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Sample records for activated receptor-1 par-1

  1. Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) Mediated Platelet Aggregation is Dependant on Clopidogrel Response

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Breall, Jeffrey A.; Kreutz, Yvonne; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Bolad, Islam; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Clopidogrel inhibits ADP mediated platelet aggregation through inhibition of the P2Y12 receptor by its active metabolite. Thrombin induces platelet aggregation by binding to protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), and inhibition of PAR-1 has been evaluated in patients treated with clopidogrel to reduce ischemic events after acute coronary syndromes. Residual PAR-1 mediated platelet aggregation may be dependent on extent of clopidogrel response. Material and Methods Platelet aggregation was measured in 55 patients undergoing elective PCI at 16-24 hours after 600mg clopidogrel loading dose by light transmittance aggregometry using ADP 20μM and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) at 15 μM and 25 μM as agonists. Genomic DNA was genotyped for common CYP2C19 variants. Results Increasing quartiles of 20 μM ADP induced platelet aggregation after clopidogrel loading were associated with increasing levels of TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. Patients in the highest quartile (clopidogrel non-responders) of post treatment ADP aggregation had significantly higher TRAP mediated aggregation than the patients in the lowest quartile (clopidogrel responders) [TRAP 15 μM: 79.6±5% vs. 69.5±8%, p<0.001]. Conclusions Non-responders to clopidogrel show increased residual platelet aggregation induced by TRAP, whereas clopidogrel responders exhibit attenuated response to TRAP. Addition of PAR-1 antiplatelet drugs may be most effective in patients with reduced clopidogrel response and high residual TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. PMID:22459907

  2. Suppression of ischaemia-induced injuries in rat brain by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) activating peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xia; Ng, Ethel Sau Kuen; Lam, Francis Fu Yuen

    2016-09-01

    Ischaemic stroke has become one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. The role of protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) in this disease is uncertain. In the present study, the actions of a protease activated receptor-1 activating peptide (PAR-1 AP) SFLLRN-NH2 were investigated in an in vivo rat model of ischaemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and in an in vitro model induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cultured rat embryonic cortical neurones. Rats subjected to MCAO exhibited increased brain infarct volume, oedema, and neurological deficit. Rat cortical neurones subjected to OGD showed increased lactate dehydrogenase, caspase-3 activity and TUNEL positive cells, whereas, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability were decreased. Furthermore, both models had elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, nitrite, and malondialdehyde, while anti-oxidant enzymes and bcl-2/bax ratio were decreased. These detrimental changes were suppressed by SFLLRN-NH2, and its protective actions were inhibited by a PAR-1 antagonist (BMS-200261). In summary, SFLLRN-NH2 was found to possess anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, and it produced marked inhibition on the detrimental effects of ischaemia in in vivo and in vitro models of ischaemic stroke. The present findings suggest PAR-1 is a promising target for development of novel treatments of ischaemic brain disease. PMID:27238976

  3. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) acts via a novel Galpha13-dishevelled axis to stabilize beta-catenin levels.

    PubMed

    Turm, Hagit; Maoz, Myriam; Katz, Vered; Yin, Yong-Jun; Offermanns, Steffan; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2010-05-14

    We have previously shown a novel link between hPar-1 (human protease-activated receptor-1) and beta-catenin stabilization. Although it is well recognized that Wnt signaling leads to beta-catenin accumulation, the role of PAR1 in the process is unknown. We provide here evidence that PAR1 induces beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt, Fz (Frizzled), and the co-receptor LRP5/6 (low density lipoprotein-related protein 5/6) and identify selective mediators of the PAR1-beta-catenin axis. Immunohistological analyses of hPar1-transgenic (TG) mouse mammary tissues show the expression of both Galpha(12) and Galpha(13) compared with age-matched control counterparts. However, only Galpha(13) was found to be actively involved in PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Indeed, a dominant negative form of Galpha(13) inhibited both PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion and Lef/Tcf (lymphoid enhancer factor/T cell factor) transcription activity. PAR1-Galpha(13) association is followed by the recruitment of DVL (Dishevelled), an upstream Wnt signaling protein via the DIX domain. Small interfering RNA-Dvl silencing leads to a reduction in PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion, inhibition of Lef/Tcf transcription activity, and decreased beta-catenin accumulation. It is of note that PAR1 also promotes the binding of beta-arrestin-2 to DVL, suggesting a role for beta-arrestin-2 in PAR1-induced DVL phosphorylation dynamics. Although infection of small interfering RNA-LRP5/6 or the use of the Wnt antagonists, SFRP2 (soluble Frizzled-related protein 2) or SFRP5 potently reduced Wnt3A-mediated beta-catenin accumulation, no effect was observed on PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Collectively, our data show that PAR1 mediates beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt. We propose here a novel cascade of PAR1-induced Galpha(13)-DVL axis in cancer and beta-catenin stabilization. PMID:20223821

  4. Protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) enhances Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Luan, Yi-Fei; Guo, Peng; Li, Yi-Hang; Liu, Yong; Qi, Su-Hua

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Src could modulate NMDA receptor, and PAR1 could also affect NMDAR signaling. However, whether PAR1 could regulate NMDAR through Src under ICH has not yet been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling cascades in rat ICH model and in vitro thrombin challenged model. Using the PAR1 agonist SFLLR, antagonist RLLFS and Src inhibitor PP2, electrophysiological analysis showed that PAR1 regulated NMDA-induced whole-cell currents (INMDA) though Src in primary cultured neurons. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed the elevated phosphorylation of tyrosine in Src and GluN2A and enhanced interaction of the Src-PSD95-GluN2A under model conditions. Treatment with the PAR1 antagonist RLLFS, AS-PSD95 (Antisense oligonucleotide against PSD95) and Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A, and p-Src, p-GluN2A. Co-application of SFLLR and AS-PSD95, PP2, or MK801 (NMDAR inhibitor) abolished the effect of SF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that activated thrombin receptor PAR1 induced Src activation, enhanced the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling modules, and up-regulated GluN2A phosphorylation after ICH injury. Elucidation of such signaling cascades would possibly provide novel targets for ICH treatment. PMID:27385592

  5. Is there any diagnostic value of serum protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) levels on determination of epithelial ovarian carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Karabulut, S; Akşit, E; Tas, F; Ciftci, R; Aydiner, A; Yildiz, I; Keskin, S; Eralp, Y; Yasasever, C T; Vatansever, S; Disci, R; Saip, P

    2014-05-01

    The role of molecular markers in ovarian cancer is still a matter of debate. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) might be a good marker in some types of malignant tumors and might provide useful information in diagnosis and prognosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of PAR1 in regard to diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic value in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Forty-four EOC patients were enrolled in this study. Serum PAR1 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Twenty-five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the analysis. The median age of patients was 58 years old, ranging from 22 to 83 years, where most of them had advanced disease (stage III-IV) (n = 40, 91%). The median serum PAR1 values were significantly elevated in patients compared to healthy controls (1.52 ng/ml vs. 1.13 ng/ml) (p = 0.03), whereas any clinical variables including response to chemotherapy did not associate with serum assay (p > 0.05). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients who did not respond to chemotherapy nor had platinum resistance in relapsed disease were poorer in the analyses. On the other hand, serum PAR1 levels showed no significant adverse effect on either PFS or OS (p = 0.43 and p = 0.49, respectively). These results proved that baseline serum PAR1 levels of patients with EOC were significantly higher than those of healthy people. However, these assays suggested no predictive or prognostic value in this group of patients. PMID:24390664

  6. Pravastatin and C reactive protein modulate protease- activated receptor-1 expression in vitro blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Chu, L-X; Zhou, S-X; Yang, F; Qin, Y-Q; Liang, Z-S; Mo, C-G; Wang, X-D; Xie, J; He, L-P

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in mediating activation of human platelets by thrombin. However, mechanism of statin in ADP-induced platelet PAR-1 expression is also unknown. Aggregometry, flow cytometry, immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine role of pravastatin participating in ADP-induced platelet activation and PAR-1 expression. ADP stimulation significantly increased PAR-1 expression on platelets. PAR-1 antagonist SCH-79797 inhibited platelet aggregation as well as decreased platelet P-selectin expression induced by ADP. CRP inhibited PAR-1 expression induced by ADP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pravastatin treatment reduced PAR-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination treatment of CRP and Pravastatin significantly reduced platelet PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. By western-blot analysis, pravastatin treatment did not influence total PAR-1 after ADP treatment. CRP decreased platelet total PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. Pravastatin and CRP reduced TXB2 formation by ADP significantly. CRP decreased thrombin fragment F1+2 level with ADP treatment. Pravastatin, in contrast, did not influence F1+2 level. Upon treatment with Pravastatin reduced platelet LOX-1 expression induced by ADP. In conclusion, PAR-1 served as a critical mechanism to relay platelet activation process induced by ADP. CRP and pravastatin reduce PAR-1 expression in platelet by ADP pathway. PMID:26950455

  7. Protease-activated receptor-1 deficiency protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Waasdorp, Maaike; Duitman, JanWillem; Florquin, Sandrine; Spek, C Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Endogenously administered activated protein C ameliorates diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-dependent manner, suggesting that PAR-1 activation limits the progression of DN. Activation of PAR-1 in fibroblast-like cells, however, induces proliferation and extracellular matrix production, thereby driving fibrotic disease. Considering the key role of mesangial proliferation and extracellular matrix production during DN, PAR-1 may in fact potentiate diabetes-induced kidney injury. To determine the net effect of PAR-1 in DN, streptozotocin-induced DN was studied in wild type and PAR-1 deficient mice. Subsequent mechanistic insight was obtained by assessing profibrotic responses of mesangial and tubular epithelial cells in vitro, following PAR-1 stimulation and inhibition. Despite having similar glucose levels, PAR-1 deficient mice developed less kidney damage after induction of diabetes, as evidenced by diminished proteinuria, plasma cystatin C levels, expansion of the mesangial area, and tubular atrophy. In vitro, PAR-1 signaling in mesangial cells led to increased proliferation and expression of matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen IV. Conversely, a reduction in both proliferation and fibronectin deposition was observed in diabetic PAR-1 deficient mice. Overall, we show that PAR-1 plays an important role in the development of DN and PAR-1 might therefore be an attractive therapeutic target to pursue in DN. PMID:27618774

  8. Protease activated receptor-1 regulates macrophage-mediated cellular senescence: a risk for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cong; Rezaee, Farhad; Waasdorp, Maaike; Shi, Kun; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive disease in part resulting from premature or mature cellular aging. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) recently emerged as a critical component in the context of fibrotic lung diseases. Therefore, we aimed to study the role of macrophages in PAR-1-mediated idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The number of macrophages were significantly reduced in lungs of PAR-1 antagonist (P1pal-12) treated animals upon bleomycin instillation. In line with these data, PAR-1 stimulation increased monocyte/macrophage recruitment in response to epithelium injury in in vitro trans-well assays. Moreover, macrophages induced fibroblasts migration, differentiation and secretion of collagen, which were inhibited in the presence of TGF-β receptor inhibitors. Interestingly, these profibrotic effects were partially inhibited by treatment with the PAR-1 inhibitor P1pal-12. Using shRNA mediated PAR-1 knock down in fibroblasts, we demonstrate that fibroblast PAR-1 contributes to TGF-β activation and production. Finally, we show that the macrophage-dependent induction of PAR-1 driven TGF-β activation was mediated by FXa. Our data identify novel mechanisms by which PAR-1 stimulation on different cell types can contribute to IPF and identify macrophages as key players in PAR-1 dependent development of this devastating disease. IPF may result from cellular senescence mediated by macrophages in the lung. PMID:26474459

  9. Activated protein C promotes breast cancer cell migration through interactions with EPCR and PAR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, Lea M.; Church, Frank C. . E-mail: fchurch@email.unc.edu

    2007-02-15

    Activated protein C (APC) is a serine protease that regulates thrombin (IIa) production through inactivation of blood coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. APC also has non-hemostatic functions related to inflammation, proliferation, and apoptosis through various mechanisms. Using two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435, we investigated the role of APC in cell chemotaxis and invasion. Treatment of cells with increasing APC concentrations (1-50 {mu}g/ml) increased invasion and chemotaxis in a concentration-dependent manner. Only the active form of APC increased invasion and chemotaxis of the MDA-MB-231 cells when compared to 3 inactive APC derivatives. Using a modified 'checkerboard' analysis, APC was shown to only affect migration when plated with the cells; therefore, APC is not a chemoattractant. Blocking antibodies to endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) attenuated the effects of APC on chemotaxis in the MDA-MB-231 cells. Finally, treatment of the MDA-MB-231 cells with the proliferation inhibitor, Na butyrate, showed that APC did not increase migration by increasing cell number. Therefore, APC increases invasion and chemotaxis of cells by binding to the cell surface and activating specific signaling pathways through EPCR and PAR-1.

  10. Protease-activated-receptor-2 affects protease-activated-receptor-1-driven breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohammad; Maoz, Miriam; Kancharla, Arun; Agranovich, Daniel; Peretz, Tamar; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian protease-activated-receptor-1 and -2 (PAR1 and PAR2) are activated by proteases found in the flexible microenvironment of a tumor and play a central role in breast cancer. We propose in the present study that PAR1 and PAR2 act together as a functional unit during malignant and physiological invasion processes. This notion is supported by assessing pro-tumor functions in the presence of short hairpin; shRNA knocked-down hPar2 or by the use of a truncated PAR2 devoid of the entire cytoplasmic tail. Silencing of hPar2 by shRNA-attenuated thrombin induced PAR1 signaling as recapitulated by inhibiting the assembly of Etk/Bmx or Akt onto PAR1-C-tail, by thrombin-instigated colony formation and invasion. Strikingly, shRNA-hPar2 also inhibited the TFLLRN selective PAR1 pro-tumor functions. In addition, while evaluating the physiological invasion process of placenta extravillous trophoblast (EVT) organ culture, we observed inhibition of both thrombin or the selective PAR1 ligand; TFLLRNPNDK induced EVT invasion by shRNA-hPar2 but not by scrambled shRNA-hPar2. In parallel, when a truncated PAR2 was utilized in a xenograft mouse model, it inhibited PAR1-PAR2-driven tumor growth in vivo. Similarly, it also attenuated the interaction of Etk/Bmx with the PAR1-C-tail in vitro and decreased markedly selective PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion. Confocal images demonstrated co-localization of PAR1 and PAR2 in HEK293T cells over-expressing YFP-hPar2 and HA-hPar1. Co-immuno-precipitation analyses revealed PAR1-PAR2 complex formation but no PAR1-CXCR4 complex was formed. Taken together, our observations show that PAR1 and PAR2 act as a functional unit in tumor development and placenta-uterus interactions. This conclusion may have significant consequences on future breast cancer therapeutic modalities and improved late pregnancy outcome. PMID:24177339

  11. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  12. Overexpression of protease-activated receptor-1 contributes to melanoma metastasis via regulation of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriel J; Dobroff, Andrey S; Wang, Hua; Zigler, Maya; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Huang, Li; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-08-15

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is a key player in melanoma metastasis with higher expression seen in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tissue specimens. cDNA microarray and Western blot analyses reveal that the gap junctional intracellular communication molecule connexin 43 (Cx-43), known to be involved in tumor cell diapedesis and attachment to endothelial cells, is significantly decreased after PAR-1 silencing in metastatic melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, Cx-43 promoter activity was significantly inhibited in PAR-1-silenced cells, suggesting that PAR-1 regulates Cx-43 at the transcriptional level. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies showed a reduction in the binding of SP-1 and AP-1 transcription factors to the promoter of Cx-43. Both transcription factors have been shown previously to be required for maximal Cx-43 promoter activity. These results were corroborated by mutating the AP-1 and SP-1 binding sites resulting in decreased Cx-43 promoter activity in PAR-1-positive cells. Moreover, as Cx-43 has been shown to facilitate arrest of circulating tumor cells at the vascular endothelium, melanoma cell attachment to endothelial cells was significantly decreased in PAR-1-silenced cells, with this effect being abrogated after PAR-1 rescue. Herein, we report that up-regulation of PAR-1 expression, seen in melanoma progression, mediates high levels of Cx-43 expression. As both SP-1 and AP-1 transcription factors act as positive regulators of Cx-43, our data provide a novel mechanism for the regulation of Cx-43 expression by PAR-1. Indeed, Cx-43 expression was restored following PAR-1 rescue in PAR-1-silenced cells. Taken together, our data support the tumor promoting function of Cx-43 in melanoma. PMID:19679555

  13. Overexpression of Protease Activated Receptor-1 Contributes to Melanoma Metastasis via Regulation of Connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Wang, Hua; Zigler, Maya; Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Huang, Li; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) is a key player in melanoma metastasis with higher expression seen in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tissue specimens. cDNA microarray and Western blot analyses reveal that the gap junctional intracellular communication molecule, Connexin 43 (Cx-43), known to be involved in tumor cell diapedesis and attachment to endothelial cells, is significantly decreased after PAR-1 silencing in metastatic melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, Cx-43 promoter activity was significantly inhibited in PAR-1 silenced cells suggesting that PAR-1 regulates Cx-43 at the transcriptional level. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation studies found a reduction in the binding of SP-1 and AP-1 transcription factors to the promoter of Cx-43. Both transcription factors have previously been shown to be required for maximal Cx-43 promoter activity. These results were corroborated by mutating the AP-1 and SP-1 binding sites resulting in decreased Cx-43 promoter activity in PAR-1 positive cells. Moreover, as Cx-43 has been shown to facilitate arrest of circulating tumor cells at the vascular endothelium, melanoma cell attachment to endothelial cells was significantly decreased in PAR-1 silenced cells with this effect being abrogated after PAR-1 rescue. Herein, we report that upregulation of PAR-1 expression seen in melanoma progression, mediates high levels of Cx-43 expression. As both SP-1 and AP-1 transcription factors act as positive regulators of Cx-43, our data provide a novel mechanism for the regulation of Cx-43 expression by PAR-1. Indeed, Cx-43 expression was restored following PAR-1 rescue in PAR-1 silenced cells. Taken together, our data support the tumor promoting function of Connexin 43 in melanoma. PMID:19679555

  14. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  15. Clinical significance of serum protease-activated receptor-1 levels in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    TAS, FARUK; KARABULUT, SENEM; TASTEKIN, DIDEM; DURANYILDIZ, DERYA

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) has a significant role in the pathogenesis of various malignancies and its expression mainly affects the survivals of cancer patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the clinical significance of the serum concentrations of PAR-1 in patients with gastric carcinoma. A total of 63 pathologically confirmed gastric cancer patients were enrolled in this study, with a median age of 62 years. Serum PAR-1 concentrations were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and no significant difference in the baseline serum PAR-1 concentrations was found between patients and normal controls (P=0.5). The investigated clinical variables, including patient age, gender, localization of lesion, histology, grade of pathology, disease stage and serum tumor markers (lactate dehydrogenase, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9) were not correlated with serum PAR-1 levels (P>0.05). Furthermore, no association was identified between the serum PAR-1 level and chemotherapy responsiveness (P=0.43). Serum PAR-1 level also had no prognostic role for survival (P=0.27). In conclusion, the serum PAR-1 concentration has no diagnostic, predictive and prognostic values in gastric cancer patients. PMID:27073639

  16. Prognostic Value of Protease Activated Receptor-1 in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Nosair, Nahla A.; Ghaith, Fatma M.; Elshenawy, Eman H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute Lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder of lymphoid progenitor cells that proliferate and replace the normal hematopoietic cells of the bone marrow. Protease-activated receptors (PARs) comprise a family of trans-membrane G-protein coupled receptors. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) is a typical member of this family of receptors that mediate cellular responses to thrombin and related proteases. PAR1 is expressed by a wide range of tumor cells and can promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this work was to study the role of PAR-1 expression in newly diagnosed ALL patients. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 44 children with newly diagnosed ALL who were admitted to Hematology Unit, Pediatric department, Tanta University Hospital including 24 males and 20 females with their age ranged from 4–17 years and their mean age value of 9.06±3.26. All patients were subjected to complete history taking, thorough clinical examination, bone marrow aspiration and flow cytometric analysis for detection of PAR-1 expression by malignant cells. Results PAR-1 was positive in 18 cases (41%) and negative in 26 cases (59%) of studied patients. This study showed no significant relation between PAR-1 expression and age, sex and most of the clinical data including hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and purpura while generalized lymphadenopathy was significantly higher in PAR-1 positive group. PAR-1 positive expression was associated with some bad prognostic laboratory parameters including higher hemoglobin, higher white blood cells, higher peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cells, higher serum LDH and lower platelets count. No significant association was detected between PAR-1 expression and immunophenotyping. There were significantly higher remission rates in PAR-1 negative group and significantly higher relapse and death rates in PAR-1 positive group. Conclusion From this study, it could be concluded that PAR-1 expression

  17. CONTRIBUTION OF PROTEASE-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR 1 IN STATUS EPILEPTICUS-INDUCED EPILEPTOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Isaev, D.; Lushnikova, I.; Lunko, O.; Zapukhliak, O.; Maximyuk, O.; Romanov, A.; Skibo, G.G.; Tian, C.; Holmes, G.L.; Isaeva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations and studies on different animal models of acquired epilepsy consistently demonstrate that blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage can be an important risk factor for developing recurrent seizures. However, the involved signaling pathways remain largely unclear. Given the important role of thrombin and its major receptor in the brain, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), in the pathophysiology of neurological injury, we hypothesized that PAR1 may contribute to status epilepticus (SE)-induced epileptogenesis and that its inhibition shortly after SE will have neuroprotective and antiepileptogenic effects. Adult rats subjected to lithium-pilocarpine SE were administrated SCH79797 (a PAR1 selective antagonist) after SE termination. Thrombin and PAR1 levels and neuronal cell survival were evaluated 48 hr following SE. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on animal survival, interictal spikes (IIS) and electrographic seizures during the first two weeks after SE and behavioral seizures during the chronic period were evaluated. SE resulted in a high mortality rate and incidence of IIS and seizures in the surviving animals. There was a marked increase in thrombin, decrease in PAR1 immunoreactivity and hippocampal cell loss in the SE-treated rats. Inhibition of PAR1 following SE resulted in a decrease in mortality and morbidity, increase in neuronal cell survival in the hippocampus and suppression of IIS, electrographic and behavioral seizures following SE. These data suggest that the PAR1 signaling pathway contributes to epileptogenesis following SE. Because breakdown of the BBB occurs frequently in brain injuries, PAR1 inhibition may have beneficial effects in a variety of acquired injuries leading to epilepsy. PMID:25843668

  18. Protease activated receptor-1 inhibits the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene to determine the melanoma metastatic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Gabriel J.; Zigler, Maya; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Wang, Hua; Song, Renduo; Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Huang, Li; Braeuer, Russell R.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-01

    The thrombin receptor protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is overexpressed in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tumor specimens. Previously, we demonstrated a significant reduction in tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis after PAR-1 silencing via systemic delivery of siRNA encapsulated into nanoliposomes. Gene expression profiling identified a 40-fold increase in expression of Maspin in PAR-1–silenced metastatic melanoma cell lines. Maspin promoter activity was significantly increased after PAR-1 silencing, suggesting that PAR1 negatively regulates Maspin at the transcriptional level. ChIP analyses revealed that PAR-1 decreases binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun transcription factors to the Maspin promoter, both known to activate Maspin transcription. PAR-1 silencing did not affect Ets-1 or c-Jun expression; rather it resulted in increased expression of the chromatin remodeling complex CBP/p300, as well as decreased activity of the CBP/p300 inhibitor p38, resulting in increased binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun to the Maspin promoter and higher Maspin expression. Functionally, Maspin expression reduced the invasive capability of melanoma cells after PAR-1 silencing, which was abrogated after rescuing with PAR-1. Furthermore, tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis was significantly decreased after expressing Maspin in a metastatic melanoma cell line. Moreover, silencing Maspin in PAR-1–silenced cells reverted the inhibition of tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate a mechanism by which PAR-1 negatively regulates the expression of the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene in the acquisition of the metastatic melanoma phenotype, thus attributing an alternative function to PAR-1 other than coagulation. PMID:21187389

  19. Protease activated receptor-1 inhibits the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene to determine the melanoma metastatic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Dobroff, Andrey S; Wang, Hua; Song, Renduo; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Huang, Li; Braeuer, Russell R; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-11

    The thrombin receptor protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is overexpressed in metastatic melanoma cell lines and tumor specimens. Previously, we demonstrated a significant reduction in tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis after PAR-1 silencing via systemic delivery of siRNA encapsulated into nanoliposomes. Gene expression profiling identified a 40-fold increase in expression of Maspin in PAR-1-silenced metastatic melanoma cell lines. Maspin promoter activity was significantly increased after PAR-1 silencing, suggesting that PAR1 negatively regulates Maspin at the transcriptional level. ChIP analyses revealed that PAR-1 decreases binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun transcription factors to the Maspin promoter, both known to activate Maspin transcription. PAR-1 silencing did not affect Ets-1 or c-Jun expression; rather it resulted in increased expression of the chromatin remodeling complex CBP/p300, as well as decreased activity of the CBP/p300 inhibitor p38, resulting in increased binding of Ets-1 and c-Jun to the Maspin promoter and higher Maspin expression. Functionally, Maspin expression reduced the invasive capability of melanoma cells after PAR-1 silencing, which was abrogated after rescuing with PAR-1. Furthermore, tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis was significantly decreased after expressing Maspin in a metastatic melanoma cell line. Moreover, silencing Maspin in PAR-1-silenced cells reverted the inhibition of tumor growth and experimental lung metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate a mechanism by which PAR-1 negatively regulates the expression of the Maspin tumor-suppressor gene in the acquisition of the metastatic melanoma phenotype, thus attributing an alternative function to PAR-1 other than coagulation. PMID:21187389

  20. Crosstalk between Protease-activated Receptor 1 and Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Regulates Melanoma Cell Adhesion Molecule (MCAM/MUC18) Expression and Melanoma Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E.; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  1. Crosstalk between protease-activated receptor 1 and platelet-activating factor receptor regulates melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM/MUC18) expression and melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Vladislava O; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J; Dobroff, Andrey S; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-10-16

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  2. Down-Regulation of PAR1 Activity with a pHLIP-based Allosteric Antagonist Induces Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kelly E.; Thévenin, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Even though abnormal expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and of their ligands is observed in many cancer cells of various origins, only a few anti-cancer compounds directly act on their signaling. One promising approach to modulate their activity consists of targeting the receptor cytoplasmic surfaces interacting with the associated G proteins using peptides mimicking the intracellular loops of the receptor. Thus, to be fully effective, the peptide mimics must be selectively targeted to the tumor while sparing healthy tissues, translocated across the cell membrane and stay anchored to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Here, we introduce a novel way to selectively target and inhibit the activity of a GPCR in cancer cells under acidic conditions, such as those found in solid tumors. We find that the conjugation of a peptide fragment derived from the third intracellular loop of the Protease Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1) to a peptide that can selectively target tumors solely based on their acidity (pHLIP), produces a construct capable of effectively down-regulating PAR1 activity in a concentration - and pH-dependent manner, and of inducing a potent cytotoxic effect in a panel of cancer cells that is proportional to the relative level of receptor expression at the cell surface. This strategy not only allows for a more selective targeting and specific intracellular delivery than current approaches, but also offers new possibilities for developing novel anti-cancer drugs targeting GPCRs. PMID:26424552

  3. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Chintala, Madhu; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  4. Down-regulation of PAR1 activity with a pHLIP-based allosteric antagonist induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kelly E; Thévenin, Damien

    2015-12-15

    Even though abnormal expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and of their ligands is observed in many cancer cells of various origins, only a few anti-cancer compounds directly act on their signalling. One promising approach to modulate their activity consists of targeting the receptor cytoplasmic surfaces interacting with the associated G-proteins using peptides mimicking the intracellular loops of the receptor. Thus, to be fully effective, the peptide mimics must be selectively targeted to the tumour while sparing healthy tissues, translocated across the cell membrane and stay anchored to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we introduce a novel way to selectively target and inhibit the activity of a GPCR in cancer cells under acidic conditions, such as those found in solid tumours. We find that the conjugation of a peptide fragment derived from the third intracellular loop (i3) of the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) to a peptide that can selectively target tumours solely based on their acidity [pH(Low) Insertion Peptide (pHLIP)], produces a construct capable of effectively down-regulating PAR1 activity in a concentration- and pH-dependent manner and of inducing a potent cytotoxic effect in a panel of cancer cells that is proportional to the relative level of receptor expression at the cell surface. This strategy not only allows for a more selective targeting and specific intracellular delivery than current approaches, but also offers new possibilities for developing novel anti-cancer drugs targeting GPCRs. PMID:26424552

  5. PAR-1 activation by thrombin is protective in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells if endothelial protein C receptor is occupied by its natural ligand

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Sup; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We recently demonstrated that the occupancy of endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) by its natural ligand activated protein C (APC)/protein C switches the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR-1)-dependent signaling specificity of thrombin from a disruptive to a protective effect in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Given the phenotypic differences between endothelial cells in venular and arterial beds, in this study we evaluated the signaling function of thrombin in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) before and after treating them with PC-S195A which lacks catalytic activity but exhibits a normal affinity for EPCR. As expected, both thrombin and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) enhanced the permeability barrier of HPAECs, however, both PAR-1 agonists exhibited a potent barrier protective effect when the cells were treated with PC-S195A prior to stimulation by the agonists. Interestingly, similar to APC, thrombin exhibited a potent cytoprotective activity in the LPS-induced permeability and TNF-α-induced apoptosis and adhesion assays in the PC-S195A treated HPAECs. Treatment of HPAECs with the cholesterol depleting molecule methyl-β-cyclodextrin eliminated the protective effect of both APC and thrombin. These results suggest that the occupancy of EPCR by its natural ligand recruits PAR-1 to a protective signaling pathway within lipid rafts of HPAECs. Based on these results we conclude that the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin would initiate a protective response in intact arterial vascular cells expressing EPCR. These findings may have important ramifications for understanding the mechanism of the participation of the vascular PAR-1 in pathophysiology of the inflammatory disorders. PMID:18612544

  6. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  7. Targeting melanoma growth and metastasis with systemic delivery of liposome-incorporated protease-activated receptor-1 small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Wu, Hong; Friedman, Ran; Leslie, Michael C; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo E; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2008-11-01

    The thrombin receptor [protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)] is overexpressed in highly metastatic melanoma cell lines and in patients with metastatic lesions. Activation of PAR-1 leads to cell signaling and up-regulation of genes involved in adhesion, invasion, and angiogenesis. Herein, we stably silence PAR-1 through the use of lentiviral short hairpin RNA and found significant decreases in both tumor growth (P < 0.01) and metastasis (P < 0.001) of highly metastatic melanoma cell lines in vivo. The use of viruses for therapy is not ideal as it can induce toxic immune responses and possible gene alterations following viral integration. Therefore, we also used systemic delivery of PAR-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) incorporated into neutral liposomes [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC)] to decrease melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo. Significant decreases in tumor growth, weight, and metastatic lung colonies (P < 0.001 for all) were found in mice treated with PAR-1 siRNA-DOPC. The in vivo effects of PAR-1 on invasion and angiogenesis were analyzed via immunohistochemistry. Concomitant decreases in vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-8, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels, as well as decreased blood vessel density (CD31), were found in tumor samples from PAR-1 siRNA-treated mice, suggesting that PAR-1 is a regulator of melanoma cell growth and metastasis by affecting angiogenic and invasive factors. We propose that siRNA incorporated into DOPC nanoparticles could be delivered systemically and used as a new modality for melanoma treatment. PMID:18974154

  8. Thrombin stimulates fibroblast procollagen production via proteolytic activation of protease-activated receptor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, R C; Dabbagh, K; McAnulty, R J; Gray, A J; Blanc-Brude, O P; Laurent, G J

    1998-01-01

    Thrombin is a multifunctional serine protease that has a crucial role in blood coagulation. It is also a potent mesenchymal cell mitogen and chemoattractant and might therefore have an important role in the recruitment and local proliferation of mesenchymal cells at sites of tissue injury. We hypothesized that thrombin might also affect the deposition of connective tissue proteins at these sites by directly stimulating fibroblast procollagen production. To address this hypothesis, the effect of thrombin on procollagen production and gene expression by human foetal lung fibroblasts was assessed over 48 h. Thrombin stimulated procollagen production at concentrations of 1 nM and above, with maximal increases of between 60% and 117% at 10 nM thrombin. These effects of thrombin were, at least in part, due to increased steady-state levels of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA. They could furthermore be reproduced with thrombin receptor-activating peptides for the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and were completely abolished when thrombin was rendered proteolytically inactive with the specific inhibitors d-Phe-Pro-ArgCH2Cl and hirudin, indicating that thrombin is mediating these effects via the proteolytic activation of PAR-1. These results suggest that thrombin might influence the deposition of connective tissue proteins during normal wound healing and the development of tissue fibrosis by stimulating fibroblast procollagen production. PMID:9639571

  9. Neuroinflammation-Induced Interactions between Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Proprotein Convertases in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, WooJin; Zekas, Erin; Lodge, Robert; Susan-Resiga, Delia; Marcinkiewicz, Edwidge; Essalmani, Rachid; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Asahchop, Eugene; Gelman, Benjamin; Cohen, Éric A; Power, Christopher; Hollenberg, Morley D; Seidah, Nabil G

    2015-11-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin, PC5, PACE4, and PC7 cleave secretory proteins after basic residues, including the HIV envelope glycoprotein (gp160) and Vpr. We evaluated the abundance of PC mRNAs in postmortem brains of individuals exhibiting HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), likely driven by neuroinflammation and neurotoxic HIV proteins (e.g., envelope and Vpr). Concomitant with increased inflammation-related gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β]), the mRNA levels of the above PCs are significantly increased, together with those of the proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), an inflammation-associated receptor that is cleaved by thrombin at ProArg41↓ (where the down arrow indicates the cleavage location), and potentially by PCs at Arg41XXXXArg46↓. The latter motif in PAR1, but not its R46A mutant, drives its interactions with PCs. Indeed, PAR1 upregulation leads to the inhibition of membrane-bound furin, PC5B, and PC7 and inhibits gp160 processing and HIV infectivity. Additionally, a proximity ligation assay revealed that furin and PC7 interact with PAR1. Reciprocally, increased furin expression reduces the plasma membrane abundance of PAR1 by trapping it in the trans-Golgi network. Furthermore, soluble PC5A/PACE4 can target/disarm cell surface PAR1 through cleavage at Arg46↓. PACE4/PC5A decreased calcium mobilization induced by thrombin stimulation. Our data reveal a new PC-PAR1-interaction pathway, which offsets the effects of HIV-induced neuroinflammation, viral infection, and potentially the development of HAND. PMID:26283733

  10. Neuroinflammation-Induced Interactions between Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Proprotein Convertases in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, WooJin; Zekas, Erin; Lodge, Robert; Susan-Resiga, Delia; Marcinkiewicz, Edwidge; Essalmani, Rachid; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Asahchop, Eugene; Gelman, Benjamin; Cohen, Éric A.; Power, Christopher; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    2015-01-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin, PC5, PACE4, and PC7 cleave secretory proteins after basic residues, including the HIV envelope glycoprotein (gp160) and Vpr. We evaluated the abundance of PC mRNAs in postmortem brains of individuals exhibiting HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), likely driven by neuroinflammation and neurotoxic HIV proteins (e.g., envelope and Vpr). Concomitant with increased inflammation-related gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β]), the mRNA levels of the above PCs are significantly increased, together with those of the proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), an inflammation-associated receptor that is cleaved by thrombin at ProArg41↓ (where the down arrow indicates the cleavage location), and potentially by PCs at Arg41XXXXArg46↓. The latter motif in PAR1, but not its R46A mutant, drives its interactions with PCs. Indeed, PAR1 upregulation leads to the inhibition of membrane-bound furin, PC5B, and PC7 and inhibits gp160 processing and HIV infectivity. Additionally, a proximity ligation assay revealed that furin and PC7 interact with PAR1. Reciprocally, increased furin expression reduces the plasma membrane abundance of PAR1 by trapping it in the trans-Golgi network. Furthermore, soluble PC5A/PACE4 can target/disarm cell surface PAR1 through cleavage at Arg46↓. PACE4/PC5A decreased calcium mobilization induced by thrombin stimulation. Our data reveal a new PC-PAR1-interaction pathway, which offsets the effects of HIV-induced neuroinflammation, viral infection, and potentially the development of HAND. PMID:26283733

  11. Blockage of protease-activated receptor 1 ameliorates heat-stress induced intestinal high permeability and bacterial translocation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiu-lin; Guo, Xiao-hua; Liu, Jing-xian; Chen, Bin; Liu, Zhi-feng; Su, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Accumulated evidences indicate intestinal lesions play an important role in the pathogenesis of heatstroke. However, the underlying mechanisms by which heat stress causes intestinal barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) in heat stress-induced intestinal hyper-permeability and bacterial translocation. Intestinal permeability in heat stressed mouse was evaluated by determining plasma endotoxin concentration and urinal lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio with gastric administration of L/M solution. Venous blood, liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph node tissues were collected for bacterial load test. Real time PCR was used to determine ileum PAR1 mRNA expression. In vitro study, permeability was assessed by determining trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. RWJ-58259, a selective antagonist of PAR1, was used both in vivo and in vitro studies. The results showed that heat stress could increase ileum PAR1 mRNA level, urinal L/M ratio, plasma endotoxin concentration and bacterial load in the blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Blocking PAR1 with RWJ-58259 (10 mg/kg) pretreatment could significantly reduce heat stress-induced above changes, but have no role to PAR1 mRNA level. In Caco-2 cells, heat stress-induced high permeability could also be reduced by RWJ-58259 (5-20 µmol/L). In summary, our results demonstrated that PAR1 signaling pathway may play an important role in the heat stress-induced elevation of intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and the occurrence of endotoxemia. PMID:25492552

  12. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1, PAR2 and PAR4 expressions in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, Si-Man; JIANG, Ping; XIANG, Yang; WANG, Wei-Wei; ZHU, Yue-Chun; FENG, Wei-Yang; LI, Shu-De; YU, Guo-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Here, we used reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot to detect protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1, PAR 2 and PAR 4 expression in cancer tissues and cell lines of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and investigated the co-relationship between PAR expression and clinic-pathological data for esophageal cancer. The methylation of PAR4 gene promoter involved in esophageal carcinoma was also analyzed. By comparing the mRNA expressions of normal esophageal tissue and human esophageal epithelial cells (HEEpiC), we found that among the 28 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, PAR1 (60%) and PAR2 (71%) were elevated in 17 and 20 cases, respectively, and PAR4 (68%) expression was lowered in 19 cases. Whereas, in human esophageal squamous cells (TE-1 and TE-10), PAR1 and PAR2 expression was increased but PAR4 was decreased. Combined with clinical data, the expression of PAR1 in poorly differentiated (P=0.016) and middle and lower parts of the esophagus (P=0.016) was higher; expression of PAR4 in poorly differentiated carcinoma was lower (P=0.049). Regarding TE-1 and TE-10 protein expression, we found that in randomized esophageal carcinoma, PAR1 (P=0.027) and PAR2 (P=0.039) expressions were increased, but lowered for PAR4 (P=0.0001). In HEEpiC, TE-1, TE-10, esophageal and normal esophagus tissue samples (case No. 7), the frequency of methylation at the 19 CpG loci of PAR4 was 35.4%, 95.2%, 83.8%, 62.6% and 48.2%, respectively. Our results indicate that the expression of PAR1 and PAR2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is increased but PAR4 is decreased. Hypermethylation of the promoter of the PAR4 gene may contribute to reduced expression of PAR4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25297082

  13. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains. PMID:27520376

  14. Targeting Protease-Activated Receptor-1 with Cell-Penetrating Pepducins in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cisowski, Jaroslaw; O'Callaghan, Katie; Kuliopulos, Athan; Yang, John; Nguyen, Nga; Deng, Qing; Yang, Eric; Fogel, Michael; Tressel, Sarah; Foley, Caitlin; Agarwal, Anika; Hunt, Stephen W.; McMurry, Tom; Brinckerhoff, Larry; Covic, Lidija

    2011-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G-protein–coupled receptors that are activated by proteolytic cleavage and generation of a tethered ligand. High PAR1 expression has been documented in a variety of invasive cancers of epithelial origin. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of the four PAR family members to motility of lung carcinomas and primary tumor samples from patients. We found that of the four PARs, only PAR1 expression was highly increased in the lung cancer cell lines. Primary lung cancer cells isolated from patient lung tumors migrated at a 10- to 40-fold higher rate than epithelial cells isolated from nonmalignant lung tissue. Cell-penetrating pepducin inhibitors were generated against the first (i1) and third (i3) intracellular loops of PAR1 and tested for their ability to inhibit PAR1-driven migration and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity. The PAR1 pepducins showed significant inhibition of cell migration in both primary and established cell lines similar to silencing of PAR1 expression with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Unlike i1 pepducins, the i3 loop pepducins were effective inhibitors of PAR1-mediated ERK activation and tumor growth. Comparable in efficacy with Bevacizumab, monotherapy with the PAR1 i3 loop pepducin P1pal-7 provided significant 75% inhibition of lung tumor growth in nude mice. We identify the PAR1–ERK1/2 pathway as a feasible target for therapy in lung cancer. PMID:21703428

  15. Protease activated receptor-1 antagonist ameliorates the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via inhibiting breakdown of blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Neui; Kim, Yu Ri; Ahn, Sung Min; Lee, Sun Kyung; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the question of whether protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) antagonist is a potential therapeutic target in multiple sclerosis, we treated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice with two PAR-1 antagonists, KC-A0590 and SCH-530348. Treatment with both antagonists resulted in a significant decrease in the clinical characteristics of EAE mice by suppressing demyelination and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the spinal cord and brain, as well as a significantly reducing the increased thrombin and tumor necrosis factor-α. Profound leakage of dextran was observed in the brain of EAE mice. However, treatment with PAR-1 antagonists resulted in the stabilization of vascular endothelial cells and reduced blood-brain barrier breakdown with suppression of inflammatory response. Treatment with PAR-1 antagonists also resulted in down-regulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and preserved expression of occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 in the brain and their significant expression was confirmed in neurons, astrocytes, and vascular endothelial cells. Finally, endothelial cells and primary cultured astrocytes were treated with PAR-1 antagonists; both antagonists suppressed thrombin-induced breakdown of ZO-1 in endothelial cells and secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in astrocytes. Collectively, our results suggest that PAR-1 antagonist is effective in attenuation of the clinical symptoms of EAE mice by stabilizing the blood-brain barrier and may have therapeutic potential for treatment of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26285165

  16. The ligand occupancy of endothelial protein C receptor switches the protease-activated receptor 1-dependent signaling specificity of thrombin from a permeability-enhancing to a barrier-protective response in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Sup; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that activated protein C (APC) may exert its cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory activities through the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR)-dependent cleavage of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) on vascular endothelial cells. Noting that (1) the activation of protein C on endothelial cells requires thrombin, (2) relative to APC, thrombin cleaves PAR-1 with approximately 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher catalytic efficiency, and (3) PAR-1 is a target for the proinflammatory activity of thrombin, it is not understood how APC can elicit a protective signaling response through the cleavage of PAR-1 when thrombin is present. In this study, we demonstrate that EPCR is associated with caveolin-1 in lipid rafts of endothelial cells and that its occupancy by the γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C/APC leads to its dissociation from caveolin-1 and recruitment of PAR-1 to a protective signaling pathway through coupling of PAR-1 to the pertussis toxin–sensitive Gi-protein. Thus, when EPCR is bound by protein C, the PAR-1 cleavage-dependent protective signaling responses in endothelial cells can be mediated by either thrombin or APC. These results provide a new paradigm for understanding how PAR-1 and EPCR participate in protective signaling events in endothelial cells. PMID:17823308

  17. Granzyme B-Induced Neurotoxicity Is Mediated via Activation of PAR-1 Receptor and Kv1.3 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongguang; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Choi, Elliot; Pardo-Villamizar, Carlos A.; Lee, Sung Bin; Yang, In Hong; Calabresi, Peter A.; Nath, Avindra

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a critical role of T cells in neurodegeneration associated with acute and subacute brain inflammatory disorders. Granzyme B (GrB), released by activated T cells, is a cytotoxic proteinase which may induce perforin-independent neurotoxicity. Here, we studied the mechanism of perforin-independent GrB toxicity by treating primary cultured human neuronal cells with recombinant GrB. GrBactivated the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 receptor on the neuronal cell surface leading to decreased intracellular cyclic AMP levels. This was followed by increased expression and translocation of the voltage gated potassium channel, Kv1.3 to the neuronal cell membrane. Similar expression of Kv1.3 was also seen in neurons of the cerebral cortex adjacent to active inflammatory lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis. Kv1.3 expression was followed by activation of Notch-1 resulting in neurotoxicity. Blocking PAR-1, Kv1.3 or Notch-1 activation using specific pharmacological inhibitors or siRNAs prevented GrB-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, clofazimine protected against GrB-induced neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus, in vivo. These observations indicate that GrB released from T cells induced neurotoxicity by interacting with the membrane bound Gi-coupled PAR-1 receptor and subsequently activated Kv1.3 and Notch-1. These pathways provide novel targets to treat T cell-mediated neuroinflammatory disorders. Kv1.3 is of particular interest since it is expressed on the cell surface, only under pathological circumstances, and early in the cascade of events making it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:22952817

  18. Targeting Melanoma Growth and Metastasis with Systemic Delivery of Liposomal Incorporated PAR-1 siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Gabriel J.; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Wu, Hong; Friedman, Ran; Leslie, Michael C.; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo E.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2008-01-01

    The thrombin receptor (PAR-1, Protease-Activated-Receptor-1) is over-expressed in highly metastatic melanoma cell lines and in patients with metastatic lesions. Activation of PAR-1 leads to cell signaling and upregulation of genes involved in adhesion, invasion and angiogenesis. Herein, we stably silence PAR-1 through the use of lentiviral shRNA and found significant decreases in both tumor growth (P<.01) and metastasis (P<.001) of highly metastatic melanoma cell lines in vivo. The use of viruses for therapy is not ideal as it can induce toxic immune responses and possible gene alterations following viral integration. Therefore, we also utilized systemic delivery of PAR-1 siRNA incorporated into neutral liposomes (DOPC) to decrease melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo. Significant decreases in tumor growth, weight and metastatic lung colonies (P<.001 for all) were found in mice treated with PAR-1-siRNA-DOPC. The in vivo effects of PAR-1 on invasion and angiogenesis were analyzed via immunohistochemistry. Concomitant decreases in VEGF, IL-8, and MMP-2 expression levels, as well as decreased blood-vessel density (CD31), were found in tumor samples from PAR-1 siRNA-treated mice, suggesting that PAR-1 is a regulator of melanoma cell growth and metastasis by affecting angiogenic and invasive factors. We propose that siRNA incorporated into DOPC nanoparticles could be delivered systemically and used as a new modality for melanoma treatment. PMID:18974154

  19. Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR)2, but Not PAR1, Is Involved in Collateral Formation and Anti-Inflammatory Monocyte Polarization in a Mouse Hind Limb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Anne Yael; van Oeveren-Rietdijk, Annemarie M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; Spek, C. Arnold; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Hamming, Jaap F.; de Boer, Hetty C.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Quax, Paul H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In collateral development (i.e. arteriogenesis), mononuclear cells are important and exist as a heterogeneous population consisting of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory/repair-associated cells. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR2 are G-protein-coupled receptors that are both expressed by mononuclear cells and are involved in pro-inflammatory reactions, while PAR2 also plays a role in repair-associated responses. Here, we investigated the physiological role of PAR1 and PAR2 in arteriogenesis in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Methods and Results PAR1-deficient (PAR1-/-), PAR2-deficient (PAR2-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent femoral artery ligation. Laser Doppler measurements revealed reduced post-ischemic blood flow recovery in PAR2-/- hind limbs when compared to WT, while PAR1-/- mice were not affected. Upon ischemia, reduced numbers of smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive collaterals and CD31-positive capillaries were found in PAR2-/- mice when compared to WT mice, whereas these parameters in PAR1-/- mice did not differ from WT mice. The pool of circulating repair-associated (Ly6C-low) monocytes and the number of repair-associated (CD206-positive) macrophages surrounding collaterals in the hind limbs were increased in WT and PAR1-/- mice, but unaffected in PAR2-/- mice. The number of repair-associated macrophages in PAR2-/- hind limbs correlated with CD11b- and CD115-expression on the circulating monocytes in these animals, suggesting that monocyte extravasation and M-CSF-dependent differentiation into repair-associated cells are hampered. Conclusion PAR2, but not PAR1, is involved in arteriogenesis and promotes the repair-associated response in ischemic tissues. Therefore, PAR2 potentially forms a new pro-arteriogenic target in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. PMID:23637930

  20. Activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs)-1 and -2 promotes alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and release of cytokines from human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Asokananthan, Nithiananthan; Lan, Rommel S; Graham, Peter T; Bakker, Anthony J; Tokanović, Ana; Stewart, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that protease-activated receptors (PARs) play an important role in various physiological processes. In the present investigation, we determined the expression of PARs on human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) and whether they were involved in cellular differentiation and pro-inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin (PGE2) secretion. PAR-1, PAR-2, PAR-3, and PAR-4 were detected in fibroblasts using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Increased expression of PAR-4, but not other PARs, was observed in fibroblasts stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. The archetypical activators of PARs, namely, thrombin and trypsin, as well as PAR-1 and PAR-2 agonist peptides, stimulated transient increases in intracellular Ca2+, and promoted increased α-smooth muscle actin expression. The proteolytic and peptidic PAR activators also stimulated the release of IL-6 and IL-8, as well as PGE2, with a rank order of potency of PAR-1 > PAR-2. The combined stimulation of PAR-1 and PAR-2 resulted in an additive release of both IL-6 and IL-8. In contrast, PAR-3 and PAR-4 agonist peptides, as well as all the PAR control peptides examined, were inactive. These results suggest an important role for PARs associated with fibroblasts in the modulation of inflammation and remodeling in the airway. PMID:25663523

  1. PAR-1 and thrombin: the ties that bind the microenvironment to melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zigler, Maya; Kamiya, Takafumi; Brantley, Emily C; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-11-01

    Progression of melanoma is dependent on cross-talk between tumor cells and the adjacent microenvironment. The thrombin receptor, protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), plays a key role in exerting this function during melanoma progression. PAR-1 and its activating factors, which are expressed on tumor cells and the surrounding stroma, induce not only coagulation but also cell signaling, which promotes the metastatic phenotype. Several adhesion molecules, cytokines, growth factors, and proteases have recently been identified as downstream targets of PAR-1 and have been shown to modulate interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment in the process of melanoma growth and metastasis. Inhibiting such interactions by targeting PAR-1 could potentially be a useful therapeutic modality for melanoma patients. PMID:22009534

  2. PAR-1 and Thrombin: The Ties that Bind the Microenvironment to Melanoma Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, Maya; Kamiya, Takafumi; Brantley, Emily C.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-01

    Progression of melanoma is dependent on cross-talk between tumor cells and the adjacent microenvironment. The thrombin receptor, Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays a key role in exerting this function during melanoma progression. PAR-1 and its activating factors, which are expressed on tumor cells and the surrounding stroma, induce not only coagulation, but also cell signaling which promotes the metastatic phenotype. Several adhesion molecules, cytokines, growth factors and proteases have recently been identified as downstream targets of PAR-1 and have been shown to modulate interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment in the process of melanoma growth and metastasis. Inhibition of these interactions by targeting PAR-1 could be utilized as a potential therapeutic modality for melanoma patients. PMID:22009534

  3. The Emerging Role of the Thrombin Receptor (PAR-1) in Melanoma Metastasis - a Possible Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Gabriel J.; Zigler, Maya; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma remains as the deadliest form of skin cancer with limited and inefficient treatment options available for patients with metastatic disease. Within the last decade, the thrombin receptor, Protease Activated Receptor-1, has been described as an essential gene involved in the progression of human melanoma. PAR-1 is known to activate adhesive, invasive and angiogenic factors to promote melanoma metastasis. It is overexpressed not only in metastatic melanoma cell lines but is also highly expressed in metastatic lesions as compared to primary nevi and normal skin. Recently, PAR-1 has been described to regulate the gap junction protein Connexin 43 and the tumor suppressor gene Maspin to promote the metastatic melanoma phenotype. Herein, we review the role of PAR-1 in the progression of melanoma as well as utilizing PAR-1-regulated genes as potential therapeutic targets for melanoma treatment. PMID:21378407

  4. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  5. PH motifs in PAR1&2 endow breast cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Kancharla, A.; Maoz, M.; Jaber, M.; Agranovich, D.; Peretz, T.; Grisaru-Granovsky, S.; Uziely, B.; Bar-Shavit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Although emerging roles of protease-activated receptor1&2 (PAR1&2) in cancer are recognized, their underlying signalling events are poorly understood. Here we show signal-binding motifs in PAR1&2 that are critical for breast cancer growth. This occurs via the association of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with Akt/PKB as a key signalling event of PARs. Other PH-domain signal-proteins such as Etk/Bmx and Vav3 also associate with PAR1 and PAR2 through their PH domains. PAR1 and PAR2 bind with priority to Etk/Bmx. A point mutation in PAR2, H349A, but not in R352A, abrogates PH-protein association and is sufficient to markedly reduce PAR2-instigated breast tumour growth in vivo and placental extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion in vitro. Similarly, the PAR1 mutant hPar1-7A, which is unable to bind the PH domain, reduces mammary tumours and EVT invasion, endowing these motifs with physiological significance and underscoring the importance of these previously unknown PAR1 and PAR2 PH-domain-binding motifs in both pathological and physiological invasion processes. PMID:26600192

  6. PH motifs in PAR1&2 endow breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Kancharla, A; Maoz, M; Jaber, M; Agranovich, D; Peretz, T; Grisaru-Granovsky, S; Uziely, B; Bar-Shavit, R

    2015-01-01

    Although emerging roles of protease-activated receptor1&2 (PAR1&2) in cancer are recognized, their underlying signalling events are poorly understood. Here we show signal-binding motifs in PAR1&2 that are critical for breast cancer growth. This occurs via the association of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with Akt/PKB as a key signalling event of PARs. Other PH-domain signal-proteins such as Etk/Bmx and Vav3 also associate with PAR1 and PAR2 through their PH domains. PAR1 and PAR2 bind with priority to Etk/Bmx. A point mutation in PAR2, H349A, but not in R352A, abrogates PH-protein association and is sufficient to markedly reduce PAR2-instigated breast tumour growth in vivo and placental extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion in vitro. Similarly, the PAR1 mutant hPar1-7A, which is unable to bind the PH domain, reduces mammary tumours and EVT invasion, endowing these motifs with physiological significance and underscoring the importance of these previously unknown PAR1 and PAR2 PH-domain-binding motifs in both pathological and physiological invasion processes. PMID:26600192

  7. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 4 signal inhibition reduces preterm neonatal hemorrhagic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; McBride, Devin W; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William B.; Flores, Jerry J.; Altay, Orhan; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study examines the role of thrombin’s protease-activated receptors (PAR)-1,-4 in mediating cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) following germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Methods GMH was induced by intraparenchymal infusion of bacterial collagenase into the right ganglionic eminence of P7 rat pups. Animals were treated with either PAR-1, -4, COX-2, or mTOR inhibitors by 1 hour, and up to five days. Results We found increased thrombin activity 6–24 hrs after GMH, and PAR-1, -4, inhibition normalized COX-2 and mTOR by 72 hrs. Early treatment with NS398 or rapamycin substantially improved long-term outcomes in juvenile animals. Conclusions Suppressing early PAR signal transduction, and postnatal NS398 or rapamycin treatment, may help reduce GMH severity in susceptible preterm infants. PMID:25931468

  8. NF-κB contributes to MMP1 expression in breast cancer spheroids causing paracrine PAR1 activation and disintegrations in the lymph endothelial barrier in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chi Huu; Senfter, Daniel; Basilio, Jose; Holzner, Silvio; Stadler, Serena; Krieger, Sigurd; Huttary, Nicole; Milovanovic, Daniela; Viola, Katharina; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Jäger, Walter; de Martin, Rainer; Krupitza, Georg

    2015-01-01

    RELA, RELB, CREL, NFKB1 and NFKB2, and the upstream regulators NEMO and NIK were knocked-down in lymph endothelial cells (LECs) and in MDA-MB231 breast cancer spheroids to study the contribution of NF-κB in vascular barrier breaching. Suppression of RELA, NFKB1 and NEMO inhibited “circular chemo-repellent induced defects” (CCIDs), which form when cancer cells cross the lymphatic vasculature, by ~20–30%. Suppression of RELB, NFKB2 and NIK inhibited CCIDs by only ~10–15%. In MDA-MB231 cells RELA and NFKB1 constituted MMP1 expression, which caused the activation of PAR1 in adjacent LECs. The knock-down of MMP1 in MDA-MB231 spheroids and pharmacological inhibition of PAR1 in LECs inhibited CCID formation by ~30%. Intracellular Ca2+ release in LECs, which was induced by recombinant MMP1, was suppressed by the PAR1 inhibitor SCH79797, thereby confirming a functional intercellular axis: RELA/NFKB1 – MMP1 (MDA-MB231) – PAR1 (LEC). Recombinant MMP1 induced PAR1-dependent phosphorylation of MLC2 and FAK in LECs, which is indicative for their activity and for directional cell migration such as observed during CCID formation. The combined knock-down of the NF-κB pathways in LECs and MDA-MB231 spheroids inhibited CCIDs significantly stronger than knock-down in either cell type alone. Also the knock-down of ICAM-1 in LECs (a NF-κB endpoint with relevance for CCID formation) and knock-down of MMP1 in MDA-MB231 augmented CCID inhibition. This evidences that in both cell types NF-κB significantly and independently contributes to tumour-mediated breaching of the lymphatic barrier. Hence, inflamed tumour tissue and/or vasculature pose an additional threat to cancer progression. PMID:26513020

  9. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  10. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  11. The emerging role of the thrombin receptor (PAR-1) in melanoma metastasis--a possible therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma remains as the deadliest form of skin cancer with limited and inefficient treatment options available for patients with metastatic disease. Within the last decade, the thrombin receptor, Protease Activated Receptor-1, has been described as an essential gene involved in the progression of human melanoma. PAR-1 is known to activate adhesive, invasive and angiogenic factors to promote melanoma metastasis. It is overexpressed not only in metastatic melanoma cell lines but is also highly expressed in metastatic lesions as compared to primary nevi and normal skin. Recently, PAR-1 has been described to regulate the gap junction protein Connexin 43 and the tumor suppressor gene Maspin to promote the metastatic melanoma phenotype. Herein, we review the role of PAR-1 in the progression of melanoma as well as utilizing PAR-1-regulated genes as potential therapeutic targets for melanoma treatment. PMID:21378407

  12. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells by V. cholerae hemagglutinin protease.

    PubMed

    Ray, Tanusree; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial toxins have emerged as promising agents in cancer treatment strategy. Hemagglutinin (HAP) protease secreted by Vibrio cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells and regresses tumor growth in mice model. The success of novel cancer therapies depends on their selectivity for cancer cells with limited toxicity for normal tissues. Increased expression of Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) has been reported in different malignant cells. In this study we report that HAP induced activation and over expression of PAR-1 in breast cancer cells (EAC). Immunoprecipitation studies have shown that HAP specifically binds with PAR-1. HAP mediated activation of PAR-1 caused nuclear translocation of p50-p65 and the phosphorylation of p38 which triggered the activation of NFκB and MAP kinase signaling pathways. These signaling pathways enhanced the cellular ROS level in malignant cells that induced the intrinsic pathway of cell apoptosis. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis by HAP of malignant breast cells without effecting normal healthy cells in the same environment makes it a good therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer. PMID:26897170

  13. Alterations in the expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the basilar artery of rats following a subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    LI, GANG; WANG, QING-SONG; LIN, TING-TING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm (CVS). The rat models were established by twice injecting blood into the cisterna magna, after which the following experimental groups were established: The normal group, the SAH3d group, the SAH5d group and the SAH7d group. The rats were perfused and the basilar artery was removed for histological examination. The cross-sectional area of the basilar artery lumen was measured using computer software; and the protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α was detected by immunohistochemistry. The cross-sectional area of the basilar artery of the rats in the SAH model groups was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner, as compared with the normal group. The protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α in the SAH3d, SAH5d and SAH7d groups was significantly increased over time (P<0.05), as compared with the normal group. CVS was detected in the basilar artery, and was associated with wall thickening and significant narrowing of the lumen, thus suggesting that the present model may be used for investigating cerebrovascular disease following SAH. The immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α was significantly increased in the basilar artery of the SAH model rats, and were positively correlated with the degree of CVS. PMID:26997984

  14. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies. PMID:27138068

  15. Kallikrein Promotes Inflammation in Human Dental Pulp Cells Via Protease-Activated Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tomomi; Kamio, Naoto; Okabe, Tatsu; Muromachi, Koichiro; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Plasma kallikrein (KLKB1), a serine protease, cleaves high-molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and pro-inflammatory peptide. In addition, KLKB1 activates plasminogen and other leukocyte and blood coagulation factors and processes pro-enkephalin, prorenin, and C3. KLKB1 has also been shown to cleave protease-activated receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor. In this study, we investigated KLKB1-dependent inflammation and activation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human dental pulp cells. These cells responded to KLKB1 stimulation by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) , upregulating cyclooxygenase-2, and secreting prostaglandin E2 . Remarkably, SCH79797, an antagonist of protease-activated receptor-1, blocked these effects. Thus, these data indicate that KLKB1 induces inflammatory reactions in human dental tissues via protease-activated receptor 1. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1522-1528, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566265

  16. Emerging Roles of PAR-1 and PAFR in Melanoma Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Villares, Gabriel J.

