 by analysis of its segregation pattern in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of two major transcripts of 4.3 and 6.3 kilobases. In addition to RPTPase alpha, two other RPTPases (beta and gamma), identified in the same screen, have been partially cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequence comparisons among LCA, the LCA-related protein LAR, and RPTPases alpha, beta, and gamma reveals the existence of a multigene family encoding different RPTPases, each containing a distinct extracellular domain, a single hydrophobic transmembrane region, and two tandemly repeated conserved cytoplasmic domains. Images PMID:2169617

  14. Highly conserved tyrosine stabilizes the active state of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Joseph A; South, Kieron; Ahuja, Shivani; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Opefi, Chikwado A; Eilers, Markus; Vogel, Reiner; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2010-11-16

    Light-induced isomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in the visual pigment rhodopsin triggers displacement of the second extracellular loop (EL2) and motion of transmembrane helices H5, H6, and H7 leading to the active intermediate metarhodopsin II (Meta II). We describe solid-state NMR measurements of rhodopsin and Meta II that target the molecular contacts in the region of the ionic lock involving these three helices. We show that a contact between Arg135(3.50) and Met257(6.40) forms in Meta II, consistent with the outward rotation of H6 and breaking of the dark-state Glu134(3.49)-Arg135(3.50)-Glu247(6.30) ionic lock. We also show that Tyr223(5.58) and Tyr306(7.53) form molecular contacts with Met257(6.40). Together these results reveal that the crystal structure of opsin in the region of the ionic lock reflects the active state of the receptor. We further demonstrate that Tyr223(5.58) and Ala132(3.47) in Meta II stabilize helix H5 in an active orientation. Mutation of Tyr223(5.58) to phenylalanine or mutation of Ala132(3.47) to leucine decreases the lifetime of the Meta II intermediate. Furthermore, the Y223F mutation is coupled to structural changes in EL2. In contrast, mutation of Tyr306(7.53) to phenylalanine shows only a moderate influence on the Meta II lifetime and is not coupled to EL2.

  15. Novel neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene mutation associated with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Su, Yi-Ning; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Wang-Tso

    2010-12-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor and nerve growth factor, as reported in previous studies. This report is of a 6-month-old male infant with typical symptoms and signs of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis. He had a homozygous insertion mutation with c.2086_2087 ins C of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1) gene with both parents as heterozygous carriers. This mutation may have a strong relation to hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV Taiwanese patients. This is the youngest reported patient in Taiwan and first reported with congenital insensitivity to pain with mutation of NTRK1 gene inherited from the parents. Early diagnosis may provide appropriate medical care and education for these children and their families for better prognosis.

  16. The autism associated MET receptor tyrosine kinase engages early neuronal growth mechanism and controls glutamatergic circuits development in the forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Zhongming; Li, Guohui; Piechowicz, Mariel; Anderson, Miranda; Uddin, Yasin; Wu, Jie; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2015-01-01

    The human MET gene imparts a replicated risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and is implicated in the structural and functional integrity of brain. MET encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, MET, which plays a pleiotropic role in embryogenesis and modifies a large number of neurodevelopmental events. Very little is known, however, on how MET signaling engages distinct cellular events to collectively affect brain development in ASD-relevant disease domains. Here, we show that MET protein expression is dynamically regulated and compartmentalized in developing neurons. MET is heavily expressed in neuronal growth cones at early developmental stages and its activation engages small GTPase Cdc42 to promote neuronal growth, dendritic arborization, and spine formation. Genetic ablation of MET signaling in mouse dorsal pallium leads to altered neuronal morphology indicative of early functional maturation. In contrast, prolonged activation of MET represses the formation and functional maturation of glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, manipulating MET signaling levels in vivo in the developing prefrontal projection neurons disrupts the local circuit connectivity made onto these neurons. Therefore, normal time-delimited MET signaling is critical in regulating the timing of neuronal growth, glutamatergic synapse maturation and cortical circuit function. Dysregulated MET signaling may lead to pathological changes in forebrain maturation and connectivity, and thus contribute to the emergence of neurological symptoms associated with ASD. PMID:26728565

  17. Transactivation of the Receptor-tyrosine Kinase Ephrin Receptor A2 Is Required for the Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan-mediated Angiogenesis That Is implicated in Tumor Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Frances E; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Salgia, Ravi; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis or the formation of new blood vessels is important in the growth and metastatic potential of various cancers. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s) by which angiogenesis occurs can have important therapeutic implications in numerous malignancies. We and others have demonstrated that low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA, ∼2500 Da) promotes endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption and angiogenesis. However, the mechanism(s) by which this occurs is poorly defined. Our data indicate that treatment of human EC with LMW-HA induced CD44v10 association with the receptor-tyrosine kinase, EphA2, transactivation (tyrosine phosphorylation) of EphA2, and recruitment of the PDZ domain scaffolding protein, PATJ, to the cell periphery. Silencing (siRNA) CD44, EphA2, PATJ, or Dbs (RhoGEF) expression blocked LMW-HA-mediated angiogenesis (EC proliferation, migration, and tubule formation). In addition, silencing EphA2, PATJ, Src, or Dbs expression blocked LMW-HA-mediated RhoA activation. To translate our in vitro findings, we utilized a novel anginex/liposomal targeting of murine angiogenic endothelium with either CD44 or EphA2 siRNA and observed inhibition of LMW-HA-induced angiogenesis in implanted Matrigel plugs. Taken together, these results indicate LMW-HA-mediated transactivation of EphA2 is required for PATJ and Dbs membrane recruitment and subsequent RhoA activation required for angiogenesis. These results suggest that targeting downstream effectors of LMW-HA could be a useful therapeutic intervention for angiogenesis-associated diseases including tumor progression. PMID:25023279

  18. Anks1a regulates COPII-mediated anterograde transport of receptor tyrosine kinases critical for tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeryung; Noh, Hyuna; Mun, Jiyoung; Gu, Changkyu; Sever, Sanja; Park, Soochul

    2016-01-01

    ErbB2 signalling, which is amplified by EphA2 binding, is an important therapeutic target for breast cancer. Despite the importance of the EphA2/ErbB2 complex in promoting breast tumorigenesis, the mechanism by which these receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are exported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remains poorly understood. Here we report that the PTB adaptor Anks1a is specifically localized to the ER on its own serine phosphorylation. Once there, Anks1a acts as an important regulator of COPII-mediated EphA2 ER export. The Anks1a ankyrin repeat domain binds EphA2 and causes it to accumulate at sites of ER exit. Simultaneously, the Anks1a PTB domain binds Sec23. This induces internalization of EphA2 via COPII vesicles, while Anks1a remains behind on the ER membrane. EphA2 also binds ErbB2 in the ER and seems to load ErbB2 into growing COPII carriers. Together, our study reveals a novel mechanism that regulates the loading of RTKs into COPII vesicles. PMID:27619642

  19. Implication of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase AXL in Head and Neck Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    von Mässenhausen, Anne; Brägelmann, Johannes; Billig, Hannah; Thewes, Britta; Queisser, Angela; Vogel, Wenzel; Kristiansen, Glen; Schröck, Andreas; Bootz, Friedrich; Brossart, Peter; Kirfel, Jutta; Perner, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a clinical challenge and identification of novel therapeutic targets is necessary. The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL has been implicated in several tumor entities and a selective AXL small molecule inhibitor (BGB324) is currently being tested in clinical trials for patients suffering from non-small cell lung cancer or acute myeloid leukemia. Our study investigates AXL expression during HNSCC progression and its use as a potential therapeutic target in HNSCC. AXL protein expression was determined in a HNSCC cohort (n = 364) using immunohistochemical staining. For functional validation, AXL was either overexpressed or inhibited with BGB324 in HNSCC cell lines to assess proliferation, migration and invasion. We found AXL protein expression increasing during tumor progression with highest expression levels in recurrent tumors. In HNSCC cell lines in vitro, AXL overexpression increased migration as well as invasion. Both properties could be reduced through treatment with BGB324. In contrast, proliferation was neither affected by AXL overexpression nor by inhibition with BGB324. Our patient-derived data and in vitro results show that, in HNSCC, AXL is important for the progression to more advanced tumor stages. Moreover, they suggest that AXL could be a target for precision medicine approaches in this dismal tumor entity. PMID:28025482

  20. Dialkoxyquinazolines: Screening Epidermal Growth Factor ReceptorTyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Potential Tumor Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Lim, John K.; Coffing, Stephanie L.; Hom,Darren L.; Negash, Kitaw; Ono, Michele Y.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Taylor,Scott E.; Vanderpoel, Jennifer L.; Slavik, Sarah M.; Morris, Andrew B.; Riese II, David J.

