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Sample records for activated relaxation process

  1. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  2. Electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms of nitroxyl radicals in ionic liquids and conventional organic liquids: temperature dependence of a thermally activated process.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Krishnendu; Kattnig, Daniel R; Mladenova, Boryana Y; Grampp, Günter; Das, Ranjan

    2015-03-26

    During the past two decades, several studies have established a significant role played by a thermally activated process in the electron spin relaxation of nitroxyl free radicals in liquid solutions. Its role has been used to explain the spin relaxation behavior of these radicals in a wide range of viscosities and microwave frequencies. However, no temperature dependence of this process has been reported. In this work, our main aim was to investigate the temperature dependence of this process in neat solvents. Electron spin-lattice relaxation times of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), in X-band microwave frequency, were measured by the pulse saturation recovery technique in three room-temperature ionic liquids ([bmim][BF4], [emim][BF4], and [bmim][PF6]), di-isononyl phthalate, and sec-butyl benzene. The ionic liquids provided a wide range of viscosity in a modest range of temperature. An auxiliary aim was to examine whether the dynamics of a probe molecule dissolved in ionic liquids was different from that in conventional molecular liquids, as claimed in several reports on fluorescence dynamics in ionic liquids. This was the reason for the inclusion of di-isononyl phthalate, whose viscosities are similar to that of the ionic liquids in similar temperatures, and sec-butyl benzene. Rotational correlation times of the nitroxyl radicals were determined from the hyperfine dependence of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line widths. Observation of highly well-resolved proton hyperfine lines, riding over the nitrogen hyperfine lines, in the low viscosity regime in all the solvents, gave more accurate values of the rotational correlation times than the values generally measured in the absence of these hyperfine lines and reported in the literature. The measured rotational correlation times obeyed a modified Stokes-Einstein-Debye relation of temperature dependence in all solvents. By separating the contributions of g

  3. Electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms of nitroxyl radicals in ionic liquids and conventional organic liquids: temperature dependence of a thermally activated process.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Krishnendu; Kattnig, Daniel R; Mladenova, Boryana Y; Grampp, Günter; Das, Ranjan

    2015-03-26

    During the past two decades, several studies have established a significant role played by a thermally activated process in the electron spin relaxation of nitroxyl free radicals in liquid solutions. Its role has been used to explain the spin relaxation behavior of these radicals in a wide range of viscosities and microwave frequencies. However, no temperature dependence of this process has been reported. In this work, our main aim was to investigate the temperature dependence of this process in neat solvents. Electron spin-lattice relaxation times of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), in X-band microwave frequency, were measured by the pulse saturation recovery technique in three room-temperature ionic liquids ([bmim][BF4], [emim][BF4], and [bmim][PF6]), di-isononyl phthalate, and sec-butyl benzene. The ionic liquids provided a wide range of viscosity in a modest range of temperature. An auxiliary aim was to examine whether the dynamics of a probe molecule dissolved in ionic liquids was different from that in conventional molecular liquids, as claimed in several reports on fluorescence dynamics in ionic liquids. This was the reason for the inclusion of di-isononyl phthalate, whose viscosities are similar to that of the ionic liquids in similar temperatures, and sec-butyl benzene. Rotational correlation times of the nitroxyl radicals were determined from the hyperfine dependence of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line widths. Observation of highly well-resolved proton hyperfine lines, riding over the nitrogen hyperfine lines, in the low viscosity regime in all the solvents, gave more accurate values of the rotational correlation times than the values generally measured in the absence of these hyperfine lines and reported in the literature. The measured rotational correlation times obeyed a modified Stokes-Einstein-Debye relation of temperature dependence in all solvents. By separating the contributions of g

  4. RELAXATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-07-10

    Based on global conservation principles, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation theory predicts the existence of several equilibria, such as the Taylor state or global dynamic alignment. These states are generally viewed as very long-time and large-scale equilibria, which emerge only after the termination of the turbulent cascade. As suggested by hydrodynamics and by recent MHD numerical simulations, relaxation processes can occur during the turbulent cascade that will manifest themselves as local patches of equilibrium-like configurations. Using multi-spacecraft analysis techniques in conjunction with Cluster data, we compute the current density and flow vorticity and for the first time demonstrate that these localized relaxation events are observed in the solar wind. Such events have important consequences for the statistics of plasma turbulence.

  5. Ultra-Slow Dielectric Relaxation Process in Polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomogida, Yoshiki; Minoguchi, Ayumi; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2004-04-01

    Dielectric relaxation processes with relaxation times larger than that for the structural α process are reported for glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol and their mixtures for the first time. Appearance of this ultra-slow process depends on cooling rate. More rapid cooling gives larger dielectric relaxation strength. However, relaxation time is not affected by cooling rate and shows non-Arrhenius temperature dependence with correlation to the α process. It can be considered that non-equilibrium dynamic structure causes the ultra-slow process. Scale of such structure would be much larger than that of the region for the cooperative molecular orientations for the α process.

  6. Ultraslow dielectric relaxation process in supercooled polyhydric alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomogida, Yoshiki; Minoguchi, Ayumi; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2006-04-01

    Complex permittivity was obtained on glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol and sorbitol-xylitol mixtures in the supercooled liquid state in the frequency range between 10μHz and 500MHz at temperatures near and above the glass transition temperature. For all the materials, a dielectric relaxation process was observed in addition to the well-known structural α and Johari-Goldstein β relaxation process [G. P. Johari and M. Goldstein, J. Chem. Phys. 53, 2372 (1970)]. The relaxation time for the new process is always larger than that for the α process. The relaxation time shows non-Arrhenius temperature dependence with correlation to the behavior of the α process and it depends on the molecular size systematically. The dielectric relaxation strength for the new process shows the effect of thermal history and decreases exponentially with time at a constant temperature. It can be considered that a nonequilibrium dynamics causes the new process.

  7. Microscopic dynamics and relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, R.; Giura, P.; Monaco, G.; Sette, F.; Fioretto, D.; Ruocco, G.

    2004-12-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering and Brillouin light scattering measurements of the dynamic structure factor of liquid hydrogen fluoride have been performed in the temperature range T=214-283 K. The data, analyzed using a viscoelastic model with a two time-scale memory function, show a positive dispersion of the sound velocity c(Q) between the low frequency value c{sub 0}(Q) and the high frequency value c{sub {infinity}}{sub {alpha}}(Q). This finding confirms the existence of a structural ({alpha}) relaxation directly related to the dynamical organization of the hydrogen bonds network of the system. The activation energy E{sub a} of the process has been extracted by the analysis of the temperature behavior of the relaxation time {tau}{sub {alpha}}(T) that follows an Arrhenius law. The obtained value for E{sub a}, when compared with that observed in another hydrogen bond liquid as water, suggests that the main parameter governing the {alpha}-relaxation process is the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule.

  8. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  9. Difference and similarity of dielectric relaxation processes among polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoguchi, Ayumi; Kitai, Kei; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2003-09-01

    Complex permittivity measurements were performed on sorbitol, xylitol, and sorbitol-xylitol mixture in the supercooled liquid state in an extremely wide frequency range from 10 μHz to 500 MHz at temperatures near and above the glass transition temperature. We determined detailed behavior of the relaxation parameters such as relaxation frequency and broadening against temperature not only for the α process but also for the β process above the glass transition temperature, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Since supercooled liquids are in the quasi-equilibrium state, the behavior of all the relaxation parameters for the β process can be compared among the polyols as well as those for the α process. The relaxation frequencies of the α processes follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann manner and the loci in the Arrhenius diagram are different corresponding to the difference of the glass transition temperatures. On the other hand, the relaxation frequencies of the β processes, which are often called as the Johari-Goldstein processes, follow the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence. The relaxation parameters for the β process are quite similar among the polyols at temperatures below the αβ merging temperature, TM. However, they show anomalous behavior near TM, which depends on the molecular size of materials. These results suggest that the origin of the β process is essentially the same among the polyols.

  10. Thermally Induced Deformation in Metallic Glass: the Activations and Relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced deformation in metallic glasses was investigated by sampling the potential energy landscape (PEL) and probing the changes in the atomic properties (e.g. energy, displacement, stress). The complete deformation processes consist of two stages: the activation (i.e. trigger, from initial minima to nearby saddle states on PEL), and relaxation (i.e. from saddle states to final minima on PEL). We show that the activation stages are triggered by local rearrangements of a small number of atoms, typically 5 atoms in average. Surprisingly, the individual triggers are invariant of the cooling history or elastic structure of the system. However, the organizations between different trigger centers can be varied and are related to the overall stability of the system. On the other hand, relaxation stages consist of two branches, a localized branch, and a cascade branch. While the localized branch is insensitive to the cooling history the system, the cascade branch is highly related with the processing conditions. In particular, for a faster quenched system, the cascade relaxation is found more prominent than in a slowly quenched system. The work is supported by Department of Energy.

  11. A comparison of somatic relaxation and EEG activity in classical progressive relaxation and transcendental meditation.

    PubMed

    Warrenburg, S; Pagano, R R; Woods, M; Hlastala, M

    1980-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, electroencephalogram (EEG), and four other measures of somatic relaxation were monitored in groups of long-term practitioners of classical Jacobson's progressive relaxation (PR) and Transcendental Meditation (TM) and also in a group of novice PR trainees. All subjects (1) practiced relaxation or meditation (treatment), (2) sat with eyes closed (EC control), and (3) read from a travel book during two identical sessions on different days. EEG findings indicated that all three groups remained primarily awake during treatment and EC control and that several subjects in each group displayed rare theta (5-7 Hz) waveforms. All three groups demonstrated similar decrements in somatic activity during treatment and EC control which were generally of small magnitude (e. g., 2-5% in oxygen consumption). These results supported the "relaxation response" model for state changes in somatic relaxation for techniques practiced under low levels of stress but not the claim that the relaxation response produced a hypometabolic state. Despite similar state effects, the long-term PR group manifested lower levels of somatic activity across all conditions compared to both novice PR and long-term TM groups. We concluded that PR causes a generalized trait of somatic relaxation which is manifested in a variety of settings and situations. Two likely explanations for this trait were discussed: (1) PR practitioners are taught to generalize relaxation to daily activities, and/or (2) according to a "multiprocess model," PR is a "somatic technique," which should produce greater somatic relaxation than does TM, a "cognitive technique." Further research is required to elucidate these possibilities.

  12. Resource Paper: Molecular Excited State Relaxation Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William

    1979-01-01

    Develops the concept of oscillatory v dissipative limits as it applies to electronic excited state processes in molecular systems. Main emphasis is placed on the radiative and nonradiative dynamics of the excited state of a molecule prepared by interaction with light or some other excitation source. (BT)

  13. Glass transition and relaxation processes of nanocomposite polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Money, Benson K; Hariharan, K; Swenson, Jan

    2012-07-01

    This study focus on the effect of δ-Al(2)O(3) nanofillers on the dc-conductivity, glass transition, and dielectric relaxations in the polymer electrolyte (PEO)(4):LiClO(4). The results show that there are three dielectric relaxation processes, α, β, and γ, in the systems, although the structural α-relaxation is hidden in the strong conductivity contribution and could therefore not be directly observed. However, by comparing an enhanced dc-conductivity, by approximately 2 orders of magnitude with 4 wt % δ-Al(2)O(3) added, with a decrease in calorimetric glass transition temperature, we are able to conclude that the dc-conductivity is directly coupled to the hidden α-relaxation, even in the presence of nanofillers (at least in the case of δ-Al(2)O(3) nanofillers at concentrations up to 4 wt %). This filler induced speeding up of the segmental polymer dynamics, i.e., the α-relaxation, can be explained by the nonattractive nature of the polymer-filler interactions, which enhance the "free volume" and mobility of polymer segments in the vicinity of filler surfaces. PMID:22686254

  14. Fast algorithm for relaxation processes in big-data systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2014-10-01

    Relaxation processes driven by a Laplacian matrix can be found in many real-world big-data systems, for example, in search engines on the World Wide Web and the dynamic load-balancing protocols in mesh networks. To numerically implement such processes, a fast-running algorithm for the calculation of the pseudoinverse of the Laplacian matrix is essential. Here we propose an algorithm which computes quickly and efficiently the pseudoinverse of Markov chain generator matrices satisfying the detailed-balance condition, a general class of matrices including the Laplacian. The algorithm utilizes the renormalization of the Gaussian integral. In addition to its applicability to a wide range of problems, the algorithm outperforms other algorithms in its ability to compute within a manageable computing time arbitrary elements of the pseudoinverse of a matrix of size millions by millions. Therefore our algorithm can be used very widely in analyzing the relaxation processes occurring on large-scale networked systems.

  15. Relaxation Processes within Flux Ropes in Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telloni, D.; Carbone, V.; Perri, S.; Bruno, R.; Lepreti, F.; Veltri, P.

    2016-08-01

    Flux ropes are localized structures in space plasma whose tube-like organized magnetic configuration can be well approximated by a force-free field model. Both numerical simulations and simple models suggest that the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can relax toward a minimum energy state, where magnetic helicity is conserved, characterized by force-free magnetic fields (Taylor relaxation). In this paper, we evaluate MHD rugged invariants within more than 100 flux ropes identified in the solar wind at 1 AU, showing that the magnetic and cross-helicity content carried out by these structures tend to be “attracted” toward a particular subphase in the parameter plane. The final configuration of the MHD rugged invariants in the parameter plane suggests indeed that flux ropes represent well-organized structures coming from the dynamical evolution of MHD turbulent cascade. These observational results, along with a simple model based on a truncated set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for both the velocity and magnetic field Fourier coefficients, thus, support a scenario in which the flux ropes naturally come out from the ideal MHD decay to large-scale magnetic field in space plasmas, probably governed by relaxation processes similar to those observed in laboratory plasmas.

  16. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  17. Cardiovascular and airway relaxant activities of peony root extract.

    PubMed

    Ghayur, Muhammad N; Gilani, Anwarul H; Rasheed, Huma; Khan, Abdullah; Iqbal, Zafar; Ismail, Muhammad; Saeed, Sheikh A; Janssen, Luke J

    2008-11-01

    Paeonia emodi (peony) is a well known plant used medicinally to treat hypertension, palpitations, and asthma. Despite its popularity, there are few reports in the scientific literature examining its use in such conditions. We prepared a 70% ethanolic extract of peony root (Pe.Cr) and applied it to segments of guinea pig atria and trachea and rat aorta suspended separately in tissue baths. Activity against arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation was measured in human platelet-rich plasma. Airway relaxant effect was evaluated against acetylcholine (ACh)-induced airway contraction in mouse lung slices loaded with fluo-4. Pe.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) showed an atropine-resistant negative inotropic effect in atria. In rat aorta, an endothelium-independent vasodilatory effect (0.3-10 mg/mL) was seen in phenylephrine- and high-K+-induced contractions. Pe.Cr (0.01-1 mg/mL) also inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation. In isolated trachea, Pe.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) relaxed carbachol- and histamine-induced contractions independently of beta-adrenergic receptors. In mouse lung slices, Pe.Cr (0.3-1 mg/mL) inhibited ACh-induced airway narrowing and oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ in airway smooth muscle cells. The results showed cardiosuppressant, vasodilatory, antiplatelet, and tracheal and airway relaxant activities of peony, providing potential justification for its medicinal use in different hyperactive cardiovascular and respiratory disorders.

  18. Late cortical disinhibition in relaxed versus active hand muscles.

    PubMed

    Caux-Dedeystère, A; Derambure, P; Devanne, H

    2015-07-01

    Recent research suggests that long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) is followed by a transitory period of late cortical disinhibition (LCD) that can even lead to a net increase in cortical excitability. The relationship between LICI/LCD and voluntary drive remains poorly understood. Our study aims at investigating the influence of index abduction on LICI and LCD in an actively engaged muscle and a neighboring muscle, while varying the intensity of the conditioning stimulus (CS). Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in 13 subjects. Paired-pulses were delivered with 10 different interstimulus intervals (ranging from 60 to 290 ms). Whatever the condition (relaxed or active FDI), the test stimulus was set to evoke an MEP of 1mV. The time course of conditioned MEP amplitude was compared for relaxed and active conditions when the CS intensity was set to (i) 130% of the rest motor threshold (RMT) or (ii) to evoke the same size of MEP under both conditions. LICI lasted longer (i.e. disinhibition occurred later) at rest than during abduction when evoked either by similar or matched conditioning stimuli. No post-LICI facilitation was observed at rest - even when the CS intensity was set to 160% RMT. In contrast, long-interval intracortical facilitation (LICF) was observed in the quiescent ADM when FDI was active. LICF may then be associated with voluntary activity albeit with lack of topographic specificity. PMID:25888934

  19. Anthelmintic and relaxant activities of Verbascum Thapsus Mullein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Verbascum thapsus is used in tribal medicine as an antispasmodic, anti-tubercular agent and wormicide. In this study, we investigated the antispasmodic and anthelmintic activities of crude aqueous methanolic extract of the plant. Methods V. thapsus extracts were tested against roundworms (Ascaridia galli) and tapeworms (Raillietina spiralis). Each species of worm was placed into a negative control group, an albendazole treatment group, or a V. thapsus treatment group, and the time taken for paralysis and death was determined. In addition, relaxation activity tests were performed on sections of rabbit's jejunum. Plant extracts were tested on KCl-induced contractions and the relaxation activities were quantified against atropine. V. thapsus calcium chloride curves were constructed to investigate the mode of action of the plant extracts. Results We detected flavonoids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids, glycosides, carbohydrates, proteins, fats and fixed oils in V. thapsus. For both species of worm, paralysis occurred fastest at the highest concentration of extract. The relative index values for paralysis in A. galli were 4.58, 3.41 and 2.08, at concentrations of 10, 20 and 40 mg/ml of plant extract, respectively. The relative index for death in A. galli suggested that V. thapsus extract is wormicidal at high concentration. Similarly, the relative indexes for paralysis and death in R. spiralis suggested that the extract is a more potent wormicidal agent than albendazole. The mean EC50 relaxation activity values for spontaneous and KCl induced contractions were 7.5 ± 1.4 mg/ml (6.57-8.01, n = 6) and 7.9 ± 0.41 mg/ml (7.44-8.46, n = 6), respectively. The relaxation activity of the extract was 11.42 ± 2, 17.0 ± 3, 28.5 ± 4, and 128.0 ± 7% of the maximum observed for atropine at corresponding concentrations. The calcium chloride curves showed that V. thapsus extracts (3 mg/ml), had a mean EC50 (log molar [calcium]) value of -1.9 ± 0.06 (-1.87 - -1.98, n = 6

  20. Active Batch Selection via Convex Relaxations with Guaranteed Solution Bounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Sun, Qian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2015-10-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar instances for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts towards a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. In this paper, we propose two novel batch mode active learning (BMAL) algorithms: BatchRank and BatchRand. We first formulate the batch selection task as an NP-hard optimization problem; we then propose two convex relaxations, one based on linear programming and the other based on semi-definite programming to solve the batch selection problem. Finally, a deterministic bound is derived on the solution quality for the first relaxation and a probabilistic bound for the second. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research effort to derive mathematical guarantees on the solution quality of the BMAL problem. Our extensive empirical studies on 15 binary, multi-class and multi-label challenging datasets corroborate that the proposed algorithms perform at par with the state-of-the-art techniques, deliver high quality solutions and are robust to real-world issues like label noise and class imbalance.

  1. Transition from stress-driven to thermally activated stress relaxation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J. C.; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zhao, L. Z.; Dai, L. H.; Crespo, D.; Pelletier, J. M.; Keer, L. M.; Yao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The short-range ordered but long-range disordered structure of metallic glasses yields strong structural and dynamic heterogeneities. Stress relaxation is a technique to trace the evolution of stress in response to a fixed strain, which reflects the dynamic features phenomenologically described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation. The KWW equation describes a broad distribution of relaxation times with a small number of empirical parameters, but it does not arise from a particular physically motivated mechanistic picture. Here we report an anomalous two-stage stress relaxation behavior in a Cu46Zr46Al8 metallic glass over a wide temperature range and generalize the findings in other compositions. Thermodynamic analysis identifies two categories of processes: a fast stress-driven event with large activation volume and a slow thermally activated event with small activation volume, which synthetically dominates the stress relaxation dynamics. Discrete analyses rationalize the transition mechanism induced by stress and explain the anomalous variation of the KWW characteristic time with temperature. Atomistic simulations reveal that the stress-driven event involves virtually instantaneous short-range atomic rearrangement, while the thermally activated event is the percolation of the fast event accommodated by the long-range atomic diffusion. The insights may clarify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the phenomenological description and shed light on correlating the hierarchical dynamics and structural heterogeneity of amorphous solids.

  2. Fast dynamics and relaxation of colloidal drops during the drying process using multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yong; Hwang, Ji Won; Jung, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Seong Jae; Yoon, Kisun; Weitz, David A

    2013-01-22

    The fast dynamics generated by the Brownian motion of particles in colloidal drops, and the related relaxation during drying, which play key roles in suspension systems, were investigated incorporating multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS). MSDWS equipment was implemented to analyze the relaxation properties of suspensions under a nonergodic and nonstationary drying process, which cannot be elucidated by conventional light scattering methods, such as dynamic light scattering and diffusing wave spectroscopy. Rapid particle movement can be identified by the characteristic relaxation time, which is closely related to the Brownian motion due to thermal fluctuations of the particles. In the compacting stage of the drying process, the characteristic relaxation time increased gradually with the drying time because the particles in the colloidal drop were constrained by themselves. Moreover, variations of the initial concentration and particle size considerably affected the complete drying time and characteristic relaxation time, producing a shorter relaxation time for a low concentrated suspension with small particles. PMID:23281633

  3. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation.

  4. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation. PMID:27575178

  5. Vibrational origin of the fast relaxation processes in molecular glass formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossa, S.; Monaco, G.; Ruocco, G.

    2002-10-01

    We study the interaction of the relaxation processes with the density fluctuations by molecular dynamics simulation of a flexible molecular model for o-terphenyl in the liquid and supercooled phases. We find evidence, besides the structural relaxation, of a secondary vibrational relaxation whose characteristic time, few ps, is slightly temperature dependent. This i) confirms the result by Monaco et al. (Phys. Rev. E, 62 (2000) 7595) of the vibrational nature of the fast relaxation observed in Brillouin Light Scattering experiments in o-terphenyl; and ii) poses a caveat on the interpretation of the BLS spectra of molecular systems in terms of a purely center-of-mass dynamics.

  6. The time dependence of rock healing as a universal relaxation process, a tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Wu, Renjie

    2016-10-01

    The material properties of earth materials often change after the material has been perturbed (slow dynamics). For example, the seismic velocity of subsurface materials changes after earthquakes, and granular materials compact after being shaken. Such relaxation processes are associated by observables that change logarithmically with time. Since the logarithm diverges for short and long times, the relaxation can, strictly speaking, not have a log-time dependence. We present a self-contained description of a relaxation function that consists of a superposition of decaying exponentials that has log-time behavior for intermediate times, but converges to zero for long times, and is finite for t = 0. The relaxation function depends on two parameters, the minimum and maximum relaxation time. These parameters can, in principle, be extracted from the observed relaxation. As an example, we present a crude model of a fracture that is closing under an external stress. Although the fracture model violates some of the assumptions on which the relaxation function is based, it follows the relaxation function well. We provide qualitative arguments that the relaxation process, just like the Gutenberg-Richter law, is applicable to a wide range of systems and has universal properties.

  7. Relaxation processes and glass transition in confined 1,4-polybutadiene films: A Molecular Dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Wolfgang; Solar, Mathieu

    We will present results from Molecular Dynamics simulations of a chemically realistic model of 1,4-polybutadiene (PB) chains confined by graphite walls. Relaxation processes in this system are heterogeneous and anisotropic. We will present evidence for a slow additional relaxation process related to chain desorption from the walls. We also study the structural relaxation resolved with respect to the distance from the graphite walls and show the influence of structural changes on the relaxation behavior. The temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation in layers of different thickness near the walls shows no indication of a shift of Tg as a function of thickness when analyzed with a Vogel-Fulcher fit. We explain this by the importance of intramolecular dihedral barriers for the glass transition in PB which dominate over the density changes next to a wall except for a 1 nm thick layer directly at the wall.

  8. A study of the stack relaxation in thermal batteries on activation

    SciTech Connect

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    2000-04-17

    The stack-relaxation processes occurring in a thermal-battery upon activation and discharge were studied dynamically with a special test fixture that incorporated an internal load cell. The factors which were screened initially included stack diameter and height (number of cells), thickness and binder content of the separator, temperature, and closing pressure. A second series of more-detailed experiments included only those factors that were identified by the screening study as being important (as closing force, number of cells, and separator thickness). The resulting experimental data from this second series of experiments were used to generate a surface-response model based on these three factors. This model accounted for 94% of the variation in the response (final stack-relaxation pressure) over the range of conditions studied.

  9. Relaxation of Isolated Ventricular Cardiomyocytes by a Voltage-Dependent Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, John H. B.; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Ershler, Philip R.

    1988-08-01

    Cell contraction and relaxation were measured in single voltage-clamped guinea pig cardiomyocytes to investigate the contribution of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange to mechanical relaxation. Cells clamped from -80 to 0 millivolts displayed initial phasic and subsequent tonic contractions; caffeine reduced or abolished the phasic and enlarged the tonic contraction. The rate of relaxation from tonic contractions was steeply voltage-dependent and was significantly slowed in the absence of a sarcolemmal Na+ gradient. Tonic contractions elicited in the absence of a Na+ gradient promptly relaxed when external Na+ was applied, reflecting activation of Na+-Ca2+ exchange. It appears that a voltage-dependent Na+-Ca2+ exchange can rapidly mechanically relax mammalian heart muscle.

  10. Dynamics of Relaxation Processes of Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, William James

    The dynamical response of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) to suppression by ipsilateral pulsed external tones of different frequencies and levels is investigated in nine female subjects under normal conditions and in four female subjects during periods when aspirin is being administered. A simple Van der Pol limit-cycle oscillator driven by an external tone is used as an interpretive model. Typical results for both the onset of, and recovery from suppression yield 1/r_1 (where -r_1 is the negative linear component of the damping function) in the range of 2-25 msec. In accordance with the predictions of the model: (a) the relaxation time for the onset of suppression increases with the amount of suppression induced by the external tone, (b) the values of r _1 and the amplitudes of the unsuppressed emissions exhibit an inverse correlation, (c) the values inferred for r_1 are not significantly dependent on the frequency of the pulsed suppressor tone and (d) the inferred r_1 values are not significantly dependent upon the amount of suppression. In investigations involving subjects under aspirin administration, the changes in the relaxation time constants indicate that the main effect of aspirin administration is to reduce the negative damping parameter r_1. The salicylate is apparently not metabolized in some subjects whose emissions are negligibly affected by aspirin administration. A modification of the single-oscillator model is used to describe pulsed suppression data obtained from a primary SOAE (2545 Hz) which is suppressed by a neighboring secondary emission (2895 Hz). The response of the SOAE amplitude during pulsed suppression is modeled by a pair of Van der Pol limit-cycle oscillators with the primary oscillator linearly coupled to the displacement of the secondary higher-frequency one. The relaxation time constants for the onset of, and recovery from, suppression are 4.5 and 4.8 msec, respectively, for the primary SOAE and 7.5 and 10.5 msec for the

  11. Synthesizing primary molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases using a two-frequency reconstructive algorithm.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, Andi G; Lueptow, Richard M

    2005-06-17

    Identifying molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases remains challenging. An algorithm that reconstructs the primary relaxation processes is presented. Based on measurements of acoustic attenuation and sound speed at two frequencies, it synthesizes the entire frequency dependence of the complex effective specific heat of the gas, which is the macroscopic "footprint" of relaxation effects. The algorithm is based on the fact that for a simple relaxation process, such as occurs in many polyatomic gases at temperatures around 300 K, the effective specific heat traces a semicircle in the complex plane as a function of frequency. Knowing the high-frequency or instantaneous value of the specific heat provides the capability to not only sense the presence, but also infer the nature and, for mixtures of unlike-symmetry molecules, the concentration of foreign molecules leaking in a host gas. PMID:16090508

  12. Critical behavior of the absorbing state transition in the contact process with relaxing immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Claudia P. T.; Lyra, M. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Corso, Gilberto

    2012-11-01

    We introduce a model for the Contact Process with relaxing immunization CPRI. In this model, local memory is introduced by a time and space dependence of the contamination probability. The model has two parameters: a typical immunization time τ and a maximum contamination probability a. The system presents an absorbing state phase transition whenever the contamination probability a is above a minimum threshold. For short immunization times, the system evolves to a statistically stationary active state. Above τc(a), immunization predominates and the system evolves to the absorbing vacuum state. We employ a finite-size scaling analysis to show that the transition belongs to the standard directed percolation universality class. The critical immunization time diverges in the limit of a→1. In this regime, the density of active sites decays exponentially as τ increases, but never reaches the vacuum state in the thermodynamic limit.

  13. Direct simulation Monte Carlo modeling of relaxation processes in polyatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Nizenkov, P.; Mirza, A.; Fasoulas, S.

    2016-02-01

    Relaxation processes of polyatomic molecules are modeled and implemented in an in-house Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code in order to enable the simulation of atmospheric entry maneuvers at Mars and Saturn's Titan. The description of rotational and vibrational relaxation processes is derived from basic quantum-mechanics using a rigid rotator and a simple harmonic oscillator, respectively. Strategies regarding the vibrational relaxation process are investigated, where good agreement for the relaxation time according to the Landau-Teller expression is found for both methods, the established prohibiting double relaxation method and the new proposed multi-mode relaxation. Differences and applications areas of these two methods are discussed. Consequently, two numerical methods used for sampling of energy values from multi-dimensional distribution functions are compared. The proposed random-walk Metropolis algorithm enables the efficient treatment of multiple vibrational modes within a time step with reasonable computational effort. The implemented model is verified and validated by means of simple reservoir simulations and the comparison to experimental measurements of a hypersonic, carbon-dioxide flow around a flat-faced cylinder.

  14. Probing of structural relaxation times in the glassy state of sucrose and trehalose based on dynamical properties of two secondary relaxation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, K.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.; Kaminska, E.

    2011-06-15

    Time-dependent isothermal dielectric measurements were carried out deeply in the glassy state on two very important saccharides: sucrose and trehalose. In both compounds two prominent secondary relaxation processes were identified. The faster one is an inherent feature of the whole family of carbohydrates. The slower one can also be detected in oligo- and polysaccharides. It was shown earlier that the {beta} process is the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation coupled to motions of the glycosidic linkage, while the {gamma} relaxation originates from motions of the exocyclic hydroxymethyl unit. Recently, it was shown that the JG relaxation process can be used to determine structural relaxation times in the glassy state [R. Casalini and C. M. Roland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 035701 (2009)]. In this paper we present the results of an analysis of the data obtained during aging using two independent approaches. The first was proposed by Casalini and Roland, and the second one is based on the variation of the dielectric strength of the secondary relaxation process during aging [J. K. Vij and G. Power, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 783 (2011)]. Surprisingly, we found that the estimated structural relaxation times in the glassy state of both saccharides are almost the same, independent of the type of secondary mode. This finding calls into question the common view that secondary modes of intramolecular origin do not provide information about the dynamics of the glassy state.

  15. Comparison of endothelium-derived relaxing factor activity between nonpregnant and pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, H; Kaneko, H; Kondo, M; Kogo, H

    1996-07-01

    The tension of isolated ring preparation of aorta from nonpregnant and pregnant rats was measured isometrically to study the effect of pregnancy on endothelium-derived relaxing factor activity. Contraction in response to norepinephrine and potassium chloride was greater in aortae from nonpregnant rats than in those from pregnant rats. The endothelium-dependent relaxation that was caused by acetylcholine (10(-10)-3 x 10(-9) M) in aortae precontracted with norepinephrine was significantly enhanced in aortae from pregnant rats compared with the relaxation in those from nonpregnant rats. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) inhibited the endothelium-dependent relaxation in both aorta from pregnant and nonpregnant rats. L-Arginine reversed the inhibition of L-NAME. Those results suggest that the enhanced endothelium-derived relaxing factor activity in rats aortae is associated with pregnancy. PMID:8856958

  16. The logarithmic relaxation process and the critical temperature of liquids in nano-confined states

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changjiu; Wong, Kaikin; Mole, Richard A.; Yu, Dehong; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2016-01-01

    The logarithmic relaxation process is the slowest of all relaxation processes and is exhibited by only a few molecular liquids and proteins. Bulk salol, which is a glass-forming liquid, is known to exhibit logarithmic decay of intermediate scattering function for the β-relaxation process. In this article, we report the influence of nanoscale confinements on the logarithmic relaxation process and changes in the microscopic glass-transition temperature of salol in the carbon and silica nanopores. The generalized vibrational density-of-states of the confined salol indicates that the interaction of salol with ordered nanoporous carbon is hydrophilic in nature whereas the interaction with silica surfaces is more hydrophobic. The mode-coupling theory critical temperature derived from the QENS data shows that the dynamic transition occurs at much lower temperature in the carbon pores than in silica pores. The results of this study indicate that, under nano-confinements, liquids that display logarithmic β-relaxation phenomenon undergo a unique glass transition process. PMID:27671486

  17. Active open boundary forcing using dual relaxation time-scales in downscaled ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.; Gillibrand, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Regional models actively forced with data from larger scale models at their open boundaries often contain motion at different time-scales (e.g. tidal and low frequency). These motions are not always individually well specified in the forcing data, and one may require a more active boundary forcing while the other exert less influence on the model interior. If a single relaxation time-scale is used to relax toward these data in the boundary equation, then this may be difficult. The method of fractional steps is used to introduce dual relaxation time-scales in an open boundary local flux adjustment scheme. This allows tidal and low frequency oscillations to be relaxed independently, resulting in a better overall solution than if a single relaxation parameter is optimized for tidal (short relaxation) or low frequency (long relaxation) boundary forcing. The dual method is compared to the single relaxation method for an idealized test case where a tidal signal is superimposed on a steady state low frequency solution, and a real application where the low frequency boundary forcing component is derived from a global circulation model for a region extending over the whole Great Barrier Reef, and a tidal signal subsequently superimposed.

  18. Theoretical description of slow non-monotonic relaxation processes in Al-Y melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasin, M. G.; Menshikova, S. G.; Ivshin, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The slow non-monotonic relaxation processes, which have been recently fixed in Al-Y melts, are described theoretically. The theoretical description is based on the Cahn-Hilliard theory and functional methods of non-equilibrium dynamics. In terms of the suggested approach the reasons of this relaxation kinetics are non-linearity of the system near to the liquidus line, which sharply increases with Y concentration, and strong initial heterogeneity of the melt on the concentration of Y atoms. According to our analysis one can conclude that the non-monotonic temporal dependence of viscosity is caused by the Ostwald ripening processes in the rich in yttrium areas.

  19. Dielectric relaxation processes in solid and supercooled liquid solutions of acetaminophen and nifedipine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Goresy, Tarek; Böhmer, Roland

    2007-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to study supercooled liquid and glassy mixtures of acetaminophen and nifedipine. The glass transition temperature Tg was found to vary continuously as a function of the acetaminophen concentration x, indicating complete miscibility of these drugs. The steepness index m characterizing the α-relaxation as well as the dispersion width of this process were almost independent of x. A weak Johari Goldstein β-relaxation was identified by its typical decoupling from the α-process. A well-resolved low-temperature γ-relaxation was found and ascribed to a side group motion, predominantly of the nifedipine molecule. The energy barriers hindering this motion exhibit a wide distribution, with a mean value of typically about 3500 K.

  20. Intermolecular and intramolecular contributions to the relaxation process in sorbitol and maltitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sixou, B.; Faivre, A.; David, L.; Vigier, G.