    2008-01-01

    Melanoma growth, angiogenesis and metastatic progression are strongly promoted by the inflammatory tumor microenvironment due to high levels of cytokine and chemokine secretion by the recruited inflammatory and stromal cells. In addition, platelets and molecular components of procoagulant pathways have been recently emerging as critical players of tumor growth and metastasis. In particular, thrombin, through the activity of its receptor protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), regulates tumor cell adhesion to platelets and endothelial cells, stimulates tumor angiogenesis, and promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Notably, in many tumor types including melanoma, PAR-1 expression directly correlates with their metastatic phenotype and is directly responsible for the expression of interleukin-8, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and integrins. Another proinflammatory receptor–ligand pair, platelet-activating factor (PAF) and its receptor (PAFR), have been shown to act as important modulators of tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells, angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis. PAF is a bioactive lipid produced by a variety of cells from membrane glycerophospholipids in the same reaction that releases arachidonic acid, and can be secreted by platelets, inflammatory cells, keratinocytes and endothelial cells. We have demonstrated that in metastatic melanoma cells, PAF stimulates the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF-1), which results in overexpression of MMP-2 and membrane type 1-MMP (membrane type 1-MMP). Since only metastatic melanoma cells overexpress CREB/ATF-1, we propose that metastatic melanoma cells are better equipped than their non-metastatic counterparts to respond to PAF within the tumor microenvironment. The evidence supporting the hypothesis that the two G-protein coupled receptors, PAR-1

  17. Emerging roles of PAR-1 and PAFR in melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Vladislava O; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2008-12-01

    Melanoma growth, angiogenesis and metastatic progression are strongly promoted by the inflammatory tumor microenvironment due to high levels of cytokine and chemokine secretion by the recruited inflammatory and stromal cells. In addition, platelets and molecular components of procoagulant pathways have been recently emerging as critical players of tumor growth and metastasis. In particular, thrombin, through the activity of its receptor protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), regulates tumor cell adhesion to platelets and endothelial cells, stimulates tumor angiogenesis, and promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Notably, in many tumor types including melanoma, PAR-1 expression directly correlates with their metastatic phenotype and is directly responsible for the expression of interleukin-8, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and integrins. Another proinflammatory receptor-ligand pair, platelet-activating factor (PAF) and its receptor (PAFR), have been shown to act as important modulators of tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells, angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis. PAF is a bioactive lipid produced by a variety of cells from membrane glycerophospholipids in the same reaction that releases arachidonic acid, and can be secreted by platelets, inflammatory cells, keratinocytes and endothelial cells. We have demonstrated that in metastatic melanoma cells, PAF stimulates the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF-1), which results in overexpression of MMP-2 and membrane type 1-MMP (membrane type 1-MMP). Since only metastatic melanoma cells overexpress CREB/ATF-1, we propose that metastatic melanoma cells are better equipped than their non-metastatic counterparts to respond to PAF within the tumor microenvironment. The evidence supporting the hypothesis that the two G-protein coupled receptors, PAR-1

  18. PAR1 participates in the ability of multidrug resistance and tumorigenesis by controlling Hippo-YAP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Daisuke; Ueda, Yuki; Hirono, Yasuo; Goi, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway significantly correlates with organ size control and tumorigenesis. The activity of YAP/TAZ, a transducer of the Hippo pathway, is required to sustain self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacities in cancer stem cells (CSCs). But, upstream signals that control the mammalian Hippo pathway have not been well understood. Here, we reveal a connection between the Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling pathway and the Hippo-YAP pathway in gastric cancer stem-like cells. The selective PAR1 agonist TFLLR-NH2 induces an increase in the fraction of side population cells which is enriched in CSCs, and promotes tumorigenesis, multi cancer drug resistance, cell morphological change, and cell invasion which are characteristics of CSCs. In addition, PAR1 activation inhibits the Hippo-YAP pathway kinase Lats via Rho GTPase. Lats kinase inhibition in turn results in increased nuclear localization of dephosphorylated YAP. Furthermore, PAR1 activation confers CSCs related traits via the Hippo-YAP pathway, and the Hippo-YAP pathway correlates with epithelial mesenchymal transition which is induced by PAR1 activation. Our research suggests that the PAR1 signaling deeply participates in the ability of multi drug resistance and tumorigenesis through interactions with the Hippo-YAP pathway signaling in gastric cancer stem-like cells. We presume that inhibited YAP is a new therapeutic target in the treatment human gastric cancer invasion and metastasis by dysregulated PAR1 or its agonists. The Hippo pathway significantly correlates with organ size control and tumorigenesis. The activity of YAP/TAZ, a transducer of the Hippo pathway, is required to sustain self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacities in cancer stem cells (CSCs). But, upstream signals that control the mammalian Hippo pathway have not been well understood. Here, we reveal a connection between the Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling pathway and the Hippo-YAP pathway in gastric cancer stem

  19. Extracellular granzyme K mediates endothelial activation through the cleavage of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mehul; Merkulova, Yulia; Raithatha, Sheetal; Parkinson, Leigh G; Shen, Yue; Cooper, Dawn; Granville, David J

    2016-05-01

    Granzymes are a family of serine proteases that were once thought to function exclusively as mediators of cytotoxic lymphocyte-induced target cell death. However, non-apoptotic roles for granzymes, including granzyme K (GzK), have been proposed. As recent studies have observed elevated levels of GzK in the plasma of patients diagnosed with clinical sepsis, we hypothesized that extracellular GzK induces a proinflammatory response in endothelial cells. In the present study, extracellular GzK proteolytically activated protease-activated receptor-1 leading to increased interleukin 6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 production in endothelial cells. Enhanced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 along with an increased capacity for adherence of THP-1 cells was also observed. Characterization of downstream pathways implicated the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway for intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression, and both the p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathways in cytokine production. GzK also increased tumour necrosis factor α-induced inflammatory adhesion molecule expression. Furthermore, the physiological inhibitor of GzK, inter-α-inhibitor protein, significantly inhibited GzK activity in vitro. In summary, extracellular GzK promotes a proinflammatory response in endothelial cells. PMID:26936634

  20. Inhibition of diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) in the lateral hypothalamus of rats prevents the increase in REMS and food ingestion induced by PAR1 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Marcel; López-Colomé, Ana María; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2014-08-22

    Stimulation of the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) in vitro, was shown to induce synaptic retrograde signaling through the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) synthesis and activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R). The activation of PAR1 by the agonist S1820 in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) increases rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and food intake in rats, and both effects are prevented by the CB1R inverse agonist AM251. In the present study, we implanted rats with electrodes and with cannulae aimed bilaterally to the LH. We administered tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), an inhibitor of the diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL), the enzyme responsible for 2-AG synthesis, to evaluate the sleep-wake cycle and food ingestion. THL in the LH readily prevented the increase in REMS and food intake induced by PAR1 stimulation, further supporting 2-AG as an upstream activator of PAR1. Our results demonstrate that the effect of PAR1 on REMS and food intake is blocked by the inhibition of DAGL, further suggesting that PAR1 stimulation in the lateral hypothalamus of rats induces an increase in sleep and food intake through 2-AG. PMID:24996194

  1. Protease-activated receptor-1 negatively regulates proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells derived from the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Yoneyama, Masanori; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Taro; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2016-07-01

    Thrombin-activated protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 regulates the proliferation of neural cells following brain injury. To elucidate the involvement of PAR-1 in the neurogenesis that occurs in the adult hippocampus, we examined whether PAR-1 regulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the murine hippocampal dentate gyrus. NPC cultures expressed PAR-1 protein and mRNA encoding all subtypes of PAR. Direct exposure of the cells to thrombin dramatically attenuated the cell proliferation without causing cell damage. This thrombin-induced attenuation was almost completely abolished by the PAR antagonist RWJ 56110, as well as by dabigatran and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF), which are selective and non-selective thrombin inhibitors, respectively. Expectedly, the PAR-1 agonist peptide (AP) SFLLR-NH2 also attenuated the cell proliferation. The cell proliferation was not affected by the PAR-1 negative control peptide RLLFT-NH2, which is an inactive peptide for PAR-1. Independently, we determined the effect of in vivo treatment with AEBSF or AP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mouse. The administration of AEBSF, but not that of AP, significantly increased the number of newly-generated cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone. These data suggest that PAR-1 negatively regulated adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus by inhibiting the proliferative activity of the NPCs. PMID:27426918

  2. Regulator of G protein signaling 8 inhibits protease-activated receptor 1/Gi/o signaling by forming a distinct G protein-dependent complex in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Ghil, Sungho

    2016-05-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane-domain-possessing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by extracellular stimuli elicits intracellular responses. One class of GPCRs-protease-activated receptors (PARs)-is activated by endogenous proteases, such as thrombin and trypsin. Members of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family stimulate GTP hydrolysis of G protein alpha (Gα) subunits, thereby inhibiting GPCR/Gα-mediated signaling. We previously reported that RGS2 and RGS4 inhibit PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling by interacting with PAR1 in a Gα-dependent manner. Here, employing the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technique, we identified RGS8 as a novel PAR1-interacting protein. Very little BRET activity was observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven) and RGS8-Luciferase (RGS8-Luc) in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of Gαo, BRET activity was specifically and significantly increased. This interaction was confirmed by biochemical and immunofluorescence assays. Notably, RGS8 inhibited PAR1/Gαi/o-mediated adenylyl cyclase and ERK activation, and prevented Gαo-induced neurite outgrowth and activation of Necdin protein, a downstream target of Gαo. Our findings suggest a novel function of RGS8 and reveal cellular mechanisms by which RGS8 mediates PAR1 inhibition. PMID:26829215

  3. Protease Activated Receptors 1 and 2 Correlate Differently with Breast Cancer Aggressiveness Depending on Tumor ER Status

    PubMed Central

    Lidfeldt, Jon; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Forsare, Carina; Malmström, Per; Fernö, Mårten; Belting, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Experimental models implicate protease activated receptors (PARs) as important sensors of the proteolytic tumor microenvironment during breast cancer development. However, the role of the major PARs, PAR-1 and PAR-2, in human breast tumors remains to be elucidated. Here, we have investigated how PAR-1 and PAR-2 protein expression correlate with established clinicopathological variables and patient outcome in a well-characterized cohort of 221 breast cancer patients. Univariable and multivariable hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by the Cox proportional hazards model, distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and overall survival by the Kaplan–Meier method, and survival in different strata was determined by the log-rank test. Associations between PARs and clinicopathological variables were analyzed using Pearson’s χ2-test. We find that PAR-2 associates with DDFS (HR = 3.1, P = 0.003), whereas no such association was found with PAR-1 (HR = 1.2, P = 0.6). Interestingly, the effect of PAR-2 was confined to the ER-positive sub-group (HR = 5.5, P = 0.003 vs. HR = 1.2 in ER-negative; P = 0.045 for differential effect), and PAR-2 was an independent prognostic factor specifically in ER-positive tumors (HR = 3.9, P = 0.045). On the contrary, PAR-1 correlated with worse prognosis specifically in the ER-negative group (HR = 2.6, P = 0.069 vs. HR = 0.5, P = 0.19 in ER-positive; P = 0.026 for differential effect). This study provides novel insight into the respective roles of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in human breast cancer and suggests a hitherto unknown association between PARs and ER signaling that warrants further investigation. PMID:26244666

  4. PAR1 signaling regulates the retention and recruitment of EPCR-expressing bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Itkin, Tomer; Chakrabarty, Sagarika; Graf, Claudine; Kollet, Orit; Ludin, Aya; Golan, Karin; Kalinkovich, Alexander; Ledergor, Guy; Wong, Eitan; Niemeyer, Elisabeth; Porat, Ziv; Erez, Ayelet; Sagi, Irit; Esmon, Charles T; Ruf, Wolfram; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2016-01-01

    Retention of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) in the bone marrow is essential for hematopoiesis and for protection from myelotoxic injury. We report that signaling cascades that are traditionally viewed as coagulation-related also control retention of EPCR+ LT-HSCs in the bone marrow and their recruitment to the blood via two different protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated pathways. Thrombin-PAR1 signaling induces nitric oxide (NO) production, leading to TACE-mediated EPCR shedding, enhanced CXCL12-CXCR4-induced motility, and rapid stem and progenitor cell mobilization. Conversely, bone marrow blood vessels provide a microenvironment enriched with protein C that retain EPCR+ LT-HSCs by limiting NO generation, reducing Cdc42 activity and enhancing VLA4 affinity and adhesion. Inhibition of NO production by activated protein C (aPC)-EPCR-PAR1 signaling reduces progenitor cell egress, increases NOlow bone marrow EPCR+ LT-HSCs retention and protects mice from chemotherapy-induced hematological failure and death. Our study reveals new roles for PAR1 and EPCR that control NO production to balance maintenance and recruitment of bone marrow EPCR+ LT-HSCs with clinical relevance. PMID:26457757

  5. Endocytosis of Ligand-Activated Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Mediated by the Clathrin-Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Patrick M; Kang, Yuan-Lin; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is one of five G protein-coupled receptors activated by the lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Stimulation of S1PR1 by binding S1P or the synthetic agonist FTY720P results in rapid desensitization, associated in part with depletion of receptor from the cell surface. We report here combining spinning disc confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to show that rapid internalization of activated S1PR1 relies on a functional clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Uptake of activated S1PR1 was strongly inhibited in cells disrupted in their clathrin-mediated endocytosis by depleting clathrin or AP-2 or by treating cells with dynasore-OH. The uptake of activated S1P1R was strongly inhibited in cells lacking both β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2, indicating that activated S1PR1 follows the canonical route of endocytosis for G-protein coupled receptor's (GPCR)'s. PMID:26481905

  6. SGIP1 alters internalization and modulates signaling of activated cannabinoid receptor 1 in a biased manner.

    PubMed

    Hájková, Alena; Techlovská, Šárka; Dvořáková, Michaela; Chambers, Jayne Nicole; Kumpošt, Jiří; Hubálková, Pavla; Prezeau, Laurent; Blahos, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases of the nervous system are accompanied by alterations in synaptic functions. Synaptic plasticity mediated by the endogenous cannabinoid system involves the activation of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R). The principles of CB1R signaling must be understood in detail for its therapeutic exploration. We detected the Src homology 3-domain growth factor receptor-bound 2-like (endophilin) interacting protein 1 (SGIP1) as a novel CB1R partner. SGIP1 is functionally linked to clathrin-mediated endocytosis and its overexpression in animals leads to an energy regulation imbalance resulting in obesity. We report that SGIP1 prevents the endocytosis of activated CB1R and that it alters signaling via the CB1R in a biased manner. CB1R mediated G-protein activation is selectively influenced by SGIP1, β-arrestin associated signaling is changed profoundly, most likely as a consequence of the prevention of the receptor's internalization elicited by SGIP1. PMID:26970018

  7. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  8. Prostaglandin E2 regulates angiogenesis via activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Federica; Solito, Raffaella; Morbidelli, Lucia; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2008-01-25

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) behaves as a mitogen in epithelial tumor cells as well as in many other cell types. We investigated the actions of PGE(2) on microvascular endothelial cells (capillary venular endothelial cells) with the purpose of delineating the signaling pathway leading to the acquisition of the angiogenic phenotype and to new vessel formation. PGE(2) (100 nM) produced activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR-1), as measured by its phosphorylation, but not of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. PGE(2) stimulated the EP3 subtype receptor, as deduced by abrogation of EP3 Galpha(i) subunit activity through pertussis toxin. Consistent with this result, in human umbilical venular endothelial cells missing the EP3 receptor, PGE(2) did not phosphorylate FGFR-1. Upon binding to its receptor, PGE(2) initiated an autocrine/paracrine signaling cascade involving the intracellular activation of c-Src, activation of matrix metalloproteinase (predominantly MMP2), which in turn caused the mobilization of membrane-anchored fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). In fact, in cells unable to release FGF-2 the transfection with both FGFR-1 and EP3 did not result in FGFR-1 phosphorylation in response to PGE(2). Relevance for the FGF2-FGFR-1 system was highlighted by confocal analysis, showing receptor internalization after cell exposure to the prostanoid. ERK1/2 appeared to be the distal signal involved, its phosphorylation being sensitive to either cSrc inhibitor or FGFR-1 blocker. Finally, PGE(2) stimulated cell migration and capillary formation in aortic rings, which were severely reduced by inhibitors of signaling molecules or by receptor antagonist. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the involvement of FGFR-1 through FGF2 in eliciting PGE(2) angiogenic responses. This signaling pattern is similar to the autocrine-paracrine mechanism which operates in endothelial cells to support neovascular growth. PMID:18042549

  9. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Deficiency Potentiates PAR-1-induced Increase in Endothelial Permeability in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Profirovic, Jasmina; Han, Jingyan; Andreeva, Alexandra V.; Neamu, Radu F.; Pavlovic, Sasha; Vogel, Stephen M.; Walter, Ulrich; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A.

    2010-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is implicated in the protection of the endothelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. VASP function in thrombin signaling in the endothelial cells (ECs) is not known. For the first time we studied the effects of VASP deficiency on EC permeability and pulmonary vascular permeability in response to thrombin receptor stimulation. We provided the evidence that VASP deficiency potentiates the increase in endothelial permeability induced by activation of thrombin receptor in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and isolated mouse lungs. Using transendothelial resistance measurement, we showed that siRNA-mediated VASP downregulation in HUVECs leads to a potentiation of thrombin- and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) agonist-induced increase in endothelial permeability. Compared to control cells, VASP-deficient HUVECs had delayed endothelial junctional reassembly and abrogated VE-cadherin cytoskeletal anchoring in the recovery phase after thrombin stimulation, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence studies and cell fractionation analysis, respectively. Measurement of the capillary filtration coefficient in isolated mouse lungs demonstrated that VASP−/− mice have increased microvascular permeability in response to infusion with PAR-1 agonist compared to wild type mice. Lack of VASP led to decreased Rac1 activation both in VASP-deficient HUVECs after thrombin stimulation and VASP−/− mouse lungs after PAR-1 agonist infusion, indicating that VASP effects on thrombin signaling may correlated with changes in Rac1 activity. This study demonstrates that VASP may play critical and complex role in the regulation of thrombin-dependent disruption of the endothelial barrier function. PMID:20945373

  10. Senescent Fibroblasts Enhance Early Skin Carcinogenic Events via a Paracrine MMP-PAR-1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Malaquin, Nicolas; Vercamer, Chantal; Bouali, Fatima; Martien, Sébastien; Deruy, Emeric; Wernert, Nicolas; Chwastyniak, Maggy; Pinet, Florence; Abbadie, Corinne; Pourtier, Albin

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of carcinoma increases greatly with aging, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this correlation are only partly known. It is established that senescent fibroblasts promote the malignant progression of already-transformed cells through secretion of inflammatory mediators. We investigated here whether the senescent fibroblast secretome might have an impact on the very first stages of carcinogenesis. We chose the cultured normal primary human epidermal keratinocyte model, because after these cells reach the senescence plateau, cells with transformed and tumorigenic properties systematically and spontaneously emerge from the plateau. In the presence of medium conditioned by autologous senescent dermal fibroblasts, a higher frequency of post-senescence emergence was observed and the post-senescence emergent cells showed enhanced migratory properties and a more marked epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Using pharmacological inhibitors, siRNAs, and blocking antibodies, we demonstrated that the MMP-1 and MMP-2 matrix metalloproteinases, known to participate in late stages of cancer invasion and metastasis, are responsible for this enhancement of early migratory capacity. We present evidence that MMPs act by activating the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1), whose expression is specifically increased in post-senescence emergent keratinocytes. The physiopathological relevance of these results was tested by analyzing MMP activity and PAR-1 expression in skin sections. Both were higher in skin sections from aged subjects than in ones from young subjects. Altogether, our results suggest that during aging, the dermal and epidermal skin compartments might be activated coordinately for initiation of skin carcinoma, via a paracrine axis in which MMPs secreted by senescent fibroblasts promote very early epithelial-mesenchymal transition of keratinocytes undergoing transformation and oversynthesizing the MMP-activatable receptor PAR-1. PMID:23675494

  11. Glycosylation at Asn211 Regulates the Activation State of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1)*

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hsueh-Liang; Valiathan, Rajeshwari R.; Payne, Leo; Kumarasiri, Malika; Mahasenan, Kiran V.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Huang, Paul; Fridman, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) belongs to a unique family of receptor tyrosine kinases that signal in response to collagens. DDR1 undergoes autophosphorylation in response to collagen binding with a slow and sustained kinetics that is unique among members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. DDR1 dimerization precedes receptor activation suggesting a structural inhibitory mechanism to prevent unwarranted phosphorylation. However, the mechanism(s) that maintains the autoinhibitory state of the DDR1 dimers is unknown. Here, we report that N-glycosylation at the Asn211 residue plays a unique role in the control of DDR1 dimerization and autophosphorylation. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that mutations that disrupt the conserved 211NDS N-glycosylation motif, but not other N-glycosylation sites (Asn260, Asn371, and Asn394), result in collagen I-independent constitutive phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry revealed that the N211Q mutant undergoes phosphorylation at Tyr484, Tyr520, Tyr792, and Tyr797. The N211Q traffics to the cell surface, and its ectodomain displays collagen I binding with an affinity similar to that of the wild-type DDR1 ectodomain. However, unlike the wild-type receptor, the N211Q mutant exhibits enhanced receptor dimerization and sustained activation upon ligand withdrawal. Taken together, these data suggest that N-glycosylation at the highly conserved 211NDS motif evolved to act as a negative repressor of DDR1 phosphorylation in the absence of ligand. The presence of glycan moieties at that site may help to lock the collagen-binding domain in the inactive state and prevent unwarranted signaling by receptor dimers. These studies provide a novel insight into the structural mechanisms that regulate DDR activation. PMID:24509848

  12. Leukocyte Elastase Induces Lung Epithelial Apoptosis via a PAR-1–, NF-κB–, and p53-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Yamashita, Cory; Zemans, Rachel L.; Briones, Natalie; Van Linden, Annemie; Downey, Gregory P.

    2009-01-01

    Leukocyte elastase induces apoptosis of lung epithelial cells via alterations in mitochondrial permeability, but the signaling pathways regulating this response remain uncertain. Here we investigated the involvement of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), the transcription factor NF-κB, and the protooncogene p53 in this pathway. Elastase-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells correlated temporally with activation of NF-κB, phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation of p53, increased p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression, and mitochondrial translocation of Bax resulting in enhanced permeability. Elastase-induced apoptosis was also prevented by pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-κB and p53 and by short interfering RNA knockdown of PAR-1, p53, or PUMA. These inhibitors prevented elastase-induced PUMA expression, mitochondrial translocation of Bax, increased mitochondrial permeability, and attenuated apoptosis. NF-κB inhibitors also reduced p53 phosphorylation. We conclude that elastase-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells is mediated by a PAR-1–triggered pathway involving activation of NF-κB and p53, and a PUMA- and Bax-dependent increase in mitochondrial permeability leading to activation of distal caspases. Further, p53 contributes to elastase-induced apoptosis by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:19307610

  13. PAR-1 phosphorylates Mind bomb to promote vertebrate neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ossipova, Olga; Ezan, Jerome; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Generation of neurons in the vertebrate central nervous system requires complex transcriptional regulatory network and signaling processes in polarized neuroepithelial progenitor cells. Here we demonstrate that neurogenesis in the Xenopus neural plate in vivo and mammalian neural progenitors in vitro involves intrinsic antagonistic activities of the polarity proteins PAR-1 and aPKC. Furthermore, we show that Mind bomb (Mib), a ubiquitin ligase that promotes Notch ligand trafficking and activity, is a crucial molecular substrate for PAR-1. The phosphorylation of Mib by PAR-1 results in Mib degradation, repression of Notch signaling and stimulation of neuronal differentiation. These observations suggest a conserved mechanism for neuronal fate determination that might operate during asymmetric divisions of polarized neural progenitor cells. PMID:19686683

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 are associated with acute normal tissue toxicity in Chinese rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Mengyun; Shi, Tingyan; Shen, Lijun; Zhu, Ji; Sun, Menghong; Deng, Yun; Liang, Liping; Li, Guichao; Wu, Yongxin; Fan, Ming; Wei, Qingyi; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) are crucial mediators of the intestinal microenvironment and are involved in radiation-induced acute and chronic injury. To evaluate whether genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 were predictors of radiation-induced injury in patients with rectal cancer, we retrospectively evaluated 356 rectal cancer patients who had received pelvic radiotherapy and analyzed the association of genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 with acute toxicities after radiotherapy. Acute adverse events were scored, including dermatitis, fecal incontinence (anal toxicity), hematological toxicity, diarrhea, and vomiting. The patients were grouped into grade ≥2 and grade 0–1 toxicity groups to analyze the acute toxicities. Genotyping of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAI-1 and PAR-1 was performed using TaqMan assays. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 356 individuals, 264 (72.5%) had grade ≥2 total toxicities; within this group, there were 65 (18.3%) individuals who reached grade ≥3 toxicities. There were 19.5% (69/354) and 36.9% (130/352) patients that developed grade ≥2 toxicities for diarrhea and fecal incontinence, respectively. The variant genotype GG of rs1050955 in PAI-1 was found to be negatively associated with the risk of diarrhea and incontinence (P<0.05), whereas the AG and GG genotypes of rs2227631 in PAI-1 were associated with an increased risk of incontinence. The CT genotype of PAR-1 rs32934 was associated with an increased risk of total toxicity compared with the CC allele. Our results demonstrated that SNPs in the PAI-1 and PAR-1 genes were associated with acute injury in rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic irradiation. These SNPs may be useful biomarkers for predicting acute radiotoxicity in patients with rectal cancer if validated in future studies. PMID:26347502

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 are associated with acute normal tissue toxicity in Chinese rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Mengyun; Shi, Tingyan; Shen, Lijun; Zhu, Ji; Sun, Menghong; Deng, Yun; Liang, Liping; Li, Guichao; Wu, Yongxin; Fan, Ming; Wei, Qingyi; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) are crucial mediators of the intestinal microenvironment and are involved in radiation-induced acute and chronic injury. To evaluate whether genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 were predictors of radiation-induced injury in patients with rectal cancer, we retrospectively evaluated 356 rectal cancer patients who had received pelvic radiotherapy and analyzed the association of genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 with acute toxicities after radiotherapy. Acute adverse events were scored, including dermatitis, fecal incontinence (anal toxicity), hematological toxicity, diarrhea, and vomiting. The patients were grouped into grade ≥2 and grade 0-1 toxicity groups to analyze the acute toxicities. Genotyping of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAI-1 and PAR-1 was performed using TaqMan assays. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 356 individuals, 264 (72.5%) had grade ≥2 total toxicities; within this group, there were 65 (18.3%) individuals who reached grade ≥3 toxicities. There were 19.5% (69/354) and 36.9% (130/352) patients that developed grade ≥2 toxicities for diarrhea and fecal incontinence, respectively. The variant genotype GG of rs1050955 in PAI-1 was found to be negatively associated with the risk of diarrhea and incontinence (P<0.05), whereas the AG and GG genotypes of rs2227631 in PAI-1 were associated with an increased risk of incontinence. The CT genotype of PAR-1 rs32934 was associated with an increased risk of total toxicity compared with the CC allele. Our results demonstrated that SNPs in the PAI-1 and PAR-1 genes were associated with acute injury in rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic irradiation. These SNPs may be useful biomarkers for predicting acute radiotoxicity in patients with rectal cancer if validated in future studies. PMID:26347502

  16. PAR1 is selectively over expressed in high grade breast cancer patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Norma A; Correa, Elma; Avila, Esther P; Vela, Teresa A; Pérez, Víctor M

    2009-01-01

    Background The protease-activated receptor (PAR1) expression is correlated with the degree of invasiveness in cell lines. Nevertheless it has never been directed involved in breast cancer patients progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether PAR1 expression could be used as predictor of metastases and mortality. Methods In a cohort of patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma studied longitudinally since 1996 and until 2007, PAR1 over-expression was assessed by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and flow citometry. Chi-square and log rank tests were used to determine whether there was a statistical association between PAR1 overexpression and metastases, mortality, and survival. Multivariate analysis was performed including HER1, stage, ER and nodes status to evaluate PAR1 as an independent prognostic factor. Results Follow up was 95 months (range: 2–130 months). We assayed PAR1 in a cohort of patients composed of 136 patients; we found PAR1 expression assayed by immunoblotting was selectively associated with high grade patients (50 cases of the study cohort; P = 0.001). Twenty-nine of 50 (58%) patients overexpressed PAR1, and 23 of these (46%) developed metastases. HER1, stage, ER and PAR1 overexpression were robustly correlated (Cox regression, P = 0.002, P = 0.024 and P = 0.002 respectively). Twenty-one of the 50 patients (42%) expressed both receptors (PAR1 and HER1 P = 0.0004). We also found a statistically significant correlation between PAR1 overexpression and increased mortality (P = 0.0001) and development of metastases (P = 0.0009). Conclusion Our data suggest PAR1 overexpression may be involved in the development of metastases in breast cancer patient and is associated with undifferentiated cellular progression of the tumor. Further studies are needed to understand PAR1 mechanism of action and in a near future assay its potential use as risk factor for metastasis development in high grade breast cancer patients. PMID:19538737

  17. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is Activated by Amiodarone Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Aaron N.; Miyakawa, Motonori; Tan, Edwin S.; Scanlan, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Amiodarone (Cordarone, Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals) is a clinically available drug used to treat a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias. We report here the synthesis and characterization of a panel of potential amiodarone metabolites that have significant structural similarity to thyroid hormone and its metabolites the iodothyronamines. Several of these amiodarone derivatives act as specific agonists of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). This result demonstrates a novel molecular target for amiodarone derivatives with potential clinical significance. PMID:18752950

  18. Recombination in the Human Pseudoautosomal Region PAR1

    PubMed Central

    Hinch, Anjali G.; Altemose, Nicolas; Noor, Nudrat; Donnelly, Peter; Myers, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome. PMID:25033397

  19. Recombination in the human Pseudoautosomal region PAR1.

    PubMed

    Hinch, Anjali G; Altemose, Nicolas; Noor, Nudrat; Donnelly, Peter; Myers, Simon R

    2014-07-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome. PMID:25033397

  20. Molecular basis for antagonistic activity of anifrolumab, an anti-interferon-α receptor 1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Oganesyan, Vaheh; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2015-01-01

    Anifrolumab (anifrolumab) is an antagonist human monoclonal antibody that targets interferon α receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Anifrolumab has been developed to treat autoimmune diseases and is currently in clinical trials. To decipher the molecular basis of its mechanism of action, we engaged in multiple epitope mapping approaches to determine how it interacts with IFNAR1 and antagonizes the receptor. We identified the epitope of anifrolumab using enzymatic fragmentation, phage-peptide library panning and mutagenesis approaches. Our studies revealed that anifrolumab recognizes the SD3 subdomain of IFNAR1 with the critical residue R(279). Further, we solved the crystal structure of anifrolumab Fab to a resolution of 2.3 Å. Guided by our epitope mapping studies, we then used in silico protein docking of the anifrolumab Fab crystal structure to IFNAR1 and characterized the corresponding mode of binding. We find that anifrolumab sterically inhibits the binding of IFN ligands to IFNAR1, thus blocking the formation of the ternary IFN/IFNAR1/IFNAR2 signaling complex. This report provides the molecular basis for the mechanism of action of anifrolumab and may provide insights toward designing antibody therapies against IFNAR1. PMID:25606664

  1. PAR1-dependent and independent increases in COX-2 and PGE2 in human colonic myofibroblasts stimulated by thrombin.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Michelle L; Zaidi, Nosheen F; Hollenberg, Morley D; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2003-05-01

    Subepithelial myofibroblast-derived prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) regulates epithelial chloride secretion in the intestine. Thrombin is elevated in inflammatory conditions of the bowel. Therefore, we sought to determine a role for thrombin in regulating PGE(2) synthesis by colonic myofibroblasts. Incubation of cultured CCD-18Co colonic myofibroblasts with thrombin, the proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR(1))-activating peptide (Cit-NH(2)), and peptides corresponding to 2 noncatalytic regions of thrombin (TP367 and TP508) for 18 h increased both cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression (immunocytochemistry) and PGE(2) synthesis (enzyme immunoassay). Inhibition of thrombin by D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK) did not significantly reduce PGE(2) synthesis, which remained elevated compared with control. We also investigated the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) dependence of thrombin-induced PGE(2) elevations. Recombinant human bFGF concentration dependently increased PGE(2) synthesis, and a bFGF neutralizing antibody inhibited PGE(2) synthesis induced by TP367 and TP508 (approximately 40%) and by thrombin (approximately 20%) (but not Cit-NH(2)). Thrombin, therefore, upregulates COX-2-derived PGE(2) synthesis by both catalytic cleavage of PAR(1) and bFGF-dependent noncatalytic activity. This presents a novel mechanism by which intestinal myofibroblasts might regulate epithelial chloride secretion. PMID:12505789

  2. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Ung; de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, Juan; Mahler, Nathan; Best, Cameron A; Tara, Shuhei; Yi, Tai; Shoji, Toshihiro; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Lee, Avione Y; Robledo-Avila, Frank; Hibino, Narutoshi; Pober, Jordan S; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Breuer, Christopher K

    2016-07-01

    Stenosis is a critical problem in the long-term efficacy of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs). We previously showed that host monocyte infiltration and activation within the graft drives stenosis and that TGF-β receptor 1 (TGF-βR1) inhibition can prevent it, but the latter effect was attributed primarily to inhibition of mesenchymal cell expansion. In this study, we assessed the effects of TGF-βR1 inhibition on the host monocytes. Biodegradable TEVGs were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition conduits in 2 groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 25/group): unseeded grafts and unseeded grafts with TGF-βR1 inhibitor systemic treatment for the first 2 wk. The TGF-βR1 inhibitor treatment effectively improved TEVG patency at 6 mo compared to the untreated control group (91.7 vs. 48%, P < 0.001), which is associated with a reduction in classic activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Consistent with these findings, the addition of rTGF-β to LPS/IFN-γ-stimulated monocytes enhanced secretion of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-6; this effect was blocked by TGF-βR1 inhibition (P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the TGF-β signaling pathway contributes to TEVG stenosis by inducing classic activation of host monocytes. Furthermore, blocking monocyte activation by TGF-βR1 inhibition provides a viable strategy for preventing TEVG stenosis while maintaining neotissue formation.-Lee, Y.-U., de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, J., Mahler, N., Best, C. A., Tara, S., Yi, T., Shoji, T., Sugiura, T., Lee, A. Y., Robledo-Avila, F., Hibino, N., Pober, J. S., Shinoka, T., Partida-Sanchez, S., Breuer, C. K. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation. PMID:27059717

  3. Identification of California Condor Estrogen Receptors 1 and 2 and Their Activation by Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Felton, Rachel G; Steiner, Cynthia C; Durrant, Barbara S; Keisler, Duane H; Milnes, Matthew R; Tubbs, Christopher W

    2015-12-01

    Recently, California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) have been reintroduced to coastal regions of California where they feed on marine mammal carcasses. There is evidence that coastal-dwelling condors experience reproductive issues, such as eggshell thinning, likely resulting from exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). To address this problem, we have identified and cloned condor estrogen receptors (ESRs) 1 and 2 and characterized their activation by EDCs present in the coastal habitats where condors reside. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites all activated ESR1 and ESR2, although their relative potency differed between the receptors. Bisphenol A, dieldrin, trans-nonachlor, and polychlorinated biphenyl 52 (PCB52) moderately activated both ESRs, whereas PCB138 and PCB153 stimulated little to no activation. Overall, EDC activation of condor ESR2, which is the first ESR2 cloned from a raptor species, was greater than that of ESR1. Significant activation of both condor ESRs by EDCs occurred at high concentrations (≥1μM), which are within the range of plasma levels of certain EDCs (eg, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene [p'p-DDE]) in coastal-dwelling condors. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of ESRs of 41 avian species identified a single amino acid position in ESR2 under positive selection. Mutation of this amino acid affected receptor activation by EDCs, suggesting the identity of this amino acid may influence EDC sensitivity of avian species. Together, these findings broaden our understanding of EDC interactions with ESRs in avian species. For condors specifically, these data could be used to evaluate EDC exposure risk at future release sites to identify those least likely to compromise the continued recovery of this species. PMID:26372180

  4. Induction of proteinuria by cannabinoid receptors 1 signaling activation in CB1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Ho, Cheng; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Proteinuria is not only a sign of kidney damage but is also involved in the progression of renal disease as an independent pathologic factor. Although patients with mutated type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) polymorphism are associated with renal microvascular damage, the biologic role of CB1 signaling in proteinuria remains uncharacterized till now. Herein, we investigate whether CB1 participates in glomerular proteinuria in CB1 transgenic mice and treatment with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 rat, neither of which are diabetic models. The CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher kidney weight and urinary protein concentrations but not blood glucose levels compared with the wild-type group. A combination of laser-capture microsdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical validation revealed that CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in renal glomeruli than that of the wild-type group. Geneticorpharmacological activation of CB1 by transgenic CB1 mice or treatment with WIN55212-2 reduced nephrin expression in the renal glomeruli compared with that of the wild-type group in the glomerular mesanglium. Taken together, CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 induced proteinuria with upregulation of CB1 resulting in impaired nephrin expression, by inducing excess VEGF reaction in the renal glomeruli. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of CB1 signaling revealed VEGF-dependent nephrin depression of glomerulopathy. Controlling CB1 activity can be used an alternative strategy for sustaining renal function in the presence of CB1 activation. PMID:25474224

  5. Regulation of airway contractility by plasminogen activators through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Taher; Yarovoi, Serge; Fanne, Rami Abu; Akkawi, Sa'ed; Jammal, Mahmud; Allen, Timothy Craig; Idell, Steven; Cines, Douglas B; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof

    2010-12-01

    Reactive airway disease is mediated by smooth muscle contraction initiated through several agonist-dependent pathways. Activation of type 1 N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R1s) by plasminogen activators (PAs) has been linked to control of vascular tone, but their effect on airway smooth muscle contractility has not previously been studied to our knowledge. We observed that NMDA-R1s are expressed by human airway smooth muscle cells and constitutively inhibit the contraction of isolated rat tracheal rings in response to acetylcholine (Ach). Both tissue-type PA (tPA) and urokinase-type PA (uPA) bind to NMDA-R1 and reverse this effect, thereby enhancing Ach-induced tracheal contractility. Tracheal contractility initiated by Ach is reduced in rings isolated from tPA(-/-) and uPA(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts. The procontractile effect of uPA or tPA was mimicked and augmented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, l-NAME. uPA and tPA further enhanced the contractility of rings denuded of epithelium, an effect that was inhibited by the NMDA-R antagonist, MK-801. Binding of PAs to NMDA-R1 and the subsequent activation of the receptor were inhibited by PA inhibitor type 1, by a PA inhibitor type 1-derived hexapeptide that recognizes the tPA and uPA docking domains, as well as by specific mutations within the docking site of tPA. These studies identify involvement of PAs and NMDA-R1 in airway contractility, and define new loci that could lead to the development of novel interventions for reactive airway disease. PMID:20097831

  6. Regulation of rotenone-induced microglial activation by 5-lipoxygenase and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lu; Yang, Yi; Xu, Dong-Min; Zhang, Si-Ran; Li, Chen-Tan; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Shu-Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Li-Hui

    2014-07-14

    The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) products cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent pro-inflammatory mediators. CysLTs mediate their biological actions through activating CysLT receptors (CysLT(1)R and CysLT(2)R). We have recently reported that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R mediated PC12 cell injury induced by high concentrations of rotenone (0.3-10 μM), which was reduced by the selective 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton and CysLT(1)R antagonist montelukast. The purpose of this study was to examine the regulatory roles of the 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway in microglial activation induced by low concentration rotenone. After mouse microglial BV2 cells were stimulated with rotenone (0.3-3 nM), phagocytosis and release of pro-inflammatory cytokine were assayed as indicators of microglial activation. We found that rotenone (1 and 3 nM) increased BV2 microglial phagocytosis and the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zileuton and montelukast prevented rotenone (3 nM)-induced phagocytosis and cytokine release. Furthermore, rotenone significantly up-regulated 5-LOX expression, induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear envelope, and increased the production of CysLTs. These responses were inhibited by zileuton. Rotenone also increased CysLT(1)R expression and induced nuclear translocation of CysLT(1)R. In primary rat microglia, rotenone (10 nM) increased release of IL-1β and TNF-α, whereas zileuton (0.1 μΜ) and montelukast (0.01 μΜ) significantly inhibited this response. These results indicated that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R might be key regulators of microglial activation induced by low concentration of rotenone. Interference of 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway may be an effective therapeutic strategy for microglial inflammation. PMID:24858057

  7. Selective Cannabinoid Receptor-1 Agonists Regulate Mast Cell Activation in an Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gaewon; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Park, Bu Man; Lee, Sin Hee; Kim, Hyun Jong; Hong, Seung-Phil; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Many inflammatory mediators, including various cytokines (e.g. interleukins and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]), inflammatory proteases, and histamine are released following mast cell activation. However, the endogenous modulators for mast cell activation and the underlying mechanism have yet to be elucidated. Endogenous cannabinoids such as palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide or AEA), were found in peripheral tissues and have been proposed to possess autacoid activity, implying that cannabinoids may downregulate mast cell activation and local inflammation. Objective In order to investigate the effect of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) agonists on mast cell activation, AEA-derived compounds were newly synthesized and evaluated for their effect on mast cell activation. Methods The effects of selected compounds on FcεRI-induced histamine and β-hexosaminidase release were evaluated in a rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3). To further investigate the inhibitory effects of CB1R agonist in vivo, an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis mouse model was exploited. Results We found that CB1R inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators without causing cytotoxicity in RBL-2H3 cells and that CB1R agonists markedly and dose-dependently suppressed mast cell proliferation indicating that CB1R plays an important role in modulating antigen-dependent immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated mast cell activation. We also found that topical application of CB1R agonists suppressed the recruitment of mast cells into the skin and reduced the level of blood histamine. Conclusion Our results indicate that CB1R agonists down-regulate mast cell activation and may be used for relieving inflammatory symptoms mediated by mast cell activation, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis. PMID:26848215

  8. Estrogen Receptor β Activation Rapidly Modulates Male Sexual Motivation through the Transactivation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1a.

    PubMed

    Seredynski, Aurore L; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F; Cornil, Charlotte A

    2015-09-23

    In addition to the transcriptional activity of their liganded nuclear receptors, estrogens, such as estradiol (E2), modulate cell functions, and consequently physiology and behavior, within minutes through membrane-initiated events. The membrane-associated receptors (mERs) underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. We determined here, by acute intracerebroventricular injections of specific agonists and antagonists, the type(s) of mERs that modulate rapid effects of brain-derived estrogens on sexual motivation in male Japanese quail. Brain aromatase blockade acutely inhibited sexual motivation. Diarylpropionitrile (DPN), an estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-specific agonist, and to a lesser extent 17α-estradiol, possibly acting through ER-X, prevented this effect. In contrast, drugs targeting ERα (PPT and MPP), GPR30 (G1 and G15), and the Gq-mER (STX) did not affect sexual motivation. The mGluR1a antagonist LY367385 significantly inhibited sexual motivation but mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 antagonists were ineffective. LY367385 also blocked the behavioral restoration induced by E2 or DPN, providing functional evidence that ERβ interacts with metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a (mGluR1a) signaling to acutely regulate male sexual motivation. Together these results show that ERβ plays a key role in sexual behavior regulation and the recently uncovered cooperation between mERs and mGluRs is functional in males where it mediates the acute effects of estrogens produced centrally in response to social stimuli. The presence of an ER-mGluR interaction in birds suggests that this mechanism emerged relatively early in vertebrate history and is well conserved. Significance statement: The membrane-associated receptors underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females, where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. Using acute

  9. Estrogen Receptor β Activation Rapidly Modulates Male Sexual Motivation through the Transactivation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1a

    PubMed Central

    Seredynski, Aurore L.; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the transcriptional activity of their liganded nuclear receptors, estrogens, such as estradiol (E2), modulate cell functions, and consequently physiology and behavior, within minutes through membrane-initiated events. The membrane-associated receptors (mERs) underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. We determined here, by acute intracerebroventricular injections of specific agonists and antagonists, the type(s) of mERs that modulate rapid effects of brain-derived estrogens on sexual motivation in male Japanese quail. Brain aromatase blockade acutely inhibited sexual motivation. Diarylpropionitrile (DPN), an estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-specific agonist, and to a lesser extent 17α-estradiol, possibly acting through ER-X, prevented this effect. In contrast, drugs targeting ERα (PPT and MPP), GPR30 (G1 and G15), and the Gq-mER (STX) did not affect sexual motivation. The mGluR1a antagonist LY367385 significantly inhibited sexual motivation but mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 antagonists were ineffective. LY367385 also blocked the behavioral restoration induced by E2 or DPN, providing functional evidence that ERβ interacts with metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a (mGluR1a) signaling to acutely regulate male sexual motivation. Together these results show that ERβ plays a key role in sexual behavior regulation and the recently uncovered cooperation between mERs and mGluRs is functional in males where it mediates the acute effects of estrogens produced centrally in response to social stimuli. The presence of an ER–mGluR interaction in birds suggests that this mechanism emerged relatively early in vertebrate history and is well conserved. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The membrane-associated receptors underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females, where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. Using acute

  10. Altered Circadian Food Anticipatory Activity Rhythms in PACAP Receptor 1 (PAC1) Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Jens; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Light signals from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) entrain the circadian clock and regulate negative masking. Two neurotransmitters, glutamate and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP), found in the ipRGCs transmit light signals to the brain via glutamate receptors and the specific PACAP type 1 (PAC1) receptor. Light entrainment occurs during the twilight zones and has little effect on clock phase during daytime. When nocturnal animals have access to food only for a few hours during the resting phase at daytime, they adapt behavior to the restricted feeding (RF) paradigm and show food anticipatory activity (FAA). A recent study in mice and rats demonstrating that light regulates FAA prompted us to investigate the role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling in the light mediated regulation of FAA. PAC1 receptor knock out (PAC1-/-) and wild type (PAC1+/+) mice placed in running wheels were examined in a full photoperiod (FPP) of 12:12 h light/dark (LD) and a skeleton photoperiod (SPP) 1:11:1:11 h L:DD:L:DD at 300 and 10 lux light intensity. Both PAC1-/- mice and PAC1+/+ littermates entrained to FPP and SPP at both light intensities. However, when placed in RF with access to food for 4–5 h during the subjective day, a significant change in behavior was observed in PAC1-/- mice compared to PAC1+/+ mice. While PAC1-/- mice showed similar FAA as PAC1+/+ animals in FPP at 300 lux, PAC1-/- mice demonstrated an advanced onset of FAA with a nearly 3-fold increase in amplitude compared to PAC1+/+ mice when placed in SPP at 300 lux. The same pattern of FAA was observed at 10 lux during both FPP and SPP. The present study indicates a role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling during light regulated FAA. Most likely, PACAP found in ipRGCs mediating non-image forming light information to the brain is involved. PMID:26757053

  11. Altered Circadian Food Anticipatory Activity Rhythms in PACAP Receptor 1 (PAC1) Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Light signals from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) entrain the circadian clock and regulate negative masking. Two neurotransmitters, glutamate and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP), found in the ipRGCs transmit light signals to the brain via glutamate receptors and the specific PACAP type 1 (PAC1) receptor. Light entrainment occurs during the twilight zones and has little effect on clock phase during daytime. When nocturnal animals have access to food only for a few hours during the resting phase at daytime, they adapt behavior to the restricted feeding (RF) paradigm and show food anticipatory activity (FAA). A recent study in mice and rats demonstrating that light regulates FAA prompted us to investigate the role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling in the light mediated regulation of FAA. PAC1 receptor knock out (PAC1-/-) and wild type (PAC1+/+) mice placed in running wheels were examined in a full photoperiod (FPP) of 12:12 h light/dark (LD) and a skeleton photoperiod (SPP) 1:11:1:11 h L:DD:L:DD at 300 and 10 lux light intensity. Both PAC1-/- mice and PAC1+/+ littermates entrained to FPP and SPP at both light intensities. However, when placed in RF with access to food for 4-5 h during the subjective day, a significant change in behavior was observed in PAC1-/- mice compared to PAC1+/+ mice. While PAC1-/- mice showed similar FAA as PAC1+/+ animals in FPP at 300 lux, PAC1-/- mice demonstrated an advanced onset of FAA with a nearly 3-fold increase in amplitude compared to PAC1+/+ mice when placed in SPP at 300 lux. The same pattern of FAA was observed at 10 lux during both FPP and SPP. The present study indicates a role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling during light regulated FAA. Most likely, PACAP found in ipRGCs mediating non-image forming light information to the brain is involved. PMID:26757053

  12. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  13. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP3R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP3R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP3R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  14. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    SciTech Connect

    Mochimaru, Yuta; Azuma, Morio; Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kouhei; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Tomura, Hideaki

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved.

  15. Ferulic Acid Exerts Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumor Activity by Targeting Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Song; Lu, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here, we identified ferulic acid as a novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) inhibitor and a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Ferulic acid demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of ferulic acid on different molecular components and found that ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-triggered activation of FGFR1 and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, ferulic acid directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the PI3K-Akt pathway in melanoma cell. In vivo, using a melanoma xenograft model, ferulic acid showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that ferulic acid targets the FGFR1-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of melanoma growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26473837

  16. Differential Conserted Activity Induced Regulation of Nogo Receptors (1–3), LOTUS and Nogo mRNA in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Tobias E.; Koczy, Josefin; Brené, Stefan; Olson, Lars; Josephson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Nogo Receptor 1 (NgR1) mRNA is downregulated in hippocampal and cortical regions by increased neuronal activity such as a kainic acid challenge or by exposing rats to running wheels. Plastic changes in cerebral cortex in response to loss of specific sensory inputs caused by spinal cord injury are also associated with downregulation of NgR1 mRNA. Here we investigate the possible regulation by neuronal activity of the homologous receptors NgR2 and NgR3 as well as the endogenous NgR1 antagonist LOTUS and the ligand Nogo. The investigated genes respond to kainic acid by gene-specific, concerted alterations of transcript levels, suggesting a role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, Downregulation of NgR1, coupled to upregulation of the NgR1 antagonist LOTUS, paired with upregulation of NgR2 and 3 in the dentate gyrus suggest a temporary decrease of Nogo/OMgp sensitivity while CSPG and MAG sensitivity could remain. It is suggested that these activity-synchronized temporary alterations may serve to allow structural alterations at the level of local synaptic circuitry in gray matter, while maintaining white matter pathways and that subsequent upregulation of Nogo-A and NgR1 transcript levels signals the end of such a temporarily opened window of plasticity. PMID:23593344

  17. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish.

    PubMed

    Mochimaru, Yuta; Azuma, Morio; Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kouhei; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Tomura, Hideaki

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. PMID:25576873

  18. Synthetic cannabinoids: In silico prediction of the cannabinoid receptor 1 affinity by a quantitative structure-activity relationship model.

    PubMed

    Paulke, Alexander; Proschak, Ewgenij; Sommer, Kai; Achenbach, Janosch; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-03-14

    The number of new synthetic psychoactive compounds increase steadily. Among the group of these psychoactive compounds, the synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) are most popular and serve as a substitute of herbal cannabis. More than 600 of these substances already exist. For some SCBs the in vitro cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) affinity is known, but for the majority it is unknown. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed, which allows the determination of the SCBs affinity to CB1 (expressed as binding constant (Ki)) without reference substances. The chemically advance template search descriptor was used for vector representation of the compound structures. The similarity between two molecules was calculated using the Feature-Pair Distribution Similarity. The Ki values were calculated using the Inverse Distance Weighting method. The prediction model was validated using a cross validation procedure. The predicted Ki values of some new SCBs were in a range between 20 (considerably higher affinity to CB1 than THC) to 468 (considerably lower affinity to CB1 than THC). The present QSAR model can serve as a simple, fast and cheap tool to get a first hint of the biological activity of new synthetic cannabinoids or of other new psychoactive compounds. PMID:26795018

  19. MMP-9 gene ablation and TIMP-4 mitigate PAR-1-mediated cardiomyocyte dysfunction: a plausible role of dicer and miRNA.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2010-07-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is involved in cardiomyocytes contractility dysfunction, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4 (TIMP-4) mitigates the effect of MMP-9, and proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1, a G-protein couple receptor, GPCR) is involved in the signaling cascade of MMP-9-mediated cardiac dysfunction, the mechanism(s) are unclear. To test the hypothesis that induction of dicer and differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute, in part, to the down regulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase isoform 2a (serca-2a) in MMP-9 and PAR-1-mediated myocytes dysfunction, ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from C57BL/6J mice and treated with 3 ng/ml of MMP-9, 12 ng/ml of TIMP-4, and 10 and 100 microM of PAR-1 antagonist with MMP-9. Specific role of MMP-9 was determined by using MMP-9 knock out (MMP-9KO) and their corresponding control (FVB) mice. Ion Optics video-edge detection system and Fura 2-AM loading were used for determining the contractility and calcium release from cardiomyocytes. Quantitative and semi-quantitative PCR were used to determine the expression of dicer, TIMP-4 and serca-2a. miRNA microarrays were used for assessing the expression of different miRNAs between MMP-9KO and FVB cardiomyocytes. The results suggest that MMP-9 treatment attenuates the voltage-induced contraction of primary cardiomyocytes while TIMP-4, an inhibitor of MMP-9, reverses the inhibition. MMP-9 treatment is also associated with reduced Ca(2+) transients. This effect is blocked by a PAR-1 antagonist, suggesting that PAR-1 mediates this effect. The effect is not as great at high concentrations (100 microM) perhaps due to mild toxicity. The PAR-1 antagonist effect did not affect calcium transients unlike TIMP-4. Interestingly, we show that MMP-KO myocytes contract more rapidly and release more Ca(2+) than FVB. The relevant RNA species serca-2a is induced and dicer is inhibited. There is selective inhibition of miR-376b and over

  20. Structural Insights into the Activation of Human Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 by Small-Molecule Agonists.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Myhr, Courtney; Huang, Zaohua; Xiao, Jingbo; Barnaeva, Elena; Ho, Brian A; Agoulnik, Irina U; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-29

    The GPCR relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) mediates the action of relaxin peptide hormone, including its tissue remodeling and antifibrotic effects. The peptide has a short half-life in plasma, limiting its therapeutic utility. However, small-molecule agonists of human RXFP1 can overcome this limitation and may provide a useful therapeutic approach, especially for chronic diseases such as heart failure and fibrosis. The first small-molecule agonists of RXFP1 were recently identified from a high-throughput screening, using a homogeneous cell-based cAMP assay. Optimization of the hit compounds resulted in a series of highly potent and RXFP1 selective agonists with low cytotoxicity, and excellent in vitro ADME and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we undertook extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies in combination with computational modeling analysis to probe the molecular basis of the small-molecule binding to RXFP1. The results showed that the agonists bind to an allosteric site of RXFP1 in a manner that closely interacts with the seventh transmembrane domain (TM7) and the third extracellular loop (ECL3). Several residues were determined to play an important role in the agonist binding and receptor activation, including a hydrophobic region at TM7 consisting of W664, F668, and L670. The G659/T660 motif within ECL3 is crucial to the observed species selectivity of the agonists for RXFP1. The receptor binding and activation effects by the small molecule ML290 were compared with the cognate ligand, relaxin, providing valuable insights on the structural basis and molecular mechanism of receptor activation and selectivity for RXFP1. PMID:26866459

  1. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) activates cancer-related pathways and is widely expressed in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, V; Ezer, S; Sundman, L; Hagström, J; Remes, S; Söderhäll, C; Greco, D; Dario, G; Haglund, C; Kere, J; Arola, J

    2014-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) arise from disseminated neuroendocrine cells and express general and specific neuroendocrine markers. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) is expressed in neuroendocrine cells and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) affects cell proliferation. Our aim was to study whether NPS/NPSR1 could be used as a biomarker for neuroendocrine neoplasms and to identify the gene pathways affected by NPS/NPSR1. We collected a cohort of NETs comprised of 91 samples from endocrine glands, digestive tract, skin, and lung. Tumor type was validated by immunostaining of chromogranin-A and synaptophysin expression and tumor grade was analyzed by Ki-67 proliferation index. NPS and NPSR1 expression was quantified by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies against NPS and monoclonal antibodies against the amino-terminus and carboxy-terminus of NPSR1 isoform A (NPSR1-A). The effects of NPS on downstream signaling were studied in a human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line which overexpresses NPSR1-A and is of neuroendocrine origin. NPSR1 and NPS were expressed in most NET tissues, with the exception of adrenal pheochromocytomas in which NPS/NPSR1 immunoreactivity was very low. Transcriptome analysis of NPSR1-A overexpressing cells revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, circadian activity, focal adhesion, transforming growth factor beta, and cytokine-cytokine interactions were the most altered gene pathways after NPS stimulation. Our results show that NETs are a source of NPS and NPSR1, and that NPS affects cancer-related pathways. PMID:24915894

  2. Desensitization and internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a following activation of heterologous Gq/11-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Pula, Giordano; McIlhinney, R A Jeffrey; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-06-15

    In this study we characterized the heterologous desensitization and internalization of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) splice variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b following activation of endogenous G(q/11)-coupled receptors in HEK293 cells. Agonist activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine or P2Y1 purinergic receptors triggered the PKC- and CaMKII-dependent internalization of mGluR1a. In co-immunoprecipitation studies, both glutamate and carbachol increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Co-addition of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 blocked the ability of glutamate and carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Glutamate also increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1b, whereas carbachol did not. However, unlike mGluR1a, glutamate-stimulated association of GRK2 with mGluR1b was not reduced by PKC/CaMKII inhibition. Pretreatment of cells expressing mGluR1a or mGluR1b with carbachol rapidly desensitized subsequent glutamate-stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation. The carbachol-induced heterologous desensitization and internalization of mGluR1a was blocked by LY367385, an mGluR1a antagonist with inverse agonist activity. Furthermore, LY367385 blocked the ability of carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. On the other hand, LY367385 had no effect on the carbachol-induced desensitization and internalization of the nonconstitutively active mGluR1b splice variant. These results demonstrate that the internalization of mGluR1a, triggered homologously by glutamate or heterologously by carbachol, is PKC/CaMKII-, GRK2-, arrestin-, and clathrin-dependent and that PKC/CaMKII activation appears to be necessary for GRK2 to associate with mGluR1a. Furthermore, the heterologous desensitization of mGluR1a is dependent upon the splice variant being in an active conformation. PMID:15182196

  3. Activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-1 by FTY720 is neuroprotective after ischemic stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Sozen, Takumi; Rolland, William; Zhang, John H

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose FTY720 is a known sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist. In the present study we investigated the neuroprotective effect of postischemic administration of FTY720 in rats with 2 hours transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Methods One hundred eleven male rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated and MCAO treated with vehicle, 0.25mg/kg and 1mg/kg of FTY720, another selective S1P receptor-1 (S1P1) agonist SEW2871 (5mg/kg), or 0.25mg/kg of FTY720+ a S1P antagonist VPC23019 (0.5mg/kg). Drugs were injected intraperitoneally immediately after reperfusion. Neurological score and infarct volume were assessed at 24 and 72 hours after MCAO. Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5′-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) were conducted at 24 hours after MCAO. Results FTY720 significantly reduced infarct volume and improved neurological score at 24 and 72 hours after MCAO compared with the vehicle group. SEW2871 showed similar neuroprotective effects to FTY720, while VPC 20319 abolished the neuroprotective effects of FTY720. FTY720 significantly retained Akt and extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation and Bcl-2 expression, and decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression and TUNEL-positive neurons at 24 hours after MCAO. VPC23019 blocked the antiapoptotic effects of FTY720. Conclusions These data suggest that activation of S1P1 by FTY720 reduces neuronal death after transient MCAO. PMID:19940275

  4. Streptococcal SpeB Cleaved PAR-1 Suppresses ERK Phosphorylation and Blunts Thrombin-Induced Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Ender, Miriam; Andreoni, Federica; Zinkernagel, Annelies Sophie; Schuepbach, Reto Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background The family of 4 related protease-activated receptors (PAR-1, 2, 3 & 4) expressed by mammalian cells allow to sense for and react to extracellular proteolytic activity. Since major human bacterial pathogens secret a wide array of protease(-s) we investigated whether they interfere with human PAR function. Methodology/Principal Findings Supernatants from cultures of major human bacterial pathogens were assayed for the presence of protease(-s) capable to cleave overexpressed human PAR-1, 2, 3 and 4 reporter constructs. Group A streptococcus (GAS) was found to secret a PAR-1-cleaving protease. Experiments involving genetical and pharmacological gain and loss of function identified streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B SpeB as the protease responsible. On the host’s side analysis of overexpressed PAR-1 carrying alanine substitutions and deletions showed the amino acid residue leucine44 on PAR-1’s extracellular N-terminus to be the only cleavage site. Complementary studies on endogenously expressed PAR-1 using PAR-1 blocking antibodies further supported our conclusion. Through PAR-1 cleavage SpeB efficiently blunted thrombin-induced induction of the ERK-pathway in endothelial cells and prevented platelets aggregation in response to thrombin. Conclusions/Significance Our results identify a novel function of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB. By cleaving human PAR-1 at the N-terminal amino acid residue leucine44 SpeB rendered endothelial cells unresponsive to thrombin and prevented human platelets from thrombin-induced aggregation. These results suggest that by blunting PAR-1 signaling, SpeB modulates various innate host responses directed against invasive GAS potentially helping the invasive bacteria to escape. This may allow to tailor additional treatments in the future since upon invasion of the blood stream endothelial cells as well as platelets and mononuclear cells respond to PAR-1 agonists aiming to prevent further bacterial dissemination. PMID

  5. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 is principally responsible for fibroblast growth factor 2-induced catabolic activities in human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cartilage degeneration driven by catabolic stimuli is a critical pathophysiological process in osteoarthritis (OA). We have defined fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) as a degenerative mediator in adult human articular chondrocytes. Biological effects mediated by FGF-2 include inhibition of proteoglycan production, up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), and stimulation of other catabolic factors. In this study, we identified the specific receptor responsible for the catabolic functions of FGF-2, and established a pathophysiological connection between the FGF-2 receptor and OA. Methods Primary human articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer (24 hours) or alginate beads (21 days), and stimulated with FGF-2 or FGF18, in the presence or absence of FGFR1 (FGF receptor 1) inhibitor. Proteoglycan accumulation and chondrocyte proliferation were assessed by dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and DNA assay, respectively. Expression of FGFRs (FGFR1 to FGFR4) was assessed by flow cytometry, immunoblotting, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The distinctive roles of FGFR1 and FGFR3 after stimulation with FGF-2 were evaluated using either pharmacological inhibitors or FGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA). Luciferase reporter gene assays were used to quantify the effects of FGF-2 and FGFR1 inhibitor on MMP-13 promoter activity. Results Chondrocyte proliferation was significantly enhanced in the presence of FGF-2 stimulation, which was inhibited by the pharmacological inhibitor of FGFR1. Proteoglycan accumulation was reduced by 50% in the presence of FGF-2, and this reduction was successfully rescued by FGFR1 inhibitor. FGFR1 inhibitors also fully reversed the up-regulation of MMP-13 expression and promoter activity stimulated by FGF-2. Blockade of FGFR1 signaling by either chemical inhibitors or siRNA targeting FGFR1 rather than FGFR3 abrogated the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 13 (MMP-13) and a disintegrin and

  6. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activation suppresses alpha2beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through inhibition of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wang, Chau-Zen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Upregulation and overexpression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) have been implied in the regulation of kidney development and progression of cancers. Our previous studies with Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells showed that overexpression of DDR1 inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative DDR1 promoted cell spreading on collagen-coated dish. Cell spreading is an important characteristic for cell differentiation and survival. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of DDR1 in cell spreading. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of DDR1 consisting of Cdc42 that regulates the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeleton and cell spreading in MDCK cells. Cell spreading involves the organization of cytoskeleton that is mainly regulated by Rho-family GTPases. We assessed the activity of Rho-family GTPases and transfected MDCK cells with constitutively active or dominant negative GTPases, and quantified the extent of cell spreading. These results showed that DDR1 decreased the filamentous actin ratio and Rac1/Cdc42 activities, but had no effects on RhoA activity. Neither constitutively active nor dominant negative Rac1 altered DDR1-inhibited cell spreading. Constitutively active Cdc42 could rescue the DDR1-inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative Cdc42 inhibited cell spreading, indicating that DDR1-inhibited cell spreading is Cdc42 dependent. With the use of alpha(2)beta(1) integrin blocking antibody, we showed that collagen-induced Cdc42 activation was mediated by alpha(2)beta(1) integrin. Moreover, ectopic FAK expression enhanced the Cdc42 activity. Reducing FAK activity by dominant negative FAK (FRNK) markedly abolished the Cdc42 activity. These findings show that DDR1a/b activation inhibits cell spreading through suppressing alpha(2)beta(1) integrin-mediated Cdc42 activation. PMID:18780290

  7. Crystal Structure of Thrombin Bound to the Uncleaved Extracellular Fragment of PAR1

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Prafull S.; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico

    2010-05-11

    Abundant structural information exists on how thrombin recognizes ligands at the active site or at exosites separate from the active site region, but remarkably little is known about how thrombin recognizes substrates that bridge both the active site and exosite I. The case of the protease-activated receptor PAR1 is particularly relevant in view of the plethora of biological effects associated with its activation by thrombin. Here, we present the 1.8 {angstrom} resolution structure of thrombin S195A in complex with a 30-residue long uncleaved extracellular fragment of PAR1 that documents for the first time a productive binding mode bridging the active site and exosite I. The structure reveals two unexpected features of the thrombin-PAR1 interaction. The acidic P3 residue of PAR1, Asp{sup 39}, does not hinder binding to the active site and actually makes favorable interactions with Gly{sup 219} of thrombin. The tethered ligand domain shows a considerable degree of disorder even when bound to thrombin. The results fill a significant gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of recognition by thrombin in ways that are relevant to other physiological substrates.