    2005-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a long-standingdrug development target, is also a desirable target for imaging. Sixteendialkoxyquinazoline analogs, suitable for labeling with positron-emittingisotopes, have been synthesized and evaluated in a battery of in vitroassays to ascertain their chemical and biological properties. Thesecharacteristics provided the basis for the adoption of a selection schemato identify lead molecules for labeling and in vivo evaluation. A newEGFR tyrosine kinase radiometric binding assay revealed that all of thecompounds possessed suitable affinity (IC50 = 0.4 - 51 nM) for the EGFRtyrosine kinase. All of the analogs inhibited ligand-induced EGFRtyrosine phosphorylation (IC50 = 0.8 - 20 nM). The HPLC-estimatedoctanol/water partition coefficients ranged from 2.0-5.5. Four compounds,4-(2'-fluoroanilino)- and 4-(3'-fluoroanilino)-6,7-diethoxyquinazoline aswell as 4-(3'-chloroanilino)- and4-(3'-bromoanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, possess the bestcombination of characteristics that warrant radioisotope labeling andfurther evaluation in tumor-bearing mice.

  1. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors activate autophagy as a cytoprotective response in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Weidong; Pan, Hongming; Chen, Yan; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yanshan; Li, Jing; Ge, Weiting; Feng, Lifeng; Lin, Xiaoying; Wang, Xiaojia; Wang, Xian; Jin, Hongchuan

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib have been widely used in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Unfortunately, the efficacy of EGFR-TKIs is limited because of natural and acquired resistance. As a novel cytoprotective mechanism for tumor cell to survive under unfavorable conditions, autophagy has been proposed to play a role in drug resistance of tumor cells. Whether autophagy can be activated by gefitinib or erlotinib and thereby impair the sensitivity of targeted therapy to lung cancer cells remains unknown. Here, we first report that gefitinib or erlotinib can induce a high level of autophagy, which was accompanied by the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Moreover, cytotoxicity induced by gefitinib or erlotinib was greatly enhanced after autophagy inhibition by the pharmacological inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) and siRNAs targeting ATG5 and ATG7, the most important components for the formation of autophagosome. Interestingly, EGFR-TKIs can still induce cell autophagy even after EGFR expression was reduced by EGFR specific siRNAs. In conclusion, we found that autophagy can be activated by EGFR-TKIs in lung cancer cells and inhibition of autophagy augmented the growth inhibitory effect of EGFR-TKIs. Autophagy inhibition thus represents a promising approach to improve the efficacy of EGFR-TKIs in the treatment of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

  2. Src tyrosine kinase alters gating of hyperpolarization-activated HCN4 pacemaker channel through Tyr531.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) 4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2), on HCN4 and its mutant channels expressed in HEK 293 cells by using a whole cell patch-clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr(531) and Tyr(554). Substituting HCN4-Tyr(531) with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr(554) with phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src's actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr(531).

  3. Ca2+/Calmodulin and Apo-Calmodulin Both Bind to and Enhance the Tyrosine Kinase Activity of c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Anguita, Estefanía; Benaim, Gustavo; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinases play a prominent role in multiple cellular processes, including: cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, stress response, and cell adhesion and migration, among others. And when deregulated by mutations, overexpression, and/or the arrival of faulty incoming signals, its hyperactivity contributes to the development of hematological and solid tumors. c-Src is a prototypical member of this family of kinases, which is highly regulated by a set of phosphorylation events. Other factor contributing to the regulation of Src activity appears to be mediated by the Ca2+ signal generated in cells by different effectors, where the Ca2+-receptor protein calmodulin (CaM) plays a key role. In this report we demonstrate that CaM directly interacts with Src in both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent manners in vitro and in living cells, and that the CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) inhibits the activation of this kinase induced by the upstream activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in human carcinoma epidermoide A431 cells, and by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, in both A431 cells and human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+/CaM complex strongly activates the auto-phosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src toward exogenous substrates, but most relevantly and for the first time, we demonstrate that Ca2+-free CaM (apo-CaM) exerts a far higher activatory action on Src auto-phosphorylation and kinase activity toward exogenous substrates than the one exerted by the Ca2+/CaM complex. This suggests that a transient increase in the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is not an absolute requirement for CaM-mediated activation of Src in living cells, and that a direct regulation of Src by apo-CaM could be inferred. PMID:26058065

  4. Knock-in Mutation of the Distal Four Tyrosines of Linker for Activation of T Cells Blocks Murine T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Menon, Rashmi K.; Grinberg, Alexander; Zhang, Weiguo; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Love, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    The integral membrane adapter protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) performs a critical function in T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signal transduction by coupling the TCR to downstream signaling pathways. After TCR engagement, LAT is tyrosine phosphorylated by ZAP-70 creating docking sites for multiple src homology 2–containing effector proteins. In the Jurkat T cell line, the distal four tyrosines of LAT bind PLCγ-1, Grb2, and Gads. Mutation of these four tyrosine residues to phenylalanine (4YF) blocked TCR-mediated calcium mobilization, Erk activation, and nuclear factor (NF)-AT activation. In this study, we examined whether these four tyrosine residues were essential for T cell development by generating LAT “knock-in” mutant mice that express the 4YF mutant protein under the control of endogenous LAT regulatory sequences. Significantly, the phenotype of 4YF knock-in mice was identical to LAT−/− (null) mice; thymocyte development was arrested at the immature CD4−CD8− stage and no mature T cells were present. Knock-in mice expressing wild-type LAT protein, generated by a similar strategy, displayed a normal T cell developmental profile. These results demonstrate that the distal four tyrosine residues of LAT are essential for preTCR signaling and T cell development in vivo. PMID:11457888

  5. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition causes simultaneous bone loss and excess bone formation within growing bone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmio, Mirja; Joki, Henna; Kallio, Jenny; Maeaettae, Jorma A.; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo; Toppari, Jorma; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina

    2011-08-01

    During postnatal skeletal growth, adaptation to mechanical loading leads to cellular activities at the growth plate. It has recently become evident that bone forming and bone resorbing cells are affected by the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571, Gleevec (registered)) . Imatinib targets PDGF, ABL-related gene, c-Abl, c-Kit and c-Fms receptors, many of which have multiple functions in the bone microenvironment. We therefore studied the effects of imatinib in growing bone. Young rats were exposed to imatinib (150 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-7, or 100 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-13), and the effects of RTK inhibition on bone physiology were studied after 8 and 70 days (3-day treatment), or after 14 days (9-day treatment). X-ray imaging, computer tomography, histomorphometry, RNA analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate bone modeling and remodeling in vivo. Imatinib treatment eliminated osteoclasts from the metaphyseal osteochondral junction at 8 and 14 days. This led to a resorption arrest at the growth plate, but also increased bone apposition by osteoblasts, thus resulting in local osteopetrosis at the osteochondral junction. The impaired bone remodelation observed on day 8 remained significant until adulthood. Within the same bone, increased osteoclast activity, leading to bone loss, was observed at distal bone trabeculae on days 8 and 14. Peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT) and micro-CT analysis confirmed that, at the osteochondral junction, imatinib shifted the balance from bone resorption towards bone formation, thereby altering bone modeling. At distal trabecular bone, in turn, the balance was turned towards bone resorption, leading to bone loss. - Research Highlights: > 3-Day imatinib treatment. > Causes growth plate anomalies in young rats. > Causes biomechanical changes and significant bone loss at distal trabecular bone. > Results in loss of osteoclasts at osteochondral junction.