    Molecular mobility in sorbitol and maltitol is studied with spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulations in order to evaluate the relative contributions of the intermolecular and intramolecular interactions involved in the relaxation processes. The results of the molecular dynamics simulations performed on the polyols in the bulk or in vacuum compares well with the results of the analysis of the relaxation diagrams in the framework of the Perez et al . model. They both imply that the difference in the relative contributions of the intermolecular and intramolecular interactions associated with the different chemical architectures of the two polyols must be taken into account. The intermolecular interactions cannot be neglected and they are stronger in sorbitol than in maltitol in relation with the linear structure of this polyol. The intramolecular barrier, higher in the maltitol molecule with a more complex structure, could be at the origin of the higher junction temperature between the αand βrelaxation processes.

  1. Appearance of a Debye process at the Conductivity Relaxation Frequency of a Viscous Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, Ranko; Agapov, Alexander L; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a Debye-type ultraslow process in dielectric spectra of bulk polyalcohols and similar materials has been reported repeatedly in the recent literature. Its loss peak is observed at frequencies that are decades below those of the primary structural relaxation, in a range where the loss signal is usually dominated by dc-conductivity or even electrode polarization. We show that this peak originates from an incomplete filling of the capacitor volume, e.g., as a result of gas bubbles, a situation that gives rise to a Debye process at the conductivity relaxation frequency of the material, where the values of storage and loss components of permittivity are identical. The result implies that these peaks are not endemic to the liquid and can lead to various misinterpretations of the dielectric relaxation spectra. Techniques avoiding the occurrence of such artifacts are discussed. 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Appearance of a Debye process at the conductivity relaxation frequency of a viscous liquid.

    PubMed

    Richert, Ranko; Agapov, Alexander; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-03-14

    The existence of a Debye-type ultraslow process in dielectric spectra of bulk polyalcohols and similar materials has been reported repeatedly in the recent literature. Its loss peak is observed at frequencies that are decades below those of the primary structural relaxation, in a range where the loss signal is usually dominated by dc-conductivity or even electrode polarization. We show that this peak originates from an incomplete filling of the capacitor volume, e.g., as a result of gas bubbles, a situation that gives rise to a Debye process at the conductivity relaxation frequency of the material, where the values of storage and loss components of permittivity are identical. The result implies that these peaks are not endemic to the liquid and can lead to various misinterpretations of the dielectric relaxation spectra. Techniques avoiding the occurrence of such artifacts are discussed.

  3. General theory of intraband relaxation processes in heavily doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupčić, I.

    2015-05-01

    The frequency and wave-vector-dependent memory function in the longitudinal conductivity tensor of weakly interacting electronic systems is calculated by using an approach based on quantum transport equations. In this paper, we show that there is a close relation between the single-electron self-energy, the electron-hole pair self-energy, and the memory function. It is also shown in which way singular long-range Coulomb interactions, together with other q ≈0 scattering processes, drop out of both the memory function and the related transport equations. The theory is illustrated on heavily doped graphene, which is the prototype of weakly interacting single-band electron-phonon systems. A steplike increase of the width of the quasiparticle peak in angle-resolved photoemission spectra at frequencies of the order of the frequency of in-plane optical phonons is shown to be consistent with the behavior of an intraband plasmon peak in the energy loss spectroscopy spectra. Both anomalies can be understood as a direct consequence of weak electron scattering from in-plane optical phonons.

  4. Relaxation processes in a lower disorder order transition diblock copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, Alejandro; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Nogales, Aurora

    2015-02-14

    The dynamics of lower disorder-order temperature diblock copolymer leading to phase separation has been observed by X ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Two different modes have been characterized. A non-diffusive mode appears at temperatures below the disorder to order transition, which can be associated to compositional fluctuations, that becomes slower as the interaction parameter increases, in a similar way to the one observed for diblock copolymers exhibiting phase separation upon cooling. At temperatures above the disorder to order transition T{sub ODT}, the dynamics becomes diffusive, indicating that after phase separation in Lower Disorder-Order Transition (LDOT) diblock copolymers, the diffusion of chain segments across the interface is the governing dynamics. As the segregation is stronger, the diffusive process becomes slower. Both observed modes have been predicted by the theory describing upper order-disorder transition systems, assuming incompressibility. However, the present results indicate that the existence of these two modes is more universal as they are present also in compressible diblock copolymers exhibiting a lower disorder-order transition. No such a theory describing the dynamics in LDOT block copolymers is available, and these experimental results may offer some hints to understanding the dynamics in these systems. The dynamics has also been studied in the ordered state, and for the present system, the non-diffusive mode disappears and only a diffusive mode is observed. This mode is related to the transport of segment in the interphase, due to the weak segregation on this system.

  5. Relaxation processes in a lower disorder order transition diblock copolymer.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Alejandro; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Hernández, Rebeca; Sprung, Michael; Nogales, Aurora

    2015-02-14

    The dynamics of lower disorder-order temperature diblock copolymer leading to phase separation has been observed by X ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Two different modes have been characterized. A non-diffusive mode appears at temperatures below the disorder to order transition, which can be associated to compositional fluctuations, that becomes slower as the interaction parameter increases, in a similar way to the one observed for diblock copolymers exhibiting phase separation upon cooling. At temperatures above the disorder to order transition TODT, the dynamics becomes diffusive, indicating that after phase separation in Lower Disorder-Order Transition (LDOT) diblock copolymers, the diffusion of chain segments across the interface is the governing dynamics. As the segregation is stronger, the diffusive process becomes slower. Both observed modes have been predicted by the theory describing upper order-disorder transition systems, assuming incompressibility. However, the present results indicate that the existence of these two modes is more universal as they are present also in compressible diblock copolymers exhibiting a lower disorder-order transition. No such a theory describing the dynamics in LDOT block copolymers is available, and these experimental results may offer some hints to understanding the dynamics in these systems. The dynamics has also been studied in the ordered state, and for the present system, the non-diffusive mode disappears and only a diffusive mode is observed. This mode is related to the transport of segment in the interphase, due to the weak segregation on this system. PMID:25681940

  6. Relaxation rate of a stochastic spreading process in a closed ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, Daniel; Cohen, Doron

    2016-06-01

    The relaxation process of a diffusive ring becomes underdamped if the bias (so-called affinity) exceeds a critical threshold value, also known as the delocalization transition. This is related to the spectral properties of the pertinent stochastic kernel. We find the dependence of the relaxation rate on the affinity and on the length of the ring. Additionally we study the implications of introducing a weak link into the circuit and illuminate some subtleties that arise while taking the continuum limit of the discrete model.

  7. Probing of structural relaxation times in the glassy state of sucrose and trehalose based on dynamical properties of two secondary relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Kaminska, E.; Paluch, M.

    2011-06-01

    Time-dependent isothermal dielectric measurements were carried out deeply in the glassy state on two very important saccharides: sucrose and trehalose. In both compounds two prominent secondary relaxation processes were identified. The faster one is an inherent feature of the whole family of carbohydrates. The slower one can also be detected in oligo- and polysaccharides. It was shown earlier that the β process is the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation coupled to motions of the glycosidic linkage, while the γ relaxation originates from motions of the exocyclic hydroxymethyl unit. Recently, it was shown that the JG relaxation process can be used to determine structural relaxation times in the glassy state [R. Casalini and C. M. Roland, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.035701 102, 035701 (2009)]. In this paper we present the results of an analysis of the data obtained during aging using two independent approaches. The first was proposed by Casalini and Roland, and the second one is based on the variation of the dielectric strength of the secondary relaxation process during aging [J. K. Vij and G. Power, J. Non-Cryst. SolidsJNCSBJ0022-309310.1016/j.jnoncrysol.2010.07.067 357, 783 (2011)]. Surprisingly, we found that the estimated structural relaxation times in the glassy state of both saccharides are almost the same, independent of the type of secondary mode. This finding calls into question the common view that secondary modes of intramolecular origin do not provide information about the dynamics of the glassy state.

  8. Relaxation transition due to different cooling processes in a superconducting levitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You-He; Zhang, Xing-Yi; Zhou, Jun

    2008-06-01

    We present an experimental study of relaxation of vertical and horizontal force components in a high-temperature superconducting levitation system, with different initial cooling process after fixing the levitated body in an expected position statically. In the experiment, the bulk YBaCuO cylinder superconductor and the permanent magnet disk are employed. For a selected levitation height (LH) and a lateral displacement (LD) of the system, the experimental results show that the relaxations of the vertical and horizontal forces are strongly dependent on the initial cooling height (CH). With CH decreasing, the transition of the lateral force from repulsion to attraction is found as well as the changing characteristics with time from decrease to increase. Additionally, when LH is fixed at the CH, the transition phenomenon is also observed in the levitation force behavior and their relaxation under different LDs.

  9. Optimized energy landscape exploration using the ab initio based activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado-Charry, Eduardo; Béland, Laurent Karim; Caliste, Damien; Genovese, Luigi; Deutsch, Thierry; Mousseau, Normand; Pochet, Pascal

    2011-07-01

    Unbiased open-ended methods for finding transition states are powerful tools to understand diffusion and relaxation mechanisms associated with defect diffusion, growth processes, and catalysis. They have been little used, however, in conjunction with ab initio packages as these algorithms demanded large computational effort to generate even a single event. Here, we revisit the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) and introduce a two-step convergence to the saddle point, combining the previously used Lanczós algorithm with the direct inversion in interactive subspace scheme. This combination makes it possible to generate events (from an initial minimum through a saddle point up to a final minimum) in a systematic fashion with a net 300-700 force evaluations per successful event. ART nouveau is coupled with BigDFT, a Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) electronic structure code using a wavelet basis set with excellent efficiency on parallel computation, and applied to study the potential energy surface of C20 clusters, vacancy diffusion in bulk silicon, and reconstruction of the 4H-SiC surface.

  10. Multiple relaxation processes versus the fragile-to-strong transition in confined water.

    PubMed

    Bruni, F; Mancinelli, R; Ricci, M A

    2011-11-28

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy data on water confined in three different environments, namely at the surface of a globular protein or inside the small pores of two silica substrates, in the temperature range 140 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K, are presented and discussed in comparison with previous results from different techniques. It is found that all samples show a fast relaxation process, independently of the hydration level and confinement size. This relaxation is well known in the literature and its cross-over from Arrhenius to non-Arrhenius temperature behavior is the object of vivid debate, given its claimed relation to the existence of a second critical point of water. We find such a cross-over at a temperature of ~180 K, and assign the relaxation process to the layer of molecules adjacent and strongly interacting with the substrate surface. This is the water layer known to have the highest density and slowest translational dynamics compared to the average: its apparent cross-over may be due to the freezing of some degree of freedom and survival of very localized motions alone, to the onset of finite size effects, or to the presence of a calorimetric glass transition of the hydration shell at ~170 K. Another relaxation process is visible in water confined in the silica matrices: this is slower than the previous one and has distinct temperature behaviors, depending on the size of the confining volume and consequent ice nucleation.

  11. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed. PMID:26468456

  12. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed.

  13. Exploring the assembly mechanism of tetrapeptide oligomers using the Activation-Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are associated with formation of amyloid fibrils. All amyloid fibrils seem to share a common cross β-sheet structure. Experimental studies have shown that peptides as short as 4 amino acids can form amyloid fibrils. It has also been shown that the oligomers that form early in the aggregation process of even non-disease-related proteins may be cytotoxic. We report a detailed study of the assembly mechanisms of the tetrapeptides into different size oligomers: trimers, hexamers and more. The assembly of the oligomers, in which the peptides form β-sheets through interpeptide interactions, are studied using the activation-relaxation technique (ART) in combination with a reduced off-lattice energy model (OPEP). We also describe the multiple pathways of oligomerization as well as categorize the various oligomeric intermediates, providing information of the early events of β-sheet formation.

  14. Numerical methods for TVD transport and coupled relaxing processes in gases and plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    The construction of second-order upwind schemes for nonequilibrium plasmas, for both one- and two-fluid formulations is demonstrated. Coupled relaxation processes, including ionization kinetics and radiative processes and their algorithms for nonequilibrium, multiple temperature conditions are described as well. The paper applies the numerical techniques on some simple test cases, points out critical problems and their solutions, and makes qualitative comparisons with known results, whenever possible.

  15. The influence of dimension on the relaxation process of East-like models: Rigorous results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chleboun, P.; Faggionato, A.; Martinelli, F.

    2014-08-01

    We study facilitated models which extend to arbitrary dimensions the one-dimensional East process and which are supposed to catch some of the main features of the complex dynamics of fragile glasses. We focus on the low-temperature regime (small density c\\approx e^{-\\beta} of the facilitating sites). In the literature the relaxation process has been assumed to be quasi-one-dimensional and the equilibration time has been computed using the relaxation time of the East model (d=1) on the equilibrium length scale L_c=(1/c)^{1/d} in d-dimension. This led to a super-Arrhenius scaling for the relaxation time of the form T_{\\text{rel}}\\asymp \\exp(\\beta^2/dlog 2) . In a companion paper, using renormalization group ideas and electrical networks methods, we rigorously establish that instead T_{\\text{rel}}\\asymp \\exp(\\beta^2/2dlog 2) , contradicting the quasi-one-dimensional assumption. The above scaling confirms previous MCAMC simulations. Next we compute the relaxation time at finite and mesoscopic length scales, and show a dramatic dependence on the boundary conditions. Our final result is related to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics. Starting with a single facilitating site at the origin we show that, up to length scales L=O(L_c) , its influence propagates much faster (on a logarithmic scale) along the diagonal direction than along the axes directions.

  16. Ion relaxation processes in the heliospheric interface:how perturbed are ion distribution functions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashei, I.; Fahr, H.

    Charge-exchange processes between H/O atoms from the local interstellar medium and protons of the bulk interstellar plasma downstream of the outer bowshock in the heliospheric interface induce ions with non-relaxated velocity distribution functions. The relaxation of these freshly induced ions towards an equilibrium distribution occurs due to Coulomb interactions and wave-particle interactions with the background turbulence. Here we study in detail the effect of wave-particle interactions. To find the turbulence levels in the interface we consider the MHD-wave transformation at the outer shock surface between the interface and the local interstellar plasma. The turbulence in the interface region downstream of the bowshock is shown to be dominated by incompressible Alfven waves both for cases of quasiparallel and quasiperpendicular shocks. Also we show that waves propagating towards the shock are more intensive than those propagating away from it. The level of Alfven turbulence in the interface is estimated using the recent data on local interstellar turbulence deduced from the observations of the interstellar scintillations of distant radiosources. Two proton relaxation processes are considered: quasilinear resonant interactions with Alfven waves and nonlinear induced wave-particle scattering. The corresponding diffusion coefficients are estimated, and typical time periods for proton relaxation are shown to be of the same order of magnitude as the H/O atoms passage time over the extent of the interface. This indicates that perturbed ion distribution functions must be expected there.

  17. Stable 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog relaxes coronary arteries through potassium channel activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqi; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Reddy, L Manmohan; Sangras, Bhavani; Sharma, Kamalesh K; Nithipatikom, Kasem; Falck, John R; Campbell, William B

    2005-04-01

    5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (5,6-EET) is a cytochrome P450 epoxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid that causes vasorelaxation. However, investigations of its role in biological systems have been limited by its chemical instability. We developed a stable agonist of 5,6-EET, 5-(pentadeca-3(Z),6(Z),9(Z)-trienyloxy)pentanoic acid (PTPA), in which the 5,6-epoxide was replaced with a 5-ether. PTPA obviates chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis. In bovine coronary artery rings precontracted with U46619, PTPA (1 nmol/L to 10 micromol/L) induced concentration-dependent relaxations, with maximal relaxation of 86+/-5% and EC50 of 1 micromol/L. The relaxations were inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10 micromol/L; max relaxation 43+/-9%); the ATP-sensitive K+ channel inhibitor glybenclamide (10 micromol/L; max relaxation 49+/-6%); and the large conductance calcium-activated K+ channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (100 nmol/L; max relaxation 38+/-6%) and abolished by the combination of iberiotoxin with indomethacin or glybenclamide or increasing extracellular K+ to 20 mmol/L. Whole-cell outward K+ current was increased nearly 6-fold by PTPA (10 micromol/L), which was also blocked by iberiotoxin. Additionally, we synthesized 5-(pentadeca-6(Z),9(Z)-dienyloxy)pentanoic acid and 5-(pentadeca-3(Z),9(Z)-dienyloxy)pentanoic acid (PDPA), PTPA analogs that lack the 8,9 or 11,12 double bonds of arachidonic acid and therefore are not substrates for cyclooxygenase. The PDPAs caused concentration-dependent relaxations (max relaxations 46+/-13% and 52+/-7%, respectively; EC50 1micromol/L), which were not altered by glybenclamide but blocked by iberiotoxin. These studies suggested that PTPA induces relaxation through 2 mechanisms: (1) cyclooxygenase-dependent metabolism to 5-ether-containing prostaglandins that activate ATP-sensitive K+ channels and (2) activation of smooth muscle large conductance calcium-activated K+ channels. PDPAs only activate large conductance calcium-activated

  18. Relaxation times of the two-phonon processes with spin-flip and spin-conserving in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Liu, Lei; Li, Shu-Shen

    2014-04-07

    We perform a theoretical investigation on the two-phonon processes of the spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in quantum dots in the frame of the Huang-Rhys' lattice relaxation model. We find that the relaxation time of the spin-flip is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the spin-conserving, which is in agreement with previous experimental measurements. Moreover, the opposite variational trends of the relaxation time as a function of the energy separation for two-phonon processes are obtained in different temperature regime. The relaxation times display the oscillatory behaviors at the demarcation point with increasing magnetic field, where the energy separation matches the optical phonon energy and results in the optical phonon resonance. These results are useful in understanding the intraband levels' relaxation in quantum dots and could be helpful in designing photoelectric and spin-memory devices.

  19. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  20. The effect of a broad activation energy distribution on deuteron spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ylinen, E E; Punkkinen, M; Birczyński, A; Lalowicz, Z T

    2015-10-01

    Deuteron NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation were studied experimentally in zeolite NaY(2.4) samples containing 100% or 200% of CD3OH or CD3OD molecules of the total coverage of Na atoms in the temperature range 20-150K. The activation energies describing the methyl and hydroxyl motions show broad distributions. The relaxation data were interpreted by improving a recent model (Stoch et al., 2013 [16]) in which the nonexponential relaxation curves are at first described by a sum of three exponentials with adjustable relaxation rates and weights. Then a broad distribution of activation energies (the mean activation energy A0 and the width σ) was assumed for each essentially different methyl and hydroxyl position. The correlation times were calculated from the Arrhenius equation (containing the pre-exponential factor τ0), individual relaxation rates computed and classified into three classes, and finally initial relaxation rates and weights for each class formed. These were compared with experimental data, motional parameters changed slightly and new improved rates and weights for each class calculated, etc. This method was improved by deriving for the deuterons of the A and E species methyl groups relaxation rates, which depend explicitly on the tunnel frequency ωt. The temperature dependence of ωt and of the low-temperature correlation time were obtained by using the solutions of the Mathieu equation for a threefold potential. These dependencies were included in the simulations and as the result sets of A0, σ and τ0 obtained, which describe the methyl and hydroxyl motions in different positions in zeolite.

  1. Optically controlled release of DNA based on nonradiative relaxation process of quenchers

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yusuke; Onishi, Atsushi; Nishimura, Takahiro; Tanida, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Optically controlled release of a DNA strand based on a nonradiative relaxation process of black hole quenchers (BHQs), which are a sort of dark quenchers, is presented. BHQs act as efficient energy sources because they relax completely via a nonradiative process, i.e., without fluorescent emission-based energy losses. A DNA strand is modified with BHQs and the release of its complementary strand is controlled by excitation of the BHQs. Experimental results showed that up to 50% of the target strands were released, and these strands were capable of inducing subsequent reactions. The controlled release was localized on a substrate within an area of no more than 5 micrometers in diameter. PMID:27375933

  2. Optically controlled release of DNA based on nonradiative relaxation process of quenchers.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yusuke; Onishi, Atsushi; Nishimura, Takahiro; Tanida, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Optically controlled release of a DNA strand based on a nonradiative relaxation process of black hole quenchers (BHQs), which are a sort of dark quenchers, is presented. BHQs act as efficient energy sources because they relax completely via a nonradiative process, i.e., without fluorescent emission-based energy losses. A DNA strand is modified with BHQs and the release of its complementary strand is controlled by excitation of the BHQs. Experimental results showed that up to 50% of the target strands were released, and these strands were capable of inducing subsequent reactions. The controlled release was localized on a substrate within an area of no more than 5 micrometers in diameter. PMID:27375933

  3. Non-rigid ultrasound image registration using generalized relaxation labeling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Ha; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Park, MoonHo; Woo, Kyoung-Gu; Ku, Jeonghun; Park, Hee-Jun

    2013-03-01

    This research proposes a novel non-rigid registration method for ultrasound images. The most predominant anatomical features in medical images are tissue boundaries, which appear as edges. In ultrasound images, however, other features can be identified as well due to the specular reflections that appear as bright lines superimposed on the ideal edge location. In this work, an image's local phase information (via the frequency domain) is used to find the ideal edge location. The generalized relaxation labeling process is then formulated to align the feature points extracted from the ideal edge location. In this work, the original relaxation labeling method was generalized by taking n compatibility coefficient values to improve non-rigid registration performance. This contextual information combined with a relaxation labeling process is used to search for a correspondence. Then the transformation is calculated by the thin plate spline (TPS) model. These two processes are iterated until the optimal correspondence and transformation are found. We have tested our proposed method and the state-of-the-art algorithms with synthetic data and bladder ultrasound images of in vivo human subjects. Experiments show that the proposed method improves registration performance significantly, as compared to other state-of-the-art non-rigid registration algorithms.

  4. Adapting Creative and Relaxation Activities to Students with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenko, Nika; Stopar, Mojca Lipec

    2015-01-01

    The team which forms a comprehensive treatment plan for students with cancer includes, among other experts, special educators. In cooperation with other team members, their role is to enable students to integrate in the educational process, having regard to their individual needs. In the present paper we introduce the study of specific methodical…

  5. Sodium pump activity and calcium relaxation in vascular smooth muscle of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt rats

    SciTech Connect

    Soltis, E.E.; Field, F.P.

    1986-11-01

    The Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity was determined in femoral arterial smooth muscle from deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats using potassium relaxation and ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake as indices. The membrane-stabilizing effect of calcium and its relation to Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity also were examined. Femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats exhibited a greater relaxation in response to potassium addition after contraction with norepinephrine in a low potassium (0.6 mM) Krebs solution. The concentration of potassium required to produce a 50% relaxation was significantly less in DOCA-salt rats. Ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake was significantly greater at 3, 10, and 20 minutes of /sup 86/Rb incubation in femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between the uptake of /sup 86/Rb and time of incubation in both control and DOCA-salt rats. A significant difference in the slopes of the regression lines showed that the rate of uptake was greater in DOCA-salt rats. No difference was observed in ouabain-insensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake. A dose-dependent relaxation in response to increasing concentrations of calcium following contraction to norepinephrine was observed in femoral arteries from control and DOCA-salt rats. The relaxation was directly dependent on the level of extracellular potassium and was blocked by ouabain. Femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats relaxed to a significantly greater extent in response to calcium at each level of potassium when compared with controls. These results provide further evidence for an increase in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity in vascular smooth muscle from DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

  6. TRPM8 Channel Activation Induced by Monoterpenoid Rotundifolone Underlies Mesenteric Artery Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Darizy Flavia; de Almeida, Monica Moura; Chaves, Cinthia Guedes; Braz, Ana Letícia; Gomes, Maria Aparecida; Pinho-da-Silva, Leidiane; Pesquero, Jorge Luiz; Andrade, Viviane Aguiar; Leite, Maria de Fátima; de Albuquerque, José George Ferreira; Araujo, Islania Giselia Albuquerque; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Cruz, Jader dos Santos; Correia, Nadja de Azevedo; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida

    2015-01-01

    In this study, our aims were to investigate transient receptor potential melastatin-8 channels (TRPM8) involvement in rotundifolone induced relaxation in the mesenteric artery and to increase the understanding of the role of these thermosensitive TRP channels in vascular tissue. Thus, message and protein levels of TRPM8 were measured by semi-quantitative PCR and western blotting in superior mesenteric arteries from 12 week-old Spague-Dawley (SD) rats. Isometric tension recordings evaluated the relaxant response in mesenteric rings were also performed. Additionally, the intracellular Ca2+ changes in mesenteric artery myocytes were measured using confocal microscopy. Using PCR and western blotting, both TRPM8 channel mRNA and protein expression was measured in SD rat mesenteric artery. Rotundifolone and menthol induced relaxation in the isolated superior mesenteric artery from SD rats and improved the relaxant response induced by cool temperatures. Also, this monoterpene induced an increase in transient intracellular Ca2+. These responses were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with capsazepine or BCTC, both TRPM8 channels blockers. The response induced by rotundifolone was not significantly attenuated by ruthenium red, a non-selective TRP channels blocker, or following capsaicin-mediated desensitization of TRPV1. Our findings suggest that rotundifolone induces relaxation by activating TRPM8 channels in rat superior mesenteric artery, more selectively than menthol, the classic TRPM8 agonist, and TRPM8 channels participates in vasodilatory pathways in isolated rat mesenteric arteries. PMID:26599698

  7. Viscoelastic effects in relaxation processes of concentration fluctuations in dynamically asymmetric polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Mikihito; Takeno, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Saito, Shin; Hashimoto, Takeji; Nagao, Michihiro

    2002-02-01

    Relaxation processes of the concentration fluctuations induced by a rapid pressure change were investigated for a dynamically asymmetric polymer blend [deuterated polybutadiene (DPB)/polyisoprene (PI)] with a composition of 50-50 by weight by using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering. The pressure change was carried out inside the single-phase of the blend with the cell designed for polymeric systems under high pressure and temperature. Time change in the scattered intensity distribution with wave number (q) during the relaxation processes was found to be approximated by Cahn-Hilliard-Cook linearized theory. The theoretical analysis yielded the q dependence of Onsager kinetic coefficient that is characterized by the q-2 dependence at qξve>1 with the characteristic length ξve (with ξve being the viscoelastic length) being much larger than radius of gyration of DPB or PI. The estimated ξve agrees well with that calculated using the Doi and Onuki theory that takes into account the viscoelastic effects arising from the dynamical asymmetry between the component polymers in the relaxation of concentration fluctuations.

  8. Uncertainty management by relaxation of conflicting constraints in production process scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Juergen; Slany, Wolfgang; Stary, Christian

    1992-01-01

    Mathematical-analytical methods as used in Operations Research approaches are often insufficient for scheduling problems. This is due to three reasons: the combinatorial complexity of the search space, conflicting objectives for production optimization, and the uncertainty in the production process. Knowledge-based techniques, especially approximate reasoning and constraint relaxation, are promising ways to overcome these problems. A case study from an industrial CIM environment, namely high-grade steel production, is presented to demonstrate how knowledge-based scheduling with the desired capabilities could work. By using fuzzy set theory, the applied knowledge representation technique covers the uncertainty inherent in the problem domain. Based on this knowledge representation, a classification of jobs according to their importance is defined which is then used for the straightforward generation of a schedule. A control strategy which comprises organizational, spatial, temporal, and chemical constraints is introduced. The strategy supports the dynamic relaxation of conflicting constraints in order to improve tentative schedules.

  9. Ion relaxation processes in the heliospheric interface: how perturbed are ion distribution functions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashei, I. V.; Fahr, H. J.

    Charge-exchange processes between interstellar H-/O-atoms and protons of the bulk of the interstellar plasma flow downstream of the outer bowshock in the heliospheric interface induce secondary ions leading to non-relaxated velocity distribution functions. The relaxation of these freshly induced ions towards an equilibrium distribution occurs due to Coulomb interactions and wave-particle interactions with the background turbulence. Since Coulomb interactions are of low relevance, we study here in detail the effect of wave-particle interactions. To find the turbulence levels in the interface we consider the MHD-wave transformation at the outer shock surface between the interface and the local interstellar plasma. The turbulence in the outer interface region is shown to be dominated by incompressible Alfvén waves both for cases of quasiparallel and quasiperpendicular shocks. Also we show that waves propagating towards the shock are more intensive than those propagating away from it. The level of Alfvén turbulence in the interface is estimated using the recent data on local interstellar turbulence deduced from observations of interstellar scintillations of distant radiosources. Two proton relaxation processes are considered: quasilinear resonant interactions with Alfvén waves and non-linear self-induced wave-particle scattering. The corresponding diffusion coefficients are estimated, and typical time periods for protons and oxygen ions relaxation are shown to be of the same order of magnitude as H-/O-atoms passage time over the extent of the interface. This indicates that perturbed ion distribution functions must be expected there.

  10. Relaxation in crystal plasticity with three active slip systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Dolzmann, Georg

    2016-09-01

    We study a variational model for finite crystal plasticity in the limit of rigid elasticity. We focus on the case of three distinct slip systems whose slip directions lie in one plane and are rotated by 120° with respect to each other, with linear self-hardening and infinite latent hardening, in the sense that each material point has to deform in single slip. Under these conditions, plastic deformation is accompanied by the formation of fine-scale structures, in which activity along the different slip systems localizes in different areas. The quasiconvex envelope of the energy density, which describes the macroscopic material behavior, is determined in a regime from small up to intermediate strains, and upper and lower bounds are provided for large strains. Finally sufficient conditions are given under which the lamination convex envelope of an extended-valued energy density is an upper bound for its quasiconvex envelope.

  11. Unusual eigenvalue spectrum and relaxation in the Lévy-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Deepika; Sebastian, K L

    2014-10-01

    We consider the rates of relaxation of a particle in a harmonic well, subject to Lévy noise characterized by its Lévy index μ. Using the propagator for this Lévy-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (LOUP), we show that the eigenvalue spectrum of the associated Fokker-Planck operator has the form (n+mμ)ν where ν is the force constant characterizing the well, and n,m∈N. If μ is irrational, the eigenvalues are all nondegenerate, but rational μ can lead to degeneracy. The maximum degeneracy is shown to be 2. The left eigenfunctions of the fractional Fokker-Planck operator are very simple while the right eigenfunctions may be obtained from the lowest eigenfunction by a combination of two different step-up operators. Further, we find that the acceptable eigenfunctions should have the asymptotic behavior |x|(-n1-n2μ) as |x|→∞, with n1 and n2 being positive integers, though this condition alone is not enough to identify them uniquely. We also assert that the rates of relaxation of LOUP are determined by the eigenvalues of the associated fractional Fokker-Planck operator and do not depend on the initial state if the moments of the initial distribution are all finite. If the initial distribution has fat tails, for which the higher moments diverge, one can have nonspectral relaxation, as pointed out by et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 150602 (2013)]. PMID:25375420

  12. Iron GH2036 alloy residual stress thermal relaxation behavior in laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Zhou, W. F.; Xu, S. D.; Yuan, S. Q.; Ren, N. F.; Wang, Y.; Zhan, Q. B.

    2015-11-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) has a significant effect on the fatigue performance of Iron GH2036 alloy by inducing a deep compressive residual stress field. The effects of isothermal annealing treatments on Iron GH2036 alloy compressive residual stress after laser shock processing at various temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 650 °C were studied comprehensively using experimental and simulation methods. The thermal stability of compressive residual stress induced by LSP was investigated. The residual stress distributions of original and processed specimens were measured by the X-ray diffraction method. The results showed that the experimental measurements were well consistent with the simulation data. Residual stress of laser shock processing Iron GH2036 alloy had released but not completely released at the selected temperatures and during the initial exposure period (less than 30 min); the thermal relaxation magnitude was large and increased with the rise of applied temperature. We infer that the main mechanism of thermal relaxation is the mechanism involving rearrangement and annihilation of dislocation.

  13. Study of dielectric relaxation process in nanocomposite of Li{sub 2}O−SiO{sub 2} nanoglass-CuO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dhriti Ranjan Chakravorty, Dipankar

    2014-04-24

    Dielectric behaviour of a nanocomposite consisting of 23Li{sub 2}O⋅77SiO{sub 2} nanoglass within the pores of compacted CuO nanoparticles was studied. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity of the material were measured over the temperature range 313 to 363 K. The results indicated a relaxation behaviour. The data were explained by a space charge polarization model developed in the case of a laminar conductor. The activation energy of the relaxation process was in close agreement with that of lithium ion conduction in the nanoglass.

  14. Understanding surface limiting processes occurring during the relaxation of steps on vicinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Ajmi BH; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2008-09-01

    In our recently constructed Fokker-Planck formalism for describing the equilibration of the terrace-width distribution of a vicinal surface from an arbitrary initial configuration, the meaning of the relaxation time, related to the strength of the random noise in the underlying Langevin equation, was rather unclear. Using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations we show that the time constant exhibits activated behavior with a barrier that has a physically plausible dependence on the energies of the governing atomistic model. Thus, the Fokker-Planck time has some physical meaning.

  15. Overlapping post-seismic deformation processes: afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation following the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku (Japan) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Faqi; Xiong, Xiong; Wang, Rongjiang; Zheng, Yong; Walter, Thomas R.; Weng, Huihui; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Large tectonic earthquakes lead to significant deformations in the months and years thereafter. These so-called post-seismic deformations include contributions mainly from afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation, quantification of their relative influence is of importance for understanding the evolution of post-seismic crustal stress, strain and aftershocks. Here, we investigate the post-seismic deformation processes following the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake using surface displacement data as observed by the onshore global positioning system network in the first ˜1.5 yr following the main shock. We explore two different inversion modelling strategies: (i) we simulate pure afterslip and (ii) we simulate the combined effect of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. By assuming that the afterslip is solely responsible for the observed post-seismic deformation, we find most afterslip activities to be located close to the downdip area of the coseismic rupture at 20-80 km depth with a maximum cumulative slip of ˜3.8 m and a seismic moment of 2.3 × 1022 Nm, equivalent in moment to an Mw 8.84 earthquake. By assuming a combination of afterslip and viscoelastic components, the best data fit is found for an afterslip portion that is spatially consistent with the pure afterslip model, but reveals a decreased seismic moment of 2.1 × 1022 Nm, or Mw 8.82. In addition, the combined model suggests an effective thickness of the elastic crust of ˜50 km overlying an asthenosphere with a Maxwell viscosity of 2 × 1019 Pa s. Temporal analysis of our model inversions suggests that the rate of afterslip rapidly decreases with time, consistent with the state- and rate-strengthening frictional law. The spatial pattern of afterslip coincides with the locations of aftershocks, and also with the area of coseismically increased Coulomb failure stress (CFS). Only a small part of the coseismically increased CFS was released by the afterslip in 564 d after the event. The effect of the

  16. Fim study on the relaxation and crystallization processes of a Cu-Zr amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, Lu; Lu, Hua; D, S. Tang; Tang, Disheng; Y, Y. Xiong; Xiong, Yanyun

    1987-09-01

    The relaxation of the Cu-50at.%Zr amorphous alloy was revealed by FIM as a process of formation of clusters consisting of 2, 3, or 4 atoms, which afterwards migrate towards some definite centers, predominantly the quenched-in "embryos", to construct ordered structure. This dynamic picture, so far as we know, is observed for the first time. Crystallized regions were determined by atom-probe analysis as Cu10Zr7 phase, and the coexisting phase CuZr2 was not revealed simultaneously.

  17. Isolated many-body quantum systems far from equilibrium: Relaxation process and thermalization

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Herrera, E. J.; Santos, Lea F.