  8. Predicted PAR1 inhibitors from multiple computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2016-08-01

    Multiple computational approaches are employed in order to find potentially strong binders of PAR1 from the two molecular databases: the Specs database containing more than 200,000 commercially available molecules and the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database. By combining the use of popular docking scoring functions together with detailed molecular dynamics simulation and protein-ligand free energy calculations, a total of fourteen molecules are found to be potentially strong binders of PAR1. The atomic details in protein-ligand interactions of these molecules with PAR1 are analyzed to help understand the binding mechanism which should be very useful in design of new drugs.

  9. PAR-1 antagonist SCH79797 ameliorates apoptosis following surgical brain injury through inhibition of ASK1-JNK in rats

    PubMed Central

    Manaenko, Anatol; Sun, Xuejun; Kim, Cherine; Yan, Junhao; Ma, Qingyi

    2012-01-01

    Neurosurgical procedures inevitably produce intraoperative hemorrhage. The subsequent entry of blood into the brain parenchyma results in the release of large amounts of thrombin, a known contributor to perihematomal edema formation and apoptosis after brain injury. The present study seeks to test 1) the effect of surgically induced brain injury (SBI) on thrombin activity, expression of thrombin’s receptor PAR-1, and PAR-1 mediated apoptosis; 2) the effect of thrombin inhibition by argatroban and PAR-1 inhibition by SCH79797 on the development of secondary brain injury in the SBI model on rats. A total of 88 Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle-, argatroban-, or SCH79797-treated groups. SBI involved partial resection of the right frontal lobe under inhalation isoflurane anesthesia. Sham-operated animals received only craniotomy. Thrombin activity, brain water content, and neurological deficits were measured at 24 hours following SBI. Involvement of the Ask1/JNK pathway in PAR-1-induced post-SBI apoptosis was characterized by using Ask1 or JNK inhibitors. We observed that SBI increased thrombin activity, yet failed to demonstrate any effect on PAR-1 expression. Argatroban and SCH79797 reduced SBI-induced brain edema and neurological deficits in a dose-dependent manner. SBI-induced apoptosis seemed mediated by the PAR-1/Ask1/JNK pathways. Administration of SCH79797 ameliorated the apoptosis following SBI. Our finding indicate that PAR-1 antagonist protects against secondary brain injury after SBI by decreasing both brain edema and apoptosis by inactivating PAR-1/Ask1/JNK pathway. The anti-apoptotic effect of PAR-1 antagonists may provide a promising path for therapy following SBI. PMID:23000356

  10. A novel signaling pathway of tissue kallikrein in promoting keratinocyte migration: Activation of proteinase-activated receptor 1 and epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2010-02-01

    Biological functions of tissue kallikrein (TK, KLK1) are mainly mediated by kinin generation and subsequent kinin B2 receptor activation. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TK and its signaling pathways in cultured human keratinocyte migration and in a rat skin wound healing model. Herein, we show that TK promoted cell migration and proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Inactive TK or kinin had no significant effect on cell migration. Interestingly, cell migration induced by active TK was not blocked by icatibant or L-NAME, indicating an event independent of kinin B2 receptor and nitric oxide formation. TK's stimulatory effect on cell migration was inhibited by small interfering RNA for proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR{sub 1}), and by PAR{sub 1} inhibitor. TK-induced migration was associated with increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which was blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC), Src, EGFR and ERK. TK-induced cell migration and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked by metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, heparin, and antibodies against EGFR external domain, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and amphiregulin (AR). Local application of TK promoted skin wound healing in rats, whereas icatibant and EGFR inhibitor blocked TK's effect. Skin wound healing was further delayed by aprotinin and neutralizing TK antibody. This study demonstrates a novel role of TK in skin wound healing and uncovers new signaling pathways mediated by TK in promoting keratinocyte migration through activation of the PAR{sub 1}-PKC-Src-MMP pathway and HB-EGF/AR shedding-dependent EGFR transactivation.

  11. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of novel phenoxyacetamide-based free fatty acid receptor 1 agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Xuekun; Xu, Xue; Yang, Jianyong; Qiu, Qianqian; Qiang, Hao; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-10-15

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1) has attracted extensive attention as a novel antidiabetic target in the last decade. Several FFA1 agonists reported in the literature have been suffered from relatively high molecular weight and lipophilicity. We have previously reported the FFA1 agonist 1. Based on the common amide structural characteristic of SAR1 and NIH screened compound, we here describe the continued structure-activity exploration to decrease the molecular weight and lipophilicity of the compound 1 series by converting various amide linkers. All of these efforts lead to the discovery of the preferable lead compound 18, a compound with considerable agonistic activity, high LE and LLE values, lower lipophilicity than previously reported agonists, and appreciable efficacy on glucose tolerance in both normal and type 2 diabetic mice. PMID:26420383

  12. Ubiquitin plays an atypical role in GPCR-induced p38 MAP kinase activation on endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grimsey, Neil J.; Aguilar, Berenice; Smith, Thomas H.; Le, Phillip; Soohoo, Amanda L.; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin and promotes inflammatory responses through multiple pathways including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. The mechanisms that govern PAR1-induced p38 activation remain unclear. Here, we define an atypical ubiquitin-dependent pathway for p38 activation used by PAR1 that regulates endothelial barrier permeability. Activated PAR1 K63-linked ubiquitination is mediated by the NEDD4-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and initiated recruitment of transforming growth factor-β–activated protein kinase-1 binding protein-2 (TAB2). The ubiquitin-binding domain of TAB2 was essential for recruitment to PAR1-containing endosomes. TAB2 associated with TAB1, which induced p38 activation independent of MKK3 and MKK6. The P2Y1 purinergic GPCR also stimulated p38 activation via NEDD4-2–mediated ubiquitination and TAB1–TAB2. TAB1–TAB2-dependent p38 activation was critical for PAR1-promoted endothelial barrier permeability in vitro, and p38 signaling was required for PAR1-induced vascular leakage in vivo. These studies define an atypical ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway used by a subset of GPCRs that regulates endosomal p38 signaling and endothelial barrier disruption. PMID:26391660

  13. c-mos and cdc2 Cooperate in the Translational Activation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 during Xenopus Oocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Culp, Patricia A.; Musci, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    During oocyte maturation in Xenopus, previously quiescent maternal mRNAs are translationally activated at specific times. We hypothesized that the translational recruitment of individual messages is triggered by particular cellular events and investigated the potential for known effectors of the meiotic cell cycle to activate the translation of the FGF receptor-1 (XFGFR) maternal mRNA. We found that both c-mos and cdc2 activate the translation of XFGFR. However, although oocytes matured by injection of recombinant cdc2/cyclin B translate normal levels of XFGFR protein, c-mos depletion reduces the level of XFGFR protein induced by cdc2/cyclin B injection. In oocytes blocked for cdc2 activity, injection of mos RNA induced low levels of XFGFR protein, independent of MAPK activity. Through the use of injected reporter RNAs, we show that the XFGFR 3′ untranslated region inhibitory element is completely derepressed by cdc2 alone. In addition, we identified a new inhibitory element through which both mos and cdc2 activate translation. We found that cdc2 derepresses translation in the absence of polyadenylation, whereas mos requires poly(A) extension to activate XFGFR translation. Our results demonstrate that mos and cdc2, in addition to functioning as key regulators of the meiotic cell cycle, cooperate in the translational activation of a specific maternal mRNA during oocyte maturation. PMID:10564256

  14. CRF receptor 1 antagonism and brain distribution of active components contribute to the ameliorative effect of rikkunshito on stress-induced anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Mogami, Sachiko; Sadakane, Chiharu; Nahata, Miwa; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Yamada, Chihiro; Hattori, Tomohisa; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Rikkunshito (RKT), a Kampo medicine, has been reported to show an ameliorative effect on sustained hypophagia after novelty stress exposure in aged mice through serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) antagonism. We aimed to determine (1) whether the activation of anorexigenic neurons, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, is involved in the initiation of hypophagia induced by novelty stress in aged mice; (2) whether the ameliorative effect of RKT is associated with CRF and POMC neurons and downstream signal transduction; and (3) the plasma and brain distribution of the active components of RKT. The administration of RKT or 5-HT2CR, CRF receptor 1 (CRFR1), and melanocortin-4 receptor antagonists significantly restored the decreased food intake observed in aged male C57BL/6 mice in the early stage after novelty stress exposure. Seven components of RKT exhibited antagonistic activity against CRFR1. Hesperetin and isoliquiritigenin, which showed antagonistic effects against both CRFR1 and 5-HT2CR, were distributed in the plasma and brain of male Sprague-Dawley rats after a single oral administration of RKT. In conclusion, the ameliorative effect of RKT in this model is assumed to be at least partly due to brain-distributed active components possessing 5-HT2CR and CRFR1 antagonistic activities. PMID:27273195

  15. CRF receptor 1 antagonism and brain distribution of active components contribute to the ameliorative effect of rikkunshito on stress-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Sachiko; Sadakane, Chiharu; Nahata, Miwa; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Yamada, Chihiro; Hattori, Tomohisa; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Rikkunshito (RKT), a Kampo medicine, has been reported to show an ameliorative effect on sustained hypophagia after novelty stress exposure in aged mice through serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) antagonism. We aimed to determine (1) whether the activation of anorexigenic neurons, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, is involved in the initiation of hypophagia induced by novelty stress in aged mice; (2) whether the ameliorative effect of RKT is associated with CRF and POMC neurons and downstream signal transduction; and (3) the plasma and brain distribution of the active components of RKT. The administration of RKT or 5-HT2CR, CRF receptor 1 (CRFR1), and melanocortin-4 receptor antagonists significantly restored the decreased food intake observed in aged male C57BL/6 mice in the early stage after novelty stress exposure. Seven components of RKT exhibited antagonistic activity against CRFR1. Hesperetin and isoliquiritigenin, which showed antagonistic effects against both CRFR1 and 5-HT2CR, were distributed in the plasma and brain of male Sprague-Dawley rats after a single oral administration of RKT. In conclusion, the ameliorative effect of RKT in this model is assumed to be at least partly due to brain-distributed active components possessing 5-HT2CR and CRFR1 antagonistic activities. PMID:27273195

  16. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from Different Mammalian Species by Relaxin Peptide and Small-Molecule Agonist ML290

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zaohua; Myhr, Courtney; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Ho, Brian A.; Bueno, Amaya; Hu, Xin; Xiao, Jingbo; Southall, Noel; Barnaeva, Elena; Agoulnik, Irina U.; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Agoulnik, Alexander I.

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptide (RLN), which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1) GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small-molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the seven-transmembrane domain (7TM). Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the fourth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit RLNs. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled RLN to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species, RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit–human and guinea pig–human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing. PMID:26347712

  17. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from Different Mammalian Species by Relaxin Peptide and Small-Molecule Agonist ML290.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaohua; Myhr, Courtney; Bathgate, Ross A D; Ho, Brian A; Bueno, Amaya; Hu, Xin; Xiao, Jingbo; Southall, Noel; Barnaeva, Elena; Agoulnik, Irina U; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptide (RLN), which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1) GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small-molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the seven-transmembrane domain (7TM). Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the fourth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit RLNs. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled RLN to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species, RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit-human and guinea pig-human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing. PMID:26347712

  18. Cannabinoid receptor 1 induces a biphasic ERK activation via multiprotein signaling complex formation of proximal kinases PKCε, Src, and Fyn in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Asimaki, Olga; Mangoura, Dimitra

    2011-02-01

    Cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1Rs) play important roles in the regulation of dendritic branching, synapse density, and synaptic transmission through multiple G-protein-coupled signaling systems, including the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2. The proximal signaling interactions leading to ERK1/2 activation by CB1R in CNS remain, however, unclear. Here, we present evidence that the CB1R agonist methanandamide induced a biphasic and sustained activation of ERK1/2 in primary neurons derived from E7 telencephalon. We show that E7 neurons natively express high levels of CB1R message and protein, the majority of which associates with PKCɛ at basal conditions. We now demonstrate that the first peak of ERK activation by CB1R was mediated by the sequential activation of G(q), PLC, and PKCɛ, selectively, and that the CB1R-activated PKCɛ acutely formed transient signaling modules containing activated Src and Fyn. A second pool of CB1Rs, coupled to PTX-sensitive activation of G(i/o), utilized as effectors additional Src and Fyn molecules to generate a second, additional wave of ERK activation at 15 min. Concurrently to these intermolecular signaling interactions, cytoskeleton-associated proteins MARCKS and p120catenin were drastically modified by phosphorylation of PKC and Src, respectively. These receptor-proximal signaling events correlated well with induction of neuritic outgrowth in the long term. Our data provide evidence for multiprotein signaling complex formation in the coupling of CB1R to activation of ERK in CNS neurons, and may elucidate several of the less understood acute effects of cannabinoid drugs. PMID:21074588

  19. Activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-1 by SEW2871 improves cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease model rats

    PubMed Central

    Asle-Rousta, Masoumeh; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Rahnema, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) is involved in a variety of cellular processes via activation of S1P receptors (S1PRs; S1PR1 to S1PR5) that are highly expressed in the brain. It has been shown that the level of S1P is reduced in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. However, there is no study designed to evaluate the expression of S1PRs in AD brains. The objectives of the present work are (1) to examine the expression of S1PR1-3 in the hippocampus of beta amyloid (Aβ) 1-42 injected rats and (2) to clarify the effects of chronic S1PR1 activation on S1PR1-3 levels, spatial memory deficit and hippocampal damage in AD rats. SEW2871, the S1PR1 selective agonist, repeatedly was injected intraperitoneally during a period of two weeks. Upon Western Blot data bilateral intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 decreased the expression of S1PR1 while increased S1PR2 level and did not affect that of S1PR3. We found that chronic administration of SEW2871 inhibited the reduction of S1PR1 expression and ameliorated spatial memory impairment in the Morris water maze task in rats. In addition, SEW2871 attenuated the Aβ1-42-induced hippocampal neuronal loss according to Nissl staining findings. Data in the current study highlights the importance of S1PR1 signaling pathway deregulation in AD development and suggests that activation of S1PR1 may represent a potential approach for developing new therapeutics to manage memory deficit and apoptosis associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:26417237

  20. Activation of central CRF receptor 1 by cortagine results in enhanced passive coping with a naturalistic threat in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tovote, Philip; Farrokhi, Catherine Borna; Gonzales, Rachael M. K.; Schnitzbauer, Udo; Blanchard, D. Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J.; Spiess, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Summary CRF receptor subtype 1 (CRF1), abundantly expressed in the central nervous system, has been implicated in defensive behavior in rodents. Pharmacological activation of CRF1 by peptidic agonists results in enhancement of anxiety-like behavior. However, receptor specificity of commonly used agonists was confounded by significant affinity to other receptors and widely used laboratory tests of experimental anxiety suffer from artificial aversive stimulation (e.g. electric shock), and limited measures of anxiety-like behavior. We used the recently developed, CRF1-selective agonist cortagine in a mouse model of defensive behaviors under semi-natural conditions, the Rat Exposure Test (RET). Cortagine was injected bilaterally into the cerebral ventricles (i.c.v.) of male C57Bl/6J mice, 20 min before exposure to a rat in specifically designed box that evokes a wide variety of defensive behaviors such as active/passive avoidance, freezing, risk assessment, and burying. Pre-injection of the CRF receptor antagonist acidic astressin was used to test for receptor specificity of the observed cortagine effects. A control experiment with no rat present was performed to test for baseline effects of cortagine in the exposure setup. Cortagine dose-dependently enhanced passive avoidance and freezing while burying was decreased. CRF receptor antagonism reliably blocked the effects of cortagine. Our results confirm previous findings of anxiogenic-like effects of cortagine, and demonstrate the usefulness of the RET in investigating differential pattering of drug-induced anxiety-like behavior in mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that CRF1 activation in forebrain areas promotes passive coping with the natural threat presented in the RET. PMID:20036073

  1. 1,2-Naphthoquinone activates vanilloid receptor 1 through increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to contraction of guinea pig trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuno, Shota; Taguchi, Keiko; Iwamoto, Noriko; Yamano, Shigeru; Cho, Arthur K.; Froines, John R.; Kumagai, Yoshito . E-mail: yk-em-tu@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-01-15

    1,2-Naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) has recently been identified as an environmental quinone in diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and atmospheric PM{sub 2.5}. We have found that this quinone is capable of causing a concentration-dependent contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in guinea pigs with EC{sub 5} value of 18.7 {mu}M. The contraction required extracellular calcium and was suppressed by L-type calcium channel blockers nifedipine and diltiazem. It was found that 1,2-NQ activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2)/lipoxygenase (LO)/vanilloid receptor (VR1) signaling. Additionally, 1,2-NQ was capable of transactivating protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in guinea pig trachea, suggesting that phosphorylation of PTKs contributes to 1,2-NQ-induced tracheal contraction. Consistent with this notion, this action was blocked by the PTKs inhibitor genistein and the EGFR antagonist PD153035, indicating that contraction was, at least in part, attributable to PTKs phosphorylation that activates VR1, resulting in increased intracellular calcium content in the smooth muscle cells.

  2. Ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 induced by protein synthesis inhibitors regulates TNF-{alpha}-mediated activation of NF-{kappa}B and caspase-8

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Hirotsugu; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Sugimoto, Hikaru; Igarashi, Masayuki; Nagai, Kazuo; Kataoka, Takao

    2008-04-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) plays a major role in the inducible resistance to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. It has been established that the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) sensitizes many types of cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced apoptosis, mainly due to its ability to block de novo synthesis of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). Nevertheless, we have surprisingly found that CHX, as well as its structural analogue acetoxycycloheximide (Ac-CHX), prevents TNF-{alpha}-mediated activation of NF-{kappa}B and caspase-8 in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Both CHX and Ac-CHX reduced the expression of cell surface TNF receptor 1 (TNF-R1) in a dose-dependent manner, while Ac-CHX was approximately 100-fold more effective than CHX. Consistent with this observation, Ac-CHX induced the proteolytic cleavage of TNF-R1 and its release into the culture medium. CHX and Ac-CHX profoundly decreased constitutive and inducible expression of c-FLIP, whereas these compounds potentiated TNF-{alpha}-induced caspase-8 activation only when metalloprotease inhibitors were present. Thus, our results indicate that ectodomain shedding of TNF-R1 induced by protein synthesis inhibitors regulates TNF-{alpha}-mediated activation of NF-{kappa}B and caspase-8.

  3. Activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER-1) ameliorates blood-brain barrier permeability after global cerebral ischemia in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Qu, Yan; Shi, Fei; Feng, Dayun; Tao, Kai; Gao, Guodong; He, Shiming; Zhao, Tianzhi

    2016-08-19

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER-1) plays important roles in estrogen-mediated neuroprotection. However, protective effects of GPER-1 on blood-brain barrier (BBB) after ischemic stroke have not been determined. The aim of present study was to determine whether GPER-1 activation ameliorates BBB permeability in ovariectomized rats with induced global cerebral ischemia (GCI). GCI was induced by 4-vessel occlusion for 20 min followed by 24 h reperfusion period. The GPER-1 agonist (G1) was bilaterally administered immediately upon reperfusion by intracerebroventricular (icv) injection. We found that the GPER-1 agonist could significantly decrease immunoglobulin G (IgG) extravasation and increase the levels of tight junctions (occludin and claudin-5) in the CA1 at 24 h of reperfusion after GCI. Further, protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) was significantly decreased in the ischemic CA1 by G1. Our results suggest that GPER-1 activation reduce tight junctions disruption via inhibition of VEGF-A expression after ischemic injury. PMID:27311857

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 activation during exposure to novelty stress protects against Alzheimer's disease-like cognitive decline in AβPP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Gillian A; Hewitt, Katherine N; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    A lifestyle rich in physical and mental activities protects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have proposed that this is mediated by a stress response and have shown that repeated exposure to novelty stress, which induces physical and exploratory activities, delays the progression of AD-like pathology in the TASTPM mouse model. Here, we aimed to establish the role played by corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1), a major component of the stress axis, in TASTPM's behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to novelty and related protective effects. We show that the stress response of TASTPM mice is altered with reduced CRFR1-mediated neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to novelty and a distinct profile of behavioral responses. Repeated novelty-induced CRFR1 activation, however, mediated the improved contextual fear memory and extinction performance of TASTPM mice and increased hippocampal and fronto-cortical levels of synaptophysin, a marker of synaptic density, and fronto-cortical levels of the post-synaptic marker PSD95. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is the major receptor for synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory. Although novelty-induced NMDAR activation contributed to enhancement of fear memory and synaptophysin levels, antagonism of CRFR1 and NMDAR prevented the novelty-induced increase in hippocampal synaptophysin levels but reversed the other effects of CRFR1 inactivation, i.e., the enhancement of contextual fear extinction and fronto-cortical synaptophysin and PSD95 levels. These findings suggest a novel mechanism whereby a stimulating environment can delay AD symptoms through CRFR1 activation, facilitating NMDAR-mediated synaptic plasticity and synaptogenesis in a region-dependent manner, either directly, or indirectly, by modulating PSD95. PMID:23302658

  5. A Par-1-Par-3-Centrosome Cell Polarity Pathway and Its Tuning for Isotropic Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; McKinley, R F Andrew; McGill, Melanie A; Angers, Stephane; Harris, Tony J C

    2015-10-19

    To form regulated barriers between body compartments, epithelial cells polarize into apical and basolateral domains and assemble adherens junctions (AJs). Despite close links with polarity networks that generate single polarized domains, AJs distribute isotropically around the cell circumference for adhesion with all neighboring cells [1-3]. How AJs avoid the influence of polarity networks to maintain their isotropy has been unclear. In established epithelia, trans cadherin interactions could maintain AJ isotropy [4], but AJs are dynamic during epithelial development and remodeling [5, 6], and thus specific mechanisms may control their isotropy. In Drosophila, aPKC prevents hyper-polarization of junctions as epithelia develop from cellularization to gastrulation [7]. Here, we show that aPKC does so by inhibiting a positive feedback loop between Bazooka (Baz)/Par-3, a junctional organizer [5, 8-10], and centrosomes. Without aPKC, Baz and centrosomes lose their isotropic distributions and recruit each other to single plasma membrane (PM) domains. Surprisingly, our loss- and gain-of-function analyses show that the Baz-centrosome positive feedback loop is driven by Par-1, a kinase known to phosphorylate Baz and inhibit its basolateral localization [8, 11, 12]. We find that Par-1 promotes the positive feedback loop through both centrosome microtubule effects and Baz phosphorylation. Normally, aPKC attenuates the circuit by expelling Par-1 from the apical domain at gastrulation. The combination of local activation and global inhibition is a common polarization strategy [13-16]. Par-1 seems to couple both effects for a potent Baz polarization mechanism that is regulated for the isotropy of Baz and AJs around the cell circumference. PMID:26455305

  6. Design, synthesis and Structure-activity relationship studies of new thiazole-based free fatty acid receptor 1 agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Qiu, Qianqian; Xu, Xue; Wang, Xuekun; Jiao, Lei; Su, Xin; Pan, Miaobo; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2016-05-01

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1/GPR40) has attracted interest as a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Several series of FFA1 agonists including TAK-875, the most advanced compound terminated in phase III studies due to concerns about liver toxicity, have been hampered by relatively high molecular weight and lipophilicity. Aiming to develop potent FFA1 agonists with low risk of liver toxicity by decreasing the lipophilicity, the middle phenyl of TAK-875 was replaced by 11 polar five-membered heteroaromatics. Subsequently, systematic exploration of SAR and application of molecular modeling, leads to the identification of compound 44, which was an excellent FFA1 agonist with robustly hypoglycemic effect both in normal and type 2 diabetic mice, low risks of hypoglycemia and liver toxicity even at the twice molar dose of TAK-875. Meanwhile, two important findings were noted. First, the methyl group in our thiazole series occupied a small hydrophobic subpocket which had no interactions with TAK-875. Furthermore, the agonistic activity revealed a good correlation with the dihedral angle between thiazole core and the terminal benzene ring. These results promote the understanding of ligand-binding pocket and might help to design more promising FFA1 agonists. PMID:26945112

  7. REPEATED ANABOLIC/ANDROGENIC STEROID EXPOSURE DURING ADOLESCENCE ALTERS PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE AND GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR 1 SUBUNIT IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN HAMSTER BRAIN: CORRELATION WITH OFFENSIVE AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Shannon G.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with moderately high doses (5.0mg/kg/day) of anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27–P56) display highly escalated offensive aggression. The current study examined whether adolescent AAS-exposure influenced the immunohistochemical localization of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glutamate, a fast-acting neurotransmitter implicated in the modulation of aggression in various species and models of aggression, as well as glutamate receptor 1 subunit (GluR1). Hamsters were administered AAS during adolescence, scored for offensive aggression using the resident-intruder paradigm, and then examined for changes in PAG and GluR1 immunoreactivity in areas of the brain implicated in aggression control. When compared with sesame oil-treated control animals, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters displayed a significant increase in the number of PAG- and area density of GluR1- containing neurons in several notable aggression regions, although the differential pattern of expression did not appear to overlap across brain regions. Together, these results suggest that altered glutamate synthesis and GluR1 receptor expression in specific aggression areas may be involved in adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. PMID:17418431

  8. Selective activation of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 decreases cocaine's reinforcing efficacy and prevents cocaine-induced changes in brain reward thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yue; Mortas, Patrick; Hoener, Marius C; Canales, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has emerged as a promising target for medication development in stimulant addiction due to its ability to regulate dopamine (DA) function and modulate stimulants' effects. Recent findings indicate that TAAR1 activation blocks some of the abuse-related physiological and behavioral effects of cocaine. However, findings from existing self-administration studies are inconclusive due to the very limited range of cocaine unit doses tested. Here, in order to shed light on the influence of TAAR1 on cocaine's reward and reinforcement, we studied the effects of partial and full activation of TAAR1on (1) the dose-response curve for cocaine self-administration and (2) cocaine-induced changes in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the first experiment, we examined the effects of the selective full and partial TAAR1 agonists, RO5256390 and RO5203648, on self-administration of five unit-injection doses of cocaine (0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.45, and 1mg/kg/infusion). Both agonists induced dose-dependent downward shifts in the cocaine dose-response curve, indicating that both partial and full TAAR1 activation decrease cocaine, reinforcing efficacy. In the second experiment, RO5256390 and the partial agonist, RO5263397, dose-dependently prevented cocaine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TAAR1 stimulation effectively suppresses the rewarding and reinforcing effects of cocaine in self-administration and ICSS models, supporting the candidacy of TAAR1 as a drug discovery target for cocaine addiction. PMID:26048337

  9. Decreased dopamine receptor 1 activity and impaired motor-skill transfer in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai T.; Liu, Jun; Gandre, Jason R.; Kwon, Kelly; Yuen, Robert; Li, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a movement disorder caused by a trinucleotide deletion (ΔGAG) in DYT1 (TOR1A), corresponding to a glutamic acid loss in the C-terminal region of torsinA. Functional alterations in the basal ganglia circuits have been reported in both DYT1 dystonia patients and rodent models. Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in (KI) mice exhibit motor deficits and decreased striatal dopamine receptor 2 (D2R) binding activity, suggesting a malfunction of the indirect pathway. However, the role of the direct pathway in pathogenesis of dystonia is not yet clear. Here, we report that Dyt1 KI mice exhibit significantly decreased striatal dopamine receptor 1 (D1R) binding activity and D1R protein levels, suggesting the alteration of the direct pathway. The decreased D1R may be caused by translational or post-translational processes since Dyt1 KI mice had normal levels of striatal D1R mRNA and a normal number of striatal neurons expressing D1R. Levels of striatal ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, dopamine transporter, acetylcholine muscarinic M4 receptor and adenosine A2A receptor were not altered suggesting a specificity of affected polytopic membrane-associated proteins. Contribution of the direct pathway to motor-skill learning has been suggested in another pharmacological rat model injected with a D1R antagonist. In the present study, we developed a novel motor skill transfer test for mice and found deficits in Dyt1 KI mice. Further characterization of both the direct and the indirect pathways in Dyt1 KI mice will aid the development of novel therapeutic drugs. PMID:25451552

  10. PAR-3 and PAR-1 Inhibit LET-99 Localization to Generate a Cortical Band Important for Spindle Positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Ching

    2007-01-01

    The conserved PAR proteins are localized in asymmetric cortical domains and are required for the polarized localization of cell fate determinants in many organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, LET-99 and G protein signaling act downstream of the PARs to regulate spindle positioning and ensure asymmetric division. PAR-3 and PAR-2 localize LET-99 to a posterior cortical band through an unknown mechanism. Here we report that LET-99 asymmetry depends on cortically localized PAR-1 and PAR-4 but not on cytoplasmic polarity effectors. In par-1 and par-4 embryos, LET-99 accumulates at the entire posterior cortex, but remains at low levels at the anterior cortex occupied by PAR-3. Further, PAR-3 and PAR-1 have graded cortical distributions with the highest levels at the anterior and posterior poles, respectively, and the lowest levels of these proteins correlate with high LET-99 accumulation. These results suggest that PAR-3 and PAR-1 inhibit the localization of LET-99 to generate a band pattern. In addition, PAR-1 kinase activity is required for the inhibition of LET-99 localization, and PAR-1 associates with LET-99. Finally, examination of par-1 embryos suggests that the banded pattern of LET-99 is critical for normal posterior spindle displacement and to prevent spindle misorientation caused by cell shape constraints. PMID:17761536

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  12. Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels by Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 and Receptor-2 in Small DRG Neurons of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leo, M.; Argalski, S.; Schäfers, M.; Hagenacker, T.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Its effects are mediated by two receptors, TNF receptor-1 (TNFR-1) and TNF receptor-2 (TNFR-2). These receptors play a crucial role in the sensitization of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), a key mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic pain. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we examined the influence of TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 on VGSCs and TTX-resistant NaV1.8 channels in isolated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons by using selective TNFR agonists. The TNFR-1 agonist R32W (10 pg/mL) caused an increase in the VGSC current (INa(V)) by 27.2 ± 5.1%, while the TNFR-2 agonist D145 (10 pg/mL) increased the current by 44.9 ± 2.6%. This effect was dose dependent. Treating isolated NaV1.8 with R32W (100 pg/mL) resulted in an increase in INaV(1.8) by 18.9 ± 1.6%, while treatment with D145 (100 pg/mL) increased the current by 14.5 ± 3.7%. Based on the current-voltage relationship, 10 pg of R32W or D145 led to an increase in INa(V) in a bell-shaped, voltage-dependent manner with a maximum effect at −30 mV. The effects of TNFR activation on VGSCs promote excitation in primary afferent neurons and this might explain the sensitization mechanisms associated with neuropathic and inflammatory pain. PMID:26504355

  13. Impact of structural polymorphism for the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein on binding to polarity-regulating kinase PAR1b.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroko; Hayashi, Takeru; Arisaka, Fumio; Senda, Toshiya; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. CagA, the product of the cagA gene, is a bacterial oncoprotein, which, upon delivery into gastric epithelial cells, binds to and inhibits the polarity-regulating kinase, partitioning-defective 1b (PAR1b) [also known as microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 (MARK2)], via its CagA multimerization (CM) motif. The inhibition of PAR1b elicits junctional and polarity defects, rendering cells susceptible to oncogenesis. Notably, the polymorphism in the CM motif has been identified among geographic variants of CagA, differing in either the copy number or the sequence composition. In this study, through quantitative analysis of the complex formation between CagA and PAR1b, we found that several CagA species have acquired elevated PAR1b-binding activity via duplication of the CM motifs, while others have lost their PAR1b-binding activity. We also found that strength of CagA-PAR1b interaction was proportional to the degrees of stress fiber formation and tight junctional disruption by CagA in gastric epithelial cells. These results indicate that the CM polymorphism is a determinant for the magnitude of CagA-mediated deregulation of the cytoskeletal system and thereby possibly affects disease outcome of cagA-positive H. pylori infection, including gastric cancer. PMID:27445265

  14. Impact of structural polymorphism for the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein on binding to polarity-regulating kinase PAR1b

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroko; Hayashi, Takeru; Arisaka, Fumio; Senda, Toshiya; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. CagA, the product of the cagA gene, is a bacterial oncoprotein, which, upon delivery into gastric epithelial cells, binds to and inhibits the polarity-regulating kinase, partitioning-defective 1b (PAR1b) [also known as microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 (MARK2)], via its CagA multimerization (CM) motif. The inhibition of PAR1b elicits junctional and polarity defects, rendering cells susceptible to oncogenesis. Notably, the polymorphism in the CM motif has been identified among geographic variants of CagA, differing in either the copy number or the sequence composition. In this study, through quantitative analysis of the complex formation between CagA and PAR1b, we found that several CagA species have acquired elevated PAR1b-binding activity via duplication of the CM motifs, while others have lost their PAR1b-binding activity. We also found that strength of CagA-PAR1b interaction was proportional to the degrees of stress fiber formation and tight junctional disruption by CagA in gastric epithelial cells. These results indicate that the CM polymorphism is a determinant for the magnitude of CagA-mediated deregulation of the cytoskeletal system and thereby possibly affects disease outcome of cagA-positive H. pylori infection, including gastric cancer. PMID:27445265

  15. Natural variant of the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein that lost the ability to interact with PAR1.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kana; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Varon, Christine; Mégraud, Francis; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains carrying the cagA gene are associated with severe disease outcomes, most notably gastric cancer. CagA protein is delivered into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system. The translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at the C-terminal EPIYA motifs by host cell kinases. Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA acquires the ability to interact with and activate SHP2, thereby activating mitogenic signaling and inducing cell morphological transformation (hummingbird phenotype). CagA also interacts with PAR1b via the CM sequence, resulting in induction of junctional and polarity defects. Furthermore, CagA-PAR1b interaction stabilizes the CagA-SHP2 complex. Because transgenic mice systemically expressing CagA develop gastrointestinal and hematological malignancies, CagA is recognized as a bacterium-derived oncoprotein. Interestingly, the C-terminal region of CagA displays a large diversity among H. pylori strains, which influences the ability of CagA to bind to SHP2 and PAR1b. In the present study, we investigated the biological activity of v225d CagA, an Amerindian CagA of H. pylori isolated from a Venezuelan Piaroa Amerindian subject, because the variant CagA does not possess a canonical CM sequence. We found that v225d CagA interacts with SHP2 but not PAR1b. Furthermore, SHP2-binding activity of v225d CagA was much lower than that of CagA of H. pylori isolated from Western countries (Western CagA). v225d CagA also displayed a reduced ability to induce the hummingbird phenotype than that of Western CagA. Given that perturbation of PAR1b and SHP2 by CagA underlies the oncogenic potential of CagA, the v225d strain is considered to be less oncogenic than other well-studied cagA-positive H. pylori strains. PMID:24354359

  16. Normal Activation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mutants with Disulfide Cross-links, Insertions, or Deletions in the Extracellular Juxtamembrane Region

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huifang; Abe, Takemoto; Liu, Justin K. H.; Zalivina, Irina; Hohenester, Erhard; Leitinger, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by collagen. DDR activation does not appear to occur by the common mechanism of ligand-induced receptor dimerization: the DDRs form stable noncovalent dimers in the absence of ligand, and ligand-induced autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosines is unusually slow and sustained. Here we sought to identify functionally important dimer contacts within the extracellular region of DDR1 by using cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. Cysteine substitutions close to the transmembrane domain resulted in receptors that formed covalent dimers with high efficiency, both in the absence and presence of collagen. Enforced covalent dimerization did not result in constitutive activation and did not affect the ability of collagen to induce receptor autophosphorylation. Cysteines farther away from the transmembrane domain were also cross-linked with high efficiency, but some of these mutants could no longer be activated. Furthermore, the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 tolerated large deletions as well as insertions of flexible segments, with no adverse effect on activation. These findings indicate that the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 is exceptionally flexible and does not constrain the basal or ligand-activated state of the receptor. DDR1 transmembrane signaling thus appears to occur without conformational coupling through the juxtamembrane region, but requires specific receptor interactions farther away from the cell membrane. A plausible mechanism to explain these findings is signaling by DDR1 clusters. PMID:24671415

  17. Targeting a Metalloprotease-PAR1 Signaling System with Cell-Penetrating Pepducins Inhibits Angiogenesis, Ascites, and Progression of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anika; Covic, Lidija; Sevigny, Leila M; Kaneider, Nicole C; Lazarides, Katherine; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Sharifi, Sheida; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2009-01-01

    Gene chip and proteomic analyses of tumors and stromal tissue has led to the identification of dozens of candidate tumor and host components potentially involved in tumor-stromal interactions, angiogenesis, and progression of invasive disease. In particular, matrix metalloproteases have emerged as important biomarkers and prognostic factors for invasive and metastatic cancers. From an initial screen of benign versus malignant patient fluids, we delineated a metalloprotease cascade comprising MMP-14, MMP-9 and MMP-1 that culminates in activation of PAR1—a G protein-coupled protease-activated receptor upregulated in diverse cancers. In xenograft models of advanced peritoneal ovarian cancer, PAR1-dependent angiogenesis, ascites formation and metastasis was effectively inhibited by intraperitoneal administration of cell-penetrating pepducins based on the intracellular loops of PAR1. These data provide an in vivo proof-of-concept that targeting the metalloprotease-PAR1 signaling system may be a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:18790755

  18. Targeting a metalloprotease-PAR1 signaling system with cell-penetrating pepducins inhibits angiogenesis, ascites, and progression of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anika; Covic, Lidija; Sevigny, Leila M; Kaneider, Nicole C; Lazarides, Katherine; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Sharifi, Sheida; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2008-09-01

    Gene chip and proteomic analyses of tumors and stromal tissue has led to the identification of dozens of candidate tumor and host components potentially involved in tumor-stromal interactions, angiogenesis, and progression of invasive disease. In particular, matrix metalloproteases (MMP) have emerged as important biomarkers and prognostic factors for invasive and metastatic cancers. From an initial screen of benign versus malignant patient fluids, we delineated a metalloprotease cascade comprising MMP-14, MMP-9, and MMP-1 that culminates in activation of PAR1, a G protein-coupled protease-activated receptor up-regulated in diverse cancers. In xenograft models of advanced peritoneal ovarian cancer, PAR1-dependent angiogenesis, ascites formation, and metastasis were effectively inhibited by i.p. administration of cell-penetrating pepducins based on the intracellular loops of PAR1. These data provide an in vivo proof-of-concept that targeting the metalloprotease-PAR1 signaling system may be a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:18790755

  19. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 mediates relaxation of coronary arteries via cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of MLCP.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuan; Li, Fen; Klussmann, Enno; Stallone, John N; Han, Guichun

    2014-08-15

    Activation of GPER exerts a protective effect in hypertension and ischemia-reperfusion models and relaxes arteries in vitro. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of GPER-mediated vascular regulation is far from complete. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that GPER-induced relaxation of porcine coronary arteries is mediated via cAMP/PKA signaling. Our findings revealed that vascular relaxation to the selective GPER agonist G-1 (0.3-3 μM) was associated with increased cAMP production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC) with SQ-22536 (100 μM) or of PKA activity with either Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS (5 μM) or PKI (5 μM) attenuated G-1-induced relaxation of coronary arteries preconstricted with PGF2α (1 μM). G-1 also increased PKA activity in cultured coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine downstream signals of the cAMP/PKA cascade, we measured RhoA activity in cultured human and porcine coronary SMCs and myosin-light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity in these artery rings by immunoblot analysis of phosphorylation of myosin-targeting subunit protein-1 (p-MYPT-1; the MLCP regulatory subunit). G-1 decreased PGF2α-induced p-MYPT-1, whereas Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS prevented this inhibitory effect of G-1. Similarly, G-1 inhibited PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of MLC in coronary SMCs, and this inhibitory effect was also reversed by Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. RhoA activity was downregulated by G-1, whereas G36 (GPER antagonist) restored RhoA activity. Finally, FMP-API-1 (100 μM), an inhibitor of the interaction between PKA and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), attenuated the effect of G-1 on coronary artery relaxation and p-MYPT-1. These findings demonstrate that localized cAMP/PKA signaling is involved in GPER-mediated coronary vasodilation by activating MLCP via inhibition of RhoA pathway. PMID:25005496

  20. Activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the desensitization and internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptors 1a and 1b.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Pula, Giordano; More, Julia C A; Jane, David E; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-06-01

    In this study, we characterized the effects of activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the internalization and functional coupling of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1) splice variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique to assess receptor internalization, we found that the glutamate-induced internalization of mGluR1a or mGluR1b transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells was inhibited by coactivation of endogenous beta2-adrenoceptors with isoprenaline or by direct activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin. The PKA inhibitor N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino]ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H89) blocked the effects of both isoprenaline and forskolin. The heterologous internalization of the mGluR1 splice variants triggered by carbachol was also inhibited by isoprenaline and forskolin in a PKA-sensitive fashion, whereas the constitutive (agonist-independent) internalization of mGluR1a was inhibited only modestly by PKA activation. Using inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation in cells prelabeled with [3H]inositol to assess receptor coupling, PKA activation increased basal IP accumulation in mGluR1a receptor-expressing cells and also increased glutamate-stimulated IP accumulation in both mGluR1a- and mGluR1b-expressing cells, but only at short times of glutamate addition. Furthermore, PKA activation completely blocked the carbachol-induced heterologous desensitization of glutamate-stimulated IP accumulation in both mGluR1a- and mGluR1b-expressing cells. In coimmunoprecipitation experiments, the ability of glutamate to increase association of GRK2 and arrestin-2 with mGluR1a and mGluR1b was inhibited by PKA activation with forskolin. Together, these results indicate that PKA activation inhibits the agonist-induced internalization and desensitization of mGluR1a and mGluR1b, probably by reducing their interaction with GRK2 and nonvisual arrestins. PMID:15155843

  1. Combined anti CXC receptors 1 and 2 therapy is a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases by reducing neutrophil migration and activation.

    PubMed

    Planagumà, A; Domènech, T; Pont, M; Calama, E; García-González, V; López, R; Aulí, M; López, M; Fonquerna, S; Ramos, I; de Alba, J; Nueda, A; Prats, N; Segarra, V; Miralpeix, M; Lehner, M D

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil infiltration and activation in the lung are important pathophysiological features in COPD, severe asthma and bronchiectasis mostly mediated by CXCL8 and CXCL1 via CXCR1 and CXCR2. No thorough study to date has been performed to compare the anti-inflammatory effect profile of dual CXCR1/2 vs. selective CXCR2 antagonists in relevant human neutrophil assays and pulmonary inflammation models. Dual CXCR1/2 (SCH527123, diaminocyclobutandione-1) and selective CXCR2 (SB265610, thiopyrimidine-1) antagonist activity and receptor residence time were determined by [(35)S]GTPγS binding in human (h)- and guinea pig (gp)-CXCR1 and CXCR2 overexpressing membranes. h-neutrophil chemotaxis, degranulation and ROS production were established using CXCL8 or CXCL1 to evaluate dual CXCR1/2- or selective CXCR2-dependent activities. LPS-induced lung inflammation in gp was selected to assess in vivo potency. Dual CXCR1/2 antagonists blocked both CXCL8 and CXCL1-induced h-neutrophil functions and [(35)S]GTPγS binding. In contrary, selective CXCR2 antagonists displayed significantly reduced potency in CXCL8 -mediated h-neutrophil responses despite being active in CXCR2 assays. Upon LPS challenge in gp, administration of SCH527123 inhibited the increase of neutrophils in BALF, modestly reduced blood neutrophils and induced minor neutrophil accumulation in bone marrow. Differentiation of CXCR1/2 vs. CXCR2 antagonists could not be extended to in vivo due to differences in CXCR1 receptor homology between h and gp. Dual CXCR1/2 therapy may represent a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases reducing more effectively neutrophil migration and activation in the lung than a CXCR2 selective treatment. However, the in vivo confirmation of this claim is still missing due to species differences in CXCR1. PMID:26271598

  2. Evaluation of Phytocannabinoids from High Potency Cannabis sativa using In Vitro Bioassays to Determine Structure-Activity Relationships for Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Cannabinoid Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Husni, Afeef S; McCurdy, Christopher R; Radwan, Mohamed M; Ahmed, Safwat A; Slade, Desmond; Ross, Samir A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Cutler, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Cannabis has been around for thousands of years and has been used recreationally, medicinally, and for fiber. Over 500 compounds have been isolated from Cannabis sativa with approximately 105 being cannabinoids. Of those 105 compounds, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol has been determined as the primary constituent, which is also responsible for the psychoactivity associated with Cannabis. Cannabinoid receptors belong to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. Targeting the cannabinoid receptors has the potential to treat a variety of conditions such as pain, neurodegeneration, appetite, immune function, anxiety, cancer, and others. Developing in vitro bioassays to determine binding and functional activity of compounds has the ability to lead researchers to develop a safe and effective drug that may target the cannabinoid receptors. Using radioligand binding and functional bioassays, a structure-activity relationship for major and minor cannabinoids was developed. PMID:25419092

  3. Evaluation of Phytocannabinoids from High Potency Cannabis sativa using In Vitro Bioassays to Determine Structure-Activity Relationships for Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Cannabinoid Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Husni, Afeef S.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Slade, Desmond; Ross, Samir A.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis has been around for thousands of years and has been used recreationally, medicinally, and for fiber. Over 500 compounds have been isolated from Cannabis sativa with approximately 105 being cannabinoids. Of those 105 compounds, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol has been determined as the primary constituent, which is also responsible for the psychoactivity associated with Cannabis. Cannabinoid receptors belong to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. Targeting the cannabinoid receptors has the potential to treat a variety of conditions such as pain, neurodegeneration, appetite, immune function, anxiety, cancer, and others. Developing in vitro bioassays to determine binding and functional activity of compounds has the ability to lead researchers to develop a safe and effective drug that may target the cannabinoid receptors. Using radioligand binding and functional bioassays, a structure-activity relationship for major and minor cannabinoids was developed. PMID:25419092

  4. PAR-1, -4, and the mTOR Pathway Following Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Krafft, Paul R; Klebe, Damon; Flores, Jerry; Rolland, William B; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common cause of neurological complications of prematurity and has lasting implications. PAR-1 and PAR-4 receptors are involved with upstream signaling pathways following brain hemorrhage in adult models of stroke, of which the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a potential downstream mediator. Therefore, we hypothesized a role for PAR-1, -4/ mTOR signaling following GMH brain injury. Postnatal day 7 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to GMH through stereotactic infusion of collagenase into the right ganglionic eminence. Rodents were euthanized at 72 h (short term), or 4 weeks (long term). Short-term mTOR expression was evaluated by Western blot in the context of PAR-1 (SCH-79797) and PAR-4 (P4pal10) inhibition. Pups in the long-term group were administered the selective mTOR inhibitor (rapamycin) with neurobehavioral and brain pathological examinations performed at 4 weeks. Pharmacological PAR-1, -4 antagonism normalized the increased mTOR expression following GMH. Early inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin improved long-term outcomes in rats. Mammalian-TOR signaling plays an important role in brain injury following neonatal GMH, possibly involving upstream PAR-1, -4 mechanisms. PMID:26463951

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Lymphotoxin-α Mediate Myocardial Ischemic Injury via TNF Receptor 1, but Are Cardioprotective When Activating TNF Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wayne Bond; Jiao, Li-Yuan; Liu, Baojiang; Yuan, Yuexing; Wang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J.; Ma, Xin-Liang; Wang, Yajing

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study determines the roles of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and lymphotoxin-α (LTα) in post-myocardial infarction (post-MI) cardiac injury, and identifies the TNF receptor type responsible for TNFα- and LTα-mediated cardiac injury. Methods and Results Adult male wild type (WT), TNFα−/−, LTα−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR2−/− mice were subjected to MI via coronary artery occlusion. Functional, histological, and biochemical analyses were performed 1 to 7 days post-MI. In WT mice, MI significantly increased both TNFα and LTα levels in plasma, but in distinct temporal manner. Plasma TNFα peaked 1 day after MI, and decreased toward baseline 3 days after MI. In contrast, plasma LTα became significantly increased 3 days post-MI, and remained elevated thereafter. TNFα deletion significantly improved cardiac function 3 days, but not 7 days, after MI. In contrast, LTα deletion had no effect upon cardiac dysfunction 3 days after MI, but improved cardiac function 7 days after MI. More importantly, knockout of TNFR1 and TNFR2 had opposite effects upon post-MI cardiac dysfunction, which was markedly attenuated by TNFR1 deletion (P<0.01 vs. WT), but exacerbated by TNFR2 deletion (P<0.05 vs. WT). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that TNFα and LTα overproduction contribute to early and late cardiac dysfunction after MI, respectively. We provide clear evidence that both TNFα and LTα mediate post-MI cardiac dysfunction via TNFR1 stimulation, whereas TNFR2 activation is cardioprotective against ischemic injury. Simultaneous inhibition of TNFα and LTα or specific TNFR1 function blockade may represent superior cardioprotective approaches over general TNF activity suppression. PMID:23704873

  6. Activation of neurotensin receptor 1 facilitates neuronal excitability and spatial learning and memory in the entorhinal cortex: beneficial actions in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhaoyang; Cilz, Nicholas I; Kurada, Lalitha; Hu, Binqi; Yang, Chuanxiu; Wada, Etsuko; Combs, Colin K; Porter, James E; Lesage, Florian; Lei, Saobo

    2014-05-14

    Neurotensin (NT) is a tridecapeptide distributed in the CNS, including the entorhinal cortex (EC), a structure that is crucial for learning and memory and undergoes the earliest pathological alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas NT has been implicated in modulating cognition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which NT modifies cognitive processes and the potential therapeutic roles of NT in AD have not been determined. Here we examined the effects of NT on neuronal excitability and spatial learning in the EC, which expresses high density of NT receptors. Brief application of NT induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency, which could last for at least 1 h. NT-induced facilitation of neuronal excitability was mediated by downregulation of TREK-2 K(+) channels and required the functions of NTS1, phospholipase C, and protein kinase C. Microinjection of NT or NTS1 agonist, PD149163, into the EC increased spatial learning as assessed by the Barnes Maze Test. Activation of NTS1 receptors also induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency and significantly improved the memory status in APP/PS1 mice, an animal model of AD. Our study identifies a cellular substrate underlying learning and memory and suggests that NTS1 agonists may exert beneficial actions in an animal model of AD. PMID:24828655

  7. Powerful anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of a new anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 peptide in colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Cicatiello, Valeria; Apicella, Ivana; Tudisco, Laura; Tarallo, Valeria; Formisano, Luigi; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Kim, Younghee; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Orlandi, Augusto; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; De Falco, Sandro

    2015-04-30

    To assess the therapeutic outcome of selective block of VEGFR1, we have evaluated the activity of a new specific antagonist of VEGFR1, named iVR1 (inhibitor of VEGFR1), in syngenic and xenograft colorectal cancer models, in an artificial model of metastatization, and in laser-induced choroid neovascularization. iVR1 inhibited tumor growth and neoangiogenesis in both models of colorectal cancer, with an extent similar to that of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody anti-VEGF-A. It potently inhibited VEGFR1 phosphorylation in vivo, determining a strong inhibition of the recruitment of monocyte-macrophages and of mural cells as confirmed, in vitro, by the ability to inhibit macrophages migration. iVR1 was able to synergize with irinotecan determining a shrinkage of tumors that became undetectable after three weeks of combined treatment. Such treatment induced a significant prolongation of survival similar to that observed with bevacizumab and irinotecan combination. iVR1 also fully prevented lung invasion by HCT-116 cells injected in mouse tail vein. Also, iVR1 impressively inhibited choroid neovascularization after a single intravitreal injection. Collectively, data showed the strong potential of iVR1 peptide as a new anti-tumor and anti-metastatic agent and demonstrate the high flexibility of VEGFR1 antagonists as therapeutic anti-angiogenic agents in different pathological contexts. PMID:25868854

  8. Activation of Neurotensin Receptor 1 Facilitates Neuronal Excitability and Spatial Learning and Memory in the Entorhinal Cortex: Beneficial Actions in an Alzheimer's Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhaoyang; Cilz, Nicholas I.; Kurada, Lalitha; Hu, Binqi; Yang, Chuanxiu; Wada, Etsuko; Combs, Colin K.; Porter, James E.; Lesage, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a tridecapeptide distributed in the CNS, including the entorhinal cortex (EC), a structure that is crucial for learning and memory and undergoes the earliest pathological alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas NT has been implicated in modulating cognition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which NT modifies cognitive processes and the potential therapeutic roles of NT in AD have not been determined. Here we examined the effects of NT on neuronal excitability and spatial learning in the EC, which expresses high density of NT receptors. Brief application of NT induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency, which could last for at least 1 h. NT-induced facilitation of neuronal excitability was mediated by downregulation of TREK-2 K+ channels and required the functions of NTS1, phospholipase C, and protein kinase C. Microinjection of NT or NTS1 agonist, PD149163, into the EC increased spatial learning as assessed by the Barnes Maze Test. Activation of NTS1 receptors also induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency and significantly improved the memory status in APP/PS1 mice, an animal model of AD. Our study identifies a cellular substrate underlying learning and memory and suggests that NTS1 agonists may exert beneficial actions in an animal model of AD. PMID:24828655

  9. Activation of the sigma receptor 1 modulates AMPA receptor-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei-Lei; Deng, Qin-Qin; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-09-22

    Sigma receptor (σR), a unique receptor family, is classified into three subtypes: σR1, σR2 and σR3. It was previously shown that σR1 activation induced by 1μM SKF10047 (SKF) suppressed N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses of rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and the suppression was mediated by a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase C (PLC)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. In the present work, using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we further demonstrate that SKF of higher dosage (50μM) significantly suppressed AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) of retinal ON-type GCs (ON GCs), and the effect was reversed by the σR1 antagonist BD1047, suggesting the involvement of σR1. The SKF (50μM) effect was unlikely due to a change in glutamate release from bipolar cells, as suggested by the unaltered paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of AMPAR-mediated EPSCs of ON GCs. SKF (50μM) did not change L-EPSCs of ON GCs when the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT5823 was intracellularly infused. Calcium imaging further revealed that SKF (50μM) did not change intracellular calcium concentration in GCs and persisted to suppress L-EPSCs when intracellular calcium was chelated by BAPTA. The SKF (50μM) effect was intact when protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphatidylinostiol (PI)-PLC signaling pathways were both blocked. We conclude that the SKF (50μM) effect is Ca(2+)-independent, PKG-dependent, but not involving PKA, PI-PLC pathways. PMID:27373906

  10. uPA Attenuated LPS-induced Inflammatory Osteoclastogenesis through the Plasmin/PAR-1/Ca2+/CaMKK/AMPK Axis

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Yosuke; Ishisaki, Akira; Kawashita, Eri; Kuretake, Hiromi; Ikeda, Kanako; Matsuo, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis-caused bone destruction, results from an increase of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) induced by inflammation. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. We herein investigated that the effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) on inflammatory osteoclastogenesis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is a potent stimulator of bone resorption in inflammatory diseases. We found that the uPA deficiency promoted inflammatory osteoclastogenesis and bone loss induced by LPS. We also showed that LPS induced the expression of uPA, and the uPA treatment attenuated the LPS-induced inflammatory osteoclastogenesis of RAW264.7 mouse monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. Additionally, we showed that the uPA-attenuated inflammatory osteoclastgenesis is associated with the activation of plasmin/protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 axis by uPA. Moreover, we examined the mechanism underlying the effect of uPA on inflammatory osteoclastogenesis, and found that uPA/plasmin/PAR-1 activated the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway through Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) activation, and attenuated inflammatory osteoclastogenesis by inactivation of NF-κB in RAW264.7 cells. These data suggest that uPA attenuated inflammatory osteoclastogenesis through the plasmin/PAR-1/Ca2+/CaMKK/AMPK axis. Our findings may provide a novel therapeutic approach to bone loss caused by inflammatory diseases. PMID:26722218

  11. A Human Platelet Receptor Protein Microarray Identifies the High Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor Subunit α (FcεR1α) as an Activating Platelet Endothelium Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) Ligand*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Vandenbriele, Christophe; Kauskot, Alexandre; Verhamme, Peter; Hoylaerts, Marc F.; Wright, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies to identify loci responsible for platelet function and cardiovascular disease susceptibility have repeatedly identified polymorphisms linked to a gene encoding platelet endothelium aggregation receptor 1 (PEAR1), an “orphan” cell surface receptor that is activated to stabilize platelet aggregates. To investigate how PEAR1 signaling is initiated, we sought to identify its extracellular ligand by creating a protein microarray representing the secretome and receptor repertoire of the human platelet. Using an avid soluble recombinant PEAR1 protein and a systematic screening assay designed to detect extracellular interactions, we identified the high affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor subunit α (FcεR1α) as a PEAR1 ligand. FcεR1α and PEAR1 directly interacted through their membrane-proximal Ig-like and 13th epidermal growth factor domains with a relatively strong affinity (KD ∼ 30 nm). Precomplexing FcεR1α with IgE potently inhibited the FcεR1α-PEAR1 interaction, and this was relieved by the anti-IgE therapeutic omalizumab. Oligomerized FcεR1α potentiated platelet aggregation and led to PEAR1 phosphorylation, an effect that was also inhibited by IgE. These findings demonstrate how a protein microarray resource can be used to gain important insight into the function of platelet receptors and provide a mechanistic basis for the initiation of PEAR1 signaling in platelet aggregation. PMID:25713122

  12. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  13. Loss of Hep Par 1 immunoreactivity in the livers of patients with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Kataoka, Tatsuki R; Shibayama, Takahiro; Fukuda, Akinari; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Sakurai, Takaki; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Yorifuji, Toru; Kasahara, Mureo; Uemoto, Shinji; Haga, Hironori

    2016-06-01

    The hepatocyte paraffin 1 (Hep Par 1) antibody is widely used as a hepatocyte marker, recognizing carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1), an essential component of the urea cycle. Various missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations occur in the CPS1 gene. In neonatal patients with homozygous CPS1 deficiency (CPS1D), urea cycle defects with resulting severe hyperammonemia can be fatal, though liver transplantation provides a complete cure for CPS1D. We performed Hep Par 1 immunostaining in the explanted livers of 10 liver transplant patients with CPS1D. Seven were negative for Hep Par 1 in the hepatocytes and the other three showed normal diffuse granular cytoplasmic staining. As expected, all three Hep Par 1-positive patients had at least one missense mutation, and all four patients who had only nonsense or frameshift mutations were Hep Par 1-negative. The other three patients were unexpectedly negative for Hep Par 1, even though each had one missense mutation. These results suggest that CPS1D can be related to the loss of Hep Par 1 reactivity due to the loss of protein production, a one amino acid substitution resulting in an abortive protein product, or both. Hep Par 1 immunohistochemistry can be used as a simple method to confirm CPS1D. PMID:27150549

  14. Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and in levels of proopiomelanocortin and corticotropin-releasing hormone-receptor 1 mRNAs in the pituitary and hypothalamus of the rat during chronic 'binge' cocaine and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Spangler, Rudolph; Schlussman, Stefan D; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2003-02-28

    Tolerance to the stimulatory effects of cocaine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis develops after chronic 'binge' cocaine exposure in the rat. This blunting of HPA axis activity in response to cocaine is associated with a cocaine-induced reduction of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA level in the hypothalamus. There is limited information about the effects of withdrawal from chronic cocaine on HPA activity. The present studies were undertaken to determine levels of the HPA hormones adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone across 10 days of withdrawal following chronic 'binge' pattern cocaine administration (3 x 15 mg/kg/day at hourly intervals) for 14 days. Male Fischer rats showed a significantly attenuated HPA axis response to chronic 'binge' pattern cocaine administration 30 min after the last injection on the 14th day, as measured by both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels at the nadir time point. Twenty-four hours following the final administration of 'binge' cocaine (the 1st day of withdrawal), a significant elevation of plasma ACTH levels and a modest, but significant, elevation of plasma corticosterone levels were found at the nadir time point. This acute withdrawal-related activation of the hormones of the HPA axis was no longer found on the 10th day of withdrawal. In the anterior pituitary, levels of both proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and CRH-receptor 1 (R1) mRNAs were significantly higher than saline controls on the 14th day of chronic 'binge' cocaine and were at control levels on the 4th day of withdrawal. In the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary, a sustained reduction in POMC mRNA levels was observed on the 3rd, 7th and 14th day of chronic 'binge' cocaine, but POMC mRNA was at control levels by the 4th day of withdrawal. In the hypothalamus, POMC mRNA levels showed a transient decrease on the 1st day of 'binge' cocaine with no change during chronic 'binge' cocaine or its withdrawal. CRH mRNA levels in the

  15. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  16. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  17. The Marine-Derived Kinase Inhibitor Fascaplysin Exerts Anti-Thrombotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ampofo, Emmanuel; Später, Thomas; Müller, Isabelle; Eichler, Hermann; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The marine-derived kinase inhibitor fascaplysin down-regulates the PI3K pathway in cancer cells. Since this pathway also plays an essential role in platelet signaling, we herein investigated the effect of fascaplysin on thrombosis. Methods: Fascaplysin effects on platelet activation, platelet aggregation and platelet-leukocyte aggregates (PLA) formation were analyzed by flow cytometry. Mouse dorsal skinfold chambers were used to determine in vivo the effect of fascaplysin on photochemically induced thrombus formation and tail-vein bleeding time. Results: Pre-treatment of platelets with fascaplysin reduced the activation of glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa after protease-activated receptor-1-activating peptide (PAR-1-AP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulation, but did not markedly affect the expression of P-selectin. This was associated with a decreased platelet aggregation. Fascaplysin also decreased PLA formation after PMA but not PAR-1-AP and ADP stimulation. This may be explained by an increased expression of CD11b on leukocytes in PAR-1-AP- and ADP-treated whole blood. In the dorsal skinfold chamber model of photochemically induced thrombus formation, fascaplysin-treated mice revealed a significantly extended complete vessel occlusion time when compared to controls. Furthermore, fascaplysin increased the tail-vein bleeding time. Conclusion: Fascaplysin exerts anti-thrombotic activity, which represents a novel mode of action in the pleiotropic activity spectrum of this compound. PMID:26569265