  6. The insulin and IGF1 receptor kinase domains are functional dimers in the activated state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabail, M. Zulema; Li, Shiqing; Lemmon, Eric; Bowen, Mark E.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2015-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) are highly related receptor tyrosine kinases with a disulfide-linked homodimeric architecture. Ligand binding to the receptor ectodomain triggers tyrosine autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domains, which stimulates catalytic activity and creates recruitment sites for downstream signalling proteins. Whether the two phosphorylated tyrosine kinase domains within the receptor dimer function independently or cooperatively to phosphorylate protein substrates is not known. Here we provide crystallographic, biophysical and biochemical evidence demonstrating that the phosphorylated kinase domains of IR and IGF1R form a specific dimeric arrangement involving an exchange of the juxtamembrane region proximal to the kinase domain. In this dimer, the active position of α-helix C in the kinase N lobe is stabilized, which promotes downstream substrate phosphorylation. These studies afford a novel strategy for the design of small-molecule IR agonists as potential therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes.

  7. A case of Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome with a novel mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene complicated by medullary sponge kidney.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuki; Sato, Takashi; Takagi, Masaki; Watanabe, Toru; Nagayama, Yoshihisa; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Abe, Tokinari

    2012-01-01

    Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS) is a genetic disorder characterized by severe insulin resistance and somatic characteristics. Recombinant insulin-like growth factor 1 (r-IGF-1) is used to treat RMS, as the IGF-1 and insulin receptors share homology. However, the effect of r-IGF-1 varies in patients and it is difficult to manage metabolic status appropriately in r-IGF-1 resistant cases. We report a Japanese boy with RMS who showed resistance to r-IGF-1 therapy and a novel mutation in the insulin receptor in the tyrosine kinase domain. Mutations in this region disturb tyrosine kinase catalytic activity in IGF-1 receptors as a result of dominant negative effects. We consider this mutation to be the cause of resistance to r-IGF-1. The patient also exhibited radiographical features of medullary sponge kidney and had severe nephrocalcinosis and hypokalemia, indicating Bartter syndrome. However, analysis revealed no mutations in the responsible genes and the etiology of the renal abnormalities therefore remains unknown.

  8. The serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha cytoplasmic tail negatively regulate immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Wienands, J; Reth, M

    2000-07-18

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is a multiprotein complex consisting of the membrane-bound Ig molecule and the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimer. On BCR engagement, Ig-alpha and Ig-beta become phosphorylated not only on tyrosine residues of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif but also on serine and threonine residues. We have mutated all serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha tail to alanine and valine, respectively. The mutated Ig-alpha sequence was expressed either as a single-chain Fv/Ig-alpha molecule or in the context of the complete BCR. In both cases, the mutated Ig-alpha showed a stronger tyrosine phosphorylation than the wild-type Ig-alpha and initiated increased signaling on stimulation. These findings suggest that serine/threonine kinases can negatively regulate signal transduction from the BCR.

  9. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for interneuron connectivity at specific subcellular compartments of granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Beuter, Simone; Ardi, Ziv; Horovitz, Omer; Wuchter, Jennifer; Keller, Stefanie; Saha, Rinki; Tripathi, Kuldeep; Anunu, Rachel; Kehat, Orli; Kriebel, Martin; Richter-Levin, Gal; Volkmer, Hansjürgen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal transmission is regulated by the local circuitry which is composed of principal neurons targeted at different subcellular compartments by a variety of interneurons. However, mechanisms that contribute to the subcellular localisation and maintenance of GABAergic interneuron terminals are poorly understood. Stabilization of GABAergic synapses depends on clustering of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and its interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Lentiviral knockdown experiments in adult rats indicated that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for the stabilisation of basket cell terminals on proximal dendritic and somatic compartments of granular cells of the dentate gyrus. EphA7 deficiency and concomitant destabilisation of GABAergic synapses correlated with impaired long-term potentiation and reduced hippocampal learning. Reduced GABAergic innervation may be explained by an impact of EphA7 on gephyrin clustering. Overexpression or ephrin stimulation of EphA7 induced gephyrin clustering dependent on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is an interaction partner of gephyrin. Gephyrin interactions with mTOR become released after mTOR activation while enhanced interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin was observed in parallel. In conclusion, EphA7 regulates gephyrin clustering and the maintenance of inhibitory synaptic connectivity via mTOR signalling. PMID:27405707

  10. Three generations of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors developed to revolutionize the therapy of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, ~80%–85% of which is non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Sensitizing mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene (EGFRm+), such as exon 19 deletions and exon 21 L858R point mutations, are the most important drivers in NSCLC patients. In this respect, small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been designed and developed, which launched the era of targeted, personalized and precise medicine for lung cancer. Patients with EGFRm+ could achieve good responses to the treatment with the first-generation EGFR TKIs, such as erlotinib and gefitinib. However, most patients develop acquired drug resistance mostly driven by the T790M mutation occurring within exon 20. Although the second-generation EGFR TKIs, such as afatinib, dacomitinib and neratinib, demonstrated promising activity against T790M in preclinical models, they have failed to overcome resistance in patients due to dose-limiting toxicity. Recently, the third-generation EGFR TKIs have shown to be effective against cell lines and murine models harboring T790M mutations while sparing wild-type EGFR, which represents a promising breakthrough approach in overcoming T790M-mediated resistance in NSCLC patients. This article provides a comprehensive review of the therapy revolution for NSCLC with three generations of EGFR TKIs. PMID:27920501

  11. Role of the Non-Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ACK2 in EGF Receptor Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13 . SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Original contains color plates: All DTIC reproductions will be in black and white...ACK2 through a series of GST pull-down assays [ 13 ]. SH3PX1 (sorting nexin 9, SNX9), a member of the nexin family of vesicle transport proteins...undergoes an EGF- dependent phosphorylation, mediated via the Cdc42-promoted activation of ACK2 [ 13 ]. While the precise role of SH3PX1 phosphorylation

  12. Fulvestrant-induced cell death and proteasomal degradation of estrogen receptor α protein in MCF-7 cells require the CSK c-Src tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wei-Lan; Shioda, Keiko; Coser, Kathryn R; Rivizzigno, Danielle; McSweeney, Kristen R; Shioda, Toshi

    2013-01-01

    Fulvestrant is a representative pure antiestrogen and a Selective Estrogen Receptor Down-regulator (SERD). In contrast to the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) such as 4-hydroxytamoxifen that bind to estrogen receptor α (ERα) as antagonists or partial agonists, fulvestrant causes proteasomal degradation of ERα protein, shutting down the estrogen signaling to induce proliferation arrest and apoptosis of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells. We performed genome-wide RNAi knockdown screenings for protein kinases required for fulvestrant-induced apoptosis of the MCF-7 estrogen-dependent human breast caner cells and identified the c-Src tyrosine kinase (CSK), a negative regulator of the oncoprotein c-Src and related protein tyrosine kinases, as one of the necessary molecules. Whereas RNAi knockdown of CSK in MCF-7 cells by shRNA-expressing lentiviruses strongly suppressed fulvestrant-induced cell death, CSK knockdown did not affect cytocidal actions of 4-hydroxytamoxifen or paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent. In the absence of CSK, fulvestrant-induced proteasomal degradation of ERα protein was suppressed in both MCF-7 and T47D estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells whereas the TP53-mutated T47D cells were resistant to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant in the presence or absence of CSK. MCF-7 cell sensitivities to fulvestrant-induced cell death or ERα protein degradation was not affected by small-molecular-weight inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src, suggesting possible involvement of other signaling molecules in CSK-dependent MCF-7 cell death induced by fulvestrant. Our observations suggest the importance of CSK in the determination of cellular sensitivity to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant.