    2014-10-15

    We present an overview of our recent numerical and analytical results on the dynamics of isolated interacting quantum systems that are taken far from equilibrium by an abrupt perturbation. The studies are carried out on one-dimensional systems of spins-1/2, which are paradigmatic models of many-body quantum systems. Our results show the role of the interplay between the initial state and the post-perturbation Hamiltonian in the relaxation process, the size of the fluctuations after equilibration, and the viability of thermalization.

  18. Ultrafast charge carrier relaxation and charge transfer processes in CdS/CdTe thin films.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Bill; Dharmadasa, Ruvini; Dharmadasa, I M; Druffel, Thad; Liu, Jinjun

    2015-07-14

    Ultrafast transient absorption pump-probe spectroscopy (TAPPS) has been employed to investigate charge carrier relaxation in cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) nanoparticle (NP)-based thin films and electron transfer (ET) processes between CdTe and CdS. Effects of post-growth annealing treatments to ET processes have been investigated by carrying out TAPPS experiments on three CdS/CdTe samples: as deposited, heat treated, and CdCl2 treated. Clear evidence of ET process in the treated thin films has been observed by comparing transient absorption (TA) spectra of CdS/CdTe thin films to those of CdS and CdTe. Quantitative comparison between ultrafast kinetics at different probe wavelengths unravels the ET processes and enables determination of its rate constants. Implication of the photoinduced dynamics to photovoltaic devices is discussed. PMID:26033446

  19. Relaxation process of quantum system: Stochastic Liouville equation and initial correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Masashi; Kitajima, Sachiko; Shibata, Fumiaki

    2010-08-15

    Time evolution of a quantum system which is influenced by a stochastically fluctuating environment is studied by means of the stochastic Liouville equation. The two different types of the stochastic Liouville equation and their relation are discussed. The stochastic Liouville equation is shown to be derived from the quantum master equation of the Lindblad under certain conditions. Relaxation processes of single and bipartite quantum systems which are initially correlated with a stochastic environment are investigated. It is shown the possibility that the stochastic fluctuation can create coherence and entanglement of a quantum system with the assistance of the initial correlation. The results are examined in the pure dephasing processes of qubits, which are caused by the nonstationary Gauss-Markov process and two-state jump Markov process.

  20. Dynamical fingerprints for probing individual relaxation processes in biomolecular dynamics with simulations and kinetic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Noe, F; Diadone, Isabella; Lollmann, Marc; Sauer, Marcus; Chondera, John D; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    There is a gap between kinetic experiment and simulation in their views of the dynamics of complex biomolecular systems. Whereas experiments typically reveal only a few readily discernible exponential relaxations, simulations often indicate complex multistate behavior. Here, a theoretical framework is presented that reconciles these two approaches. The central concept is dynamical fingerprints which contain peaks at the time scales of the dynamical processes involved with amplitudes determined by the experimental observable. Fingerprints can be generated from both experimental and simulation data, and their comparison by matching peaks permits assignment of structural changes present in the simulation to experimentally observed relaxation processes. The approach is applied here to a test case interpreting single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments on a set of fluorescent peptides with molecular dynamics simulations. The peptides exhibit complex kinetics shown to be consistent with the apparent simplicity of the experimental data. Moreover, the fingerprint approach can be used to design new experiments with site-specific labels that optimally probe specific dynamical processes in the molecule under investigation.

  1. Energy-transfer and exciton-state relaxation processes in allophycocyanin

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, W.F.; Sauer, K.

    1992-05-28

    The authors have employed picosecond spectroscopic techniques to characterize the photophysics of the phycocyanobilin chromophores in linker-free allophycocyanin isolated from the cyanobactrium Synechococcus PCC 6301 (AN112 mutant). In analogy with the known structure of the related phycobiliprotein C-phycocyanin, allophycocyanin is probably organized as a ringlike homotrimer; the monomeric units are composed of an {alpha} and a {beta} subunit, each of which binds a phycocyanobilin chromophore via a thioether linkage to a cysteine residue at amino acid position 84. The authors observe bidirectional excitation transfer in the {alpha}{beta} monomer between the {alpha}84 and {beta}84 chromophores with a 140-ps time constant. The authors assign an ultrafast (<2-ps time constant) anisotropy and photobleaching transient observed only in ({alpha}{beta}){sub 3} trimers to an interexciton level transition; the transient occurs with a polarization change that is consistent with a transition between the orthogonal upper and lower exciton states. The upper exciton state also relaxes directly to the ground state through a decay process with a 45-ps time constant. They attribute the heterogeneous relaxation of the upper exciton state through these two paths to an inhomogeneous broadening due to site heterogeneity, which was previously observed in C-phycocyanin in hole-burning experiments at low temperature. Excitation transfer among the degenerate lower exciton states is detected in terms of a 70-ps anisotropy decay observed in the photobleaching and stimulated emission. The interexcition level transition rapidly concentrates excitation in the lower exciton state of allophycocyanin ({alpha}{beta}){sub 3} trimers; this kind of spectral relaxation process may be important in facilitating directional excitation transfer in reaction center/light-harvesting protein assemblies. 47 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    SciTech Connect

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  3. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-01

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  4. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    DOE PAGES

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion pathsmore » and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.« less

  5. Structural aspects of the relaxation process in spin crossover solids: Phase separation, mapping of lattice strain, and domain wall structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolazzi, W.; Pillet, S.

    2012-03-01

    We present a nonequilibrium study of the relaxation process in spin crossover solids using numerical simulations of a recently introduced two-variable elastic Ising-like model. We analyze the structural lattice distortions accompanying the relaxation from the metastable high-spin to the ground low-spin state as a function of cooperativity. In the highly cooperative case, a sigmoidal relaxation behavior of the high-spin fraction nHS is described, and it occurs jointly with a structural phase separation process. The mean lattice spacing follows a similar sigmoidal trend, owing to the interplay between electronic and lattice variables in the Hamiltonian. Weakly cooperative systems are characterized by single exponential relaxations of the high-spin fraction, the corresponding structural transformation proceeds homogeneously with a progressive relaxation of the mean lattice spacing. Long relaxation tail effects are also observed. We highlight the development of lattice strain accompanying the spin transition, and show that structural phase rebuilding proceeds in the late stage of the relaxation by releasing residual strain. Under specific conditions, a temporal decoupling between the electronic and lattice variables is observed, which may have direct applications for interpreting time-resolved spectroscopic or diffraction experiments and for elucidating unusual structural behaviors, such as the development of superstructures, modulated structures, or transient phases.

  6. Elastically Cooperative Activated Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Liquids. I. General Formulation and Application to Hard Sphere Fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  7. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. I. General formulation and application to hard sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-05-01

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  8. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. I. General formulation and application to hard sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2014-05-21

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time. PMID:24852549

  9. Intra-well relaxation process in magnetic fluids subjected to strong polarising fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, C. N.; Fannin, P. C.; Mălăescu, I.; Barvinschi, P.; Ercuţa, A.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the frequency and field dependent complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of a kerosene-based magnetic fluid with iron oxide nanoparticles, stabilized with oleic acid, in the frequency range 0.1-6 GHz and over the polarising field range of 0-168.4 kA/m. By increasing polarising field, H, a subsidiary loss-peak clearly occurs in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic resonance peak, from which it remains distinct even in strong polarising fields of 168.4 kA/m. This is in contrast to other reported cases in which the intra-well relaxation process is manifested only as a shoulder of the resonance peak, which vanishes in polarising fields larger than that of 100 kA/m. The results of the XRD analysis connected to the anisotropy field results confirm that the investigated sample contains particles of magnetite and of the tetragonal phase of maghemite. Taking into account the characteristics of our sample, the theoretical analysis revealed that the intra-well relaxation process of the small particles of the tetragonal phase of maghemite may be responsible for the subsidiary loss peak of the investigated magnetic fluid.

  10. Estimation of magnetic relaxation property for CVD processed YBCO-coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    Ion Beam Assist Deposition/Chemical Vapor Deposition(IBAD/CVD)-processed YBCO-coated conductors with high critical current density Jc at high magnetic fields are expected to be applied to superconducting equipments such as superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES). For application to superconducting magnet in SMES one of the most important properties for superconductors is the relaxation property of superconducting current. In this paper, the relaxation property is investigated for IBAD/CVD-processed YBCO-coated conductors of the superconducting layer in the range of 0.18-0.90 μm. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential, U0∗. It is found that U0∗ takes a smaller value due to the two-dimensional pinning mechanism at high magnetic fields for conductor with thinner superconducting layer. Although U0∗ decreases with increasing thickness at low magnetic fields at 20 K, it increases at high magnetic fields. The results are theoretically explained by the model of the flux creep and flow based on the dimensionality of flux pinning. Scaling analysis is examined for the dependence of U0∗ on the magnetic field, temperature and the layer thickness.

  11. Combination of distinct conduction and dielectric relaxation processes in LiCoO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. S. K.; Govindaraj, G.

    2016-05-01

    The dielectric loss peaks are rarely seen in highly conducting solids due to conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss of material. LiCoO2 for the temperature range of l48K to 248K show dielectric relaxation at high frequencies with dc conductivity contribution. Conduction and dielectric relaxation of the material is studied with Cole-Cole type combined `pinned dipole' relaxation from hopping charges and `free dipole' relaxation due to host matrix.

  12. Unusual eigenvalue spectrum and relaxation in the Lévy-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janakiraman, Deepika; Sebastian, K. L.

    2014-10-01

    We consider the rates of relaxation of a particle in a harmonic well, subject to Lévy noise characterized by its Lévy index μ. Using the propagator for this Lévy-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (LOUP), we show that the eigenvalue spectrum of the associated Fokker-Planck operator has the form (n+mμ)ν where ν is the force constant characterizing the well, and n ,m∈N. If μ is irrational, the eigenvalues are all nondegenerate, but rational μ can lead to degeneracy. The maximum degeneracy is shown to be 2. The left eigenfunctions of the fractional Fokker-Planck operator are very simple while the right eigenfunctions may be obtained from the lowest eigenfunction by a combination of two different step-up operators. Further, we find that the acceptable eigenfunctions should have the asymptotic behavior |x|-n1-n2μ as |x|→∞, with n1 and n2 being positive integers, though this condition alone is not enough to identify them uniquely. We also assert that the rates of relaxation of LOUP are determined by the eigenvalues of the associated fractional Fokker-Planck operator and do not depend on the initial state if the moments of the initial distribution are all finite. If the initial distribution has fat tails, for which the higher moments diverge, one can have nonspectral relaxation, as pointed out by Toenjes et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 150602 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.150602].

  13. Two-phonon processes of intraband relaxation in the terahertz regime in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Li, Shu-Shen

    2011-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the intraband relaxation of quantum dots in the terahertz regime due to two acoustic phonon scattering by applying a lattice relaxation approach based on the deformation potential coupling between electrons and acoustic phonons. In particular, we find that the relaxation time depends strongly on the ratio of two acoustic phonons. The influences of the energy separation between the ground and first excited state, the quantum dot height, and the lattice temperature on the relaxation time are also discussed. Our theoretical results not only give a reasonable explanation for the current experimental measurement but also provide some insight into two-phonon intraband relaxation in quantum dots.

  14. [Etomidate and suxamethonium. The duration of relaxation and pseudocholinesterase activity. A clinical experimental study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Doenicke, A; Dittmann-Kessler, I; Sramoto, A; Beyer, E

    1980-03-01

    In ten health volunteers general anaesthesia was induced with etomidate (0.3 mg per kg body weight) and continued with NWO/O2 inhalation. Together with etomidate, suxamethonium (1.5 mg per kg body weight) was given simultaneously and the same dose reinjected as soon as the original muscle tone had returned completely. At equal intervals after the first and second injection the pseudocholinesterase was spectrophotometrically measured. No significant alteration of the enzyme activity was detectable at any time. Etomidate therefore does not inhibit the pseudocholinesterase. The two phases of relaxation were registered with the "finger-twitch" method and their duration compared. Etomidate did not prolong the time of relaxation after suxamethonium.

  15. Unified Theory of Activated Relaxation in Liquids over 14 Decades in Time

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a predictive theory at the level of forces of activated relaxation in hard-sphere fluids and thermal liquids that covers in a unified manner the apparent Arrhenius, crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes. The alpha relaxation event involves coupled cage-scale hopping and a long-range collective elastic distortion of the surrounding liquid, which results in two inter-related, but distinct, barriers. The strongly temperature and density dependent collective barrier is associated with a growing length scale, the shear modulus, and density fluctuations. Thermal liquids are mapped to an effective hard-sphere fluid based on matching long wavelength density fluctuation amplitudes, resulting in a zeroth-order quasi-universal description. The theory is devoid of fit parameters, has no divergences at finite temperature nor below jamming, and captures the key features of the alpha time of molecular liquids from picoseconds to hundreds of seconds.

  16. Relaxation Processes in Aqueous Systems upon X-ray Ionization: Entanglement of Electronic and Nuclear Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Slavíček, Petr; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V; Aziz, Emad F; Winter, Bernd

    2016-01-21

    The knowledge of primary processes following the interaction of high-energy radiation with molecules in liquid phase is rather limited. In the present Perspective, we report on a newly discovered type of relaxation process involving simultaneous autoionization and proton transfer between adjacent molecules, so-called proton transfer mediated charge separation (PTM-CS) process. Within PTM-CS, transients with a half-transferred proton are formed within a few femtoseconds after the core-level ionization event. Subsequent nonradiative decay of the highly nonequilibrium transients leads to a series of reactive species, which have not been considered in any high-energy radiation process in water. Nonlocal electronic decay processes are surprisingly accelerated upon proton dynamics. Such strong coupling of electronic and nuclear dynamics is a general phenomenon for hydrogen-bonded systems, however, its probability correlates strongly with hydration geometry. We suggest that the newly observed processes will impact future high-energy radiation-chemistry-relevant modeling, and we envision application of autoionization spectroscopy for identification of solution structure details. PMID:26712083

  17. Unified Theory of Activated Relaxation in Cold Liquids over 14 Decades in Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Kenneth; Mirigian, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    We formulate a predictive theory at the level of forces of activated relaxation in thermal liquids that covers in a unified manner the apparent Arrhenius, crossover and deeply supercooled regimes (J.Phys.Chem.Lett.4,3648(2013)). The alpha relaxation event involves coupled cage-scale hopping and a long range cooperative elastic distortion of the surrounding liquid, which results in two inter-related, but distinct, barriers. The strongly temperature and density dependent collective barrier is associated with a growing length scale, the shear modulus and density fluctuations. Thermal liquids are mapped to an effective hard sphere fluid based on matching long wavelength density fluctuation amplitudes. The theory is devoid of fit parameters, has no divergences at finite temperature nor below jamming, and captures the key features of the alpha relaxation time in molecular liquids from picoseconds to hundreds of seconds. The approach is extended to polymer liquids based on the Kuhn length as the key variable. The influence of chain length and backbone stiffness on the glass transition temperature and fragility have been studied where degree of polymerization enters via corrections to asymptotic conformational statistics.

  18. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 mediate relaxation of guinea pig internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2014-02-10

    Activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 stimulates contraction of the rat but relaxation of the guinea pig colon. The aim of the present study was to investigate PAR effects on internal anal sphincter (IAS) motility. We measured relaxation of isolated muscle strips from the guinea pig IAS caused by PAR agonists using isometric transducers. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the existence of PAR. In the IAS, thrombin and PAR1 peptide agonists TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 evoked moderate to marked relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, trypsin and PAR2 peptide agonists 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 produced relaxation. In contrast, both PAR1 and PAR2 inactive control peptides did not elicit relaxation. Furthermore, the selective PAR1 antagonist vorapaxar and PAR2 antagonist GB 83 specifically inhibited thrombin and trypsin-induced relaxations, respectively. RT-PCR revealed the presence of PAR1 and PAR2 in the IAS. This indicates that PAR1 and PAR2 mediate the IAS relaxation. The relaxant responses of TFLLR-NH2 and trypsin were attenuated by N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), indicating involvement of NO. These responses were not affected by tetrodotoxin, implying that the PAR effects are not neurally mediated. On the other hand, PAR4 agonists GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2 did not cause relaxation or contraction, suggesting that PAR4 is not involved in the sphincter motility. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both PAR1 and PAR2 mediate relaxation of the guinea pig IAS through the NO pathway. PAR1 and PAR2 may regulate IAS tone and might be potential therapeutic targets for anal motility disorders. PMID:24631471

  19. Physiological relaxation induced by horticultural activity: transplanting work using flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite increasing attention and a growing volume of research data, little physiological evidence is available on the benefits of horticultural activity and the different effects on individuals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological effects of horticultural activity and to examine how differences in personality alter these effects. Results The effects of transplanting real flowers (horticultural activity) and handling artificial flowers (control activity) on human physiological activity were compared. On the first day, eight participants engaged in horticultural activity and another eight in the control activity. On the second day, participants switched roles. Participants’ physiological conditions during each activity were assessed by measuring the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV). Psychological responses, which were measured using a semantic differential rating scale, showed that the horticultural activity promoted comfortable, soothed, and natural feelings, compared to the control activity. Analysis of physiological responses using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that sympathetic nervous activity significantly decreased in the late time period (11 to 15 minutes) of horticultural activity only in the type A group. Conclusions This study supports the fact that the horticultural activity can enhance psychological and physiological relaxation effects, although these physiological effects can differ among individuals with different personalities. PMID:24112302

  20. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 but not PAR4 mediate relaxations in lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2007-07-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), PAR2 and PAR4 activation can alter the gastrointestinal motility. To investigate effects mediated by PARs in the lower esophageal sphincter, we measured contraction or relaxation of transverse strips from the guinea-pig lower esophageal sphincter caused by PAR1 (TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2), PAR2 (SLIGKV-NH2 and SLIGRL-NH2) and PAR4 peptide agonists (GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2) as well as PAR protease activators (thrombin and trypsin). In resting lower esophageal sphincter strips, TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 caused moderate concentration-dependent relaxation whereas thrombin did not cause any relaxation or contraction. Furthermore, in carbachol-contracted strips, TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 caused marked whereas thrombin caused mild concentration-dependent relaxation. These indicate the existence of PAR1 mediating relaxation. Similarly, in resting lower esophageal sphincter strips, trypsin caused moderate concentration-dependent relaxation whereas SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 did not cause any relaxation or contraction. In addition, in carbachol-contracted strips, trypsin caused marked whereas SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 caused mild concentration-dependent relaxation. These indicate the existence of PAR2 mediating relaxation. The relaxant response of thrombin, TFLLR-NH2, trypsin and SLIGKV-NH2 was insensitive to atropine or tetrodotoxin, suggesting a direct effect. The relaxant response of trypsin was not affected by apamin, charybdotoxin, indomethacin and capsaicin but was attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indicating involvement of NO. FSLLR-NH2, a PAR1 control peptide, and VKGILS-NH2, a PAR2 control peptide, as well as all three PAR4 peptide agonists, GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2, did not cause any relaxation or contraction. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PAR1 and PAR2 but not PAR4 mediate relaxations in the guinea-pig lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:17335921

  1. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  2. Changes in cortisol level in saliva following relaxation-activation autoregulative intervention.

    PubMed

    Machac, M; Machacová, H; Stárka, L; Hampl, R

    1987-09-01

    The relaxation-activation autoregulative method (RAM) is a psychoregulative procedure characterized by typical autonomic patterns of relaxation and activation phases (blood pressure, electric skin resistance, heart beat, EEG, etc.). They are used as feedback information in the training of autoregulative abilities. RAM has a multidimensional (non-specific) tuning effect which is manifested by changes in the psychophysiological state (emotional tuning, physiological functioning and performance). It has a therapeutical effect on disorders with a psychic pathogenic component, e.g., essential hypertension. The increased production of adrenaline following the application of RAM was found in previous experiments.--The present experiment with a sample of six persons well mastering RAM has shown that the cortisol level following this psychoregulative intervention also rises significantly and that this rise has been recorded over three days, i.e., over the whole period of saliva sampling. It may be said that RAM has a non-specific, ergotropic (activating) subsequent effect and that this effect has the character of stress, more accurately eustress. Autogenic training, on the other hand, reduces the cortisol level.

  3. Temperature Dependence of the Collisional Deactivation Processes in Excited O2: A Probe to the Relaxation Pathways and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, E. R.; Amaral, G. A.; Cone, K. V.; Spangler, E. L.; Kalogerakis, K. S.; Copeland, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    Emission from electronically excited O2 is an important component of the nightglow of the Earth and Venus. Since these emissions occur at altitudes where the temperature is significantly below room temperature, understanding the temperature dependence of collisional removal is crucial to modeling the emission. Recent results have shown an unexpectedly large variation in the removal rates for nearby vibrational levels in the a 1Δg, b 1Σ g^+, and c 1Σ u^- states. As an example, the b 1Σ g^+ (ν = 13) removal rate constant for collisions with O2 at 150 K is 4 to 60 times larger than that of the neighboring ν = 14 and 12 levels, respectively. Such a large discrepancy can be caused by the presence of a resonant energy transfer pathway. A difference in behavior is also seen in how the magnitude of the rate constant varies with temperature. Knowledge of this behavior helps us to achieve a better understanding of the relaxation pathways and the relevant kinetic parameters in the collisional deactivation of the highly excited levels. The removal rates for the b 1Σ g^+ state ν = 14 and 15 levels by collisions with O2 were measured to be 2--4 x 10-12 cm3s-1 and found to be almost independent of temperature over the entire atmospheric range (150--300 K), which points to a deactivation process with little or no energetic barrier. However, the rates for ν = 11 and 12 at 150 K are an order of magnitude slower than those for ν = 13--15. We find that the ν = 12 rate increases by a factor of 5 going from 150 to 240 K, indicative of a relaxation process with an activation barrier of about 350 +/- 120 cm-1. For the c 1Σ u^- state at 155 K, the collisional removal rate constants in O2 are (2.6 +/- 0.3) x 10-11 and (7 +/- 3) x 10-11 cm3s-1 for ν = 10 and 11, respectively. As the temperature is varied between 150 and 300 K, little or no change is observed in the magnitude of these rate constants. In contrast, the rate for ν = 9 increases by more than a factor of 3 in the

  4. Predicting the activation states of the muscles governing upper esophageal sphincter relaxation and opening.

    PubMed

    Omari, Taher I; Jones, Corinne A; Hammer, Michael J; Cock, Charles; Dinning, Philip; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Costa, Marcello; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2016-03-15

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation and deactivation of neural inputs to these muscles, including the intrinsic cricopharyngeus (CP) and extrinsic submental (SM) muscles, results in their mechanical activation or deactivation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure, and ultimately reduces or promotes flow of content. By measuring the changes in diameter, using intraluminal impedance, and the concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure, it is possible to determine when the muscles are passively or actively relaxing or contracting. From these "mechanical states" of the muscle, the neural inputs driving the specific motor behaviors of the UES can be inferred. In this study we compared predictions of UES mechanical states directly with the activity measured by electromyography (EMG). In eight subjects, pharyngeal pressure and impedance were recorded in parallel with CP- and SM-EMG activity. UES pressure and impedance swallow profiles correlated with the CP-EMG and SM-EMG recordings, respectively. Eight UES muscle states were determined by using the gradient of pressure and impedance with respect to time. Guided by the level and gradient change of EMG activity, mechanical states successfully predicted the activity of the CP muscle and SM muscle independently. Mechanical state predictions revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. Derivation of "activation state" maps may allow better physiological and pathophysiological interpretations of UES function.

  5. Elastically Cooperative Activated Barrier Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Fluids. II. Thermal Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in Paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singularities above zero Kelvin, and relaxation in the equilibrium low temperature limit is predicted to be of a roughly Arrhenius form. The two-barrier (local cage and long range collective elastic) description results in a rich dynamic behavior including apparent Arrhenius, narrow crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes, and multiple characteristic or crossover times and temperatures of clear physical meaning. Application of the theory to nonpolar molecules, alcohols, rare gases, and liquids metals is carried out. Overall, the agreement with experiment is quite good for the temperature dependence of the alpha time, plateau shear modulus, and Boson-like peak frequency for van der Waals liquids, though less so for hydrogen-bonding molecules. The theory predicts multiple growing length scales upon cooling, which reflect distinct aspects of the coupled local hopping and cooperative elastic physics. Calculations of the growth with cooling of an activation volume, which is strongly correlated with a measure of dynamic cooperativity, agree quantitatively with experiment. Comparisons with elastic, entropy crisis, dynamic facilitation, and other approaches are performed, and a fundamental basis for empirically extracted crossover temperatures is established. The present work sets the stage for addressing distinctive glassy phenomena in polymer melts, and diverse liquids under strong confinement.

  6. Ionization yield and absorption spectra reveal superexcited Rydberg state relaxation processes in H2O and D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion, J.-H.; Dulieu, F.; Baouche, S.; Lemaire, J.-L.; Jochims, H. W.; Leach, S.

    2003-07-01

    The absorption cross section and the ionization quantum yield of H2O have been measured using a synchrotron radiation source between 9 and 22 eV. Comparison between the two curves highlights competition between relaxation processes for Rydberg states converging to the first tilde A 2A 1 and to the second tilde B 2B 2 excited states of H2O+. Comparison with D2O absorption and ionization yields, derived from Katayama et al (1973 J. Chem. Phys. 59 4309), reveals specific energy-dependent deuteration effects on competitive predissociation and autoionization relaxation channels. Direct ionization was found to be only slightly affected by deuteration.

  7. The slow relaxation dynamics in active pharmaceutical ingredients studied by DSC and TSDC: Voriconazole, miconazole and itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Joaquim J Moura; Diogo, Hermínio P

    2016-03-30

    The slow molecular mobility of three active pharmaceutical drugs (voriconazole, miconazole and itraconazole) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC). This study yielded the main kinetic features of the secondary relaxations and of the main (glass transition) relaxation, in particular their distribution of relaxation times. The dynamic fragility of the three glass formers was determined from DSC data (using two different procedures) and from TSDC data. According to our results voriconazole behaves as a relatively strong liquid, while miconazole is moderately fragile and itraconazole is a very fragile liquid. There are no studies in this area published in the literature relating to voriconazole. Also not available in the literature is a slow mobility study by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the amorphous miconazole. Apart from that, the results obtained are in reasonable agreement with published works using different experimental techniques.

  8. Relationship between relaxation processes of light scattering in network of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Soheil

    2015-02-01

    This work presents a study of the association behavior of different length scale of tri-block polymers in aqueous solution, in the presence of oil in water microemulsion nano-droplets. We have investigated various types of multiply bridging tri-block polymers and their effect on the structure and dynamics of droplets. A detailed structural form was obtained by X-ray scattering measurements, especially with respect to the effects on the droplet sizes and even more on the interactions in the microemulsion systems induced by the bridging tri-block polymer. The results show that the size of droplets is little affected by the addition of the polymer while the interactions are modified by the presence of the polymer. The dynamic response of the systems becomes much more complex with increasing number of arms and slow relaxation processes become very pronounced due to a much more efficient network formation. The distance between diffusion coefficient of slow and fast motion of droplets is increasing with increase of length scale of bridging tri-block polymer.

  9. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in {approximately}240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a {approximately}350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  10. Superconducting layer thickness dependence of magnetic relaxation property in CVD processed YGdBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2011-11-01

    One of the most important properties of coated conductors for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is the relaxation property of persistent superconducting current. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential U0∗. In this paper, the dependence of U0∗ on the thickness of superconducting layer d is investigated in the range of 0.33-1.43 μm at the temperature range of 20-30 K and in magnetic fields up to 6.5 T for Y 0.7Gd 0.3Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ coated conductors. It was found that the value of critical current density did not appreciably depend on d at 20 K. This indicates that no structural deterioration of superconducting layer occurs during the process of increasing thickness. U0∗ increases and then tends to decrease with an increasing magnetic field. The magnetic field at which U0∗ starts to decrease increases with increasing thickness. This property was analyzed using the flux creep-flow model. Application of scaling law is examined for the dependence of U0∗ on magnetic field and temperature. It was found that the dependence could be expressed using scaling parameters B,U0 peak∗ in the temperature range 20-30 K.

  11. A review of the slow relaxation processes in the glass-rubber transition region of amorphous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; He, Xianru; Huang, Guangsu

    2015-09-01

    This article is a review that introduces several articles about slow relaxation processes, also known as slower segmental dynamics. According to the literature, the coupling effect and free volume holes are two important elements for slower micro-dynamics. In addition, the slower processes of many-body systems (blend and diluted systems) are summarised. A good numerical method for detecting multiple modes in the glass-rubber transition region is introduced.

  12. Antioxidant and relaxant activity of fractions of crude methanol extract and essential oil of Artemisia macrocephala jacquem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current work is an attempt to know about additional chemical profile of Artemisia macrocephala. Antioxidant activity is performed as the plant is reported to contain flavonoids, which have antioxidant activity in general. Relaxant activity of fractions of crude methanol extract is performed to know in which fraction(s) the relaxant constituents concentrate as we have already reported that its crude methanol has relaxant activity. Antispasmodic activity of essential oil is also performed as the plant is rich with essential oil. Methods Phytochemical profile of the plant is performed. Free radical scavenging activity was performed using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Relaxation activity tests of fractions and essential oil of Artemisia macrocephala were performed on sections of rabbits’ jejunum. Calcium chloride curves were constructed to investigate the mode of action of plant extracts and its essential oil. Results We detected carbohydrates, flavonoids and saponins in A. macrocephala. At concentration 0.005 mg/ml, free radical scavenging activity of ethyl acetate fraction was 121.5 ± 2.02% of ascorbic acid. n- hexane fraction relaxed spontaneous activity with EC50 0.74 ± 0.04 mg/ml. Essential oil relaxed spontaneous activity with EC50 0.8 ± 0.034 mg/ml. Chloroform and ethylacetate fractions relaxed both spontaneous and KCl-induced contractions suggesting its possible mode through calcium channels. Constructing calcium chloride curves, the test fractions showed a right shift in the EC50. Essential oil at concentration 0.1 mg/ml produced right shift with EC50 (log [Ca++]M) -2.08 ± 0.08 vs. control with EC50 -2.47 ± 0.07. The curve resembled the curves of verapamil, which caused a right shift at 0.1 μM, with EC50 -1.7 ±0.07 vs. control EC50 (log [Ca++]M) -2.45 ± 0.06. Conclusions Crude methanol and its fractions (ethyl acetate, chloroform and butanol) are rich sources of antioxidant constituents. The relaxing constituents following

  13. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    PubMed

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  14. Hydrogels with tunable stress relaxation regulate stem cell fate and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Klumpers, Darinka; Darnell, Max; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lee, Hong-Pyo; Lippens, Evi; Duda, Georg N.; Mooney, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Natural extracellular matrices (ECMs) are viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation. However, hydrogels used as synthetic ECMs for three-dimensional (3D) culture are typically elastic. Here, we report a materials approach to tune the rate of stress relaxation of hydrogels for 3D culture, independently of the hydrogel's initial elastic modulus, degradation, and cell-adhesion-ligand density. We find that cell spreading, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all enhanced in cells cultured in gels with faster relaxation. Strikingly, MSCs form a mineralized, collagen-1-rich matrix similar to bone in rapidly relaxing hydrogels with an initial elastic modulus of 17 kPa. We also show that the effects of stress relaxation are mediated by adhesion-ligand binding, actomyosin contractility and mechanical clustering of adhesion ligands. Our findings highlight stress relaxation as a key characteristic of cell-ECM interactions and as an important design parameter of biomaterials for cell culture.

  15. Hydrogels with tunable stress relaxation regulate stem cell fate and activity

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Klumpers, Darinka; Darnell, Max; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lee, Hong-pyo; Lippens, Evi; Duda, Georg N.; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Natural extracellular matrices (ECMs) are viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation. However, hydrogels used as synthetic ECMs for three-dimensional (3D) culture are typically elastic. Here, we report a materials approach to tune the rate of stress relaxation of hydrogels for 3D culture, independently of the hydrogel’s initial elastic modulus, cell-adhesion-ligand density and degradation. We find that cell spreading, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all enhanced in cells cultured in gels with faster relaxation. Strikingly, MSCs form a mineralized, collagen-1-rich matrix similar to bone in rapidly relaxing hydrogels with an initial elastic modulus of 17 kPa. We also show that the effects of stress relaxation are mediated by adhesion-ligand binding, actomyosin contractility and mechanical clustering of adhesion ligands. Our findings highlight stress relaxation as a key characteristic of cell-ECM interactions and as an important design parameter of biomaterials for cell culture. PMID:26618884

  16. Ultrafast dynamics of liquid water: Energy relaxation and transfer processes of the OH stretch and the HOH bend

    SciTech Connect

    Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

    2015-08-27

    The vibrational energy relaxation and transfer processes of the OH stretching and the HOH bending vibrations in liquid water are investigated via the theoretical calculation of the pump-probe spectra obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with the TTM3-F interaction potential. The excitation of the OH stretch induces an instantaneous response of the high frequency librational motions in the 600-1000 cm-1 range. In addition, the excess energy of the OH stretch of a water molecule quickly transfers to the OH stretches of molecules in its first hydration shell with a time constant of ~50 fs, followed by relaxation to the HOH bends of the surrounding molecules with a time constant of 230 fs. The excitation of the HOH bend also results in the ultrafast excitation of the high frequency librational motions. The energy of the excited HOH bend of a water molecule decays, with a time constant of 200 fs, mainly to the relaxation of the HOH bends of its surrounding molecules. The energies of the HOH bends were found to transfer quickly to the intermolecular motions via the coupling with the high frequency librational motions. The excess energy of the OH stretch or the HOH bend relaxes to the high frequency intermolecular librational motions and eventually to the hot ground state with a time scale of ~1 ps via the coupling with the librational and translational motions. The energy relaxation and transfer processes were found to depend on the local hydrogen bonding network; the relaxations of the excess energy of the OH stretch and the HOH bend of four- and five-coordinated molecules are faster than those of a three-coordinated molecule due to the delocalization of the vibrational motions of the former (four- and five-coordinated molecules) compared to those of the later (three-coordinated molecules). The present results highlight the importance of the high frequency intermolecular librational modes in facilitating the ultrafast energy relaxation process in

  17. Femtosecond UV studies of the electronic relaxation processes in Cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Bräm, Olivier; Consani, Cristina; Cannizzo, Andrea; Chergui, Majed

    2011-11-24

    We report on an experimental study with UV and visible ultrafast time-gated emission and transient absorption of the early photodynamics of horse heart Cytochrome c in both ferric and ferrous redox states. A clear separation in time and energy of tryptophan and haem emission is observed. Excitation of the haem via resonant energy transfer from the tryptophan residue is observed in the subsequent haem electronic relaxation. Different Trp-haem energy transfer time constants of the ferrous and ferric forms are obtained. An almost instantaneous relaxation to the lowest singlet excited state (corresponding to the so-called Q band) characterizes the earliest electronic dynamics of the haem, independent of excitation energy, while dark intermediate states govern the ground-state recovery. The information gathered in these two experiments and in the literature allows us to propose a simple scheme for the electronic relaxation leading to ligand dissociation.

  18. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  19. Transport and relaxation processes in supercritical fluids: Technical progress report, October 20, 1988--January 19, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Jonas, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this period our efforts concentrated on two main projects. First, we finished the theoretical interpretation of the experimental data on transport and relaxation properties of naphthalene in supercritical fluids. Second, we investigated the intermolecular interactions in the CH/sub 3/OH-CO/sub 2/ system. 2 tabs.