  18. Novel mechanisms for activated protein C cytoprotective activities involving noncanonical activation of protease-activated receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Burnier, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The direct cytoprotective activities of activated protein C (APC) on cells convey therapeutic, relevant, beneficial effects in injury and disease models in vivo and require the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Thrombin also activates PAR1, but its effects on cells contrast APC’s cytoprotective effects. To gain insights into mechanisms for these contrasting cellular effects, protease activated receptor 3 (PAR3) activation by APC and thrombin was studied. APC cleaved PAR3 on transfected and endothelial cells in the presence of EPCR. Remarkably, APC cleaved a synthetic PAR3 N-terminal peptide at Arg41, whereas thrombin cleaved at Lys38. On cells, APC failed to cleave R41Q-PAR3, whereas K38Q-PAR3 was still cleaved by APC but not by thrombin. PAR3 tethered-ligand peptides beginning at amino acid 42, but not those beginning at amino acid 39, conveyed endothelial barrier-protective effects. In vivo, the APC-derived PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide, but not the thrombin-derived PAR3 peptide, blunted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular permeability. These data indicate that PAR3 cleavage by APC at Arg41 can initiate distinctive APC-like cytoprotective effects. These novel insights help explain the differentiation of APC’s cytoprotective versus thrombin’s proinflammatory effects on cells and suggest a unique contributory role for PAR3 in the complex mechanisms underlying APC cytoprotective effects. PMID:23788139

  19. Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Receptor 1 Antagonists Lacking an Aliphatic Amine: Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel 1-(Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-6-yl)pyridin-2(1H)-one Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Kakegawa, Keiko; Kina, Asato; Ikoma, Minoru; Aida, Jumpei; Yasuma, Tsuneo; Kawata, Yayoi; Ashina, Shuntaro; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Kundu, Mrinalkanti; Khamrai, Uttam; Hirabayashi, Hideki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nagisa, Yasutaka; Kasai, Shizuo; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-02-11

    Aiming to discover melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists with improved safety profiles, we hypothesized that the aliphatic amine employed in most antagonists reported to date could be removed if the bicyclic motif of the compound scaffold interacted with Asp123 and/or Tyr272 of MCHR1. We excluded aliphatic amines from our compound designs, with a cutoff value of pK(a) < 8, and explored aliphatic amine-free MCHR1 antagonists in a CNS-oriented chemical space limited by four descriptors (TPSA, ClogP, MW, and HBD count). Screening of novel bicyclic motifs with high intrinsic binding affinity for MCHR1 identified the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine ring (represented in compounds 6a and 6b), and subsequent cyclization of the central aliphatic amide linkage led to the discovery of a potent, orally bioavailable MCHR1 antagonist 4-[(4-chlorobenzyl)oxy]-1-(2-cyclopropyl-3-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-6-yl)pyridin-2(1H)-one 10a. It exhibited low potential for hERG inhibition and phospholipidosis induction as well as sufficient brain concentration to exert antiobesity effects in diet-induced obese rats. PMID:26736071

  20. A natural kinase-deficient variant of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Y; Edenson, S P; Yu, Y L; Senderowicz, L; Turck, C W

    1996-08-01

    A fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant missing 37 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal tyrosine kinase catalytic domain was discovered in human lung fibroblasts and several other human cell lines. The receptor variant binds specifically to acidic fibroblast growth factor but has no tyrosine kinase activity. It was found that cellular transfectants expressing the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant are mitogenically inactive and ligand binding to the receptor causes neither receptor autophosphorylation nor phospholipase C-gamma transphosphorylation. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant therefore represents an inactive receptor for acidic fibroblast growth factor. Since both kinase and kinase-deficient receptor forms are expressed in cells, it is conceivable that the kinase-deficient receptor plays an important role in regulating cellular responses elicited by acidic fibroblast growth factor stimulation. PMID:8756477

  1. Effects of Trace Amine-associated Receptor 1 Agonists on the Expression, Reconsolidation, and Extinction of Cocaine Reward Memory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Thorn, David A; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    Background: As a modulator of dopaminergic system, trace amine-associated receptor 1 has been shown to play a critical role in regulating the rewarding properties of additive drugs. It has been demonstrated that activation of trace amine-associated receptor 1 decreased the abuse-related behaviors of cocaine in rats. However, the role of trace amine-associated receptor 1 in specific stages of cocaine reward memory is still unclear. Methods: Here, using a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference model, we tested the effects of a selective trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonist RO5166017 on the expression, reconsolidation, and extinction of cocaine reward memory. Results: We found that RO5166017 inhibited the expression but not retention of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. RO5166017 had no effect on the reconsolidation of cocaine reward memory. Pretreatment with RO5166017 before extinction hindered the formation of extinction long-term memory. RO5166017 did not affect the movement during the conditioned place preference test, indicating the inhibitory effect of RO5166017 on the expression of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference was not caused by locomotion inhibition. Using a cocaine i.v. self-administration model, we found that the combined trace amine-associated receptor 1 partial agonist RO5263397 with extinction had no effect on the following cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Repeated administration of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonist during extinction showed a continually inhibitory effect on the expression of cocaine reward memory both in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and cocaine self-administration models. Conclusions: Taken together, these results indicate that activation of trace amine-associated receptor 1 specifically inhibited the expression of cocaine reward memory. The inhibitory effect of trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonists on cocaine reward memory suggests

  2. PAR1 inhibition suppresses the self-renewal and growth of A2B5-defined glioma progenitor cells and their derived gliomas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Auvergne, R; Wu, C; Connell, A; Au, S; Cornwell, A; Osipovitch, M; Benraiss, A; Dangelmajer, S; Guerrero-Cazares, H; Quinones-Hinojosa, A; Goldman, S A

    2016-07-21

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains the most common and lethal intracranial tumor. In a comparison of gene expression by A2B5-defined tumor-initiating progenitor cells (TPCs) to glial progenitor cells derived from normal adult human brain, we found that the F2R gene encoding PAR1 was differentially overexpressed by A2B5-sorted TPCs isolated from gliomas at all stages of malignant development. In this study, we asked if PAR1 is causally associated with glioma progression. Lentiviral knockdown of PAR1 inhibited the expansion and self-renewal of human GBM-derived A2B5(+) TPCs in vitro, while pharmacological inhibition of PAR 1 similarly slowed both the growth and migration of A2B5(+) TPCs in culture. In addition, PAR1 silencing potently suppressed tumor expansion in vivo, and significantly prolonged the survival of mice following intracranial transplantation of human TPCs. These data strongly suggest the importance of PAR1 to the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of A2B5-defined glioma TPCs; as such, the abrogation of PAR1-dependent signaling pathways may prove a promising strategy for gliomas. PMID:26616854

  3. Histamine up-regulates fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 and increases FOXP2 neurons in cultured neural precursors by histamine type 1 receptor activation: conceivable role of histamine in neurogenesis during cortical development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During rat development, histamine (HA) is one of the first neuroactive molecules to appear in the brain, reaching its maximal value at embryonic day 14, a period when neurogenesis of deep layers is occurring in the cerebral cortex, suggesting a role of this amine in neuronal specification. We previously reported, using high-density cerebrocortical neural precursor cultures, that micromolar HA enhanced the effect of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 on proliferation, and that HA increased neuronal differentiation, due to HA type 1 receptor (H1R) activation. Results Clonal experiments performed here showed that HA decreased colony size and caused a significant increase in the percentage of clones containing mature neurons through H1R stimulation. In proliferating precursors, we studied whether HA activates G protein-coupled receptors linked to intracellular calcium increases. Neural cells presented an increase in cytoplasmic calcium even in the absence of extracellular calcium, a response mediated by H1R. Since FGF receptors (FGFRs) are known to be key players in cell proliferation and differentiation, we determined whether HA modifies the expression of FGFRs1-4 by using RT-PCR. An important transcriptional increase in FGFR1 was elicited after H1R activation. We also tested whether HA promotes differentiation specifically to neurons with molecular markers of different cortical layers by immunocytochemistry. HA caused significant increases in cells expressing the deep layer neuronal marker FOXP2; this induction of FOXP2-positive neurons elicited by HA was blocked by the H1R antagonist chlorpheniramine in vitro. Finally, we found a notable decrease in FOXP2+ cortical neurons in vivo, when chlorpheniramine was infused in the cerebral ventricles through intrauterine injection. Conclusion These results show that HA, by activating H1R, has a neurogenic effect in clonal conditions and suggest that intracellular calcium elevation and transcriptional up

  4. Simvastatin Attenuates Oxidative Stress, NF-κB Activation, and Artery Calcification in LDLR-/- Mice Fed with High Fat Diet via Down-regulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and TNF Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Lai, Chung Fang; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jia-Shiong

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin (SIM) is anti-inflammatory. We used low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-/-) mice and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) as model systems to study the effect of SIM on arterial calcification and to explore the potential mechanisms contributing to this protective effect. High-fat diet (HFD) caused the LRLR -/- to develop dyslipidemia, diabetics, atherosclerosis and aortic smooth muscle calcification. SIM, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) and apocynin (APO, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor) did not significantly retard the development of dyslipidemia or diabetic. However, those treatments were still effective in attenuating the HFD-induced atherosclerosis and aortic smooth muscle calcification. These findings suggest that the protective effect of SIM against aortic calcification is not contributed by the cholesterol lowering effect. SIM, NAC and APO were found to attenuate the HFD induced elevation of serum TNF-α, soluble TNFR1 (sTNFR1), 3-nitro-tyrosine. We hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, oxidative stress and TNFR1 played a role in inducing aortic calcification. We used HASMC to investigate the role of TNF-α, oxidative stress and TNFR1 in inducing aortic calcification and to elucidate the mechanism contributes the protective effect of SIM against aortic calcification. We demonstrated that treating HASMC with TNF-α induced cell Ca deposit and result in an increase in ALP, NADPH oxidase activity, NF-kB subunit p65, BMP2, MSX2, and RUNX2 expression. SIM suppressed the TNF-α induced activation of NADPH oxidase subunit p47, the above-mentioned bone markers and TNFR1 expression. Furthermore, p65, p47 and TNFR1 siRNAs inhibited the TNF-α-mediated stimulation of BMP-2, MSX2, RUNX2 expression. SIM, APO, and NAC either partially inhibit or completely block the TNF-α induced H2O2 or superoxide production. These results suggest that SIM may, independent of its cholesterol-lowering effect, suppresses the progression of

  5. Simvastatin Attenuates Oxidative Stress, NF-κB Activation, and Artery Calcification in LDLR-/- Mice Fed with High Fat Diet via Down-regulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and TNF Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Lai, Chung Fang; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jia-Shiong

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin (SIM) is anti-inflammatory. We used low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-/-) mice and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) as model systems to study the effect of SIM on arterial calcification and to explore the potential mechanisms contributing to this protective effect. High-fat diet (HFD) caused the LRLR -/- to develop dyslipidemia, diabetics, atherosclerosis and aortic smooth muscle calcification. SIM, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) and apocynin (APO, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor) did not significantly retard the development of dyslipidemia or diabetic. However, those treatments were still effective in attenuating the HFD-induced atherosclerosis and aortic smooth muscle calcification. These findings suggest that the protective effect of SIM against aortic calcification is not contributed by the cholesterol lowering effect. SIM, NAC and APO were found to attenuate the HFD induced elevation of serum TNF-α, soluble TNFR1 (sTNFR1), 3-nitro-tyrosine. We hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, oxidative stress and TNFR1 played a role in inducing aortic calcification. We used HASMC to investigate the role of TNF-α, oxidative stress and TNFR1 in inducing aortic calcification and to elucidate the mechanism contributes the protective effect of SIM against aortic calcification. We demonstrated that treating HASMC with TNF-α induced cell Ca deposit and result in an increase in ALP, NADPH oxidase activity, NF-kB subunit p65, BMP2, MSX2, and RUNX2 expression. SIM suppressed the TNF-α induced activation of NADPH oxidase subunit p47, the above-mentioned bone markers and TNFR1 expression. Furthermore, p65, p47 and TNFR1 siRNAs inhibited the TNF-α-mediated stimulation of BMP-2, MSX2, RUNX2 expression. SIM, APO, and NAC either partially inhibit or completely block the TNF-α induced H2O2 or superoxide production. These results suggest that SIM may, independent of its cholesterol-lowering effect, suppresses the progression of

  6. Dioxin activation of CYP1A5 promoter/enhancer regions from two avian species, common cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) and chicken (Gallus gallus): Association with aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 and 2 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Seon; Kim, Eun-Young Iwata, Hisato

    2009-01-01

    The present study focuses on the molecular mechanism and interspecies differences in susceptibility of avian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) signaling pathway. By the cloning of 5'-flanking regions of CYP1A5 gene from common cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) and chicken (Gallus gallus), seven putative xenobiotic response elements (XREs) were identified within 2.7 kb upstream region of common cormorant CYP1A5 (ccCYP1A5), and six XREs were found within 0.9 kb of chicken CYP1A5 (ckCYP1A5). Analysis of sequential deletion and mutagenesis of the binding sites in avian CYP1A5 genes by in vitro reporter gene assays revealed that two XREs at -613 bp and -1585 bp in ccCYP1A5, and one XRE at -262 bp in ckCYP1A5 conferred TCDD-responsiveness. The binding of AHR1 with AHR nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1) to the functional XRE in a TCDD-dependent manner was verified with gel shift assays, suggesting that avian CYP1A5 is induced by TCDD through AHR1/ARNT1 signaling pathway as well as mammalian CYP1A1 but through a distinct pathway from mammalian CYP1A2, an ortholog of the CYP1A5. TCDD-EC{sub 50} for the transcriptional activity in both cormorant AHR1- and AHR2-ccCYP1A5 reporter construct was 10-fold higher than that in chicken AHR1-ckCYP1A5 reporter construct. In contrast, chicken AHR2 showed no TCDD-dependent response. The TCDD-EC{sub 50} for CYP1A5 transactivation was altered by switching AHR1 between the two avian species, irrespective of the species from which the regulatory region of CYP1A5 gene originates. Therefore, the structural difference in AHR, not the CYP1A5 regulatory region may be a major factor to account for the dioxin susceptibility in avian species.

  7. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  8. Interaction of lipids with the neurotensin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan H; Muñoz-García, Juan C; Castro-Dopico, Tomas; Dijkman, Patricia M; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Watts, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Information about lipid-protein interactions for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is scarce. Here, we use electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin-labelled lipids to study lipid interactions with the rat neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1). A fusion protein containing rat NTS1 fully able to bind its ligand neurotensin was reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers at specific lipid:protein molar ratios. The fraction of motionally restricted lipids in the range of 40:1 to 80:1 lipids per receptor suggested an oligomeric state of the protein, and the result was unaffected by increasing the hydrophobic thickness of the lipid bilayer from C-18 to C-20 or C-22 chain length PC membranes. Comparison of the ESR spectra of different spin-labelled lipids allowed direct measurement of lipid binding constants relative to PC (Kr), with spin-labelled phosphatidylethanolamine (PESL), phosphatidylserine (PSSL), stearic acid (SASL), and a spin labelled cholesterol analogue (CSL) Kr values of 1.05±0.05, 1.92±0.08, 5.20±0.51 and 0.91±0.19, respectively. The results contrast with those from rhodopsin, the only other GPCR studied this way, which has no selectivity for the lipids analysed here. Molecular dynamics simulations of NTS1 in bilayers are in agreement with the ESR data, and point to sites in the receptor where PS could interact with higher affinity. Lipid selectivity could be necessary for regulation of ligand binding, oligomerisation and/or G protein activation processes. Our results provide insight into the potential modulatory mechanisms that lipids can exert on GPCRs. PMID:26926422

  9. Cannabinoid receptor 1-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Krüger, Juliane M; Huang, Xiaojie; Gallaher, Zachary R; Ishikawa, Masago; Czaja, Krzysztof; Krueger, James M; Huang, Yanhua H; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2012-10-01

    Endocannabinoid signaling critically regulates emotional and motivational states via activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the brain. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) functions to gate emotional and motivational responses. Although expression of CB1 in the NAc is low, manipulation of CB1 signaling within the NAc triggers robust emotional/motivational alterations related to drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders, and these effects cannot be exclusively attributed to CB1 located at afferents to the NAc. Rather, CB1-expressing neurons in the NAc, although sparse, appear to be critical for emotional and motivational responses. However, the cellular properties of these neurons remain largely unknown. Here, we generated a knock-in mouse line in which CB1-expressing neurons expressed the fluorescent protein td-Tomato (tdT). Using these mice, we demonstrated that tdT-positive neurons within the NAc were exclusively fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs). These FSIs were electrically coupled with each other, and thus may help synchronize populations/ensembles of NAc neurons. CB1-expressing FSIs also form GABAergic synapses on adjacent medium spiny neurons (MSNs), providing feed-forward inhibition of NAc output. Furthermore, the membrane excitability of tdT-positive FSIs in the NAc was up-regulated after withdrawal from cocaine exposure, an effect that might increase FSI-to-MSN inhibition. Taken together with our previous findings that the membrane excitability of NAc MSNs is decreased during cocaine withdrawal, the present findings suggest that the basal functional output of the NAc is inhibited during cocaine withdrawal by multiple mechanisms. As such, CB1-expressing FSIs are targeted by cocaine exposure to influence the overall functional output of the NAc. PMID:23012412

  10. Influence of Genetic Ancestry on INDEL Markers of NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1, IL4 and CYP19A1 Genes in Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pablo; Salgado, Claudio; Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; Santos, Sidney; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an insidious infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacteria Mycobacterium leprae, and host genetic factors can modulate the immune response and generate distinct categories of leprosy susceptibility that are also influenced by genetic ancestry. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the possible effects of CYP19A1 [rs11575899], NFKβ1 [rs28362491], IL1α [rs3783553], CASP8 [rs3834129], UGT1A1 [rs8175347], PAR1 [rs11267092], CYP2E1 [INDEL 96pb] and IL4 [rs79071878] genes in a group of 141 leprosy patients and 180 healthy individuals. The INDELs were typed by PCR Multiplex in ABI PRISM 3130 and analyzed with GeneMapper ID v3.2. The NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and IL4 INDELs were associated with leprosy susceptibility, while NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and CYP19A1 were associated with the MB (Multibacilary) clinical form of leprosy. Conclusions/Significance NFKβ1 [rs28362491], CASP8 [rs3834129], PAR1 [rs11267092] and IL4 [rs79071878] genes are potential markers for susceptibility to leprosy development, while the INDELs in NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and CYP19A1 (rs11575899) are potential markers for the severe clinical form MB. Moreover, all of these markers are influenced by genetic ancestry, and European contribution increases the risk to leprosy development, in other hand an increase in African contribution generates protection against leprosy. PMID:26367014

  11. Stability validation of paraformaldehyde-fixed samples for the assessment of the platelet PECAM-1, P-selectin, and PAR-1 thrombin receptor by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Atar, Oliver D; Eisert, Christian; Pokov, Ilya; Serebruany, Victor L

    2010-07-01

    Sample fixation for storage and/or transportation represents an unsolved challenge for multicenter clinical trials assessing serial changes in platelet activity, or monitoring various antiplatelet regimens. Whole blood flow cytometry represents a major advance in defining platelet function, although special training and expensive equipment is required. We sought to determine how fixation with 2% paraformaldehyde (PFA), and storage of blood samples over 1 week affects the flow cytometry readings for both intact and thrombin-activating four major surface platelet receptors. Whole blood platelet expression of PECAM-1, P-selectin, PAR-1 inactive receptor (SPAN-12), and cleaved (WEDE-15) epitope was assessed immediately after blood draw, after staining with 2% PFA, and at day 1, 3, 5, and 7. The study was performed in 6 volunteers with multiple risk factors for vascular disease, not receiving any antiplatelet agents. Staining with PFA resulted in a slight decrease of fluorescence intensity, especially for PECAM-1, while antigen expression at day 1, 3 and 5 remains consistent, and highly reproducible. At day 7 there was a small but inconsistent trend towards diminished fluorescence intensity. The platelet data were consistent while validated with the isotype-matched irrelevant antibody. These data suggest that there is a 5 day window to perform final flow cytometry readings of whole blood PFA-fixed inactivated platelet samples. In contrast, thrombin activation cause gradual loss of flow cytometry signal, and cannot be recommended for long-term storage. This is critical logistic information for conducting multicenter platelet substudies within the framework of major clinical trials. PMID:19866345

  12. 3K3A-activated protein C stimulates postischemic neuronal repair by human neural stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaoming; Zhao, Zhen; Rege, Sanket V; Wang, Min; Si, Gabriel; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Su; Griffin, John H; Goldman, Steven A; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-09-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a blood protease with anticoagulant activity and cell-signaling activities mediated by the activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (F2R, also known as PAR1) and F2RL1 (also known as PAR3) via noncanonical cleavage. Recombinant variants of APC, such as the 3K3A-APC (Lys191-193Ala) mutant in which three Lys residues (KKK191-193) were replaced with alanine, and/or its other mutants with reduced (>90%) anticoagulant activity, engineered to reduce APC-associated bleeding risk while retaining normal cell-signaling activity, have shown benefits in preclinical models of ischemic stroke, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sepsis, ischemic and reperfusion injury of heart, kidney and liver, pulmonary, kidney and gastrointestinal inflammation, diabetes and lethal body radiation. On the basis of proof-of-concept studies and an excellent safety profile in humans, 3K3A-APC has advanced to clinical trials as a neuroprotectant in ischemic stroke. Recently, 3K3A-APC has been shown to stimulate neuronal production by human neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs) in vitro via a PAR1-PAR3-sphingosine-1-phosphate-receptor 1-Akt pathway, which suggests the potential for APC-based treatment as a strategy for structural repair in the human central nervous (CNS) system. Here we report that late postischemic treatment of mice with 3K3A-APC stimulates neuronal production by transplanted human NSCs, promotes circuit restoration and improves functional recovery. Thus, 3K3A-APC-potentiated neuronal recruitment from engrafted NSCs might offer a new approach to the treatment of stroke and related neurological disorders. PMID:27548576

  13. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1), AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1) and CYP1 family monooxygenase mRNAs and their activity in chicken ovarian follicles following in vitro exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

    PubMed

    Antos, Piotr A; Błachuta, Małgorzata; Hrabia, Anna; Grzegorzewska, Agnieszka K; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of TCDD and luteinizing hormone (LH) on mRNA expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1), AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1), and the CYP1 family monooxygenases (CYP1A4, CYP1A5, CYP1B1), and to assess the basal and TCDD-induced activity of these enzymes in chicken ovarian follicles. White (WF) and yellowish (YF) prehierarchical follicles and fragments of the theca (TL) and granulosa (GL) layers of the 3 largest preovulatory follicles (F3-F1) were exposed to TCDD (10nM), ovine LH (oLH; 10ng/mL) or a combination of TCDD (10nM) and oLH (10ng/mL), and increasing doses of TCDD (0.01-100nM). AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA transcripts were found in all examined follicles. The effect of TCDD and oLH on AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA expression depended on the maturational state of the follicle. CYP1A4 was predominantly expressed in the GL of the F3-F1 follicles; in comparison with the WF, a higher level of CYP1A5 mRNA was found both in the GL and TL of F3-F1 follicles. Alternatively, the highest level of CYP1B1 mRNA was noticed in the WF follicles. In different developmental stages of the follicle TCDD and oLH induced a different CYP1 isoform. TCDD increased EROD and MROD activities in all the investigated ovarian follicles. In conclusion, AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA expression indicate that the chicken ovary is a target tissue for dioxin and dioxin-like compounds. The expression of CYP1-family genes and TCDD-inducible EROD and MROD activities in ovarian follicles suggest the possibility of xenobiotic detoxification in the chicken ovary. PMID:26043675

  14. The potential impacts of formyl peptide receptor 1 in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. N-formyl peptides, which originate from bacterial peptides or mitochondrial proteins bind with a high binding affinity to formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). N-formyl peptide-FPR1 is involved in the pathogenesis of sterile and infectious inflammatory processes and causes phagocytosis of pathogens or injured cells by neutrophils. Excessive activation of neutrophils by binding of N-formyl peptides is associated with tissue injury requiring drugs that block FPR1-dependent signaling. Here, we review the roles of FPR1 as a critical regulator of inflammatory processes and its involvement in pathological conditions. PMID:27100350

  15. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 Expression in Human Cerebral Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rupal I.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Castellani, Rudy J.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In animal models of stroke, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), a member of the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter gene family, is transcriptionally upregulated in neural and vascular cells in which it plays a leading role in edema formation and necrotic cell death. To date, expression of Sur1 in the brains of humans with cerebral infarcts has not been systematically evaluated. We examined Sur1 expression in postmortem specimens obtained from 13 patients within the first 31 days after focal infarcts, 5 patients with lacunar infarcts, and 6 normal control brains using immunohistochemistry. Elevated immunoreactivity for Sur1 was detected in all cases of focal infarcts, with 3 distinct temporal patterns of expression: 1) neurons and endothelium showed the greatest elevation during the first week, after which levels declined; 2) astrocytes and microglia/macrophages showed progressive increases during the first 31 days; and 3) neutrophils near the infarct showed prominent immunoreactivity that did not change over time. Upregulation of Sur1 was corroborated using in situ hybridization for Abcc8 mRNA. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 immunoreactivity in lacunar infarcts was less prominent and more sporadic than in nonlacunar infarcts. In conjunction with previous studies, these data suggest that Sur1 may be a promising treatment target in patients with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:23965746

  16. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 expression in human cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rupal I; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Castellani, Rudy J; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2013-09-01

    In animal models of stroke, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), a member of the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter gene family, is transcriptionally upregulated in neural and vascular cells in which it plays a leading role in edema formation and necrotic cell death. To date, expression of Sur1 in the brains of humans with cerebral infarcts has not been systematically evaluated. We examined Sur1 expression in postmortem specimens obtained from 13 patients within the first 31 days after focal infarcts, 5 patients with lacunar infarcts, and 6 normal control brains using immunohistochemistry. Elevated immunoreactivity for Sur1 was detected in all cases of focal infarcts, with 3 distinct temporal patterns of expression: 1) neurons and endothelium showed the greatest elevation during the first week, after which levels declined; 2) astrocytes and microglia/macrophages showed progressive increases during the first 31 days; and 3) neutrophils near the infarct showed prominent immunoreactivity that did not change over time. Upregulation of Sur1 was corroborated using in situ hybridization for Abcc8 mRNA. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 immunoreactivity in lacunar infarcts was less prominent and more sporadic than in nonlacunar infarcts. In conjunction with previous studies, these data suggest that Sur1 may be a promising treatment target in patients with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:23965746

  17. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses. PMID:26516201

  18. Function of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 in Reproductive System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hongyan; Xuan, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1), also known as GPR30, is a novel estrogen receptor mediating estrogen receptor signaling in multiple cell types. The progress of estrogen-related cancer is promoted by GPER-1 activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. However, this promoting effect of GPER-1 is nonclassic estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. In addition, clinical evidences revealed that GPER-1 is associated with estrogen resistance in estrogen-related cancer patients. These give a hint that GPER-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the estrogen-related cancers. However, preclinical studies also found that GPER-1 activation of its special agonist G-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation. This review aims to summarize the characteristics and complex functions of GPER-1 in cancers. PMID:27314054

  19. Trace amine-associated receptor 1: a promising target for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Li, Jun-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Abuse of and addiction to psychostimulants remains a challenging clinical issue, yet no effective pharmacotherapy is available. Trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR 1) is increasingly recognized as a novel drug target that participates in the modulation of drug abuse. This review analyzed existing preclinical evidence from electrophysiological, biochemical to behavioral aspects regarding the functional interactions between TAAR 1 and dopaminergic system. TAAR 1 knockout mice demonstrate increased sensitivity to dopaminergic activation while TAAR 1 agonists reduce the neurochemical effects of cocaine and amphetamines, attenuate abuse- and addiction-related behavioral effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. It is concluded that TAAR 1 activation functionally modulate the dopaminergic activity and TAAR 1 agonists appear to be promising pharmacotherapies against psychostimulant addiction. PMID:26092759

  20. PAR-1-Stimulated Factor IXa Binding to a Small Platelet Subpopulation Requires a Pronounced and Sustained Increase of Cytoplasmic Calcium †

    PubMed Central

    London, Fredda S.; Marcinkiewicz, Mariola; Walsh, Peter N.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that only a subpopulation of PAR-1-stimulated platelets binds coagulation factor IXa, since confirmed by other laboratories. Since calcium changes have been implicated in exposure of procoagulant aminophospholipids, we have now examined calcium fluxes in this subpopulation by measuring fluorescence changes in Fura Red/AM-loaded platelets following PAR-1 stimulation. While fluorescence changes in all platelets indicated calcium release from internal stores and influx of external calcium, a subpopulation of platelets displayed a pronounced increase in calcium transients by 15 seconds and positive factor IXa binding by 2 minutes, with calcium transients sustained for 45 minutes. Pretreatment of platelets with Xestospongin C to inhibit IP3-mediated dense tubule calcium release, and the presence of impermeable calcium channel blockers nifedipine, SKF96365 or LaCl3, inhibited PAR-1-induced development of a subpopulation with pronounced calcium transients, factor IXa binding, and platelet support of FXa generation, suggesting the importance of both release of calcium from internal stores and influx of extracellular calcium. When platelets were stimulated in EDTA for 5 to 20 minutes before addition of calcium, factor IXa binding sites developed on a smaller subpopulation but with unchanged rate indicating sustained opening of calcium channels and continued availability of signaling elements required for binding site exposure. While pretreatment of platelets with 100 μM BAPTA/AM (Kd 160 nM) had minimal effects, 100 μM 5, 5′-dimethylBAPTA/AM (Kd 40 nM) completely inhibited the appearance and function of the platelet subpopulation, indicating the importance of minor increases of cytoplasmic calcium. We conclude that PAR-1-stimulated development of factor IXa binding sites in a subpopulation of platelets is dependent upon release of calcium from internal stores leading to sustained and pronounced calcium transients. PMID:16752917

  1. Central Administration of Galanin Receptor 1 Agonist Boosted Insulin Sensitivity in Adipose Cells of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; He, Biao; Guo, Lili; Runesson, Johan; Langel, Ülo; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies testified the beneficial effect of central galanin on insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetic rats. The aim of the study was further to investigate whether central M617, a galanin receptor 1 agonist, can benefit insulin sensitivity. The effects of intracerebroventricular administration of M617 on insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling were evaluated in adipose tissues of type 2 diabetic rats. The results showed that central injection of M617 significantly increased plasma adiponectin contents, glucose infusion rates in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests, GLUT4 mRNA expression levels, GLUT4 contents in plasma membranes, and total cell membranes of the adipose cells but reduced the plasma C-reactive protein concentration in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. The ratios of GLUT4 contents were higher in plasma membranes to total cell membranes in both nondiabetic and diabetic M617 groups than each control. In addition, the central administration of M617 enhanced the ratios of pAkt/Akt and pAS160/AS160, but not phosphorylative cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB)/CREB in the adipose cells of nondiabetic and diabetic rats. These results suggest that excitation of central galanin receptor 1 facilitates insulin sensitivity via activation of the Akt/AS160 signaling pathway in the fat cells of type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:27127795

  2. Kin2, the Budding Yeast Ortholog of Animal MARK/PAR-1 Kinases, Localizes to the Sites of Polarized Growth and May Regulate Septin Organization and the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Si-Min; Nie, Wen-Chao; He, Fei; Jia, Zhi-Wen; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    MARK/PAR-1 protein kinases play important roles in cell polarization in animals. Kin1 and Kin2 are a pair of MARK/PAR-1 orthologs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They participate in the regulation of secretion and ER stress response. However, neither the subcellular localization of these two kinases nor whether they may have other cellular functions is clear. Here, we show that Kin2 localizes to the sites of polarized growth in addition to localization on the plasma membrane. The localization to polarity sites is mediated by two targeting domains—TD1 and TD2. TD1 locates in the N-terminal region that spans the protein kinase domain whereas TD2 locates in the C-terminal end that covers the KA1 domain. We also show that an excess of Kin2 activity impaired growth, septin organization, and chitin deposition in the cell wall. Both TD1 and TD2 contribute to this function. Moreover, we find that the C-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Cdc11, a septin subunit, and Pea2, a component of the polarisome that is known to play a role in septin organization. These findings suggest that Kin2 may play a role in the regulation of the septin cytoskeleton and the cell wall. Finally, we show that the C-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Rho3, a Rho GTPase, whereas the N-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Bmh1, a 14-3-3 protein. We speculate that Kin2 may be regulated by Bmh1, Rho3, or Pea2 in vivo. Our study provides new insight in the localization, function, and regulation of Kin2. PMID:27096577

  3. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Association With Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangning; Williamson, Vernell S.; An, Seon-Sook; Hettema, John M.; Aggen, Steven H.; Neale, Michael C.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Context The endogenous cannabinoid system has been implicated in drug addiction in animal models. The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene is 1 of the 2 receptors expressed in the brain. It has been reported to be associated with alcoholism and multiple drug abuse and dependence. Objective To test the hypothesis that the CNR1 gene is associated with nicotine dependence. Design Genotype-phenotype association study. Ten single-nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in the CNR1 gene in 2 independent samples. For the first sample (n=688), a 3-group case-control design was used to test allele association with smoking initiation and nicotine dependence. For the second sample (n = 961), association was assessed with scores from the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Settings Population samples selected from the Mid-Atlantic Twin Registry. Participants White patients aged 18 to 65 years who met the criteria of inclusion. Main Outcome Measures Fagerström Tolerance Questionnaire and FTND scores. Results Significant single-marker and haplotype associations were found in both samples, and the associations were female specific. Haplotype 1-1-2 of markers rs2023239-rs12720071-rs806368 was associated with nicotine dependence and FTND score in the 2 samples (P<.001 and P = .009, respectively). Conclusion Variants and haplotypes in the CNR1 gene may alter the risk for nicotine dependence, and the associations are likely sex specific. PMID:18606954

  4. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  5. Bioactivation pathways of the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Moa Andresen; Isin, Emre M; Castagnoli, Neal; Milne, Claire E

    2011-10-01

    In the present work, the characterization of the biotransformation and bioactivation pathways of the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant (Acomplia) is described. Rimonabant was approved in Europe in 2006 for the treatment of obesity but was withdrawn in 2008 because of a significant drug-related risk of serious psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present work is to characterize the biotransformation and potential bioactivation pathways of rimonabant in vitro in human and rat liver microsomes. The observation of a major iminium ion metabolite led us to perform reactive metabolite trapping, covalent binding to proteins, and time-dependent inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 studies. The major biotransformation pathways were oxidative dehydrogenation of the piperidinyl ring to an iminium ion, hydroxylation of the 3 position of the piperidinyl ring, and cleavage of the amide linkage. In coincubations with potassium cyanide, three cyanide adducts were detected. A high level of covalent binding of rimonabant in human liver microsomes was observed (920 pmol equivalents/mg protein). In coincubations with potassium cyanide and methoxylamine, the covalent binding was reduced by approximately 40 and 30%, respectively, whereas GSH had no significant effect on covalent binding levels. Rimonabant was also found to inhibit cytochrome P450 3A4 irreversibly in a time-dependent manner. In view of these findings, it is noteworthy that, to date, no toxicity findings related to the formation of reactive metabolites from rimonabant have been reported. PMID:21733882

  6. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  7. Protease-activated receptors mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    McEachron, Troy A; Pawlinski, Rafal; Richards, Kristy L; Church, Frank C; Mackman, Nigel

    2010-12-01

    The coagulation and fibrinolytic systems contribute to malignancy by increasing angiogenesis, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. Oncogenic transformation increases the expression of tissue factor (TF) that results in local generation of coagulation proteases and activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR-2. We compared the PAR-dependent expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in 2 murine mammary adencocarcinoma cell lines: metastatic 4T1 cells and nonmetastatic 67NR cells. 4T1 cells expressed TF, PAR-1 and PAR-2 whereas 67NR cells expressed TF and PAR-1. We also silenced PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression in the 4T1 cells. We discovered 2 distinct mechanisms for PAR-dependent expression of uPA and PAI-1. First, we found that factor Xa or thrombin activation of PAR-1 led to a rapid release of stored intracellular uPA into the culture supernatant. Second, thrombin transactivation of a PAR-1/PAR-2 complex resulted in increases in PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cells lacking PAR-2 failed to express PAI-1 in response to thrombin and factor Xa did not activate the PAR-1/PAR-2 complex. Our results reveal how PAR-1 and PAR-2 on tumor cells mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:20736455

  8. Protease-activated receptors mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    McEachron, Troy A.; Pawlinski, Rafal; Richards, Kristy L.; Church, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    The coagulation and fibrinolytic systems contribute to malignancy by increasing angiogenesis, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. Oncogenic transformation increases the expression of tissue factor (TF) that results in local generation of coagulation proteases and activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR-2. We compared the PAR-dependent expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in 2 murine mammary adencocarcinoma cell lines: metastatic 4T1 cells and nonmetastatic 67NR cells. 4T1 cells expressed TF, PAR-1 and PAR-2 whereas 67NR cells expressed TF and PAR-1. We also silenced PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression in the 4T1 cells. We discovered 2 distinct mechanisms for PAR-dependent expression of uPA and PAI-1. First, we found that factor Xa or thrombin activation of PAR-1 led to a rapid release of stored intracellular uPA into the culture supernatant. Second, thrombin transactivation of a PAR-1/PAR-2 complex resulted in increases in PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cells lacking PAR-2 failed to express PAI-1 in response to thrombin and factor Xa did not activate the PAR-1/PAR-2 complex. Our results reveal how PAR-1 and PAR-2 on tumor cells mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:20736455

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phenoxyacetic acid derivatives as novel free fatty acid receptor 1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuekun; Zhao, Tianxiao; Yang, Baowei; Li, Zheng; Cui, Jian; Dai, Yuxuan; Qiu, Qianqian; Qiang, Hao; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1) is a new potential drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because of its role in amplifying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cell. In the present studies, we identified phenoxyacetic acid derivative (18b) as a potent FFA1 agonist (EC50=62.3 nM) based on the structure of phenylpropanoic acid derivative 4p. Moreover, compound 18b could significantly improve oral glucose tolerance in ICR mice and dose-dependently reduced glucose levels in type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 mice without observation of hypoglycemic side effect. Additionally, compound 18b exhibited acceptable PK profiles. In summary, compound 18b with ideal PK profiles exhibited good activity in vitro and in vivo, and might be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25481394

  10. Antagonism of human formyl peptide receptor 1 with natural compounds and their synthetic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-08-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) regulates a wide variety of neutrophil functional responses and plays an important role in inflammation and the pathogenesis of various diseases. To date, a variety of natural and synthetic molecules have been identified as FPR1 ligands. Here, we review current knowledge on natural products and natural product-inspired small molecules reported to antagonize and/or inhibit the FPR1-mediated responses. Based on this literature, additional screening of selected commercially available natural compounds for their ability to inhibit fMLF-induced Ca(2+) mobilization in human neutrophils and FPR1 transfected HL-60 cells, and pharmacophore modeling, natural products with potential as FPR1 antagonists are considered and discussed in this review. The identification and characterization of natural products that antagonize FPR1 activity may have potential for the development of novel therapeutics to limit or alter the outcome of inflammatory processes. PMID:26382576

  11. Corneal avascularity is due to soluble VEGF receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Ambati, Balamurali K; Nozaki, Miho; Singh, Nirbhai; Takeda, Atsunobu; Jani, Pooja D; Suthar, Tushar; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Richter, Elizabeth; Sakurai, Eiji; Newcomb, Michael T; Kleinman, Mark E; Caldwell, Ruth B; Lin, Qing; Ogura, Yuichiro; Orecchia, Angela; Samuelson, Don A; Agnew, Dalen W; St Leger, Judy; Green, W Richard; Mahasreshti, Parameshwar J; Curiel, David T; Kwan, Donna; Marsh, Helene; Ikeda, Sakae; Leiper, Lucy J; Collinson, J Martin; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir S; Shibuya, Masabumi; Baldwin, Megan E; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gerber, Hans-Peter; De Falco, Sandro; Witta, Jassir; Baffi, Judit Z; Raisler, Brian J; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2006-10-26

    Corneal avascularity-the absence of blood vessels in the cornea-is required for optical clarity and optimal vision, and has led to the cornea being widely used for validating pro- and anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies for many disorders. But the molecular underpinnings of the avascular phenotype have until now remained obscure and are all the more remarkable given the presence in the cornea of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, and the proximity of the cornea to vascularized tissues. Here we show that the cornea expresses soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1; also known as sflt-1) and that suppression of this endogenous VEGF-A trap by neutralizing antibodies, RNA interference or Cre-lox-mediated gene disruption abolishes corneal avascularity in mice. The spontaneously vascularized corneas of corn1 and Pax6+/- mice and Pax6+/- patients with aniridia are deficient in sflt-1, and recombinant sflt-1 administration restores corneal avascularity in corn1 and Pax6+/- mice. Manatees, the only known creatures uniformly to have vascularized corneas, do not express sflt-1, whereas the avascular corneas of dugongs, also members of the order Sirenia, elephants, the closest extant terrestrial phylogenetic relatives of manatees, and other marine mammals (dolphins and whales) contain sflt-1, indicating that it has a crucial, evolutionarily conserved role. The recognition that sflt-1 is essential for preserving the avascular ambit of the cornea can rationally guide its use as a platform for angiogenic modulators, supports its use in treating neovascular diseases, and might provide insight into the immunological privilege of the cornea. PMID:17051153

  12. par-1, Atypical pkc, and PP2A/B55 sur-6 Are Implicated in the Regulation of Exocyst-Mediated Membrane Trafficking in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jiu, Yaming; Hasygar, Kiran; Tang, Lois; Liu, Yanbo; Holmberg, Carina I.; Bürglin, Thomas R.; Hietakangas, Ville; Jäntti, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    The exocyst is a conserved protein complex that is involved in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane and regulating cell polarity. Despite a large body of work, little is known how exocyst function is controlled. To identify regulators for exocyst function, we performed a targeted RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover kinases and phosphatases that genetically interact with the exocyst. We identified seven kinase and seven phosphatase genes that display enhanced phenotypes when combined with hypomorphic alleles of exoc-7 (exo70), exoc-8 (exo84), or an exoc-7;exoc-8 double mutant. We show that in line with its reported role in exocytotic membrane trafficking, a defective exoc-8 caused accumulation of exocytotic soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in both intestinal and neuronal cells in C. elegans. Down-regulation of the phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) phosphatase regulatory subunit sur-6/B55 gene resulted in accumulation of exocytic SNARE proteins SNB-1 and SNAP-29 in wild-type and in exoc-8 mutant animals. In contrast, RNAi of the kinase par-1 caused reduced intracellular green fluorescent protein signal for the same proteins. Double RNAi experiments for par-1, pkc-3, and sur-6/B55 in C. elegans suggest a possible cooperation and involvement in postembryo lethality, developmental timing, as well as SNARE protein trafficking. Functional analysis of the homologous kinases and phosphatases in Drosophila median neurosecretory cells showed that atypical protein kinase C kinase and phosphatase PP2A regulate exocyst-dependent, insulin-like peptide secretion. Collectively, these results characterize kinases and phosphatases implicated in the regulation of exocyst function, and suggest the possibility for interplay between the par-1 and pkc-3 kinases and the PP2A phosphatase regulatory subunit sur-6 in this process. PMID:24192838

  13. par-1, atypical pkc, and PP2A/B55 sur-6 are implicated in the regulation of exocyst-mediated membrane trafficking in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jiu, Yaming; Hasygar, Kiran; Tang, Lois; Liu, Yanbo; Holmberg, Carina I; Bürglin, Thomas R; Hietakangas, Ville; Jäntti, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    The exocyst is a conserved protein complex that is involved in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane and regulating cell polarity. Despite a large body of work, little is known how exocyst function is controlled. To identify regulators for exocyst function, we performed a targeted RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover kinases and phosphatases that genetically interact with the exocyst. We identified seven kinase and seven phosphatase genes that display enhanced phenotypes when combined with hypomorphic alleles of exoc-7 (exo70), exoc-8 (exo84), or an exoc-7;exoc-8 double mutant. We show that in line with its reported role in exocytotic membrane trafficking, a defective exoc-8 caused accumulation of exocytotic soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in both intestinal and neuronal cells in C. elegans. Down-regulation of the phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) phosphatase regulatory subunit sur-6/B55 gene resulted in accumulation of exocytic SNARE proteins SNB-1 and SNAP-29 in wild-type and in exoc-8 mutant animals. In contrast, RNAi of the kinase par-1 caused reduced intracellular green fluorescent protein signal for the same proteins. Double RNAi experiments for par-1, pkc-3, and sur-6/B55 in C. elegans suggest a possible cooperation and involvement in postembryo lethality, developmental timing, as well as SNARE protein trafficking. Functional analysis of the homologous kinases and phosphatases in Drosophila median neurosecretory cells showed that atypical protein kinase C kinase and phosphatase PP2A regulate exocyst-dependent, insulin-like peptide secretion. Collectively, these results characterize kinases and phosphatases implicated in the regulation of exocyst function, and suggest the possibility for interplay between the par-1 and pkc-3 kinases and the PP2A phosphatase regulatory subunit sur-6 in this process. PMID:24192838

  14. Protective effects of activated protein C on neurovascular unit in a rat model of intrauterine infection-induced neonatal white matter injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sheng-juan; Liu, Yan; Deng, Shi-hua; Lin, Tu-lian; Rashid, Abid; Liao, Li-hong; Ning, Qin; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2015-12-01

    Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant, has been reported to exert direct vasculoprotective, neural protective, anti-inflammatory, and proneurogenic activities in the central nervous system. This study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effects and potential mechanisms of APC on the neurovascular unit of neonatal rats with intrauterine infection-induced white matter injury. Intraperitoneal injection of 300 μg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered consecutively to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats at embryonic days 19 and 20 to establish the rat model of intrauterine infection- induced white matter injury. Control rats were injected with an equivalent amount of sterile saline on the same time. APC at the dosage of 0.2 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected to neonatal rats immediately after birth. Brain tissues were collected at postnatal day 7 and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate myelin basic protein (MBP) expression in the periventricular white matter region. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and brain water content were measured using Evens Blue dye and wet/dry weight method. Double immunofluorescence staining and real-time quantitative PCR were performed to detect microglial activation and the expression of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Typical pathological changes of white matter injury were observed in rat brains exposed to LPS, and MBP expression in the periventricular region was significantly decreased. BBB was disrupted and the brain water content was increased. Microglia were largely activated and the mRNA and protein levels of PAR1 were elevated. APC administration ameliorated the pathological lesions of the white matter and increased MBP expression. BBB permeability and brain water content were reduced. Microglia activation was inhibited and the PAR1 mRNA and protein expression levels were both down-regulated. Our results suggested that APC exerted neuroprotective effects

  15. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Protein Is a Novel Modulator of Megakaryocyte-Collagen Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Abbonante, Vittorio; Gruppi, Cristian; Rubel, Diana; Gross, Oliver; Moratti, Remigio; Balduini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that extracellular matrices regulate many aspects of megakaryocyte (MK) development; however, among the different extracellular matrix receptors, integrin α2β1 and glycoprotein VI are the only collagen receptors studied in platelets and MKs. In this study, we demonstrate the expression of the novel collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) by human MKs at both mRNA and protein levels and provide evidence of DDR1 involvement in the regulation of MK motility on type I collagen through a mechanism based on the activity of SHP1 phosphatase and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Specifically, we demonstrated that inhibition of DDR1 binding to type I collagen, preserving the engagement of the other collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI, α2β1, and LAIR-1, determines a decrease in MK migration due to the reduction in SHP1 phosphatase activity and consequent increase in the phosphorylation level of its main substrate Syk. Consistently, inhibition of Syk activity restored MK migration on type I collagen. In conclusion, we report the expression and function of a novel collagen receptor on human MKs, and we point out that an increasing level of complexity is necessary to better understand MK-collagen interactions in the bone marrow environment. PMID:23530036

  16. Regulation of motor function and behavior by atypical chemokine receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Erich H; Fowler, Stephen C; Lionakis, Michail S; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Holmes, Gibran; Diaz, Vivian; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Peiper, Stephen C; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2014-09-01

    Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1), previously known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines, stands out among chemokine receptors for high selective expression on cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Although ACKR1 ligands activate Purkinje cells in vitro, evidence for ACKR1 regulation of brain function in vivo is lacking. Here we demonstrate that Ackr1 (-/-) mice have markedly impaired balance and ataxia on a rotating rod and increased tremor when injected with harmaline, which induces whole-body tremor by activating Purkinje cells. Ackr1 (-/-) mice also exhibited impaired exploratory behavior, increased anxiety-like behavior and frequent episodes of marked hypoactivity under low-stress conditions. Surprisingly, Ackr1 (+/-) had similar behavioral abnormalities, indicating pronounced haploinsufficiency. The behavioral phenotype of Ackr1 (-/-) mice was the opposite of mouse models of cerebellar degeneration, and the defects persisted when Ackr1 was deficient only on non-hematopoietic cells. Together, the results suggest that normal motor function and behavior may partly depend on negative regulation of Purkinje cell activity by Ackr1. PMID:24997773

  17. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system. PMID:25116250

  18. Discovery of a potent and selective free fatty acid receptor 1 agonist with low lipophilicity and high oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E; Urban, Christian; Grundmann, Manuel; Schmidt, Johannes; Hansen, Steffen V F; Hudson, Brian D; Zaibi, Mohamed; Markussen, Stine B; Hagesaether, Ellen; Milligan, Graeme; Cawthorne, Michael A; Kostenis, Evi; Kassack, Matthias U; Ulven, Trond

    2013-02-14

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also known as GPR40) mediates enhancement of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and is emerging as a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Several FFA1 agonists are known, but the majority of these suffer from high lipophilicity. We have previously reported the FFA1 agonist 3 (TUG-424). We here describe the continued structure-activity exploration and optimization of this compound series, leading to the discovery of the more potent agonist 40, a compound with low lipophilicity, excellent in vitro metabolic stability and permeability, complete oral bioavailability, and appreciable efficacy on glucose tolerance in mice. PMID:23294321

  19. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor-1 Antagonists as Modulators of Innate Immune Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Theron, A. J.; Steel, H. C.; Tintinger, G. R.; Gravett, C. M.; Anderson, R.; Feldman, C.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are produced predominantly by cells of the innate immune system, especially basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Notwithstanding potent bronchoconstrictor activity, cysLTs are also proinflammatory consequent to their autocrine and paracrine interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors expressed not only on the aforementioned cell types, but also on Th2 lymphocytes, as well as structural cells, and to a lesser extent neutrophils and CD8+ cells. Recognition of the involvement of cysLTs in the immunopathogenesis of various types of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, especially bronchial asthma, prompted the development of selective cysLT receptor-1 (cysLTR1) antagonists, specifically montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast. More recently these agents have also been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory activities, distinct from cysLTR1 antagonism, which appear to be particularly effective in targeting neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Underlying mechanisms include interference with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, 5′-lipoxygenase, and the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B. These and other secondary anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the commonly used cysLTR1 antagonists are the major focus of the current review, which also includes a comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast on human neutrophils in vitro, as well as an overview of both the current clinical applications of these agents and potential future applications based on preclinical and early clinical studies. PMID:24971371

  20. Leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor-1-deficient mice have an altered immune cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaobin; Tian, Linjie; Esteso, Gloria; Choi, Seung-Chul; Barrow, Alexander D; Colonna, Marco; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E

    2012-01-15

    Cross-linking of the collagen binding receptor leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) in vitro delivers an inhibitory signal that is able to downregulate activation-mediated signals. To study the in vivo function of LAIR-1, we generated LAIR-1(-/-) mice. They are healthy and fertile and have normal longevity; however, they show certain phenotypic characteristics distinct from wild-type mice, including increased numbers of splenic B, regulatory T, and dendritic cells. As LAIR-1(-/-) mice age, the splenic T cell population shows a higher frequency of activated and memory T cells. Because LAIR-1(+/+) and LAIR-1(-/-) T cells traffic with equal proficiency to peripheral lymphoid organs, this is not likely due to abnormal T lymphocyte trafficking. LAIR-1(-/-) mice have lower serum levels of IgG1 and, in response to T-dependent immunization with trinitrophenyl-OVA, switch less efficiently to Ag specific IgG2a and IgG2b, whereas switching to IgG1 is not affected. Several mouse disease models, including experimental autoimmune encephalitis and colitis, were used to examine the effect of LAIR-1 deficiency, and no differences in the responses of LAIR-1(-/-) and LAIR-1(+/+) mice were observed. Taken together, these observations indicate that LAIR-1 plays a role in regulating immune cells and suggest that any adverse effects of its absence may be balanced in vivo by other inhibitory receptors. PMID:22156345

  1. 3D-pharmacophere models for CC chemokine receptor 1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Andre, Philippe; Wei, Jing; Zhao, Kang

    2009-07-01

    The CC Chemokine Receptor 1 (CCR1) is closely related to various chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and plays a crucial role in transplant rejection. Inhibiting its activity with CCR1 antagonists has been proved to be effective in preventing some diseases. A number of in vivo experiments have been carried out to shed light on the underlying mechanism of the interactions between the CCR1 and its ligands. However, their conclusions are still controversial. In this study, ligand-based computational drug design is applied as a new and effective way to study the structure-activity relationship of CCR1 antagonists. Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for CCR1 antagonists, using both HypoGen and HipHop algorithms in Catalyst software. Two optimal pharmacophore models were defined through careful qualification processes. Both of them have four features: one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one positive ionable and two hydrophobic groups. Additional information was obtained through comparison between the two models. Our results can be valuable tools for the discovery and development of specific, highly potent CCR1 antagonists. For Supplement material, please see the online version of the article. PMID:19689388

  2. Resolvin E1 and chemokine-like receptor 1 mediate bone preservation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Faibish, Dan; Fredman, Gabrielle; Herrera, Bruno S; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Gyurko, Robert

    2013-01-15

    The polyunsaturated ω-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid-derived resolvin E1 (RvE1) enhances resolution of inflammation, prevents bone loss, and induces bone regeneration. Although the inflammation-resolving actions of RvE1 are characterized, the molecular mechanism of its bone-protective actions are of interest. To test the hypothesis that receptor-mediated events impact bone changes, we prepared transgenic mice overexpressing the RvE1 receptor chemokine-like receptor 1 (chemR23) on leukocytes. In zymosan-initiated peritonitis, neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration in response to RvE1 was limited requiring log order lower doses in chemR23tg mice. Ligature-induced alveolar bone loss was diminished in chemR23tg mice. Local RvE1 treatment of uniform craniotomy in the parietal bone significantly accelerated regeneration of the bone defect. In in vitro bone cultures, RvE1 significantly enhanced expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) without inducing change in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand levels, whereas the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, and Runt-related transcription factor 2 remained unchanged. These results indicate that RvE1 modulates osteoclast differentiation and bone remodeling by direct actions on bone, rescuing OPG production and restoring a favorable receptor activator of NF-κB ligand/OPG ratio, in addition to known anti-inflammatory and proresolving actions. PMID:23241890

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Sense Three Dimensional Type I Collagen through Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lund, A.W.; Stegemann, J.P.; Plopper, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix provides structural and organizational cues for tissue development and defines and maintains cellular phenotype during cell fate determination. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells use this matrix to tightly regulate the balance between their differentiation potential and self-renewal in the native niche. When understood, the mechanisms that govern cell-matrix crosstalk during differentiation will allow for efficient engineering of natural and synthetic matrices to specifically direct and maintain stem cell phenotype. This work identifies the discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen activated receptor tyrosine kinase, as a potential link through which stem cells sense and respond to the 3D organization of their extracellular matrix microenvironment. DDR1 is dependent upon both the structure and proteolytic state of its collagen ligand and is specifically expressed and localized in three dimensional type I collagen culture. Inhibition of DDR1 expression results in decreased osteogenic potential, increased cell spreading, stress fiber formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, loss of DDR1 activity alters the cell-mediated organization of the naïve type I collagen matrix. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for DDR1 in the stem cell response to and interaction with three dimensional type I collagen. Dynamic changes in cell shape in 3D culture and the tuning of the local ECM microstructure, directs crosstalk between DDR1 and two dimensional mechanisms of osteogenesis that can alter their traditional roles. PMID:20589230

  4. Optimization of cAMP fluorescence dataset from ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaela S; Abidi, Ammaar H; Moore, Bob M

    2016-06-01

    The ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 functional system is comprised of transfected HEK cells with the parental cyclic nucleotide gated channel (CNG) co-transfected with cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). The ACTOne CB1 cell line was evaluated for cAMP driven fluorescence by optimizing experimental conditions for sensitivity to forskolin and CP 55,940, reading time point, reliability of cell passage number, and pertussis inactivation of Gi/o. PMID:27115025

  5. Optimization of cAMP fluorescence dataset from ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Chaela S.; Abidi, Ammaar H.; Moore, Bob M.