  13. TLR4 Signaling Is Coupled to SRC Family Kinase Activation, Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Zonula Adherens Proteins, and Opening of the Paracellular Pathway in Human Lung Microvascular Endothelia*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Angelini, Daniel J.; Yang, Shiqi; Xia, Guanjun; Cross, Alan S.; Mann, Dean; Bannerman, Douglas D.; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Goldblum, Simeon E.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key mediator in the vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections. LPS opens the paracellular pathway in pulmonary vascular endothelia through protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We now have identified the protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and their substrates required for LPS-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and opening of the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-Ls). LPS disrupted barrier integrity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prior broad spectrum PTK inhibition was protective. LPS increased tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins, VE-cadherin, γ-catenin, and p120ctn. Two SRC family PTK (SFK)-selective inhibitors, PP2 and SU6656, blocked LPS-induced increments in tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and p120ctn and paracellular permeability. In HMVEC-Ls, c-SRC, YES, FYN, and LYN were expressed at both mRNA and protein levels. Selective small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of c-SRC, FYN, or YES diminished LPS-induced SRC Tyr416 phosphorylation, tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and p120ctn, and barrier disruption, whereas knockdown of LYN did not. For VE-cadherin phosphorylation, knockdown of either c-SRC or FYN provided total protection, whereas YES knockdown was only partially protective. For p120ctn phosphorylation, knockdown of FYN, c-SRC, or YES each provided comparable but partial protection. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was expressed both on the surface and intracellular compartment of HMVEC-Ls. Prior knockdown of TLR4 blocked both LPS-induced SFK activation and barrier disruption. These data indicate that LPS recognition by TLR4 activates the SFKs, c-SRC, FYN, and YES, which, in turn, contribute to tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins to open the endothelial paracellular pathway. PMID:18326860

  14. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Molecular variation and evolution of the tyrosine kinase domains of insulin receptor IRa and IRb genes in Cyprinidae.

    PubMed

    Kong, XiangHui; Wang, XuZhen; He, ShunPing

    2011-07-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) gene plays an important role in regulating cell growth, differentiation and development. In the present study, DNA sequences of insulin receptor genes, IRa and IRb, were amplified and sequenced from 37 representative species of the Cyprinidae and from five outgroup species from non-cyprinid Cypriniformes. Based on coding sequences (CDS) of tyrosine kinase regions of IRa and IRb, molecular evolution and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed to better understand the characteristics of IR gene divergence in the family Cyprinidae. IRa and IRb were clustered into one lineage in the gene tree of the IR gene family, reconstructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). IRa and IRb have evolved into distinct genes after IR gene duplication in Cyprinidae. For each gene, molecular evolution analyses showed that there was no significant difference among different groups in the reconstructed maximum parsimony (MP) tree of Cyprinidae; IRa and IRb have been subjected to similar evolutionary pressure among different lineages. Although the amino acid sequences of IRa and IRb tyrosine kinase regions were highly conserved, our analyses showed that there were clear sequence variations between the tyrosine kinase regions of IRa and IRb proteins. This indicates that IRa and IRb proteins might play different roles in the insulin signaling pathway.

  16. Skin problems and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kozuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is a good target for the treatment of lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor was first approved for the treatment of advanced lung cancer in 2002. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor plays an essential role in the treatment of cancer, especially for patients harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutation. Hence, skin toxicity is the most concerning issue for the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Skin toxicity is bothersome and sometimes affects the quality of life and treatment compliance. Thus, it is important for physicians to understand the background and how to manage epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated skin toxicity. Here, the author reviewed the mechanism and upfront preventive and reactive treatments for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-associated skin toxicities. PMID:26826719

  17. Skin problems and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kozuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is a good target for the treatment of lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor was first approved for the treatment of advanced lung cancer in 2002. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor plays an essential role in the treatment of cancer, especially for patients harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutation. Hence, skin toxicity is the most concerning issue for the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Skin toxicity is bothersome and sometimes affects the quality of life and treatment compliance. Thus, it is important for physicians to understand the background and how to manage epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated skin toxicity. Here, the author reviewed the mechanism and upfront preventive and reactive treatments for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-associated skin toxicities.

  18. The second immunoglobulin-like domain of the VEGF tyrosine kinase receptor Flt-1 determines ligand binding and may initiate a signal transduction cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Davis-Smyth, T; Chen, H; Park, J; Presta, L G; Ferrara, N

    1996-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic inducer that mediates its effects through two high affinity receptor tyrosine kinases, Flt-1 and KDR. Flt-1 is required for endothelial cell morphogenesis whereas KDR is involved primarily in mitogenesis. Flt-1 has an alternative ligand, placenta growth factor (PlGF). Both Flt-1 and KDR have seven immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in the extracellular domain. The significance and function of these domains for ligand binding and receptor activation are unknown. Here we show that deletion of the second domain of Flt-1 completely abolishes the binding of VEGF. Introduction of the second domain of KDR into an Flt-1 mutant lacking the homologous domain restored VEGF binding. However, the ligand specificity was characteristic of the KDR receptor. We then created chimeric receptors where the first three or just the second Ig-like domains of Flt-1 replaced the corresponding domains in Flt-4, a receptor that does not bind VEGF, and analyzed their ability to bind VEGF. Both swaps conferred upon Flt-4 the ability to bind VEGF with an affinity nearly identical to that of wild-type Flt-1. Furthermore, transfected cells expressing these chimeric Flt-4 receptors exhibited increased DNA synthesis in response to VEGF or PlGF. These results demonstrate that a single Ig-like domain is the major determinant for VEGF-PlGF interaction and that binding to this domain may initiate a signal transduction cascade. Images PMID:8890165

  19. The immunopharmacologic potential of Semaxanib and new generation directed therapeutic drugs: Receptor tyrosine kinase regulation with anti-tumorigenensis/angiogenesis properties

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular signaling of messages emanating from cellular membranes through receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a major mechanism for intercellular communication and transduction during development and metabolism, as well as in disease-associated processes. The phosphorylation status and signaling activity of RTKs are determined by a dynamic equilibrium of the activity of both RTKs and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). RTKs are essentially a class of cell-surface receptors for growth factors and other extracellular ligands, the most conspicuous perhaps are members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene family, which plays a fundamental role in the growth and differentiation of vascular, as well as lymphatic endothelial cells. In particular, VEGF is a major regulator of normal (physiologic) and abnormal (cancerous) angiogenesis, including that associated with tumors and cancer. Blockers/inhibitors and regulators of RTKs are indeed promising cancer interventions, their specific mechanisms are yet to be unraveled. In this cutting-edge synopsis, I elaborate on breakthroughs/advances and current concepts of RTK regulation, further shedding light on exploring the role of potential regulators, particularly the RTK inhibitor Semaxanib, and the mechanisms associated with tumorigenesis in an effort to understand a potentially alleviating pharmacologic therapeutic intervention. This survey also tackles the loopholes and shortcomings of the aforementioned inhibitory role of Semaxanib, especially its inefficacy and ultimate discontinuation of relevant clinical trials. PMID:23960782

  20. Activation of the Lck tyrosine protein kinase by hydrogen peroxide requires the phosphorylation of Tyr-394.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J S; Sefton, B M