  20. Will spin-relaxation times in molecular magnets permit quantum information processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, Arzhang

    2007-03-01

    Certain computational tasks can be efficiently implemented using quantum logic, in which the information-carrying elements are permitted to exist in quantum superpositions. To achieve this in practice, a physical system that is suitable for embodying quantum bits (qubits) must be identified. Some proposed scenarios employ electron spins in the solid state, for example phosphorous donors in silicon, quantum dots, heterostructures and endohedral fullerenes, motivated by the long electron-spin relaxation times exhibited by these systems. An alternative electron-spin based proposal exploits the large number of quantum states and the non-degenerate transitions available in high spin molecular magnets. Although these advantages have stimulated vigorous research in molecular magnets, the key question of whether the intrinsic spin relaxation times are long enough has hitherto remained unaddressed. Using X-band pulsed electron spin resonance, we measure the intrinsic spin-lattice (T1) and phase coherence (T2) relaxation times in molecular nanomagnets for the first time. In Cr7M heterometallic wheels, with M = Ni and Mn, phase coherence relaxation is dominated by the coupling of the electron spin to protons within the molecule. In deuterated samples T2 reaches 3 μs at low temperatures, which is several orders of magnitude longer than the duration of spin manipulations, satisfying a prerequisite for the deployment of molecular nanomagnets in quantum information applications.

  1. One phonon relaxation processes in Y 2O 3 : Eu 3+ nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ho-Soon; Feofilov, S. P.; Williams, Diane K.; Milora, Jennifer C.; Tissue, Brian M.; Meltzer, R. S.; Dennis, W. M.

    1999-03-01

    The phonon spectrum for isolated nanoparticles is expected to become discrete with a gap opening up at very low frequencies. In this paper we investigate the effect of the modified phonon spectrum on the relaxation of closely spaced electronic levels. We compare the results for nanoparticles with those for larger (∼μm) size particles with the same crystal structure.

  2. Effect of relaxation processes on fluorescence lifetime and polarization characteristics of rhodamine 6G in glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Levshin, L.V.; Struganova, I.A.; Tolevtaev, B.N.

    1986-11-01

    Some new phenomena which can be attributed to the relaxation kinetics of the distribution halfwidth over the 0-0 frequencies for organic dye solutions have been discovered in the present work. The kinetic and polarization characteristics of flourescence from the viscous dipolar solutions of the dyes exhibiting dynamic inhomogeneous broadening upon excitation near the absorption band center have been studied. The objects of the study are rhodamine 6G solutions in glycerol and ethanol at the concentration 10/sup -//sub 6/ mole/liter. It was concluded that the presence of the dip in the flourescence lifetime and the hump in the fluorescence polarization dependences on emission wavelength in the viscous dipolar solution of rhodamine 6G has been detected. The phenomena have been explained by the formation of the excited-state nonequilibrium distribution of the flourescence centers over the 0-0 transition frequencies upon monochromatic excitation and by the subsequent relaxation of the nonequilibrium distribution into the equilibrium one.

  3. The development of the Be Active & Relax “Vitality in Practice” (VIP) project and design of an RCT to reduce the need for recovery in office employees

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to suggest that multiple work-related health problems are preceded by a higher need for recovery. Physical activity and relaxation are helpful in decreasing the need for recovery. This article aims to describe (1) the development and (2) the design of the evaluation of a daily physical activity and relaxation intervention to reduce the need for recovery in office employees. Methods/Design The study population will consist of employees of a Dutch financial service provider. The intervention was systematically developed, based on parts of the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol. Assessment of employees needs was done by combining results of face-to-face interviews, a questionnaire and focus group interviews. A set of theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected which resulted in an intervention program consisting of Group Motivational Interviewing (GMI) supported by a social media platform, and environmental modifications. The Be Active & Relax program will be evaluated in a modified 2 X 2 factorial design. The environmental modifications will be pre-stratified and GMI will be randomised on department level. The program will be evaluated, using 4 arms: (1) GMI and environmental modifications; (2) environmental modifications; (3) GMI; (4) no intervention (control group). Questionnaire data on the primary outcome (need for recovery) and secondary outcomes (daily physical activity, sedentary behaviour, relaxation/detachment, work- and health-related factors) will be gathered at baseline (T0), at 6 months (T1), and at 12 months (T2) follow-up. In addition, an economic and a process evaluation will be performed. Discussion Reducing the need for recovery is hypothesized to be beneficial for employees, employers and society. It is assumed that there will be a reduction in need for recovery after 6 months and 12 months in the intervention group, compared to the control group. Results are expected in 2013. Trial

  4. Influence of the turbulence on the processes formation and relaxation of periodical artificial irregularities in the lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terina, Galina

    2016-07-01

    The periodic artificial irregularities (PAI) are formed in the standing wave field of powerful radio emission. The study the scattering of probing radio pulses on PAI allowed to create a method diagnostics of the ionospheric plasma parameters - the resonance scattering method (RSM) of radio waves on the periodic artificial irregularities. The different mechanisms of PAI formation in D and E ranges of the lower ionosphere were investigated (G.I. Terina, J.Atm.Terr.Phys., 1996, 58, 645). However the height range 75-90 km where there is turbulent diffusion, remained unstudied. In present paper the study results the processes formation and relaxation of periodic artificial irregularities in this height range are considered. For the analysis the processes of the formation and the relaxation of PAI one can use quasi-hydrodynamic equation for the homogeneous isotropic ionospheric plasma. Under the small disturbances, quasi-neutral plasma and some assumptions can to obtain the differential equations for regular and fluctuation PAI parts, which take account: the ambipolar diffusion, the temperature dependence of the coefficient of electrons recombination, the temperature dependence of the coefficient of the electrons attachment to the neutral molecules and also the turbulent diffusion and caused by it small-scale irregularities of the electron density. The solutions of the inhomogeneous and homogeneous equations present the processes of the formation and relaxation of PAI accordingly. The numerical estimations of obtained solutions showed that the main reasons of PAI formation in considered range of heights are the small-scale irregularities of the electron concentration and the turbulence diffusion. The obtained results qualitatively agree with results of experimental investigations. The experiments were carried out at the heating facilities "Zimenki" and "Sura". The heater transmitter periodically was switched on for several seconds and off for the same duration. The

  5. Muscle relaxing activity of Hyssopus officinalis essential oil on isolated intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Battinelli, Lucia; Daniele, Claudia; Melchioni, Cristiana; Salvatore, Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Gabriela

    2002-03-01

    The muscle relaxing activity of the essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) and some of its main components (isopinocamphone, limonene and beta-pinene) was studied on isolated preparations of guinea-pig and rabbit intestine. The essential oil and isopinocamphone inhibited the acetylcholine- and BaCl2-induced contractions in guinea-pig ileum in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 42.4 microg/ml and 61.9 microg/ml to acetylcholine; 48.3 microg/ml and 70.4 microg/ml to BaCl2) whereas limonene or beta-pinene left tissue contraction unchanged. In guinea-pig ileum H. officinalis essential oil also blocked the contractions induced by CaCl2. In isolated rabbit jejunum the essential oil reduced the amplitude of spontaneous movements and decreased the basal tone; neither haemoglobin, methylene blue, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or propranolol blocked the myorelaxant effect.

  6. Muscle relaxing activity of Hyssopus officinalis essential oil on isolated intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Battinelli, Lucia; Daniele, Claudia; Melchioni, Cristiana; Salvatore, Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Gabriela

    2002-03-01

    The muscle relaxing activity of the essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) and some of its main components (isopinocamphone, limonene and beta-pinene) was studied on isolated preparations of guinea-pig and rabbit intestine. The essential oil and isopinocamphone inhibited the acetylcholine- and BaCl2-induced contractions in guinea-pig ileum in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 42.4 microg/ml and 61.9 microg/ml to acetylcholine; 48.3 microg/ml and 70.4 microg/ml to BaCl2) whereas limonene or beta-pinene left tissue contraction unchanged. In guinea-pig ileum H. officinalis essential oil also blocked the contractions induced by CaCl2. In isolated rabbit jejunum the essential oil reduced the amplitude of spontaneous movements and decreased the basal tone; neither haemoglobin, methylene blue, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or propranolol blocked the myorelaxant effect. PMID:11914956

  7. Half-Sarcomere Dynamics in Myofibrils during Activation and Relaxation Studied by Tracking Fluorescent Markers

    PubMed Central

    Telley, Ivo A.; Denoth, Jachen; Stüssi, Edgar; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Stehle, Robert

    2006-01-01

    To study the dynamics of individual half-sarcomeres in striated muscle contraction, myofibrils prepared from rabbit psoas muscle and left ventricles of guinea pig were immunostained with two conjugated antibody complexes consisting of a primary antibody against either α-actinin or myomesin and a secondary fluorescently labeled Fab-fragment. We simultaneously measured force kinetics and determined the positions of the Z-line and M-band signals by fluorescence video microscopy and sophisticated computer vision (tracking) algorithms. Upon calcium activation, sarcomeres and half-sarcomeres shortened nonuniformly. Shortening occurred first rapidly and exponentially during the force rise and then slowly during the force plateau. In psoas myofibrils, time-resolved displacements of the A-band in sarcomeres were observed, i.e., the two halves of individual sarcomeres behaved nonuniformly. Nonuniformity in length changes between the two halves of sarcomeres was comparable to that between two adjacent half-sarcomeres of neighboring sarcomeres. Sequential lengthening of half-sarcomeres was observed in cardiac myofibrils during the rapid phase of force relaxation. The independent dynamics of the halves in a sarcomere reveals the half-sarcomere as the functional unit rather than the structural unit, the sarcomere. The technique will facilitate the study of filament sliding within individual half-sarcomeres and the mechanics of intersegmental chemomechanical coupling in multisegmental striated muscles. PMID:16239326

  8. Activation of two sites by adenosine receptor agonists to cause relaxation in rat isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, D J; Payne, S L; Hourani, S M O

    1997-01-01

    In this study we have characterized the receptor(s) in the rat mesenteric artery mediating relaxant responses to adenosine and a number of adenosine analogues, N6 -R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA), N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N6-(3-iodo-benzyl)-adenosine-5′-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), by use of the non-selective antagonist 8-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) and the A2A selective ligands 2-[p-(2-carbonylethyl)-phenylethylamino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]-triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]-triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl) phenol (ZM 241385). We have also studied the effects of endothelial removal and uptake inhibition by nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) and the effects of the A3 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine (BWA1433).Adenosine, NECA, CPA and R-PIA all elicited relaxant responses in tissues precontracted with phenylephrine (1 μM) with the following potency order: NECA>R-PIA>adenosine=CPA. However, E/[A] curves to NECA were biphasic. CGS 21680 was inactive at concentrations up to 30 μM and IB-MECA elicited relaxant responses which were resistant to blockade by 8-SPT and BWA1433 (100 μM).Removal of the endothelium produced a small but significant decrease in the asymptote of the high potency phase of E/[A] curves to NECA with no change in p[A]50. E/[A] curves to adenosine were not altered by removal of the endothelium. However, there were small rightward shifts of E/[A] curves to CPA and R-PIA in the absence of endothelium.Inhibition of uptake by NBTI (1 μM) had no effect on E/[A] curves to NECA, CPA or R-PIA, but E/[A] curves to adenosine were significantly left-shifted in the presence of NBTI.8-SPT (10–100 μM) caused significant rightward shifts of the high potency phase of the E/[A] curves to NECA (pA2=5.63±0.26). The second phase of the concentration-response curve to NECA appeared to be resistant to blockade by 8-SPT, as were E

  9. Observation of a novel relaxation process associated with electronic transitions from deep (D) defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J. David; Leen, Thomas M.; Rasmussen, Randall J.

    1992-12-01

    Junction capacitance transient measurements were employed to study the thermal emission of electrons trapped in deep (D) defects in lightly n-doped a-Si:H samples. We conclude that a novel defect relaxation process occurs upon a change of change state of the defect such that an electron's thermal release rate is inversely proportional to its residence time in the defect. Supplemental spin transient measurements indicate that both D-/D0 and D0/D+ transitions must be involved. A good fit to our data is obtained if we assume a non-Markovian process for the D0/D+ transition.

  10. Improving the mechanical properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glass by controlling the activation energy for β-relaxation through plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Nozomu; Todaka, Yoshikazu Umemoto, Minoru; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko

    2014-09-29

    The mechanism of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is widely believed to be based on a shear transformation zone (STZ). This model assumes that a shear-induced atomic rearrangement occurs at local clusters that are a few to hundreds of atoms in size. It was recently postulated that the potential energy barrier for STZ activation, W{sub STZ}, calculated using the cooperative shear model, is equivalent to the activation energy for β-relaxation, E{sub β}. This result suggested that the fundamental process for STZ activation is the mechanically activated β-relaxation. Since the E{sub β} value and the glass transition temperature T{sub g} of BMGs have a linear relation, that is, because E{sub β} ≈ 26RT{sub g}, the composition of the BMG determines the ease with which the STZ can be activated. Enthalpy relaxation experiments revealed that the BMG Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} when deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) has a lower E{sub β} of 101 kJ/mol. The HPT-processed samples accordingly exhibited tensile plastic elongation (0.34%) and marked decreases in their yield strength (330 MPa). These results suggest that mechanically induced structural defects (i.e., the free volume and the anti-free volume) effectively act to reduce W{sub STZ} and increase the number of STZs activated during tensile testing to accommodate the plastic strain without requiring a change in the composition of the BMG. Thus, this study shows quantitatively that mechanically induced structural defects can overcome the compositional limitations of E{sub β} (or W{sub STZ}) and result in improvements in the mechanical properties of the BMG.

  11. Homochiral mononuclear Dy-Schiff base complexes showing field-induced double magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Min; Xu, Zhong-Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Ze-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Chao; Zheng, Li-Min

    2016-01-14

    A pair of enantiopure mononuclear dysprosium/salen-type complexes (Et3NH)[Dy((R,R)/(S,S)-3-NO2salcy)2] (/), where 3-NO2salcyH2 represents N,N'-(1,2-cyclohexanediylethylene)bis(3-nitrosalicylideneiminato), are reported. The enantiomer contains two crystallographically independent dysprosium(iii) ions, each chelated by two enantiopure 3-NO2salcy(2-) ligands forming a [DyN4O4] core. Detailed magnetic studies on compound reveal a field-induced dual magnetic relaxation behavior, originating from single ion anisotropy and intermolecular interactions, respectively. PMID:26621766

  12. Yield-aware mask assignment by positive semidefinite relaxation in triple patterning using cut process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohira, Yukihide; Kodama, Chikaaki; Matsui, Tomomi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nojima, Shigeki; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    LELECUT type triple patterning lithography is one of the most promising techniques in 14 nm logic node and beyond. To prevent yield loss caused by overlay error, LELECUT mask assignment, which is tolerant to overlay error, is desired. We propose a method that obtains a LELECUT assignment that is tolerant to overlay error. The proposed method uses positive semidefinite relaxation and randomized rounding technique. In our method, the cost function that takes the length of boundary of features determined by the cut mask into account is introduced.

  13. Synthesis and pharmacological screening for muscle relaxant, anticonvulsant, and sedative activities of certain organic compounds produced by Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Said, Makarem M; Ahmed, Amany A E; El-Alfy, Abir T

    2004-12-01

    Michael addition of certain nucleophiles on alpha, beta-unsaturated ketones 1 led to the formation of adducts 2-7 as well as the reaction of arylidene derivatives with secondary amines afforded the amino compounds 9 and 11. Also, dialkylmalonates were treated with alpha-cyano cinnamide to afford 13. On the other hand, double Michael cycloaddition of ethylcyanoacetate or tetrachlorophthalic anhydride to the suitable divinylketone were synthesized to produce 15-17. Selected compounds (13 and 6) were screened for muscle relaxant, anticonvulsant, and sedative activities using established pharmacological models. Their activities were compared with that of phenobarbital sodium taken as standard. Compound 6 was the most potent muscle relaxant while compounds 13a and 13c offered the highest anticonvulsant activity. Meanwhile compound 13c showed the highest potentiation of phenobarbital induced sleep in mice. PMID:15646790

  14. Prebiotic activation processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Questions regarding the combination of amino acids and ribonucleotides to polypeptides and polynucleotides are investigated. Each of the reactions considered occurs in the solid state in plausible prebiotic conditions. Together they provide the basis for a unified scheme of amino acid and nucleotide activation. Urea, imidazole and Mg(++) are essential catalytic components of the reaction mixtures. However, these compounds could probably be replaced by other organic molecules.

  15. Activation of endothelial and epithelial KCa2.3 calcium-activated potassium channels by NS309 relaxes human small pulmonary arteries and bronchioles

    PubMed Central

    Kroigaard, Christel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Gorm; Laursen, Britt E; Pilegaard, Hans; Köhler, Ralf; Simonsen, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Small (KCa2) and intermediate (KCa3.1) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) may contribute to both epithelium- and endothelium-dependent relaxations, but this has not been established in human pulmonary arteries and bronchioles. Therefore, we investigated the expression of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels, and hypothesized that activation of these channels would produce relaxation of human bronchioles and pulmonary arteries. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Channel expression and functional studies were conducted in human isolated small pulmonary arteries and bronchioles. KCa2 and KCa3.1 currents were examined in human small airways epithelial (HSAEpi) cells by whole-cell patch clamp techniques. RESULTS While KCa2.3 expression was similar, KCa3.1 protein was more highly expressed in pulmonary arteries than bronchioles. Immunoreactive KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 proteins were found in both endothelium and epithelium. KCa currents were present in HSAEpi cells and sensitive to the KCa2.3 blocker UCL1684 and the KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34. In pulmonary arteries contracted by U46619 and in bronchioles contracted by histamine, the KCa2.3/ KCa3.1 activator, NS309, induced concentration-dependent relaxations. NS309 was equally potent in relaxing pulmonary arteries, but less potent in bronchioles, than salbutamol. NS309 relaxations were blocked by the KCa2 channel blocker apamin, while the KCa3.1 channel blocker, charybdotoxin failed to reduce relaxation to NS309 (0.01–1 µM). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels are expressed in the endothelium of human pulmonary arteries and epithelium of bronchioles. KCa2.3 channels contributed to endo- and epithelium-dependent relaxations suggesting that these channels are potential targets for treatment of pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:22506557

  16. Activating and Relaxing Music Entrains the Speed of Beat Synchronized Walking

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is ‘activating’ in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is ‘relaxing’ in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation. PMID:23874469

  17. EEG-based time and spatial interpretation of activation areas for relaxation and words writing between poor and capable dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, N B; Lee, Khuan Y; Mansor, W; Mahmoodin, Z; Fadzal, C W N F C W; Amirin, S

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of dyslexia such as difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition, and/or poor spelling as well as decoding abilities, are easily misinterpreted as laziness and defiance amongst school children. Indeed, 37.9% of 699 school dropouts and failures are diagnosed as dyslexic. Currently, Screening for dyslexia relies heavily on therapists, whom are few and subjective, yet objective methods are still unavailable. EEG has long been a popular method to study the cognitive processes in human such as language processing and motor activity. However, its interpretation is limited to time and frequency domain, without visual information, which is still useful. Here, our research intends to illustrate an EEG-based time and spatial interpretation of activated brain areas for the poor and capable dyslexic during the state of relaxation and words writing, being the first attempt ever reported. From the 2D distribution of EEG spectral at the activation areas and its progress with time, it is observed that capable dyslexics are able to relax compared to poor dyslexics. During the state of words writing, neural activities are found higher on the right hemisphere than the left hemisphere of the capable dyslexics, which suggests a neurobiological compensation pathway in the right hemisphere, during reading and writing, which is not observed in the poor dyslexics.

  18. Subsecond pore-scale displacement processes and relaxation dynamics in multiphase flow

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Ryan T; Ott, Holger; Georgiadis, Apostolos; Rücker, Maja; Schwing, Alex; Berg, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances at X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) synchrotron beam lines, it is now possible to study pore-scale flow in porous rock under dynamic flow conditions. The collection of four-dimensional data allows for the direct 3-D visualization of fluid-fluid displacement in porous rock as a function of time. However, even state-of-the-art fast-μCT scans require between one and a few seconds to complete and the much faster fluid movement occurring during that time interval is manifested as imaging artifacts in the reconstructed 3-D volume. We present an approach to analyze the 2-D radiograph data collected during fast-μCT to study the pore-scale displacement dynamics on the time scale of 40 ms which is near the intrinsic time scale of individual Haines jumps. We present a methodology to identify the time intervals at which pore-scale displacement events in the observed field of view occur and hence, how reconstruction intervals can be chosen to avoid fluid-movement-induced reconstruction artifacts. We further quantify the size, order, frequency, and location of fluid-fluid displacement at the millisecond time scale. We observe that after a displacement event, the pore-scale fluid distribution relaxes to (quasi-) equilibrium in cascades of pore-scale fluid rearrangements with an average relaxation time for the whole cascade between 0.5 and 2.0 s. These findings help to identify the flow regimes and intrinsic time and length scales relevant to fractional flow. While the focus of the work is in the context of multiphase flow, the approach could be applied to many different μCT applications where morphological changes occur at a time scale less than that required for collecting a μCT scan. PMID:25745271

  19. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO2 thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-01

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and capacitance-frequency (C-f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO2 thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C-V anomalous) is observed in the C-V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C-V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO2 interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60-0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti3+ ions. Both the C-V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO2 arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  20. Motion, relaxation dynamics, and diffusion processes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined between walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Dorothea; Virnau, Peter; Snook, Ian K.; Binder, Kurt

    2012-11-01

    The dynamical behavior of single-component two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined in a slit geometry is studied by Langevin dynamics simulation of a simple model. The colloids are modeled as pointlike particles, interacting with the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential, and the fluid molecules in the colloidal suspension are not explicitly considered. Considering a crystalline strip of triangular lattice structure with n=30 rows, the (one-dimensional) walls confining the strip are chosen as two rigidly fixed crystalline rows at each side, commensurate with the lattice structure and, thus, stabilizing long-range order. The case when the spacing between the walls is incommensurate with the ideal triangular lattice is also studied, where (due to a transition in the number of rows, n→n-1) the confined crystal is incommensurate with the confining boundaries, and a soliton staircase forms along the walls. It is shown that mean-square displacements (MSDs) of particles as a function of time show an overshoot and then saturate at a horizontal plateau in the commensurate case, the value of the plateau being largest in the center of the strip. Conversely, when solitons are present, MSDs are largest in the rows containing the solitons, and all MSDs do not settle down at well-defined plateaus in the direction parallel to the boundaries, due to the lack of positional long-range order in ideal two-dimensional crystals. The MSDs of the solitons (which can be treated like quasiparticles at very low temperature) have also been studied and their dynamics are found to be about an order of magnitude slower than that of the colloidal particles themselves. Finally, transport of individual colloidal particles by diffusion processes is studied: both standard vacancy-interstitial pair formation and cooperative ring rotation processes are identified. These processes require thermal activation, with activation energies of the order of 10Tm (Tm being the melting temperature of

  1. Guinea-pig interpubic joint (symphysis pubica) relaxation at parturition: Underlying cellular processes that resemble an inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Horacio A; Ortega, Hugo H; Ramos, Jorge G; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Luque, Enrique H

    2003-01-01

    Background At term, cervical ripening in coordination with uterine contractions becomes a prerequisite for a normal vaginal delivery. Currently, cervical ripening is considered to occur independently from uterine contractions. Many evidences suggest that cervical ripening resembles an inflammatory process. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the increased flexibility of the pelvic symphysis that occurs in many species to enable safe delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the guinea-pig interpubic joint relaxation process observed during late pregnancy and parturition resembles an inflammatory process. Methods Samples of pubic symphysis were taken from pregnant guinea-pigs sacrificed along gestation, parturition and postpartum. Serial sections of paraffin-embedded tissues were used to measure the interpubic distance on digitalized images, stained with Giemsa to quantify leukocyte infiltration and to describe the vascular area changes, or studied by the picrosirius-polarization method to evaluate collagen remodeling. P4 and E2 serum levels were measured by a sequential immunometric assay. Results Data showed that the pubic relaxation is associated with an increase in collagen remodeling. In addition, a positive correlation between E2 serum levels and the increase in the interpubic distance was found. On the other hand, a leukocyte infiltration in the interpubic tissue around parturition was described, with the presence of almost all inflammatory cells types. At the same time, histological images show an increase in vascular area (angiogenesis). Eosinophils reached their highest level immediately before parturition; whereas for the neutrophilic and mononuclear infiltration higher values were recorded one day after parturition. Correlation analysis showed that eosinophils and mononuclear cells were positively correlated with E2 levels, but only eosinophilic infiltration was associated with collagen remodeling. Additionally, we observed

  2. Stress relaxant and antioxidant activities of acid glycoside from Spondias mangifera fruit against physically and chemically challenged albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Muhammad; Fareed, Sheeba; Rahman, Md. Azizur

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Stress relaxant and antioxidant activities of ethanolic extract of fruit Spondias mangifera (EEFSM) and its isolated compound (Sm-01) were evaluated. The structure of Sm-01 was also elucidated. Materials and Methods: EEFSM at two different doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg (bw)/day and Sm-01 at dose of 10 mg/kg (bw)/day were screened for in vivo stress relaxant activity using anoxia stress tolerance, swimming endurance and cyclophosphamide-induced immune suppression model and in vitro antioxidant activity using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) model. The levels of Hb, red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) along with organ and body weights suppressed by cyclophosphamide were estimated. The structure of Sm-01 was elucidated by spectroscopy (ultraviolet, infrared, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR],13 C-NMR and mass spectrometry) and chemical analyses. Results: Sm-01 was structurally elucidated as propan-1,2-dioic acid-3-carboxyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(6’→1”)-β-D-glucofuranoside. It was found that EEFSM and Sm-01 significantly increased the anoxia stress tolerance, swimming endurance and duration of stay on rotarod and normalized the levels of Hb, RBC, and WBC along with altered organ and body weights suppressed by cyclophosphamide. EEFSM and Sm-01 also exhibited significant antioxidant activity against DPPH free radical at the concentrations of 0.05, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/mL with obtained IC50 of 0.32 and 0.15 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusions: These findings demonstrated that extract and Sm-01 both possess significant stress relaxant and antioxidant activities favoring its use as adaptogens. The activities of the extract may be due to the Sm-01. PMID:26957871

  3. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com; Schweizer, Kenneth S. E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com

    2015-12-28

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry.

  4. The influence of secondary processing on the structural relaxation dynamics of fluticasone propionate.

    PubMed

    Depasquale, Roberto; Lee, Sau L; Saluja, Bhawana; Shur, Jagdeep; Price, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the structural relaxation of micronized fluticasone propionate (FP) under different lagering conditions and its influence on aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of binary and tertiary carrier-based dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. Micronized FP was lagered under low humidity (LH 25 C, 33% RH [relative humidity]), high humidity (HH 25°C, 75% RH) for 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively, and high temperature (HT 60°C, 44% RH) for 14 days. Physicochemical, surface interfacial properties via cohesive-adhesive balance (CAB) measurements and amorphous disorder levels of the FP samples were characterized. Particle size, surface area, and rugosity suggested minimal morphological changes of the lagered FP samples, with the exception of the 90-day HH (HH90) sample. HH90 FP samples appeared to undergo surface reconstruction with a reduction in surface rugosity. LH and HH lagering reduced the levels of amorphous content over 90-day exposure, which influenced the CAB measurements with lactose monohydrate and salmeterol xinafoate (SX). CAB analysis suggested that LH and HH lagering led to different interfacial interactions with lactose monohydrate but an increasing adhesive affinity with SX. HT lagering led to no detectable levels of the amorphous disorder, resulting in an increase in the adhesive interaction with lactose monohydrate. APSD analysis suggested that the fine particle mass of FP and SX was affected by the lagering of the FP. In conclusion, environmental conditions during the lagering of FP may have a profound effect on physicochemical and interfacial properties as well as product performance of binary and tertiary carrier-based DPI formulations. PMID:25398478

  5. Identifying Model Inaccuracies and Solution Uncertainties in Non-Invasive Activation-Based Imaging of Cardiac Excitation using Convex Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Erem, Burak; van Dam, Peter M.; Brooks, Dana H.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cardiac electrical function has begun to move towards clinical adoption. Here we consider one common formulation of the problem, in which the goal is to estimate the spatial distribution of electrical activation times during a cardiac cycle. We address the challenge of understanding the robustness and uncertainty of solutions to this formulation. This formulation poses a non-convex, non-linear least squares optimization problem. We show that it can be relaxed to be convex, at the cost of some degree of physiological realism of the solution set, and that this relaxation can be used as a framework to study model inaccuracy and solution uncertainty. We present two examples, one using data from a healthy human subject and the other synthesized with the ECGSIM software package. In the first case, we consider uncertainty in the initial guess and regularization parameter. In the second case, we mimic the presence of an ischemic zone in the heart in a way which violates a model assumption. We show that the convex relaxation allows understanding of spatial distribution of parameter sensitivity in the first case, and identification of model violation in the second. PMID:24710159

  6. KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channel activators as bronchodilators: combination with a β2-adrenergic agonist enhances relaxation of rat airways.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Haick, Jennifer M; Neuburg, Samantha; Tate, Shawn; Randhawa, Devjit; Cribbs, Leanne L; Byron, Kenneth L

    2014-03-15

    KCNQ (Kv7 family) potassium (K(+)) channels were recently found in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) from rodent and human bronchioles. In the present study, we evaluated expression of KCNQ channels and their role in constriction/relaxation of rat airways. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed expression of KCNQ4 > KCNQ5 > KCNQ1 > KCNQ2 > KCNQ3, and patch-clamp electrophysiology detected KCNQ currents in rat ASMCs. In precision-cut lung slices, the KCNQ channel activator retigabine induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of small bronchioles preconstricted with methacholine (MeCh; EC50 = 3.6 ± 0.3 μM). Bronchoconstriction was also attenuated in the presence of two other structurally unrelated KCNQ channel activators: zinc pyrithione (ZnPyr; 1 μM; 22 ± 7%) and 2,5-dimethylcelecoxib (10 μM; 24 ± 8%). The same three KCNQ channel activators increased KCNQ currents in ASMCs by two- to threefold. The bronchorelaxant effects of retigabine and ZnPyr were prevented by inclusion of the KCNQ channel blocker XE991. A long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, formoterol (10 nM), did not increase KCNQ current amplitude in ASMCs, but formoterol (1-1,000 nM) did induce a time- and concentration-dependent relaxation of rat airways, with a notable desensitization during a 30-min treatment or with repetitive treatments. Coadministration of retigabine (10 μM) with formoterol produced a greater peak and sustained reduction of MeCh-induced bronchoconstriction and reduced the apparent desensitization observed with formoterol alone. Our findings support a role for KCNQ K(+) channels in the regulation of airway diameter. A combination of a β2-adrenergic receptor agonist with a KCNQ channel activator may improve bronchodilator therapy. PMID:24441871

  7. Ring flips revisited: (13)C relaxation dispersion measurements of aromatic side chain dynamics and activation barriers in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Modig, Kristofer; Akke, Mikael

    2014-07-22

    Intramolecular motions of proteins are critical for biological function. Transient structural fluctuations underlie a wide range of processes, including enzyme catalysis, ligand binding to buried sites, and generic protein motions, such as 180° rotation of aromatic side chains in the protein interior, but remain poorly understood. Understanding the dynamics and molecular nature of concerted motions requires characterization of their rates and energy barriers. Here we use recently developed (13)C transverse relaxation dispersion methods to improve our current understanding of aromatic ring flips in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). We validate these methods by benchmarking ring-flip rates against the three previously characterized cases in BPTI, namely, Y23, Y35, and F45. Further, we measure conformational exchange for one additional aromatic ring, F22, which can be interpreted in terms of a flip rate of 666 s(-1) at 5 °C. Upon inclusion of our previously reported result that Y21 also flips slowly [Weininger, U., et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 9241-9247], the (13)C relaxation dispersion experiments thus reveal relatively slow ring-flip rates for five of eight aromatic residues in BPTI. These results are in contrast with previous reports, which have estimated that all rings, except Y23, Y35, and F45, flip with a high rate at ambient temperature. The (13)C relaxation dispersion data result in an updated rank order of ring-flip rates in BPTI, which agrees considerably better with that estimated from a recent 1 ms molecular dynamics trajectory than do previously published NMR data. However, significant quantitative differences remain between experiment and simulation, in that the latter yields flip rates that are in many cases too fast by 1-2 orders of magnitude. By measuring flip rates across a temperature range of 5-65 °C, we determined the activation barriers of ring flips for Y23, Y35, and F45. Y23 and F45 have identical activation parameters

  8. The role of non-equilibrium fluxes in the relaxation processes of the linear chemical master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Luciana Renata de; Bazzani, Armando; Giampieri, Enrico; Castellani, Gastone C.

    2014-08-14

    We propose a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description in terms of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) to characterize the dynamics of a chemical cycle chain reaction among m different species. These systems can be closed or open for energy and molecules exchange with the environment, which determines how they relax to the stationary state. Closed systems reach an equilibrium state (characterized by the detailed balance condition (D.B.)), while open systems will reach a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). The principal difference between D.B. and NESS is due to the presence of chemical fluxes. In the D.B. condition the fluxes are absent while for the NESS case, the chemical fluxes are necessary for the state maintaining. All the biological systems are characterized by their “far from equilibrium behavior,” hence the NESS is a good candidate for a realistic description of the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of living organisms. In this work we consider a CME written in terms of a discrete Kolmogorov forward equation, which lead us to write explicitly the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes. For systems in NESS, we show that there is a non-conservative “external vector field” whose is linearly proportional to the chemical fluxes. We also demonstrate that the modulation of these external fields does not change their stationary distributions, which ensure us to study the same system and outline the differences in the system's behavior when it switches from the D.B. regime to NESS. We were interested to see how the non-equilibrium fluxes influence the relaxation process during the reaching of the stationary distribution. By performing analytical and numerical analysis, our central result is that the presence of the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes reduces the characteristic relaxation time with respect to the D.B. condition. Within a biochemical and biological perspective, this result can be related to the “plasticity property” of biological systems

  9. The role of non-equilibrium fluxes in the relaxation processes of the linear chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciana Renata; Bazzani, Armando; Giampieri, Enrico; Castellani, Gastone C

    2014-08-14

    We propose a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description in terms of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) to characterize the dynamics of a chemical cycle chain reaction among m different species. These systems can be closed or open for energy and molecules exchange with the environment, which determines how they relax to the stationary state. Closed systems reach an equilibrium state (characterized by the detailed balance condition (D.B.)), while open systems will reach a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). The principal difference between D.B. and NESS is due to the presence of chemical fluxes. In the D.B. condition the fluxes are absent while for the NESS case, the chemical fluxes are necessary for the state maintaining. All the biological systems are characterized by their "far from equilibrium behavior," hence the NESS is a good candidate for a realistic description of the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of living organisms. In this work we consider a CME written in terms of a discrete Kolmogorov forward equation, which lead us to write explicitly the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes. For systems in NESS, we show that there is a non-conservative "external vector field" whose is linearly proportional to the chemical fluxes. We also demonstrate that the modulation of these external fields does not change their stationary distributions, which ensure us to study the same system and outline the differences in the system's behavior when it switches from the D.B. regime to NESS. We were interested to see how the non-equilibrium fluxes influence the relaxation process during the reaching of the stationary distribution. By performing analytical and numerical analysis, our central result is that the presence of the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes reduces the characteristic relaxation time with respect to the D.B. condition. Within a biochemical and biological perspective, this result can be related to the "plasticity property" of biological systems and to their

  10. The role of non-equilibrium fluxes in the relaxation processes of the linear chemical master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Luciana Renata; Bazzani, Armando; Giampieri, Enrico; Castellani, Gastone C.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description in terms of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) to characterize the dynamics of a chemical cycle chain reaction among m different species. These systems can be closed or open for energy and molecules exchange with the environment, which determines how they relax to the stationary state. Closed systems reach an equilibrium state (characterized by the detailed balance condition (D.B.)), while open systems will reach a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). The principal difference between D.B. and NESS is due to the presence of chemical fluxes. In the D.B. condition the fluxes are absent while for the NESS case, the chemical fluxes are necessary for the state maintaining. All the biological systems are characterized by their "far from equilibrium behavior," hence the NESS is a good candidate for a realistic description of the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of living organisms. In this work we consider a CME written in terms of a discrete Kolmogorov forward equation, which lead us to write explicitly the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes. For systems in NESS, we show that there is a non-conservative "external vector field" whose is linearly proportional to the chemical fluxes. We also demonstrate that the modulation of these external fields does not change their stationary distributions, which ensure us to study the same system and outline the differences in the system's behavior when it switches from the D.B. regime to NESS. We were interested to see how the non-equilibrium fluxes influence the relaxation process during the reaching of the stationary distribution. By performing analytical and numerical analysis, our central result is that the presence of the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes reduces the characteristic relaxation time with respect to the D.B. condition. Within a biochemical and biological perspective, this result can be related to the "plasticity property" of biological systems and to their

  11. Involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels in both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type relaxation in human penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Király, István; Pataricza, János; Bajory, Zoltán; Simonsen, Ulf; Varro, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pajor, Lászlo; Kun, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels (BKC a ), located on the vascular smooth muscle, play an important role in regulation of vascular tone. In penile corpus cavernosum tissue, opening of BKC a channels leads to relaxation of corporal smooth muscle, which is essential during erection; however, there is little information on the role of BKC a channels located in penile vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of BKC a channels in endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of human intracavernous penile arteries. In human intracavernous arteries obtained in connection with transsexual operations, change in isometric force was recorded in microvascular myographs, and endothelium-dependent [nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type] and endothelium-independent (NO-donor) relaxations were measured in contracted arteries. In penile small arteries contracted with phenylephrine, acetylcholine evoked NO- and EDH-type relaxations, which were sensitive to iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of BKC a channels. Iberiotoxin also inhibited relaxations induced by a NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside. NS11021, a selective opener of BKC a channels, evoked pronounced relaxations that were inhibited in the presence of IbTX. NS13558, a BKC a -inactive analogue of NS11021, failed to relax human penile small arteries. Our results show that BKC a channels are involved in both NO- and EDH-type relaxation of intracavernous penile arteries obtained from healthy men. The effect of a selective opener of BKC a channels also suggests that direct activation of the channel may be an advantageous approach for treatment of impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation often associated with erectile dysfunction.