    2016-01-01

    The ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 functional system is comprised of transfected HEK cells with the parental cyclic nucleotide gated channel (CNG) co-transfected with cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). The ACTOne CB1 cell line was evaluated for cAMP driven fluorescence by optimizing experimental conditions for sensitivity to forskolin and CP 55,940, reading time point, reliability of cell passage number, and pertussis inactivation of Gi/o. PMID:27115025

  6. Cannabinoid receptor 1 ligands revisited: Pharmacological assessment in the ACTOne system.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaela S; Abidi, Ammaar H; Moore, Bob M

    2016-04-01

    In vitro cannabinoid pharmacology has evolved over time from simple receptor binding to include [(35)S]GTPγ, β-arrestin, and cAMP assays. Each assay has benefits and drawbacks; however, no single functional system has been used for high-throughput evaluation of compounds from binding to pharmacological functionality and antagonist assessment in a well-characterized human cell line. In this study, we evaluated and validated one system-ACTOne human embryonic kidney cells transfected with a cyclic nucleotide gated channel and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1)-and compared human CB1 affinity, functional, and antagonistic effects on cAMP with previously published results. The study was conducted on a diverse group of CB1 ligands, including endocannabinoids and related compounds, 2-AG, AEA, MAEA, and ACEA, the phytocannabinoid Δ(9) THC, and synthetic cannabinoids CP 55,940, WIN 55,212-2, SR 141716A, CP 945,598, and WIN 55,212-3. Our results were compared with literature values where human CB1 was used for affinity determination and cAMP was used as a functional readout. Here we report the first detailed evaluation of the ACTOne assay for the pharmacological evaluation of CB1 ligands. The results from the study reveal some interesting deviations from previously reported functional activities of the aforementioned ligands. PMID:26772161

  7. Immunohistochemical distribution of the cannabinoid receptor 1 and fatty acid amide hydrolase in the dog claustrum.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Cantile, Carlo; Miragliotta, Vincenzo; Lenzi, Carla; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Cozzi, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are part of the endocannabinoid system (ECB) which exerts a neuromodulatory activity on different brain functions and plays a key role in neurogenesis. Although many studies have reported FAAH and CB1R expression in the brain of different animal species, to the best of our knowledge they have never been described in the canine claustrum. Claustrum samples, obtained from necropsy of four neurologically normal dogs, were formalin fixed for paraffin embedding. Sections were either stained for morpho-histological analysis or immunostained for CB1R and FAAH. Analysis of adjacent sections incubated with the two antisera showed a complementary labeling pattern in the claustrum, with CB1R antibody staining fibers while anti-FAAH antibody stained cell bodies and the proximal portion of dendrites; this particular anatomical relationship suggests a retrograde endocannabinoid action via CB1R. CB1R and FAAH complementary immunostaining and their cellular localization reported here provide the first anatomical evidence for existence of the ECB in the dog claustrum. PMID:26907575

  8. Epithelial estrogen receptor 1 intrinsically mediates squamous differentiation in the mouse vagina

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-mediated actions in female reproductive organs are tightly regulated, mainly through estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1). The mouse vaginal epithelium cyclically exhibits cell proliferation and differentiation in response to estrogen and provides a unique model for analyzing the homeostasis of stratified squamous epithelia. To address the role of ESR1-mediated tissue events during homeostasis, we analyzed mice with a vaginal epithelium-specific knockout of Esr1 driven by keratin 5-Cre (K5-Esr1KO). We show here that loss of epithelial ESR1 in the vagina resulted in aberrant epithelial cell proliferation in the suprabasal cell layers and led to failure of keratinized differentiation. Gene expression analysis showed that several known estrogen target genes, including erbB growth factor ligands, were not induced by estrogen in the K5-Esr1KO mouse vagina. Organ culture experiments revealed that the addition of erbB growth factor ligands, such as amphiregulin, could activate keratinized differentiation in the absence of epithelial ESR1. Thus, epithelial ESR1 integrates estrogen and growth factor signaling to mediate regulation of cell proliferation in squamous differentiation, and our results provide new insights into estrogen-mediated homeostasis in female reproductive organs. PMID:26438838

  9. Ferristatin II Promotes Degradation of Transferrin Receptor-1 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghan; Luo, Flora; Sanford, Jack; Chen, Juxing; Enns, Caroline; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the small molecule iron transport inhibitor ferristatin (NSC30611) acts by down-regulating transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) via receptor degradation. In this investigation, we show that another small molecule, ferristatin II (NSC8679), acts in a similar manner to degrade the receptor through a nystatin-sensitive lipid raft pathway. Structural domains of the receptor necessary for interactions with the clathrin pathway do not appear to be necessary for ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. While TfR1 constitutively traffics through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, with or without ligand, the presence of Tf blocked ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. This effect of Tf was lost in a ligand binding receptor mutant G647A TfR1, suggesting that Tf binding to its receptor interferes with the drug’s activity. Rats treated with ferristatin II have lower TfR1 in liver. These effects are associated with reduced intestinal 59Fe uptake, lower serum iron and transferrin saturation, but no change in liver non-heme iron stores. The observed hypoferremia promoted by degradation of TfR1 by ferristatin II appears to be due to induced hepcidin gene expression. PMID:23894616

  10. Incretin-like effects of small molecule trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Susanne; Wang, Haiyan; Uhles, Sabine; Cole, Nadine; Alvarez-Sanchez, Ruben; Künnecke, Basil; Ullmer, Christoph; Matile, Hugues; Bedoucha, Marc; Norcross, Roger D.; Ottaway-Parker, Nickki; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Conde Knape, Karin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hoener, Marius C.; Sewing, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes and obesity are emerging pandemics in the 21st century creating worldwide urgency for the development of novel and safe therapies. We investigated trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) as a novel target contributing to the control of glucose homeostasis and body weight. Methods We investigated the peripheral human tissue distribution of TAAR1 by immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of a small molecule TAAR1 agonist on insulin secretion in vitro using INS1E cells and human islets and on glucose tolerance in C57Bl6, and db/db mice. Body weight effects were investigated in obese DIO mice. Results TAAR1 activation by a selective small molecule agonist increased glucose-dependent insulin secretion in INS1E cells and human islets and elevated plasma PYY and GLP-1 levels in mice. In diabetic db/db mice, the TAAR1 agonist normalized glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test. Sub-chronic treatment of diet-induced obese (DIO) mice with the TAAR1 agonist resulted in reduced food intake and body weight. Furthermore insulin sensitivity was improved and plasma triglyceride levels and liver triglyceride content were lower than in controls. Conclusions We have identified TAAR1 as a novel integrator of metabolic control, which acts on gastrointestinal and pancreatic islet hormone secretion. Thus TAAR1 qualifies as a novel and promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:26844206

  11. Immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 mediates fat-stimulated cholecystokinin secretion.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rashmi; Wang, Yu; Shahid, Rafiq A; Vigna, Steven R; Freedman, Neil J; Liddle, Rodger A

    2013-08-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a satiety hormone produced by discrete enteroendocrine cells scattered among absorptive cells of the small intestine. CCK is released into blood following a meal; however, the mechanisms inducing hormone secretion are largely unknown. Ingested fat is the major stimulant of CCK secretion. We recently identified a novel member of the lipoprotein remnant receptor family known as immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1) in intestinal CCK cells and postulated that this receptor conveyed the signal for fat-stimulated CCK secretion. In the intestine, ILDR1 is expressed exclusively in CCK cells. Orogastric administration of fatty acids elevated blood levels of CCK in wild-type mice but not Ildr1-deficient mice, although the CCK secretory response to trypsin inhibitor was retained. The uptake of fluorescently labeled lipoproteins in ILDR1-transfected CHO cells and release of CCK from isolated intestinal cells required a unique combination of fatty acid plus HDL. CCK secretion secondary to ILDR1 activation was associated with increased [Ca2+]i, consistent with regulated hormone release. These findings demonstrate that ILDR1 regulates CCK release through a mechanism dependent on fatty acids and lipoproteins and that absorbed fatty acids regulate gastrointestinal hormone secretion. PMID:23863714

  12. The trace amine-associated receptor 1 modulates methamphetamine's neurochemical and behavioral effects

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Rachel; Pei, Yue; Mus, Liudmila; Harmeier, Anja; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Hoener, Marius C.; Canales, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has the ability to regulate both dopamine function and psychostimulant action. Here, we tested in rats the ability of RO5203648, a selective TAAR1 partial agonist, to modulate the physiological and behavioral effects of methamphetamine (METH). In experiment 1, RO5203468 dose- and time-dependently altered METH-induced locomotor activity, manifested as an early attenuation followed by a late potentiation of METH's stimulating effects. In experiment 2, rats received a 14-day treatment regimen during which RO5203648 was co-administered with METH. RO5203648 dose-dependently attenuated METH-stimulated hyperactivity, with the effects becoming more apparent as the treatments progressed. After chronic exposure and 3-day withdrawal, rats were tested for locomotor sensitization. RO5203648 administration during the sensitizing phase prevented the development of METH sensitization. However, RO5203648, at the high dose, cross-sensitized with METH. In experiment 3, RO5203648 dose-dependently blocked METH self-administration without affecting operant responding maintained by sucrose, and exhibited lack of reinforcing efficacy when tested as a METH's substitute. Neurochemical data showed that RO5203648 did not affect METH-mediated DA efflux and uptake inhibition in striatal synaptosomes. In vivo, however, RO5203648 was able to transiently inhibit METH-induced accumulation of extracellular DA levels in the nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these data highlight the significant potential of TAAR1 to modulate METH's neurochemical and behavioral effects. PMID:25762894

  13. Synthesis of fluorinated agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Lucie; Chao, Sovy; Brizuela, Leyre; Pfund, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Lequeux, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingosine kinases (SphKs), mediates diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. A fluorinated analogue of S1P receptor agonist has been synthesized by utilizing a ring opening reaction of oxacycles by a lithiated difluoromethylphosphonate anion as the key reaction. In vitro activity of this S1P analogue is also reported. PMID:25047939

  14. Enhanced adiponectin actions by overexpression of adiponectin receptor 1 in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Nanlan; Chung, B Hong; Wang, Xiangdong; Klein, Richard L.; Tang, Chao-Ke; Garvey, W. Timothy; Fu, Yuchang

    2013-01-01

    Objective Adiponectin is one of several important, metabolically active cytokines secreted from adipose tissue. Epidemiologic studies have associated low circulating levels of this adipokine with multiple metabolic disorders including obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. To investigate how enhanced adiponectin-mediated changes in metabolism in vivo, we generated transgenic mice which specifically overexpress the gene coding for adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) in mouse macrophages using the human scavenger receptor A-I gene (SR-AI) enhancer/promoter. We found that macrophage-specific AdipoR1 transgenic mice (AdR1-TG) presented reduced whole body weight, fat accumulation and liver steatosis when these transgenic mice were fed with a high fat diet. Moreover, these macrophage AdR1-TG mice exhibited enhanced whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity with reduced proinflammatory cytokines, MCP-1 and TNF-α, both in the serum and in the insulin target metabolic tissues. Additional studies demonstrated that these macrophage AdR1-TG animals exhibited reduced macrophage foam cell formation in the arterial wall when these transgenic mice were crossed with a low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) deficient mouse model. Conclusions These results suggest that AdipoR1 overexpressed in macrophages can physiologically modulate metabolic activities in vivo by enhancing adiponectin actions in distal metabolically active tissues. The AdipoR1 modified macrophages provide unique interactions with the residented tissues/cells, suggesting a novel role of macrophage adiponectin receptor in improving metabolic disorders in vivo. PMID:23510830

  15. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1-mediated effects in the rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Tica, Andrei A; Dun, Erica C; Tica, Oana S; Gao, Xin; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Oprea, Tudor I; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2011-11-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER), also named GPR30, has been previously identified in the female reproductive system. In this study, GPER expression was found in the female rat myometrium by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Using GPER-selective ligands, we assessed the effects of the GPER activation on resting membrane potential and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in rat myometrial cells, as well as on contractility of rat uterine strips. G-1, a specific GPER agonist, induced a concentration-dependent depolarization and increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in myometrial cells. The depolarization was abolished in Na(+)-free saline. G-1-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase was markedly decreased by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, by Ca(2+)-free or Na(+)-free saline. Intracellular administration of G-1 produced a faster and transitory increase in [Ca(2+)](i), with a higher amplitude than that induced by extracellular application, supporting an intracellular localization of the functional GPER in myometrial cells. Depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin produced a robust store-activated Ca(2+) entry; the Ca(2+) response to G-1 was similar to the constitutive Ca(2+) entry and did not seem to involve store-operated Ca(2+) entry. In rat uterine strips, administration of G-1 increased the frequency and amplitude of contractions and the area under the contractility curve. The effects of G-1 on membrane potential, [Ca(2+)](i), and uterine contractility were prevented by pretreatment with G-15, a GPER antagonist, further supporting the involvement of GPER in these responses. Taken together, our results indicate that GPER is expressed and functional in rat myometrium. GPER activation produces depolarization, elevates [Ca(2+)](i) and increases contractility in myometrial cells. PMID:21865584

  16. Minor Type IV Collagen α5 Chain Promotes Cancer Progression through Discoidin Domain Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qian; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Qingbo; Yue, Jiao; Liu, Chunying; Zhao, Xiaotong; Qiao, Yuemei; Ji, Hongbin; Chen, Jianfeng; Ge, Gaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Type IV collagens (Col IV), components of basement membrane, are essential in the maintenance of tissue integrity and proper function. Alteration of Col IV is related to developmental defects and diseases, including cancer. Col IV α chains form α1α1α2, α3α4α5 and α5α5α6 protomers that further form collagen networks. Despite knowledge on the functions of major Col IV (α1α1α2), little is known whether minor Col IV (α3α4α5 and α5α5α6) plays a role in cancer. It also remains to be elucidated whether major and minor Col IV are functionally redundant. We show that minor Col IV α5 chain is indispensable in cancer development by using α5(IV)-deficient mouse model. Ablation of α5(IV) significantly impeded the development of KrasG12D-driven lung cancer without affecting major Col IV expression. Epithelial α5(IV) supports cancer cell proliferation, while endothelial α5(IV) is essential for efficient tumor angiogenesis. α5(IV), but not α1(IV), ablation impaired expression of non-integrin collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor-1 (DDR1) and downstream ERK activation in lung cancer cells and endothelial cells. Knockdown of DDR1 in lung cancer cells and endothelial cells phenocopied the cells deficient of α5(IV). Constitutively active DDR1 or MEK1 rescued the defects of α5(IV)-ablated cells. Thus, minor Col IV α5(IV) chain supports lung cancer progression via DDR1-mediated cancer cell autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms. Minor Col IV can not be functionally compensated by abundant major Col IV. PMID:25992553

  17. Prokineticin receptor 1 is required for mesenchymal-epithelial transition in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Arora, Himanshu; Boulberdaa, Mounia; Qureshi, Rehana; Bitirim, Verda; Messadeq, Nadia; Dolle, Pascal; Nebigil, Canan G

    2016-08-01

    Identification of factors regulating renal development is important to understand the pathogenesis of congenital kidney diseases. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of renal development and functions triggered by the angiogenic hormone prokineticin-2 and its receptor, PKR1. Utilizing the Gata5 (G5)-Cre and Wilms tumor 1 (Wt1)(GFP)cre transgenic lines, we generated mutant mice with targeted PKR1 gene disruptions in nephron progenitors. These mutant mice exhibited partial embryonic and postnatal lethality. Kidney developmental defects in PKR(G5-/-) mice are manifested in the adult stage as renal atrophy with glomerular defects, nephropathy, and uremia. PKR1(Wt1-/-) embryos exhibit hypoplastic kidneys with premature glomeruli and necrotic nephrons as a result of impaired proliferation and increased apoptosis in Wt1(+) renal mesenchymal cells. PKR1 regulates renal mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) that is involved in formation of renal progenitors, regulating glomerulogenesis toward forming nephrons during kidney development. In the isolated embryonic Wt1(+) renal cells, overexpression or activation of PKR1 promotes MET defined by the transition from elongated cell to octagonal cell morphology, and alteration of the expression of MET markers via activating NFATc3 signaling. Together, these results establish PKR1 via NFATc3 as a crucial modifier of MET processing to the development of nephron. Our study should facilitate new therapeutic opportunities in human renal disorders.-Arora, H., Boulberdaa, M., Qureshi, R., Bitirim, V., Messadeq, N., Dolle, P., Nebigil, C. G. Prokineticin receptor 1 is required for mesenchymal-epithelial transition in kidney development. PMID:27084889

  18. The antifibrotic effects of plasminogen activation occur via prostaglandin E2 synthesis in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Kristy A.; Wettlaufer, Scott H.; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Vannella, Kevin M.; Stoolman, Joshua S.; Huang, Steven K.; Courey, Anthony J.; White, Eric S.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Simon, Richard H.; Toews, Galen B.; Sisson, Thomas H.; Moore, Bethany B.; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Plasminogen activation to plasmin protects from lung fibrosis, but the mechanism underlying this antifibrotic effect remains unclear. We found that mice lacking plasminogen activation inhibitor–1 (PAI-1), which are protected from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit lung overproduction of the antifibrotic lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Plasminogen activation upregulated PGE2 synthesis in alveolar epithelial cells, lung fibroblasts, and lung fibrocytes from saline- and bleomycin-treated mice, as well as in normal fetal and adult primary human lung fibroblasts. This response was exaggerated in cells from Pai1–/– mice. Although enhanced PGE2 formation required the generation of plasmin, it was independent of proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and instead reflected proteolytic activation and release of HGF with subsequent induction of COX-2. That the HGF/COX-2/PGE2 axis mediates in vivo protection from fibrosis in Pai1–/– mice was demonstrated by experiments showing that a selective inhibitor of the HGF receptor c-Met increased lung collagen to WT levels while reducing COX-2 protein and PGE2 levels. Of clinical interest, fibroblasts from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were found to be defective in their ability to induce COX-2 and, therefore, unable to upregulate PGE2 synthesis in response to plasmin or HGF. These studies demonstrate crosstalk between plasminogen activation and PGE2 generation in the lung and provide a mechanism for the well-known antifibrotic actions of the fibrinolytic pathway. PMID:20501949

  19. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses. PMID:26129676

  20. Inhibition of transferrin receptor 1 transcription by a cell density response element

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    TfR1 (transferrin receptor 1) mediates the uptake of transferrin-bound iron and thereby plays a critical role in cellular iron metabolism. Its expression is coupled to cell proliferation/differentiation and controlled in response to iron levels and other signals by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. It is well established that TfR1 levels decline when cultured cells reach a high density and in the present study we have investigated the underlying mechanisms. Consistent with previous findings, we demonstrate that TfR1 expression is attenuated in a cell-density-dependent manner in human lung cancer H1299 cells and in murine B6 fibroblasts as the result of a marked decrease in mRNA content. This response is not associated with alterations in the RNA-binding activity of iron regulatory proteins that are indicative of a transcriptional mechanism. Reporter assays reveal that the human TfR1 promoters contains sequences mediating cell-density-dependent transcriptional inhibition. Mapping of the human and mouse TfR1 promoters identified a conserved hexa-nucleotide 5′-GAGGGC-3′ motif with notable sequence similarity to a previously described element within the IGF-2 (insulin-like growth factor-2) promoter. We show that this motif is necessary for the formation of specific complexes with nuclear extracts and for cell-density-dependent regulation in reporter gene assays. Thus the TfR1 promoter contains a functional ‘cell density response element’ (CDRE). PMID:16092918

  1. Trace Amines and the Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1: Pharmacology, Neurochemistry, and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yue; Asif-Malik, Aman; Canales, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines are a collection of endogenous molecules that play pivotal roles as neurotransmitters and hormones. In addition to the "classical" biogenic amines resulting from decarboxylation of aromatic acids, including dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin (5-HT), and histamine, other biogenic amines, present at much lower concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS), and hence referred to as "trace" amines (TAs), are now recognized to play significant neurophysiological and behavioral functions. At the turn of the century, the discovery of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a phylogenetically conserved G protein-coupled receptor that is responsive to both TAs, such as β-phenylethylamine, octopamine, and tyramine, and structurally-related amphetamines, unveiled mechanisms of action for TAs other than interference with aminergic pathways, laying the foundations for deciphering the functional significance of TAs and its mammalian CNS receptor, TAAR1. Although, its molecular interactions and downstream targets have not been fully elucidated, TAAR1 activation triggers accumulation of intracellular cAMP, modulates PKA and PKC signaling and interferes with the β-arrestin2-dependent pathway via G protein-independent mechanisms. TAAR1 is uniquely positioned to exert direct control over DA and 5-HT neuronal firing and release, which has profound implications for understanding the pathophysiology of, and therefore designing more efficacious therapeutic interventions for, a range of neuropsychiatric disorders that involve aminergic dysregulation, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, mood disorders, and addiction. Indeed, the recent development of novel pharmacological tools targeting TAAR1 has uncovered the remarkable potential of TAAR1-based medications as new generation pharmacotherapies in neuropsychiatry. This review summarizes recent developments in the study of TAs and TAAR1, their intricate neurochemistry and

  2. Differentiation in the angiotensin II receptor 1 blocker class on autonomic function.

    PubMed

    Krum, H

    2001-09-01

    Autonomic function is disordered in cardiovascular disease states such as chronic heart failure (CHF) and hypertension. Interactions between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) may potentially occur at a number of sites. These include central sites (eg, rostral ventrolateral medulla), at the level of baroreflex control, and at the sympathetic prejunctional angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT(1)) receptor, which is facilitatory for norepinephrine release from the sympathetic nerve terminal. Therefore, drugs that block the RAAS may be expected to improve autonomic dysfunction in cardiovascular disease states. In order to test the hypothesis that RAAS inhibition directly reduces SNS activity, a pithed rat model of sympathetic stimulation has been established. In this model, an increase in frequency of stimulation results in a pressor response that is sympathetically mediated and highly reproducible. This pressor response is enhanced in the presence of angiotensin II and is reduced in the presence of nonselective AIIRAs that block both AT(1) and AT(2) receptor subtypes (eg, saralasin). AT(1)-selective antagonists have also been studied in this model, at pharmacologically relevant doses. In one such study, only the AT(1) blocker eprosartan reduced sympathetically stimulated increases in blood pressure, whereas comparable doses of losartan, valsartan, and irbesartan did not. The reason(s) for the differences between eprosartan and other agents of this class on sympathetic modulation are not clear, but may relate to the chemical structure of the drug (a non- biphenyl tetrazole structure that is chemically distinct from the structure of other AIIRAs), receptor binding characteristics (competitive), or unique effects on presynaptic AT(1) receptors. PMID:11580884

  3. Trace Amines and the Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1: Pharmacology, Neurochemistry, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yue; Asif-Malik, Aman; Canales, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines are a collection of endogenous molecules that play pivotal roles as neurotransmitters and hormones. In addition to the “classical” biogenic amines resulting from decarboxylation of aromatic acids, including dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin (5-HT), and histamine, other biogenic amines, present at much lower concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS), and hence referred to as “trace” amines (TAs), are now recognized to play significant neurophysiological and behavioral functions. At the turn of the century, the discovery of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a phylogenetically conserved G protein-coupled receptor that is responsive to both TAs, such as β-phenylethylamine, octopamine, and tyramine, and structurally-related amphetamines, unveiled mechanisms of action for TAs other than interference with aminergic pathways, laying the foundations for deciphering the functional significance of TAs and its mammalian CNS receptor, TAAR1. Although, its molecular interactions and downstream targets have not been fully elucidated, TAAR1 activation triggers accumulation of intracellular cAMP, modulates PKA and PKC signaling and interferes with the β-arrestin2-dependent pathway via G protein-independent mechanisms. TAAR1 is uniquely positioned to exert direct control over DA and 5-HT neuronal firing and release, which has profound implications for understanding the pathophysiology of, and therefore designing more efficacious therapeutic interventions for, a range of neuropsychiatric disorders that involve aminergic dysregulation, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, mood disorders, and addiction. Indeed, the recent development of novel pharmacological tools targeting TAAR1 has uncovered the remarkable potential of TAAR1-based medications as new generation pharmacotherapies in neuropsychiatry. This review summarizes recent developments in the study of TAs and TAAR1, their intricate neurochemistry and

  4. Evolutionary Conservation of 3-Iodothyronamine as an Agonist at the Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cöster, Maxi; Biebermann, Heike; Schöneberg, Torsten; Stäubert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The trace amine-associated receptor 1 (Taar1) is a Gs protein-coupled receptor activated by trace amines, such as β-phenylethylamine (β-PEA) and 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM). T1AM is an endogenous biogenic amine and thyroid hormone derivative that exerts several biological functions. However, the physiological relevance of T1AM acting via Taar1 is still under discussion. Therefore, we studied the structural and functional evolution of Taar1 in vertebrates to provide evidence for a conserved Taar1-mediated T1AM function. Study Design We searched public sequence databases to retrieve Taar1 sequence information from vertebrates. We cloned and functionally characterized Taar1 from selected vertebrate species using cAMP assays to determine the evolutionary conservation of T1AM action at Taar1. Results We found intact open reading frames of Taar1 in more than 100 vertebrate species, including mammals, sauropsids and amphibians. Evolutionary conservation analyses of Taar1 protein sequences revealed a high variation in amino acid residues proposed to be involved in agonist binding, especially in rodent Taar1 orthologs. Functional characterization showed that T1AM, β-PEA and p-tyramine (p-Tyr) act as agonists at all tested orthologs, but EC50 values of T1AM at rat Taar1 differed significantly when compared to all other tested vertebrate Taar1. Conclusions The high structural conservation of Taar1 throughout vertebrate evolution highlights the physiological relevance of Taar1, but species-specific differences in T1AM potency at Taar1 orthologs suggest a specialization of rat Taar1 for T1AM recognition. In contrast, β-PEA and p-Tyr potencies were rather conserved throughout all tested Taar1 orthologs. We provide evidence that the observed differences in potency are related to differences in constraint during Taar1 evolution. PMID:26601069

  5. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  6. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A R; Harkness, John H; Neve, Kim A; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K; Eshleman, Amy J; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  7. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-1 Contributes to Progression in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Malathi; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Semma, Sara N.; Osuala, Kingsley O.; Kounalakis, Nicole; Torres Torres, Keila E.; Barnard, Nicola J.; Kim, Hyunjin J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Miller, Fred R.; Goydos, James S.; Gorski, David H.

    2014-01-01

    TNBC is an aggressive breast cancer subtype that does not express hormone receptors (estrogen and progesterone receptors, ER and PR) or amplified human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and there currently exist no targeted therapies effective against it. Consequently, finding new molecular targets in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critical to improving patient outcomes. Previously, we have detected the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (gene: GRM1; protein: mGluR1) in TNBC and observed that targeting glutamatergic signaling inhibits TNBC growth both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we explored how mGluR1 contributes to TNBC progression, using the isogenic MCF10 progression series, which models breast carcinogenesis from nontransformed epithelium to malignant basal-like breast cancer. We observed that mGluR1 is expressed in human breast cancer and that in MCF10A cells, which model nontransformed mammary epithelium, but not in MCF10AT1 cells, which model atypical ductal hyperplasia, mGluR1 overexpression results in increased proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness. In contrast, mGluR1 knockdown results in a decrease in these activities in malignant MCF10CA1d cells. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of glutamatergic signaling in MCF10CA1d cells results in a decrease in proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Finally, transduction of MCF10AT1 cells, which express c-Ha-ras, using a lentiviral construct expressing GRM1 results in transformation to carcinoma in 90% of resultant xenografts. We conclude that mGluR1 cooperates with other factors in hyperplastic mammary epithelium to contribute to TNBC progression and therefore propose that glutamatergic signaling represents a promising new molecular target for TNBC therapy. PMID:24404125

  8. MiR-503 inhibits adipogenesis by targeting bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1a

    PubMed Central

    Man, Xiao-Fei; Tan, Shu-Wen; Tang, Hao-Neng; Guo, Yue; Tang, Chen-Yi; Tang, Jun; Zhou, Ci-La; Zhou, Hou-De

    2016-01-01

    Adipogenesis plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis and is critically related to obesity. To overcome obesity and its associated disorders, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in adipogenesis. An adipogenesis-related miRNA array analysis demonstrated that miR-503 was differentially expressed before and after adipocyte differentiation; however, the exact role of miR-503 in adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Thus, the objective of this study was to further examine miR-503 in adipocyte differentiation. We found significantly decreased expression of miR-503 during adipocyte differentiation process. Using bioinformatic analysis, miR-503 was identified as a potential regulator of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor 1a (BMPR1a). We then validated BMPR1a as the target of miR-503 using a dual luciferase assay, and found decreased miR-503 and increased BMPR1a expression during adipogenesis. Overexpression of miR-503 in preadipocytes repressed expression of BMPR1a and adipogenic-related factors such as CCAAT/enhancer binding protein a (C/EBPα), proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ), and adipocyte protein 2 (AP2). In addition, miR-503 overexpression impaired the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Inhibition of miR-503 had the opposite effect. Additionally, BMPR1a interference by siRNA attenuated adipocyte differentiation and the accumulation of lipid droplets via downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Our study provides the first evidence of the role miR-503 plays in adipocyte differentiation by regulating BMPR1a via the PI3K/Akt pathway, which may become a novel target for obesity therapy. PMID:27398155

  9. Role of CRF receptor 1 in central CRF-induced stimulation of colonic propulsion in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez, V; Taché, Y

    2001-03-01

    The CRF receptor subtype mediating the colonic and gastric motor responses to central CRF was investigated in conscious rats. CRF (0.6 microg/rat) injected intracerebroventicularly (i.c.v.) or 1 h water avoidance stress stimulated defecation (pellet/60 min: 4.1+/-1.0 and 8.7+/-0.7 respectively vs. 0.3+/-0.3 in i.c.v. vehicle/no stress). The CRF receptor 1 (CRF-R1) antagonist, NBI-27914 (50-100 microg/rat) injected i.c.v., abolished the colonic response to i.c.v. CRF and dose-dependently reduced that induced by water avoidance stress. NBI-27914 (100 microg/rat) injected peripherally did not influence the defecatory response to stress. The peptide CRF-R1/R2 antagonist, astressin (10 microg/rat, i.c.v.) inhibited the colonic motor response to i.c.v. CRF and stress similarly as NBI-27914 injected i.c.v. at 100 microg/rat. Intracisternal (i.c.) injection of astressin (10 microg/rat) also completely prevented CRF (0.6 g, i.c.)-induced delayed gastric emptying while i.c. NBI-27914 (50 or 100 microg) had no effect. These results indicate a differential role of central CRF receptor subtypes in the colonic stimulatory and gastric inhibitory motor responses to central CRF and that the CRF component of stress-related activation of colonic expulsion is primarily mediated by CRF-R1. PMID:11222989

  10. Late-Onset Inner Retinal Dysfunction in Mice Lacking Sigma Receptor 1 (σR1)

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yonju; Saul, Alan; Tawfik, Amany; Williams, Cory; Bollinger, Kathryn; Smith, Robert; Tachikawa, Masanori; Zorrilla, Eric; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Sigma receptor 1 (σR1) is expressed abundantly in the eye, and several reports suggest that this putative molecular chaperone plays a role in lens cell survival, control of intraocular pressure (IOP), and retinal neuroprotection. The present study examined the consequence of the absence of σR1 on ocular development, structure, and function. Methods. Wild-type (σR1+/+), heterozygous (σR1+/−), and homozygous (σR1−/−, knockout) mice aged 5 to 59 weeks were subjected to comprehensive electrophysiological testing and IOP measurement. The eyes were examined by light and electron microscopy and subjected to morphometric examination and detection of apoptosis. Results. Cornea and lens of σR1−/− mice were similar to wild-type mice in morphologic appearance at all ages examined, and IOP was within normal limits. Comprehensive ERG and morphometric analyses initially yielded normal findings in the σR1−/− mice compared with those in the wild-type. By 12 months, however, significantly decreased ERG b-wave amplitudes and diminished negative scotopic threshold responses, consistent with inner retinal dysfunction, were detected in σR1−/− mice. Concomitant with these late-onset changes were increased TUNEL- and active caspase 3-positive cells in the inner retina and significant loss of cells in the ganglion cell layer, particularly in the central retina. Before these functional and structural abnormalities, there was ultrastructural evidence of axonal disruption in the optic nerve head of σR1−/− mice as early as 6 months of age, although there were no alterations observed in retinal vascularization in σR1−/− mice. Conclusions. These data suggest that lack of σR1 leads to development of late-onset retinal dysfunction with similarities to optic neuropathy. PMID:21862648

  11. Riluzole mediates anti-tumor properties in breast cancer cells independent of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Cecilia L; Nassar, Mahdy A; Hachem, Ali H; Bukhsh, Miriam A; Jafry, Waris S; Khansa, Rafa M; Gorski, David H

    2016-06-01

    Riluzole, the only drug approved by the FDA for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inhibits melanoma proliferation through its inhibitory effect on glutamatergic signaling. We demonstrated that riluzole also inhibits the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and described a role for metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) in regulating TNBC cell growth and progression. However, the role of GRM1 in mediating riluzole's effects in breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we seek to determine how much of riluzole's action in breast cancer is mediated through GRM1. We investigated anti-tumor properties of riluzole in TNBC and ER+ cells using cell growth, invasion, and soft-agar assays and compared riluzole activity with GRM1 levels. Using Lentiviral vectors expressing GRM1 or shGRM1, these studies were repeated in cells expressing high or low GRM1 levels where the gene was either silenced or overexpressed. Riluzole inhibited proliferation, invasion, and colony formation in both TNBC and ER+ cells. There was a trend between GRM1 expression in TNBC cells and their response to riluzole in both cell proliferation and invasion assays. However, silencing and overexpression studies had no effect on cell sensitivity to riluzole. Our results clearly suggest a GRM1-independent mechanism through which riluzole mediates its effects on breast cancer cells. Understanding the mechanism by which riluzole mediates breast cancer progression will be useful in identifying new therapeutic targets for treating TNBC and in facilitating stratification of patients in clinical trials using riluzole in conjunction with conventional therapy. PMID:27146584

  12. Key Role of Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 in Progressive Secondary Hemorrhage after Brain Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Michael; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Tosun, Cigdem; Caridi, John; Ivanova, Svetlana; Keledjian, Kaspar; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2009-01-01

    Abstract An important but poorly understood feature of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the clinically serious problem of spatiotemporal progression (“blossoming”) of a hemorrhagic contusion, a phenomenon we term progressive secondary hemorrhage (PSH). Molecular mechanisms of PSH are unknown and efforts to reduce it by promoting coagulation have met with equivocal results. We hypothesized that PSH might be due to upregulation and activation of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1)-regulated NCCa-ATP channels in capillary endothelial cells, predisposing to oncotic death of endothelial cells and catastrophic failure of capillary integrity. Anesthetized adult male rats underwent left parietal craniectomy for induction of a focal cortical contusion. The regulatory subunit of the channel, SUR1, was prominently upregulated in capillaries of penumbral tissues surrounding the contusion. In untreated rats, PSH was characterized by progressive enlargement of the contusion deep into the site of cortical impact, including corpus callosum, hippocampus, and thalamus, by progressive accumulation of extravasated blood, with a doubling of the volume during the first 12 h after injury, and by capillary fragmentation in penumbral tissues. Block of SUR1 using low-dose (non-hypoglycemogenic) glibenclamide largely eliminated PSH and capillary fragmentation, and was associated with a significant reduction in the size of the necrotic lesion and in preservation of neurobehavioral function. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide against SUR1, administered after injury, reduced both SUR1 expression and PSH, consistent with a requirement for transcriptional upregulation of SUR1. Our findings provide novel insights into molecular mechanisms responsible for PSH associated with hemorrhagic contusions, and point to SUR1 as a potential therapeutic target in TBI. PMID:19604096

  13. [Disseminated BCG disease revealing a partial deficiency in receptor 1 interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Antonietti, J; Retornaz, K; Bernasconi, A; Laporte, R-J; Minodier, P; Bustamante, J-C; Dubus, J-C

    2015-09-01

    We report on a case of disseminated BCGitis with an unusual presentation in a 4-month-old infant revealing a syndrome of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacteria due to a partial dominant mutation of the interferon gamma receptor 1 gene. PMID:26251056

  14. α-enolase Causes Pro-Inflammatory Activation of Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Primes Neutrophils through Plasmin Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor-2

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Ashley; Tucker, Nicole; Kelher, Marguerite R.; Khan, Samina Y.; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Wohlauer, Max; Hansen, Kirk; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Sauaia, Angels; Banerjee, Anirban; Moore, Ernest E.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory activation of vascular endothelium leading to increased surface expression of adhesion molecules and neutrophil (PMN) sequestration and subsequent activation is paramount in the development of acute lung (ALI) and organ injury in injured patients. We hypothesize that α-enolase, which accumulates in injured patients primes PMNs and causes pro-inflammatory activation of endothelial cells leading to PMN-mediated cytotoxicity. Methods Proteomic analyses of field plasma samples from injured vs. healthy patients was used for protein identification. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were incubated with α-enolase or thrombin, and ICAM-1 surface expression was measured by flow cytometry. A two-event in vitro model of PMN cytotoxicity HMVECs activated with α-enolase, thrombin, or buffer was used as targets for lysophosphatidylcholine-primed or buffer-treated PMNs. The PMN priming activity of α-enolase was completed, and lysates from both PMNs and HMVECs were immunoblotted for protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and PAR-2 and co-precipitation of α-enolase with PAR-2 and plasminogen/plasmin. Results α-enolase increased 10.8-fold in injured patients (p<0.05). Thrombin and α-enolase significantly increased ICAM-1 surface expression on HMVECs, which was inhibited by anti-proteases, induced PMN adherence, and served as the first event in the two-event model of PMN cytotoxicity. α-enolase co-precipitated with PAR-2 and plasminogen/plasmin on HMVECs and PMNs and induced PMN priming, which was inhibited by tranexamic acid, and enzymatic activity was not required. We conclude that α-enolase increases post-injury and may activate pulmonary endothelial cells and prime PMNs through plasmin activity and PAR-2 activation. Such pro-inflammatory endothelial activation may predispose to PMN-mediated organ injury. PMID:25944790

  15. Local delivery of soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 gene reduces infarct size following ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Masahiro; Hata, Tomoji; Tsuchida, Keiko; Suematsu, Nobuhiro; Oyama, Jun-Ichi; Satoh, Shinji; Makino, Naoki

    2004-11-01

    Apoptosis in the myocardium is linked to ischemia/reperfusion injury, and TNF-alpha induces apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. A significant amount of TNF-alpha is detected after ischemia and reperfusion. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 (sTNFR1) is an extracellular domain of TNF-alpha receptor 1 and is an antagonist to TNF-alpha. In the present study, we examined the effects of sTNFR1 on infarct size in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) following ischemia/reperfusion. Male Wistar rats were subjected to left coronary artery (LCA) ligation. After 30 min of LCA occlusion, the temporary ligature on the LCA was released and blood flow was restored. Immediately after reperfusion, a total of 200 microg of sTNFR1 or LacZ plasmid was injected into three different sites of the left ventricular wall. At 6 h, 1 and 2 days after reperfusion, the TNF-alpha bioactivity in the myocardium was significantly higher in rats receiving LacZ plasmid than in sham-operated rats, whereas sTNFR1 plasmid significantly suppressed the increase in the TNF-alpha bioactivity. The sTNFR1 plasmid significantly reduced DNA fragmentation and caspase activity compared to the LacZ plasmid. Finally, the sTNFR1 expression-plasmid treatment significantly reduced the area of myocardial infarction at 2 days after ischemia/reperfusion compared to LacZ plasmid. In conclusion, the TNF-alpha bioactivity in the heart increased from the early stage of ischemia/reperfusion, and this increase was thought to contribute in part to the increased area of myocardial infarction. Suppression of TNF-alpha bioactivity with the sTNFR1 plasmid reduced the infarct size in AMI following ischemia and reperfusion. PMID:15646033

  16. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 (Grm1) Is An Oncogene In Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Jeffrey J; Wall, Brian A; Mastrantoni, Elisa; Wilimczyk, Barbara J; La Cava, Stephanie N; Degenhardt, Kurt; White, E; Chen, Suzie

    2014-01-01

    Non-neuronal expression of components of the glutamatergic system has been increasingly observed, and our laboratory previously had demonstrated the etiological role of ectopically expressed metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1/mGluR1) in mouse models of melanoma. We hypothesize that inappropriate glutamatergic signaling in other cell types can dysregulate growth leading to transformation and tumorigenesis. As most cancers are carcinomas, we selected an immortalized primary baby mouse kidney (iBMK) cell model to assess whether Grm1 can transform epithelial cells. These iBMK cells, engineered to be immortal yet non-tumorigenic and retaining normal epithelial characteristics, were used as recipients for exogenous Grm1 cDNA. Several stable Grm1 expressing clones were isolated and the Grm1-receptors were shown to be functional, as evidenced by the accumulation of second messengers in response to Grm1 agonist. Additionally activated by agonist were MAPK and AKT signaling cascades, major intracellular pathways shown by many investigators to be critical in melanomagenesis and other neoplasms. These Grm1-iBMK cells exhibited enhanced cell proliferation in in vitro MTT assays and significant tumorigenicity in in vivo allografts. Persistent Grm1 expression was required for the maintenance of the in vivo tumorigenic phenotype as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA. These are the first results that indicate Grm1 can be an oncogene in epithelial cells. Additionally, relevance to human disease in the corresponding tumor type of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may be suggested by observed expression of GRM1/mGluR1 in a number of RCC tumor biopsy samples and cell lines, and the effects of GRM1 modulation on tumorigenicity therein. Moreover RCC cell lines exhibited elevated levels of extracellular glutamate, and some lines responded to drugs which modulate the glutamatergic system. These findings imply a possible role for glutamate signaling apparatus in RCC cell growth

  17. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  18. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 and Related Ligands in Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Yu, Hui; Badzio, Andrzej; Boyle, Theresa A.; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Lu, Xian; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Heasley, Lynn E.; Kowalewski, Ashley A.; Ellison, Kim; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Caicun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 15% of all lung cancers and has been understudied for novel therapies. Signaling through fibroblast growth factors (FGF2, FGF9) and their high-affinity receptor has recently emerged as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis and progression of non–small-cell lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and ligand expression in primary SCLC samples. Methods: FGFR1 protein expression, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, and gene copy number were determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC), mRNA in situ hybridization, and silver in situ hybridization, respectively, in primary tumors from 90 patients with SCLC. Protein and mRNA expression of the FGF2 and FGF9 ligands were determined by IHC and mRNA in situ hybridization, respectively. In addition, a second cohort of 24 SCLC biopsy samples with known FGFR1 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization was assessed for FGFR1 protein expression by IHC. Spearman correlation analysis was performed to evaluate associations of FGFR1, FGF2 and FGF9 protein levels, respective mRNA levels, and FGFR1 gene copy number. Results: FGFR1 protein expression by IHC demonstrated a significant correlation with FGFR1 mRNA levels (p < 0.0001) and FGFR1 gene copy number (p = 0.03). The prevalence of FGFR1 mRNA positivity was 19.7%. FGFR1 mRNA expression correlated with both FGF2 (p = 0.0001) and FGF9 (p = 0.002) mRNA levels, as well as with FGF2 (p = 0.01) and FGF9 (p = 0.001) protein levels. There was no significant association between FGFR1 and ligands with clinical characteristics or prognosis. In the second cohort of specimens with known FGFR1 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization, 23 of 24 had adequate tumor by IHC, and 73.9% (17 of 23) were positive for FGFR1 protein expression. Conclusions: A subset of SCLCs is characterized by potentially activated FGF/FGFR1 pathways, as evidenced by positive FGF2, FGF9, and FGFR1 protein

  19. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Actions of Orthosteric and Allosteric Ligands on Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1α*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jason Y.; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Zhang, Li; Hamelberg, Donald; Hall, Randy A.; Brown, Edward M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α), a member of the family C G protein-coupled receptors, is emerging as a potential drug target for various disorders, including chronic neuronal degenerative diseases. In addition to being activated by glutamate, mGluR1α is also modulated by extracellular Ca2+. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Moreover, it has long been challenging to develop receptor-specific agonists due to homologies within the mGluR family, and the Ca2+-binding site(s) on mGluR1α may provide an opportunity for receptor-selective targeting by therapeutics. In the present study, we show that our previously predicted Ca2+-binding site in the hinge region of mGluR1α is adjacent to the site where orthosteric agonists and antagonists bind on the extracellular domain of the receptor. Moreover, we found that extracellular Ca2+ enhanced mGluR1α-mediated intracellular Ca2+ responses evoked by the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate. Conversely, extracellular Ca2+ diminished the inhibitory effect of the mGluR1α orthosteric antagonist (S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine. In addition, selective positive (Ro 67-4853) and negative (7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester) allosteric modulators of mGluR1α potentiated and inhibited responses to extracellular Ca2+, respectively, in a manner similar to their effects on the response of mGluR1α to glutamate. Mutations at residues predicted to be involved in Ca2+ binding, including E325I, had significant effects on the modulation of responses to the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate and the allosteric modulator Ro 67-4853 by extracellular Ca2+. These studies reveal that binding of extracellular Ca2+ to the predicted Ca2+-binding site in the extracellular domain of mGluR1α modulates not only glutamate-evoked signaling but also the actions of both orthosteric ligands and allosteric modulators on mGluR1α. PMID:24280223

  20. Expression analysis of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 in B cells during pregnancy and their role on cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, M L; Muzzio, D O; Ehrhardt, J; Franchi, A M; Zygmunt, M; Jensen, F

    2016-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists in a family of lipids that binds to and activates cannabinoid receptors. There are two receptors so far described, the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2). In the context of pregnancy, the endocannabinoid system was shown participates in different key aspects of reproductive events. B-lymphocytes are pleiotropic cells belonging to the adaptive arm of the immune system. Besides immunoglobulin production, B-lymphocytes were recently shown to be actively involved in antigen presentation as well as cytokine production, thus playing a central role in immunity. In this study we first aimed to characterize the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in B cells during pregnancy and then analyze the impact of their activation in term of cytokine production by B cells from pregnant and non-pregnant mice. We observed that the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in B-lymphocytes is differentially regulated during pregnancy. While CB2 expression is down regulated CB1 is augmented in B-lymphocytes of pregnant mice. Additionally, the treatment of activated B-lymphocytes with specific CB1 and CB2 agonists, showed a different response in term of cytokine production. Particularly, CB1 against boosted the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by activated B-lymphocytes from pregnant mice. PMID:27163857

  1. Suboptimal Activation of Protease-activated Receptors Enhances α2β1 Integrin-mediated Platelet Adhesion to Collagen*

    PubMed Central

    Marjoram, Robin J.; Voss, Bryan; Pan, Yumei; Dickeson, S. Kent; Zutter, Mary M.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Santoro, Samuel A.

    2009-01-01

    Thrombin and fibrillar collagen are potent activators of platelets at sites of vascular injury. Both agonists cause platelet shape change, granule secretion, and aggregation to form the primary hemostatic plug. Human platelets express two thrombin receptors, protease-activated receptors 1 and 4 (PAR1 and PAR4) and two collagen receptors, the α2β1 integrin (α2β1) and the glycoprotein VI (GPVI)/FcRγ chain complex. Although these receptors and their signaling mechanisms have been intensely studied, it is not known whether and how these receptors cooperate in the hemostatic function of platelets. This study examined cooperation between the thrombin and collagen receptors in platelet adhesion by utilizing a collagen-related peptide (α2-CRP) containing the α2β1-specific binding motif, GFOGER, in conjunction with PAR-activating peptides. We demonstrate that platelet adhesion to α2-CRP is substantially enhanced by suboptimal PAR activation (agonist concentrations that do not stimulate platelet aggregation) using the PAR4 agonist peptide and thrombin. The enhanced adhesion induced by suboptimal PAR4 activation was α2β1-dependent and GPVI/FcRγ-independent as revealed in experiments with α2β1- or FcRγ-deficient mouse platelets. We further show that suboptimal activation of other platelet Gq-linked G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) produces enhanced platelet adhesion to α2-CRP. The enhanced α2β1-mediated platelet adhesion is controlled by phospholipase C (PLC), but is not dependent on granule secretion, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, or on phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate a platelet priming mechanism initiated by suboptimal activation of PAR4 or other platelet Gq-linked GPCRs through a PLC-dependent signaling cascade that promotes enhanced α2β1 binding to collagens containing GFOGER sites. PMID:19815553

  2. Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 Is an Enhancer of Tumor Angiogenesis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Chavarría, Iván; Cerro, Rita P.; Parra, Natalie P.; Sandoval, Felipe A.; Zuñiga, Felipe A.; Omazábal, Valeska A.; Lamperti, Liliana I.; Jiménez, Silvana P.; Fernandez, Edelmira A.; Gutiérrez, Nicolas A.; Rodriguez, Federico S.; Onate, Sergio A.; Sánchez, Oliberto; Vera, Juan C.; Toledo, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells. PMID:25170920

  3. Failure to extinguish fear and genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Klumpers, F; Oosting, R S; Evers, D J J; Leon Kenemans, J; Baas, J M P

    2012-01-01

    Failure to extinguish fear can lead to persevering anxiety and has been postulated as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of human anxiety disorders. In animals, it is well documented that the endogenous cannabinoid system has a pivotal role in the successful extinction of fear, most importantly through the cannabinoid receptor 1. However, no human studies have reported a translation of this preclinical evidence yet. Healthy medication-free human subjects (N=150) underwent a fear conditioning and extinction procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex was measured to assess fear-conditioned responding, and subjective fear ratings were collected. Participants were genotyped for two polymorphisms located within the promoter region (rs2180619) and the coding region (rs1049353) of cannabinoid receptor 1. As predicted from the preclinical literature, acquisition and expression of conditioned fear did not differ between genotypes. Crucially, whereas both homozygote (G/G, N=23) and heterozygote (A/G, N=68) G-allele carriers of rs2180619 displayed robust extinction of fear, extinction of fear-potentiated startle was absent in A/A homozygotes (N=51). Additionally, this resistance to extinguish fear left A/A carriers of rs2180619 with significantly higher levels of fear-potentiated startle at the end of the extinction training. No effects of rs1049353 genotype were observed regarding fear acquisition and extinction. These results suggest for the first time involvement of the human endocannabinoid system in fear extinction. Implications are that genetic variability in this system may underlie individual differences in anxiety, rendering cannabinoid receptor 1 a potential target for novel pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders. PMID:23010766

  4. New targets for renal interstitial fibrosis: relaxin family peptide receptor 1-angiotensin type 2 receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Jennifer M

    2014-07-01

    The signal transduction mechanisms involved in the renoprotective effects of relaxin are not well understood. Chow et al. demonstrate that relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) forms heterodimer complexes with the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2), even in the absence of ligand, and that these heterodimers are required for relaxin's antifibrotic effects. These findings identify a previously unknown link between relaxin and angiotensin II signaling that could be a potential new target for slowing the progression of fibrotic renal diseases. PMID:24978374

  5. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in cardiovascular regulating nuclei in the brainstem: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr M.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids elicit complex hemodynamic responses in experimental animals that involve both peripheral and central sites. Centrally administered cannabinoids have been shown to predominantly cause pressor response. However, very little is known about the mechanism of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-centrally evoked pressor response. In this review, we provided an overview of the contemporary knowledge regarding the cannabinoids centrally elicited cardiovascular responses and the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. The current review focuses on the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) as the primary brainstem nucleus implicated in CB1R-evoked pressor response. PMID:25685481

  6. Targeting of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 to Low Density Plasma Membrane Domains in Human Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessio, Alessio; Kluger, Martin S.; Li, Jie H.; Al-Lamki, Rafia; Bradley, John R.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2010-01-01

    TNFR1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1) localizes to caveolae of human endothelial-derived EA.hy926 cells. Transduced TNFR1 molecules lacking amino acid residues 229–244 (spanning the transmembrane/intercellular boundary) are expressed on the cell surface equivalently to full-length TNFR1 molecules but incompletely localize to caveolae. A peptide containing this sequence pulls down CAV-1 (caveolin-1) and TNFR1 from cell lysates but fails to do so following disruption of caveolae with methyl-β-cyclodextrin. We previously reported that methyl-β-cyclodextrin eliminates caveolae and blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced internalization of TNFR1 but not TNF-induced activation of NF-κB in EA.hy926 cells. Both CAV-1 and FLOT-2 (flotillin-2), organizing proteins of caveolae and lipid rafts, respectively, associate with caveolae in EA.hy926 cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CAV-1 but not FLOT-2 strikingly reduces caveolae number. Both knockdowns reduce total TNFR1 protein expression, but neither prevents TNFR1 localization to low density membrane domains, TNF-induced internalization of TNFR1, or NF-κB activation by TNF. Both CAV-1 and FLOT-2 knockdowns reduce TNF-mediated activation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK). However, both knockdowns reduce expression of TRAF2 (TNF receptor-associated factor-2) protein, and small interfering RNA targeting of TRAF2 also selectively inhibits SAPK activation. We conclude that TNFR1 contains a membrane-proximal sequence that targets the receptor to caveolae/lipid rafts. Neither TNFR1 targeting to nor internalization from these low density membrane domains depends upon CAV-1 or FLOT-2. Furthermore, both NF-κB and SAPK activation appear independent of both TNFR1 localization to low density membrane domains and to TNF-induced receptor internalization. PMID:20511226

  7. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1c Ameliorates Obesity and Glucose Intolerance via Central Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Christopher J.; Ahnmark, Andrea; Admyre, Therese; Ahlstedt, Ingela; Irving, Lorraine; Keyes, Feenagh; Patterson, Laurel; Mumphrey, Michael B.; Bjursell, Mikael; Gorman, Tracy; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Buchanan, Andrew; Harrison, Paula; Vaughan, Tristan; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Lindén, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We have generated a novel monoclonal antibody targeting human FGFR1c (R1c mAb) that caused profound body weight and body fat loss in diet-induced obese mice due to decreased food intake (with energy expenditure unaltered), in turn improving glucose control. R1c mAb also caused weight loss in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, leptin receptor-mutant db/db mice, and in mice lacking either the melanocortin 4 receptor or the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1. In addition, R1c mAb did not change hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Agrp, Cart, Pomc, Npy, Crh, Mch, or Orexin, suggesting that R1c mAb could cause food intake inhibition and body weight loss via other mechanisms in the brain. Interestingly, peripherally administered R1c mAb accumulated in the median eminence, adjacent arcuate nucleus and in the circumventricular organs where it activated the early response gene c-Fos. As a plausible mechanism and coinciding with the initiation of food intake suppression, R1c mAb induced hypothalamic expression levels of the cytokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and 3 and ERK1/2 and p70 S6 kinase 1 activation. PMID:25427253

  8. Proinsulin Shares a Motif with Interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and Induces Inflammatory Cytokine via Interleukin-1 Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siyoung; Kim, Eunsom; Jhun, Hyunjhung; Hong, Jaewoo; Kwak, Areum; Jo, Seunghyun; Bae, Suyoung; Lee, Jongho; Kim, Busun; Lee, Jungmin; Youn, Sulah; Kim, Somi; Kim, Miyeon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Lee, Youngmin; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-01-01

    Although it has been established that diabetes increases susceptibility to infections, the role of insulin (INS) in the immune response is unknown. Here, we investigated the immunological function of INS. Proinsulin dimer (pINSd) was a potent immune stimulus that induced inflammatory cytokines, but mature INS was unable to induce an immune response. An affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against mature IL-1α recognized IL-1α and pINS but failed to detect mature INS and IL-1β. Analysis of the pINS sequence revealed the existence of an INS/IL-1α motif in the C-peptide of pINS. Surprisingly, the INS/IL-1α motif was recognized by monoclonal antibody raised against IL-1α. Deleting the INS/IL-1α motif in pINSd and IL-1α changed their activities. To investigate the pINSd receptor, the reconstitution of IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1) in Wish cells restored pINSd activity that was reversed by an IL-1R antagonist. These data suggested that pINSd needs IL-1R1 for inflammatory cytokine induction. Mouse embryo fibroblast cells of IL-1R1-deficient mice further confirmed that pINSd promotes immune responses through IL-1R1. PMID:27226621

  9. Proinsulin Shares a Motif with Interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and Induces Inflammatory Cytokine via Interleukin-1 Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siyoung; Kim, Eunsom; Jhun, Hyunjhung; Hong, Jaewoo; Kwak, Areum; Jo, Seunghyun; Bae, Suyoung; Lee, Jongho; Kim, Busun; Lee, Jungmin; Youn, Sulah; Kim, Somi; Kim, Miyeon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Lee, Youngmin; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-07-01

    Although it has been established that diabetes increases susceptibility to infections, the role of insulin (INS) in the immune response is unknown. Here, we investigated the immunological function of INS. Proinsulin dimer (pINSd) was a potent immune stimulus that induced inflammatory cytokines, but mature INS was unable to induce an immune response. An affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against mature IL-1α recognized IL-1α and pINS but failed to detect mature INS and IL-1β. Analysis of the pINS sequence revealed the existence of an INS/IL-1α motif in the C-peptide of pINS. Surprisingly, the INS/IL-1α motif was recognized by monoclonal antibody raised against IL-1α. Deleting the INS/IL-1α motif in pINSd and IL-1α changed their activities. To investigate the pINSd receptor, the reconstitution of IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1) in Wish cells restored pINSd activity that was reversed by an IL-1R antagonist. These data suggested that pINSd needs IL-1R1 for inflammatory cytokine induction. Mouse embryo fibroblast cells of IL-1R1-deficient mice further confirmed that pINSd promotes immune responses through IL-1R1. PMID:27226621

  10. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  11. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  12. Association of Neurotensin receptor 1 gene polymorphisms with processing speed in healthy Chinese-Han subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man; Ma, Hui; Huang, Ying-lin; Zhu, Gang; Zhao, Jing-ping

    2014-12-01

    Neurotensin modulates dopamine and serotonin transmission in the brain. The study investigated whether genetic polymorphisms in the Neurotensin receptor 1 gene were associated with performance on processing speed and executive function. A total of 129 healthy Chinese-Han volunteers were recruited. Genotyping for three SNPs, including rs6090453, rs6011914, and rs2427422, was analyzed by using a PCR and a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Performances of processing speed and executive function were assessed by using Trail Making Test-A (TMT-A), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Stroop Color-Word Test. We found significant differences in the outcomes of TMT-A score among rs6090453C/G (F(2,126)=4.405, P=0.014) and rs2427422A/G (F(2,126)=7.498, P=0.001) genotypes. Neurotensin receptor 1 SNP polymorphisms were significantly associated with the variance in processing speed performance in a sample of Chinese college students. PMID:25159184

  13. Hyperalgesia and increased neuropathic pain-like response in mice lacking galanin receptor 1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, K H; Hao, J-X; Xu, X-J; Jacoby, A S; Shine, J; Crawley, J N; Iismaa, T; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    2003-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin may have a role in modulation of nociception, particularly after peripheral nerve injury. The effect of galanin is mediated by at least three subtypes of receptors. In the present study, we assessed the nociceptive sensitivity in mice lacking the galanin receptor 1 gene (Galr1) and the development of neuropathic pain-like behaviours after photochemically induced partial sciatic nerve ischaemic injury. Under basal condition, Galr1 knock-out (Galr1(-/-)) mice had shortened response latency on the hot plate, but not tail flick and paw radiant heat, tests. The mechanical sensitivity was not different between Galr1(-/-) and wild type (Galr1(+/+)) mice, whereas the cold response was moderately enhanced in Galr1(-/-) mice. Both Galr1(-/-) mice and Galr1(+/+) controls developed mechanical and heat hypersensitivity after partial sciatic nerve injury. The duration of such pain-like behaviours was significantly increased in Galr1(-/-). The Galr1(-/-) mice and Galr1(+/+) mice did not differ in their recovery from deficits in toe-spread after sciatic nerve crush. The results provide some evidence for an inhibitory function for the neuropeptide galanin acting on galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) in nociception and neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in mice. PMID:12605908

  14. In Vitro Characterization of Psychoactive Substances at Rat, Mouse, and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Simmler, Linda D; Buchy, Danièle; Chaboz, Sylvie; Hoener, Marius C; Liechti, Matthias E

    2016-04-01

    Trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has been implicated in the behavioral effects of amphetamine-type stimulant drugs in rodents. TAAR1 has also been suggested as a target for novel medications to treat psychostimulant addiction. We previously reported that binding affinities at TAAR1 can differ between structural analogs of psychostimulants, and species differences have been observed. In this study, we complement our previous findings with additional substances and the determination of functional activation potencies. In summary, we present here pharmacological in vitro profiles of 101 psychoactive substances at human, rat, and mouse TAAR1. p-Tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, and tryptamine were included as endogenous comparator compounds. Functional cAMP measurements and radioligand displacement assays were conducted with human embryonic kidney 293 cells that expressed human, rat, or mouse TAAR1. Most amphetamines, phenethylamine, and aminoindanes exhibited potentially physiologically relevant rat and mouse TAAR1 activation (EC50 < 5 µM) and showed full or partial (Emax < 80%) agonist properties. Cathinone derivatives, including mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone, exhibited weak (EC50 = 5-10 µM) to negligible (EC50 > 10 µM) binding properties at TAAR1. Pipradrols, including methylphenidate, exhibited no affinity for TAAR1. We found considerable species differences in activity at TAAR1 among the highly active ligands, with a rank order of rat > mouse > human. This characterization provides information about the pharmacological profile of psychoactive substances. The species differences emphasize the relevance of clinical studies to translationally complement rodent studies on the role of TAAR1 activity for psychoactive substances. PMID:26791601

  15. Stabilization of Microtubule-Unbound Tau via Tau Phosphorylation at Ser262/356 by Par-1/MARK Contributes to Augmentation of AD-Related Phosphorylation and Aβ42-Induced Tau Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kanae; Maruko-Otake, Akiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Sekiya, Michiko; Iijima, Koichi M.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-interacting protein tau is associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). β-amyloid (Aβ) lies upstream of abnormal tau behavior, including detachment from microtubules, phosphorylation at several disease-specific sites, and self-aggregation into toxic tau species in AD brains. To prevent the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration in AD, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the initial events of tau mismetabolism. Currently, however, these mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using transgenic Drosophila co-expressing human tau and Aβ, we found that tau phosphorylation at AD-related Ser262/356 stabilized microtubule-unbound tau in the early phase of tau mismetabolism, leading to neurodegeneration. Aβ increased the level of tau detached from microtubules, independent of the phosphorylation status at GSK3-targeted SP/TP sites. Such mislocalized tau proteins, especially the less phosphorylated species, were stabilized by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via PAR-1/MARK. Levels of Ser262 phosphorylation were increased by Aβ42, and blocking this stabilization of tau suppressed Aβ42-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity and an increase in the levels of tau phosphorylation at the SP/TP site Thr231, suggesting that this process may be involved in AD pathogenesis. In contrast to PAR-1/MARK, blocking tau phosphorylation at SP/TP sites by knockdown of Sgg/GSK3 did not reduce tau levels, suppress tau mislocalization to the cytosol, or diminish Aβ-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity. These results suggest that stabilization of microtubule-unbound tau by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via the PAR-1/MARK may act in the initial steps of tau mismetabolism in AD pathogenesis, and that such tau species may represent a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27023670

  16. Underactivation of the adiponectin-adiponectin receptor 1 axis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: implications for progression.