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of cells to H2O2 mimics many of the effects of treatment of cells with extracellular ligands. Among these is the stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation. In this study, we show that exposure of cells to H2O2 increases the catalytic activity of the lymphocyte-specific tyrosine protein kinase p56lck (Lck) and induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-394, the autophosphorylation site. Using mutant forms of Lck, we found that Tyr-394 is required for H2O2-induced activation of Lck, suggesting that phosphorylation of this site may activate Lck. In addition, H2O2 treatment induced phosphorylation at Tyr-394 in a catalytically inactive mutant of Lck in cells that do not express endogenous Lck. This demonstrates that a kinase other than Lck itself is capable of phosphorylating Lck at the so-called autophosphorylation site and raises the possibility that this as yet unidentified tyrosine protein kinase functions as an activator of Lck. Such an activating enzyme could play an important role in signal transduction in T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7538674

  1. Anti-Angiogenic Properties of BDDPM, a Bromophenol from Marine Red Alga Rhodomela confervoides, with Multi Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Li, Xiangqian; Liu, Shaofang; Luo, Jiao; Shi, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Bis-(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-methane (BDDPM) is a bromophenol first isolated from Rhodomelaceae confervoides. Our previous studies showed that BDDPM exerts PTP1B-inhibiting activity and anti-cancer activity against a wide range of tumor cells while it also showed lower cytotoxicity against normal cells. In the present study, we found that BDDPM exhibits significant activities toward angiogenesis in vitro. BDDPM inhibits multiple angiogenesis processes, including endothelial cell sprouting, migration, proliferation, and tube formation. Further kinase assays investigations found that BDDPM is a potent selective, but multi-target, receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKs) inhibitor. BDDPM (10 μM) inhibits the activities of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (FGFR2, 3), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) (inhibition rate: 57.7%, 78.6%, 78.5% and 71.1%, respectively). Moreover, BDDPM also decreases the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as nitric oxide (NO) production in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that BDDPM can be exploited as an anti-angiogenic drug, or as a lead compound for the development of novel multi-target RTKs inhibitors. PMID:26075871

  2. Threonine-124 and phenylalanine-448 in Citrobacter freundii tyrosine phenol-lyase are necessary for activity with L-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Demidkina, Tatyana V; Barbolina, Maria V; Faleev, Nicolai G; Sundararaju, Bakthavatsalam; Gollnick, Paul D; Phillips, Robert S

    2002-05-01

    Thr-124 and Phe-448 are located in the active site of Citrobacter freundii tyrosine phenol-lyase (TPL) near the phenol ring of a bound substrate analogue, 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid [Sundararaju, Antson, Phillips, Demidkina, Barbolina, Gollnick, Dodson and Wilson (1997) Biochemistry 36, 6502-6510]. Thr-124 is replaced by Asp and Phe-448 is replaced by His in the crystal structure of a structurally similar enzyme, Proteus vulgaris tryptophan indole-lyase, which has 50% identical residues. Hence, Thr-124 and Phe-448 in TPL were mutated to Ala or Asp, and His, respectively, in order to probe the role of these residues in the reaction specificity for L-Tyr. These mutant enzymes have little or no beta-elimination activity with L-Tyr or 3-fluoro-L-Tyr as a substrate, but retain significant elimination activity with S-(o-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine, S-alkyl-L-cysteines and beta-chloroalanine. Furthermore, the binding of L-Tyr and other non-substrate amino acids is not significantly affected by the mutations. The mutant TPLs form intermediates in rapid-scanning stopped-flow experiments with L-Phe, L-Tyr and L-Trp, similar to those seen with wild-type TPL. These results demonstrate that Thr-124 and Phe-448 are necessary for the reaction specificity of TPL for L-Tyr, and probably play a role in the elimination stage of the reaction mechanism. Thr-124 is within hydrogen-bonding distance of the phenolic group of the bound substrate, and may help to orientate the ring for beta-elimination to occur. Phe-448 may be important to allow the formation of the closed conformation during the reaction.

  3. Hierarchical Disabled-1 Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Src family Kinase Activation and Neurite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Zhihua; Monckton, Elizabeth; Glubrecht, Darryl; Godbout, Roseline

    2013-01-01

    There are two developmentally regulated alternatively spliced forms of Disabled-1 (Dab1) in the chick retina: an early form (Dab1-E) expressed in retinal precursor cells and a late form (Dab1-L) expressed in neuronal cells. The main difference between these two isoforms is the absence of two Src family kinase (SFK) recognition sites in Dab1-E. Both forms retain two Abl/Crk/Nck recognition sites implicated in the recruitment of SH2 domain-containing signaling proteins. One of the Dab1-L-specific SFK recognition sites, at tyrosine(Y)-198, has been shown to be phosphorylated in Reelin-stimulated neurons. Here, we use Reelin-expressing primary retinal cultures to investigate the role of the four Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites on overall tyrosine phosphorylation, Dab1 phosphorylation, SFK activation and neurite formation. We show that Y198 is essential but not sufficient for maximal Dab1 phosphorylation, SFK activation and neurite formation, with Y232 and Y220 playing particularly important roles in SFK activation and neuritogenesis, and Y185 having modifying effects secondary to Y232 and Y220. Our data support a role for all four Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites in mediating the spectrum of activities associated with Reelin-Dab1 signaling in neurons. PMID:17350651

  4. Regulation and function of syk tyrosine kinase in mast cell signaling and beyond.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Rodrigo Orlandini

    2011-01-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase Syk plays a critical role in FcεRI signaling in mast cells. Binding of Syk to phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (p-ITAM) of the receptor subunits results in conformational changes and tyrosine phosphorylation at multiple sites that leads to activation of Syk. The phosphorylated tyrosines throughout the molecule play an important role in the regulation of Syk-mediated signaling. Reconstitution of receptor-mediated signaling in Syk(-/-) cells by wild-type Syk or mutants which have substitution of these tyrosines with phenylalanine together with in vitro assays has been useful strategies to understand the regulation and function of Syk.

  5. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib.

  6. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM signaling and vascular integrity in inflammation and development.

    PubMed

    Lee, R H; Bergmeier, W

    2016-04-01

    Platelets are essential for maintaining hemostasis following mechanical injury to the vasculature. Besides this established function, novel roles of platelets are becoming increasingly recognized, which are critical in non-injury settings to maintain vascular barrier integrity. For example, during embryogenesis platelets act to support the proper separation of blood and lymphatic vessels. This role continues beyond birth, where platelets prevent leakage of blood into the lymphatic vessel network. During the course of inflammation, platelets are necessary to prevent local hemorrhage due to neutrophil diapedesis and disruption of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, platelets also work to secure tumor-associated blood vessels, inhibiting excessive vessel permeability and intra-tumor hemorrhaging. Interestingly, many of these novel platelet functions depend on immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling but not on signaling via G protein-coupled receptors, which plays a crucial role in platelet plug formation at sites of mechanical injury. Murine platelets express two ITAM-containing receptors: the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which functionally associates with the collagen receptor GPVI, and the C-type lectin-like 2 (CLEC-2) receptor, a hemITAM receptor for the mucin-type glycoprotein podoplanin. Human platelets express an additional ITAM receptor, FcγRIIA. These receptors share common downstream effectors, including Syk, SLP-76 and PLCγ2. Here we will review the recent literature that highlights a critical role for platelet GPVI/FcRγ and CLEC-2 in vascular integrity during development and inflammation in mice and discuss the relevance to human disease.