  12. Contributions of dipolar relaxation processes and ionic transport to the response of liquids to electrical perturbation fields.

    PubMed

    Sanchis, M J; Ortiz-Serna, P; Carsí, M; Díaz-Calleja, R; Riande, E; Gargallo, L; Radić, D

    2011-05-19

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of small variations in the chemical structure on the molecular dynamics of liquids using as models bis(cyclohexylmethyl) 2-methyl- and dicyclohexyl 2-methylsuccinate. The dielectric behavior of the low molecular weight liquids was studied over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures. The results show that the temperature dependence of the dielectric strengths, relaxation times, and shape parameters of the secondary and glass-liquid relaxations are very sensitive to the slight differences in the structures of the liquids. Significant changes take place in the dielectric strength of the β relaxation in the glass liquid transition. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the β relaxation exhibits Arrhenius behavior in the glassy state and departs from this behavior in the liquid state. Special attention is paid to the temperature dependence of low-frequency relaxations produced by the motion of a macrodipole arising from charges located near the liquid-electrode boundaries.

  13. Temporal evolution of relaxation in rubbed polystyrene thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, O. C.; Tsui, O. K. C.; Yang, Z.

    2001-06-01

    Temporal relaxation of rubbed polystyrene (PS) thin films (50 nm thick) was studied by probing the decay of the optical anisotropy in the sample. Our results show that the relaxation process is characterized by two single-exponential decays plus a temperature-dependent constant. Both relaxations are orders of magnitude faster than the main chain ({alpha}) relaxation at temperatures well below ({gt}10{degree}C)T{sub g}, with activation energies 3.0 kcal/mol and 5.1 kcal/mol, respectively, either of which are much smaller than that of the {alpha} relaxation ({similar_to}50 kcal/mol). The decay time constants are found to be independent of the sample molecular weights M{sub w} (=13.7 K to 550 K Daltons, M{sub w}/M{sub n}{le}1.1) at these temperatures. This shows the local nature of the relaxation modes of rubbed PS.

  14. Kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique and Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo: Comparison of on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Beland, Laurent Karim; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-02-07

    Here, we present a comparison of the Kinetic Activation–Relaxation Technique (k-ART) and the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC), two off-lattice, on-the-fly Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques that were recently used to solve several materials science problems. We show that if the initial displacements are localized the dimer method and the Activation–Relaxation Technique nouveau provide similar performance. We also show that k-ART and SEAKMC, although based on different approximations, are in agreement with each other, as demonstrated by the examples of 50 vacancies in a 1950-atom Fe box and of interstitial loops in 16,000-atom boxes. Generally speaking, k-ART’s treatment of geometry and flickers is more flexible, e.g. it can handle amorphous systems, and rigorous than SEAKMC’s, while the later’s concept of active volumes permits a significant speedup of simulations for the systems under consideration and therefore allows investigations of processes requiring large systems that are not accessible if not localizing calculations.

  15. Kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique and Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo: Comparison of on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    Beland, Laurent Karim; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-02-07

    Here, we present a comparison of the Kinetic Activation–Relaxation Technique (k-ART) and the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC), two off-lattice, on-the-fly Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques that were recently used to solve several materials science problems. We show that if the initial displacements are localized the dimer method and the Activation–Relaxation Technique nouveau provide similar performance. We also show that k-ART and SEAKMC, although based on different approximations, are in agreement with each other, as demonstrated by the examples of 50 vacancies in a 1950-atom Fe box and of interstitial loops in 16,000-atom boxes. Generally speaking, k-ART’s treatment ofmore » geometry and flickers is more flexible, e.g. it can handle amorphous systems, and rigorous than SEAKMC’s, while the later’s concept of active volumes permits a significant speedup of simulations for the systems under consideration and therefore allows investigations of processes requiring large systems that are not accessible if not localizing calculations.« less

  16. Relaxation processes of PGPR at the water/oil interface inferred by oscillatory or transient viscoelasticity measurements.

    PubMed

    Marze, Sébastien

    2009-10-20

    The rheological properties of PolyGlycerol PolyRicinoleate (PGPR) at the oil/water interface were studied using a drop-shaped tensiometer. Small deformation oscillations of the drop area allow the measurement of the interfacial viscoelasticity spectrum, that is, the elastic and viscous moduli as a function of frequency. Another way to obtain such a spectrum is to perform a transient relaxation measurement from which the relaxation modulus as a function of time is deduced and interpreted. Several models containing one or more relaxation times were considered, and their resulting spectra were compared to the oscillatory ones. Similar results suggest that one could in principle use oscillatory or transient relaxations indifferently. However, the transient relaxation technique proved to be more adapted for the determination of the relaxation times. At low PGPR concentrations in oil, the behavior is controlled by long relaxation times, whereas short ones take over when approaching and exceeding the saturation interfacial concentration. This was understood as a shift from a diffusion-dominated regime to a rearrangements-dominated regime. PMID:19764774

  17. Mechanics of myocardial relaxation: application of a model to isometric and isotonic relaxation of rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Wiegner, A W; Bing, O H

    1982-01-01

    Using a simple model for cardiac muscle relaxation which takes into account muscle length, activation, elasticity and a rate constant for the decay of activation, we are able to use easily measured mechanical parameters to assess the state of the cardiac relaxing system. In isolated trabeculae carneae from the left ventricle of the rat, performing physiologically sequenced contractions, observations have been made (1) at varying preloads and afterloads, (2) with changes in temperature from 23 degrees to 33 degrees C, (3) with changes in bath Ca2+ concentration and (4) with the addition of isoproterenol. During isometric relaxation, the slope (SIM) of the curve relating maximum rate of decline of force (-dF/dtmax) to end-systolic muscle length is load-independent and sensitive to interventions which directly affect the cardiac relaxing system (e.g., temperature, isoproterenol); it is only slightly sensitive to bath calcium concentration. During isotonic relaxation, the maximum velocity of lengthening (+dL/dtmax) is in negative linear proportion to muscle shortening at a given preload, the slope (SIT) of the curve relating +dL/dtmax to end-systolic length is sensitive to the interventions which directly affect the cardiac relaxing system but insensitive to calcium-mediated inotropic interventions. The model provides a theoretical basis for the use of SIM and SIT as measures of the relaxation process. PMID:7161285

  18. Fluctuating systems under cyclic perturbations: Relation between energy dissipation and intrinsic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Camerin, Fabrizio; Frezzato, Diego

    2016-08-01

    This study focuses on fluctuating classical systems in contact with a thermal bath, and whose configurational energetics undergoes cyclic transformations due to interaction with external perturbing agents. Under the assumptions that the configurational dynamics is a stochastic Markov process in the overdamped regime and that the nonequilibrium configurational distribution remains close to the underlying equilibrium one, we derived an analytic approximation of the average dissipated energy per cycle in the asymptotic limit (i.e., after many cycles of perturbation). The energy dissipation is then readily translated into average entropy production, per cycle, in the environment. The accuracy of the approximation was tested by comparing the outcomes with the exact values obtained by stochastic simulations of a model case: a "particle on a ring" that fluctuates in a bistable potential perturbed in two different ways. As pointed out in previous studies on the stochastic resonance phenomenon, the dependence of the average dissipation on the perturbation period may unveil the inner spectrum of the system's fluctuation rates. In this respect, the analytical approximation presented here makes it possible to unveil the connection between average dissipation, intrinsic rates and modes of fluctuation of the system at the unperturbed equilibrium, and features of the perturbation itself (namely, the period of the cycle and the projections of the energy perturbation over the system's modes). The possibilities of employing the analytical results as a guide to devising and rationalizing a sort of "spectroscopic calorimetry" experiment, and of employing them in strategies aiming to optimize the system's features on the basis of a target average dissipation, are briefly discussed. PMID:27627256

  19. Fluctuating systems under cyclic perturbations: Relation between energy dissipation and intrinsic relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerin, Fabrizio; Frezzato, Diego

    2016-08-01

    This study focuses on fluctuating classical systems in contact with a thermal bath, and whose configurational energetics undergoes cyclic transformations due to interaction with external perturbing agents. Under the assumptions that the configurational dynamics is a stochastic Markov process in the overdamped regime and that the nonequilibrium configurational distribution remains close to the underlying equilibrium one, we derived an analytic approximation of the average dissipated energy per cycle in the asymptotic limit (i.e., after many cycles of perturbation). The energy dissipation is then readily translated into average entropy production, per cycle, in the environment. The accuracy of the approximation was tested by comparing the outcomes with the exact values obtained by stochastic simulations of a model case: a "particle on a ring" that fluctuates in a bistable potential perturbed in two different ways. As pointed out in previous studies on the stochastic resonance phenomenon, the dependence of the average dissipation on the perturbation period may unveil the inner spectrum of the system's fluctuation rates. In this respect, the analytical approximation presented here makes it possible to unveil the connection between average dissipation, intrinsic rates and modes of fluctuation of the system at the unperturbed equilibrium, and features of the perturbation itself (namely, the period of the cycle and the projections of the energy perturbation over the system's modes). The possibilities of employing the analytical results as a guide to devising and rationalizing a sort of "spectroscopic calorimetry" experiment, and of employing them in strategies aiming to optimize the system's features on the basis of a target average dissipation, are briefly discussed.

  20. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) induces vascular relaxation by activating Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels in rat mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Owain Llŷr; Kamishima, Tomoko; Barrett-Jolley, Richard; Quayle, John M; Dart, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Vasodilator-induced elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a central mechanism governing arterial relaxation but is incompletely understood due to the diversity of cAMP effectors. Here we investigate the role of the novel cAMP effector exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) in mediating vasorelaxation in rat mesenteric arteries. In myography experiments, the Epac-selective cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP-AM (5 μm, subsequently referred to as 8-pCPT-AM) elicited a 77.6 ± 7.1% relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted arteries over a 5 min period (mean ± SEM; n= 6). 8-pCPT-AM induced only a 16.7 ± 2.4% relaxation in arteries pre-contracted with high extracellular K+ over the same time period (n= 10), suggesting that some of Epac's relaxant effect relies upon vascular cell hyperpolarization. This involves Ca2+-sensitive, large-conductance K+ (BKCa) channel opening as iberiotoxin (100 nm) significantly reduced the ability of 8-pCPT-AM to reverse phenylephrine-induced contraction (arteries relaxed by only 35.0 ± 8.5% over a 5 min exposure to 8-pCPT-AM, n= 5; P < 0.05). 8-pCPT-AM increased Ca2+ spark frequency in Fluo-4-AM-loaded mesenteric myocytes from 0.045 ± 0.008 to 0.103 ± 0.022 sparks s-1μm-1 (P < 0.05) and reversibly increased both the frequency (0.94 ± 0.25 to 2.30 ± 0.72 s−1) and amplitude (23.9 ± 3.3 to 35.8 ± 7.7 pA) of spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) recorded in isolated mesenteric myocytes (n= 7; P < 0.05). 8-pCPT-AM-activated STOCs were sensitive to iberiotoxin (100 nm) and to ryanodine (30 μm). Current clamp recordings of isolated myocytes showed a 7.9 ± 1.0 mV (n= 10) hyperpolarization in response to 8-pCPT-AM that was sensitive to iberiotoxin (n= 5). Endothelial disruption suppressed 8-pCPT-AM-mediated relaxation in phenylephrine-contracted arteries (24.8 ± 4.9% relaxation after 5 min of exposure, n= 5; P < 0.05), as did apamin and TRAM-34, blockers of Ca2+-sensitive, small- and intermediate

  1. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) induces vascular relaxation by activating Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Owain Llŷr; Kamishima, Tomoko; Barrett-Jolley, Richard; Quayle, John M; Dart, Caroline

    2013-10-15

    Vasodilator-induced elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a central mechanism governing arterial relaxation but is incompletely understood due to the diversity of cAMP effectors. Here we investigate the role of the novel cAMP effector exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) in mediating vasorelaxation in rat mesenteric arteries. In myography experiments, the Epac-selective cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2-O-Me-cAMP-AM (5 μM, subsequently referred to as 8-pCPT-AM) elicited a 77.6 ± 7.1% relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted arteries over a 5 min period (mean ± SEM; n = 6). 8-pCPT-AM induced only a 16.7 ± 2.4% relaxation in arteries pre-contracted with high extracellular K(+) over the same time period (n = 10), suggesting that some of Epac's relaxant effect relies upon vascular cell hyperpolarization. This involves Ca(2+)-sensitive, large-conductance K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel opening as iberiotoxin (100 nM) significantly reduced the ability of 8-pCPT-AM to reverse phenylephrine-induced contraction (arteries relaxed by only 35.0 ± 8.5% over a 5 min exposure to 8-pCPT-AM, n = 5; P < 0.05). 8-pCPT-AM increased Ca(2+) spark frequency in Fluo-4-AM-loaded mesenteric myocytes from 0.045 ± 0.008 to 0.103 ± 0.022 sparks s(-1) μm(-1) (P < 0.05) and reversibly increased both the frequency (0.94 ± 0.25 to 2.30 ± 0.72 s(-1)) and amplitude (23.9 ± 3.3 to 35.8 ± 7.7 pA) of spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) recorded in isolated mesenteric myocytes (n = 7; P < 0.05). 8-pCPT-AM-activated STOCs were sensitive to iberiotoxin (100 nM) and to ryanodine (30 μM). Current clamp recordings of isolated myocytes showed a 7.9 ± 1.0 mV (n = 10) hyperpolarization in response to 8-pCPT-AM that was sensitive to iberiotoxin (n = 5). Endothelial disruption suppressed 8-pCPT-AM-mediated relaxation in phenylephrine-contracted arteries (24.8 ± 4.9% relaxation after 5 min of exposure, n = 5; P < 0.05), as did apamin and TRAM-34, blockers of Ca(2+)-sensitive, small- and

  2. Career management: an active process.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, J; Eckel, F M

    1985-03-01

    The self-assessment, goal-setting, and career-planning techniques of career management are discussed, and the organization's role in career management is discussed. Career management is a planned process, initiated and carried out by an individual with the assistance of others. Because work and nonwork activities are so interrelated, career and life management planning can maximize a pharmacist's personal success. The career- and life-management process begins with the development of a personal definition of success. A self-assessment must be made of one's values, needs, interests, and activities. The next step of the process involves setting goals and establishing a plan or strategy to achieve them. Establishing a career path requires researching alternate career goals. Career competencies are identified that can increase an employee's chances of success. The employer shares the responsibility for career development through coaching, job structuring, and keeping the employee aware of constraints. Through the integration of the roles of the individual and the organization in the career-management process, employees can optimize their contribution to an organization. Pharmacists can successfully manage their careers by applying the techniques of self-assessment, goal setting, and career planning. PMID:3985018

  3. Multigrid mapping and box relaxation for simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.

    1994-12-31

    A new multilevel technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation for the whole process of flow transition in 3-D flat plate boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition on a relatively coarse grid with low CPU cost. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time-marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all employed for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to catch the large eddies and represent main roles of small eddies to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The computation also reproduced the K-type and C-type transition observed by laboratory experiments. The CPU cost for a typical case is around 2-9 CRAY-YMP hours.

  4. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation. [Spiropyrans

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in [approximately]240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH[sub 2]I[sub 2] and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a [approximately]350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  5. B2 kinin receptor activation is the predominant mechanism by which trypsin mediates endothelium-dependent relaxation in bovine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Grant R; Selemidis, Stavros; Cocks, Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    The roles of kinin and protease-activated receptors (PAR) in endothelium-dependent relaxations to the serine protease, trypsin, were examined in rings of bovine left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Trypsin (0.01-30 U/ml) caused biphasic, endothelium-dependent relaxations-a high potency (0.01-0.3 U/ml), low efficacy relaxation [maximum relaxation (R (max)), 9.0 +/- 5.1%] followed by a lower potency (1-30 U/ml) but high efficacy (R (max), 90.4 +/- 5.5%) relaxation, which was abolished by aprotinin. Captopril (10 microM) caused an approximately 10-fold leftward shift of the second phase response such that the first phase was masked. The second phase relaxation to trypsin was inhibited in a concentration-dependent, non-surmountable manner by the B2 antagonist, HOE-140. At 3 nM HOE-140, the second phase response to trypsin was abolished unmasking the first phase. Kallikrein (0.0003-0.3 U/ml) caused monophasic, endothelium-dependent relaxations (R (max), 33.7 +/- 14.6%), which were potentiated by captopril (R (max), 94.2 +/- 1.0%) and abolished by HOE-140. In the presence of captopril, the second phase relaxation to trypsin was only minimally inhibited by either N(G)-nitro-L: -arginine (100 microM) or 67 mM [K(+)](o) alone but markedly reduced when these two treatments were combined (R (max), 26.1 +/- 11.6% versus 98.6 +/- 2.9% in controls). The PAR1-activating peptide, SFLLRN (0.1-30 microM), but not the PAR2-activating peptide, SLIGRL, caused concentration-dependent relaxations (pEC(50), 5.9 +/- 0.0%; R (max), 43.3 +/- 8.3%). In conclusion, trypsin causes endothelium-dependent relaxations in the bovine LAD predominantly via release of endogenous BK, which in turn activates endothelial B2 receptors. Only a minor role for PAR1-like receptors was evident in this tissue. PMID:18458878

  6. Activation of PPARβ/δ prevents hyperglycaemia-induced impairment of Kv7 channels and cAMP-mediated relaxation in rat coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Morales-Cano, Daniel; Moreno, Laura; Barreira, Bianca; Briones, Ana M; Pandolfi, Rachele; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Callejo, Maria; Mondejar-Parreño, Gema; Cortijo, Julio; Salaices, Mercedes; Duarte, Juan; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Cogolludo, Angel

    2016-10-01

    PPARβ/δ activation protects against endothelial dysfunction in diabetic models. Elevated glucose is known to impair cAMP-induced relaxation and Kv channel function in coronary arteries (CA). Herein, we aimed to analyse the possible protective effects of the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 on the hyperglycaemic-induced impairment of cAMP-induced relaxation and Kv channel function in rat CA. As compared with low glucose (LG), incubation under high glucose (HG) conditions attenuated the relaxation induced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin in CA and this was prevented by GW0742. The protective effect of GW0742 was supressed by a PPARβ/δ antagonist. In myocytes isolated from CA under LG, forskolin enhanced Kv currents and induced hyperpolarization. In contrast, when CA were incubated with HG, Kv currents were diminished and the electrophysiological effects of forskolin were abolished. These deleterious effects were prevented by GW0742. The protective effects of GW0742 on forskolin-induced relaxation and Kv channel function were confirmed in CA from type-1 diabetic rats. In addition, the differences in the relaxation induced by forskolin in CA incubated under LG, HG or HG + GW0742 were abolished by the Kv7 channel inhibitor XE991. Accordingly, GW0742 prevented the down-regulation of Kv7 channels induced by HG. Finally, the preventive effect of GW0742 on oxidative stress and cAMP-induced relaxation were overcome by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA). Our results reveal that the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 prevents the impairment of the cAMP-mediated relaxation in CA under HG. This protective effect was associated with induction of PDK4, attenuation of oxidative stress and preservation of Kv7 channel function. PMID:27413020

  7. Activation of PPARβ/δ prevents hyperglycaemia-induced impairment of Kv7 channels and cAMP-mediated relaxation in rat coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Morales-Cano, Daniel; Moreno, Laura; Barreira, Bianca; Briones, Ana M; Pandolfi, Rachele; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Callejo, Maria; Mondejar-Parreño, Gema; Cortijo, Julio; Salaices, Mercedes; Duarte, Juan; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Cogolludo, Angel

    2016-10-01

    PPARβ/δ activation protects against endothelial dysfunction in diabetic models. Elevated glucose is known to impair cAMP-induced relaxation and Kv channel function in coronary arteries (CA). Herein, we aimed to analyse the possible protective effects of the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 on the hyperglycaemic-induced impairment of cAMP-induced relaxation and Kv channel function in rat CA. As compared with low glucose (LG), incubation under high glucose (HG) conditions attenuated the relaxation induced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin in CA and this was prevented by GW0742. The protective effect of GW0742 was supressed by a PPARβ/δ antagonist. In myocytes isolated from CA under LG, forskolin enhanced Kv currents and induced hyperpolarization. In contrast, when CA were incubated with HG, Kv currents were diminished and the electrophysiological effects of forskolin were abolished. These deleterious effects were prevented by GW0742. The protective effects of GW0742 on forskolin-induced relaxation and Kv channel function were confirmed in CA from type-1 diabetic rats. In addition, the differences in the relaxation induced by forskolin in CA incubated under LG, HG or HG + GW0742 were abolished by the Kv7 channel inhibitor XE991. Accordingly, GW0742 prevented the down-regulation of Kv7 channels induced by HG. Finally, the preventive effect of GW0742 on oxidative stress and cAMP-induced relaxation were overcome by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA). Our results reveal that the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 prevents the impairment of the cAMP-mediated relaxation in CA under HG. This protective effect was associated with induction of PDK4, attenuation of oxidative stress and preservation of Kv7 channel function.

  8. Smooth muscle relaxation activity of an aqueous extract of dried immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliata (PF-W) on an isolated strip of rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Sang; Shim, Won-Sik; dela Peña, Ike Campomayor; Seo, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Woo-Young; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Hoon; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrated that an aqueous extract of dried immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliate (PF-W) produces relaxation of intestinal smooth muscle using the ileac strips of a rat. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism of its relaxant activity was investigated. PF-W was prepared using the standard extraction protocol. A 1.5 - 2 cm long rat ileac strip was placed in an organ bath with Tyrode's solution and smooth muscle contractility was recorded by connecting it to a force transducer. Various compounds were added to the organ baths, and changes in muscular contractility were measured. PF-W concentration-dependently induced relaxation of rat ileac strips that were contracted both spontaneously and via acetylcholine treatment. Various potassium channel blockers did not inhibit the relaxation by PF-W. No difference in the effect of PF-W was observed between ileac strips treated with low (20 mM) and high concentrations (60 mM) of KCl. PF-W inhibited the contraction of rat ileac strips induced by extracellular calcium. PF-W acts as a potent smooth muscle relaxant, implicating its possible action as a rapid acting reliever for abdominal pains and a cure for intestinal convulsion. Considering that PF-W also exhibits prokinetic activity, its use in various gastrointestinal disorders seems promising.

  9. Dependence of P2-nucleotide receptor agonist-mediated endothelium-independent relaxation on ectonucleotidase activity and A2A-receptors in rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Guibert, C; Loirand, G; Vigne, P; Savineau, J P; Pacaud, P

    1998-04-01

    1. The mechanism of action of P2 nucleotide receptor agonists that produce endothelium-independent relaxation and the influence of ecto-ATPase activity on this relaxing effect have been investigated in rat portal vein smooth muscle. 2. At 25 degrees C, ATP, 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) and 2-chloroATP (2-ClATP), dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous contractile activity of endothelium-denuded muscular strips from rat portal vein. The rank order of agonist potency defined from the half-inhibitory concentrations was 2-CIATP (2.7+/-0.5 microM, n=7) >ATP (12.9+/-1.1 microM, n=9) > or =2-MeSATP (21.9+/-4.8 M, n=4). In the presence of alphabeta-methylene ATP (alphabeta-MeATP, 200 microM) which itself produced a transient contractile effect, the relaxing action of ATP and 2-MeSATP was completely abolished and that of 2-ClATP strongly inhibited. 3. The non-selective P2-receptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 100 microM) did not affect the relaxation induced by ATP, 2-MeSATP, and 2-ClATP. 4. The A2A-adenosine receptor antagonist ZM 241385 inhibited the ATP-induced relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner (1-100 nM). In the presence of 100 nM ZM 241385, the relaxing effects of 2-MeSATP and 2-ClATP were also inhibited. 5. ADP, AMP and adenosine also produced concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous contractions. The relaxing effects of AMP and adenosine were insensitive to alphabeta-MeATP (200 microM) but were inhibited by ZM 241385 (100 nM). 6. Simultaneous measurements of contraction and ecto-ATPase activity estimated by the degradation of [gamma-32P]-ATP showed that muscular strips rapidly (10-60 s) hydrolyzed ATP. This ecto-ATPase activity was abolished in the presence of EDTA and was inhibited by 57+/-11% (n=3) by 200 microM alphabeta-MeATP. 7. These results suggest that ATP and other P2-receptor agonists are relaxant in rat portal vein smooth muscle, because ectonucleotidase activity leads to the formation of

  10. Relaxed active space: Fixing tailored-CC with high order coupled cluster. II

    SciTech Connect

    Melnichuk, Ann Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2014-02-14

    Due to the steep increase in computational cost with the inclusion of higher-connected cluster operators in coupled-cluster applications, it is usually not practical to use such methods for larger systems or basis sets without an active space partitioning. This study generates an active space subject to unambiguous statistical criteria to define a space whose size permits treatment at the CCSDT level. The automated scheme makes it unnecessary for the user to judge whether a chosen active space is sufficient to correctly solve the problem. Two demanding applications are presented: twisted ethylene and the transition states for the bicyclo[1,1,0]butane isomerization. As bi-radicals both systems require at least a CCSDT level of theory for quantitative results, for the geometries and energies.

  11. Neurosedative and muscle relaxant activities of aqueous extract of Bryophyllum pinnatum.

    PubMed

    Yemitan, O K; Salahdeen, H M

    2005-03-01

    The saline leaf extract of Bryophyllum pinnatum was investigated on neuropharmacological activities to ascertain claims of local use. When tested in mice, it produced a dose-dependent prolongation of onset and duration of pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis, reduction of exploratory activities in the head-dip and evasion tests. Moreover, a dose-dependent muscle in-coordination was observed in the inclined screen, traction and climbing tests. It delayed onset to convulsion in both strychnine- and picrotoxin-induced seizures in addition to minimal protection against picrotoxin seizures. PMID:15752629

  12. Relaxation processes in an alternating-current electric field and energy loss mechanisms in hafnium diselenide cointercalated with copper and silver atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshchev, V. G.; Melnikova, N. V.; Baranov, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Samples based on hafnium diselenide intercalated with atoms of two types, Cu x Ag y HfSe2 at ( x + y) ≤ 0.2, have been synthesized for the first time. The frequency dependences of the components of the complex impedance have been measured using impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, and the specific features of the relaxation processes occurring in samples of different compositions have been analyzed. It has been shown that the characteristic times of these processes depend not only on the total concentration of intercalated atoms, but also on the ratio between them. As the total concentration of copper and silver increases, the onset of frequency dispersion of the complex admittance shifts to the higher frequency range. The relative contributions from the conduction and relaxation polarization losses also change depending on the total and element concentrations of the intercalated atoms.

  13. Parallel Activation in Bilingual Phonological Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Su-Yeon

    2011-01-01

    In bilingual language processing, the parallel activation hypothesis suggests that bilinguals activate their two languages simultaneously during language processing. Support for the parallel activation mainly comes from studies of lexical (word-form) processing, with relatively less attention to phonological (sound) processing. According to…

  14. EPR and spin-lattice relaxation of rare-earth activated centres in Y 2SiO 5 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, I. N.; Chernov, K. P.

    1980-08-01

    An investigation of the EPR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation of Ce 3+, Nd 3+ and Yb 3+ ions in Y 2SiO 5 single crystals has been carried out. Two different EPR spectra for each rare-earth ion are observed due to a substitution of Y 1 and Y 2 sites crytals. Spin-lattice relaxation times for both activated centres are shown to be essentially different, although static crystal field of Y 1 and Y 2 sites differ slightly.

  15. Restricting query relaxation through user constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Gaasterland, T.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes techniques to restrict and to heuristically control relaxation of deductive database queries. The process of query relaxation provides a user with a means to automatically identify new queries that are related to the user`s original query. However, for large databases, many relaxations may be possible. The methods to control and restrict the relaxation process introduced in this paper focus the relaxation process and make it more efficient. User restrictions over the data base domain may be expressed as user constraints. This paper describes how user constraints can restrict relaxed queries. Also, a set of heuristics based on cooperative answering techniques are presented for controlling the relaxation process. Finally, the interaction of the methods for relaxing queries, processing user constraints, and applying the heuristic rules is described.

  16. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  17. Thermal Decoupling of Molecular-Relaxation Processes from the Vibrational Density of States at Terahertz Frequencies in Supercooled Hydrogen-Bonded Liquids.

    PubMed

    Sibik, Juraj; Elliott, Stephen R; Zeitler, J Axel

    2014-06-01

    At terahertz frequencies, the libration-vibration motions couple to the dielectric relaxations in disordered hydrogen-bonded solids. The interplay between these processes is still poorly understood, in particular at temperatures below the glass transition temperature, Tg, yet this behavior is of vital importance for the molecular mobility of such materials to remain in the amorphous phase. A series of polyhydric alcohols were studied at temperatures between 80 and 310 K in the frequency range of 0.2-3 THz using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Three universal features were observed in the dielectric losses, ϵ″(ν): (a) At temperatures well below the glass transition, ϵ″(ν) comprises a temperature-independent microscopic peak, which persists into the liquid phase and which is identified as being due to librational/torsional modes. For 0.65 Tg < T < Tg, additional thermally dependent contributions are observed, and we found strong evidence for its relation to the Johari-Goldstein secondary β-relaxation process. (b) Clear spectroscopic evidence is found for a secondary β glass transition at 0.65 Tg, which is not related to the fragility of the glasses. (c) At temperatures above Tg, the losses become dominated by primary α-relaxation processes. Our results show that the thermal changes in the losses seem to be underpinned by a universal change in the hydrogen bonding structure of the samples. PMID:26273882

  18. Presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors mediate fade induced by neuromuscular relaxants that exhibit anticholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Bornia, Elaine Cs; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Alves-Do-Prado, Wilson

    2011-03-01

    1. Pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium are antinicotinic agents that, in contrast with d-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, exhibit anticholinesterase activity. Pancuronium-, cisatracurium- and vecuronium-induced fade results from blockade of facilitatory nicotinic receptors on motor nerves, but fade produced by such agents also depends on the presynaptic activation of inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptors by acetylcholine released from motor nerve terminals and activation of inhibitory adenosine A1 receptors by adenosine released from motor nerves and muscles. The participation of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors in fade caused by pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we determined the effects of ZM241385, an antagonist of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors, on fade produced by these neuromuscular relaxants in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparation. 2. The muscles were stimulated indirectly at 75±3Hz to induce a sustained tetanizing muscular contraction. The lowest concentration at which each antinicotinic agent produced fade without modifying initial tetanic tension (presynaptic action) was determined. 3. d-Tubocurarine-induced fade occurred only at 55 nmol/L, a concentration that also reduced maximal tetanic tension (post-synaptic action). At 10 nmol/L, ZM 241385 alone did not produce fade, but it did attenuate pancuronium (0.32 μmol/L)-, cisatracurium (0.32 μmol/L)- and vecuronium (0.36 μmol/L)-induced fade. 4. The fade induced by the 'pure' antinicotinic agents d-tubocurarine (55 nmol/L) and hexamethonium (413 μmol/L) was not altered by 10 nmol/L ZM 241385, indicating that presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors play a significant role in the fade produced by antinicotinic agents when such agents have anticholinesterase activity.

  19. Association, partition, and surface activity in biphasic systems displaying relaxation oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Vincent; Tadmouri, Rawad; Lavabre, Dominique; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Pimienta, Véronique

    2007-11-01

    Several biphasic systems giving rise to periodical Marangoni instability have been analyzed from the point of view of the physicochemical properties of the involved compounds. In each case, the compound at the origin of the oscillatory behavior has been identified: the reactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) for the CTAB/picric acid (PH) system and the product of reaction dodecyl sulfate tetraalkylammonium (TAADS) for the sodium dodecyl sulfate/tetraalkylammonium bromide (SDS/TAAB) system. The properties of the latter system have been varied progressively by increasing the chain length of the tetraalkylammonium ion. Oscillations were observed whichever the direction of transfer (from water to dichloromethane and from dichloromethane to water). The comparison of the dynamic interfacial tension, recorded during transfer, to equilibrium measurements shows that the instability is favored when partition is highly in favor of the organic phase. The main criteria for the appearance of the instability are a high surface activity and a low interfacial adsorption.

  20. Fluorescence properties and relaxation processes of Tb{sup 3+} ions in ZnCl{sub 2}-based glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Noriyuki; Shibuta, Masahiro; Shimazaki, Hiroko; Wada, Noriko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Kazuo

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In 60ZnCl{sub 2}–20KCl–20BaCl{sub 2}–xTbCl{sub 3} glasses, no energy transfer occurred for 0 < x ≤ 0.34. • For 0.34 < x ≤ 1.25, the cross relaxation, ({sup 5}D{sub 3} → {sup 5}D{sub 4}) → ({sup 7}F{sub 0} ← {sup 7}F{sub 6}) occurred between Tb{sup 3+} ions. • For 0 < x ≤ 0.34, the 72% of excited electrons were radiatively relaxed by the {sup 5}D{sub 3} → {sup 7}F{sub J} transitions. • The lifetime of the {sup 5}D{sub 3} initial level was long and 1.1 ms. - Abstract: 60ZnCl{sub 2}–20KCl–20BaCl{sub 2}–xTbCl{sub 3} glasses (x = 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25) were prepared by melt-quenching method, and Tb{sup 3+} fluorescence properties were investigated under 355 nm excitation. Regardless of x values, the electrons that were relaxed from the {sup 5}D{sub 3} to {sup 5}D{sub 4} level of Tb{sup 3+} ions by the multiphonon relaxation, were repressed to 28% of all the excited electrons because the ZnCl{sub 2}-based glass had much lower phonon energy than oxide glasses. For 0 < x ≤ 0.34, the cross relaxation, ({sup 5}D{sub 3} → {sup 5}D{sub 4}) → ({sup 7}F{sub 0} ← {sup 7}F{sub 6}), was repressed, and consequently 72% and 28% of all the excited electrons were radiatively relaxed by the {sup 5}D{sub 3} → {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2) and {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 6, 5, 4, and 3) transitions, respectively. The lifetimes of the {sup 5}D{sub 3} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} initial levels were obtained to be 1.1 and 2.1 ms, respectively.