    PubMed

    Kleinmann, Nir; Duivenvoorden, Wilhelmina C M; Hopmans, Sarah N; Beatty, Laura K; Qiao, Shengjun; Gallino, Daniel; Lhotak, Sarka; Daya, Dean; Paschos, Athanasios; Austin, Richard C; Pinthus, Jehonathan H

    2014-02-01

    Energy-sensing pathways, normally coordinated by 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), are dysregulated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Obesity can accentuate the pre-existing pro-tumorigenic metabolic machinery in RCC cells through its associated obesogenic hormonal milieu, characterized by lower circulating levels of adiponectin. In RCC patients, low adiponectin levels associate clinically with more aggressive disease. We investigated the adiponectin signaling pathway in RCC, focusing on adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) and associated activation of AMPK. AdipoR1 protein in RCC and normal surrounding renal tissues was determined by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Anti-tumorigenic effects of adiponectin in RCC cells in vitro were investigated via VEGF and MMP ELISA and invasion assays. Using in vivo models of RCC, the effect of AdipoR1-knockdown (shRNA) on tumor latency, growth and dissemination were determined. AdipoR1 protein was significantly reduced in clear cell RCC specimens. Adiponectin treatment inhibited VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion and activity and invasive and migratory capacities of RCC cells. AMPKα1-knockdown (shRNA) attenuated adiponectin's effects. In cells stably expressing AdipoR1-specific shRNA, AMPK activation by adiponectin was significantly reduced compared to cells expressing control shRNA. In vivo, AdipoR1 knockdown increased the growth, dissemination and angiogenesis of RCC. These findings suggest that deficiencies in the entire adiponectin hormonal axis (the hormone and its receptor) result in underactivation of AMPK leading to increased angiogenic and invasive capacities of RCC. The established link between obesity and RCC can therefore be further explained by the adiponectin deficiency in obese individuals together with reduced AdipoR1 protein in RCC. PMID:24096711

  17. Augmentation of methamphetamine-induced behaviors in transgenic mice lacking the trace amine-associated receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Achat-Mendes, Cindy; Lynch, Laurie J.; Sullivan, Katherine A.; Vallender, Eric J.; Miller, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is functionally activated by amphetamine-based psychostimulants, including amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA. Previous studies have shown that in transgenic mice lacking the TAAR1 gene (TAAR1 knockout; KO) a single injection of amphetamine can produce enhanced behavioral responses compared to responses evoked in wild-type (WT) mice. Further, the psychostimulant effects of cocaine can be diminished by selective activation of TAAR1. These findings suggest that TAAR1 might be implicated in the rewarding properties of psychostimulants. To investigate the role of TAAR1 in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, the psychomotor stimulating effects of amphetamine and methamphetamine and the conditioned rewarding effects of methamphetamine and morphine were compared between WT and TAAR1 KO mice. In locomotor activity studies, both single and repeated exposure to d-amphetamine or methamphetamine generated significantly higher levels of total distance travelled in TAAR1 KO mice compared to WT mice. In conditioned place preference (CPP) studies, TAAR1 KO mice acquired methamphetamine-induced CPP earlier than WT mice and retained CPP longer during extinction training. In orphine-induced CPP, both WT and KO genotypes displayed similar levels of CPP. Results from locomotor activity studies suggest that TAAR1 may have a modulatory role in the behavioral sensitization to amphetamine-based psychostimulants. That methamphetamine- but not morphine-induced CPP was augmented in TAAR1 KO mice suggests a selective role of TAAR1 in the conditioned reinforcing effects of methamphetamine. Collectively, these findings provide support for a regulatory role of TAAR1 in methamphetamine signaling. PMID:22079347

  18. Augmentation of methamphetamine-induced behaviors in transgenic mice lacking the trace amine-associated receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Achat-Mendes, Cindy; Lynch, Laurie J; Sullivan, Katherine A; Vallender, Eric J; Miller, Gregory M

    2012-04-01

    The trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is functionally activated by amphetamine-based psychostimulants, including amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA. Previous studies have shown that in transgenic mice lacking the TAAR1 gene (TAAR1 knockout; KO) a single injection of amphetamine can produce enhanced behavioral responses compared to responses evoked in wild-type (WT) mice. Further, the psychostimulant effects of cocaine can be diminished by selective activation of TAAR1. These findings suggest that TAAR1 might be implicated in the rewarding properties of psychostimulants. To investigate the role of TAAR1 in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, the psychomotor stimulating effects of amphetamine and methamphetamine and the conditioned rewarding effects of methamphetamine and morphine were compared between WT and TAAR1 KO mice. In locomotor activity studies, both single and repeated exposure to d-amphetamine or methamphetamine generated significantly higher levels of total distance traveled in TAAR1 KO mice compared to WT mice. In conditioned place preference (CPP) studies, TAAR1 KO mice acquired methamphetamine-induced CPP earlier than WT mice and retained CPP longer during extinction training. In morphine-induced CPP, both WT and KO genotypes displayed similar levels of CPP. Results from locomotor activity studies suggest that TAAR1 may have a modulatory role in the behavioral sensitization to amphetamine-based psychostimulants. That methamphetamine-but not morphine-induced CPP was augmented in TAAR1 KO mice suggests a selective role of TAAR1 in the conditioned reinforcing effects of methamphetamine. Collectively, these findings provide support for a regulatory role of TAAR1 in methamphetamine signaling. PMID:22079347

  19. KDEL receptor 1 regulates T-cell homeostasis via PP1 that is a key phosphatase for ISR

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Kokichi; Arima, Yasunobu; Atsumi, Toru; Jiang, Jing-jing; Bando, Hidenori; Meng, Jie; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Stofkova, Andrea; Nishikawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Hironao; Ogura, Hideki; Ueda, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Mineko; Harada, Masaya; Kobayashi, Junya; Hasegawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishida, Keigo; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Toshio; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    KDEL receptors are responsible for retrotransporting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones from the Golgi complex to the ER. Here we describe a role for KDEL receptor 1 (KDELR1) that involves the regulation of integrated stress responses (ISR) in T cells. Designing and using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutant mouse line, T-Red (naïve T-cell reduced), we show that a point mutation in KDELR1 is responsible for the reduction in the number of naïve T cells in this model owing to an increase in ISR. Mechanistic analysis shows that KDELR1 directly regulates protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a key phosphatase for ISR in naïve T cells. T-Red KDELR1 does not associate with PP1, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity against eIF2α and subsequent expression of stress responsive genes including the proapoptotic factor Bim. These results demonstrate that KDELR1 regulates naïve T-cell homeostasis by controlling ISR. PMID:26081938

  20. Regulatory role of C-terminus in the G-protein coupling of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2008-11-01

    The signaling property of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGlu1alpha) is different from that of short-form splice variants. This could be caused by the exposure of a cluster of positively charged amino acid residues, RRKK, in the proximal C-tail which is thought to be masked by the long C-tail of mGlu1alpha. We found that the RRKK residues, when exposed, attenuate Gq coupling and decrease the basal activity and the surface expression of mGlu1, in agreement with previous results. Moreover, these residues abolish the Gi/o coupling of mGlu1, but do not affect glutamate-induced dimeric rearrangement and protein kinase A-dependent modulation of mGlu1. These results suggest that the RRKK residues do not inhibit the conformational change upon glutamate binding and protein accessibility to the intracellular loops where G-protein coupling occurs, but rather act as an inhibitory domain against G-protein coupling in a different manner depending on the type of G protein. PMID:18786167

  1. Defective sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) phosphorylation exacerbates TH17-mediated autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Garris, Christopher S; Wu, Linfeng; Acharya, Swati; Arac, Ahmet; Blaho, Victoria A; Huang, Yingxiang; Moon, Byoung San; Axtell, Robert C; Ho, Peggy P; Steinberg, Gary K; Lewis, David B; Sobel, Raymond A; Han, David K; Steinman, Lawrence; Snyder, Michael P; Hla, Timothy; Han, May H

    2013-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling regulates lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs into systemic circulation. The sphingosine phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) agonist FTY-720 (Gilenya) arrests immune trafficking and prevents multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. However, alternative mechanisms of S1P-S1P1 signaling have been reported. Phosphoproteomic analysis of MS brain lesions revealed S1P1 phosphorylation on S351, a residue crucial for receptor internalization. Mutant mice harboring an S1pr1 gene encoding phosphorylation-deficient receptors (S1P1(S5A)) developed severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) due to autoimmunity mediated by interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) in the peripheral immune and nervous system. S1P1 directly activated the Jak-STAT3 signal-transduction pathway via IL-6. Impaired S1P1 phosphorylation enhances TH17 polarization and exacerbates autoimmune neuroinflammation. These mechanisms may be pathogenic in MS. PMID:24076635

  2. Asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 is a specific cell-surface marker for isolating hepatocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Derek T; Henderson, Christopher A; Warren, Curtis R; Friesen, Max; Xia, Fang; Becker, Caroline E; Musunuru, Kiran; Cowan, Chad A

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in vitro, but differentiation protocols commonly give rise to a heterogeneous mixture of cells. This variability confounds the evaluation of in vitro functional assays performed using HLCs. Increased differentiation efficiency and more accurate approximation of the in vivo hepatocyte gene expression profile would improve the utility of hPSCs. Towards this goal, we demonstrate the purification of a subpopulation of functional HLCs using the hepatocyte surface marker asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 (ASGR1). We analyzed the expression profile of ASGR1-positive cells by microarray, and tested their ability to perform mature hepatocyte functions (albumin and urea secretion, cytochrome activity). By these measures, ASGR1-positive HLCs are enriched for the gene expression profile and functional characteristics of primary hepatocytes compared with unsorted HLCs. We have demonstrated that ASGR1-positive sorting isolates a functional subpopulation of HLCs from among the heterogeneous cellular population produced by directed differentiation. PMID:27143754

  3. Involvement of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 in Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tang, Su-Su; Hong, Hao; Chen, Lan; Mei, Zhen-Lin; Ji, Miao-Jin; Xiang, Guo-Qing; Li, Ning; Ji, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) is thought to be associated with the progressive neuronal death observed in Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity triggered by Aβ remain elusive. In the current study, we investigated the roles of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1R) in Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity in vitro or in vivo. In vitro exposure of mouse primary neurons to Aβ1-42 caused a gradual increases in CysLT1R expression. In vivo bilateral intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 also elicited time-dependent increases of CysLT1R expression in the hippocampus and cortex of mice. The CysLT1R antagonist pranlukast not only reversed Aβ1-42-induced upregulation of CysLT1R, but also suppressed Aβ1-42-triggered neurotoxicity evidenced by enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B p65, activated caspase-3, decreased B-cell lymphoma-2 and cell viability and impaired memory. Furthermore, chronic treatment with pranlukast produced similar beneficial effects on memory behavior and hippocampal long-term potentiation to memantine or donepezil in intrahippocampal Aβ1-42-injected mice. Our data indicate that CysLT1R is involved in Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity, and that blockade of CysLT1R, such as application of CysLT1R antagonist, could be a novel and promising strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24269024

  4. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2012-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts proinflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5-2 μM) for 6 hours significantly increases corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 μM) to LAD2 cells, which are "primed" with SP for 48 hours and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hours later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 μM) for 6 hours induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared with controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 μM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, whereas CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  5. KDEL receptor 1 regulates T-cell homeostasis via PP1 that is a key phosphatase for ISR.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Kokichi; Arima, Yasunobu; Atsumi, Toru; Jiang, Jing-jing; Bando, Hidenori; Meng, Jie; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Stofkova, Andrea; Nishikawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Hironao; Ogura, Hideki; Ueda, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Mineko; Harada, Masaya; Kobayashi, Junya; Hasegawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishida, Keigo; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Toshio; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    KDEL receptors are responsible for retrotransporting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones from the Golgi complex to the ER. Here we describe a role for KDEL receptor 1 (KDELR1) that involves the regulation of integrated stress responses (ISR) in T cells. Designing and using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutant mouse line, T-Red (naïve T-cell reduced), we show that a point mutation in KDELR1 is responsible for the reduction in the number of naïve T cells in this model owing to an increase in ISR. Mechanistic analysis shows that KDELR1 directly regulates protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a key phosphatase for ISR in naïve T cells. T-Red KDELR1 does not associate with PP1, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity against eIF2α and subsequent expression of stress responsive genes including the proapoptotic factor Bim. These results demonstrate that KDELR1 regulates naïve T-cell homeostasis by controlling ISR. PMID:26081938

  6. Lipopolysaccharide augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by up-regulating lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Takahashi, Miyuki; Mannan, Shahnewaj B; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting an intimate association of immune activation with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) through scavenging receptors promotes the formation of mature lipid-laden macrophages, which subsequently leads to exacerbation of regional inflammation and atherosclerotic plaque formation. In this study, we first examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and the human PMA-induced macrophage cell line THP-1 after LPS stimulation. LPS significantly up-regulated LOX-1 mRNA in RAW264.7 cells; LOX-1 cell-surface protein expression was also increased. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with LPS stimulation. The augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was almost completely abrogated by treatment with an anti-LOX-1 antibody. Of note, knockdown of Erk1/2 resulted in a significant reduction of LPS-induced LOX-1 up-regulation. Treatment with U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK, significantly suppressed LPS-induced expression of LOX-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, LOX-1 promoter activity was significantly augmented by LPS stimulation; this augmentation was prevented by U0126 treatment. Similar results were also observed in human PMA-induced THP-1 macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that LPS up-regulates LOX-1, at least in part through activation of the Erk1/2 signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of TLR4-mediated aberrant LOX-1 signaling in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:25348362

  7. Antidepressant/anxiolytic potential and adverse effect liabilities of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in animal models.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Shigeyuki; Shimazaki, Toshiharu; Nishiguchi, Mariko; Funakoshi, Takeo; Iijima, Michihiko; Ito, Akie; Kanuma, Kosuke; Sekiguchi, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1 receptor) is known to be involved in the control of mood and stress, in addition to the regulation of feeding. Here, we report further evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects in a variety of animal models using TASP0382650 and TASP0489838, newly synthesized MCH1 receptor antagonists, with different scaffolds. Both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited high affinities for human MCH1 receptor with IC50 values of 7.13 and 3.80nM, respectively. Both compounds showed potent antagonist activities at the MCH1 receptor, as assessed using MCH-increased [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human MCH1 receptor and an MCH-induced [Ca(2+)]i assay in rat MCH1 receptor expressing cells. In contrast, neither TASP0382650 nor TASP0489838 showed an affinity for the MCH2 receptor, another MCH receptor subtype. The oral administration of TASP0382650 or TASP0489838 significantly reduced the immobility time during the forced swimming test in rats, and reduced hyperemotionality induced by an olfactory bulbectomy, both of which are indicative of an antidepressant-like potential. In the olfactory bulbectomy model, the antidepressant effect of TASP0382650 appeared following a single administration, suggesting a faster onset of action, compared with current medications. Moreover, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited anxiolytic effects in several animal models of anxiety. In contrast, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, motor function, spatial memory during the Morris water maze task, or the convulsion threshold to pentylenetetrazole. These findings provide additional evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant- and anxiolytic activities with no adverse effects in experimental animal models. PMID:26044968

  8. Orexin A Affects INS-1 Rat Insulinoma Cell Proliferation via Orexin Receptor 1 and the AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhao, Yuyan; Zheng, Delu; Ju, Shujing; Shen, Yang; Guo, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to investigate the role of the AKT/PKB (protein kinase B) signaling pathway acting via orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) and the effects of orexin A (OXA) on cell proliferation in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line (INS-1 cells). Rat INS-1 cells were exposed to different concentrations of OXA in vitro and treated with OX1R antagonist (SB334867), PI3K antagonist (wortmannin), AKT antagonist (PF-04691502), or negative control. INS-1 amount of cell proliferation, viability and apoptosis, insulin secretion, OX1R protein expression, caspase-3 activity, and AKT protein levels were determined. We report that OXA (10−10 to 10−6 M) stimulates INS-1 cell proliferation and viability, reduces the proapoptotic activity of caspase-3 to protect against apoptotic cell death, and increases insulin secretion. Additionally, AKT phosphorylation was stimulated by OXA (10−10 to 10−6 M). However, the OX1R antagonist SB334867 (10−6 M), the PI3K antagonist wortmannin (10−8 M), the AKT antagonist PF-04691502 (10−6 M), or the combination of both abolished the effects of OXA to a certain extent. These results suggest that the upregulation of OXA-OX1R mediated by AKT activation may inhibit cell apoptosis and promote cell proliferation in INS-1 cells. This finding provides functional evidence of the biological actions of OXA in rat insulinoma cells. PMID:24382962

  9. The Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor 1 Contribution to Early Clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and to Natural Killer-Macrophage Cross Talk

    PubMed Central

    Yossef, Rami; Hadad, Uzi; Elkabets, Moshe; Vallon-Eberhard, Alexandra; Hulihel, Luai; Jung, Steffen; Ghadially, Hormas; Braiman, Alex; Apte, Ron N.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Dagan, Ron; Mizrachi-Nebenzahl, Yaffa; Porgador, Angel

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells serve as a crucial first line of defense against tumors, viral and bacterial infections. We studied the involvement of a principal activating natural killer cell receptor, natural cytotoxicity receptor 1 (NCR1), in the innate immune response to S. pneumoniae infection. Our results demonstrate that the presence of the NCR1 receptor is imperative for the early clearance of S. pneumoniae. We tied the ends in vivo by showing that deficiency in NCR1 resulted in reduced lung NK cell activation and lung IFNγ production at the early stages of S. pneumoniae infection. NCR1 did not mediate direct recognition of S. pneumoniae. Therefore, we studied the involvement of lung macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) as the mediators of NK-expressed NCR1 involvement in response to S. pneumoniae. In vitro, wild type BM-derived macrophages and DC expressed ligands to NCR1 and co-incubation of S. pneumoniae-infected macrophages/DC with NCR1-deficient NK cells resulted in significantly lesser IFNγ levels compared to NCR1-expressing NK cells. In vivo, ablation of lung macrophages and DC was detrimental to the early clearance of S. pneumoniae. NCR1-expressing mice had more potent alveolar macrophages as compared to NCR1-deficient mice. This result correlated with the higher fraction of NCR1-ligandhigh lung macrophages, in NCR1-expressing mice, that had better phagocytic activity compared to NCR1-liganddull macrophages. Overall, our results point to the essential contribution of NK-expressed NCR1 in early response to S. pneumoniae infection and to NCR1-mediated interaction of NK and S. pneumoniae infected-macrophages and -DC. PMID:21887255

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 antagonist ki16425 blunts abdominal and systemic inflammation in a mouse model of peritoneal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Weathington, Nathaniel; Jacko, Anastasia M; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan; Zhao, Yutong

    2015-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator of inflammation via the LPA receptors 1-6. We and others have previously described proinflammatory and profibrotic activities of LPA signaling in bleomycin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary fibrosis or lung injury models. In this study, we investigated if LPA signaling plays a role in the pathogenesis of systemic sepsis from an abdominal source. We report here that antagonism of the LPA receptor LPA1 with the small molecule ki16425 reduces the severity of abdominal inflammation and organ damage in the setting of peritoneal endotoxin exposure. Pretreatment of mice with intraperitoneal ki16425 eliminates LPS-induced peritoneal neutrophil chemokine and cytokine production, liver oxidative stress, liver injury, and cellular apoptosis in visceral organs. Mice pretreated with ki16425 are also protected from LPS-induced mortality. Tissue myeloperoxidase activity is not affected by LPA1 antagonism. We have shown that LPA1 is associated with LPS coreceptor CD14 and the association is suppressed by ki16425. LPS-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in liver cells and interleukin 6 production in Raw264 cells are likewise blunted by LPA1 antagonism. These studies indicate that the small molecule inhibitor of LPA1, ki16425, suppresses cytokine responses and inflammation in a peritoneal sepsis model by blunting downstream signaling through the LPA1-CD14-toll-like receptor 4 receptor complex. This anti-inflammatory effect may represent a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of systemic inflammatory responses to infection of the abdominal cavity. PMID:25701366

  11. Noncanonical role of transferrin receptor 1 is essential for intestinal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alan C.; Donovan, Adriana; Ned-Sykes, Renee; Andrews, Nancy C.

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin receptor 1 (Tfr1) facilitates cellular iron uptake through receptor-mediated endocytosis of iron-loaded transferrin. It is expressed in the intestinal epithelium but not involved in dietary iron absorption. To investigate its role, we inactivated the Tfr1 gene selectively in murine intestinal epithelial cells. The mutant mice had severe disruption of the epithelial barrier and early death. There was impaired proliferation of intestinal epithelial cell progenitors, aberrant lipid handling, increased mRNA expression of stem cell markers, and striking induction of many genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Administration of parenteral iron did not improve the phenotype. Surprisingly, however, enforced expression of a mutant allele of Tfr1 that is unable to serve as a receptor for iron-loaded transferrin appeared to fully rescue most animals. Our results implicate Tfr1 in homeostatic maintenance of the intestinal epithelium, acting through a role that is independent of its iron-uptake function. PMID:26324903

  12. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise A.; Holder, Kayla A.; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A. C.; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology. PMID:26352587

  13. Pancreatitis Secondary to Anti-Programmed Death Receptor 1 Immunotherapy Diagnosed by FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Alabed, Yazan Z; Aghayev, Ayaz; Sakellis, Christopher; Van den Abbeele, Annick D

    2015-11-01

    A 57-year-old man with metastatic melanoma developed colitis secondary to ipilimumab, a known immune-related adverse event (irAE). The patient then received pembrolizumab immunotherapy, an anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 (PD-1) antibody. Restaging FDG PET/CT study following 3 cycles of therapy demonstrated diffuse increased FDG uptake throughout the body of the pancreas associated with fat stranding in the peripancreatic region, suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced pancreatitis. Although the patient was clinically asymptomatic, diagnosis was biochemically confirmed with elevated amylase and lipase levels. In the era of immunotherapy, it will be critical to recognize irAEs early to allow prompt initiation of appropriate therapy and reduce the risk of long-term sequelae. PMID:26284765

  14. Ractopamine, a Livestock Feed Additive, Is a Full Agonist at Trace Amine–Associated Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Grandy, David K.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Ractopamine (RAC) is fed to an estimated 80% of all beef, swine, and turkey raised in the United States. It promotes muscle mass development, limits fat deposition, and reduces feed consumption. However, it has several undesirable behavioral side effects in livestock, especially pigs, including restlessness, agitation, excessive oral-facial movements, and aggressive behavior. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest RAC’s physiological actions begin with its stimulation of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptor–mediated signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue; however, the molecular pharmacology of RAC’s psychoactive effects is poorly understood. Using human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (hCFTR) chloride channels as a sensor for intracellular cAMP, we found that RAC and p-tyramine (TYR) produced concentration-dependent increases in chloride conductance in oocytes coexpressing hCFTR and mouse trace amine–associated receptor 1 (mTAAR1), which was completely reversed by the trace amine–associated receptor 1 (TAAR1)–selective antagonist EPPTB [N-(3-ethoxyphenyl)-4-pyrrolidin-1-yl-3-trifluoromethylbenzamide]. Oocytes coexpressing hCFTR and the human β2-adrenergic receptor showed no response to RAC or TYR. These studies demonstrate that, contrary to expectations, RAC is not an agonist of the human β2-adrenergic receptor but rather a full agonist for mTAAR1. Since TAAR1-mediated signaling can influence cardiovascular tone and behavior in several animal models, our finding that RAC is a full mTAAR1 agonist supports the idea that this novel mechanism of action influences the physiology and behavior of pigs and other species. These findings should stimulate future studies to characterize the pharmacological, physiological, and behavioral actions of RAC in humans and other species exposed to this drug. PMID:24799633

  15. Ractopamine, a livestock feed additive, is a full agonist at trace amine-associated receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehong; Grandy, David K; Janowsky, Aaron

    2014-07-01

    Ractopamine (RAC) is fed to an estimated 80% of all beef, swine, and turkey raised in the United States. It promotes muscle mass development, limits fat deposition, and reduces feed consumption. However, it has several undesirable behavioral side effects in livestock, especially pigs, including restlessness, agitation, excessive oral-facial movements, and aggressive behavior. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest RAC's physiological actions begin with its stimulation of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue; however, the molecular pharmacology of RAC's psychoactive effects is poorly understood. Using human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (hCFTR) chloride channels as a sensor for intracellular cAMP, we found that RAC and p-tyramine (TYR) produced concentration-dependent increases in chloride conductance in oocytes coexpressing hCFTR and mouse trace amine-associated receptor 1 (mTAAR1), which was completely reversed by the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1)-selective antagonist EPPTB [N-(3-ethoxyphenyl)-4-pyrrolidin-1-yl-3-trifluoromethylbenzamide]. Oocytes coexpressing hCFTR and the human β2-adrenergic receptor showed no response to RAC or TYR. These studies demonstrate that, contrary to expectations, RAC is not an agonist of the human β2-adrenergic receptor but rather a full agonist for mTAAR1. Since TAAR1-mediated signaling can influence cardiovascular tone and behavior in several animal models, our finding that RAC is a full mTAAR1 agonist supports the idea that this novel mechanism of action influences the physiology and behavior of pigs and other species. These findings should stimulate future studies to characterize the pharmacological, physiological, and behavioral actions of RAC in humans and other species exposed to this drug. PMID:24799633

  16. Structural Model of the Cytosolic Domain of the Plant Ethylene Receptor 1 (ETR1)

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, Hubert; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Kaljunen, Heidi; Tuukkanen, Anne; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene initiates important aspects of plant growth and development through disulfide-linked receptor dimers located in the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptors feature a small transmembrane, ethylene binding domain followed by a large cytosolic domain, which serves as a scaffold for the assembly of large molecular weight complexes of different ethylene receptors and other cellular participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Here we report the crystallographic structures of the ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1) catalytic ATP-binding and the ethylene response sensor 1 dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains and the solution structure of the entire cytosolic domain of ETR1, all from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isolated dimeric ethylene response sensor 1 DHp domain is asymmetric, the result of different helical bending angles close to the conserved His residue. The structures of the catalytic ATP-binding, DHp, and receiver domains of ethylene receptors and of a homologous, but dissimilar, GAF domain were refined against experimental small angle x-ray scattering data, leading to a structural model of the entire cytosolic domain of the ethylene receptor 1. The model illustrates that the cytosolic domain is shaped like a dumbbell and that the receiver domain is flexible and assumes a position different from those observed in prokaryotic histidine kinases. Furthermore the cytosolic domain of ETR1 plays a key role, interacting with all other receptors and several participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Our model, therefore, provides the first step toward a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanics of this important signal transduction process in plants. PMID:25451923

  17. Discovery and biological evaluation of tetrahydrothieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives as selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 antagonists for the potential treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Nam, Mina; Kim, TaeHun; Kwak, Jinsook; Seo, Seon Hee; Ko, Min Kyung; Lim, Eun Jeong; Min, Sun-Joon; Cho, Yong Seo; Keum, Gyochang; Baek, Du-Jong; Lee, Jiyoun; Pae, Ae Nim

    2015-06-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) has been a prime target for drug discovery due to its heavy involvement in various brain disorders. Recent studies suggested that mGluR1 is associated with chronic pain and can serve as a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. In an effort to develop a novel mGluR1 antagonist, we designed and synthesized a library of compounds with tetrahydrothieno[2,3-c]pyridine scaffold. Among these compounds, compound 9b and 10b showed excellent antagonistic activity in vitro and demonstrated pain-suppressing activity in animal models of pain. Both compounds were orally active, and compound 9b exhibited a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in rats. We believe that these compounds can provide a promising lead compound that is suitable for the potential treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25984841

  18. Losartan attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury by suppression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wang; Deng, Yue; Deng, Jia; Wang, Dao-Xin; Zhang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recent study has shown that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI) with high level of angiotensin II (AngII) generated form AngI catalyzed by angiotensin-converting enzyme. AngII plays a major effect mainly through AT1 receptor. Therefore, we speculate inhibition of AT1 receptor may possibly attenuate the lung injury. Losartan, an antagonist of AT1 receptor for angiotensin II, attenuated lung injury by alleviation of the inflammation response in ALI, but the mechanism of losartan in ALI still remains unclear. Methods: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Control group, ALI group (LPS), and Losartan group (LPS + Losartan). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis. The expressions of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and caspase-3 were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Results: In ALI group, TNF-α and protein level in BALF, MPO activity in lung tissue, pulmonary edema and lung injury were significantly increased. Losartan significantly reduced LPS-induced increase in TNF-α and protein level in BALF, MPO activity, pulmonary edema and lung injury in LPS-induced lung injury. The mRNA and protein expression levels of LOX-1 were significantly decreased with the administration of losartan in LPS-induced lung injury. Also, losartan blocked the protein levels of caspase-3 and ICAM-1 mediated by LOX-1 in LPS-induced lung injury. Conclusions: Losartan attenuated lung injury by alleviation of the inflammation and cell apoptosis by inhibition of LOX-1 in LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:26884836

  19. Neurotensin-induced miR-133α expression regulates neurotensin receptor 1 recycling through its downstream target aftiphilin

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ivy Ka Man; Jensen, Dane; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2016-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) triggers signaling in human colonic epithelial cells by activating the G protein-coupled receptor, the neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1). Activated NTR1 traffics from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, and then recycles. Although sustained NT/NTR1 signaling requires efficient NTR1 recycling, little is known about the regulation of NTR1 recycling. We recently showed that NT/NTR1 signaling increases expression of miR-133α. Herein, we studied the mechanism of NT-regulated miR-133α expression and examined the role of miR-133α in intracellular NTR1 trafficking in human NCM460 colonocytes. We found that NT-induced miR-133α upregulation involves the negative transcription regulator, zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1. Silencing of miR-133α or overexpression of aftiphilin (AFTPH), a binding target of miR-133α, attenuated NTR1 trafficking to plasma membrane in human colonocytes, without affecting NTR1 internalization. We localized AFTPH to early endosomes and the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in unstimulated human colonic epithelial cells. AFTPH overexpression reduced NTR1 localization in early endosomes and increased expression of proteins related to endosomes and the TGN trafficking pathway. AFTPH overexpression and de-acidification of intracellular vesicles increased NTR1 expression. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of GPCR trafficking in human colonic epithelial cells by which a microRNA, miR-133α regulates NTR1 trafficking through its downstream target AFTPH. PMID:26902265

  20. Methamphetamine induces trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) expression in human T lymphocytes: role in immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Uma; Cenna, Jonathan M; Haldar, Bijayesh; Fernandes, Nicole C; Razmpour, Roshanak; Fan, Shongshan; Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava

    2016-01-01

    The novel transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor, trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), represents a potential, direct target for drugs of abuse and monoaminergic compounds, including amphetamines. For the first time, our studies have illustrated that there is an induction of TAAR1 mRNA expression in resting T lymphocytes in response to methamphetamine. Methamphetamine treatment for 6 h significantly increased TAAR1 mRNA expression (P < 0.001) and protein expression (P < 0.01) at 24 h. With the use of TAAR1 gene silencing, we demonstrate that methamphetamine-induced cAMP, a classic response to methamphetamine stimulation, is regulated via TAAR1. We also show by TAAR1 knockdown that the down-regulation of IL-2 in T cells by methamphetamine, which we reported earlier, is indeed regulated by TAAR1. Our results also show the presence of TAAR1 in human lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected patients, with or without a history of methamphetamine abuse. TAAR1 expression on lymphocytes was largely in the paracortical lymphoid area of the lymph nodes with enhanced expression in lymph nodes of HIV-1-infected methamphetamine abusers rather than infected-only subjects. In vitro analysis of HIV-1 infection of human PBMCs revealed increased TAAR1 expression in the presence of methamphetamine. In summary, the ability of methamphetamine to activate trace TAAR1 in vitro and to regulate important T cell functions, such as cAMP activation and IL-2 production; the expression of TAAR1 in T lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes; and our in vitro HIV-1 infection model in PBMCs suggests that TAAR1 may play an important role in methamphetamine -mediated immune-modulatory responses. PMID:26302754

  1. Methamphetamine and HIV-1-induced neurotoxicity: Role of trace amine associated receptor 1 cAMP signaling in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Irma E.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is abused by about 5% of the United States population with approximately 10–15% of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) patients reporting its use. METH abuse accelerates the onset and severity of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and astrocyte-induced neurotoxicity. METH activates G-protein coupled receptors such as trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) increasing intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in presynaptic cells of monoaminergic systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of METH and HIV-1 on primary human astrocyte TAAR1 expression, function and glutamate clearance. Our results demonstrate combined conditions increased TAAR1 mRNA levels 7-fold and increased intracellular cAMP levels. METH and beta-phenylethylamine (β-PEA), known TAAR1 agonists, increased intracellular cAMP levels in astrocytes. Further, TAAR1 knockdown significantly reduced intracellular cAMP levels in response to METH/β-PEA, indicating signaling through astrocyte TAAR1. METH +/− HIV-1 decreased excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (EAAT-2) mRNA and significantly decreased glutamate clearance. RNA interference for TAAR1 prevented METH-mediated decreases in EAAT-2. TAAR1 knockdown significantly increased glutamate clearance, which was further heightened significantly by METH. Moreover, TAAR1 overexpression significantly decreased EAAT-2 levels and glutamate clearance that were further reduced by METH. Taken together, our data show that METH treatment activated TAAR1 leading to intracellular cAMP in human astrocytes and modulated glutamate clearance abilities. Furthermore, molecular alterations in astrocyte TAAR1 levels correspond to changes in astrocyte EAAT-2 levels and function. To our knowledge this is the first report implicating astrocyte TAAR1 as a novel receptor for METH during combined injury in the context of HAND. PMID:24950453

  2. Neurotensin-induced miR-133α expression regulates neurotensin receptor 1 recycling through its downstream target aftiphilin.

    PubMed

    Law, Ivy Ka Man; Jensen, Dane; Bunnett, Nigel W; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2016-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) triggers signaling in human colonic epithelial cells by activating the G protein-coupled receptor, the neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1). Activated NTR1 traffics from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, and then recycles. Although sustained NT/NTR1 signaling requires efficient NTR1 recycling, little is known about the regulation of NTR1 recycling. We recently showed that NT/NTR1 signaling increases expression of miR-133α. Herein, we studied the mechanism of NT-regulated miR-133α expression and examined the role of miR-133α in intracellular NTR1 trafficking in human NCM460 colonocytes. We found that NT-induced miR-133α upregulation involves the negative transcription regulator, zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1. Silencing of miR-133α or overexpression of aftiphilin (AFTPH), a binding target of miR-133α, attenuated NTR1 trafficking to plasma membrane in human colonocytes, without affecting NTR1 internalization. We localized AFTPH to early endosomes and the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in unstimulated human colonic epithelial cells. AFTPH overexpression reduced NTR1 localization in early endosomes and increased expression of proteins related to endosomes and the TGN trafficking pathway. AFTPH overexpression and de-acidification of intracellular vesicles increased NTR1 expression. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of GPCR trafficking in human colonic epithelial cells by which a microRNA, miR-133α regulates NTR1 trafficking through its downstream target AFTPH. PMID:26902265

  3. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thyronamine Analogues as Novel Potent Mouse Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 (mTAAR1) Agonists.

    PubMed

    Chiellini, Grazia; Nesi, Giulia; Digiacomo, Maria; Malvasi, Rossella; Espinoza, Stefano; Sabatini, Martina; Frascarelli, Sabina; Laurino, Annunziatina; Cichero, Elena; Macchia, Marco; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Fossa, Paola; Raimondi, Laura; Zucchi, Riccardo; Rapposelli, Simona

    2015-06-25

    Trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed in brain and periphery activated by a wide spectrum of agonists that include, but are not limited to, trace amines (TAs), amphetamine-like psychostimulants, and endogenous thyronamines such as thyronamine (T0AM) and 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM). Such polypharmacology has made it challenging to understand the role and the biology of TAAR1. In an effort to understand the molecular basis of TAAR1 activation, we rationally designed and synthesized a small family of thyronamine derivatives. Among them, compounds 2 and 3 appeared to be a good mimic of the parent endogenous thyronamine, T0AM and T1AM, respectively, both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, these compounds offer suitable tools for studying the physiological roles of mouse TAAR1 and could represent the starting point for the development of more potent and selective TAAR1 ligands. PMID:26010728

  4. Associations between Cannabinoid Receptor-1 (CNR1) Variation and Hippocampus and Amygdala Volumes in Heavy Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Schacht, Joseph P; Hutchison, Kent E; Filbey, Francesca M

    2012-01-01

    Heavy cannabis users display smaller amygdalae and hippocampi than controls, and genetic variation accounts for a large proportion of variance in liability to cannabis dependence (CD). A single nucleotide polymorphism in the cannabis receptor-1 gene (CNR1), rs2023239, has been associated with CD diagnosis and intermediate phenotypes, including abstinence-induced withdrawal, cue-elicited craving, and parahippocampal activation to cannabis cues. This study compared hippocampal and amygdalar volumes (potential CD intermediate phenotypes) between heavy cannabis users and healthy controls, and analyzed interactions between group, rs2023239 variation, and the volumes of these structures. Ninety-four heavy cannabis users participated, of whom 37 (14 men, 23 women; mean age=27.8) were matched to 37 healthy controls (14 men, 23 women; mean age=27.3) for case-control analyses. Controlling for total intracranial volume and other confounding variables, matched cannabis users had smaller bilateral hippocampi (left, p=0.002; right, p=0.001) and left amygdalae (p=0.01) than controls. When genotype was considered in the case-control analyses, there was a group by genotype interaction, such that the rs2023239 G allele predicted lower volume of bilateral hippocampi among cannabis users relative to controls (both p<0.001). This interaction persisted when all 94 cannabis users were compared to controls. There were no group by genotype interactions on amygdalar volume. These data replicate previous findings of reduced hippocampal and amygdalar volume among heavy cannabis users, and suggest that CNR1 rs2023239 variation may predispose smaller hippocampal volume after heavy cannabis use. This association should be tested in future studies of brain volume differences in CD. PMID:22669173

  5. G-1 exerts neuroprotective effects through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 following spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiang; Meng, Jia; Wang, Xin-Shang; Kang, Wen-Bo; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) always occurs accidently and leads to motor dysfunction because of biochemical and pathological events. Estrogen has been shown to be neuroprotective against SCI through estrogen receptors (ERs), but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of a newly found membrane ER, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPR30 or GPER1), and discussed the feasibility of a GPR30 agonist as an estrogen replacement. Forty adult female C57BL/6J mice (10-12 weeks old) were divided randomly into vehicle, G-1, E2, G-1 + G-15 and E2 + G-15 groups. All mice were subjected to SCI using a crushing injury approach. The specific GPR30 agonist, G-1, mimicked the effects of E2 treatment by preventing SCI-induced apoptotic cell death and enhancing motor functional recovery after injury. GPR30 activation regulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways, increased GPR30 and anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but decreased the pro-apoptosis factor Bax and cleaved caspase-3. However, the neuroprotective effects of G-1 and E2 were blocked by the specific GPR30 antagonist, G-15. Thus, GPR30 rather than classic ERs is required to induce estrogenic neuroprotective effects. Given that estrogen replacement therapy may cause unexpected side effects, especially on the reproductive system, GPR30 agonists may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating SCI. PMID:27407175

  6. Variation in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene modulates age effects on working memory.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Simone; Gärtner, Matti; Fuge, Philipp; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Feeser, Melanie; Aust, Sabine; Heekeren, Hauke R; Jacobs, Arthur; Heuser, Isabella; Bajbouj, Malek

    2015-02-01

    Decline in working memory (WM) functions during aging has been associated with hippocampal dysfunction mediated by age-related changes to the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system. Recent reports suggest that GG-homozygous individuals of single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs110402 and rs242924) in the CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene show increased stress vulnerability and decreased BOLD responses in WM relevant regions. However, until now, no study investigated the interaction effects of variation in the CRHR1 gene and age on individual differences in WM. Here, young, middle-aged and old subjects (N = 466) were genotyped for rs110402 and rs242924 within the CRHR1 gene and an n-back task was used to investigate the hypothesis that vulnerable genotypes (GG-homozygotes) would show impaired WM functions that might be magnified by increased CRH production with advancing age. Our results show an impact of genotype already in middle-age with significantly better performance in AT-carriers. Working memory performance in AT-carriers did not differ between young and middle-aged subjects, but was significantly impaired in old age. In GG-homozygotes, severe working memory dysfunction occurred already in middle age. Our data indicate that GG-homozygotes of CRHR1 rs110402 and rs242924 represent a genetically driven subtype of early WM impairments due to alterations in hippocampal CRHR1 activation. Early interventions that have proven effective in delaying cognitive decline appear to be particularly important for these subjects at risk for premature memory decline, who are in the prime of their personal and professional lives. PMID:25541005

  7. G-1 exerts neuroprotective effects through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 following spinal cord injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiang; Meng, Jia; Wang, Xin-shang; Kang, Wen-bo; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) always occurs accidently and leads to motor dysfunction because of biochemical and pathological events. Estrogen has been shown to be neuroprotective against SCI through estrogen receptors (ERs), but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of a newly found membrane ER, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPR30 or GPER1), and discussed the feasibility of a GPR30 agonist as an estrogen replacement. Forty adult female C57BL/6J mice (10–12 weeks old) were divided randomly into vehicle, G-1, E2, G-1 + G-15 and E2 + G-15 groups. All mice were subjected to SCI using a crushing injury approach. The specific GPR30 agonist, G-1, mimicked the effects of E2 treatment by preventing SCI-induced apoptotic cell death and enhancing motor functional recovery after injury. GPR30 activation regulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways, increased GPR30 and anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but decreased the pro-apoptosis factor Bax and cleaved caspase-3. However, the neuroprotective effects of G-1 and E2 were blocked by the specific GPR30 antagonist, G-15. Thus, GPR30 rather than classic ERs is required to induce estrogenic neuroprotective effects. Given that estrogen replacement therapy may cause unexpected side effects, especially on the reproductive system, GPR30 agonists may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating SCI. PMID:27407175

  8. Nogo Receptor 1 (RTN4R) as a Candidate Gene for Schizophrenia: Analysis Using Human and Mouse Genetic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ruby; Woodroffe, Abigail; Lai, Wen-Sung; Cook, Melloni N.; Mukai, Jun; Dunning, Jonathan P.; Swanson, Douglas J.; Roos, J. Louw; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Background NOGO Receptor 1 (RTN4R) regulates axonal growth, as well as axon regeneration after injury. The gene maps to the 22q11.2 schizophrenia susceptibility locus and is thus a strong functional and positional candidate gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluate evidence for genetic association between common RTN4R polymorphisms and schizophrenia in a large family sample of Afrikaner origin and screen the exonic sequence of RTN4R for rare variants in an independent sample from the U.S. We also employ animal model studies to assay a panel of schizophrenia-related behavioral tasks in an Rtn4r-deficient mouse model. We found weak sex-specific evidence for association between common RTN4R polymorphisms and schizophrenia in the Afrikaner patients. In the U.S. sample, we identified two novel non-conservative RTN4R coding variants in two patients with schizophrenia that were absent in 600 control chromosomes. In our complementary mouse model studies, we identified a haploinsufficient effect of Rtn4r on locomotor activity, but normal performance in schizophrenia-related behavioral tasks. We also provide evidence that Rtn4r deficiency can modulate the long-term behavioral effects of transient postnatal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction. Conclusions Our results do not support a major role of RTN4R in susceptibility to schizophrenia or the cognitive and behavioral deficits observed in individuals with 22q11 microdeletions. However, they suggest that RTN4R may modulate the genetic risk or clinical expression of schizophrenia in a subset of patients and identify additional studies that will be necessary to clarify the role of RTN4R in psychiatric phenotypes. In addition, our results raise interesting issues about evaluating the significance of rare genetic variants in disease and their role in causation. PMID:18043741

  9. The endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) exerts neuroprotective effects after excitotoxic neuronal damage via cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)).

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Urszula; Koch, Marco; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Kraft, Robert; Hill, Kerstin; Merkwitz, Claudia; Ghadban, Chalid; Lutz, Beat; Straiker, Alex; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2012-03-01

    Endocannabinoids exert numerous effects in the CNS under physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) may protect neurons in excitotoxically lesioned organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). OHSC were excitotoxically lesioned by application of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 50 μM) for 4 h and subsequently treated with different NADA concentrations (0.1 pM-50 μM) alone or in combination with cannabinoid receptor antagonists. NADA protected dentate gyrus granule cells and caused a slight reduction in the number of microglial cells. The number of degenerated neurons significantly decreased between 100 pM and 10 μM NADA (p < 0.05). To identify the responsive receptor type of NADA mediated neuroprotection, we applied the cannabinoid (CB) receptor 1 (CB(1)) inverse agonist/antagonist AM251, CB(2) inverse agonist/antagonist AM630, abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-CBD)-sensitive receptor antagonist O-1918, transient receptor potential channel V1 (TRPV1) antagonist 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and A1 (TRPA1) antagonist HC-030031. Neuroprotective properties of low (1 nM) but not high (10 μM) NADA concentrations were solely blocked by AM251 and were absent in CB(1)(-/-) mice. AM630, O-1918, 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and HC-030031 showed no effects at all NADA concentrations applied. Our findings demonstrate that NADA protects dentate gyrus granule cells by acting via CB(1). NADA reduced the number of microglial cells at distinct concentrations. TRPV1 and TRPA1 were not involved in NADA mediated neuroprotection. Thus, our data implicate that NADA mediated activation of neuronal CB(1) may serve as a novel pharmacological target to mitigate symptoms of neuronal damage. PMID:22186081

  10. A missense mutation in TFRC, encoding transferrin receptor 1, causes combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jabara, Haifa H.; Boyden, Steven E.; Chou, Janet; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Massaad, Michel J.; Benson, Halli; Bainter, Wayne; Fraulino, David; Rahimov, Fedik; Sieff, Colin; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Alshemmari, Salem H.; Al-Ramadi, Basel K.; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Arnaout, Rand; Abu-Shukair, Mohammad; Vatsayan, Anant; Silver, Eli; Ahuja, Sanjay; Davies, E. Graham; Sola-Visner, Martha; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Andrews, Nancy C.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Fleming, Mark D.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kunkel, Louis M.; Geha, Raif S.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a combined immunodeficiency characterized by normal numbers, but impaired function, of T and B cells had a homozygous p.Tyr20His mutation in transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), encoded by TFRC. The mutation disrupts the TfR1 internalization motif, resulting in defective receptor endocytosis and markedly increased TfR1 surface expression. Iron citrate rescued the lymphocyte defects and transduction of wild type, but not mutant, TfR1 rescued impaired transferrin uptake in patient fibroblasts. TfrcY20H/Y20H mice recapitulated the patients’ immunologic defects. Despite the critical role of TfR1 in erythrocyte development and function, the patients had only mild anemia and only slightly increased TfR1 expression in erythroid precursors. We show that STEAP3, a metalloreductase expressed in erythroblasts, associates with TfR1 and partially rescues transferrin uptake in patient fibroblasts, suggesting that STEAP3 may provide an accessory TfR1 endocytosis signal that spares the patients from severe anemia. These findings demonstrate the importance of TfR1 in adaptive immunity. PMID:26642240

  11. Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 Is Essential for Arteriogenesis in a Mouse Model of Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, N. J.; Boguslawski, E. A.; Naidu, A. S.; Szot, C.; Bromberg-White, J. L.; Kits, K.; Kuk, C. Y.; Holton, L. E.; St. Croix, B.; Chambers, C. M.; Duesbery, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptor 1/tumor endothelial marker 8 (Antxr1 or TEM8) is up-regulated in tumor vasculature and serves as a receptor for anthrax toxin, but its physiologic function is unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of Antxr1 in arteriogenesis. The role of Antxr1 in arteriogenesis was tested by measuring gene expression and immunohistochemistry in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia using wild-type and ANTXR1-/- mice. Additional tests were performed by measuring gene expression in in vitro models of fluid shear stress and hypoxia, as well as in human muscle tissues obtained from patients having peripheral artery disease. We observed that Antxr1 expression transiently increased in ischemic tissues following femoral artery ligation and that its expression was necessary for arteriogenesis. In the absence of Antxr1, the mean arterial lumen area in ischemic tissues decreased. Antxr1 mRNA and protein expression was positively regulated by fluid shear stress, but not by hypoxia. Furthermore, Antxr1 expression was elevated in human peripheral artery disease requiring lower extremity bypass surgery. These findings demonstrate an essential physiologic role for Antxr1 in arteriogenesis and peripheral artery disease, with important implications for managing ischemia and other arteriogenesis-dependent vascular diseases. PMID:26785120

  12. Differential expression and tumorigenic function of neurotensin receptor 1 in neuroendocrine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Tae; Li, Jing; Song, Jun; Lee, Eun Y.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Evers, B. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin (NTS), localized predominantly to the small bowel, stimulates the growth of a variety of cancers, including neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), mainly through its interaction with the high-affinity NTS receptor 1 (NTSR1). Here, we observed increased expression of NTSR1 in almost all tested clinical NET samples, but not in normal tissues. Through RT-PCR analysis, we found that the expression of NTSR1 and NTSR2 was either variable (NTSR1) or absent (NTSR2) in human NET cell lines. In contrast, NTSR3 and NTS were expressed in all NET cells. Treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent, increased levels of NTSR1 and NTSR2 suggesting that DNA methylation contributes to NTSR1/2 expression patterns, which was confirmed by methylation analyses. In addition, we found that knockdown of NTSR1 decreased proliferation, expression levels of growth-related proteins, and anchorage-independent growth of BON human carcinoid cells. Moreover, stable silencing of NTSR1 suppressed BON cell growth, adhesion, migration and invasion. Our results show that high expression of NTSR1 is found in clinical NETs and that promoter methylation is an important mechanism controlling the differential expression of NTSR1 and silencing of NTSR2 in NET cells. Furthermore, knockdown of NTSR1 in BON cells suppressed oncogenic functions suggesting that NTSR1 contributes to NET tumorigenesis. PMID:26298774

  13. Expression of Nogo receptor 1 in the regeneration process of the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, He-Xin; Zeng, Xian-Ping; Sun, Yue-Qi; Fu, Qing-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) is the most important Nogo-A receptor. By its interaction with myelin-associated inhibitory proteins, NgR1 inhibits the regeneration of axons and is extensively expressed in the central nervous system. However, the expression of NgR1 in regenerable neurons, such as olfactory neurons, and its expression in the regeneration progress of olfactory neurons have not been reported. In this study, we demonstrated that NgR1 was expressed in the cell bodies of certain mature olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) but was not expressed in immature ORNs in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of normal adult mice. On day 21 after OE injury, NgR1 was expressed not only in the cell bodies of mature ORNs but also in the cell bodies of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in the top and submucosal layers of the OE. On day 48 after model establishment, NgR1 expression decreased in the cell bodies of the GFAP-positive cells. On day 56 after model establishment, no NgR1 expression was found in the cell bodies of the GFAP-positive cells, and NgR1 was again expressed only in the mature ORNs. Our results demonstrated that NgR1 expression is upregulated in the OE after injury, which suggests that NgR1 might be involved in the regeneration of the OE. PMID:27138950

  14. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression –but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  15. Erasure of fear memories is prevented by Nogo Receptor 1 in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, S M; Butler, S S; Taylor, J R; McEwen, B S; Strittmatter, S M

    2016-09-01

    Critical periods are temporary windows of heightened neural plasticity early in development. For example, fear memories in juvenile rodents are subject to erasure following extinction training, while after closure of this critical period, extinction training only temporarily and weakly suppresses fear memories. Persistence of fear memories is important for survival, but the inability to effectively adapt to the trauma is a characteristic of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We examined whether Nogo Receptor 1 (NgR1) regulates the plasticity associated with fear extinction. The loss of NgR1 function in adulthood eliminates spontaneous fear recovery and fear renewal, with a restoration of fear reacquisition rate equal to that of naive mice; thus, mimicking the phenotype observed in juvenile rodents. Regional gene disruption demonstrates that NgR1 expression is required in both the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and infralimbic (IL) cortex to prevent fear erasure. NgR1 expression by parvalbumin expressing interneurons is essential for limiting extinction-dependent plasticity. NgR1 gene deletion enhances anatomical changes of inhibitory synapse markers after extinction training. Thus, NgR1 robustly inhibits elimination of fear expression in the adult brain and could serve as a therapeutic target for anxiety disorders, such as PTSD. PMID:26619810

  16. Increased endometrial expression of CC-chemokine receptor-1 in women with adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Yang, Yanfeng; Zhou, Caiyun; Huang, Xiufeng; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Xinmei

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal endometrial expression of CC-chemokine receptor-1 (CCR1) may play a role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Adenomyosis, also called endometriosis interna, occurs when the endometrium invades the myometrium. The objective of this study was to determine CCR1 expression in endometrium in women with adenomyosis as compared to women without adenomyosis. We evaluated endometrial mRNA and protein expression in women with and without adenomyosis using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis, respectively. We detected CCR1-immunoreactive expression in endometrium in all women with and without adenomyosis. CCR1-immunoreactive staining in endometrial cells was significantly higher in women with adenomyosis (4.89±1.06) compared to those without adenomyosis (2.21±1.16, P<0.001). Women with adenomyosis had higher levels of CCR1 mRNA in endometrium compared to women without adenomyosis (P<0.05). CCR1 protein levels in endometrium were significantly higher in women with adenomyosis (1.66±0.79) compared to women without adenomyosis (0.56±0.13, P<0.001), and positively correlated with the severity of dysmenorrhea (r=0.87, P<0.001). These results suggest that increased CC-chemokine receptor expression may play a role in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. PMID:24599574

  17. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  18. Oxytocin receptor and vasopressin receptor 1a genes are respectively associated with emotional and cognitive empathy.

    PubMed

    Uzefovsky, F; Shalev, I; Israel, S; Edelman, S; Raz, Y; Mankuta, D; Knafo-Noam, A; Ebstein, R P

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is the ability to recognize and share in the emotions of others. It can be considered a multifaceted concept with cognitive and emotional aspects. Little is known regarding the underlying neurochemistry of empathy and in the current study we used a neurogenetic approach to explore possible brain neurotransmitter pathways contributing to cognitive and emotional empathy. Both the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) genes contribute to social cognition in both animals and humans and hence are prominent candidates for contributing to empathy. The following research examined the associations between polymorphisms in these two genes and individual differences in emotional and cognitive empathy in a sample of 367 young adults. Intriguingly, we found that emotional empathy was associated solely with OXTR, whereas cognitive empathy was associated solely with AVPR1a. Moreover, no interaction was observed between the two genes and measures of empathy. The current findings contribute to our understanding of the distinct neurogenetic pathways involved in cognitive and emotional empathy and underscore the pervasive role of both oxytocin and vasopressin in modulating human emotions. PMID:25476609

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation. PMID:27004954

  20. Brain structural and clinical changes after first episode psychosis: Focus on cannabinoid receptor 1 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pinilla, Paula; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Ortiz-García de la Foz, Víctor; Guest, Paul C; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2015-08-30

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene polymorphisms have been associated with central and peripheral effects of cannabis and schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here, we have tested whether three CNR1 variants (rs1049353, rs1535255 and rs2023239) are associated with changes in brain volumes, body mass index (BMI) or psychopathological scores in a 3-year longitudinal study of 65 first-episode psychosis patients. The rs1049353 at-risk allele was significantly associated with a greater reduction of caudate volume, and the rs2023239 T/C polymorphism showed a significant decrease in thalamic volume after the 3-year period. For those who were not cannabis users, the rs1535255 and rs2023239 polymorphisms had effects in lateral ventricle (LV), and LV and white matter, respectively. The rs2023239 variant also was associated with significant improvements in positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. There was no significant effect of any of the variants on changes in BMI over the 3-year study. Finally, an interaction between all three polymorphisms was found involving evolution of positive symptoms. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid pathway is associated with schizophrenia evolution over time. However, further studies using larger cohorts are needed to confirm these results. If confirmed, the present findings could lead in subsequent investigations for identification of novel drug targets for improved treatment of patients suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:26071625

  1. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  2. Hemovascular Progenitors in the Kidney Require Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 for Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Li, Minghong; Göthert, Joachim R; Gomez, R Ariel; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S

    2016-07-01

    The close relationship between endothelial and hematopoietic precursors during early development of the vascular system suggested the possibility of a common yet elusive precursor for both cell types. Whether similar or related progenitors for endothelial and hematopoietic cells are present during organogenesis is unclear. Using inducible transgenic mice that specifically label endothelial and hematopoietic precursors, we performed fate-tracing studies combined with colony-forming assays and crosstransplantation studies. We identified a progenitor, marked by the expression of helix-loop-helix transcription factor stem cell leukemia (SCL/Tal1). During organogenesis of the kidney, SCL/Tal1(+) progenitors gave rise to endothelium and blood precursors with multipotential colony-forming capacity. Furthermore, appropriate morphogenesis of the kidney vasculature, including glomerular capillary development, arterial mural cell coating, and lymphatic vessel development, required sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling via the G protein-coupled S1P receptor 1 in these progenitors. Overall, these results show that SCL/Tal1(+) progenitors with hemogenic capacity originate and differentiate within the early embryonic kidney by hemovasculogenesis (the concomitant formation of blood and vessels) and underscore the importance of the S1P pathway in vascular development. PMID:26534925

  3. (18)F- and (68)Ga-Labeled Neurotensin Peptides for PET Imaging of Neurotensin Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Maschauer, Simone; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Prante, Olaf

    2016-07-14

    The neurotensin (NT) receptor-1 (NTS1) is overexpressed in a variety of carcinomas and is therefore an interesting target for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this study was the development of new NT derivatives based on the metabolically stable peptide sequence NLys-Lys-Pro-Tyr-Tle-Leu suitable for PET imaging. The NT peptides were synthesized by solid-phase supported peptide synthesis and elongated with respective chelators (NODA-GA, DOTA) for (68)Ga-labeling or propargylglycine for (18)F-labeling via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Receptor affinities of the peptides for NTS1 were in the range of 19-110 nM. Biodistribution studies using HT29 tumor-bearing mice showed highest tumor uptake for [(68)Ga]6 and [(68)Ga]8 and specific binding in small-animal PET studies. The tumor uptake of (68)Ga-labeled peptides in vivo significantly correlated with the in vitro Ki values for NTS1. [(68)Ga]8 displayed an excellent tumor-to-background ratio and could therefore be considered as an appropriate molecular probe for NTS1 imaging by PET. PMID:27336295

  4. The Discovery of Indole Full Agonists of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 (NTSR1)

    PubMed Central

    Di Fruscia, Paolo; He, Yuanjun; Koenig, Marcel; Tabrizifard, Sahba; Nieto, Ainhoa; McDonald, Patricia H.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is an endogenous tridecapeptide found in the central nervous system (CNS) and in peripheral tissues. Neurotensin exerts a wide range of physiological effects and it has been found to play a critical role in a number of human diseases, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. The discovery of small-molecule non-peptide neurotensin receptor (NTSR) modulators would represent an important breakthrough as such compounds could be used as pharmacological tools, to further decipher the cellular functions of neurotensin, and potentially as therapeutic agents to treat human disease. Herein, we report the identification of non-peptide low-micromolar neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) full agonists, discovered through structural optimization of the known NTSR1 partial agonist 1. In vitro cellular screenings, based on an intracellular Ca2+ mobilization assay, revealed our best hit molecule 8 (SR-12062) to have an EC50 of 2 μM at NTSR1 with full agonist behaviour (Emax = 100%), showing a higher efficacy and ~ 90-fold potency improvement compared to parent compound 1 (EC50 = 178 μM; Emax = 17%). PMID:24997685

  5. Uremic Pruritus Is Not Associated with Endocannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Monika; Łaczmański, Łukasz; Reich, Adam; Lwow, Felicja

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a frequent and bothersome symptom in hemodialysis patients. Its etiology is not fully understood and that is why there is no specific treatment. The endocannabinoid system plays a role in many pathological conditions. There is reliable evidence on the association between cannabinoid system and pruritus. In our study, we aimed to evaluate whether genetic variations in the endocannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene can affect UP. The rs12720071, rs806368, rs1049353, rs806381, rs10485170, rs6454674, and rs2023239 polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene were genotyped in 159 hemodialysis patients and 150 healthy controls using two multiplex polymerase chain reactions and the minisequencing technique. No statistically significant relationship was found in any of the evaluated genotypes between patients with and without UP, even after excluding patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. There were no differences between patients with UP and the control group. However, in the group of all HD patients, a significantly higher incidence of GA genotype and lower incidence in GG genotype in the polymorphism rs806381s were revealed versus the control group (p = 0.04). It seems that polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene are not associated with uremic pruritus. PMID:27034934

  6. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  7. Artificial selection of the melanocortin receptor 1 gene in Chinese domestic pigs during domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Yang, H; Li, J-r; Li, H-p; Ning, T; Pan, X-R; Shi, P; Zhang, Y-P

    2010-09-01

    Black coat colour is common in Chinese indigenous domestic pigs, but not among their wild ancestors, and it is thus presumed to be a 'domestication trait.' To determine whether artificial interference contributes to morphological diversification, we examined nucleotide variation from 157 Chinese domestic pigs and 40 wild boars in the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) gene, which has a key role in the coat pigmentation of Sus scrofa. Compared with a pseudogene GPIP, our results showed that the joint effects of demography and selection have resulted in markedly low genetic diversity of MC1R in Chinese domestic pigs. Coalescent simulation and selection tests further suggest that the fixation of two non-synonymous substitutions associated with black colour is the result of artificial selection. In contrast, a much higher genetic diversity and only a single non-synonymous substitution were found among the wild boars, suggesting a strong functional constraint. Moreover, our conclusion is consistent with the preference for black colour in the ancient Chinese sacrificial culture. This case provides an interesting example of a molecular evaluation of artificial livestock selection and its associated cultural impact in ancient China. PMID:20179735

  8. Nogo Receptor 1 Limits Tactile Task Performance Independent of Basal Anatomical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kast, Ryan J.; Chapman, Katherine S.; Dorton, Hilary M.; Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Arnett, Megan T.; Herman, David H.; McGee, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    The genes that govern how experience refines neural circuitry and alters synaptic structural plasticity are poorly understood. The nogo-66 receptor 1 gene (ngr1) is one candidate that may restrict the rate of learning as well as basal anatomical plasticity in adult cerebral cortex. To investigate if ngr1 limits the rate of learning we tested adult ngr1 null mice on a tactile learning task. Ngr1 mutants display greater overall performance despite a normal rate of improvement on the gap-cross assay, a whisker-dependent learning paradigm. To determine if ngr1 restricts basal anatomical plasticity in the associated sensory cortex, we repeatedly imaged dendritic spines and axonal varicosities of both constitutive and conditional adult ngr1 mutant mice in somatosensory barrel cortex for two weeks through cranial windows with two-photon chronic in vivo imaging. Neither constant nor acute deletion of ngr1 affected turnover or stability of dendritic spines or axonal boutons. The improved performance on the gap-cross task is not attributable to greater motor coordination, as ngr1 mutant mice possess a mild deficit in overall performance and a normal learning rate on the rotarod, a motor task. Mice lacking ngr1 also exhibit normal induction of tone-associated fear conditioning yet accelerated fear extinction and impaired consolidation. Thus, ngr1 alters tactile and motor task performance but does not appear to limit the rate of tactile or motor learning, nor determine the low set point for synaptic turnover in sensory cortex. PMID:25386856

  9. A role of the sulfonylurea receptor 1 in endocytic trafficking of ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Bruederle, Cathrin E.; Gay, Joel; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel consisting of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and inward rectifier potassium channel 6.2 (Kir6.2) has a well-established role in insulin secretion. Mutations in either subunit can lead to disease due to aberrant channel gating, altered channel density at the cell surface or a combination of both. Endocytic trafficking of channels at the plasma membrane is one way to influence surface channel numbers. It has been previously reported that channel endocytosis is dependent on a tyrosine-based motif in Kir6.2 while SUR1 alone is unable to internalize. In this study, we followed endocytic trafficking of surface channels in real time by live cell imaging of channel subunits tagged with an extracellular minimal α-bungarotoxin binding peptide labeled with a fluorescent dye. We demonstrate that SUR1 undergoes endocytosis independent of Kir6.2. Moreover, mutations in the putative endocytosis motif of Kir6.2, Y330C, Y330A and F333I are unable to prevent channel endocytosis. These findings challenge the notion that Kir6.2 bears the sole endocytic signal for KATP channels and support a role of SUR1 in this trafficking process. PMID:21649805

  10. Paediatric phenotype of Kallmann syndrome due to mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Zenaty, Delphine; Bretones, Patricia; Lambe, Cécile; Guemas, Isabelle; David, Michel; Léger, Juliane; de Roux, Nicolas

    2006-07-25

    Kallmann syndrome characterised by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and anosmia is genetically heterogeneous with X-linked, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms. The autosomal dominant form due to loss of function mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) accounts for about 10% of cases. We report here three paediatric cases of Kallmann syndrome with unusual phenotype in two unrelated patients with severe ear anomalies (hypoplasia or agenesis of external ear) associated with classical features, such as cleft palate, dental agenesis, syndactylia, micropenis and cryptorchidism. We found de novo mutation in these two patients (Cys178Ser and Arg622Gly, respectively), and one inherited Arg622Gln mutation with intrafamilial variable phenotype. These genotype-phenotype correlations indicate that paediatric phenotypic expression of FGFR1 loss of function mutations is highly variable, the severity of the oro-facial malformations at birth does not predict gonadotropic function at the puberty and that de novo mutations of FGFR1 are relatively frequent. PMID:16757108

  11. Expression of Genomic Functional Estrogen Receptor 1 in Mouse Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Zhu, Jia; Li, Xian; Li, Shengqiang; Lan, Zijian; Ko, Jay

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus whether Sertoli cells express estrogen receptor 1 (Esr1). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunofluorescence demonstrated that mouse Sertoli cell lines, TM4, MSC-1, and 15P-1, and purified primary mouse Sertoli cells (PSCs) contained Esr1 messenger RNA and proteins. Incubation of Sertoli cells with 17β-estradiol (E2) or ESR1 agonist stimulated the expression of an estrogen responsive gene Greb1, which was prevented by ESR inhibitor or ESR1 antagonist. Overexpression of Esr1 in MSC-1 enhanced E2-induced Greb1 expression, while knockdown of Esr1 by small interfering RNA in TM4 attenuated the response. Furthermore, E2-induced Greb1 expression was abolished in the PSCs isolated from Amh-Cre/Esr1-floxed mice in which Esr1 in Sertoli cells were selectively deleted. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that E2-induced Greb1 expression in Sertoli cells was mediated by binding of ESR1 to estrogen responsive elements. In summary, ligand-dependent nuclear ESR1 was present in mouse Sertoli cells and mediates a classical genomic action of estrogens. PMID:24615934

  12. Depressed expression of Klotho and FGF receptor 1 in hyperplastic parathyroid glands from uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Komaba, Hirotaka; Goto, Shunsuke; Fujii, Hideki; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Akira; Shibuya, Koji; Tominaga, Yoshihiro; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-Ichi; Nakagawa, Kimie; Tsugawa, Naoko; Okano, Toshio; Kitazawa, Riko; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Kita, Tomoyuki

    2010-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) exerts its effect by binding to its cognate FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) in the presence of its co-receptor Klotho. Parathyroid glands express both FGFR1 and Klotho, and FGF23 decreases parathyroid hormone gene expression and hormone secretion directly. In uremic patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), however, parathyroid hormone secretion remains elevated despite extremely high FGF23 levels. To determine the mechanism of this resistance, we measured the expression of Klotho, FGFR1, and the proliferative marker Ki67 in 7 normal and 80 hyperplastic parathyroid glands from uremic patients by immunohistochemistry. All uremic patients had severe SHPT along with markedly high FGF23 levels. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR showed that the mRNA levels for Klotho and FGFR1correlated significantly with their semi-quantitative immunohistochemical intensity. Compared with normal tissue, the immunohistochemical expression of Klotho and FGFR1 decreased, but Ki67 expression increased significantly in hyperplastic parathyroid glands, particularly in glands with nodular hyperplasia. These results suggest that the depressed expression of the Klotho-FGFR1 complex in hyperplastic glands underlies the pathogenesis of SHPT and its resistance to extremely high FGF23 levels in uremic patients. PMID:19890272