  7. Signal transduction activated by the cancer chemopreventive isothiocyanates: cleavage of BID protein, tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of JNK

    PubMed Central

    Xu, K; Thornalley, P J

    2001-01-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate and allyl isothiocyanate induce apoptosis of human leukaemia HL60 cells in vitro. Apoptosis was associated with cleavage of p22 BID protein to p15, p13 and p11 fragments and activation of JNK and tyrosine phosphorylation (18 kDa and 45 kDa proteins). All these effects and apoptosis were prevented by exogenous glutathione (15 mM). Protein tyrosine phosphatase activity was unchanged. The general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk prevented apoptosis but not JNK activation – excluding a role for caspases in JNK activation, whereas curcumin prevented JNK activation but only delayed apoptosis. This suggests that in isothiocyanate-induced apoptosis, the caspase pathway has an essential role, the JNK pathway a supporting role, and inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases is not involved. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11237388

  8. Sprouty-related Ena/Vasodilator-stimulated Phosphoprotein Homology 1-Domain-containing Protein (SPRED1), a Tyrosine-Protein Phosphatase Non-receptor Type 11 (SHP2) Substrate in the Ras/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar-Audelo, Martina; Yusoff, Permeen; Sinniah, Saravanan; Chandramouli, Sumana; Guy, Graeme R.

    2011-01-01

    SHP2 is a tyrosine phosphatase involved in the activation of the Ras/ERK signaling pathway downstream of a number of receptor tyrosine kinases. One of the proposed mechanisms involving SHP2 in this context is to dephosphorylate and inactivate inhibitors of the Ras/ERK pathway. Two protein families bearing a unique, common domain, Sprouty and SPRED proteins, are possible candidates because they have been reported to inhibit the Ras/ERK pathway upon FGF activation. We tested whether any of these proteins are likely substrates of SHP2. Our findings indicate that Sprouty2 binds to the C-terminal tail of SHP2, which is an unlikely substrate binding site, whereas SPRED proteins bind to the tyrosine phosphatase domain that is known to be the binding site for its substrates. Overexpressed SHP2 was able to dephosphorylate SPREDs but not Sprouty2. Finally, we found two tyrosine residues on SPRED1 that are required, when phosphorylated, to inhibit Ras/ERK activation and identified Tyr-420 as a specific dephosphorylation target of SHP2. The evidence obtained indicates that SPRED1 is a likely substrate of SHP2, whose tyrosine dephosphorylation is required to attenuate the inhibitory action of SPRED1 in the Ras/ERK pathway. PMID:21531714

  9. Endothelial tyrosine kinase receptor B prevents VE-cadherin cleavage and protects against atherosclerotic lesion development in ApoE−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun; Li, Xian; Huang, Shanying; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) is a high-affinity receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In addition to its nervous system functions, TrkB is also expressed in the aortic endothelium. However, the effects of endothelial TrkB signaling on atherosclerosis remained unknown. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that TrkB expression is downregulated in the endothelium of atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE−/− mice compared with the atheroma-free aorta of WT mice. Endothelial TrkB knockdown led to increased lesion size, lipid deposition and inflammatory responses in the atherosclerotic lesions of the ApoE−/− mice compared with the control mice. Mechanistic studies showed that TrkB activation prevented VE-cadherin shedding by enhancing the interaction between vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase and VE-cadherin, maintaining VE-cadherin in a dephosphorylated state. Our data demonstrate that TrkB is an endothelial injury-response molecule in atherogenesis. Endothelial BDNF/TrkB signaling reduces VE-cadherin shedding and protects against atherosclerotic lesion development in ApoE−/− mice. PMID:26431274

  10. Analysis of the murine Dtk gene identifies conservation of genomic structure within a new receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.M.; Crosier, K.E.; Crosier, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Dtk/Tyro 3/Sky/rse/brt/tif is a member of a new subfamily of receptors that also includes Axl/Ufo/Ark and Eyk/Mer. These receptors are characterized by the presence of two immunoglobulin-like loops and two fibronectin type III repeats in their extracellular domains. The structure of the murine Dtk gene has been determined. The gene consists of 21 exons that are distributed over 21 kb of genomic DNA. An isoform of Dtk is generated by differential splicing of exons from the 5{prime} region of the gene. The overall genomic structure of Dtk is virtually identical to that determined for the human UFO gene. This particular genomic organization is likely to have been duplicated and closely maintained throughout evolution. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Integration of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Determines Sensitivity to PI3Kα-selective Inhibitors in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-chao; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Yi; Chen, Si-meng; Yang, Xin-ying; Sun, Yi-ming; Geng, Mei-yu; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2017-01-01

    PI3Kα-selective inhibitor BYL719 is currently in phase II/III clinical trial for the treatment of breast cancer, but highly variable response has been observed among patients. We sought to discover predictive biomarker for the efficacy of BYL719 by dissecting the proliferative signaling pathway mediated by PI3K in breast cancer. BYL719 concurrently inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in PIK3CA-mutated human breast cancer cells. PI3K-regulated ERK phosphorylation was independent of canonical PDK1/AKT/mTOR pathway, while it was associated with RAF/MEK. Hyper-activation of EGFR or RAS abrogated inhibition of ERK phosphorylation by BYL719. Furthermore, hyper-activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including EGFR, c-MET, FGFR and HER3 but not IGF-1R restored ERK phosphorylation and cell viability suppressed by BYL719, suggesting the discriminative functions of RTKs in cell signaling and proliferation. By profiling 22 breast cancer cell lines, we found that BYL719 was more potent in cell lines where phosphorylation of both AKT and ERK was attenuated than those where only AKT phosphorylation was inhibited. The potency of BYL719 was further found to be significantly correlated with the expression profile of RTKs in breast cancer cells. Specifically, overexpression of EGFR, c-MET and/or FGFR1 forecasted resistance, while overexpression of IGF-1R and/or HER2 predicted sensitivity to BYL719 in breast cancer cells. Similar correlation between BYL719 efficacy and expression profile of RTKs was found in patient-derived xenograft models of breast cancer. Thus, inhibition of ERK phosphorylation by PI3Kα inhibitor BYL719 contributes to its antitumor efficacy and is determined by the converged signaling from RTKs. The expression profile of RTKs in breast cancer tissue could be potentially developed as a predictive biomarker for the efficacy of PI3Kα inhibitors. PMID:28382169

  12. Ligand-Binding Affinity at the Insulin Receptor Isoform-A and Subsequent IR-A Tyrosine Phosphorylation Kinetics are Important Determinants of Mitogenic Biological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Harinda; Forbes, Briony E.

    2015-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A) arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signaling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival, and migration by activating some unique signaling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signaling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signaling (MAPK and Akt) and receptor internalization rates (related to mitogenic signaling). We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic [(His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51) IGF-I, qIGF-I] or metabolic (S597 peptide) biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signaling through the IR-A. The threefold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316, and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide, it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I. PMID:26217307

  13. Functional analysis of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mediated signal transduction: the two YxxL segments within a single CD3zeta-ITAM are functionally distinct.

    PubMed

    Sunder-Plassmann, R; Lialios, F; Madsen, M; Koyasu, S; Reinherz, E L

    1997-08-01

    Functional analysis of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) derived from the membrane-proximal ITAM of CD3zeta demonstrates that mutations at either the tyrosine or leucine residues in the N-terminal YxxL segment of the ITAM abolish all signal transduction functions of this ITAM. In contrast, mutations at the tyrosine or leucine residues in the C-terminal YxxL segment abrogate signals for interleukin (IL)-2 production but do not prevent tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-terminal tyrosine of the ITAM, lck association with the ITAM, activation of phospholipase C-gamma1 or calcium mobilization. Cross-linking of chimeric receptors containing a C-terminal YxxL leucine mutation induces tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP70 but without stable binding to the phosphorylated ITAM. These results indicate that the two YxxL segments in an ITAM are functionally distinct and that both are essential for ZAP70 binding and IL-2 production. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP70 per se is not sufficient to trigger the downstream events leading to IL-2 production. Substitution of an alanine for the bulky side chain at the Y+1 position of the N-terminal YxxL segment reduces the receptor cross-linking requirement necessary to achieve cellular activation and the absolute dependence on lck in this process. Our results reveal that both the number of ITAM as well as the specific amino acid residues within a single ITAM determine the extent of chimeric receptor cross-linking required to trigger tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent signaling events.