  1. Long-time atomistic evolution of grain boundary in nickel using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Sami; Trochet, Mickaël; Restrepo, Oscar; Mousseau, Normand

    The microscopic mechanisms associated with the evolution of metallic materials are still a matter of debate as both experimental and numerical approaches fail to provide a detailed atomic picture of their time evolution. Here, we use the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an unbiased off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building to overcome these limitations and follow the atomistic evolution of a 10.000-atom grain boundary Ni system over macroscopic time scales. We first characterize the kinetic properties of four different empirical potentials, the embedded atom method (EAM), the first and second modified embedded atom method (MEAM1NN and MEAM2NN respectively) and the Reax force field (ReaxFF) potentials. Comparing the energetics, the elastic effects and the diffusion mechanisms for systems with one to three vacancies and one to three self-interstitials in nickel simulated over second time scale, we conclude that ReaxFF and EAM potentials are closest to experimental values. We then proceed to study the long-time evolution of a grain boundary with the Reax forcefield and to offer a detailed description of its energy landscape, including the exact description of short and long-range effects on self-diffusion along the interface

  2. Dielectric relaxation of α -tocopherol acetate (vitamin E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Maslanka, S.; Ziolo, J.; Paluch, M.; McGrath, K. J.; Roland, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric loss spectra are reported for α -tocopherol acetate (an isomer of vitamin E) in the supercooled and glassy states. The α -relaxation times, τα , measured over a 190° range of temperatures, T , at pressures, P , up to 400MPa can be expressed as a single function of TV3.9 ( V is specific volume, measured herein as a function of T and P ). At ambient pressure, there is no dynamic crossover over eight decades of measured τα . The relaxation spectra above the glass transition temperature Tg show ionic conductivity and an excess wing on the high-frequency flank of the α -relaxation loss peak. Temperature-pressure superpositioning is valid for the α process; moreover, the peak shape is constant (stretch exponent equal to 0.65). However, application of pressure changes the shape of the dielectric spectrum at higher frequencies due to the shift of the excess wing to form a resolved peak. Additionally, another relaxation process, absent at atmospheric pressure, emerges on the high-frequency side of the α -process. We propose that this new peak reflects a more compact conformation of the α -tocopherol acetate molecule. Drawing on the coupling model, the experimentally determined relaxation times, activation energy, and activation volume for the Johari-Goldstein process are compared to values calculated from the properties of the α relaxation. The agreement is generally satisfactory, at least for T

  3. Dielectric relaxation of alpha -tocopherol acetate (vitamin E).

    PubMed

    Kaminski, K; Maslanka, S; Ziolo, J; Paluch, M; McGrath, K J; Roland, C M

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric loss spectra are reported for alpha -tocopherol acetate (an isomer of vitamin E) in the supercooled and glassy states. The alpha -relaxation times, tau_{alpha} , measured over a 190 degrees range of temperatures, T , at pressures, P , up to 400MPa can be expressed as a single function of TV3.9 ( V is specific volume, measured herein as a function of T and P ). At ambient pressure, there is no dynamic crossover over eight decades of measured tau_{alpha} . The relaxation spectra above the glass transition temperature T_{g} show ionic conductivity and an excess wing on the high-frequency flank of the alpha -relaxation loss peak. Temperature-pressure superpositioning is valid for the alpha process; moreover, the peak shape is constant (stretch exponent equal to 0.65). However, application of pressure changes the shape of the dielectric spectrum at higher frequencies due to the shift of the excess wing to form a resolved peak. Additionally, another relaxation process, absent at atmospheric pressure, emerges on the high-frequency side of the alpha -process. We propose that this new peak reflects a more compact conformation of the alpha -tocopherol acetate molecule. Drawing on the coupling model, the experimentally determined relaxation times, activation energy, and activation volume for the Johari-Goldstein process are compared to values calculated from the properties of the alpha relaxation. The agreement is generally satisfactory, at least for T

  4. A physiological and subjective evaluation of meditation, hypnosis, and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Morse, D R; Martin, J S; Furst, M L; Dubin, L L

    1977-01-01

    Ss were monitored for respiratory rate, pulse rate, blood pressure, skin resistance, EEG activity, and muscle activity. They were monitored during the alert state, meditation (TM or simple word type), hypnosis (relaxation and task types), and relaxation. Ss gave a verbal comparative evaluation of each state. The results showed significantly better relaxation responses for the relaxation states (relaxation, relaxation-hypnosis, meditation) than for the alert state. There were no significant differences between the relaxation states except for the measure "muscle activity" in which meditation was significantly better than the other relaxation states. Overall, there were significant differences between task-hypnosis and relaxation-hypnosis. No significant differences were found between TM and simple word meditation. For the subjective measures, relaxation-hypnosis and meditation were significantly better than relaxation, but no significant differences were found between meditation and relaxation-hypnosis.

  5. The glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, A. P.; Marković, V. Lj; Stamenković, S. N.; Stankov, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    The study of dc glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure is presented. The breakdown time delay dependence as a function of relaxation time \\overline{{{t}\\text{d}}}(τ ) (the memory curve) is measured and modelled from milliseconds to the saturation region determined by the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level. Due to fast conversion \\text{N}2++{{\\text{O}}2}\\to {{\\text{N}}2}+\\text{O}2+ , relaxation of dc discharge in synthetic air in the time interval from one to about ninety milliseconds is dominated by the diffusion decay of molecular oxygen {{O}}_2^ + ions. The change of regimes, from ambipolar to the free diffusion limit, is investigated and the variation of effective diffusion coefficients is determined. The late relaxation is explained by the kinetics of nitrogen atoms, recombining on the surfaces of gas discharge tube and stainless steel electrodes and relevant surface recombination coefficients are determined.

  6. Molecular Relaxations in Constrained Nanoscale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Daniel B., Jr.

    Current engineering challenges in the areas of energy, gas separation and photonics demand novel materials that are cognitively engineered at the molecular level, with a view toward replacing the conventional trial and error approach to materials development. Cognitive molecular engineering of organic materials demands the incorporation of internal constraints (inherent to molecular architecture) and external constraints (stemming from interactions with system boundaries) to obtain desired material properties. Both types of constraints affect intrinsic relaxation behavior in a material, which dictates thermal and viscoelastic material properties. The challenge, then, is to quantify the influence of constraints on relaxation behavior with a view toward producing a 'toolbox' for molecular engineering. In this work, local atomic force microscopy based thermomechanical measurements, paired with dielectric spectroscopy, kinetic models and molecular dynamic simulation are used to explore the effect of constraints on the relaxation behavior of model lubricants, amorphous polymers, and organic non-linear optical (NLO) materials. The impact of interfacial constraints on the inter- and intramolecular relaxation processes were investigated in lubricating model systems from fast relaxing simple monolayers to sluggishly unwinding complex polymer systems. At the free surface of amorphous polystyrene, apparent Arrhenius-type surface and subsurface activation energies were found where dissipation is a discrete function of loading, indicating sensitivity to surface and subsurface mobilities. Finally, in organic NLO systems, constraints in the form of self assembling dendritic groups are introduced to provide both sufficient mobility for alignment of their constituent chromophores and limited mobility for long-term alignment stability. Relaxation activation energies for NLO materials were deduced for these self assembling glassy chromophores, resulting in a first toolbox to guide

  7. Kinetics of isothermal structural relaxation in metallic glasses measured by real-time diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajlaoui, K.; Yousfi, M. A.; Ouelhazi, I.; Georgarakis, K.; Tourki, Z.; Vaughan, G.; Yavari, A. R.

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative measurements of the excess free volume in Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 and Cu55Zr30Ti10Pd5 metallic glasses during in situ isothermal annealing at various temperatures are used to identify physical parameters of structural relaxation in metallic glasses and to discuss proposed models describing this process. The free-volume model is found to provide a simple and predictive description for structural relaxation phenomena. We show that structural relaxation kinetics follows a second-order law in a satisfactory manner. The activation energy for relaxation is found to depend on annealing temperature and the extent of structural relaxation.

  8. The influence of hostility and family history of cardiovascular disease on autonomic activation in response to controllable versus noncontrollable stress, anger imagery induction, and relaxation imagery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Charles; Franks, Susan; Brose, Andrea; Raven, Peter; Williamson, Jon; Shi, Xiangrong; McGill, Jerry; Harrell, Ernest

    2005-06-01

    Autonomic activation in response to controllable versus noncontrollable stress, anger imagery induction, and relaxation imagery was studied among 80 participants between the ages of 18 and 34 years. Participants differed in level of trait hostility and family history of cardiovascular disease. Results were obtained through power spectral analyses of electrocardiograph R-R intervals, which produced an index of autonomic nervous system activation. For both male and female populations, parasympathetic regulation was diminished during anger induction for individuals with high levels of trait hostility and having a family history of cardiovascular disease. Similar results were obtained for women during the uncontrolled stress condition. Based on family history of cardiovascular disease and trait hostility, men responded differentially to relaxation imagery induction, whereas no differences were found among females. PMID:16015455

  9. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 mediates relaxation of coronary arteries via cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of MLCP.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuan; Li, Fen; Klussmann, Enno; Stallone, John N; Han, Guichun

    2014-08-15

    Activation of GPER exerts a protective effect in hypertension and ischemia-reperfusion models and relaxes arteries in vitro. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of GPER-mediated vascular regulation is far from complete. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that GPER-induced relaxation of porcine coronary arteries is mediated via cAMP/PKA signaling. Our findings revealed that vascular relaxation to the selective GPER agonist G-1 (0.3-3 μM) was associated with increased cAMP production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC) with SQ-22536 (100 μM) or of PKA activity with either Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS (5 μM) or PKI (5 μM) attenuated G-1-induced relaxation of coronary arteries preconstricted with PGF2α (1 μM). G-1 also increased PKA activity in cultured coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine downstream signals of the cAMP/PKA cascade, we measured RhoA activity in cultured human and porcine coronary SMCs and myosin-light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity in these artery rings by immunoblot analysis of phosphorylation of myosin-targeting subunit protein-1 (p-MYPT-1; the MLCP regulatory subunit). G-1 decreased PGF2α-induced p-MYPT-1, whereas Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS prevented this inhibitory effect of G-1. Similarly, G-1 inhibited PGF2α-induced phosphorylation of MLC in coronary SMCs, and this inhibitory effect was also reversed by Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. RhoA activity was downregulated by G-1, whereas G36 (GPER antagonist) restored RhoA activity. Finally, FMP-API-1 (100 μM), an inhibitor of the interaction between PKA and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), attenuated the effect of G-1 on coronary artery relaxation and p-MYPT-1. These findings demonstrate that localized cAMP/PKA signaling is involved in GPER-mediated coronary vasodilation by activating MLCP via inhibition of RhoA pathway. PMID:25005496

  10. A nine-coordinated dysprosium(III) compound with an oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer exhibiting two slow magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Liu, Xiangyu; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping

    2015-10-21

    A 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) compound, formulated as [Dy(C2O4)1.5(H2O)3]n·2nH2O (1), has been hydrothermally isolated. As for compound 1, structural analysis reveals that the nine-coordinated Dy(III) ions reside in a slightly distorted tricapped trigonal prism. Under an applied magnetic field of 700 Oe, the compound was magnetically characterized as a new example that two slow relaxations of the magnetization processes can be observed in a 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer. PMID:26327427

  11. A nine-coordinated dysprosium(III) compound with an oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer exhibiting two slow magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Liu, Xiangyu; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping

    2015-10-21

    A 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) compound, formulated as [Dy(C2O4)1.5(H2O)3]n·2nH2O (1), has been hydrothermally isolated. As for compound 1, structural analysis reveals that the nine-coordinated Dy(III) ions reside in a slightly distorted tricapped trigonal prism. Under an applied magnetic field of 700 Oe, the compound was magnetically characterized as a new example that two slow relaxations of the magnetization processes can be observed in a 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer.

  12. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  13. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  14. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  15. Secondary and primary relaxations in hyperbranched polyglycerol: a comparative study in the frequency and time domains.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Bernabé, Abel; Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Diaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Riande, Evaristo; Haag, Rainer

    2007-09-28

    The non-Debye relaxation behavior of hyperbranched polyglycerol was investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy. A thorough study of the relaxations was carried out paying special attention to truncation effects on deconvolutions of overlapping processes. Hyperbranched polyglycerol exhibits two relaxations in the glassy state named in increasing order of frequency beta and gamma processes. The study of the evolution of these two fast processes with temperature in the time retardation spectra shows that the beta absorption is swallowed by the alpha in the glass-liquid transition, the gamma absorption being the only relaxation that remains operative in the liquid state. In heating, a temperature is reached at which the alpha absorption vanishes appearing the alphagamma relaxation. Two characteristics of alpha absorptions, decrease of the dielectric strength with increasing temperature and rather high activation energy, are displayed by the alphagamma process. Williams' ansatz seems to hold for these topologically complex macromolecules. PMID:17902934

  16. Secondary and primary relaxations in hyperbranched polyglycerol: a comparative study in the frequency and time domains.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Bernabé, Abel; Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Diaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Riande, Evaristo; Haag, Rainer

    2007-09-28

    The non-Debye relaxation behavior of hyperbranched polyglycerol was investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy. A thorough study of the relaxations was carried out paying special attention to truncation effects on deconvolutions of overlapping processes. Hyperbranched polyglycerol exhibits two relaxations in the glassy state named in increasing order of frequency beta and gamma processes. The study of the evolution of these two fast processes with temperature in the time retardation spectra shows that the beta absorption is swallowed by the alpha in the glass-liquid transition, the gamma absorption being the only relaxation that remains operative in the liquid state. In heating, a temperature is reached at which the alpha absorption vanishes appearing the alphagamma relaxation. Two characteristics of alpha absorptions, decrease of the dielectric strength with increasing temperature and rather high activation energy, are displayed by the alphagamma process. Williams' ansatz seems to hold for these topologically complex macromolecules.

  17. Aronia melanocarpa juice, a rich source of polyphenols, induces endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary arteries via the redox-sensitive activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Auger, Cyril; Kurita, Ikuko; Anselm, Eric; Rivoarilala, Lalainasoa Odile; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2013-11-30

    This study examined the ability of Aronia melanocarpa (chokeberry) juice, a rich source of polyphenols, to cause NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine the underlying mechanism and the active polyphenols. A. melanocarpa juice caused potent endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary artery rings. Relaxations to A. melanocarpa juice were minimally affected by inhibition of the formation of vasoactive prostanoids and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses, and markedly reduced by N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine (endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor), membrane permeant analogs of superoxide dismutase and catalase, PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor), and wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor). In cultured endothelial cells, A. melanocarpa juice increased the formation of NO as assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using the spin trap iron(II)diethyldithiocarbamate, and reactive oxygen species using dihydroethidium. These responses were associated with the redox-sensitive phosphorylation of Src, Akt and eNOS. A. melanocarpa juice-derived fractions containing conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids induced the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. The present findings indicate that A. melanocarpa juice is a potent stimulator of the endothelial formation of NO in coronary arteries; this effect involves the phosphorylation of eNOS via the redox-sensitive activation of the Src/PI3-kinase/Akt pathway mostly by conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids.

  18. Significance of the direct relaxation process in the low-energy spin dynamics of a one-dimensional ferrimagnet NiCu(C 7H 6N 2O 6)(H 2O) 3·2H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.

    2000-11-01

    In response to recent nuclear magnetic resonance measurements on a ferrimagnetic chain compound NiCu(C 7H 6N 2O 6)(H 2O) 3·2H 2O [Solid State Commun. 113 (2000) 433], we calculate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T1 in terms of a modified spin-wave theory. Emphasizing that the dominant relaxation mechanism arises from the direct (single-magnon) process rather than the Raman (two-magnon) one, we explain the observed temperature and applied-field dependences of 1/ T1. Ferrimagnetic relaxation phenomena are generally discussed and novel ferrimagnets with extremely slow dynamics are predicted.

  19. Steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamic modeling of the relaxation process of isolated chemically reactive systems using density of states and the concept of hypoequilibrium state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the nonequilibrium relaxation process of chemically reactive systems using steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT). The trajectory of the chemical reaction, i.e., the accessible intermediate states, is predicted and discussed. The prediction is made using a thermodynamic-ensemble approach, which does not require detailed information about the particle mechanics involved (e.g., the collision of particles). Instead, modeling the kinetics and dynamics of the relaxation process is based on the principle of steepest-entropy ascent (SEA) or maximum-entropy production, which suggests a constrained gradient dynamics in state space. The SEAQT framework is based on general definitions for energy and entropy and at least theoretically enables the prediction of the nonequilibrium relaxation of system state at all temporal and spatial scales. However, to make this not just theoretically but computationally possible, the concept of density of states is introduced to simplify the application of the relaxation model, which in effect extends the application of the SEAQT framework even to infinite energy eigenlevel systems. The energy eigenstructure of the reactive system considered here consists of an extremely large number of such levels (on the order of 10130) and yields to the quasicontinuous assumption. The principle of SEA results in a unique trajectory of system thermodynamic state evolution in Hilbert space in the nonequilibrium realm, even far from equilibrium. To describe this trajectory, the concepts of subsystem hypoequilibrium state and temperature are introduced and used to characterize each system-level, nonequilibrium state. This definition of temperature is fundamental rather than phenomenological and is a generalization of the temperature defined at stable equilibrium. In addition, to deal with the large number of energy eigenlevels, the equation of motion is formulated on the basis of the density of states and a set of

  20. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: Surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, J. L.; Santoro, P. A.; Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Ciuchi, F.; Mazzulla, A.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  1. Low temperature dielectric relaxation and charged defects in ferroelectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Artemenko, A.; Payan, S.; Rousseau, A.; Arveux, E.; Maglione, M.; Levasseur, D.; Guegan, G.

    2013-04-15

    We report a dielectric relaxation in BaTiO{sub 3}-based ferroelectric thin films of different composition and with several growth modes: sputtering (with and without magnetron) and sol-gel. The relaxation was observed at cryogenic temperatures (T < 100 K) for frequencies from 100 Hz up to 10 MHz. This relaxation activation energy is always lower than 200 meV and is very similar to the relaxation that we reported in the parent bulk perovskites. Based on our Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) investigation, we ascribe this dielectric relaxation to the hopping of electrons among Ti{sup 3+}-V(O) charged defects. Being dependent on the growth process and on the amount of oxygen vacancies, this relaxation can be a useful probe of defects in actual integrated capacitors with no need for specific shaping.

  2. Time Course of Corticospinal Excitability and Intracortical Inhibition Just before Muscle Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Sugawara, Kenichi; Ogahara, Kakuya; Higashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we investigated how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was involved with transient motor cortex (M1) excitability changes observed just before the transition from muscle contraction to muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simultaneous relaxation task of the ipsilateral finger and foot, relaxing from 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force after the go signal. In the simple reaction time (RT) paradigm, single or paired TMS pulses were randomly delivered after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We analyzed the time course prior to the estimated relaxation reaction time (RRT), defined here as the onset of voluntary relaxation. SICI decreased in the 80–100 ms before RRT, and MEPs were significantly greater in amplitude in the 60–80 ms period before RRT than in the other intervals in single-pulse trials. TMS pulses did not effectively increase RRT. These results show that cortical excitability in the early stage, before muscle relaxation, plays an important role in muscle relaxation control. SICI circuits may vary between decreased and increased activation to continuously maintain muscle relaxation during or after a relaxation response. With regard to M1 excitability dynamics, we suggest that SICI also dynamically changes throughout the muscle relaxation process. PMID:26858619

  3. Resonant dipolar relaxation in poly ( ɛ -caprolactone)—A thermally stimulated depolarization current study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patidar, M. M.; Jain, D.; Nath, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2016-07-01

    Resonant dipolar relaxation in poly( ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) is reported using thermally stimulated discharge current spectroscopy. PCL is a bio-medically known shape memory polymer having a well defined γ, β, α, and α ' relaxations, respectively, centered around 125 K, 170 K, 220 K, and 270 K as seen by the measurements. By employing a new protocol variable poling temperature at constant freezing temperature, resonant dipolar relaxation in PCL could be induced, especially in the vicinity of α relaxation. Such a protocol is useful in de-convoluting the features in a more meaningful fashion. By an analysis of activation process, we could show a clear contrast enhancement of the dynamics of the participating dipoles by means of a minimum in the activation energies situated around the glass transition region. The relevant parameters of interest such as activation energies and relaxation times are estimated and discussed.

  4. Ultrafast electronic relaxation processes in semiconductor nanoparticles (silver iodide, silver iodide/silver sulfide, silver bromide/silver sulfide, silver sulfide, cupric sulfide, and copper sulfide) and carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelle, Michael Chris

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation examines primarily the ultrafast dynamics of excited state charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles. The dissertation also briefly examines the excited state lifetimes of a few carotenoids. Understanding the dynamic properties of charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles is crucial for the further development of applications utilizing these systems. The dynamic properties including shallow and deep trapping as well as recombination have been studied in a variety of semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Kinetic modeling was utilized to assist in the assignment of all observed signals and the nature of the decays. The first observation of ultrafast trapping in silver halides was observed in AgI nanoparticles including the identification that interstitial silver ions may act as deep traps. Several interesting phenomena were observed in Ag2S and CuxS nanoparticles including dark shallow trap states and shallow trap state saturation leading to increased transient absorption over transient bleach with increasing excitation intensity. These observations have provided further insight into the relaxation pathways for charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Lifetimes of the S2 excited states of four carotenoids have also been determined. The S2 lifetime for beta-carotene was confirmed from previous fluorescence up-conversion experiments whereas the S2 lifetimes that were previously unknown for three carotenoids, violaxanthin, neaxanthin, and lutein were discovered. These experiments together demonstrate the capabilities of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to characterize and better understand the processes involved in the ultrafast relaxation events in both molecular and nanoparticle systems.

  5. Dielectric relaxation in dimethyl sulfoxide/water mixtures studied by microwave dielectric relaxation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zijie; Manias, Evangelos; Macdonald, Digby D; Lanagan, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Dielectric spectra of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water mixtures, over the entire concentration range, have been measured using the transmission line method at frequencies from 45 MHz to 26 GHz and at temperatures of 298-318 K. The relaxation times of the mixtures show a maximum at an intermediate molar fraction of DMSO. The specific structure of mixtures in different concentration regions was determined by the dielectric relaxation dynamics, obtained from the effect of temperature on the relaxation time. A water structure "breaking effect" is observed in dilute aqueous solutions. The average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in these mixtures is found to be reduced compared to pure water. The increase in the dielectric relaxation time in DMSO/water mixtures is attributed to the spatial (steric) constraints of DMSO molecules on the hydrogen-bond network, rather than being due to hydrophobic hydration of the methyl groups. The interaction between water and DMSO by hydrogen bonding reaches a maximum at a DMSO molar fraction of 0.33, reflected by the maximum activation enthalpy for dielectric relaxation in this concentration, suggesting the formation of a stoichiometric compound, H2O-DMSO-H2O. In highly concentrated solutions, negative activation entropies are observed, indicating the presence of aggregates of DMSO molecules. A distinct antiparallel arrangement of dipoles is obtained for neat DMSO in the liquid state according to the Kirkwood correlation factor (g(K) = 0.5), calculated from the static permittivity. The similarity of the dielectric behavior of pure DMSO and DMSO-rich mixtures suggests that dipole-dipole interactions contribute significantly to the rotational relaxation process in these solutions.

  6. Beta-adrenergic relaxation of mouse urinary bladder smooth muscle in the absence of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sean M; Bentcheva-Petkova, Lilia M; Liu, Lei; Hristov, Kiril L; Chen, Muyan; Kellett, Whitney F; Meredith, Andrea L; Aldrich, Richard W; Nelson, Mark T; Petkov, Georgi V

    2008-10-01

    In urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM), stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-ARs) leads to activation of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel currents (Petkov GV and Nelson MT. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 288: C1255-C1263, 2005). In this study we tested the hypothesis that the BK channel mediates UBSM relaxation in response to beta-AR stimulation using the highly specific BK channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (IBTX) and a BK channel knockout (BK-KO) mouse model in which the gene for the pore-forming subunit was deleted. UBSM strips isolated from wild-type (WT) and BK-KO mice were stimulated with 20 mM K+ or 1 microM carbachol to induce phasic and tonic contractions. BK-KO and WT UBSM strips pretreated with IBTX had increased overall contractility, and UBSM BK-KO cells were depolarized with approximately 12 mV. Isoproterenol, a nonspecific beta-AR agonist, and forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator, decreased phasic and tonic contractions of WT UBSM strips in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of IBTX, the concentration-response curves to isoproterenol and forskolin were shifted to the right in WT UBSM strips. Isoproterenol- and forskolin-mediated relaxations were enhanced in BK-KO UBSM strips, and a leftward shift in the concentration-response curves was observed. The leftward shift was eliminated upon PKA inhibition with H-89, suggesting upregulation of the beta-AR-cAMP pathway in BK-KO mice. These results indicate that the BK channel is a key modulator in beta-AR-mediated relaxation of UBSM and further suggest that alterations in BK channel expression or function could contribute to some pathophysiological conditions such as overactive bladder and urinary incontinence.

  7. Processed sweet corn has higher antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Dewanto, Veronica; Wu, Xianzhong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2002-08-14

    Processed fruits and vegetables have been long considered to have lower nutritional value than the fresh produce due to the loss of vitamin C during processing. Vitamin C in apples has been found to contribute <0.4% of total antioxidant activity, indicating most of the activity comes from the natural combination of phytochemicals. This suggests that processed fruits and vegetables may retain their antioxidant activity despite the loss of vitamin C. Here it is shown that thermal processing at 115 degrees C for 25 min significantly elevated the total antioxidant activity of sweet corn by 44% and increased phytochemical content such as ferulic acid by 550% and total phenolics by 54%, although 25% vitamin C loss was observed. Processed sweet corn has increased antioxidant activity equivalent to 210 mg of vitamin C/100 g of corn compared to the remaining 3.2 mg of vitamin C in the sample that contributed only 1.5% of its total antioxidant activity. These findings do not support the notion that processed fruits and vegetables have lower nutritional value than fresh produce. This information may have a significant impact on consumers' food selection by increasing their consumption of fruits and vegetables to reduce the risk of chronic diseases. PMID:12166989

  8. Unusual fast secondary relaxation in metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Zhang, S.T.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y.D.; Liu, C.T.; Lu, J.

    2015-01-01

    The relaxation spectrum of glassy solids has long been used to probe their dynamic structural features and the fundamental deformation mechanisms. Structurally complicated glasses, such as molecular glasses, often exhibit multiple relaxation processes. By comparison, metallic glasses have a simple atomic structure with dense atomic packing, and their relaxation spectra were commonly found to be simpler than those of molecular glasses. Here we show the compelling evidence obtained across a wide range of temperatures and frequencies from a La-based metallic glass, which clearly shows two peaks of secondary relaxations (fast versus slow) in addition to the primary relaxation peak. The discovery of the unusual fast secondary relaxation unveils the complicated relaxation dynamics in metallic glasses and, more importantly, provides us the clues which help decode the structural features serving as the ‘trigger' of inelasticity on mechanical agitations. PMID:26204999

  9. Screening of plants used by Southern African traditional healers in the treatment of dysmenorrhoea for prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors and uterine relaxing activity.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, K; Jäger, A K; Raidoo, D M; van Staden, J

    1999-01-01

    Plants used by Southern African traditional healers for the treatment of menstrual pains were screened for prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors and the ability to reduce isolated uterine muscle contraction using the cyclooxygenase and in vitro uterine bioassays respectively. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid and the enzyme that drives this reaction is cyclooxygenase. The excessive production of prostaglandins by the myometrium and endometrium induces uterine contractions. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase and hence of the prostaglandin biosynthetic pathway may lead to relief of menstrual pain. Ten plants used by traditional healers for menstrual pains were assayed for cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity. Several plant extracts exhibited high inhibitory activity in the assay. The highest activities were obtained with ethanolic extracts of Siphonochilus aethiopicus, Cenchrus ciliaris and Solanum mauritianum. Generally ethanolic extracts gave higher activity than the aqueous extracts. None of the ethanolic plant extracts were able to relax or reduce the contractions of the precontracted guinea pig uterus. PMID:10075117

  10. Activation of bitter taste receptors (tas2rs) relaxes detrusor smooth muscle and suppresses overactive bladder symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Nyirimigabo, Eric; Mi, Yue; Wang, Yan; Liu, Qinghua; Man, Libo; Wu, Shiliang; Jin, Jie; Ji, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are traditionally thought to be expressed exclusively on the taste buds of the tongue. However, accumulating evidence has indicated that this receptor family performs non-gustatory functions outside the mouth in addition to taste. Here, we examined the role of TAS2Rs in human and mouse detrusor smooth muscle (DSM). We showed that mRNA for various TAS2R subtypes was expressed in both human and mouse detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) at distinct levels. Chloroquine (CLQ), an agonist for TAS2Rs, concentration-dependently relaxed carbachol- and KCl-induced contractions of human DSM strips. Moreover, 100 μM of CLQ significantly inhibited spontaneous and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractions of human DSM strips. After a slight contraction, CLQ (1 mM) entirely relaxed carbachol-induced contraction of mouse DSM strips. Furthermore, denatonium and quinine concentration-dependently decreased carbachol-induced contractions of mouse DSM strips. Finally, we demonstrated that CLQ treatment significantly suppressed the overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms of mice with partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO). In conclusion, we for the first time provide evidence of the existence of TAS2Rs in the urinary DSM and demonstrate that TAS2Rs may represent a potential target for OAB. These findings open a new approach to develop drugs for OAB in the future. PMID:27056888

  11. Activated processes and Inherent Structure dynamics of finite-size mean-field models for glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisanti, A.; Ritort, F.

    2000-12-01

    We investigate the Inherent Structure (IS) dynamics of mean-field finite-size spin-glass models whose high-temperature dynamics is described in the thermodynamic limit by the schematic Mode Coupling Theory for supercooled liquids. Near the threshold energy the dynamics is ruled by activated processes which induce a logarithmic slow relaxation. We show the presence of aging in both the IS correlation and integrated response functions and check the validity of the one-step replica symmetry breaking scenario in the presence of activated processes. Our work shows: 1) the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be computed from the configurational entropy obtained in the Stillinger and Weber approach, 2) the intermediate time regime (log (t) ~ N) in mean-field theory automatically includes activated processes opening the way to analytically investigate activated processes by computing corrections beyond mean field.

  12. Slow processes in viscous liquids: Stress and structural relaxation, chemical reaction freezing, crystal nucleation and microemulsion arrest, in relation to liquid fragility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. A.; Alba, C.; Arzimanoglou, A.; Fan, J.; Böhmer, R.; Lu, Q.; Sanchez, E.; Senapati, H.; Tatsumisago, M.

    1992-05-01

    We review a variety of measurements on model systems in the medium viscosity range which seem consistent with both thermodynamical (entropy vanishing) and dynamical (mode coupling) origins of glassy behavior and then examine behavior near and below Tg to seek relations between liquid fragility and the non-exponential and non-linear aspects of liquid relaxation processes. We include the model ionic system Ca(NO3)2-KNO3 and analogs, van der Waals systems, and the covalently-bonded system Ge-As-Se in which the relation of liquid properties to the vector percolation concepts of Phillips and Thorpe can be conveniently studied. With some basic phenomenology in the liquid state itself thereby established, we turn attention to longer length-scale processes occurring in viscous liquid media. Among these will be the kinetics of nucleation of crystals, the freezing of microemulsion droplet sizes during continuous cooling of temperature sensitive microemulsions, and the freezing of chemical reactions during continuous cooling or continuous evaporation of solvent. The latter freezings can occur at temperatures which are far above the solvent glass transition temperature depending on solvent fragility, which may be a consideration in the strategies adopted by nature in preservation of plant and insect integrity in cold and arid climates. Finally we consider the slowing down which occurs in liquids with density maxima like water and SiO2 which appear to have, as their low temperature metastable limits, spinodal instabilities (with associated divergences in physical properties) in place of the usual ideal glass transitions. So far little studied for lack of tractable slow systems, these offer a new and challenging arena for relaxation studies.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    global magnetic helicity. Some of the shortcomings of the Taylor theory in explaining details of real pinch experiments are used by the authors as a justification for a more phenomenological approach, described in detail in Chapter 4. They construct a `phenomenological model' that utilizes experimental information and linear stability properties; this is described authoritatively, since the authors have been very much involved in this work. The experimental evidence showing the presence of large scale instabilities in RFPs is used to provide support for the main thrust of the monograph, described in Chapter 5, namely that numerical computations of the non-linear evolution of MHD modes is the key to understanding the dynamical processes occurring in relaxation. These MHD processes give rise to a dynamo effect, analogous to that generating magnetic fields in the earth or stars, which overcomes the natural consequences of Spitzer resistivity and produces a reversed toroidal field. Chapter 5 begins with a general discussion of dynamo models and then moves on to the pioneering work of Sykes and Wesson on numerical simulation of relaxation, before launching into an authoritative account of more detailed and advanced simulations in which the authors themselves have played a major part. These calculations capture the basic features of relaxation in pinches and provide a demonstration of Taylor's theory. Chapters 6 and 7 describe some applications to RFPs of relaxation theory: the anomalous loop voltage, improving their performance by helicity injection, as well as sawteeth and thermal transport. The penultimate Chapter 8 proposes applications of this computational approach to relaxation, developed initially for laboratory pinches, to the solar corona. This is a stimulating discussion, drawing analogues between the two very different situations, ideal for broadening the perspectives of the fusion physicist. Specifically, the authors consider modelling of the evolution of active

  14. Excitation photon energy dependence of the relaxation processes of the photoexcited states in a quasi-one-dimensional halogen bridged Pt complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Y.; Matsushita, N.; Ohashi, N.

    Excitation photon energy dependence of the relaxation processes of the photoexcited states in a quasi-one-dimensional halogenbridged platinum complex has been investigated by femto second transient absorption measurements. In a Pt complex, [Pt(en)2][Pt(en)2I2](SO4)2.6H2O (Pt-I-SO4), a photo-induced absorption (PA) band caused by self trapped excitons (STE's) has been observed when the excitation photon energy is close to the peak energy, 1.44 eV, of the absorption band of the one photon allowed charge transfer (CT) exciton with odd parity. In addition, a long lived PA bands caused by charged solitons (CS's) has been observed. The intensity of these long lived CS absorption band shows quadratic excitation power dependence. This shows that CS's pairs are not generated from odd-CT-excitons but from the higher energy two photon excited states. When the excitation photon energy is close to a half of the of the even CT- exciton energy, 1.84 eV, PA bands caused by STE's and CS's have been observed. These states are generated from the two photon excited even CT-excitons. When the excitation photon energy is much higher than the energy of the odd CT-exciton, PA bands caused by CS's and polarons have been observed. The intensities of these PA bands show linear excitation power dependences. Photo-generated free electron hole pairs are considered to relax into CS's and polarons.