  13. Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 Is Essential for Arteriogenesis in a Mouse Model of Hindlimb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Andersen, N J; Boguslawski, E A; Naidu, A S; Szot, C; Bromberg-White, J L; Kits, K; Kuk, C Y; Holton, L E; St Croix, B; Chambers, C M; Duesbery, N S

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptor 1/tumor endothelial marker 8 (Antxr1 or TEM8) is up-regulated in tumor vasculature and serves as a receptor for anthrax toxin, but its physiologic function is unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of Antxr1 in arteriogenesis. The role of Antxr1 in arteriogenesis was tested by measuring gene expression and immunohistochemistry in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia using wild-type and ANTXR1(-/-) mice. Additional tests were performed by measuring gene expression in in vitro models of fluid shear stress and hypoxia, as well as in human muscle tissues obtained from patients having peripheral artery disease. We observed that Antxr1 expression transiently increased in ischemic tissues following femoral artery ligation and that its expression was necessary for arteriogenesis. In the absence of Antxr1, the mean arterial lumen area in ischemic tissues decreased. Antxr1 mRNA and protein expression was positively regulated by fluid shear stress, but not by hypoxia. Furthermore, Antxr1 expression was elevated in human peripheral artery disease requiring lower extremity bypass surgery. These findings demonstrate an essential physiologic role for Antxr1 in arteriogenesis and peripheral artery disease, with important implications for managing ischemia and other arteriogenesis-dependent vascular diseases. PMID:26785120

  14. Homology Modeling, Validation and Dynamics of the G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1 (GPER-1).

    PubMed

    Bruno, Agostino; Aiello, Francesca; Costantino, Gabriele; Radi, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Estrogens exert their action mainly by binding three receptors, namely estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) and GPER-1 (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1). While the patho-physiological role of both ERα and ERβ has been deeply investigated, the role of GPER-1 in estrogens' signaling has not been clearly defined yet. Unfortunately, only few GPER-1 selective ligands were discovered so far, and the real efficiency of such compounds is still matter of debate. To better understand the physiological relevance of GPER-1, new selective chemical probes are higly needed. In this scenario, we report herein the generation and validation of a three-dimensional (3-D) GPER-1 homology model by means of docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations. The model thus generated was employed to (i) decipher the structural basis underlying the ability of estrogens and some Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) to bind GPER-1 and classical ERα and ERβ, and (ii) generate a reliable G1/GPER-1 complex useful in rationalizing the pharmacological profile of G1 reported in the literature. The G1/GPER-1 complex herein reported could be further exploited in drug design approaches aimed at improving the pharmacological profile of G1 or at identifying new chemical entities (NCEs) as potential modulators of GPER-1. PMID:27546037

  15. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 in central nervous system injury: a focused review

    PubMed Central

    Simard, J Marc; Woo, S Kyoon; Schwartzbauer, Gary T; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    The sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1)-regulated NCCa-ATP channel is a nonselective cation channel that is regulated by intracellular calcium and adenosine triphosphate. The channel is not constitutively expressed, but is transcriptionally upregulated de novo in all cells of the neurovascular unit, in many forms of central nervous system (CNS) injury, including cerebral ischemia, traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The channel is linked to microvascular dysfunction that manifests as edema formation and delayed secondary hemorrhage. Also implicated in oncotic cell swelling and oncotic (necrotic) cell death, the channel is a major molecular mechanism of ‘accidental necrotic cell death' in the CNS. In animal models of SCI, pharmacological inhibition of Sur1 by glibenclamide, as well as gene suppression of Abcc8, prevents delayed capillary fragmentation and tissue necrosis. In models of stroke and TBI, glibenclamide ameliorates edema, secondary hemorrhage, and tissue damage. In a model of SAH, glibenclamide attenuates the inflammatory response due to extravasated blood. Clinical trials of an intravenous formulation of glibenclamide in TBI and stroke underscore the importance of recent advances in understanding the role of the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel in acute ischemic, traumatic, and inflammatory injury to the CNS. PMID:22714048

  16. Protection from Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by Peripheral Targeting of Cannabinoid Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Bronova, Irina; Smith, Brett; Aydogan, Bulent; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Vemuri, Kiran; Erdelyi, Katalin; Makriyannis, Alex; Pacher, Pal; Berdyshev, Evgeny V

    2015-10-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIF) is a severe complication of thoracic radiotherapy that limits its dose, intensity, and duration. The contribution of the endocannabinoid signaling system in pulmonary fibrogenesis is not known. Using a well-established mouse model of RIF, we assessed the involvement of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) in the onset and progression of pulmonary fibrosis. Female C57BL/6 mice and CB1 knockout mice generated on C57BL/6 background received 20 Gy (2 Gy/min) single-dose thoracic irradiation that resulted in pulmonary fibrosis and animal death within 15 to 18 weeks. Some C57BL/6 animals received the CB1 peripherally restricted antagonist AM6545 at 1 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week. Animal survival and parameters of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated. Thoracic irradiation (20 Gy) was associated with marked pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and high mortality within 15 to 18 weeks after exposure. Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of CB1 receptors with a peripheral CB1 antagonist AM6545 markedly attenuated or delayed the lung inflammation and fibrosis and increased animal survival. Our results show that CB1 signaling plays a key pathological role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis, and peripherally restricted CB1 antagonists may represent a novel therapeutic approach against this devastating complication of radiotherapy/irradiation. PMID:26426981

  17. NOVEL CHARACTERIZATION OF bEnd.3 CELLS THAT EXPRESS LYMPHATIC VESSEL ENDOTHELIAL HYALURONAN RECEPTOR-1

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, D.; Leu, R.; Tse, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, L.L.; Chen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Murine bEnd.3 endothelioma cell line has been widely used in vascular research and here we report the novel finding that bEnd.3 cells express lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3). Moreover, these cells express progenitor cell markers of Sca-1 and CD133. Upon stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), the bEnd.3 cells demonstrate enhanced formation of capillary-type tubes, which express LYVE-1. As the bEnd.3 cell line is derived from murine endothelioma, we further examined human tissues of endothelioma and identified lymphatic vessels in the tumor samples which express both LYVE-1 and podoplanin. Moreover, a significantly higher number of lymphatic vessels were detected in the endothelioma samples compared with normal control. Taken together, this study not only redefines bEnd.3 cells for vascular research, but also indicates a broader category of human diseases that are associated with lymphatics, such as endothelioma. PMID:25282873

  18. Adiponectin receptor 1 conserves docosahexaenoic acid and promotes photoreceptor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Dennis S.; Calandria, Jorgelina M.; Gordon, William C.; Jun, Bokkyoo; Zhou, Yongdong; Gelfman, Claire M.; Li, Songhua; Jin, Minghao; Knott, Eric J.; Chang, Bo; Abuin, Alex; Issa, Tawfik; Potter, David; Platt, Kenneth A.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of pathways necessary for photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function is critical to uncover therapies for blindness. Here we report the discovery of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) as a regulator of these cells’ functions. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is avidly retained in photoreceptors, while mechanisms controlling DHA uptake and retention are unknown. Thus, we demonstrate that AdipoR1 ablation results in DHA reduction. In situ hybridization reveals photoreceptor and RPE cell AdipoR1 expression, blunted in AdipoR1−/− mice. We also find decreased photoreceptor-specific phosphatidylcholine containing very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and severely attenuated electroretinograms. These changes precede progressive photoreceptor degeneration in AdipoR1−/− mice. RPE-rich eyecup cultures from AdipoR1−/− reveal impaired DHA uptake. AdipoR1 overexpression in RPE cells enhances DHA uptake, whereas AdipoR1 silencing has the opposite effect. These results establish AdipoR1 as a regulatory switch of DHA uptake, retention, conservation and elongation in photoreceptors and RPE, thus preserving photoreceptor cell integrity. PMID:25736573

  19. Development and Characterization of a Potent Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (FFA1) Fluorescent Tracer.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hudson, Brian D; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2016-05-26

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1/GPR40) is a potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Although several potent agonists have been described, there remains a strong need for suitable tracers to interrogate ligand binding to this receptor. We address this by exploring fluorophore-tethering to known potent FFA1 agonists. This led to the development of 4, a high affinity FFA1 tracer with favorable and polarity-dependent fluorescent properties. A close to ideal overlap between the emission spectrum of the NanoLuciferase receptor tag and the excitation spectrum of 4 enabled the establishment of a homogeneous BRET-based binding assay suitable for both detailed kinetic studies and high throughput competition binding studies. Using 4 as a tracer demonstrated that the compound acts fully competitively with selected synthetic agonists but not with lauric acid and allowed for the characterization of binding affinities of a diverse selection of known FFA1 agonists, indicating that 4 will be a valuable tool for future studies at FFA1. PMID:27074625

  20. MicroRNA-152-mediated dysregulation of hepatic transferrin receptor 1 in liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kindrat, Iryna; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; de Conti, Aline; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Mudalige, Thilak K; Kobets, Tetyana; Erstenyuk, Anna M; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P

    2016-01-12

    Over-expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC) is observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, there is a lack of conclusive information regarding the mechanisms of this dysregulation. In the present study, we demonstrated a significant increase in the levels of TFRC mRNA and protein in preneoplastic livers from relevant experimental models of human hepatocarcinogenesis and in human HCC cells. Additionally, using the TCGA database, we demonstrated an over-expression of TFRC in human HCC tissue samples and a markedly decreased level of microRNA-152 (miR-152) when compared to non-tumor liver tissue. The results indicated that the increase in levels of TFRC in human HCC cells and human HCC tissue samples may be attributed, in part, to a post-transcriptional mechanism mediated by a down-regulation of miR-152. This was evidenced by a strong inverse correlation between the level of TFRC and the expression of miR-152 in human HCC cells (r = -0.99, p = 4. 7 × 10-9), and was confirmed by in vitro experiments showing that transfection of human HCC cell lines with miR-152 effectively suppressed TFRC expression. This suggests that miR-152-specific targeting of TFRC may provide a selective anticancer therapeutic approach for the treatment of HCC. PMID:26657500

  1. Audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Toal, Katrina L; Radziwon, Kelly E; Holfoth, David P; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A; Dent, Micheal L

    2016-02-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is found at several stages in the auditory pathway, but its role in hearing is unknown. Hearing abilities were measured in CB1R knockout mice and compared to those of wild-type mice. Operant conditioning and the psychophysical Method of Constant Stimuli were used to measure audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in trained mice using the same methods and stimuli as in previous experiments. CB1R knockout mice showed deficits at frequencies above 8 kHz in their audiograms relative to wild-type mice. CB1R knockouts showed enhancements for detecting gaps in low-pass noisebursts relative to wild-type mice, but were similar for other noise conditions. Finally, the two groups of mice did not differ in their frequency discrimination abilities as measured by the frequency difference limens task. These experiments suggest that the CB1R is involved in auditory processing and lay the groundwork for future physiological experiments. PMID:26427583

  2. A missense mutation in TFRC, encoding transferrin receptor 1, causes combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Jabara, Haifa H; Boyden, Steven E; Chou, Janet; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Massaad, Michel J; Benson, Halli; Bainter, Wayne; Fraulino, David; Rahimov, Fedik; Sieff, Colin; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Alshemmari, Salem H; Al-Ramadi, Basel K; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Arnaout, Rand; Abu-Shukair, Mohammad; Vatsayan, Anant; Silver, Eli; Ahuja, Sanjay; Davies, E Graham; Sola-Visner, Martha; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Andrews, Nancy C; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Fleming, Mark D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kunkel, Louis M; Geha, Raif S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a combined immunodeficiency characterized by normal numbers but impaired function of T and B cells had a homozygous p.Tyr20His substitution in transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), encoded by TFRC. The substitution disrupts the TfR1 internalization motif, resulting in defective receptor endocytosis and markedly increased TfR1 expression on the cell surface. Iron citrate rescued the lymphocyte defects, and expression of wild-type but not mutant TfR1 rescued impaired transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts. Tfrc(Y20H/Y20H) mice recapitulated the immunological defects of patients. Despite the critical role of TfR1 in erythrocyte development and function, patients had only mild anemia and only slightly increased TfR1 expression in erythroid precursors. We show that STEAP3, a metalloreductase expressed in erythroblasts, associates with TfR1 and partially rescues transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts, suggesting that STEAP3 may provide an accessory TfR1 endocytosis signal that spares patients from severe anemia. These findings demonstrate the importance of TfR1 in adaptive immunity. PMID:26642240

  3. Neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 transduces survival signals in neuronal cells in response to hypoxia-induced apoptotic insults.

    PubMed

    Chio, Chung-Ching; Wei, Li; Chen, Tyng Guey; Lin, Chien-Min; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Yeh, Poh-Shiow; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Hypoxia can induce cell death or trigger adaptive mechanisms to guarantee cell survival. Neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR-1) works as an early-response protein in response to a variety of environmental stresses. In this study, the authors evaluated the roles of NOR-1 in hypoxia-induced neuronal insults. METHODS Neuro-2a cells were exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Cell viability, cell morphology, cas-pase-3 activity, DNA fragmentation, and cell apoptosis were assayed to determine the mechanisms of OGD-induced neuronal insults. RNA and protein analyses were carried out to evaluate the effects of OGD on expressions of NOR-1, cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2) genes. Translations of these gene expressions were knocked down using RNA interference. Mice subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and NOR-1 was immunodetected. RESULTS Exposure of neuro-2a cells to OGD decreased cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, OGD led to cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation, and cell apoptosis. In parallel, treatment of neuro-2a cells with OGD time dependently increased cellular NOR-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Interestingly, administration of TBI also augmented NOR-1 levels in the impacted regions of mice. As to the mechanism, exposure to OGD increased nuclear levels of the transcription factor CREB protein. Downregulating CREB expression using RNA interference simultaneously inhibited OGD-induced NOR-1 mRNA expression. Also, levels of cIAP2 mRNA and protein in neuro-2a cells were augmented by OGD. After reducing cIAP2 translation, OGD-induced cell death was reduced. Sequentially, application of NOR-1 small interfering RNA to neuro-2a cells significantly inhibited OGD-induced cIAP2 mRNA expression and concurrently alleviated hypoxia-induced alterations in cell viability, caspase-3 activation, DNA damage, and cell apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS This study shows that NOR-1 can transduce survival

  4. ADAM10 controls collagen signaling and cell migration on collagen by shedding the ectodomain of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1)

    PubMed Central

    Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Ito, Noriko; Leitinger, Birgit; Enghild, Jan J.; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and transmits signals from various collagens in epithelial cells. However, how DDR1–dependent signaling is regulated has not been understood. Here we report that collagen binding induces ADAM10-dependent ectodomain shedding of DDR1. DDR1 shedding is not a result of an activation of its signaling pathway, since DDR1 mutants defective in signaling were shed in an efficient manner. DDR1 and ADAM10 were found to be in a complex on the cell surface, but shedding did not occur unless collagen bound to DDR1. Using a shedding-resistant DDR1 mutant, we found that ADAM10-dependent DDR1 shedding regulates the half-life of collagen-induced phosphorylation of the receptor. Our data also revealed that ADAM10 plays an important role in regulating DDR1-mediated cell adhesion to achieve efficient cell migration on collagen matrices. PMID:25540428

  5. Weight Gain Alters Adiponectin Receptor 1 Expression on Adipose Tissue-Resident Helios+ Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ramírez, P; Malmhäll, C; Johansson, K; Lötvall, J; Bossios, A

    2016-04-01

    Adipose tissue produces multiple mediators that modulate the immune response. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine that exhibits metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. Adiponectin acts through binding to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 (AdipoR1/AdipoR2). AdipoR1 is ubiquitously expressed, whereas AdipoR2 is restricted to skeletal muscle and liver. AdipoR1 expression has been reported on a small percentage of T cells; nevertheless, it is still unknown whether Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) express AdipoR1. Recently, it has been shown that Tregs accumulate in adipose tissue and that they play a potential role in modulating adipose tissue inflammation. Our aim was to evaluate AdipoR1 expression in adipose tissue-resident Tregs and to evaluate the effect of weight gain on this expression. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks (to develop overweight) or 21 weeks (to develop obesity). Mice on a standard diet were used as age-matched controls. Helios expression was evaluated as a marker to discriminate thymic-derived from peripherally induced Tregs. The majority of Tregs in both adipose tissue and the spleen expressed Helios. Adipose tissue Tregs expressed higher levels of AdipoR1 than Tregs in the spleen. AdipoR1 expression on adipose tissue Helios(+) Tregs was negatively correlated with epididymal fat. Overall, we show that AdipoR1 is expressed on adipose tissue-resident Tregs, mainly Helios(+) Tregs, and that this expression is dependent on weight and fat accumulation. Because both adiponectin and Tregs play roles in anti-inflammatory mechanisms, our data propose a new mechanism through which weight gain might alter immunoregulation. PMID:26900653

  6. Lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 is a novel prognostic indicator for human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Nakajima, Go; Kuramochi, Hidekazu; Ariizumi, Shun-Ichi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2013-11-01

    Angiogenesis is an important mechanism of tumor development, growth and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The poor prognosis of HCC patients has been associated with a failure to detect recurrences following surgery. In the present study, we investigated the association between the patient characteristics and the expression of angiogenic genes to identify early biomarkers of HCC. A comprehensive angiogenic gene expression profile was obtained by paired TaqMan gene array analysis of primary HCC nodules and adjacent non-HCC liver tissue from 12 patients. A total of 14 genes were found to be differentially expressed in HCC liver nodules (>2-fold change); the genes encoding collagen type XVα1, IVα1 and IVα2 were upregulated and the genes associated with vessel growth, neuropilin 2 (NRP2) and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1) were downregulated. The histopathological analysis revealed that the evolution of HCC nodules from well to poorly differentiated was associated with a 5-fold decrease in LYVE-1 expression, reaching its lowest level early during the transition. The significance of this gene as a biomarker of postoperative survival was demonstrated by a 2-fold decrease in overall survival (OS) rates in the low expression group compared to the high expression group. The multivariate and univariate Cox regression analyses identified LYVE-1 expression as a significant independent prognostic parameter of OS [hazard ratio (HR)=3.067; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.507-6.273; P=0.0021]. Thus, the results of this study suggested that LYVE-1 expression may constitute a novel early biomarker of postoperative survival in HCC patients. PMID:24649290

  7. Temporal expression of hepatic estrogen receptor 1, vitellogenin1 and vitellogenin2 in European silver eels.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Schnabel, Denhi; Nieveen, Maaike C; Spaink, Herman P; van den Thillart, Guido E E J M

    2010-03-01

    Because European silver eels have never been caught during or after their 6000-km reproductive migration to the Sargasso Sea, all existing knowledge on their sexual maturation comes from hormonal stimulation. Silver eels that start their oceanic migration are still immature with pre-vitellogenic oocytes. Hence we assumed that vitellogenesis should start with the expression of the estrogen receptor in the liver before the circulating 17beta-estradiol (E2) can have any effect. In this study we followed the hepatic vitellogenesis upon 4 weekly injections with carp pituitary extracts (CPE). New molecular primers for the expression of the estrogen receptor 1 (esr1), vitellogenin1 (vtg1) and vitellogenin2 (vtg2) in the liver were developed. Sequences of vtg2 and esr1 were not previously described in Anguilla anguilla. All eels showed weekly increase of the eye size and pectoral fin length, which are signs of early maturation. The same occurred with the gonadosomatic index, the oocyte stage and diameter, and number of deposited fat droplets. Early vitellogenesis appeared as a 3-step process (1) E2-levels and esr1 expression were significantly increased already after one injection, (2) vtg1 and vtg2 expression were significantly increased after one and two injections, respectively, and (3) vtg1 and vtg2 expression increased further after three and four injections. Then also plasma calcium (corresponds with plasma vitellogenin) increased and yolk globuli appeared in the oocytes. These results show that esr1 is the first of the three genes examined that is expressed during the onset of hepatic vitellogenesis. Furthermore, ovarian vitellogenesis (appearance of yolk globuli in oocytes) occurs 1-2 weeks later than the onset of hepatic vitellogenesis. PMID:19766647

  8. Blockade of hypocretin receptor-1 preferentially prevents cocaine seeking: comparison with natural reward seeking.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fardon, Rémi; Weiss, Friedbert

    2014-05-01

    Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin (Orx/Hcrt) peptides participate in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes and are recruited by drugs of abuse. To advance our understanding of the potential of the Orx/Hcrt receptor-1 (Hcrt-r1) as a treatment target for cocaine addiction, the effect of SB334867 [N-(2-methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N'-1,5-n-aphthyridin-4-yl urea], a specific Hcrt-r1 antagonist, on reinstatement elicited by cocaine-associated stimuli versus stimuli associated with a highly palatable conventional reinforcer [sweetened condensed milk (SCM)] was tested. Two separate groups of male Wistar rats were trained to associate a discriminative stimulus (S⁺) with the response-contingent availability of cocaine (0.25 mg/0.1 ml/infusion) or SCM [2/1 (v/v)] and subjected to reinstatement tests following extinction of cocaine-reinforced or SCM-reinforced behavior, during which the reinforcers and S⁺ were withheld. Following extinction, presentation of the cocaine or SCM S⁺ produced comparable recovery of responding. Hcrt-r1 blockade by SB334867 (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) dose-dependently and selectively reversed conditioned reinstatement induced by cocaine-related stimuli, without interfering with reward seeking produced by the same stimulus when conditioned to SCM. The findings suggest an important role for Hcrt-r1 in appetitive behavior controlled by reward-related stimuli with selectivity for cocaine seeking and identify Hcrt-r1 as a potential treatment target for cocaine relapse prevention. PMID:24407199

  9. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Regulation of Methamphetamine Intake and Related Traits

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, John H; Shi, Xiao; Janowsky, Aaron; Phillips, Tamara J

    2015-01-01

    Continued methamphetamine (MA) use is dependent on a positive MA experience and is likely attenuated by sensitivity to the aversive effects of MA. Bidirectional selective breeding of mice for high (MAHDR) or low (MALDR) voluntary consumption of MA demonstrates a genetic influence on MA intake. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping identified a QTL on mouse chromosome 10 that accounts for greater than 50% of the genetically-determined differences in MA intake in the MAHDR and MALDR lines. The trace amine-associated receptor 1 gene (Taar1) is within the confidence interval of the QTL and encodes a receptor (TAAR1) that modulates monoamine neurotransmission and at which MA serves as an agonist. We demonstrate the existence of a non-functional allele of Taar1 in the DBA/2J mouse strain, one of the founder strains of the selected lines, and show that this non-functional allele co-segregates with high MA drinking and with reduced sensitivity to MA-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) and hypothermia. The functional Taar1 allele, derived from the other founder strain, C57BL/6J, segregates with low MA drinking and heightened sensitivity to MA-induced CTA and hypothermia. A role for TAAR1 in these phenotypes is corroborated in Taar1 transgenic mice: Taar1 knockout mice consume more MA and exhibit insensitivity to MA-induced CTA and hypothermia, compared with Taar1 wild-type mice. These are the first data to show that voluntary MA consumption is, in part, regulated by TAAR1 function. Behavioral and physiological studies indicate that TAAR1 function increases sensitivity to aversive effects of MA, and may thereby protect against MA use. PMID:25740289

  10. Genetic Variation in the Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 Gene Results in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Backman, Joshua D.; Wang, Hong; Donnelly, Patrick; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Parihar, Ankita; Pavlovich, Mary A.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Herzog, William; Harman, Christopher R.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Lewis, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) is a newly identified membrane protein reported to be involved in multiple vascular and thrombotic processes. While most studies to date have focused on the effects of this receptor in platelets, PEAR1 is located in multiple tissues including the endothelium, where it is most highly expressed. Our first objective was to evaluate the role of PEAR1 in endothelial function by examining flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery in 641 participants from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Our second objective was to further define the impact of PEAR1 on cardiovascular disease computationally through meta-analysis of 75,000 microarrays, yielding insights regarding PEAR1 function, and predictions of phenotypes and diseases affected by PEAR1 dysregulation. Based on the results of this meta-analysis we examined whether genetic variation in PEAR1 influences endothelial function using an ex vivo assay of endothelial cell migration. We observed a significant association between rs12041331 and flow-mediated dilation in participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study (P = 0.02). Meta-analysis results revealed that PEAR1 expression is highly correlated with several genes (e.g. ANG2, ACVRL1, ENG) and phenotypes (e.g. endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis) that are integral to endothelial function. Functional validation of these results revealed that PEAR1 rs12041331 is significantly associated with endothelial migration (P = 0.04). Our results suggest for the first time that genetic variation of PEAR1 is a significant determinant of endothelial function through pathways implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26406321

  11. Murine complement receptor 1 is required for germinal center B cell maintenance but not initiation

    PubMed Central

    Donius, Luke R.; Weis, Janis J.; Weis, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Germinal centers are the anatomic sites for the generation of high affinity immunoglobulin expressing plasma cells and memory B cells. The germinal center B cells that are precursors of these cells circulate between the light zone B cell population that interact with antigen laden follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and the proliferative dark zone B cell population. Antigen retention by follicular dendritic cells is dependent on Fc receptors and complement receptors, and complement receptor 1 (Cr1) is the predominant complement receptor expressed by FDC. The newly created Cr1KO mouse was used to test the effect of Cr1-deficiency on the kinetics of the germinal center reaction and the generation of IgM and switched memory B cell formation. Immunization of Cr1KO mice with a T cell-dependent antigen resulted in the normal initial expansion of B cells with a germinal center phenotype however these cells were preferentially lost in the Cr1KO animal over time (days). Bone marrow chimera animals documented the surprising finding that the loss of germinal center B cell maintenance was linked to the expression of Cr1 on B cells, not the FDC. Cr1-deficiency further resulted in antigen-specific IgM titer and IgM memory B cell reductions, but not antigen-specific IgG after 35-37 days. Investigations of nitrophenyl (NP)-specific IgG demonstrated that Cr1 is not necessary for affinity maturation during the response to particulate antigen. These data, along with those generated in our initial description of the Cr1KO animal describe unique functions of Cr1 on the surface of both B cells and FDC. PMID:24636730

  12. TNF receptor 1 signaling is critically involved in mediating angiotensin-II-induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Reineke, Erin; Taffet, George E; Trial, Joann; Entman, Mark L; Haudek, Sandra B

    2013-04-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is associated with many conditions involving heart failure and pathologic hypertrophy. Ang-II induces the synthesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 that mediates the uptake of CD34(+)CD45(+) monocytic cells into the heart. These precursor cells differentiate into collagen-producing fibroblasts and are responsible for the Ang-II-induced development of non-adaptive cardiac fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that in vitro, using a human monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation model, Ang-II required the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) to induce fibroblast maturation from monocytes. In vivo, mice deficient in both TNF receptors did not develop cardiac fibrosis in response to 1week Ang-II infusion. We then subjected mice deficient in either TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1-KO) or TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2-KO) to continuous Ang-II infusion. Compared to wild-type, in TNFR1-KO, but not in TNFR2-KO hearts, collagen deposition was greatly attenuated, and markedly fewer CD34(+)CD45(+) cells were present. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a striking reduction of key fibrosis-related, as well as inflammation-related mRNA expression in Ang-II-treated TNFR1-KO hearts. TNFR1-KO animals also developed less cardiac remodeling, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension compared to wild-type and TNFR2-KO in response to Ang-II. Our data suggest that TNF induced Ang-II-dependent cardiac fibrosis by signaling through TNFR1, which enhances the generation of monocytic fibroblast precursors in the heart. PMID:23337087

  13. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-03-22

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  14. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-Ichi

    2016-02-01

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. PMID:26637351

  15. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  16. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  17. Interferon-Gamma Receptor-1 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Leprosy in Children of a Single Family

    PubMed Central

    Velayati, Ali A.; Farnia, Parissa; Khalizadeh, Soheila; Farahbod, Amir M.; Hasanzadh, Maryam; Sheikolslam, Maryam F.

    2011-01-01

    The autosomal recessive disorder, because of a single mutation in interferon-γ receptor-1(IFNGR1) at position −56, was found to be associated with susceptibility to leprosy in children of the same family. The existence of such heterozygous carriers might explain the crucial role of IFNGR1 in the host defense against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium leprae. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major candidate genes, i.e., natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), interleukin-12-receptor 1 (IL-12R1), were not found to be associated with this disease. PMID:21460021

  18. Interferon-gamma receptor-1 gene promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to leprosy in children of a single family.

    PubMed

    Velayati, Ali A; Farnia, Parissa; Khalizadeh, Soheila; Farahbod, Amir M; Hasanzadh, Maryam; Sheikolslam, Maryam F

    2011-04-01

    The autosomal recessive disorder, because of a single mutation in interferon-γ receptor-1(IFNGR1) at position -56, was found to be associated with susceptibility to leprosy in children of the same family. The existence of such heterozygous carriers might explain the crucial role of IFNGR1 in the host defense against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium leprae. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major candidate genes, i.e., natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), interleukin-12-receptor 1 (IL-12R1), were not found to be associated with this disease. PMID:21460021

  19. Prokineticin Receptor 1 Antagonist PC-10 as a Biomarker for Imaging Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Orit; Weiss, Ido D.; Niu, Gang; Balboni, Gianfranco; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Lattanzi, Roberta; Salvadori, Severo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Prokineticin receptor 1 (PKR1) and its ligand Bv8 were shown to be expressed in inflammation-induced pain and by tumor-supporting fibroblasts. Blocking this receptor might prove useful for reducing pain and for cancer therapy. However, there is no method to quantify the levels of these receptors in vivo. Methods A nonpeptidic PKR1 antagonist, N-{2-[5-(4-fluoro-benzyl)-1-(4-methoxy-benzyl)-4,6-dioxo-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-[1,3,5] triazin-2-ylamino]-ethyl}-guanidine, which contains a free guanidine group, was labeled with 18F by reacting the guanidine function with N-succinimidyl-4-18F-fluorobenzoate to give the guanidinyl amide N-(4-18F-fluoro-benzoyl)-N′-{2-[5-(4-fluoro-benzyl)-1-(4-methoxy-benzyl)-4,6-dioxo-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-[1,3,5] triazin-2-ylamino]-ethyl}-guanidine (18F-PC-10). Inflammation was induced in C57BL/6 mice by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund adjuvant in the paw. The mice were imaged with 18F-PC-10, 18F-FDG, and 64Cu-pyruvaldehyde bis(4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-PTSM) at 24 h after complete Freund adjuvant injection using a small-animal PET device. Results 18F-PC-10 was synthesized with a radiochemical yield of 16% ± 3% (decay-corrected). 18F-PC-10 accumulated specifically in the inflamed paw 4- to 5-fold more than in the control paw. Compared with 18F-PC-10, 18F-FDG and 64Cu-PTSM displayed higher accumulation in the inflamed paw but also had higher accumulation in the control paw, demonstrating a reduced signal-to-background ratio. 18F-PC-10 also accumulated in PKR1-expressing organs, such as the salivary gland and gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion 18F-PC-10 can be used to image PKR1, a biomarker of the inflammation process. However, the high uptake of 18F-PC-10 in the gastrointestinal tract, due to specific uptake and the metabolic processing of this highly lipophilic molecule, would restrict its utility. PMID:21421710

  20. Nur-related receptor 1 gene polymorphisms and alcohol dependence in Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ya-Ming; Du, Yan-Lei; Nie, Yu-Qiang; Li, Yu-Yuan; Wan, Yu-Jui

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of polymorphisms of nur-related receptor 1 (Nurr1) and development of alcohol dependence in Mexican Americans. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were collected from 374 alcoholic and 346 nonalcoholic Mexican Americans; these two groups were sex- and age-matched. Sample DNA was extracted and genomic DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The -2922(C) 2-3 polymerase chain reaction products were digested with Sau96I, alleles of 1345(G/C), and -1198(C/G) in the regulatory region as well as Ex+132 (G/T/A/C) and Ex+715(T/-) in exon 3 were studied by sequencing. RESULTS: The C2/C2, C2/C3, C3/C3 genotype distribution of -2922(C) 2-3 was 34.4%, 38.2% and 27.5% in the nonalcoholic group compared to 23.3%, 51.2% and 25.4% in the alcoholic group (P = 0.001). The C/C, C/G, G/G genotype distribution of -1198(C/G) was 23.5%, 46.1% and 30.3% in the nonalcoholic group compared to 13.9%, 50.9% and 35.3% in the alcoholic group (P = 0.007). However, the -1345 (G/C), Ex3+132(G/T/A/C) and Ex3+715(T/-) alleles were not polymorphic in Mexican Americans, and all those studied had G/G, G/G and T/T genotype for these three alleles, respectively. The -2922(C) 2-3 did not show allele level difference between alcoholic and nonalcoholic individuals, but -1198 (C/G) showed a significant allele frequency difference between alcoholic (39.3%) and nonalcoholic (46.6%) populations (P = 0.005). Excluding obese individuals, significant differences were found at both genotypic and allelic levels for the -2922(C) 2-3 polymorphism (P = 0.000 and P = 0.049) and the -1198 (C/G) polymorphism (P = 0.008 and P = 0.032) between nonobese alcoholics and nonobese controls. Excluding smokers, a significant difference was found only at the genotypic level for the -2922(C) 2-3 polymorphism (P = 0.037) between nonsmoking alcoholics and nonsmoking controls, but only at the allelic level for the -1198(C/G) polymorphism (P = 0.034). CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms in the regulatory

  1. Modulation of primary cilia length by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Akie; Yamato, Shogo; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Kobayashi, Yuki; Saito, Yumiko

    2016-06-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The MCH-MCHR1 system has been implicated in the regulation of feeding, emotional processing, and sleep in rodents. Recent work revealed that MCHR1 is selectively expressed in neuronal primary cilia of the central nervous system. Cilia have various chemosensory functions in many types of cell, and ciliary dysfunction is associated with ciliopathies such as polycystic kidney disease and obesity. Although dynamic modulation of neuronal cilia length is observed in obese mice, the functional interaction of neuronal ciliary GPCR and its endogenous ligand has not yet been elucidated. We report here that MCH treatment significantly reduced cilia length in hTERT-RPE1 cells (hRPE1 cells) transfected with MCHR1. Quantitative analyses indicated that MCH-induced cilia shortening progressed in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 lower than 1nM when cells were treated for 6h. Although the assembly and disassembly of primary cilia are tightly coupled to the cell cycle, cell cycle reentry was not a determinant of MCH-induced cilia shortening. We confirmed that MCH elicited receptor internalization, Ca(2+) mobilization, ERK and Akt phosphorylation, and inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in MCHR1-expressing hRPE1 cells. Among these diverse pathways, we revealed that Gi/o-dependent Akt phosphorylation was an important component in the initial stage of MCH-induced cilia length shortening. Furthermore, induction of fewer cilia by Kif3A siRNA treatment significantly decreased the MCH-mediated phosphorylation of Akt, indicating the functional importance of the MCHR1-Akt pathway in primary cilia. Taken together, the present data suggest that the MCH-MCHR1 axis may modulate the sensitivity of cells to external environments by controlling the cilia length. Therefore, further characterization of MCHR1 as a ciliary GPCR will provide a potential molecular mechanism to link cilia length

  2. Human and Host Species Transferrin Receptor 1 Use by North American Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Min; Fofana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least five New World (NW) arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in South America. These pathogenic clade B viruses, as well as nonpathogenic arenaviruses of the same clade, use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) of their host species to enter cells. Pathogenic viruses are distinguished from closely related nonpathogenic ones by their additional ability to utilize human TfR1 (hTfR1). Here, we investigate the receptor usage of North American arenaviruses, whose entry proteins share greatest similarity with those of the clade B viruses. We show that all six North American arenaviruses investigated utilize host species TfR1 orthologs and present evidence consistent with arenavirus-mediated selection pressure on the TfR1 of the North American arenavirus host species. Notably, one of these viruses, AV96010151, closely related to the prototype Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV), entered cells using hTfR1, consistent with a role for a WWAV-like virus in three fatal human infections whose causative agent has not been identified. In addition, modest changes were sufficient to convert hTfR1 into a functional receptor for most of these viruses, suggesting that a minor alteration in virus entry protein may allow these viruses to use hTfR1. Our data establish TfR1 as a cellular receptor for North American arenaviruses, highlight an “arms race” between these viruses and their host species, support the association of North American arenavirus with fatal human infections, and suggest that these viruses have a higher potential to emerge and cause human diseases than has previously been appreciated. IMPORTANCE hTfR1 use is a key determinant for a NW arenavirus to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. All known pathogenic NW arenaviruses are transmitted in South America by their host rodents. North American arenaviruses are generally considered nonpathogenic, but some of these viruses have been tentatively implicated in human fatalities. We show that these North American

  3. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powell, David R.; Gay, Jason P.; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V.; Lanthorn, Thomas H.; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  4. Vitamin D-induced ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 as a nongenomic action: D3 vs D2 derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Seok; Yu, Hoon; Kim, Jin Ju; Lee, Mee Jeong; Park, Su-Kil

    2016-01-01

    As a nongenomic action, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) induces L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated extracellular Ca(2+) influx in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs), which activates a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) to cleave and shed the ectodomain of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1). In this study, we examined the potencies of other vitamin D3 and D2 analogs to stimulate the ectodomain shedding of TNFR1 in HASMCs. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3), a precursor of 1,25D3, and elocalcitol, an analog of 1,25D3, caused ectodomain shedding of TNFR1 within 30 min, whereas 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25D2) and paricalcitol, a derivative of 1,25D2, did not. Both 25D3 and elocalcitol rapidly induced extracellular Ca(2+) influx and markedly increased intracellular Ca(2+), while 1,25D2 and paricalcitol caused only small increases in intracellular Ca(2+). 25D3- and elocalcitol-induced TNFR1 ectodomain sheddings were abolished by verapamil and in Ca(2+)-free media. Both 25D3 and elocalcitol caused the translocation of ADAM10 to the cell surface, which was inhibited by verapamil, while 1,25D2 and paricalcitol did not cause ADAM10 translocation. When ADAM10 was depleted by ADAM10-siRNA, 25D3 and elocalcitol could not induce ectodomain shedding of TNFR1. The plasma membrane receptor, endoplasmic reticulum stress protein 57 (ERp57), but not the classic vitamin D receptor, mediated the nongenomic action of vitamin D to induce ectodomain shedding of TNFR1. In summary, like 1,25D3, 25D3 and elocalcitol caused ADAM10-mediated ectodomain shedding of TNFR1, whereas 1,25D2 and paricalcitol did not. The difference may depend on their affinities to ERp57 through which extracellular Ca(2+) influx is induced. PMID:26385608

  5. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; Gay, Jason P; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  6. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor 1/2 Antagonists Nonselectively Modulate Organic Anion Transport by Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRP1-4).

    PubMed

    Csandl, Mark A; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P C

    2016-06-01

    Active efflux of both drugs and organic anion metabolites is mediated by the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs). MRP1 (ABCC1), MRP2 (ABCC2), MRP3 (ABCC3), and MRP4 (ABCC4) have partially overlapping substrate specificities and all transport 17β-estradiol 17-(β-d-glucuronide) (E217βG). The cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1R) antagonist MK-571 inhibits all four MRP homologs, but little is known about the modulatory effects of newer leukotriene modifiers (LTMs). Here we examined the effects of seven CysLT1R- and CysLT2R-selective LTMs on E217βG uptake into MRP1-4-enriched inside-out membrane vesicles. Their effects on uptake of an additional physiologic solute were also measured for MRP1 [leukotriene C4 (LTC4)] and MRP4 [prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)]. The two CysLT2R-selective LTMs studied were generally more potent inhibitors than CysLT1R-selective LTMs, but neither class of antagonists showed any MRP selectivity. For E217βG uptake, LTM IC50s ranged from 1.2 to 26.9 μM and were most comparable for MRP1 and MRP4. The LTM rank order inhibitory potencies for E217βG versus LTC4 uptake by MRP1, and E217βG versus PGE2 uptake by MRP4, were also similar. Three of four CysLT1R-selective LTMs also stimulated MRP2 (but not MRP3) transport and thus exerted a concentration-dependent biphasic effect on MRP2. The fourth CysLT1R antagonist, LY171883, only stimulated MRP2 (and MRP3) transport but none of the MRPs were stimulated by either CysLT2R-selective LTM. We conclude that, in contrast to their CysLTR selectivity, CysLTR antagonists show no MRP homolog selectivity, and data should be interpreted cautiously if obtained from LTMs in systems in which more than one MRP is present. PMID:27068271

  7. Preclinical and first-in-human phase I studies of KW-2450, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor with insulin-like growth factor receptor-1/insulin receptor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary K; Dickson, Mark A; LoRusso, Patricia M; Sausville, Edward A; Maekawa, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Yasuo; Kashima, Naomi; Nakashima, Daisuke; Akinaga, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Numerous solid tumors overexpress or have excessively activated insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R). We summarize preclinical studies and the first-in-human study of KW-2450, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor with IGF-1R and insulin receptor (IR) inhibitory activity. Preclinical activity of KW-2450 was evaluated in various in vitro and in vivo models. It was then evaluated in a phase I clinical trial in 13 patients with advanced solid tumors (NCT00921336). In vitro, KW-2450 inhibited human IGF-1R and IR kinases (IC50 7.39 and 5.64 nmol/L, respectively) and the growth of various human malignant cell lines. KW-2450 40 mg/kg showed modest growth inhibitory activity and inhibited IGF-1-induced signal transduction in the murine HT-29/GFP colon carcinoma xenograft model. The maximum tolerated dose of KW-2450 was 37.5 mg once daily continuously; dose-limiting toxicity occurred in two of six patients at 50 mg/day (both grade 3 hyperglycemia) and in one of seven patients at 37.5 mg/day (grade 3 rash). Four of 10 evaluable patients showed stable disease. Single-agent KW-2450 was associated with modest antitumor activity in heavily pretreated patients with solid tumors and is being further investigated in combination therapy with lapatinib/letrozole in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-postive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26850678

  8. Bioactive secondary metabolites of a marine Bacillus sp. inhibit superoxide generation and elastase release in human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Jimmy; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chung, Pei-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils. PMID:23736784

  9. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 causes ADAM10-dependent ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Seok; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Joo Mi; Han, Nam Jeong; Lee, Mee Jeong; Park, Su-Kil

    2015-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) has a potential antiatherosclerotic effect through anti-inflammatory actions. We investigated how 1,25D3 regulates tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) expression in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells. TNF-α activated Rac1/reactive oxygen species/spleen tyrosine kinase and transcriptional factors, activator protein-1, and nuclear factor κB, which led to LOX-1 expression. 1,25D3 inhibited TNF-α-induced LOX-1 expression by inhibiting Rac1 activation and thereby its downstream signals. 1,25D3 rapidly induced extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Verapamil, an inhibitor of L-type calcium channels, inhibited 1,25D3-induced Ca(2+) influx and counteracted the inhibitory effects of 1,25D3 on Rac1 activation, whereas Bay K8644 [1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid, methyl ester], an L-type calcium channel agonist, attenuated TNF-α-induced Rac1 activation, as 1,25D3 did. 1,25D3 induced the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), which was abolished by verapamil and in Ca(2+)-free media. Like 1,25D3, Bay K8644 induced the ectodomain shedding of TNFR1. Both 1,25D3 and Bay K8644 caused the translocation of a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane, which was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) influx. In contrast, depletion of ADAM10 by transfection of ADAM10-small interfering RNA prevented 1,25D3- or Bay K8644-induced ectodomain shedding of TNFR1 and abolished the suppressive effect of 1,25D3 on TNF-α-induced Rac1 activation. Taken together, these findings suggest that 1,25D3 induces extracellular Ca(2+) influx via L-type calcium channel, triggering ADAM10-mediated ectodomain shedding of TNFR1, and it thereby decreases responsiveness to TNF-α. By shedding TNFR1 from the cell surface, 1,25D3 may regulate inflammation and atherogenesis, whereas this effect could be

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Collateral growth after acute occlusion of an intracranial artery is triggered by increasing shear stress in preexisting collateral pathways. Recently, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) on endothelial cells was reported to be essential in sensing fluid shear stress. Here, we evaluated the expression of S1PR1 in the hypoperfused mouse brain and investigated the effect of a selective S1PR1 agonist on leptomeningeal collateral growth and subsequent ischemic damage after focal ischemia. Methods In C57Bl/6 mice (n = 133) subjected to unilateral common carotid occlusion (CCAO) and sham surgery. The first series examined the time course of collateral growth, cell proliferation, and S1PR1 expression in the leptomeningeal arteries after CCAO. The second series examined the relationship between pharmacological regulation of S1PR1 and collateral growth of leptomeningeal anastomoses. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: LtCCAO and daily intraperitoneal (ip) injection for 7 days of an S1PR1 selective agonist (SEW2871, 5 mg/kg/day); sham surgery and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 after surgery; LtCCAO and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 and an S1PR1 inverse agonist (VPC23019, 0.5 mg/kg); LtCCAO and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days after surgery; and sham surgery and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days. Leptomeningeal anastomoses were visualized 14 days after LtCCAO by latex perfusion method, and a set of animals underwent subsequent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) 7days after the treatment termination. Neurological functions 1hour, 1, 4, and 7days and infarction volume 7days after pMCAO were evaluated. Results In parallel with the increase in S1PR1 mRNA levels, S1PR1 expression colocalized with endothelial cell markers in the leptomeningeal arteries, increased markedly on the side of the CCAO, and peaked 7 days after CCAO. Mitotic cell numbers in the leptomeningeal arteries

  11. Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 reduces cardiac fibroblast proliferation by suppressing GATA Binding Protein 4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Ning-Ning; Liu, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Shuang-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Zhi; Li, Ai-Qun; Liu, Shi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and GATA Binding Protein 4 (GATA4) are important for the growth of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). When deregulated, LOX-1 and GATA4 can cause cardiac remodeling. In the present study, we found novel evidence that GATA4 was required for the LOX-1 regulation of CF proliferation. The inhibition of LOX-1 by RNA interference LOX-1 lentivirus resulted in the loss of PI3K/Akt activation and GATA4 protein expression. The overexpression of LOX-1 by lentivirus rescued CF proliferation, PI3K/Akt activation, and GATA4 protein expression. Moreover, GATA4 overexpression enhanced CF proliferation with LOX-1 inhibition. We also found that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, reduced cell proliferation and protein level of GATA4. In summary, GATA4 may play an important role in the LOX-1 and PI3K/Akt regulation of CF proliferation. PMID:27216460

  12. Ocular neovascularization caused by HSV-1 infection results from breakdown of binding between VEGF-A and its soluble receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Amol; Mulik, Sachin; Sharma, Shalini; Reddy, Pradeep B. J.; Sehrawat, Sharvan

    2014-01-01

    The normal cornea is transparent which is essential for normal vision and although the angiogenic factor VEGF-A is present in the cornea, its angiogenic activity is impeded by being bound to a soluble form of the VEGF receptor-1 (sVR-1). This report investigates the effect on the balance between VEGF-A and sVR-1 that occurs following ocular infection with HSV, that causes prominent neovascularization, an essential step in the pathogenesis of the vision-impairing lesion, stromal keratitis (SK). We demonstrate that HSV-1 infection causes increased production of VEGF-A, but reduces sVR-1 levels resulting in an imbalance of VEGF-A and sVR-1 levels in ocular tissues. Moreover, the sVR-1 protein made was degraded by the metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes MMP-2, MMP-7 and MMP-9 produced by infiltrating inflammatory cells that were principally neutrophils. Inhibition of neutrophils, or inhibition of sVR-1 breakdown with the MMP inhibitor (MMPi) marimostat, or the provision of exogenous recombinant sVR-1 protein all resulted in reduced angiogenesis. Our results make the novel observation that ocular neovascularization resulting from HSV infection involves a change in the balance between VEGF-A and its soluble inhibitory receptor. Future therapies aimed to increase the production and activity of sVR-1 protein could benefit the management of SK, an important cause of human blindness. PMID:21325621

  13. Enkephalin levels and the number of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the hippocampus are decreased in female cannabinoid-receptor 1 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sophie A; Kempen, Tracey A Van; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction requires learning and memory processes that are facilitated by activation of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) and opioid receptors in the hippocampus. This involves activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that is partially regulated by endogenous opioid (enkephalin and dynorphin) and non-opioid peptides, specifically cholecystokinin, parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y, the neuropeptides present in inhibitory interneurons that co-express CB1 or selective opioid receptors. We tested the hypothesis that CB1 receptor expression is a determinant of the availability of one or more of these peptide modulators in the hippocampus. This was achieved by quantitatively analyzing the immunoperoxidase labeling for each of these neuropeptide in the dorsal hippocampus of female wild-type (CB1+/+) and cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout (CB1-/-) C57/BL6 mice. The levels of Leu(5)-enkephalin-immunoreactivity were significantly reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in stratum lucidum of CA3 in CB1-/- mice. Moreover, the numbers of neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate hilus were significantly lower in the CB1-/- compared to wild-type mice. However, CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice did not significantly differ in expression levels of either dynorphin or cholecystokinin, and showed no differences in numbers of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid and opioid systems have a nuanced, regulatory relationship that could affect the balance of excitation and inhibition in the hippocampus and thus processes such as learning that rely on this balance. PMID:27012427

  14. FAM19A4 is a novel cytokine ligand of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and is able to promote the migration and phagocytosis of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyan; Li, Ting; Wang, Xiaolin; Yuan, Wanxiong; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Heyu; Xu, Enquan; Zhang, Yingmei; Shi, Shuang; Ma, Dalong; Han, Wenling

    2015-01-01

    FAM19A4 is an abbreviation for family with sequence similarity 19 (chemokine (C–C motif)-like) member A4, which is a secretory protein expressed in low levels in normal tissues. The biological functions of FAM19A4 remain to be determined, and its potential receptor(s) is unclarified. In this study, we demonstrated that FAM19A4 was a classical secretory protein and we verified for the first time that its mature protein is composed of 95 amino acids. We found that the expression of this novel cytokine was upregulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes and macrophages and was typically in polarized M1. FAM19A4 shows chemotactic activities on macrophages and enhances the macrophage phagocytosis of zymosan both in vitro and in vivo with noticeable increases of the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt). FAM19A4 can also increase the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon zymosan stimulation. Furthermore, based on receptor internalization, radio ligand binding assays and receptor blockage, we demonstrated for the first time that FAM19A4 is a novel ligand of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). The above data indicate that upon inflammatory stimulation, monocyte/macrophage-derived FAM19A4 may play a crucial role in the migration and activation of macrophages during pathogenic infections. PMID:25109685

  15. Neuroprotective effects of activated protein C on intrauterine inflammation-induced neonatal white matter injury are associated with the downregulation of fibrinogen-like protein 2/fibroleukin prothrombinase and the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression

    PubMed Central

    JIN, SHENG-JUAN; LIU, YAN; DENG, SHI-HUA; LIAO, LI-HONG; LIN, TU-LIAN; NING, QIN; LUO, XIAO-PING

    2015-01-01

    Maternal intrauterine inflammation or infection is an important risk factor for neonatal cerebral white matter injury (WMI) and future neurological deficits. Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, profibrinolytic and cytoprotective activities. Recent studies have demonstrated that the novel prothrombinase, fibrinogen-like protein 2 (fgl2), contributes to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases through the generation of fibrin. Thus, we hypothesized that APC may regulate coagulant and inflammatory processes and improve brain injury in an experimental rat model of intrauterine inflammation-induced WMI. The animal model was established by the administration of an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats on embryonic day (E)17 and E18. APC was administered intraperitoneally 30 min after the second LPS injection. The expression of fgl2 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β expression in the placentas and fetal brains was determined on E19. Nerve cell death, the brain water content and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 expression was detected in the fetal brains. WMI in the neonatal rat brains was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunohistochemistry for myelin basic protein (MBP). The results revealed that APC markedly reduced the LPS-induced increase in fgl2 expression and fibrin deposition, as well as the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, in the placentas and fetal brains. In addition, APC attenuated cerebral apoptosis and brain edema, downregulated PAR1 and NF-κB p65 expression in the fetal brains, and improved hypomyelination and structural disturbances in the periventricular area of the neonatal rat brains. Our observations provide evidence that APC attenuates fetal

  16. Phosphorylation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (p55) protects macrophages from silica-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Federica; Di, Peter; Niu, Xiaomei; Friedman, Mitchell; Hammond, Timothy; Riches, David W H; Ortiz, Luis A

    2004-01-16

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in silicosis in part by removing silica particles and producing inflammatory mediators in response to silica. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a prominent mediator in silicosis. Silica induction of apoptosis in macrophages might be mediated by TNFalpha. However, TNFalpha also activates signal transduction pathways (NF-kappaB and AP-1) that rescue cells from apoptosis. Therefore, we studied the TNFalpha-mediated mechanisms that confer macrophage protection against the pro-apoptotic effects of silica. We will show that exposure to silica induced TNFalpha production by RAW 264.7 cells, but not by IC-21. Silica-induced activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ERK activation in response to silica exposure was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages, whereas activation of p38 phosphorylation was predominantly observed in IC-21 macrophages. No changes in JNK activity were observed in either cell line in response to silica exposure. Silica induced apoptosis in both macrophage cell lines, but the induction of apoptosis was significantly larger in IC-21 cells. Protection against apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells in response to silica was mediated by enhanced NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNFalpha receptor. Inhibition of these two protective mechanisms by specific pharmacological inhibitors or transfection of dominant negative mutants that inhibit IkappaBalpha or ERK phosphorylation significantly increased silica-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These data suggest that NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNF receptor are important cell survival mechanisms in the macrophage response to silica exposure. PMID:14570868

  17. Administration of orexin receptor 1 antagonist into the rostral ventromedial medulla increased swim stress-induced antinociception in rat

    PubMed Central

    Soliemani, Neda; Moslem, Alireza; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Azhdari-Zarmehri, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Intracerebroventricular injection of orexin-A (hypocretin-1) antagonist has been shown to inhibit stress-induced analgesia. However the locations of central sites that may mediate these effects have not been totally demonstrated. This study was performed to investigate the role of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) orexin receptor 1 in stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Materials and Methods: Forced swim stress in water was employed to adult male rats (200-250 g). Nociceptive responses were measured by formalin test (50 µl injection of formalin 2% subcutaneously into hind paw) and, pain related behaviors were monitored for 90 min following intra-microinjection of SB-334867 (orexin receptor 1 antagonist) into RVM. Results: Exposure to swimming stress test after administration of SB-334867 into RVM significantly reduces the formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors in phase1, interphase, and phase 2 in rats. Conclusion: The result demonstrated the involvement of OXR1 in antinociceptive behaviors induced by swim stress in RVM. PMID:27403261

  18. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  19. 3,4-Disubstituted isothiazoles: novel potent inhibitors of VEGF receptors 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Kiselyov, Alexander S; Semenova, Marina; Semenov, Victor V

    2009-02-15

    Novel derivatives of isothiazoles are described as potent ATP-competitive inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors I and II (VEGFR-1/2). A number of compounds exhibited VEGFR-2 inhibitory activity comparable to that of Vatalanib in both HTRF enzymatic and cellular assays. Several derivatives featuring bulky meta-substituents in the amide portion of the molecule displayed 4- to 8-fold specificity for VEGFR-2 versus VEGFR-1. Active molecules also showed high intrinsic permeability (> 30 x 10(-5) cm/min) across Caco-2 cell monolayer. PMID:19124243

  20. Investigation of Interactions at the Extracellular Loops of the Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 (RXFP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A.; Petrie, Emma J.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  1. Investigation of interactions at the extracellular loops of the relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1).

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Petrie, Emma J; Chen, Catherine Z; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2014-12-12

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 mediates the electrophysiological and toxic actions of the cycad derivative beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine on substantia nigra pars compacta DAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cucchiaroni, Maria Letizia; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bernardi, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Guatteo, Ezia; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2010-04-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinson dementia complex (ALS-PDC) is a neurodegenerative disease with ALS, parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's symptoms that is prevalent in the Guam population. beta-N-Methylamino alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as the toxic agent damaging several neuronal types in ALS-PDC, including substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic (SNpc DAergic) neurons. BMAA is a mixed glutamate receptor agonist, but the specific pathways activated in DAergic neurons are not yet known. We combined electrophysiology, microfluorometry, and confocal microscopy analysis to monitor membrane potential/current, cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) changes, cytochrome-c (cyt-c) immunoreactivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by BMAA. Rapid toxin applications caused reversible membrane depolarization/inward current and increase of firing rate and [Ca(2+)](i) in DAergic neurons. The inward current (I(BMAA)) was mainly mediated by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), coupled to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and to a lesser extent, AMPA receptors. Indeed, mGluR1 (CPCCOEt) and TRP channels (SKF 96365; Ruthenium Red) antagonists reduced I(BMAA), and a small component of I(BMAA) was reduced by the AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX. Calcium accumulation was mediated by mGluR1 but not by AMPA receptors. Application of a low concentration of NMDA potentiated the BMAA-mediated calcium increase. Prolonged exposure to BMAA caused significant modifications of membrane properties, calcium overload, cell shrinkage, massive cyt-c release into the cytosol and ROS production. In SNpc GABAergic neurons, BMAA activated only AMPA receptors. Our study identifies the mGluR1-activated mechanism induced by BMAA that may cause the neuronal degeneration and parkinsonian symptoms seen in ALS-PDC. Moreover, environmental exposure to BMAA might possibly also contribute to idiopathic PD. PMID:20392940

  3. Identification of small-molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by using a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Catherine Z; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2013-07-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions, including female reproduction and parturition, as well as regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. Although agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacologic utility, until now there have been no reported small-molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of a quantitative high-throughput platform for an RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cyclic AMP (cAMP) assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365 677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counterscreen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small-molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists. PMID:23212924

  4. Proton-Sensing Ovarian Cancer G Protein-Coupled Receptor 1 on Dendritic Cells Is Required for Airway Responses in a Murine Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Takeshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Kamide, Yosuke; Ichimonji, Isao; Tomura, Hideaki; Tobo, Masayuki; Sato, Koichi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Dobashi, Kunio; Mori, Tetsuya; Harada, Akihiro; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) stimulation by extracellular protons causes the activation of G proteins and subsequent cellular functions. However, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of OGR1 in airway responses remain largely unknown. In the present study, we show that OGR1-deficient mice are resistant to the cardinal features of asthma, including airway eosinophilia, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and goblet cell metaplasia, in association with a remarkable inhibition of Th2 cytokine and IgE production, in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Intratracheal transfer to wild-type mice of OVA-primed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) from OGR1-deficient mice developed lower AHR and eosinophilia after OVA inhalation compared with the transfer of those from wild-type mice. Migration of OVA-pulsed DCs to peribronchial lymph nodes was also inhibited by OGR1 deficiency in the adoption experiments. The presence of functional OGR1 in DCs was confirmed by the expression of OGR1 mRNA and the OGR1-sensitive Ca2+ response. OVA-induced expression of CCR7, a mature DC chemokine receptor, and migration response to CCR7 ligands in an in vitro Transwell assay were attenuated by OGR1 deficiency. We conclude that OGR1 on DCs is critical for migration to draining lymph nodes, which, in turn, stimulates Th2 phenotype change and subsequent induction of airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:24244587

  5. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan

    2016-01-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-Kb complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  6. Metformin reduces endothelial cell expression of both the receptor for advanced glycation end products and lectin-like oxidized receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Ouslimani, Nadjat; Mahrouf, Meriem; Peynet, Jacqueline; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Cosson, Claudine; Legrand, Alain; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    Beyond its antihyperglycemic action, the antidiabetic oral drug metformin possesses antioxidant properties that may contribute to improve the cardiovascular deleterious effects of the diabetic disease. We explored whether metformin could modulate the redox-sensible expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and lectin-like oxidized receptor 1 (LOX-1), 2 endothelial membrane receptors involved in the arterial endothelial dysfunction observed in diabetes. Bovine aortic endothelial cells, either unstimulated or activated by high levels of glucose (30 mmol/L) or advanced glycation end products, were incubated for 72 hours with metformin at therapeutically relevant concentrations (10(-5) to 5 x 10(-4) mol/L). The expressions of RAGE and LOX-1 were evaluated on cell extracts by Western blot analysis. Metformin was shown to reduce, in dose-dependent manner, such expression of the 2 receptors, both in stimulated (by either glucose or advanced glycation end products) and in unstimulated cells. The effect of metformin was associated with a decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species as assessed using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluoroprobe. Taken together, our results suggest that the intracellular antioxidant properties of metformin may result in the inhibition of cell expression of both RAGE and LOX-1, possibly through a modulation of redox-sensible nuclear factors such as nuclear factor kappaB, that were shown to be involved in such receptor cell expression. PMID:17292717

  7. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L

    2013-02-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin. PMID:23085102

  8. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  9. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Male Ox1r−/− Mice Showed Implication of Orexin Receptor-1 in Mood, Anxiety, and Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Md. G.; Shoji, Hirotaka; Soya, Shingo; Hondo, Mari; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B, which are exclusively produced by neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, play an important role in the regulation of a wide range of behaviors and homeostatic processes, including regulation of sleep/wakefulness states and energy homeostasis. The orexin system has close anatomical and functional relationships with systems that regulate the autonomic nervous system, emotion, mood, the reward system, and sleep/wakefulness states. Recent pharmacological studies using selective antagonists have suggested that orexin receptor-1 (OX1R) is involved in physiological processes that regulate emotion, the reward system, and autonomic nervous system. Here, we examined Ox1r−/− mice with a comprehensive behavioral test battery to screen additional OX1R functions. Ox1r−/− mice showed increased anxiety-like behavior, altered depression-like behavior, slightly decreased spontaneous locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, increased startle response, and decreased prepulse inhibition. These results suggest that OX1R plays roles in social behavior and sensory motor gating in addition to roles in mood and anxiety. PMID:26696848

  10. Identification of small molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by utilizing a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E.; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U.