  14. Tyrosine decarboxylase activity of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and L. brevis ATCC 367.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arribas, V; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-11-01

    Tyramine, a frequent amine in wines, is produced from tyrosine by the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) activity of bacteria. The tyramine-producing strain Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and the reference strain L. brevis ATCC 367 were studied. At the optimum pH, 5.0, K(m) values of IOEB 9809 and ATCC 367 crude extracts for L-tyrosine were 0.58 mM and 0.67 mM, and V(max) was higher for the wine strain (115 U) than the ATCC 367 (66 U). TDC exhibited a preference for L-tyrosine over L-DOPA as substrate. Enzyme activity was pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent and it was stabilized by the substrate and coenzyme. In contrast, glycerol and beta-mercaptoethanol strongly inhibited TDC. Tyramine competitively inhibited TDC for both strains. Citric acid, lactic acid and ethanol had an inhibitory effect on cells and crude extracts, but none could inhibit TDC at the usual concentrations in wines.

  15. MAP kinase activator from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle is a protein threonine/tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Wu, J; Sturgill, T

    1992-01-01

    A 'MAP kinase activator' was purified several thousand-fold from insulin-stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle, which resembled the 'activator' from nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells in that it could be inactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase 2A, but not by protein tyrosine phosphatases and its apparent molecular mass was 45-50 kDa. In the presence of MgATP, 'MAP kinase activator' converted the normal 'wild-type' 42 kDa MAP kinase from an inactive dephosphorylated form to the fully active diphosphorylated species. Phosphorylation occurred on the same threonine and tyrosine residues which are phosphorylated in vivo in response to growth factors or phorbol esters. A mutant MAP kinase produced by changing a lysine at the active centre to arginine was phosphorylated in an identical manner by the 'MAP kinase activator', but no activity was generated. The results demonstrate that 'MAP kinase activator' is a protein kinase (MAP kinase kinase) and not a protein that stimulates the autophosphorylation of MAP kinase. MAP kinase kinase is the first established example of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate an exogenous protein on threonine as well as tyrosine residues. Images PMID:1318193

  16. Discovery of Novel Benzimidazoles as Potent Inhibitors of TIE-2 and VEGFR-2 Tyrosine Kinase Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Masaichi; Nishigaki, Naohiko; Washio, Yoshiaki; Kano, Kazuya; Harris, Philip A.; Sato, Hideyuki; Mori, Ichiro; West, Rob I.; Shibahara, Megumi; Toyoda, Hiroko; Wang, Liping; Nolte, Robert T.; Veal, James M.; Cheung, Mui

    2008-09-12

    We herein disclose a novel chemical series of benzimidazole-ureas as inhibitors of VEGFR-2 and TIE-2 kinase receptors, both of which are implicated in angiogenesis. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies elucidated a critical role for the N1 nitrogen of both the benzimidazole (segment E) and urea (segment B) moieties. The SAR results were also supported by the X-ray crystallographic elucidation of the role of the N1 nitrogen and the urea moiety when the benzimidazole-urea compounds were bound to the VEGFR-2 enzyme. The left side phenyl ring (segment A) occupies the backpocket where a 3-hydrophobic substituent was favored for TIE-2 activity.

  17. Activation of insulin signal transduction pathway and anti-diabetic activity of small molecule insulin receptor activators.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, S A; Ding, V; Li, Z; Szalkowski, D; Biazzo-Ashnault, D E; Xie, D; Saperstein, R; Brady, E; Huskey, S; Shen, X; Liu, K; Xu, L; Salituro, G M; Heck, J V; Moller, D E; Jones, A B; Zhang, B B

    2000-11-24

    We recently described the identification of a non-peptidyl fungal metabolite (l-783,281, compound 1), which induced activation of human insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase and mediated insulin-like effects in cells, as well as decreased blood glucose levels in murine models of Type 2 diabetes (Zhang, B., Salituro, G., Szalkowski, D., Li, Z., Zhang, Y., Royo, I., Vilella, D., Diez, M. T. , Pelaez, F., Ruby, C., Kendall, R. L., Mao, X., Griffin, P., Calaycay, J., Zierath, J. R., Heck, J. V., Smith, R. G. & Moller, D. E. (1999) Science 284, 974-977). Here we report the characterization of an active analog (compound 2) with enhanced IR kinase activation potency and selectivity over related receptors (insulin-like growth factor I receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor). The IR activators stimulated tyrosine kinase activity of partially purified native IR and recombinant IR tyrosine kinase domain. Administration of the IR activators to mice was associated with increased IR tyrosine kinase activity in liver. In vivo oral treatment with compound 2 resulted in significant glucose lowering in several rodent models of diabetes. In db/db mice, oral administration of compound 2 elicited significant correction of hyperglycemia. In a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model, compound 2 potentiated the glucose-lowering effect of insulin. In normal rats, compound 2 improved oral glucose tolerance with significant reduction in insulin release following glucose challenge. A structurally related inactive analog (compound 3) was not effective on insulin receptor activation or glucose lowering in db/db mice. Thus, small molecule IR activators exert insulin mimetic and sensitizing effects in cells and in animal models of diabetes. These results have implications for the future development of new therapies for diabetes mellitus.

  18. Scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor, the c-met tyrosine kinase, can mediate a signal exchange between mesenchyme and epithelia during mouse development

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor (SF/HGF) has potent motogenic, mitogenic, and morphogenetic activities on epithelial cells in vitro. The cell surface receptor for this factor was recently identified: it is the product of the c-met protooncogene, a receptor-type tyrosine kinase. We report here the novel and distinct expression patterns of SF/HGF and its receptor during mouse development, which was determined by a combination of in situ hybridization and RNase protection experiments. Predominantly, we detect transcripts of c-met in epithelial cells of various developing organs, whereas the ligand is expressed in distinct mesenchymal cells in close vicinity. In addition, transient SF/HGF and c-met expression is found at certain sites of muscle formation; transient expression of the c-met gene is also detected in developing motoneurons. SF/HGF and the c-met receptor might thus play multiple developmental roles, most notably, mediate a signal given by mesenchyme and received by epithelial. Mesenchymal signals are known to govern differentiation and morphogenesis of many epithelia, but the molecular nature of the signals has remained poorly understood. Therefore, the known biological activities of SF/HGF in vitro and the embryonal expression pattern reported here indicate that this mesenchymal factor can transmit morphogenetic signals in epithelial development and suggest a molecular mechanism for mesenchymal epithelial interactions. PMID:8408200

  19. Tyrosine kinase receptor c-ros-oncogene 1 mediates TWIST-1 regulation of human mesenchymal stem cell lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Camp, Esther; Anderson, Peter J; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Gronthos, Stan

    2017-01-01

    The TWIST-1 gene encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor important in mediating skeletal and head mesodermal tissue development. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (BMSC), express high levels of TWIST-1, which is down regulated during ex vivo expansion. Cultured BMSC over-expressing TWIST-1 display decreased capacity for osteogenic differentiation and an enhanced capacity to undergo adipogenesis, suggesting that TWIST-1 is a mediator of lineage commitment. However, little is known regarding the mechanism(s) by which TWIST-1 mediates cell fate determination. In this study, microarray analysis was used to identify a novel downstream TWIST-1 target, tyrosine kinase receptor c-ros-oncogene 1 (C-ROS-1), which was down regulated in TWIST-1 over-expressing BMSC. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that TWIST-1 directly bound to two E-box binding sites on the proximal C-ROS-1 promoter. Knock-down of C-ROS-1 in human BMSC and cranial bone cells resulted in a decreased capacity for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Conversely, suppression of C-ROS-1 in BMSC resulted in an enhanced capacity to undergo adipogenesis. Furthermore, reduced C-ROS-1 levels led to activation of different components of the PI3K/AKT/mTORC1 signalling pathway during osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Collectively, these data suggest that C-ROS-1 is involved in BMSC fate switching between osteogenesis and adipogenesis, mediated via PI3K/AKT/mTORC1 signalling.