  15. Relaxation process of the excited state and selection rule in the soft X-ray emission of Si and cBN.

    PubMed

    Shin, S; Agui, A; Harada, Y

    1997-07-01

    The soft X-ray emission spectra of Si and cubic boron nitride (cBN) are compared in the Si2p- and B1s-core exciton regions because inversion symmetry is lost and the band gap is extremely large for cBN although both crystal structures are very similar. The background in the soft X-ray emission spectrum of Si is much larger than that for cBN but becomes extremely weak as the excitation energy becomes low and the Raman process becomes dominant compared with the fluorescence process. The background is found to be mainly formed by electron excitation from the valence band to the conduction band. The Raman spectrum is similar to the absorption spectrum in cBN, while those of Si are quite different from each other. It is shown that the centrosymmetry is important in the selection rule of Raman scattering. In resonant Raman scattering the selection rule partly breaks down due to the lattice relaxation process that emits an ungerade phonon in the intermediate state.

  16. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Increased rat cardiac angiotensin converting enzyme activity and mRNA expression in pressure overload left ventricular hypertrophy. Effects on coronary resistance, contractility, and relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, H; Dzau, V J; Tang, S S; Hirsch, A T; Apstein, C S; Lorell, B H

    1990-01-01

    We compared the activity and physiologic effects of cardiac angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) using isovolumic hearts from male Wistar rats with left ventricular hypertrophy due to chronic experimental aortic stenosis and from control rats. In response to the infusion of 3.5 X 10(-8) M angiotensin I in the isolated buffer perfused beating hearts, the intracardiac fractional conversion to angiotensin II was higher in the hypertrophied hearts compared with the controls (17.3 +/- 4.1% vs 6.8 +/- 1.3%, P less than 0.01). ACE activity was also significantly increased in the free wall, septum, and apex of the hypertrophied left ventricle, whereas ACE activity from the nonhypertrophied right ventricle of the aortic stenosis rats was not different from that of the control rats. Northern blot analyses of poly(A)+ purified RNA demonstrated the expression of ACE mRNA, which was increased fourfold in left ventricular tissue obtained from the hearts with left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the controls. In both groups, the intracardiac conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II caused a comparable dose-dependent increase in coronary resistance. In the control hearts, angiotensin II activation had no significant effect on systolic or diastolic function; however, it was associated with a dose-dependent depression of left ventricular diastolic relaxation in the hypertrophied hearts. These novel observations suggest that cardiac ACE is induced in hearts with left ventricular hypertrophy, and that the resultant intracardiac activation of angiotensin II may have differential effects on myocardial relaxation in hypertrophied hearts relative to controls. Images PMID:2174912

  18. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. -S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; et al

    2015-09-29

    We report direct lattice level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in-situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50 GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns) and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ~1 ns. For 80 and 125 GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ~65 GPa.more » The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density and these quantities are compared to the Livermore Multiscale Strength model as well as various molecular dynamics simulations.« less

  19. Vibrational relaxation in H/sub 2/ molecules by wall collisions: applications to negative ion source processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.; Hiskes, J.R.; Hardy, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    In the volume of a hydrogen discharge, H/sub 2/ molecules, excited to high vibrational levels (v'' > 6), are formed either by fast-electron collisions or from H/sub 2//sup +/ ions that are accelerated across the discharge-wall potential that undergo Auger neutralization prior to impact with the discharge chamber wall. We have used computer molecular dynamics to study the de-excitation and re-excitation of vibrationally-excited H/sub 2/ molecules undergoing repeated wall collisions. The initial translational energies range from thermal to 100 eV and the initial vibrational states range from v'' = 2 to v'' = 12. The average loss or gain of vibrational, rotational, translational, and total molecular energies and the survival rates of the molecules have been evaluated. At thermal energies vibrational de-excitation is the predominant process, and a consistent picture emerges of rapid energy redistribution into all the molecular degrees of freedom and a slower rate of loss of total molecular energy to the wall. At higher translational energies (1 to 100 eV) a substantial fraction of the molecules survive with large (v'' > 6) vibrational energy. This vibrational population provides a contribution to the total excited vibrational population comparable to that from the fast-electron collision process.

  20. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  1. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Zinc-Porphyrin: Electronic-Vibrational Coupling.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2016-08-18

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are the active core of compounds with crucial roles in living systems, such as hemoglobin and chlorophyll, and in technology as photocatalysts and light absorbers for solar energy conversion. Zinc-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP) is a prototypical cyclic tetrapyrrole that has been intensely studied in past decades. Because of its importance for photochemical processes the optical properties are of particular interest, and, accordingly, numerous studies have focused on light absorption and excited-state dynamics of Zn-TPP. Relaxation after photoexcitation in the Soret band involves internal conversion that is preceded by an ultrafast process. This relaxation process has been observed by several groups. Hitherto, it has not been established if it involves a higher lying "dark" state or vibrational relaxation in the excited S2 state. Here we combine high time resolution electronic and vibrational spectroscopy to show that this process constitutes vibrational relaxation in the anharmonic S2 potential. PMID:27482847

  2. Effectiveness of a Worksite Social & Physical Environment Intervention on Need for Recovery, Physical Activity and Relaxation; Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Coffeng, Jennifer K.; Boot, Cécile R. L.; Duijts, Saskia F. A.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; van Mechelen, Willem; Hendriksen, Ingrid J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of a worksite social and physical environment intervention on need for recovery (i.e., early symptoms of work-related mental and physical fatigue), physical activity and relaxation. Also, the effectiveness of the separate interventions was investigated. Methods In this 2×2 factorial design study, 412 office employees from a financial service provider participated. Participants were allocated to the combined social and physical intervention, to the social intervention only, to the physical intervention only or to the control group. The primary outcome measure was need for recovery. Secondary outcomes were work-related stress (i.e., exhaustion, detachment and relaxation), small breaks, physical activity (i.e., stair climbing, active commuting, sport activities, light/moderate/vigorous physical activity) and sedentary behavior. Outcomes were measured by questionnaires at baseline, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Multilevel analyses were performed to investigate the effects of the three interventions. Results In all intervention groups, a non-significant reduction was found in need for recovery. In the combined intervention (n = 92), exhaustion and vigorous physical activities decreased significantly, and small breaks at work and active commuting increased significantly compared to the control group. The social intervention (n = 118) showed a significant reduction in exhaustion, sedentary behavior at work and a significant increase in small breaks at work and leisure activities. In the physical intervention (n = 96), stair climbing at work and active commuting significantly increased, and sedentary behavior at work decreased significantly compared to the control group. Conclusion None of the interventions was effective in improving the need for recovery. It is recommended to implement the social and physical intervention among a population with higher baseline values of need for recovery. Furthermore, the intervention

  3. The activated sludge process: Fundamentals of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Junkins, R.; Deeny, K.J.; Eckhoff, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures given here - based on extensive and intensive experience. Background information on process mechanics is followed by detailed consideration of control and troubleshooting practices. Contents: PREFACE AND INTRODUCTION; PROCESS MECHANICS; Basic Mechanism of Activated Sludge Systems; Formation of Activated Sludge; Growth of Microorganisms; Classifications of Microorganisms: Type, Environment, Age; Solids Separation and Return; FACTORS AFFECTING OPERATION; Raw Wastewater Strength; Dissolved Oxygen; pH; Temperature; Nutrients; Toxicity; Mixing; Detention Time; Hydraulics; PROCESS MODIFICATIONS; Conventional; Complete Mix; Contact-Stabilization; Extended Aeration; Others; PROCESS MONITORING; Visual; Analytical Indicators; OPERATIONAL CONTROL; Sludge Volume Index; Sludge Age; Mean Cell Residence Time; Food/Microorganism Ratio; Organic Loading Rate; Solids Loading Rate; Clarifier Overflow Rate; Weir Overflow Rate; Sludge Recycle Rate, Sludge Wastage Rate; Chemical Feed Rate; TROUBLESHOOTING; Low BOD Removal; Low D.O. in Aeration Baisn; Poor Settling; PLANT START-UP; Introduction; Pre Start-up Checkup; Wastewater Analysis; Seed Screening; Process Checklist; Mechanical Checklist; Familiarization and Training; Start-up; Seeding; Process Monitoring; Transition; Typical Start-up Problems; Foaming; Settling Problems; Low BOD Removal; INDEX.

  4. Speech perception as an active cognitive process

    PubMed Central

    Heald, Shannon L. M.; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    One view of speech perception is that acoustic signals are transformed into representations for pattern matching to determine linguistic structure. This process can be taken as a statistical pattern-matching problem, assuming realtively stable linguistic categories are characterized by neural representations related to auditory properties of speech that can be compared to speech input. This kind of pattern matching can be termed a passive process which implies rigidity of processing with few demands on cognitive processing. An alternative view is that speech recognition, even in early stages, is an active process in which speech analysis is attentionally guided. Note that this does not mean consciously guided but that information-contingent changes in early auditory encoding can occur as a function of context and experience. Active processing assumes that attention, plasticity, and listening goals are important in considering how listeners cope with adverse circumstances that impair hearing by masking noise in the environment or hearing loss. Although theories of speech perception have begun to incorporate some active processing, they seldom treat early speech encoding as plastic and attentionally guided. Recent research has suggested that speech perception is the product of both feedforward and feedback interactions between a number of brain regions that include descending projections perhaps as far downstream as the cochlea. It is important to understand how the ambiguity of the speech signal and constraints of context dynamically determine cognitive resources recruited during perception including focused attention, learning, and working memory. Theories of speech perception need to go beyond the current corticocentric approach in order to account for the intrinsic dynamics of the auditory encoding of speech. In doing so, this may provide new insights into ways in which hearing disorders and loss may be treated either through augementation or therapy. PMID

  5. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  6. Molecular relaxations in amorphous phenylbutazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahra, M.; Thayyil, M. Shahin; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular dynamics of phenylbutazone in the supercooled liquid and glassy state is studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy for test frequencies 1 kHz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz over a wide temperature range. Above the glass transition temperature Tg, the presence of the structural α-relaxation peak was observed which shifts towards lower frequencies as the temperature decreases and kinetically freezes at Tg. Besides the structural α-relaxation peak, a β-process which arises due to the localized molecular fluctuations is observed at lower temperature.

  7. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  8. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    PubMed

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  9. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  10. Process for preparing active oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Berard, Michael F.; Hunter, Jr., Orville; Shiers, Loren E.; Dole, Stephen L.; Scheidecker, Ralph W.

    1979-02-20

    An improved process for preparing active oxide powders in which cation hydroxide gels, prepared in the conventional manner are chemically dried by alternately washing the gels with a liquid organic compound having polar characteristics and a liquid organic compound having nonpolar characteristics until the mechanical water is removed from the gel. The water-free cation hydroxide is then contacted with a final liquid organic wash to remove the previous organic wash and speed drying. The dried hydroxide treated in the conventional manner will form a highly sinterable active oxide powder.

  11. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  12. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  13. Enhanced multistatic active sonar signal processing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kexin; Liang, Junli; Karlsson, Johan; Li, Jian

    2013-07-01

    Multistatic active sonar systems involve the transmission and reception of multiple probing sequences and can achieve significantly enhanced performance of target detection and localization through exploiting spatial diversity. This paper mainly focuses on two signal processing aspects of such systems, namely, enhanced range-Doppler imaging and improved target parameter estimation. The main contributions of this paper are (1) a hybrid dense-sparse method is proposed to generate range-Doppler images with both low sidelobe levels and high accuracy; (2) a generalized K-Means clustering (GKC) method for target association is developed to associate the range measurements from different transmitter-receiver pairs, which is actually a range fitting procedure; (3) the extended invariance principle-based weighted least-squares method is developed for accurate target position and velocity estimation. The effectiveness of the proposed multistatic active sonar signal processing techniques is verified using numerical examples.

  14. Efficient upconversion luminescence from Ba5Gd8Zn4O21:Yb3+, Er3+ based on a demonstrated cross-relaxation process

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Chao; Wu, Jianhong; Yang, Yanmin; Han, Boning; Wei, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Under 971 nm excitation, bright green and red emissions from Yb3+/Er3+ co-doped Ba5Gd8Zn4O21 phosphor can be observed, especially the intense red emission in highly doped samples. The experimental results indicate that Ba5Gd8Zn4O21:Yb3+, Er3+ emits stronger upconversion luminescence than NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ under a low excitation power, and a maximum upconversion power efficiency of 2.7% for Ba5Gd8Zn4O21:Yb3+, Er3+ was achieved. More significantly, to explain the red emission enhanced with the dopant concentration, this paper presents a possible cross-relaxation process and demonstrates it based on the rate equation description and temporal evolution. In view of the strong upconversion luminescence, colour tunable ability and stable chemical nature, Yb3+/Er3+ co-doped Ba5Gd8Zn4O21 phosphor could be an excellent candidate for efficient upconversion luminescence generation. PMID:26931554

  15. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can detect, recognize, and

  16. Ellipsoidal relaxation of electrodeformed vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lin, Hao; Lira, Rafael; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin

    2015-11-01

    Electrodeformation has been extensively applied to investigate the mechanical behavior of vesicles and cells. While the deformation process often exhibits complex behavior and reveals interesting physics, the relaxation process post-pulsation is equally intriguing yet less frequently studied. In this work theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented, which reveal the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula, which is derived only for equilibrated shapes, is shown to be applicable to dynamic situations such as in relaxation. A closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a timescale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the ``entropic'' and the ``constant-tension'' regime. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data/model analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  17. Activation of consolidation processes of alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrenin, S. V.; Zenin, B. S.; Tayukin, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    The methods for activating sintering ceramics based on Al2O3 by mechanical activation in the planetary mill, by adding in the mixture of nanopowders (NP) Al, Al2O3, and submicron powder TiO2, and by applying the technology of spark plasma sintering (SPS) are developed. It has been shown that adding the nanopowder up to 20 wt. % Al2O3 in a coarse powder α-Al2O3 activates the sintering process resulting in increased density and hardness of the sintered alumina ceramics. Substantial effect of increasing density of alumina ceramics due to adding the submicron powder TiO2 in the compound of initial powder mixtures has been established.

  18. Hypoxia promotes relaxation of bovine coronary arteries through lowering cytosolic NADPH.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Sachin A; Wolin, Michael S

    2006-06-01

    Hypoxia relaxes endothelium-denuded bovine coronary arteries (BCA) through mechanisms that do not appear to involve reactive oxygen species, prostaglandins, or nitric oxide. Because of similarities in the relaxation of BCA to hypoxia (Po(2) = 8-10 Torr) and inhibitors of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) including 6-aminonicotinamide and epiandrosterone, we measured NADPH and NADP and found that hypoxia caused NADPH oxidation (decreased NADPH/NADP). The relaxation to hypoxia was similar to previously reported properties of relaxation to PPP inhibitors in that both responses were associated with glutathione oxidation and depressed intracellular calcium release and calcium influx-mediated contractile responses. Inhibitors of potassium channels had minimal effects on these relaxation responses. Relaxation to hypoxia and PPP inhibitors were attenuated by a thiol reductant (3 mM dithiothreitol) and by eliciting contraction with an activator of protein kinase C (phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate). In the presence of contraction to U-46619, relaxation to hypoxia and PPP inhibitors were attenuated by the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump inhibitor 200 microM cyclopiazonic acid and by 10 mM pyruvate. Hypoxia decreased BCA levels of glucose-6-phosphate but not ATP. Pyruvate prevented the hypoxia-elicited decrease in glucose-6-phosphate and glutathione oxidation, and it increased NADPH levels under hypoxia to levels observed under normoxia. Thus hypoxia causes a metabolic stress on the PPP that promotes BCA relaxation through processes controlled by lowering the levels of cytosolic NADPH.

  19. Yield stress in metallic glasses: The jamming-unjamming transition studied through Monte Carlo simulations based on the activation-relaxation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2009-11-01

    A Monte Carlo approach allowing for stress control is employed to study the yield stress of a two-dimensional metallic glass in the limit of low temperatures and long (infinite) time scales. The elementary thermally activated events are determined using the activation-relaxation technique (ART). By tracking the minimum-energy state of the glass for various applied stresses, we find a well-defined jamming-unjamming transition at a yield stress about 30% lower than the steady-state flow stress obtained in conventional strain-controlled quasistatic simulations. ART is then used to determine the evolution of the distribution of thermally activated events in the glass microstructure both below and above the yield stress. We show that aging below the yield stress increases the stability of the glass, both thermodynamically (the internal potential energy decreases) and dynamically (the aged glass is surrounded by higher-energy barriers than the initial quenched configuration). In contrast, deformation above the yield stress brings the glass into a high internal potential energy state that is only marginally stable, being surrounded by a high density of low-energy barriers. The strong influence of deformation on the glass state is also evidenced by the microstructure polarization, revealed here through an asymmetry of the distribution of thermally activated inelastic strains in glasses after simple shear deformation.

  20. Complete solids retention activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Amanatidou, E; Samiotis, G; Trikoilidou, E; Pekridis, G; Tsikritzis, L

    2016-01-01

    In a slaughterhouse's full-scale extended aeration activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), operating under complete solids retention time, the evolution of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) concentration, food to micro-organisms ratio (F/M) and substrate utilization rate (SUR) were studied for over a year. Biomass growth phases in correlation to sludge biological and morphological characteristics were studied. Three distinguished growth phases were observed during the 425 days of monitoring. The imposed operational conditions led the process to extended biomass starvation conditions, minimum F/M, minimum SUR and predator species growth. MLSS and MLVSS reached a stabilization phase (plateau phase) where almost zero sludge accumulation was observed. The concept of degradation of the considered non-biodegradable particulate compounds in influent and in biomass (cell debris) was also studied. Comparison of evolution of observed sludge yields (Yobs) in the WWTP with Yobs predictions by activated sludge models verified the degradation concept for the considered non-biodegradable compounds. Control of the sedimentation process was achieved, by predicting the solids loading rate critical point using state point analysis and stirred/unstirred settling velocity tests and by applying a high return activated sludge rate. The nitrogen gas related sedimentation problems were taken into consideration.

  1. Active PZT fibers: a commercial production process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, Harold B.; Pascucci, Marina R.; Parish, Mark V.; Bent, Aaron A.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    1999-07-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) active fibers, from 80 to 250 micrometers in diameter, are produced for the AFOSR/DARPA funded Active Fiber Composites Consortium (AFCC) Program and commercial customers. CeraNova has developed a proprietary ceramics-based technology to produce PZT mono-filaments of the required purity, composition, straightness, and piezoelectric properties for use in active fiber composite structures. CeraNova's process begins with the extrusion of continuous lengths of mono-filament precursor fiber from a plasticized mix of PZT-5A powder. The care that must be taken to avoid mix contamination is described using illustrations form problems experiences with extruder wear and metallic contamination. Corrective actions are described and example microstructures are shown. The consequences of inadequate lead control are also shown. Sintered mono- filament mechanical strength and piezoelectric properties data approach bulk values but the validity of such a benchmark is questioned based on variable correlation with composite performance measures. Comb-like ceramic preform structures are shown that are being developed to minimize process and handling costs while maintaining the required mono-filament straightness necessary for composite fabrication. Lastly, actuation performance data are presented for composite structures fabricated and tested by Continuum Control Corporation. Free strain actuation in excess of 2000 microstrain are observed.

  2. Brain activation during facial emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Gur, Ruben C; Schroeder, Lee; Turner, Travis; McGrath, Claire; Chan, Robin M; Turetsky, Bruce I; Alsop, David; Maldjian, Joseph; Gur, Raquel E

    2002-07-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have helped identify neural systems involved in cognitive processing and more recently have indicated limbic activation to emotional stimuli. Some functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have reported increased amygdala response during exposure to emotional stimuli while others have not shown such activation. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that activation of the amygdala is related to the relevance of the emotional valence of stimuli. Healthy young participants (7 men, 7 women) were studied in a high-field (4 tesla) scanner using blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes in a blocked "box car" design. They viewed facial displays of happiness, sadness, anger, fear, and disgust as well as neutral faces obtained from professional actors and actresses of diverse ethnicity and age. Their task alternated between emotion discrimination (indicating whether the emotion was positive or negative) and age discrimination (indicating whether the poser was older or younger than 30). Blocks contained the same proportion of emotional and neutral faces. Limbic response was greater during the emotion than during the age discrimination conditions. The response was most pronounced in the amygdala, but was also present in the hippocampus and circumscribed voxels in other limbic regions. These results support the central role of the amygdala in emotion processing, and indicate its sensitivity to the task relevance of the emotional display.

  3. The ionic transport mechanism and coupling between the ion conduction and segmental relaxation processes of PEO20-LiCF3SO3 based ion conducting polymer clay composites.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tapabrata; Jena, Sidhartha S; Pradhan, Dillip K

    2016-07-20

    A series of ion conducting polymer-clay composites has been prepared using a solution casting technique. Relaxation dynamics and the ionic transport mechanism are systematically studied employing broadband dielectric spectroscopy over a wide frequency and temperature range. Among different phenomenological and theoretical models for ion conduction in disordered ionic conductors, conductivity isotherm spectra are analysed using the modified Almond-West and random free energy barrier model. Conductivity scaling suggests that the ionic transport mechanism is independent of temperature, and a similar inference is also obtained using scaled electrical modulus spectra. DC conductivity along with conductivity and segmental relaxation time following the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher relationship suggests coupling between the ionic transport and segmental relaxation processes. Electrical modulus and dielectric formalism are used to understand the conductivity and segmental relaxation processes, respectively. The presence of first and second universality in the ionic transport mechanism is discussed using the real part of conductivity spectra and dielectric loss spectra. The crossover between the first and second universality is explained using the Kramer-Krönig approach. The ion diffusion coefficient is investigated using Ratner's classical approach in combination with the modified Stokes-Einstein relationship to correlate the coupled nature of the ion conduction mechanism and polymer segmental motion.

  4. The ionic transport mechanism and coupling between the ion conduction and segmental relaxation processes of PEO20-LiCF3SO3 based ion conducting polymer clay composites.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tapabrata; Jena, Sidhartha S; Pradhan, Dillip K

    2016-07-20

    A series of ion conducting polymer-clay composites has been prepared using a solution casting technique. Relaxation dynamics and the ionic transport mechanism are systematically studied employing broadband dielectric spectroscopy over a wide frequency and temperature range. Among different phenomenological and theoretical models for ion conduction in disordered ionic conductors, conductivity isotherm spectra are analysed using the modified Almond-West and random free energy barrier model. Conductivity scaling suggests that the ionic transport mechanism is independent of temperature, and a similar inference is also obtained using scaled electrical modulus spectra. DC conductivity along with conductivity and segmental relaxation time following the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher relationship suggests coupling between the ionic transport and segmental relaxation processes. Electrical modulus and dielectric formalism are used to understand the conductivity and segmental relaxation processes, respectively. The presence of first and second universality in the ionic transport mechanism is discussed using the real part of conductivity spectra and dielectric loss spectra. The crossover between the first and second universality is explained using the Kramer-Krönig approach. The ion diffusion coefficient is investigated using Ratner's classical approach in combination with the modified Stokes-Einstein relationship to correlate the coupled nature of the ion conduction mechanism and polymer segmental motion. PMID:27399598

  5. Prominent β-relaxations in yttrium based metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z. G.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-19

    Most metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit weak slow β-relaxation. We report the prominent β-relaxation in YNiAl metallic glass with a wide composition range. Compared with other MGs, the MGs show a pronounced β-relaxation peak and high β-relaxation peak temperature, and the β-relaxation behavior varies significantly with the changes of the constituent elements, which is attributed to the fluctuations of chemical interactions between the components. We demonstrate the correlation between the β-relaxation and the activation of flow units for mechanical behaviors of the MG and show that the MG is model system for studying some controversial issues in glasses.

  6. Universal patterns in the behavior of complex systems: from relaxation in fractal networks to distribution of income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicu, Valerica; Stoneman, Michael; Fung, Russell

    2007-03-01

    The study of relaxation is an active area of research in the fields of dielectric, mechanical and optical spectroscopy, which is insufficiently developed for the case of complex systems. It has been established that the relaxation of many systems deviates markedly from classical Debye dispersion function (in the frequency domain) or from pure exponential decay (in the time domain), but the exact ways in which these deviations occur and their significance are still debated issues. Here we propose that a fractal-tree network appropriately describes the relaxation pathway in a variety of complex systems and predicts coupled (or hierarchical) as well as uncoupled (parallel) relaxation processes. This approach has been originally introduced for description of dielectric relaxation in Cantorian trees in biology. Upon adequate generalization this approach sheds new light on a variety of processes, ranging from kinetics of protein-ligand rebinding through distribution of income in populations of humans.

  7. Two structural relaxations in protein hydration water and their dynamic crossovers.

    PubMed

    Camisasca, G; De Marzio, M; Corradini, D; Gallo, P

    2016-07-28

    We study the translational single particle dynamics of hydration water of lysozyme upon cooling by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We find that water close to the protein exhibits two distinct relaxations. By characterizing their behavior upon cooling, we are able to assign the first relaxation to the structural α-relaxation also present in bulk water and in other glass-forming liquids. The second, slower, relaxation can be ascribed to a dynamic coupling of hydration water motions to the fluctuations of the protein structure. Both relaxation times exhibit crossovers in the behavior upon cooling. For the α-process, we find upon cooling a crossover from a fragile behavior to a strong behavior at a temperature which is about five degrees higher than that of bulk water. The long-relaxation time appears strictly connected to the protein motion as it shows upon cooling a temperature crossover from a strong behavior with a lower activation energy to a strong behavior with a higher activation energy. The crossover temperature coincides with the temperature of the protein dynamical transition. These findings can help experimentalists to disentangle the different information coming from total correlators and to better characterize hydration water relaxations in different biomolecules. PMID:27475377

  8. Two structural relaxations in protein hydration water and their dynamic crossovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camisasca, G.; De Marzio, M.; Corradini, D.; Gallo, P.

    2016-07-01

    We study the translational single particle dynamics of hydration water of lysozyme upon cooling by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We find that water close to the protein exhibits two distinct relaxations. By characterizing their behavior upon cooling, we are able to assign the first relaxation to the structural α-relaxation also present in bulk water and in other glass-forming liquids. The second, slower, relaxation can be ascribed to a dynamic coupling of hydration water motions to the fluctuations of the protein structure. Both relaxation times exhibit crossovers in the behavior upon cooling. For the α-process, we find upon cooling a crossover from a fragile behavior to a strong behavior at a temperature which is about five degrees higher than that of bulk water. The long-relaxation time appears strictly connected to the protein motion as it shows upon cooling a temperature crossover from a strong behavior with a lower activation energy to a strong behavior with a higher activation energy. The crossover temperature coincides with the temperature of the protein dynamical transition. These findings can help experimentalists to disentangle the different information coming from total correlators and to better characterize hydration water relaxations in different biomolecules.

  9. Relaxation selective pulses in fast relaxing systems.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christopher J; Lu, Wei; Walls, Jamie D

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the selectivity or sharpness of the saturation profiles for relaxation selective pulses (R^rsps) that suppress magnetization possessing relaxation times of T2=T2(rsp) and T1=αT2 for α∈12,∞ was optimized. Along with sharpening the selectivity of the R^rsps, the selective saturation of these pulses was also optimized to be robust to both B0 and B1 inhomogeneities. Frequency-swept hyperbolic secant and adiabatic time-optimal saturation pulse inputs were found to work best in the optimizations, and the pulse lengths required to selectivity saturate the magnetization were always found to be less than the inversion recovery delay, T1ln(2). The selectivity of the optimized relaxation selective pulses was experimentally demonstrated in aqueous solutions with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic species, [Mn(+2)], and for use in solvent suppression. Finally, the "rotational" properties of spin relaxation were explored along with an analytical derivation of adiabatic time-optimal saturation pulses. PMID:24631803

  10. 15 CFR 400.31 - Manufacturing and processing activity; criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Manufacturing and processing activity... ZONES BOARD Manufacturing and Processing Activity-Reviews § 400.31 Manufacturing and processing activity....” When evaluating zone and subzone manufacturing and processing activity, either as proposed in...

  11. 15 CFR 400.31 - Manufacturing and processing activity; criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Manufacturing and processing activity... ZONES BOARD Manufacturing and Processing Activity-Reviews § 400.31 Manufacturing and processing activity....” When evaluating zone and subzone manufacturing and processing activity, either as proposed in...

  12. 15 CFR 400.31 - Manufacturing and processing activity; criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturing and processing activity... ZONES BOARD Manufacturing and Processing Activity-Reviews § 400.31 Manufacturing and processing activity....” When evaluating zone and subzone manufacturing and processing activity, either as proposed in...

  13. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  14. Enthalpy relaxation and annealing effect in polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-07-01

    The effects of thermal history on the enthalpy relaxation in polystyrene are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature dependence of the specific heat in the liquid and the glassy states, that of relaxation time, and the exponent of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function are determined by measurements of the thermal response against sinusoidal temperature variation. A phenomenological model equation previously proposed to interpret the memory effect in the frozen state is applied to the enthalpy relaxation and the evolution of entropy under a given thermal history is calculated. The annealing below the glass transition temperature produces two effects on enthalpy relaxation: the decay of excess entropy with annealing time in the early stage of annealing and the increase in relaxation time due to physical aging in the later stage. The crossover of these effects is reflected in the variation of temperature of the maximum specific heat observed in the heating process after annealing and cooling.

  15. Is Relaxation Training Effective in the Treatment of Clinical Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaty, Lee A.

    The process of relaxation is a complex triarchic phenomenon that incorporates behavioral, cognitive, and physiological components. Existing literature is surveyed in order to determine the efficacy of treating various forms of depression with cognitive-behavioral relaxation strategies. Relaxation training has been shown to be effective in treating…

  16. Handling qualities of a wide-body transport airplane utilizing Pitch Active Control Systems (PACS) for relaxed static stability application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William D.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Brown, Philip W.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Hunt, George E.; Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J.; Willey, C. S.; Weaver, W. A.; Cokeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of two pitch active control systems (PACS) on the flying qualities of a wide-body transport airplane when operating at negative static margins. These two pitch active control systems consisted of a simple 'near-term' PACS and a more complex 'advanced' PACS. Eight different flight conditions, representing the entire flight envelope, were evaluated with emphasis on the cruise flight conditions. These studies were made utilizing the Langley Visual/Motion Simulator (VMS) which has six degrees of freedom. The simulation tests indicated that (1) the flying qualities of the baseline aircraft (PACS off) for the cruise and other high-speed flight conditions were unacceptable at center-of-gravity positions aft of the neutral static stability point; (2) within the linear static stability flight envelope, the near-term PACS provided acceptable flying qualities for static stabilty margins to -3 percent; and (3) with the advanced PACS operative, the flying qualities were demonstrated to be good (satisfactory to very acceptable) for static stabilty margins to -20 percent.

  17. High stability of the hinge region in the membrane-active peptide helix of zervamicin: paramagnetic relaxation enhancement studies.

    PubMed

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Paramonov, Alexander S; Balashova, Tamara A; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Baru, Michael B; Mustaeva, Leila G; Raap, Jan; Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2004-12-17

    Zervamicin IIB is a 16 amino acid peptaibol that forms voltage dependent ion channels with multilevel conductance states in planar lipid bilayers and vesicular systems. Stability of the hinge region and intermolecular interactions were investigated in the N- and C-terminally spin-labelled peptide analogues. Intermolecular and intramolecular paramagnetic enhancement indicates that zervamicin behaves as a rigid helical rod in methanol solution. There are no high amplitude hinge-bending motions, and the peptaibol is monomeric up to concentration 1.5 mM. Stability of the hinge region illustrates the helix stabilising propensity of the Pro residue in membrane mimic environments and implies absence of significant conformational rearrangement due to voltage peptaibol activation.

  18. Correlated activity supports efficient cortical processing

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chou P.; Cui, Ding; Chen, Yueh-peng; Lin, Chia-pei; Levine, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Visual recognition is a computational challenge that is thought to occur via efficient coding. An important concept is sparseness, a measure of coding efficiency. The prevailing view is that sparseness supports efficiency by minimizing redundancy and correlations in spiking populations. Yet, we recently reported that “choristers”, neurons that behave more similarly (have correlated stimulus preferences and spontaneous coincident spiking), carry more generalizable object information than uncorrelated neurons (“soloists”) in macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex. The rarity of choristers (as low as 6% of IT neurons) indicates that they were likely missed in previous studies. Here, we report that correlation strength is distinct from sparseness (choristers are not simply broadly tuned neurons), that choristers are located in non-granular output layers, and that correlated activity predicts human visual search efficiency. These counterintuitive results suggest that a redundant correlational structure supports efficient processing and behavior. PMID:25610392

  19. Comparative Relaxant Effects of Ataciguat and Zaprinast on Sheep Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Erol; Yönem, Özlem; Saraç, Bülent; Parlak, Mesut; Çelik, Cumali; Ataseven, Hilmi; Bağcivan, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Relaxing the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is an important process during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This issue suggests that the easier the sphincterotomy and cannulation, the more post-ERCP complications decrease. Aims: To compare the relaxant effects of ataciguat (a novel soluble guanylyl cyclase activator) and zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5) on sheep SO in vitro, thus testing whether they can be used during ERCP. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Sheep SO rings were placed in tissue baths and their isometric tension to ataciguat and zaprinast were tested. We also tested their isometric tension against ataciguat in the presence of 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazole (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) which is a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Results: Ataciguat and zaprinast both triggered concentration addicted relaxation on sheep SO rings (p=0.0018, p=0.0025 respectively) but the relaxation of the ataciguat was significantly greater than that of zaprinast at all concentrations (p=0.0024). It was observed that decreased relaxation responses were initiated by ataciguat in the presence of ODQ (p=0.0012). Conclusion: Ataciguat and zaprinast both have relaxing effects on sphincter of Oddi, although that of zaprinast is lower. We believe that ataciguat and zaprinast can be used in ERCP procedures in order to relax the sphincter of Oddi and thus can be used locally in order to decrease complications.

  20. Comparative Relaxant Effects of Ataciguat and Zaprinast on Sheep Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Erol; Yönem, Özlem; Saraç, Bülent; Parlak, Mesut; Çelik, Cumali; Ataseven, Hilmi; Bağcivan, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Relaxing the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is an important process during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This issue suggests that the easier the sphincterotomy and cannulation, the more post-ERCP complications decrease. Aims: To compare the relaxant effects of ataciguat (a novel soluble guanylyl cyclase activator) and zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5) on sheep SO in vitro, thus testing whether they can be used during ERCP. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Sheep SO rings were placed in tissue baths and their isometric tension to ataciguat and zaprinast were tested. We also tested their isometric tension against ataciguat in the presence of 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazole (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) which is a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Results: Ataciguat and zaprinast both triggered concentration addicted relaxation on sheep SO rings (p=0.0018, p=0.0025 respectively) but the relaxation of the ataciguat was significantly greater than that of zaprinast at all concentrations (p=0.0024). It was observed that decreased relaxation responses were initiated by ataciguat in the presence of ODQ (p=0.0012). Conclusion: Ataciguat and zaprinast both have relaxing effects on sphincter of Oddi, although that of zaprinast is lower. We believe that ataciguat and zaprinast can be used in ERCP procedures in order to relax the sphincter of Oddi and thus can be used locally in order to decrease complications. PMID:27606143

  1. Cyclic creep and anelastic relaxation analysis of an ODS superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, Vincent C.; Kimmerle, William L.; Tien, John K.

    1986-09-01

    This paper documents the effect of stress and temperature on the cyclic minimum strain rate at two different loading frequencies for the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy, INCONEL* MA 6000. The apparent stress exponent and activation energy for cyclic creep at both frequencies studied are shown to be greater than values observed for static creep. The large values of the stress exponent and activation energy for cyclic creep are proposed to result from anelastic strain storage delaying nonrecoverable creep during the on-load portion of the cyclic creep loading, such that the “effective stress” driving nonrecoverable creep is only a small fraction of the applied stress. In addition, the temperature dependence of the anelastic relaxation that occurs during the off-load portion of the cyclic creep loading is determined. The activation energy found for the relaxation process is equal to about one-half that for self-diffusion in nickel. A mechanism of localized climb of dislocations over the oxide dispersoids present in INCONEL MA 6000 is postulated to account for the observed activation energy of the relaxation process.