    2016-01-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions including female reproduction and parturition, regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) RXFP1, relaxin family receptor 1, is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. While agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacological utility, up to date, there are no reported small molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of quantitative high-throughput platform for RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cAMP assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365,677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counter screen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists. PMID:23212924

  11. Plasma FGF21 Concentrations, Adipose Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 and β-Klotho Expression Decrease with Fasting in Northern Elephant Seals

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Miwa; Lee, Andrew; Vázquez-Medina, Jose Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 is secreted from the liver, pancreas, and adipose in response to prolonged fasting/starvation to facilitate lipid and glucose metabolism. Northern elephant seals naturally fast for several months, maintaining a relatively elevated metabolic rate to satisfy their energetic requirements. Thus, to better understand the impact of prolonged food deprivation on FGF21-associated changes, we analyzed the expression of FGF21, FGF receptor-1 (FGFR1), β-klotho (KLB; a co-activator of FGFR) in adipose, and plasma FGF21, glucose and 3-hydroxybutyrate in fasted elephant seal pups. Expression of FGFR1 and KLB mRNA decreased 98% and 43%, respectively, with fasting duration. While the 80% decrease in mean adipose FGF21 mRNA expression with fasting did not reach statistical significance, it paralleled the 39% decrease in plasma FGF21 concentrations suggesting that FGF21 is suppressed with fasting in elephant seals. Data demonstrate an atypical response of FGF21 to prolonged fasting in a mammal suggesting that FGF21-mediated mechanisms have evolved differentially in elephant seals. Furthermore, the typical fasting-induced, FGF21-mediated actions such as the inhibition of lipolysis in adipose may not be required in elephant seals as part of a naturally adapted mechanism to support their unique metabolic demands during prolonged fasting. PMID:25857751

  12. Plasma FGF21 concentrations, adipose fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and β-klotho expression decrease with fasting in northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Lee, Andrew Y; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2015-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 is secreted from the liver, pancreas, and adipose in response to prolonged fasting/starvation to facilitate lipid and glucose metabolism. Northern elephant seals naturally fast for several months, maintaining a relatively elevated metabolic rate to satisfy their energetic requirements. Thus, to better understand the impact of prolonged food deprivation on FGF21-associated changes, we analyzed the expression of FGF21, FGF receptor-1 (FGFR1), β-klotho (KLB; a co-activator of FGFR) in adipose, and plasma FGF21, glucose and 3-hydroxybutyrate in fasted elephant seal pups. Expression of FGFR1 and KLB mRNA decreased 98% and 43%, respectively, with fasting duration. While the 80% decrease in mean adipose FGF21 mRNA expression with fasting did not reach statistical significance, it paralleled the 39% decrease in plasma FGF21 concentrations suggesting that FGF21 is suppressed with fasting in elephant seals. Data demonstrate an atypical response of FGF21 to prolonged fasting in a mammal suggesting that FGF21-mediated mechanisms have evolved differentially in elephant seals. Furthermore, the typical fasting-induced, FGF21-mediated actions such as the inhibition of lipolysis in adipose may not be required in elephant seals as part of a naturally adapted mechanism to support their unique metabolic demands during prolonged fasting. PMID:25857751

  13. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2016-08-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-K(b) complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  14. Radiolabeling and evaluation of 64Cu-DOTA-F56 peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in the molecular imaging of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Chuanke; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Junnan; Zhou, Zheng; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao; Yang, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) remains a great challenge in early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Here we reported the synthesis, radiolabeling, and evaluation of a novel 64Cu-radiolabeled peptide for noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of VEGFR1 positive gastric cancer. The binding of modified peptide WHSDMEWWYLLG (termed as F56) to VEGER-1 expressed in gastric cancer cell BCG823 has been confirmed by immune-fluorescence overlap. DOTA-F56 was designed and prepared by solid-phase synthesis and folded in vitro. 64Cu-DOTA-F56 was synthesized in high radiochemical yield and high specific activity (S.A. up to 255.6 GBq/mmol). It has excellent in vitro stability. Micro-PET imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-F56 identifies tumor in BCG823 tumor-bearing mice, while that of 18F-FDG does not. Immunohistochemical analysis of excised BCG823 xenograft showed colocalization between the PET images and the staining of VEGFR1. These results demonstrated that 64Cu-DOTA-F56 peptide has potential as a noninvasive imaging agent in VEGFR1 positive tumors. PMID:26807312

  15. Multi-organ Site Metastatic Reactivation Mediated by Non-canonical Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Zhang, Zhanguo; Akalay, Intissar; Gadiya, Mayur; Gao, Yaquan; Sinha, Surajit; Hu, Jian; Jiang, Cizhong; Akram, Muzaffar; Brogi, Edi; Leitinger, Birgit; Giancotti, Filippo G

    2016-06-30

    Genetic screening identifies the atypical tetraspanin TM4SF1 as a strong mediator of metastatic reactivation of breast cancer. Intriguingly, TM4SF1 couples the collagen receptor tyrosine kinase DDR1 to the cortical adaptor syntenin 2 and, hence, to PKCα. The latter kinase phosphorylates and activates JAK2, leading to the activation of STAT3. This non-canonical mechanism of signaling induces the expression of SOX2 and NANOG; sustains the manifestation of cancer stem cell traits; and drives metastatic reactivation in the lung, bone, and brain. Bioinformatic analyses and pathological studies corroborate the clinical relevance of these findings. We conclude that non-canonical DDR1 signaling enables breast cancer cells to exploit the ubiquitous interstitial matrix component collagen I to undergo metastatic reactivation in multiple target organs. PMID:27368100

  16. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 – Family Archetype or Iconoclast?

    PubMed Central

    Grandy, David K.

    2009-01-01

    Interest has recently been rekindled in receptors that are activated by low molecular weight, non-catecholic, biogenic amines that are typically found as trace constituents of various vertebrate and invertebrate tissues and fluids. The timing of this resurgent focus on receptors activated by the ‘trace amines’ (TAs) β-phenylethylamine (PEA), tyramine (TYR), octopamine (OCT), synephrine (SYN), and tryptamine (TRYP) is the direct result of two publications that appeared in 2001 describing the cloning of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) referred to by their discoverers as TA1 (Borowsky et al., 2001) and TAR1 (Bunzow et al., 2001). When heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various eukaryotic cell lines recombinant rodent and human TA receptors dose-dependently couple to the stimulation of cAMP production. Structure-activity profiling based on this functional response has revealed that in addition to the TAs, other biologically active compounds containing a 2 carbon aliphatic side chain linking an amino group to at least one benzene ring are potent and efficacious TA receptor agonists with amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3-iodothyronamine, thyronamine, and dopamine among the most notable. Almost 100 years after the search for TA receptors began numerous TA1/TAR1-related sequences, now called Trace Amine-Associated Receptors (TAARs), have been identified in the genome of every species of vertebrate examined to date. Consequently, even though heterologously expressed TAAR1 fits the pharmacological criteria established for a bona fide TA receptor a major challenge for those working in the field is to discern the in vivo pharmacology and physiology of each purported member of this extended family of GPCRs. Only then will it be possible to establish whether TAAR1 is the family archetype or an iconoclast. PMID:17888514

  17. Dendritic cell maturation and survival are differentially regulated by TNF receptors 1 and 21

    PubMed Central

    Maney, Nicola J.; Reynolds, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DC) to regulate adaptive immunity is controlled by their maturation state and lifespan. Although TNF is a well-known maturation and survival factor for DC, the role of the two TNF receptors (TNFR), TNFR1 and TNFR2, in mediating these effects is poorly understood. By using unique TNF variants that selectively signal through TNFR1 and/or TNFR2, we demonstrate differential functions of TNFR in human monocyte-derived and blood CD1c+ DC. Activation of TNFR1, but not TNFR2, efficiently induced DC maturation, as defined by enhanced expression of cell surface maturation markers (CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR) as well as enhanced T-cell stimulatory capacity. In contrast, both TNFR1 and TNFR2 significantly protected DC against cell death indicating that innate signals can promote DC survival in the absence of DC maturation. We further show differential activation of NFκB signaling pathways by the TNFR: TNFR1 activated both the p65 and p52 pathways, whereas TNFR2 triggered p52, but not p65 activation. Accordingly, the p65 NFκB pathway only played a role in the pro-survival effect of TNFR1. However, cell death protection through both TNFR was mediated through the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL pathway. Together, our data show that TNFR1-, but not TNFR2-signaling induces DC maturation, whereas DC survival can be mediated independently through both TNFR. These data indicate differential but partly overlapping responses through TNFR1 and TNFR2 in both inflammatory and conventional DC, and demonstrate that DC maturation and DC survival can be regulated through independent signaling pathways. PMID:25288570

  18. Serotonin receptor 1A knockout: An animal model of anxiety-related disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ramboz, Sylvie; Oosting, Ronald; Amara, Djamel Aït; Kung, Hank F.; Blier, Pierre; Mendelsohn, Monica; Mann, J. John; Brunner, Dani; Hen, René

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of individual serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) receptors to mood control, we have used homologous recombination to generate mice lacking specific serotonergic receptor subtypes. In the present report, we demonstrate that mice without 5-HT1A receptors display decreased exploratory activity and increased fear of aversive environments (open or elevated spaces). 5-HT1A knockout mice also exhibited a decreased immobility in the forced swim test, an effect commonly associated with antidepressant treatment. Although 5-HT1A receptors are involved in controlling the activity of serotonergic neurons, 5-HT1A knockout mice had normal levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, possibly because of an up-regulation of 5-HT1B autoreceptors. Heterozygote 5-HT1A mutants expressed approximately one-half of wild-type receptor density and displayed intermediate phenotypes in most behavioral tests. These results demonstrate that 5-HT1A receptors are involved in the modulation of exploratory and fear-related behaviors and suggest that reductions in 5-HT1A receptor density due to genetic defects or environmental stressors might result in heightened anxiety. PMID:9826725

  19. Nogo receptor 1 is expressed in both primary cultured glial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ukai, Junichi; Imagama, Shiro; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nogo receptor (NgR) is common in myelin-derived molecules, i.e., Nogo, MAG, and OMgp, and plays important roles in both axon fasciculation and the inhibition of axonal regeneration. In contrast to NgR’s roles in neurons, its roles in glial cells have been poorly explored. Here, we found a dynamic regulation of NgR1 expression during development and neuronal injury. NgR1 mRNA was consistently expressed in the brain from embryonic day 18 to postnatal day 25. In contrast, its expression significantly decreased in the spinal cord during development. Primary cultured neurons, microglia, and astrocytes expressed NgR1. Interestingly, a contusion injury in the spinal cord led to elevated NgR1 mRNA expression at the injury site, but not in the motor cortex, 14 days after injury. Consistent with this, astrocyte activation by TGFβ1 increased NgR1 expression, while microglia activation rather decreased NgR1 expression. These results collectively suggest that NgR1 expression is enhanced in a milieu of neural injury. Our findings may provide insight into the roles of NgR1 in glial cells.

  20. Prokineticin receptor-1 signaling promotes Epicardial to Mesenchymal Transition during heart development

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Himanshu; Boulberdaa, Mounia; Qureshi, Rehana; Bitirim, Verda; Gasser, Adeline; Messaddeq, Nadia; Dolle, Pascal; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2016-01-01

    The epicardium plays an essential role in coronary artery formation and myocardial development. However, signals controlling the developing epicardium and epicardial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the normal and diseased adult heart are studied less rigorously. Here we investigated the role of angiogenic hormone, prokineticin-2 and its receptor PKR1 in the epicardium of developing and adult heart. Genetic ablation of PKR1 in epicardium leads to partial embryonic and postnatal lethality with abnormal heart development. Cardiac developmental defects are manifested in the adult stage as ischemic cardiomyopathy with systolic dysfunction. We discovered that PKR1 regulates epicardial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) for epicardial-derived progenitor cell (EPDC), formation. This event affects at least three consequential steps during heart development: (i) EPDC and cardiomyocyte proliferation involved in thickening of an outer compact ventricular chamber wall, (ii) rhythmicity, (iii) formation of coronary circulation. In isolated embryonic EPDCs, overexpression or activation of PKR1 alters cell morphology and EMT markers via activating Akt signaling. Lack of PKR1 signal in epicardium leads to defective heart development and underlies the origin of congenital heart disease in adult mice. Our mice provide genetic models for congenital dysfunction of the heart and should facilitate studies of both pathogenesis and therapy of cardiac disorders in humans. PMID:27150455

  1. Nogo receptor 1 is expressed in both primary cultured glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Junichi; Imagama, Shiro; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Nogo receptor (NgR) is common in myelin-derived molecules, i.e., Nogo, MAG, and OMgp, and plays important roles in both axon fasciculation and the inhibition of axonal regeneration. In contrast to NgR's roles in neurons, its roles in glial cells have been poorly explored. Here, we found a dynamic regulation of NgR1 expression during development and neuronal injury. NgR1 mRNA was consistently expressed in the brain from embryonic day 18 to postnatal day 25. In contrast, its expression significantly decreased in the spinal cord during development. Primary cultured neurons, microglia, and astrocytes expressed NgR1. Interestingly, a contusion injury in the spinal cord led to elevated NgR1 mRNA expression at the injury site, but not in the motor cortex, 14 days after injury. Consistent with this, astrocyte activation by TGFβ1 increased NgR1 expression, while microglia activation rather decreased NgR1 expression. These results collectively suggest that NgR1 expression is enhanced in a milieu of neural injury. Our findings may provide insight into the roles of NgR1 in glial cells. PMID:27578914

  2. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1) into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C.; Yu, Jianqiang; Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Widhopf, George F.; Hurton, Lenka V.; Thokala, Radhika; Singh, Harjeet; Olivares, Simon; Champlin, Richard E.; Wierda, William G.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2015-01-01

    T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1) is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28) or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137) and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC), which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString) and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire. PMID:26030772

  3. The expression of sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor-1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is impaired by tumor microenvironmental signals and enhanced by piceatannol and R406.

    PubMed

    Borge, Mercedes; Remes Lenicov, Federico; Nannini, Paula R; de los Ríos Alicandú, María M; Podaza, Enrique; Ceballos, Ana; Fernández Grecco, Horacio; Cabrejo, María; Bezares, Raimundo F; Morande, Pablo E; Oppezzo, Pablo; Giordano, Mirta; Gamberale, Romina

    2014-09-15

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by the progressive accumulation of clonal B lymphocytes. Proliferation occurs in lymphoid tissues upon interaction of leukemic cells with a supportive microenvironment. Therefore, the mobilization of tissue-resident CLL cells into the circulation is a useful therapeutic strategy to minimize the reservoir of tumor cells within survival niches. Because the exit of normal lymphocytes from lymphoid tissues depends on the presence of sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) and the regulated expression of S1P receptor-1 (S1PR1), we investigated whether the expression and function of S1PR1 can be modulated by key microenvironment signals. We found that activation of CLL cells with CXCL12, fibroblast CD40L(+), BCR cross-linking, or autologous nurse-like cells reduces their S1PR1 expression and the migratory response toward S1P. Moreover, we found that S1PR1 expression was reduced in the proliferative/activated subset of leukemic cells compared with the quiescent subset from the same patient. Similarly, bone marrow-resident CLL cells expressing high levels of the activation marker CD38 showed a lower expression of S1PR1 compared with CD38(low) counterparts. Finally, given that treatment with BCR-associated kinase inhibitors induces a transient redistribution of leukemic cells from lymphoid tissues to circulation, we studied the effect of the Syk inhibitors piceatannol and R406 on S1PR1 expression and function. We found that they enhance S1PR1 expression in CLL cells and their migratory response toward S1P. Based on our results, we suggest that the regulated expression of S1PR1 might modulate the egress of the leukemic clone from lymphoid tissues. PMID:25127862

  4. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1) into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Deniger, Drew C; Yu, Jianqiang; Huls, M Helen; Figliola, Matthew J; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra N; Widhopf, George F; Hurton, Lenka V; Thokala, Radhika; Singh, Harjeet; Olivares, Simon; Champlin, Richard E; Wierda, William G; Kipps, Thomas J; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-01-01

    T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1) is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28) or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137) and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC), which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString) and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire. PMID:26030772

  5. Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 / Tumor Endothelial Marker 8: Mutation of Conserved Inserted Domain Residues Overrides Cytosolic Control of Protective Antigen Binding†

    PubMed Central

    Ramey, Jordan D.; Villareal, Valerie A.; Ng, Charles; Ward, Sabrina; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Clubb, Robert T.; Bradley, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1) / tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is one of two known proteinaceous cell surface anthrax toxin receptors. A metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) present in the integrin-like inserted (I) domain of ANTXR1 mediates the binding of the anthrax toxin subunit, protective antigen (PA). Here we provide evidence that single point mutations in the I domain can override regulation of ANTXR1 ligand-binding activity mediated by intracellular signals. A previously reported MIDAS-mutant of ANTXR1 (T118A) was found to retain normal metal ion binding and secondary structure but failed to bind PA, consistent with a locked inactive state. Conversely, mutation of a conserved I domain phenylalanine residue to a tryptophan (F205W) increased the proportion of cell-surface ANTXR1 that bound PA, consistent with a locked active state. Interestingly, the KD and total amount of PA bound by the isolated ANTXR1 I domain was not affected by the F205W mutation, indicating that ANTXR1 is preferentially found in the active state in the absence of inside-out signaling. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that structural changes between T118A, F205W and WT I domains were minor despite a greater than 103-fold difference in their abilities to bind toxin. Regulation of toxin binding has important implications for the design of toxin inhibitors and for the targeting of ANTXR1 for anti-tumor therapies. PMID:20690680

  6. Agonist-independent internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a is arrestin- and clathrin-dependent and is suppressed by receptor inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Pula, Giordano; Mundell, Stuart J; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-05-01

    Three group I mGluR antagonists CPCCOEt, LY367385 and BAY36-7620, were analyzed for their effect on cell surface expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a and 1b. All three antagonists inhibited glutamate-induced internalization of mGluR1a and mGluR1b. However, when added alone, either LY367385 or BAY36-7620 increased the cell surface expression of mGluR1a but not mGluR1b. Both LY367385 and BAY36-7620 displayed inverse agonist activity as judged by their ability to inhibit basal inositol phosphate accumulation in cells expressing the constitutively active mGluR1a. Interestingly, mGluR1a but not mGluR1b was constitutively internalized in HEK293 cells and both LY367385 and BAY36-7620 inhibited the constitutive internalization of this splice variant. Furthermore, coexpression of dominant negative mutant constructs of arrestin-2 [arrestin-2-(319-418)] or Eps15 [Eps15(E Delta 95-295)] increased cell surface expression of mGluR1a and blocked constitutive receptor internalization. In the presence of these dominant negative mutants, incubation of cells with LY367385 and BAY36-7620 produced no further increase in cell surface expression of mGluR1a. Taken together, these results suggest that the constitutive activity of mGluR1a triggers the internalization of the receptor through an arrestin- and clathrin-dependent pathway, and that inverse agonists increase the cell surface expression of mGluR1a by promoting an inactive form of mGluR1a, which does not undergo constitutive internalization. PMID:15140199

  7. Systemic bile acid sensing by G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1) promotes PYY and GLP-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Ullmer, C; Alvarez Sanchez, R; Sprecher, U; Raab, S; Mattei, P; Dehmlow, H; Sewing, S; Iglesias, A; Beauchamp, J; Conde-Knape, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nutrient sensing in the gut is believed to be accomplished through activation of GPCRs expressed on enteroendocrine cells. In particular, L-cells located predominantly in distal regions of the gut secrete glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) upon stimulation by nutrients and bile acids (BA). The study was designed to address the mechanism of hormone secretion in L-cells stimulated by the BA receptor G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). Experimental Approach A novel, selective, orally bioavailable, and potent GPBAR1 agonist, RO5527239, was synthesized in order to investigate L-cell secretion in vitro and in vivo in mice and monkey. In analogy to BA, RO5527239 was conjugated with taurine to reduce p.o. bioavailability yet retaining its potency. Using RO5527239 and tauro-RO5527239, the acute secretion effects on L-cells were addressed via different routes of administration. Key Results GPBAR1 signalling triggers the co-secretion of PYY and GLP-1, and leads to improved glucose tolerance. The strong correlation of plasma drug exposure and plasma PYY levels suggests activation of GPBAR1 from systemically accessible compartments. In contrast to the orally bioavailable agonist RO5527239, we show that tauro-RO5527239 triggers PYY release only when applied intravenously. Compared to mice, a slower and more sustained PYY secretion was observed in monkeys. Conclusion and Implications Selective GPBAR1 activation elicits a strong secretagogue effect on L-cells, which primarily requires systemic exposure. We suggest that GPBAR1 is a key player in the intestinal proximal-distal loop that mediates the early phase of nutrient-evoked L-cell secretion effects. PMID:23488746

  8. Paternal Uniparental Isodisomy of Chromosome 6 Causing a Complex Syndrome Including Complete IFN-γ Receptor 1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prando, Carolina; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Grant, Audrey; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Bustamante, Jacinta; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Chapgier, Ariane; Rose, Yoann; Jannière, Lucile; Rizzardi, Elena; Zhang, Qiuping; Shanahan, Catherine M; Viollet, Louis; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Abel, Laurent; Ruga, Ezia Maria; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency associated with clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacterial species. Interferon gamma receptor 1 (IFN-γR1) deficiency is a genetic etiology of MSMD. We describe the clinical and genetic features of a seven-year-old Italian boy suffering from MSMD associated with a complex phenotype, including neonatal hyperglycemia, neuromuscular disease, and dysmorphic features. The child also developed necrotizing pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi. The child is homozygous for a nonsense mutation in exon 3 of IFNGR1 as a result of paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of the entire chromosome 6. This is the first reported case of uniparental disomy resulting in a complex phenotype including MSMD. PMID:20186794

  9. Novel free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40) agonists based on 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-carboxamide scaffold.

    PubMed

    Krasavin, Mikhail; Lukin, Alexey; Zhurilo, Nikolay; Kovalenko, Alexey; Zahanich, Ihor; Zozulya, Sergey; Moore, Daniel; Tikhonova, Irina G

    2016-07-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1), previously known as GPR40 is a G protein-coupled receptor and a new target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two series of FFA1 agonists utilizing a 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-caboxamide scaffold were synthetized. Both series offered significant improvement of the potency compared to the previously described 1,3,4-thiadiazole-based FFA1 agonists and high selectivity for FFA1. Molecular docking predicts new aromatic interactions with the receptor that improve agonist potency. The most potent compounds from both series were profiled for in vitro ADME properties (plasma and metabolic stability, LogD, plasma protein binding, hERG binding and CYP inhibition). One series suffered very rapid degradation in plasma and in presence of mouse liver microsomes. However, the other series delivered a lead compound that displayed a reasonable ADME profile together with the improved FFA1 potency. PMID:27229618

  10. Optimization of chromone-2-carboxamide melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists: assessment of potency, efficacy, and cardiovascular safety.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John K; Freeman, Jennifer C; Judd, Andrew S; Iyengar, Rajesh; Mulhern, Mathew; Zhao, Gang; Napier, James J; Wodka, Dariusz; Brodjian, Sevan; Dayton, Brian D; Falls, Doug; Ogiela, Christopher; Reilly, Regina M; Campbell, Thomas J; Polakowski, James S; Hernandez, Lisa; Marsh, Kennan C; Shapiro, Robin; Knourek-Segel, Victoria; Droz, Brian; Bush, Eugene; Brune, Michael; Preusser, Lee C; Fryer, Ryan M; Reinhart, Glenn A; Houseman, Kathryn; Diaz, Gilbert; Mikhail, Ann; Limberis, James T; Sham, Hing L; Collins, Christine A; Kym, Philip R

    2006-11-01

    Evaluation of multiple structurally distinct series of melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in an anesthetized rat cardiovascualar assay led to the identification of a chromone-2-carboxamide series as having excellent safety against the chosen cardiovascular endpoints at high drug concentrations in the plasma and brain. Optimization of this series led to considerable improvements in affinity, functional potency, and pharmacokinetic profile. This led to the identification of a 7-fluorochromone-2-carboxamide (22) that was orally efficacious in a diet-induced obese mouse model, retained a favorable cardiovascular profile in rat, and demonstrated dramatic improvement in effects on mean arterial pressure in our dog cardiovascular model compared to other series reported by our group. However, this analogue also led to prolongation of the QT interval in the dog that was linked to affinity for hERG channel and unexpectedly potent functional blockade of this ion channel. PMID:17064075

  11. Molecular Actions of Ovarian Cancer G Protein-Coupled Receptor 1 Caused by Extracellular Acidification in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Jiang, Li-Bo; Wang, Hui-Ren; Cao, Lu; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Li, Xi-Lei; Dong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular acidification occurs under physiologic and pathologic conditions, such as exercise, ischemia, and inflammation. It has been shown that acidosis has various adverse effects on bone. In recent years there has been increasing evidence which indicates that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) is a pH-sensing receptor and mediates a variety of extracellular acidification-induced actions on bone cells and other cell types. Recent studies have shown that OGR1 is involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation, survival, and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, OGR1 also regulates acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes in intervertebral discs. These observations demonstrate the importance of OGR1 in skeletal development and metabolism. Here, we provide an overview of OGR1 regulation ofosteoclasts, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and the molecular actions of OGR1 induced by extracellular acidification in the maintenance of bone health. PMID:25479080

  12. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) kinase as target for structure-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar; Borza, Corina M; Lowe, Edward W; Pozzi, Ambra; Meiler, Jens

    2015-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1 and 2 are transmembrane receptors that belong to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). Upon collagen binding, DDRs transduce cellular signaling involved in various cell functions, including cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and matrix homeostasis. Altered DDR function resulting from either mutations or overexpression has been implicated in several types of disease, including atherosclerosis, inflammation, cancer, and tissue fibrosis. Several established inhibitors, such as imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, originally developed as Abelson murine leukemia (Abl) kinase inhibitors, have been found to inhibit DDR kinase activity. As we review here, recent discoveries of novel inhibitors and their co-crystal structure with the DDR1 kinase domain have made structure-based drug discovery for DDR1 amenable. PMID:25284748

  13. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) kinase as target for structure-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar; Borza, Corina M.; Lowe, Will; Pozzi, Ambra; Meiler, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1 and 2 are transmembrane receptors that belong to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). Upon collagen binding, DDRs transduce cellular signaling involved in various cell functions, including cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and matrix homeostasis. Altered DDR function resulting from either mutations or overexpression has been implicated in several types of disease, including atherosclerosis, inflammation, cancer, and tissue fibrosis. Several established inhibitors, such as imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, originally developed as Abelson murine leukemia (Abl) kinase inhibitors, have been found to inhibit DDR kinase activity. As we review here, recent discoveries of novel inhibitors and their co-crystal structure with the DDR1 kinase domain have made structure-based drug discovery for DDR1 amenable. PMID:25284748

  14. Atypical signaling of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gelb, Tara; Pshenichkin, Sergey; Hathaway, Hannah A; Grajkowska, Ewa; Dalley, Carrie Bowman; Wolfe, Barry B; Wroblewski, Jarda T

    2015-11-01

    The metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptor has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of metastatic melanoma and various other cancers. Our laboratory has demonstrated that a selective, non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist slows human melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we sought to determine if the activation of a canonical G protein-dependent signal transduction cascade, which is often used as an output of mGlu1 receptor activity in neuronal cells, correlated with mGlu1 receptor-mediated melanoma cell viability. Glutamate, the endogenous ligand of mGlu1 receptors, significantly increased melanoma cell viability, but did not stimulate phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in several human melanoma cell lines. In contrast, melanoma cell viability was not increased by quisqualate, a highly potent mGlu1 receptor agonist, or DHPG, a selective group I mGlu receptor agonist. Similarly to glutamate, quisqualate also failed to stimulate PI hydrolysis in mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanoma cells. These results suggest that the canonical G protein-dependent signal transduction cascade is not coupled to mGlu1 receptors in all human melanoma cells. On the other hand, dynamin inhibition selectively decreased viability of mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanoma cells, suggesting that a mechanism requiring internalization may control melanoma cell viability. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the approaches commonly used to study mGlu1 receptor function and signaling in other systems may be inappropriate for studying mGlu1 receptor-mediated melanoma cell viability. PMID:26291396

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew L; Sharma, Ashish K; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J; Huerter, Mary E; Johnston, William F; Kron, Irving L; Lynch, Kevin R; Laubach, Victor E

    2015-06-15

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  16. Unaltered Angiogenesis-Regulating Activities of Platelets in Mild Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus despite a Marked Platelet Hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinyan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zhangsen; Li, Nailin

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with platelet dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis. Aim of the study is to investigate if platelet dysfunction might hamper platelet angiogenic activities in T2DM patients. Sixteen T2DM patients and gender/age-matched non-diabetic controls were studied. Flow cytometry and endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) tube formation on matrigel were used to assess platelet reactivity and angiogenic activity, respectively. Thrombin receptor PAR1-activating peptide (PAR1-AP) induced higher platelet P-selectin expression, and evoked more rapid and intense platelet annexin V binding in T2DM patients, seen as a more rapid increase of annexin V+ platelets (24.3±6.4% vs 12.6±3.8% in control at 2 min) and a higher elevation (30.9±5.1% vs 24.3±3.0% at 8 min). However, PAR1-AP and PAR4-AP induced similar releases of angiogenic regulators from platelets, and both stimuli evoked platelet release of platelet angiogenic regulators to similar extents in T2DM and control subjects. Thus, PAR1-stimulated platelet releasate (PAR1-PR) and PAR4-PR similarly enhanced capillary-like network/tube formation of ECFCs, and the enhancements did not differ between T2DM and control subjects. Direct supplementation of platelets to ECFCs at the ratio of 1:200 enhanced ECFC tube formation even more markedly, leading to approximately 100% increases of the total branch points of ECFC tube formation, for which the enhancements were also similar between patients and controls. In conclusion, platelets from T2DM subjects are hyperreactive. Platelet activation induced by high doses of PAR1-AP, however, results in similar releases of angiogenic regulators in mild T2DM and control subjects. Platelets from T2DM and control subjects also demonstrate similar enhancements on ECFC angiogenic activities. PMID:27612088

  17. Substituted indoles as selective protease activated receptor 4 (PAR-4) antagonists: Discovery and SAR of ML354.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wandong; Young, Summer E; Duvernay, Matthew T; Schulte, Michael L; Nance, Kellie D; Melancon, Bruce J; Engers, Julie; Locuson, Charles W; Wood, Michael R; Daniels, J Scott; Wu, Wenjun; Lindsley, Craig W; Hamm, Heidi E; Stauffer, Shaun R

    2014-10-01

    Herein we report the discovery and SAR of an indole-based protease activated receptor-4 (PAR-4) antagonist scaffold derived from a similarity search of the Vanderbilt HTS collection, leading to MLPCN probe ML354 (VU0099704). Using a novel PAC-1 fluorescent αIIbβ3 activation assay this probe molecule antagonist was found to have an IC50 of 140nM for PAR-4 with 71-fold selectivity versus PAR-1 (PAR-1IC50=10μM). PMID:25176330

  18. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development. PMID:25923916

  19. Complement Receptor 1 Genetic Variants Contribute to the Susceptibility to Gastric Cancer in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Zhi; Lin, Jia; Cao, Lei; He, Bing; Han, Sugui; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    As the receptor for C3b/C4b, type 1 complement receptor (CR1/CD35) plays an important role in the regulation of complement activity and is further involved in carcinogenesis. This study aimed to elucidate the association of CR1 genetic variants with the susceptibility to gastric cancer in Chinese population. Based on the NCBI database, totally 13 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected by Haploview program and genotyped using iPlex Gold Genotyping Assay and Sequenom MassArray among 500 gastric cancer cases and 500 healthy controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression to evaluate the association of each SNP with gastric cancer. Of all selected Tag SNPs , CR1 rs9429942 T > C was found to confer to the risk of developing gastric cancer. Compared with the carriers with rs9429942 TT genotype, those with CT genotype had 88% decreased risk of developing gastric cancer with OR (95%CI) of 0.12 (0.03-0.50). Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) analysis revealed a significant three-way interaction among rs75422544 C > A, rs10494885 C > T and rs7525160 G > C in the development of gastric cancer with a maximum testing balance accuracy of 56.07% and a cross-validation consistency of 7/10 (P = 0.011). In conclusion, our findings demonstrated the genetic role of CR1 gene in the development of gastric cancer in Chinese population. PMID:26000043

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonist SEW2871 prolongs heterotopic heart allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qian; Yuan, Baohong; Liu, Tao; Lan, Fang; Luo, Xiaochun; Lu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Ping; Dai, Liangcheng; Jin, Xiaobao; Yin, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a biologically active metabolite of plasma-membrane sphingolipids that is essential for immune cell trafficking. Recent studies have revealed immunomodulatory functions of S1P and its receptors (S1PR1-S1PR5) in many inflammatory conditions, such as asthma and autoimmunity. Here, we explore the efficacy of SEW2871, a selective S1PR1 agonist, in the prevention of acute allograft rejection in a murine cardiac transplantation model. Treatment of recipient mice with SEW2871 significantly prolongs cardiac allograft survival as compared to those recipients treated with control vehicle. The enhanced graft survival is associated with reduced circulating lymphocytes and allograft inflammatory cell infiltration. The cytokine analysis showed decreased allograft expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-2 in the SEW2871-treated mice. Moreover, administration of SEW2871 increases the percentage of CD4(+) T regulatory cells and FoxP3 expression in spleen of allograft recipients. Therefore, SEW2871 plays a critical role in regulation of lymphocyte trafficking and development, which directly contributes to prolongation of the allograft survival. PMID:25776899

  1. Expression and therapeutic targeting of dopamine receptor-1 (D1R) in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Borcherding, D C; Tong, W; Hugo, E R; Barnard, D F; Fox, S; LaSance, K; Shaughnessy, E; Ben-Jonathan, N

    2016-06-16

    Patients with advanced breast cancer often fail to respond to treatment, creating a need to develop novel biomarkers and effective therapeutics. Dopamine (DA) is a catecholamine that binds to five G protein-coupled receptors. We discovered expression of DA type-1 receptors (D1Rs) in breast cancer, thereby identifying these receptors as novel therapeutic targets in this disease. Strong to moderate immunoreactive D1R expression was found in 30% of 751 primary breast carcinomas, and was associated with larger tumors, higher tumor grades, node metastasis and shorter patient survival. DA and D1R agonists, signaling through the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) pathway, suppressed cell viability, inhibited invasion and induced apoptosis in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Fenoldopam, a peripheral D1R agonist that does not penetrate the brain, dramatically suppressed tumor growth in two mouse models with D1R-expressing xenografts by increasing both necrosis and apoptosis. D1R-expressing primary tumors and metastases in mice were detected by fluorescence imaging. In conclusion, D1R overexpression is associated with advanced breast cancer and poor prognosis. Activation of the D1R/cGMP/PKG pathway induces apoptosis in vitro and causes tumor shrinkage in vivo. Fenoldopam, which is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved to treat renal hypertension, could be repurposed as a novel therapeutic agent for patients with D1R-expressing tumors. PMID:26477316

  2. TNF is a key mediator of Septic Encephalopathy acting through its receptor, TNF Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessy J.; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick; Hensley, Lauren; Quigg, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that mice deficient in TNFR1 (TNFR1-/-) were resistant to LPS-induced encephalopathy. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a widespread inflammatory response similar to that observed in sepsis. Following LPS administration TNFR1-/- mice had less caspase-dependent apoptosis in brain cells and fewer neutrophils infiltrating the brain (p<0.039), compared to control C57Bl6 (TNFR1+/+) mice. TNFR1-dependent increase in aquaporin (AQP)-4 mRNA and protein expression was observed with a concomitant increase in water content, in brain (18% increase in C57Bl6 mice treated with LPS vs those treated with saline), similar to cerebral edema observed in sepsis. Furthermore, absence of TNFR1 partially but significantly reduced the activation of astrocytes, as shown by immunofluorescence and markedly inhibited iNOS mRNA expression (p<0.01). Septic Encephalopathy is a devastating complication of sepsis. Although, considerable work has been done to identify the mechanism causing the pathological alterations in this setting, the culprit still remains an enigma. Our results demonstrate for the first time that endotoxemia leads to inflammation in brain, with alteration in blood-brain barrier, up-regulation of AQP4 and associated edema, neutrophil infiltration, astrocytosis, as well as apoptotic cellular death, all of which appear to be mediated by TNF-α signaling through TNFR1. PMID:17884256

  3. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  4. Generation and Characterization of Small Single Domain Antibodies Inhibiting Human Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Steeland, Sophie; Puimège, Leen; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Haustraete, Jurgen; Devoogdt, Nick; Hulpiau, Paco; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Laukens, Debby; Meuleman, Philip; De Vos, Martine; Libert, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The cytokine TNF is a well known drug target for several inflammatory diseases such as Crohn disease. Despite the great success of TNF blockers, therapy could be improved because of high costs and side effects. Selective inhibition of TNF receptor (TNFR) 1 signaling holds the potential to greatly reduce the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF, thereby preserving the advantageous immunomodulatory signals mediated by TNFR2. We generated a selective human TNFR1 inhibitor based on Nanobody (Nb) technology. Two anti-human TNFR1 Nbs were linked with an anti-albumin Nb to generate Nb Alb-70-96 named “TNF Receptor-One Silencer” (TROS). TROS selectively binds and inhibits TNF/TNFR1 and lymphotoxin-α/TNFR1 signaling with good affinity and IC50 values, both of which are in the nanomolar range. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that TROS competes with TNF for binding to human TNFR1. In HEK293T cells, TROS strongly reduces TNF-induced gene expression, like IL8 and TNF, in a dose-dependent manner; and in ex vivo cultured colon biopsies of CD patients, TROS inhibits inflammation. Finally, in liver chimeric humanized mice, TROS antagonizes inflammation in a model of acute TNF-induced liver inflammation, reflected in reduced human IL8 expression in liver and reduced IL6 levels in serum. These results demonstrate the considerable potential of TROS and justify the evaluation of TROS in relevant disease animal models of both acute and chronic inflammation and eventually in patients. PMID:25538244

  5. Emotional instability but intact spatial cognition in adenosine receptor 1 knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Undine E; Lang, Florian; Richter, Kerstin; Vallon, Volker; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Schnermann, Jürgen; Wolfer, David P

    2003-10-17

    Several lines of evidence point to the involvement of adenosine in the regulation of important central mechanisms such as cognition, arousal, aggression and anxiety. In order to elucidate the involvement of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) in spatial learning and the control of exploratory behaviour, we assessed A1AR knockout mice (A1AR-/-) and their wild-type littermates (A1AR+/+) in a place navigation task in the water maze and in a battery of forced and free exploration tests. In the water maze, A1AR-/- mice showed normal escape latencies and were indistinguishable from controls with respect to measures of spatial performance during both training and probe trial. But despite normal performance they showed increased wall hugging, most prominently after the relocation of the goal platform for reversal training. Quantitative analysis of strategy choices indicated that wall hugging was increased mainly at the expense of chaining and passive floating, whereas the frequency of trials characterised as direct swims or focal searching was normal in A1AR-/- mice. These results indicate intact spatial cognition, but mildly altered emotional reactions to the water maze environment. In line with this interpretation, A1AR-/- mice showed normal levels and patterns of activity, but a mild increase of some measures of anxiety in our battery of forced and free exploration paradigms. These results are in line with findings published using a genetically similar line, but demonstrate that the magnitude of the changes and the range of affected behavioural measures may vary considerably depending on the environmental conditions during testing. PMID:14529816

  6. The generation of knock-in mice expressing fluorescently tagged galanin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Niall; Holmes, Fiona E.; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Vanderplank, Penny; Leard, Alan; Balthasar, Nina; Wynick, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has diverse roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, by activating the G protein-coupled receptors Gal1, Gal2 and the less studied Gal3 (GalR1–3 gene products). There is a wealth of data on expression of Gal1–3 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level due to the lack of specificity of currently available antibodies. Here we report the generation of knock-in mice expressing Gal1 or Gal2 receptor fluorescently tagged at the C-terminus with, respectively, mCherry or hrGFP (humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein). In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the highest levels of Gal1-mCherry, localization to the somatic cell membrane was detected by live-cell fluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and that fluorescence decreased upon addition of galanin. In spinal cord, abundant Gal1-mCherry immunoreactive processes were detected in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, and highly expressing intrinsic neurons of the lamina III/IV border showed both somatic cell membrane localization and outward transport of receptor from the cell body, detected as puncta within cell processes. In brain, high levels of Gal1-mCherry immunofluorescence were detected within thalamus, hypothalamus and amygdala, with a high density of nerve endings in the external zone of the median eminence, and regions with lesser immunoreactivity included the dorsal raphe nucleus. Gal2-hrGFP mRNA was detected in DRG, but live-cell fluorescence was at the limits of detection, drawing attention to both the much lower mRNA expression than to Gal1 in mice and the previously unrecognized potential for translational control by upstream open reading frames (uORFs). PMID:26292267

  7. Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Mutations in Sulfonylurea Receptor 1: Interplay between Expression and Mg-Nucleotide Gating Defects of ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Garin, Intza; Castaño, Luis; Argente, Jesús; Muñoz-Calvo, Ma. Teresa; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Context: ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels regulate insulin secretion by coupling glucose metabolism to β-cell membrane potential. Gain-of-function mutations in the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) or Kir6.2 channel subunit underlie neonatal diabetes. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the mechanisms by which two SUR1 mutations, E208K and V324M, associated with transient neonatal diabetes affect KATP channel function. Design: E208K or V324M mutant SUR1 was coexpressed with Kir6.2 in COS cells, and expression and gating properties of the resulting channels were assessed biochemically and electrophysiologically. Results: Both E208K and V324M augment channel response to MgADP stimulation without altering sensitivity to ATP4− or sulfonylureas. Surprisingly, whereas E208K causes only a small increase in MgADP response consistent with the mild transient diabetes phenotype, V324M causes a severe activating gating defect. Unlike E208K, V324M also impairs channel expression at the cell surface, which is expected to dampen its functional impact on β-cells. When either mutation was combined with a mutation in the second nucleotide binding domain of SUR1 previously shown to abolish Mg-nucleotide response, the activating effect of E208K and V324M was also abolished. Moreover, combination of E208K and V324M results in channels with Mg-nucleotide sensitivity greater than that seen in individual mutations alone. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that E208K and V324M, located in distinct domains of SUR1, enhance transduction of Mg-nucleotide stimulation from the SUR1 nucleotide binding folds to Kir6.2. Furthermore, they suggest that diabetes severity is determined by interplay between effects of a mutation on channel expression and channel gating. PMID:20810569

  8. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 abrogation causes resistance to inflammatory bone destruction in mice, despite promoting osteoclastogenesis in the steady state.

    PubMed

    Nakayachi, Mai; Ito, Junta; Hayashida, Chiyomi; Ohyama, Yoko; Kakino, Akemi; Okayasu, Mari; Sato, Takuya; Ogasawara, Toru; Kaneda, Toshio; Suda, Naoto; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Hakeda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory bone diseases have been attributed to increased bone resorption by augmented and activated bone-resorbing osteoclasts in response to inflammation. Although the production of diverse proinflammatory cytokines is induced at the inflamed sites, the inflammation also generates reactive oxygen species that modify many biological compounds, including lipids. Among the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), which is a key molecule in the pathogenesis of multifactorial inflammatory atherosclerosis, was downregulated with osteoclast differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that LOX-1 negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation by basically suppressing the cell-cell fusion of preosteoclasts. The LOX-1-deleted (LOX-1(-/-)) mice consistently decreased the trabecular bone mass because of elevated bone resorption during the growing phase. In contrast, when the calvaria was inflamed by a local lipopolysaccharide-injection, the inflammation-induced bone destruction accompanied by the elevated expression of osteoclastogenesis-related genes was reduced by LOX-1 deficiency. Moreover, the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), a trigger molecule for osteoclast differentiation, evoked by the inflammation was also abrogated in the LOX-1(-/-) mice. Osteoblasts, the major producers of RANKL, also expressed LOX-1 in response to proinflammatory agents, interleukin-1β and prostaglandin E2. In the co-culture of LOX-1(-/-) osteoblasts and wild-type osteoclast precursors, the osteoclastogenesis induced by interleukin-1β and prostaglandin E2 decreased; this process occurred in parallel with the downregulation of osteoblastic RANKL expression. Collectively, LOX-1 abrogation results in resistance to inflammatory bone destruction, despite promoting osteoclastogenesis in the steady state. Our findings indicate the novel involvement of LOX-1 in physiological bone homeostasis and inflammatory bone diseases

  9. Divergent responses to thermogenic stimuli in BAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue from interleukin 18 and interleukin 18 receptor 1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Tovar, Sulay; González-Touceda, David; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C.

    2015-01-01

    Brown and beige adipocytes recruitment in brown (BAT) or white adipose tissue, mainly in the inguinal fat pad (iWAT), meet the need for temperature adaptation in cold-exposure conditions and protect against obesity in face of hypercaloric diets. Using interleukin18 (Il18) and Il18 receptor 1- knockout (Il18r1-KO) mice, this study aimed to investigate the role of IL18 signaling in BAT and iWAT activation and thermogenesis under both stimuli. Il18-KO, extremely dietary obesity-prone as previously described, failed to develop diet-induced thermogenesis as assessed by BAT and iWAT Ucp1 mRNA levels. Overweight when fed standard chow but not HFD, HFD-fed Il18r1-KO mice exhibited increased iWAT Ucp1 gene expression. Energy expenditure was reduced in pre-obese Il18r1-KO mice and restored upon HFD-challenge. Cold exposure lead to similar results; Il18r1-KO mice were protected against acute body temperature drop, displaying a more brown-like structure, alternative macrophage activation and thermogenic gene expression in iWAT than WT controls. Opposite effects were observed in Il18-KO mice. Thus, Il18 and Il18r1 genetic ablation disparate effects on energy homeostasis are likely mediated by divergent BAT responses to thermogenic stimuli as well as iWAT browning. These results suggest that a more complex receptor-signaling system mediates the IL18 adipose-tissue specific effects in energy expenditure. PMID:26656097

  10. Divergent responses to thermogenic stimuli in BAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue from interleukin 18 and interleukin 18 receptor 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Tovar, Sulay; González-Touceda, David; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C

    2015-01-01

    Brown and beige adipocytes recruitment in brown (BAT) or white adipose tissue, mainly in the inguinal fat pad (iWAT), meet the need for temperature adaptation in cold-exposure conditions and protect against obesity in face of hypercaloric diets. Using interleukin18 (Il18) and Il18 receptor 1- knockout (Il18r1-KO) mice, this study aimed to investigate the role of IL18 signaling in BAT and iWAT activation and thermogenesis under both stimuli. Il18-KO, extremely dietary obesity-prone as previously described, failed to develop diet-induced thermogenesis as assessed by BAT and iWAT Ucp1 mRNA levels. Overweight when fed standard chow but not HFD, HFD-fed Il18r1-KO mice exhibited increased iWAT Ucp1 gene expression. Energy expenditure was reduced in pre-obese Il18r1-KO mice and restored upon HFD-challenge. Cold exposure lead to similar results; Il18r1-KO mice were protected against acute body temperature drop, displaying a more brown-like structure, alternative macrophage activation and thermogenic gene expression in iWAT than WT controls. Opposite effects were observed in Il18-KO mice. Thus, Il18 and Il18r1 genetic ablation disparate effects on energy homeostasis are likely mediated by divergent BAT responses to thermogenic stimuli as well as iWAT browning. These results suggest that a more complex receptor-signaling system mediates the IL18 adipose-tissue specific effects in energy expenditure. PMID:26656097

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for patients with primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Koresawa, Risa; Yamazaki, Kazuto; Oka, Daigo; Fujiwara, Hideyo; Nishimura, Hirotake; Akiyama, Takashi; Hamasaki, Shuji; Wada, Hideho; Sugihara, Takashi; Sadahira, Yoshito

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent lipid mediator that is produced during the metabolism of sphingolipid by sphingosine kinase. S1P has been implicated in the migration and trafficking of lymphocytes and several lymphoid malignancies through S1P receptors. Moreover, the overexpression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) has been correlated with the constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and poor prognosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Thus, in this study, we examined the expression of S1PR1 in 198 DLBCL samples collected from nodal and various extranodal sites and sub-classified formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples into germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) and non-GCB subgroups using immunohistochemistry. These analyses showed S1PR1 overexpression in 15·7% of all cases with DLBCL and in 54·2% of 24 cases with primary testicular (PT)-DLBCL; S1PR1 expression correlated with S1PR1mRNA expression and STAT3 phosphorylation in fresh samples. Analyses of data from a single institution suggested that S1PR1 overexpression was an independent negative prognostic marker in 68 patients with DLBCL of clinical stages I and II. The present high prevalence of S1PR1 overexpression warrants the consideration of PT-DLBCL as a distinct disease subtype and suggests the potential of the S1P/S1PR1 axis as a therapeutic target. PMID:27061580

  12. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Localization at the Apical Plasma Membrane Domain of Fisher Rat Thyroid Epithelial Cells Is Confined to Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Szumska, Joanna; Qatato, Maria; Rehders, Maren; Führer, Dagmar; Biebermann, Heike; Grandy, David K.; Köhrle, Josef; Brix, Klaudia

    2015-01-01

    Background The trace amine-associated receptor 1 (Taar1) is one member of the Taar family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) accepting various biogenic amines as ligands. It has been proposed that Taar1 mediates rapid, membrane-initiated effects of thyronamines, the endogenous decarboxylated and deiodinated relatives of the classical thyroid hormones T4 and T3. Objectives Although the physiological actions of thyronamines in general and 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) in particular are incompletely understood, studies published to date suggest that synthetic T1AM-activated Taar1 signaling antagonizes thyromimetic effects exerted by T3. However, the location of Taar1 is currently unknown. Methods To fill this gap in our knowledge we employed immunofluorescence microscopy and a polyclonal antibody to detect Taar1 protein expression in thyroid tissue from Fisher rats, wild-type and taar1-deficient mice, and in the polarized FRT cells. Results With this approach we found that Taar1 is expressed in the membranes of subcellular compartments of the secretory pathway and on the apical plasma membrane of FRT cells. Three-dimensional analyses further revealed Taar1 immunoreactivity in cilial extensions of postconfluent FRT cell cultures that had formed follicle-like structures. Conclusions The results suggest Taar1 transport along the secretory pathway and its accumulation in the primary cilium of thyrocytes. These findings are of significance considering the increasing interest in the role of cilia in harboring functional GPCR. We hypothesize that thyronamines can reach and activate Taar1 in thyroid follicular epithelia by acting from within the thyroid follicle lumen, their potential site of synthesis, as part of a nonclassical mechanism of thyroid autoregulation. PMID:26601071

  13. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor 1 Mediates Acute Estrogen-Induced Cardioprotection via MEK/ERK/GSK-3β Pathway after Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Mohammad E.; Singh, Harpreet; Lu, Rong; Olde, Bjorn; Leeb-Lundberg, L. M. Fredrik; Bopassa, Jean Chrisostome

    2015-01-01

    Three types of estrogen receptors (ER) exist in the heart, Esr1, Esr2 and the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1, Gper1. However, their relative importance in mediating estrogen protective action is unknown. We found that, in the male mouse ventricle, Gper1 transcripts are three- and seventeen-fold more abundant than Esr1 and Esr2 mRNAs, respectively. Analysis of the three ER knockouts (Esr1-/-, Esr2-/- and Gper1-/-) showed that only the Gper1-/- hearts lost their ability to be protected by 40 nM estrogen as measured by heart function, infarct size and mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, an index of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) activity. Analysis of Akt, ERK1/2 and GSK-3β salvage kinases uncovered Akt and ERK1/2 transient activation by estrogen whose phosphorylation increased during the first 5 min of non-ischemic perfusion. All these increase in phosphorylation effects were abrogated in Gper1-/-. Inhibition of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 (1 μM U0126) and PI-3K/Akt (10 μM LY294002) signaling showed that the MEK1/2/ERK1/2 pathway via GSK-3β exclusively was responsible for cardioprotection as an addition of U0126 prevented estrogen-induced GSK-3β increased phosphorylation, resistance to mitochondrial Ca2+-overload, functional recovery and protection against infarction. Further, inhibiting PKC translocation (1 μM chelerythrin-chloride) abolished estrogen-induced cardioprotection. These data indicate that estrogen-Gper1 acute coupling plays a key role in cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury in male mouse via a cascade involving PKC translocation, ERK1/2/GSK-3β phosphorylation leading to the inhibition of the mPTP opening. PMID:26356837

  14. A membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-discoidin domain receptor 1 axis regulates collagen-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  15. Oral advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) promote insulin resistance and diabetes by depleting the antioxidant defenses AGE receptor-1 and sirtuin 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weijing; Ramdas, Maya; Zhu, Li; Chen, Xue; Striker, Gary E; Vlassara, Helen

    2012-09-25

    The epidemics of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) affect the first world as well as less-developed countries, and now affect children as well. Persistently elevated oxidative stress and inflammation (OS/Infl) precede these polygenic conditions. A hallmark of contemporary lifestyle is a preference for thermally processed nutrients, replete with pro-OS/Infl advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which enhance appetite and cause overnutrition. We propose that chronic ingestion of oral AGEs promotes IR and T2D. The mechanism(s) involved in these findings were assessed in four generations of C57BL6 mice fed isocaloric diets with or without AGEs [synthetic methyl-glyoxal-derivatives (MG(+))]. F3/MG(+) mice manifested increased adiposity and premature IR, marked by severe deficiency of anti-AGE advanced glycation receptor 1 (AGER1) and of survival factor sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in white adipose tissue (WAT), skeletal muscle, and liver. Impaired 2-deoxy-glucose uptake was associated with marked changes in insulin receptor (InsR), IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt activation, and a macrophage and adipocyte shift to a pro-OS/inflammatory (M1) phenotype. These features were absent in F3/MG(-) mice. MG stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes led to suppressed AGER1 and SIRT1, and altered InsR, IRS-1, IRS-2 phosphorylation, and nuclear factor kappa-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (Nf-κB) p65 acetylation. Gene modulation revealed these effects to be coregulated by AGER1 and SIRT1. Thus, prolonged oral exposure to MG-AGEs can deplete host-defenses AGER1 and SIRT1, raise basal OS/Infl, and increase susceptibility to dysmetabolic IR. Because exposure to AGEs can be decreased, these insights provide an important framework for alleviating a major lifestyle-linked disease epidemic. PMID:22908267

  16. Functional variants of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 gene associate with asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Wade, Michael S.; Flores, Carlos; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Moitra, Jaideep; Ober, Carole; Kittles, Rick; Husain, Aliya N.; Ford, Jean G.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic mechanisms underlying asthma remain unclear. Increased permeability of the microvasculature is a feature of asthma and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, S1PR1, is an essential participant regulating lung vascular integrity and responses to lung inflammation. Objective We explored the contribution of polymorphisms in the S1PR1 gene (S1PR1) to asthma susceptibility. Methods A combination of gene re-sequencing for SNP discovery, case-control association, functional evaluation of associated SNPs, and protein immunochemistry studies was utilized. Results Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated significantly decreased S1PR1 protein expression in pulmonary vessels in asthmatic lungs compared to non-asthmatic individuals (p<0.05). Direct DNA sequencing of 27 multiethnic samples identified 39 S1PR1 variants (18 novel SNPs). Association studies were performed based on genotyping results from cosmopolitan tagging SNPs in three case-control cohorts from Chicago and New York totaling 1061 subjects (502 cases and 559 controls). Promoter SNP rs2038366 (−1557G/T) was found to be associated with asthma (p=0.03) in European Americans. In African Americans, an association was found for both asthma and severe asthma for intronic SNP rs3753194 (c.−164+170A/G) (p=0.006 and p=0.040, respectively) and for promoter SNP rs59317557 (−532C/G) with severe asthma (p=0.028). Consistent with predicted in silico functionality, alleles of promoter SNPs rs2038366 (−1557G/T) and rs59317557 (−532C/G) influenced the activity of a luciferase S1PR1 reporter vector in transfected endothelial cells exposed to growth factors (EGF, PDGF, VEGF) known to be increased in asthmatic airways. Conclusion These data provide strong support for a role for S1PR1 gene variants in asthma susceptibility and severity. Clinical Implications Our results indicate S1PR1 is a novel asthma candidate gene and an attractive target for future therapeutic strategies. Capsule summary This study

  17. Rho/ROCK acts downstream of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in modulating P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-xiang; Yuan, Xiao-min; Wang, Qiong; Wei, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK signaling is implicated in bone cancer pain development. However, it remains unknown whether the two signaling pathways function together in P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain. Results In this study, using a rat model of bone cancer, we examined the expression of P2X3 and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and further dissected whether lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK-mediated pathways interacted in modulating rat pain behavior. Bone cancer was established by inoculating Walker 256 cells into the left tibia of female Wistar rats. We observed a gradual and yet significant decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold in rats with bone cancer, but not in control rats. Our immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of P2X3- and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1-positive dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly greater in rats with bone cancer than control rats. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 blockade with VPC32183 significantly attenuated decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold. Flinching behavior test further showed that lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 inhibition with VPC32183 transiently but significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Rho inhibition by intrathecal BoTXC3 caused a rapid reversal in decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold of rats with bone cancer. Flinching behavior test showed that BoTXC3 transiently and significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Similar findings were observed with ROCK inhibition by intrathecal Y27632. Furthermore, VPC32183 and BoTXC3 effectively aborted the appearance of lysophosphatidic acid-induced calcium influx peak. Conclusions Lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor LPAR1, acting through the Rho-ROCK pathway, regulate P2X3 receptor in the development of both mechanical and spontaneous pain in bone cancer. PMID:27094551

  18. Prokineticin-1 (PROK1) modulates interleukin (IL)-11 expression via prokineticin receptor 1 (PROKR1) and the calcineurin/NFAT signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian H.; Evans, Jemma; Maldonado-Pérez, David; Critchley, Hilary O.; Sales, Kurt J.; Jabbour, Henry N.

    2010-01-01

    Prokineticin-1 (PROK1) is a multifunctional secreted protein which signals via the G-protein coupled receptor, PROKR1. Previous data from our laboratory using a human genome survey microarray showed that PROK1–prokineticin receptor 1 (PROKR1) signalling regulates numerous genes important for establishment of early pregnancy, including the cytokine interleukin (IL)-11. Here, we have shown that PROK1–PROKR1 induces the expression of IL-11 in PROKR1 Ishikawa cells and first trimester decidua via the calcium–calcineurin signalling pathway in a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gq/11), extracellular signal-regulated kinases, Ca2+ and calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells dependent manner. Conversely, treatment of human decidua with a lentiviral miRNA to abolish endogenous PROK1 expression results in a significant reduction in IL-11 expression and secretion. Importantly, we have also shown a regulatory role for the regulator of calcineurin 1 isoform 4 (RCAN1-4). Overexpression of RCAN1-4 in PROKR1 Ishikawa cells using an adenovirus leads to a reduction in PROK1 induced IL-11 indicating that RCAN1-4 is a negative regulator in the calcineurin-mediated signalling to IL-11. Finally, we have shown the potential for both autocrine and paracrine signalling in the human endometrium by co-localizing IL-11, IL-11Rα and PROKR1 within the stromal and glandular epithelial cells of non-pregnant endometrium and first trimester decidua. Overall we have identified and characterized the signalling components of a novel PROK1–PROKR1 signalling pathway regulating IL-11. PMID:19801577

  19. Amino acid sequence of the ligand-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 predicts sensitivity of wild birds to effects of dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Farmahin, Reza; Manning, Gillian E; Crump, Doug; Wu, Dongmei; Mundy, Lukas J; Jones, Stephanie P; Hahn, Mark E; Karchner, Sibel I; Giesy, John P; Bursian, Steven J; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Fredricks, Timothy B; Kennedy, Sean W

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of avian species to the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) varies up to 1000-fold among species, and this variability has been associated with interspecies differences in aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 ligand-binding domain (AHR1 LBD) sequence. We previously showed that LD(50) values, based on in ovo exposures to DLCs, were significantly correlated with in vitro EC(50) values obtained with a luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay that measures AHR1-mediated induction of cytochrome P4501A in COS-7 cells transfected with avian AHR1 constructs. Those findings suggest that the AHR1 LBD sequence and the LRG assay can be used to predict avian species sensitivity to DLCs. In the present study, the AHR1 LBD sequences of 86 avian species were studied, and differences at amino acid sites 256, 257, 297, 324, 337, and 380 were identified. Site-directed mutagenesis, the LRG assay, and homology modeling highlighted the importance of each amino acid site in AHR1 sensitivity to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and other DLCs. The results of the study revealed that (1) only amino acids at sites 324 and 380 affect the sensitivity of AHR1 expression constructs of the 86 avian species to DLCs and (2) in vitro luciferase activity of AHR1 constructs containing only the LBD of the species of interest is significantly correlated (r (2) = 0.93, p < 0.0001) with in ovo toxicity data for those species. These results indicate promise for the use of AHR1 LBD amino acid sequences independently, or combined with the LRG assay, to predict avian species sensitivity to DLCs. PMID:22923492

  20. Visualization of distinct patterns of subcellular redistribution of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 and gqalpha /G11alpha induced by agonist stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Drmota, T; Novotny, J; Gould, G W; Svoboda, P; Milligan, G

    1999-01-01

    The rat thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (TRHR-1) was modified by the addition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed stably in HEK293 cells. Extensive overlap of plasma membrane distribution of autofluorescent TRHR-1-GFP with that of the phosphoinositidase C-linked G-proteins Gqalpha/G11alpha, identified by indirect immunofluorescence, was monitored concurrently. Addition of thyrotropin-releasing hormone resulted in rapid separation of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha signals as the receptor was internalized. This situation persisted for more than an hour. At longer time periods a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha was also internalized, although much of the Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity remained associated with the plasma membrane. Parallel experiments, in which the cellular distribution of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity were monitored in sucrose-gradient fractions following cell disruption, also demonstrated a rapid, agonist-induced movement of TRHR-1-GFP away from the plasma membrane to low-density vesicular fractions. At later time points, a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity was also redistributed to overlapping, but non-identical, low-density-vesicle-containing fractions. Pretreatment of the cells with cytochalasin D or nocodazole prevented agonist-induced redistribution of G-protein but not TRHR-1-GFP, further indicating resolution of the mechanics of these two processes. The combination of a GFP-modified receptor and immunostaining of the G-proteins activated by that receptor allows, for the first time, concurrent analysis of the varying dynamics and bases of internalization and redistribution of two elements of the same signal-transduction cascade. PMID:10333499

  1. Chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 2 (CCRL2); two multifunctional receptors with unusual properties.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2011-03-10

    Chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1), also known as ChemR23, and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) are 7-transmembrane receptors that were cloned in the late 1990s based on their homology to known G-protein-coupled receptors. They were previously orphan receptors without any known biological roles; however, recent studies identified ligands for these receptors and their functions have begun to be unveiled. The plasma protein-derived chemoattractant chemerin is a ligand for CMKLR1 and activation of CMKLR1 with chemerin induces the migration of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro, suggesting a proinflammatory role. However, in vivo studies using CMKLR-deficient mice suggest an anti-inflammatory role for this receptor, possibly due to the recruitment of tolerogenic plasmacytoid DCs. Chemerin/CMKLR1 interaction also promotes adipogenesis and angiogenesis. The anti-inflammatory lipid mediator, resolving E1, is another CMKLR1 ligand and it inhibits leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory gene expression. These divergent results suggest that CMKLR1 is a multifunctional receptor. The chemokine CCL5 and CCL19 are reported to bind to CCRL2. Like Duffy antigen for chemokine receptor (DARC), D6 and CCX-CKR, CCRL2 does not signal, but it constitutively recycles, potentially reducing local concentration of CCL5 and CCL19 and subsequent immune responses. Surprisingly, chemerin, a ligand for CMKLR1, is a ligand for CCRL2. CCRL2 binds chemerin and increases local chemerin concentration to efficiently present it to CMKLR1 on nearby cells, providing a link between CCRL2 and CMKLR1. Although these findings suggest an anti-inflammatory role, a recent study using CCRL2-deficient mice indicates a proinflammatory role; thus, CCRL2 may also be multifunctional. Further studies using CMKLR1- or CCRL2-deficient mice are needed to further define the role of these receptors in immune responses and other cellular processes. PMID:21056554

  2. IgG Suppresses Antibody Responses in Mice Lacking C1q, C3, Complement Receptors 1 and 2, or IgG Fc-Receptors