  20. Bevacizumab salvage therapy following progression in high-grade glioma patients treated with VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brian J; Quant, Eudocia C; McNamara, Margaret B; Ryg, Peter A; Batchelor, Tracy T; Wen, Patrick Y

    2010-06-01

    Agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway are being used with increasing frequency in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma. The effect of more than one antiangiogenic therapy given in succession has not been established. We reviewed the efficacy of bevacizumab, a VEGF-A monoclonal antibody, in patients who progressed following prior therapy with VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (R-TKi). Seventy-three patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas received VEGF R-TKi (cediranib, sorafenib, pazopanib, or sunitinib) as part of phase I or II clinical trials. Twenty-four of these patients with glioblastoma progressed and received bevacizumab-containing regimens immediately after R-TKi. Those who stopped R-TKi therapy for reasons other than disease progression, or received a treatment that did not include bevacizumab, were excluded from the analysis. The efficacy of bevacizumab-containing regimens in these 24 patients was evaluated. During R-TKi therapy, 6 of 24 patients (25%) had a partial response (PR) to treatment. The 6-month progression-free survival (APF6) was 16.7% and median time-to-progression (TTP) was 14.3 weeks. Grade III/IV toxicities were seen in 13 of 24 patients (54%). Subsequently with bevacizumab salvage therapy, 5 of 24 patients (21%) had a PR, the APF6 was 12.5%, and the median TTP was 8 weeks. Five of 24 patients had grade III/IV toxicities (21%). The median overall survival (OS) from the start of R-TKi therapy was 9.2 months (range: 2.8-34.1+), whereas the median OS after bevacizumab was 5.2 months (range: 1.3-28.9+). Bevacizumab retains modest activity in high-grade glioma patients who progress on R-TKi. However, the APF6 of 12.5% in this cohort of patients indicates that durable tumor control is not achieved for most patients.

  1. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J.; Andersson, Leif C.; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  2. Characterization and cDNA cloning of phospholipase C-gamma, a major substrate for heparin-binding growth factor 1 (acidic fibroblast growth factor)-activated tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, W H; Dionne, C A; Kaplow, J; Mudd, R; Friesel, R; Zilberstein, A; Schlessinger, J; Jaye, M

    1990-01-01

    Heparin-binding growth factors (HBGFs) bind to high-affinity cell surface receptors which possess intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. A Mr 150,000 protein phosphorylated on tyrosine in response to class 1 HBGF (HBGF-1) was purified and partially sequenced. On the basis of this sequence, cDNA clones were isolated from a human endothelial cell library and identified as encoding phospholipase C-gamma. Phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma in intact cells treated with HBGF-1 was directly demonstrated by using antiphospholipase C-gamma antibodies. Thus, HBGF-1 joins epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, whose receptor activation leads to tyrosine phosphorylation and probable activation of phospholipase C-gamma. Images PMID:2167438

  3. Chronic Oxidative Stress Causes Amplification and Overexpression of ptprz1 Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase to Activate β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shang, Donghao; Akatsuka, Shinya; Ohara, Hiroki; Dutta, Khokon Kumar; Mizushima, Katsura; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Izumiya, Masashi; Abe, Kouichiro; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Noriko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate induces oxidative renal tubular damage via Fenton-reaction, which subsequently leads to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in rodents. Here, we used gene expression microarray and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses to find target oncogenes in this model. At the common chromosomal region of amplification (4q22) in rat RCCs, we found ptprz1, a tyrosine phosphatase (also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase ζ or receptor tyrosine phosphatase β) highly expressed in the RCCs. Analyses revealed genomic amplification up to eightfold. Despite scarcity in the control kidney, the amounts of PTPRZ1 were increased in the kidney after 3 weeks of oxidative stress, and mRNA levels were increased 16∼552-fold in the RCCs. Network analysis of the expression revealed the involvement of the β-catenin pathway in the RCCs. In the RCCs, dephosphorylated β-catenin was translocated to nuclei, resulting in the expression of its target genes cyclin D1, c-myc, c-jun, fra-1, and CD44. Furthermore, knockdown of ptprz1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA), in FRCC-001 and FRCC-562 cell lines established from the induced RCCs, decreased the amounts of nuclear β-catenin and suppressed cellular proliferation concomitant with a decrease in the expression of target genes. These results demonstrate that chronic oxidative stress can induce genomic amplification of ptprz1, activating β-catenin pathways without the involvement of Wnt signaling for carcinogenesis. Thus, iron-mediated persistent oxidative stress confers an environment for gene amplification. PMID:18055543

  4. Chronic oxidative stress causes amplification and overexpression of ptprz1 protein tyrosine phosphatase to activate beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shang, Donghao; Akatsuka, Shinya; Ohara, Hiroki; Dutta, Khokon Kumar; Mizushima, Katsura; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Izumiya, Masashi; Abe, Kouichiro; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Noriko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2007-12-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate induces oxidative renal tubular damage via Fenton-reaction, which subsequently leads to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in rodents. Here, we used gene expression microarray and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses to find target oncogenes in this model. At the common chromosomal region of amplification (4q22) in rat RCCs, we found ptprz1, a tyrosine phosphatase (also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta or receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta) highly expressed in the RCCs. Analyses revealed genomic amplification up to eightfold. Despite scarcity in the control kidney, the amounts of PTPRZ1 were increased in the kidney after 3 weeks of oxidative stress, and mRNA levels were increased 16 approximately 552-fold in the RCCs. Network analysis of the expression revealed the involvement of the beta-catenin pathway in the RCCs. In the RCCs, dephosphorylated beta-catenin was translocated to nuclei, resulting in the expression of its target genes cyclin D1, c-myc, c-jun, fra-1, and CD44. Furthermore, knockdown of ptprz1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA), in FRCC-001 and FRCC-562 cell lines established from the induced RCCs, decreased the amounts of nuclear beta-catenin and suppressed cellular proliferation concomitant with a decrease in the expression of target genes. These results demonstrate that chronic oxidative stress can induce genomic amplification of ptprz1, activating beta-catenin pathways without the involvement of Wnt signaling for carcinogenesis. Thus, iron-mediated persistent oxidative stress confers an environment for gene amplification.

  5. NFAM1, an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing molecule that regulates B cell development and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Arase, Hisashi; Takeuchi, Arata; Yamasaki, Sho; Shiina, Ritsuko; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Sakurai, Daiju; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Arase, Noriko; Iwashima, Makio; Kitamura, Toshio; Moriya, Hideshige; Saito, Takashi

    2004-05-25

    A functional cDNA cloning system was developed by using a retrovirus library encoding CD8-chimeric proteins and a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-GFP reporter cell line to identify molecules inducing NFAT activation. By using this strategy, NFAT activating molecule 1 (NFAM1) was cloned as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing cell surface molecule belonging to the Ig superfamily and is predominantly expressed in spleen B and T cells. NFAM1 crosslinking induced ITAM phosphorylation, ZAP-70/Syk recruitment, NFAT activation, and cytokine production. In vivo overexpression of NFAM1 in bone marrow chimeras and transgenic mice induced severe impairment of early B cell development in an ITAM-dependent manner. In NFAM1-expressing B cells, B cell antigen receptor stimulation induced NFAM1 translocati