  2. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  3. Collisionless Relaxation in Non-Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Yan; Pakter, Renato; Teles, Tarcisio N.

    2008-02-01

    A theoretical framework is presented which allows us to quantitatively predict the final stationary state achieved by a non-neutral plasma during a process of collisionless relaxation. As a specific application, the theory is used to study relaxation of charged-particle beams. It is shown that a fully matched beam relaxes to the Lynden-Bell distribution. However, when a mismatch is present and the beam oscillates, parametric resonances lead to a core-halo phase separation. The approach developed accounts for both the density and the velocity distributions in the final stationary state.

  4. [Main relaxation techniques].

    PubMed

    Mateos Rodilla, Juana

    2002-11-01

    After having provided a detailed explanation on what relaxation consists of (see Rev. Rol Enf 2002; 25(9):582-586), the author presents a recap of the major known relaxation techniques including progressive muscular therapy, yoga stretching exercises, breathing techniques, therapeutic massages, meditation,... emphasizing the theoretical basis and practical experience as a function of each technique; each person ought to adopt those techniques which are most appropriate.

  5. Modeling of the Sub-Tg Relaxation Spectrum of Pd42.5Ni7.5Cu30P20 Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoren; Pineda, Eloi; Qiao, Jichao; Crespo, Daniel

    2016-03-17

    We study the mechanical relaxation spectrum of Pd42.5Ni7.5Cu30P20 metallic glass. The effect of aging on the relaxation behavior is analyzed by measuring the internal friction during consecutive heating runs. The mechanical relaxation of the well-annealed glass state is modeled by fitting susceptibility functions to the primary and secondary relaxations of the system. The model is able to reproduce the mechanical relaxation spectrum below the glass transition temperature (sub-Tg region) in the frequency-temperature ranges relevant for the high temperature physical properties and forming ability of metallic glasses. The model reveals a relaxation spectrum composed by the overlapping of primary and secondary processes covering a wide domain of times but with a relatively narrow range of activation energies. PMID:26916661

  6. Spin relaxation in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.

    2011-02-01

    The Elliott theory of spin relaxation in metals and semiconductors is extended to metallic ferromagnets. Our treatment is based on the two-current model of Fert, Campbell, and Jaoul. The d→s electron-scattering process involved in spin relaxation is the inverse of the s→d process responsible for the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). As a result, spin-relaxation rate 1/τsr and AMR Δρ are given by similar formulas, and are in a constant ratio if scattering is by solute atoms. Our treatment applies to nickel- and cobalt-based alloys which do not have spin-up 3d states at the Fermi level. This category includes many of the technologically important magnetic materials. And we show how to modify the theory to apply it to bcc iron-based alloys. We also treat the case of Permalloy Ni80Fe20 at finite temperature or in thin-film form, where several kinds of scatterers exist. Predicted values of 1/τsr and Δρ are plotted versus resistivity of the sample. These predictions are compared to values of 1/τsr and Δρ derived from ferromagnetic-resonance and AMR experiments in Permalloy.

  7. p-process nucleosynthesis: Activation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, J.; Knörzer, M.; Müller, S.; Pietralla, N.; Sauerwein, A.; Sonnabend, K.; Wälzlein, C.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-04-01

    For the astrophysical p process a complex reaction network has to be solved. In the order of 10,000 theoretically predicted reaction rates are needed for simulations of this network. For reactions involving α particles or protons, the predictions in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach (HF) model were found to deviate from experimental results partially by a factor of 5 or even more. To optimize the predictive power of the applied HF codes, the nuclear physics input has to be improved. For this purpose, the reactions 166ErTm(p,n) as well as the reaction 170Yb(γ,n) have been measured with the activation method at low energies. The data can provide a further test of HF predictions but can also be used to optimize input parameters of the afore mentioned codes. Preliminary results of the experiments are presented and compared to theoretical predictions using the standard settings of the HF codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS.

  8. Tri-modal regulation of cardiac muscle relaxation; intracellular calcium decline, thin filament deactivation, and cross-bridge cycling kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac muscle relaxation is an essential step in the cardiac cycle. Even when the contraction of the heart is normal and forceful, a relaxation phase that is too slow will limit proper filling of the ventricles. Relaxation is too often thought of as a mere passive process that follows contraction. However, many decades of advancements in our understanding of cardiac muscle relaxation have shown it is a highly complex and well-regulated process. In this review, we will discuss three distinct events that can limit the rate of cardiac muscle relaxation: the rate of intracellular calcium decline, the rate of thin-filament de-activation, and the rate of cross-bridge cycling. Each of these processes are directly impacted by a plethora of molecular events. In addition, these three processes interact with each other, further complicating our understanding of relaxation. Each of these processes is continuously modulated by the need to couple bodily oxygen demand to cardiac output by the major cardiac physiological regulators. Length-dependent activation, frequency-dependent activation, and β-adrenergic regulation all directly and indirectly modulate calcium decline, thin-filament deactivation, and cross-bridge kinetics. We hope to convey our conclusion that cardiac muscle relaxation is a process of intricate checks and balances, and should not be thought of as a single rate-limiting step that is regulated at a single protein level. Cardiac muscle relaxation is a system level property that requires fundamental integration of three governing systems: intracellular calcium decline, thin filament deactivation, and cross-bridge cycling kinetics. PMID:25484996

  9. Centrally acting muscle relaxants in tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R. A.

    1961-01-01

    The anti-tetanus activity of a number of phenothiazine derivatives and other centrally acting muscle relaxants, such as mephenesin, dicyclopropyl ketoxime, 2-amino-6-methylbenzothiazole and meprobamate, has been determined in rabbits with experimental local tetanus. Structure-activity relationships were obtained for the phenothiazine derivatives and their anti-tetanus activity correlated with other central and peripheral properties. Both dicyclopropyl ketoxime and 2-amino-6-methyl-benzothiazole were twice as active as mephenesin. Meprobamate does not appear to be primarily a muscle relaxant of the mephenesin type. PMID:14005498

  10. Nondirective meditation activates default mode network and areas associated with memory retrieval and emotional processing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Vik, Alexandra; Groote, Inge R; Lagopoulos, Jim; Holen, Are; Ellingsen, Oyvind; Håberg, Asta K; Davanger, Svend

    2014-01-01

    Nondirective meditation techniques are practiced with a relaxed focus of attention that permits spontaneously occurring thoughts, images, sensations, memories, and emotions to emerge and pass freely, without any expectation that mind wandering should abate. These techniques are thought to facilitate mental processing of emotional experiences, thereby contributing to wellness and stress management. The present study assessed brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 14 experienced practitioners of Acem meditation in two experimental conditions. In the first, nondirective meditation was compared to rest. Significantly increased activity was detected in areas associated with attention, mind wandering, retrieval of episodic memories, and emotional processing. In the second condition, participants carried out concentrative practicing of the same meditation technique, actively trying to avoid mind wandering. The contrast nondirective meditation > concentrative practicing was characterized by higher activity in the right medial temporal lobe (parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala). In conclusion, the present results support the notion that nondirective meditation, which permits mind wandering, involves more extensive activation of brain areas associated with episodic memories and emotional processing, than during concentrative practicing or regular rest.

  11. CITED2 silencing sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inhibiting p53 trans-activation and chromatin relaxation on the ERCC1 DNA repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Chin; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show that silencing of CITED2 using small-hairpin RNA (shCITED2) induced DNA damage and reduction of ERCC1 gene expression in HEK293, HeLa and H1299 cells, even in the absence of cisplatin. In contrast, ectopic expression of ERCC1 significantly reduced intrinsic and induced DNA damage levels, and rescued the effects of CITED2 silencing on cell viability. The effects of CITED2 silencing on DNA repair and cell death were associated with p53 activity. Furthermore, CITED2 silencing caused severe elimination of the p300 protein and markers of relaxed chromatin (acetylated H3 and H4, i.e. H3K9Ac and H3K14Ac) in HEK293 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that DNA damage induced binding of p53 along with H3K9Ac or H3K14Ac at the ERCC1 promoter, an effect which was almost entirely abrogated by silencing of CITED2 or p300. Moreover, lentivirus-based CITED2 silencing sensitized HeLa cell line-derived tumor xenografts to cisplatin in immune-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that CITED2/p300 can be recruited by p53 at the promoter of the repair gene ERCC1 in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. The CITED2/p300/p53/ERCC1 pathway is thus involved in the cell response to cisplatin and represents a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:26384430

  12. CITED2 silencing sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inhibiting p53 trans-activation and chromatin relaxation on the ERCC1 DNA repair gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chin; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we show that silencing of CITED2 using small-hairpin RNA (shCITED2) induced DNA damage and reduction of ERCC1 gene expression in HEK293, HeLa and H1299 cells, even in the absence of cisplatin. In contrast, ectopic expression of ERCC1 significantly reduced intrinsic and induced DNA damage levels, and rescued the effects of CITED2 silencing on cell viability. The effects of CITED2 silencing on DNA repair and cell death were associated with p53 activity. Furthermore, CITED2 silencing caused severe elimination of the p300 protein and markers of relaxed chromatin (acetylated H3 and H4, i.e. H3K9Ac and H3K14Ac) in HEK293 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that DNA damage induced binding of p53 along with H3K9Ac or H3K14Ac at the ERCC1 promoter, an effect which was almost entirely abrogated by silencing of CITED2 or p300. Moreover, lentivirus-based CITED2 silencing sensitized HeLa cell line-derived tumor xenografts to cisplatin in immune-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that CITED2/p300 can be recruited by p53 at the promoter of the repair gene ERCC1 in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. The CITED2/p300/p53/ERCC1 pathway is thus involved in the cell response to cisplatin and represents a potential target for cancer therapy.

  13. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  14. Dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Lakhwant; Awasthi, A.M.; Lochab, S.P.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The present article reports the effect of gamma irradiation on the dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica. • Dielectric and electrical relaxations have been analyzed in the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and Cole–Cole formalisms. • The frequency dependent electrical conductivity has been rationalized using Johnsher’s universal power law. • The experimentally measured electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted using Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation function. - Abstract: In the present research, the dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica was studied in the frequency range of 0.1 Hz–10 MHz and temperature range of 653–853 K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The dielectric constants (ϵ′ and ϵ′′) are found to be high for gamma irradiated muscovite mica as compared to the pristine sample. The frequency dependence of the imaginary part of complex electric modulus (M′′) and dc conductivity data conforms Arrhenius law with single value of activation energy for pristine sample and two values of activation energy for gamma irradiated mica sample. The experimentally assessed electric modulus and conductivity information have been interpreted by the Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation explanation. Using the Cole–Cole framework, an analysis of real and imaginary characters of the electric modulus for pristine and gamma irradiated sample was executed which reflects the non-Debye relaxation mechanism.

  15. Sub-Tg relaxations due to dipolar solutes in nonpolar glass-forming solvents.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Md; Murthy, S S N

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that rigid dipolar solutes (in smaller quantity) dispersed in a nonpolar glassy matrix exhibit a sub-T(g) (or beta(s)) relaxation due to the solute often designated as Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation, which is intermolecular in nature. In this article, we report the results of our study of such a sub-T(g) process in a wide variety of dipolar solutes in different glassy systems using dielectric spectroscopy over a frequency range of 20-10(6) Hz down to a temperature of 77 K. The T(g) of these solutions are determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The solvents used in this study are o-terphenyl (OTP), isopropylbenzene (IPB), and methylcyclohexane. In the case of rigid molecular solutes, like mono-halogen benzenes, the activation energy (DeltaE(beta)) of the beta(s) process is found to increase with decreasing T(g) of the solvent, with a corresponding decrease in the magnitude of the beta(s) process. In the case of more symmetrical molecular solute, for example, tert-butylchloride, the change in DeltaE(beta) is not very appreciable. These results emphasize the importance of the size of the cage of the host matrix in the relaxation of the solute molecules. We have also studied the sub-T(g) relaxation(s) due to some flexible molecular solutes, viz., 1butylbromide, 1hexylbromide, 1butylacetate, and benzylacetate. These solutes in IPB matrix exhibit only one relaxation, whereas in OTP matrix they exhibit an additional sub-T(g) process, which may be identified with a JG type of relaxation. These observations lead us to the conclusion that the beta process observed in the glassy states of these pure solutes is predominantly intramolecular in nature.

  16. Low frequency dielectric relaxation in boracites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Somoano, R.

    1983-01-01

    In order to elucidate the nature of the imperfections which adversely affect pyroelectric processes in boracites, the thermal and dispersive characteristics of the low frequency dielectric response in iron-iodide boracite (Fe3B7O13I) and copper-chloride boracite (Cu3B7O13Cl) have been investigated. These characteristics were measured as a function of crystallographic orientation and applied field in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric states. The low frequency dielectric relaxation of 100 line oriented multi-domain copper-chloride boracite clearly indicates the dipole nature of the lattice imperfections. The activation energies calculated from a noninteracting Debye model, are 0.53 eV in the ferroelectric phase and 0.10 eV in the paraelectric phase.

  17. Effects of reactive oxygen species and neutrophils on endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Viktor; Sotníková, Ružena; Drábiková, Katarína

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in different metabolic processes including the respiratory burst of neutrophils accompanying local inflammation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, isolated from the guinea pig peritoneal cavity, on isolated rings of a large (conduit) artery, the rat thoracic aorta. FMLP-activated neutrophils enhanced the basal tension increased by α1-adrenergic stimulation. In phenylephrine-precontracted aortae, they elicited marked contraction, while in noradrenaline-precontracted rat aortal rings they caused a biphasic response (contraction-relaxation). To eliminate interaction of activated neutrophils with catecholamines, in the subsequent experiments the basal tension was increased by KCl-induced depolarization. Activated neutrophils evoked a low-amplitude biphasic response (relaxation-contraction) on the KCl-induced contraction. Not only the acetylcholine- and A23187-induced relaxations but also the catalase sensitive hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) elicited contractions were endothelium-dependent. Even though the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was changed by activated neutrophils and by the ROS studied, their effects differed significantly, yet none of them did eliminate fully the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine relaxation. The effect of activated neutrophils resembled the effect of superoxide anion radical (O2 •–) produced by xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) and differed from the inhibitory effects of Fe2SO4/H2O2-produced hydroxyl radical (•OH) and H2O2. Thus O2 •– produced either by activated neutrophils or X/XO affected much less the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine-activated relaxation mechanisms than did •OH and H2O2. In the large (conduit) artery, the effects of activated neutrophils and various ROS (O2 •–, •OH and H2O2) seem to be more dependent on muscle tension than on endothelial mechanisms. PMID:22319253

  18. Alternating-current conductivity and dielectric relaxation of bulk iodoargentate

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hai-Bao Yu, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Hong

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The electric modulus shows single dielectric relaxation process in the measured frequency range. - Highlights: • The conduction mechanism is described by quantum mechanical tunneling model. • The applications of dielectric modulus give a simple method for evaluating the activation energy of the dielectric relaxation. • The [Ag{sub 2}I{sub 4}]{sup 2−}1-D chain and [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} cation column form the layered stacks by hydrogen bond interactions. - Abstract: An inorganic-organic hybrid compound Cu(en){sub 2}Ag{sub 2}I{sub 4} (en = ethylenediamine) (1) was synthesized and single crystal structurally characterized. Along the [001] direction, the inorganic parts form an infinite 1-D chain and [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} cations are separated by inorganic chain. The electrical conductivity and dielectric properties of 1 have been investigated over wide ranges of frequency. The alternating-current conductivities have been fitted to the Almond–West type power law expression with use of a single value of S. It is found that S values for 1 are nearly temperature-independent, which indicates that the conduction mechanism could be quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model. The dielectric loss and electric modulus show single dielectric relaxation process. The activation energy obtained from temperature-dependent electric modulus compare with the calculated from the dc conductivity plots.

  19. New evidence disclosed for networking in natural rubber by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wu, Siwu; Tang, Zhenghai; Lin, Tengfei; Guo, Baochun; Huang, Guangsu

    2015-03-21

    Resolving the structure of natural rubber (NR) has been an important issue for a long time and essential progress has been made. It is well established that non-rubber components have significant effects on the performance of NR. A detailed discussion on the effects of proteins and phospholipids on the chain dynamics of NR will be crucial for the in-depth understanding of the role of proteins and phospholipids in NR. However, to date, there is still a lack of elaborate studies on the dielectric spectroscopy of NR. In the present study, we performed detailed dielectric relaxation analysis, together with rheological measurements, to reveal the effects of proteins and phospholipids on the chain dynamics of NR. Distinctly different from the widely accepted segmental mode (SM) and normal mode (NM), a new relaxation mode in deproteinized NR (DPNR) was identified for the first time, which cannot be found either in NR or in transesterified DPNR (TE-DPNR). Because this new mode relaxation process behaves as a thermally activated process and it is about four orders of magnitude slower than NM, it could be rationally attributed to the relaxation of the phospholipids core of DPNR, named branch mode (BM) relaxation. When further conversion of DPNR to TE-DPNR was conducted, the phospholipids were removed and BM disappeared. In addition, a new relaxation mode, which occurs at considerably lower temperature than that for SM, was revealed in TE-DPNR, and may be related to the relaxation of free mono- or di-phosphate groups at the α ends in TE-DPNR. Hence, the identification of the new relaxation modes in DPNR and TE-DPNR provide new evidence for the natural networking structure linked by protein-based ω ends and phospholipids-based α ends.

  20. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse. PMID:26764779

  1. Heterogeneous Stress Relaxation Processes at Grain Boundaries in High-Sn Solder Films: Effects of Sn Anisotropy and Grain Geometry During Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Hsun; Sarobol, Pylin; Handwerker, Carol A.; Blendell, John E.

    2016-08-01

    Four different types of stress relaxation responses have been observed in terms of local microstructural changes along grain boundaries (GBs) in large-grained high-Sn (Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu) solder films after thermal cycling. The grain boundaries were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction, and focused-ion beam (FIB) cross-section imaging. While the anisotropic coefficient of thermal expansion of Sn plays an important role in determining which boundaries have high local stresses relative to the film plane and trace of the grain boundary plane during thermal cycling, the four different relaxation behaviors of specific boundaries (no observable changes, surface defect/whisker formation, GB sliding, or a combination of GB sliding and whisker/defect formation) were determined by a combination of Sn anisotropy, the GB geometry, and crystallographic orientation relative to the film plane. The ability to separate GB sliding from surface defect formation provides insights into how long, straight whiskers form in polycrystalline thin films, particularly with respect to grain rotation at the early stages of their growth.

  2. Asymmetrical hemisphere activation enhances global-local processing.

    PubMed

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Cook, Mary S

    2013-12-01

    Decades of research focusing on the neurophysiological underpinnings related to global-local processing of hierarchical stimuli have associated global processing with the right hemisphere and local processing with the left hemisphere. The current experiment sought to expand this research by testing the causal contributions of hemisphere activation to global-local processing. To manipulate hemisphere activation, participants engaged in contralateral hand contractions. Then, EEG activity and attentional scope were measured. Right-hand contractions caused greater relative left-cortical activity than left-hand contractions. Participants were more narrowly focused after left-hemisphere activation than after right-hemisphere activation. Moreover, N1 amplitudes to local targets in the left hemisphere were larger after left-hemisphere activation than after right-hemisphere activation. Consistent with past research investigating hemispheric asymmetry and attentional scope, the current results suggest that manipulating left (right) hemisphere activity enhanced local (global) attentional processing.

  3. Increased cavernosal relaxation by Phoneutria nigriventer toxin, PnTx2-6, via activation at NO/cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, K.P.; Wynne, B.M.; Cordeiro, M.N.; Borges, M.H.; Richardson, M; Leite, R.; DeLima, M.E.; Webb, R. C

    2011-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction mechanisms in diabetic patients are multifactorial and often lead to resistance to current therapy. Animal toxins have been used as pharmacological tools to study penile erection. Human accidents involving the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer spider are characterized by priapism. We hypothesize that PnTx2-6 potentiates cavernosal relaxation in diabetic mice by increasing cGMP. This effect is nNOS dependent. Cavernosal strips were contracted with phenylephrine (10−5 M) and relaxed by electrical field stimulation (EFS, 20V, 1–32 Hz) in the presence or absence of PnTx2-6 (10−8 M).Cavernosal strips from nNOS and eNOS knocaut (KO) mice, besides nNOS inhibitor (10−5M), were used to evaluate the role of this enzyme in the potentiation effect evoked by PnTx2-6. Tissue cGMP levels were determined after stimulation with PnTx2-6 in presence or absence of L-NAME (10−4M) and ω-conotoxin GVIA (10−6M), an N-type calcium channel inhibitor. Results showed PnTx2-6 enhanced cavernosal relaxation in diabetic mice (65%) and eNOS KO mice, but not in nNOS KO mice. The toxin effect in the cavernosal relaxation was abolished by nNOS inhibitor. cGMP levels are increased by PnTx2-6, however L-NAME abolished this enhancement as well as ω-conotoxin GVIA. We conclude PnTx2-6 facilitates penile relaxation in diabetic mice through a mechanism dependent on nNOS, probably via increasing NO/cGMP production. PMID:21975567

  4. Enhancement of Paramagnetic Relaxation by Photoexcited Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tao; Wamer, Wayne G.; Subczynski, Witold K.; Hou, Shuai; Wu, Xiaochun; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the switchable, light-dependent effects of gold nanorods (GNRs) on paramagnetic properties of nitroxide spin probes. The photoexcited GNRs enhanced the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations of nitroxide spin probes. It was shown that molecular oxygen plays the key role in this process. Our results demonstrate that ESR is a powerful tool for investigating the events following photoexcitation of GNRs. The novel light-controlled effects observed for GNRs on paramagnetic properties and activities of surrounding molecules have a number of significant applications where oxygen sensing and oxygen activity is important. PMID:27071507

  5. Thermal annealing-induced electric dipole relaxation in natural alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalvi, Rosa M. Fernandes; Li, Maximo Siu; Scalvi, Luis V. A.

    2005-02-01

    Electrical properties of natural alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) are investigated by the thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) technique. Samples are submitted to consecutive annealing processes and TSDC is carried out after each annealing, yielding bands with different parameters. These bands are fitted by a continuous distribution of relaxation parameters: activation energy and pre-exponential factor of the Arrhenius equation. It has been observed that annealing influences the dipole relaxation behavior, since it promotes a modification of Fe3+ and Cr3+ impurity distributions on sites of distinct symmetry: Al1 and Al2. In order to have a reference for comparison, TSDC is also carried out on a synthetic alexandrite sample, where the only impurity present is Cr3+ ion.

  6. Two Adaptation Processes in Auditory Hair Cells Together Can Provide an Active Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Andrej; Duke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals. Two adaptation mechanisms are known to modify the ionic current flowing through the transduction channels of the hair bundles: a rapid process involves Ca2+ ions binding to the channels; and a slower adaptation is associated with the movement of myosin motors. We present a mathematical model of the hair cell which demonstrates that the combination of these two mechanisms can produce “self-tuned critical oscillations”, i.e., maintain the hair bundle at the threshold of an oscillatory instability. The characteristic frequency depends on the geometry of the bundle and on the Ca2+ dynamics, but is independent of channel kinetics. Poised on the verge of vibrating, the hair bundle acts as an active amplifier. However, if the hair cell is sufficiently perturbed, other dynamical regimes can occur. These include slow relaxation oscillations which resemble the hair bundle motion observed in some experimental preparations. PMID:12829475

  7. Rounded stretched exponential for time relaxation functions.

    PubMed

    Powles, J G; Heyes, D M; Rickayzen, G; Evans, W A B

    2009-12-01

    A rounded stretched exponential function is introduced, C(t)=exp{(tau(0)/tau(E))(beta)[1-(1+(t/tau(0))(2))(beta/2)]}, where t is time, and tau(0) and tau(E) are two relaxation times. This expression can be used to represent the relaxation function of many real dynamical processes, as at long times, t>tau(0), the function converges to a stretched exponential with normalizing relaxation time, tau(E), yet its expansion is even or symmetric in time, which is a statistical mechanical requirement. This expression fits well the shear stress relaxation function for model soft soft-sphere fluids near coexistence, with tau(E)relaxation (both the modulus and viscosity forms). It is shown that both the dielectric spectra and dynamic shear modulus imaginary parts approach the real axis with a slope equal to 0 at high frequency, whereas the dynamic viscosity has an infinite slope in the same limit. This indicates that inertial effects at high frequency are best discerned in the modulus rather than the viscosity Cole-Cole plot. As a consequence of the even expansion in time of the shear stress relaxation function, the value of the storage modulus derived from it at very high frequency exceeds that in the infinite frequency limit (i.e., G(infinity)).

  8. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  9. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  10. Thermal fluctuations and elastic relaxation in the compressed exponential dynamics of colloidal gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzid, Mehdi; Colombo, Jader; Del Gado, Emanuela

    Colloidal gels belong to the class of amorphous systems, they are disordered elastic solids that can form at very low volume fraction, via aggregation into a rich variety of networks. They exhibit a slow relaxation process in the aging regime similar to the glassy dynamics. A wide range of experiments on colloidal gels show unusual compressed exponential of the relaxation dynamical properties. We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate how the dynamic change with the age of the system. Upon breaking and reorganization of the network structure, the system may display stretched or compressed exponential relaxation. We show that the transition between these two regimes is associated to the interplay between thermally activated rearrangements and the elastic relaxation of internal stresses. In particular, ballistic-like displacements emerge from the non local relaxation of internal stresses mediated by a series of ''micro-collapses''. When thermal fluctuations dominate, the gel restructuring involves instead more homogeneous displacements across the heterogeneous gel network, leading to a stretched exponential type of relaxation.

  11. Laboratory Activities for Developing Process Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Services to Education, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This workbook contains laboratory exercises designed for use in a college introductory biology course. Each exercise helps the student develop a basic science skill. The exercises are arranged in a hierarchical sequence suggesting the scientific method. Each skill facilitates the development of succeeding ones. Activities include Use of the…

  12. Parallel inhibition of active force and relaxed fiber stiffness by caldesmon fragments at physiological ionic strength and temperature conditions: additional evidence that weak cross-bridge binding to actin is an essential intermediate for force generation.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, T; Chalovich, J M; Yu, L C; Brenner, B

    1995-01-01

    Previously we showed that stiffness of relaxed fibers and active force generated in single skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle are inhibited in parallel by actin-binding fragments of caldesmon, an actin-associated protein of smooth muscle, under conditions in which a large fraction of cross-bridges is weakly attached to actin (ionic strength of 50 mM and temperature of 5 degrees C). These results suggested that weak cross-bridge attachment to actin is essential for force generation. The present study provides evidence that this is also true for physiological ionic strength (170 mM) at temperatures up to 30 degrees C, suggesting that weak cross-bridge binding to actin is generally required for force generation. In addition, we show that the inhibition of active force is not a result of changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics but apparently results from selective inhibition of weak cross-bridge binding to actin. Together with our previous biochemical, mechanical, and structural studies, these findings support the proposal that weak cross-bridge attachment to actin is an essential intermediate on the path to force generation and are consistent with the concept that isometric force mainly results from an increase in strain of the attached cross-bridge as a result of a structural change associated with the transition from a weakly bound to a strongly bound actomyosin complex. This mechanism is different from the processes responsible for quick tension recovery that were proposed by Huxley and Simmons (Proposed mechanism of force generation in striated muscle. Nature. 233:533-538.) to represent the elementary mechanism of force generation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7647245

  13. Dielectric relaxation of NdMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sujoy Chanda, Sadhan; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T.P.

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: (a) TEM image of particle distribution of NMO. (b) HRTEM image of a single NMO particle under 4,000,000× magnification. (c) SAED pattern of a single NMO nanoparticle. - Highlights: • NdMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles are synthesized by sol–gel process. • TEM micrograph shows a granular characteristic with an average particle size of ∼50 nm. • HRTEM is consistent with the spacing between the (2 0 0) planes of the orthorhombic NdMnO{sub 3}. • Band gap is found to be 4.4 eV. • Cole–Cole model has been used to explain the dielectric relaxation in the material. • The activation energy of the material is found to be ∼0.43 eV. - Abstract: The neodymium manganate (NdMnO{sub 3}) nanoparticles are synthesized by the sol–gel process. The phase formation and particle size of the sample are determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The band gap of the material is obtained by UV–visible absorption spectroscopy using Tauc relation. Dielectric properties of the sample have been investigated in the frequency range from 42 Hz to 1 MHz and in the temperature range from 303 K to 573 K. The dielectric relaxation peaks are observed in the frequency dependent dielectric loss spectra. The Cole–Cole model is used to explain the dielectric relaxation mechanism of the material. The complex impedance plane plot confirms the existence of both the grain and grain-boundary contribution to the relaxation. The temperature dependence of both grain and grain-boundary resistances follow the Arrhenius law with the activation energy of 0.427 and 0.431 eV respectively. The frequency-dependent conductivity spectra follow the power law.

  14. Modelling the Active Hearing Process in Mosquitoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avitabile, Daniele; Homer, Martin; Jackson, Joe; Robert, Daniel; Champneys, Alan

    2011-11-01

    A simple microscopic mechanistic model is described of the active amplification within the Johnston's organ of the mosquito species Toxorhynchites brevipalpis. The model is based on the description of the antenna as a forced-damped oscillator coupled to a set of active threads (ensembles of scolopidia) that provide an impulsive force when they twitch. This twitching is in turn controlled by channels that are opened and closed if the antennal oscillation reaches a critical amplitude. The model matches both qualitatively and quantitatively with recent experiments. New results are presented using mathematical homogenization techniques to derive a mesoscopic model as a simple oscillator with nonlinear force and damping characteristics. It is shown how the results from this new model closely resemble those from the microscopic model as the number of threads approach physiologically correct values.

  15. Dielectric relaxations investigation of a synthesized epoxy resin polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-04-01

    A diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin was synthesized, and cured with 3,3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) at a curing temperature of 120 °C. The relaxation properties of the realized polymers were studied by two complementary techniques: dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS), in the temperature range 173-393K and in the frequency interval 10-1-106 Hz, and thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) with a windowing polarization process. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements were also carried out to study interfacial relaxations. Dielectric data were analyzed in terms of permittivity and electric modulus variations. Three relaxation processes ( γ, β and α) have been identified. They were found to be frequency and temperature dependent and were interpreted in terms of the Havriliak-Negami approach. Relaxation parameters were determined by fitting the experimental data. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time was well fitted by the Arrhenius law for secondary relaxations, while the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamann model was found to better fit the τ( T) variations for α relaxation. We found τ 0 = 4.9 10-12 s, 9.6 10-13 s and 1.98 10-7 s for γ, β and α relaxations, respectively. The obtained results were found to be consistent with those reported in the literature. Due to the calculation of the low-frequency data of dielectric loss by the Hamon approximation, the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) relaxation was highlighted.

  16. AMP-dependent DNA relaxation catalyzed by DNA ligase occurs by a nicking-closing mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, A; Ciarrocchi, G

    1988-01-01

    In the presence of AMP and Mg2+, a covalently closed duplex DNA containing negative superhelical turns was treated with DNA ligase isolated from bacteriophage T4-infected E. coli. This resulted in the gradual and not sudden loss of superhelical turns as for example in the case of type I DNA topoisomerase. All DNA products remain covalently closed. Since T4 enzyme-mediated DNA relaxation is inhibited by both pyrophosphate and by ATP this suggests that DNA relaxing and DNA joining activities probably coincide. EDTA addition in the presence of a large excess of enzyme, induces the formation of nicked DNA products while protein denaturing treatments are not very effective. Our observations might suggest an involvement of the relaxing activity of DNA ligase during the ligation process. Images PMID:3137526

  17. Relaxation: mapping an uncharted world.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Amutio, A; Anderson, J P; Aria, L A

    1996-03-01

    Nine hundred and forty practitioners of massage, abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), yoga stretching, breathing, imagery meditation, and various combination treatments described their technique experiences on an 82-item wordlist. Factor analysis yielded 10 interpretable relaxation categories: Joyful Affects and Appraisals (Joyful), Distant, Calm, Aware, Prayerful, Accepted, Untroubled, Limp, Silent, and Mystery The relaxation response and cognitive/somatic specificity models predict Calm and Limp, which account for only 5.5% of the variance of relaxation experience. Unlike much of previous relaxation research, we found important technique differences. PMR and massage are associated with Distant and Limp; yoga stretching, breathing, and meditation with Aware; meditation with Prayerful and all techniques except PMR with Joyful. Results are consistent with cognitive-behavioral relaxation theory and have implications for relaxation theory, treatment, training, assessment, and research. We close with a revised model of relaxation that posits three global dimensions; tension-relief, passive disengagement, and passive engagement.

  18. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  19. Uav Data Processing for Rapid Mapping Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampubolon, W.; Reinhardt, W.

    2015-08-01

    During disaster and emergency situations, geospatial data plays an important role to serve as a framework for decision support system. As one component of basic geospatial data, large scale topographical maps are mandatory in order to enable geospatial analysis within quite a number of societal challenges. The increasing role of geo-information in disaster management nowadays consequently needs to include geospatial aspects on its analysis. Therefore different geospatial datasets can be combined in order to produce reliable geospatial analysis especially in the context of disaster preparedness and emergency response. A very well-known issue in this context is the fast delivery of geospatial relevant data which is expressed by the term "Rapid Mapping". Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is the rising geospatial data platform nowadays that can be attractive for modelling and monitoring the disaster area with a low cost and timely acquisition in such critical period of time. Disaster-related object extraction is of special interest for many applications. In this paper, UAV-borne data has been used for supporting rapid mapping activities in combination with high resolution airborne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) data. A real disaster instance from 2013 in conjunction with Mount Sinabung eruption, Northern Sumatra, Indonesia, is used as the benchmark test for the rapid mapping activities presented in this paper. On this context, the reliable IFSAR dataset from airborne data acquisition in 2011 has been used as a comparable dataset for accuracy investigation and assessment purpose in 3 D reconstructions. After all, this paper presents a proper geo-referencing and feature extraction method of UAV data to support rapid mapping activities.

  20. Orientational relaxations in solid (1,1,2,2)tetrachloroethane.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, P; Mitsari, E; Romanini, M; Serra, P; Tamarit, J Ll; Zuriaga, M; Macovez, R

    2016-04-28

    We employ dielectric spectroscopy and molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the dipolar dynamics in the orientationally disordered solid phase of (1,1,2,2)tetrachloroethane. Three distinct orientational dynamics are observed as separate dielectric loss features, all characterized by a simply activated temperature dependence. The slower process, associated to a glassy transition at 156 ± 1 K, corresponds to a cooperative motion by which each molecule rotates by 180° around the molecular symmetry axis through an intermediate state in which the symmetry axis is oriented roughly orthogonally to the initial and final states. Of the other two dipolar relaxations, the intermediate one is the Johari-Goldstein precursor relaxation of the cooperative dynamics, while the fastest process corresponds to an orientational fluctuation of single molecules into a higher-energy orientation. The Kirkwood correlation factor of the cooperative relaxation is of the order of one tenth, indicating that the molecular dipoles maintain on average a strong antiparallel alignment during their collective motion. These findings show that the combination of dielectric spectroscopy and molecular simulations allows studying in great detail the orientational dynamics in molecular solids.

  1. Orientational relaxations in solid (1,1,2,2)tetrachloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, P.; Mitsari, E.; Romanini, M.; Serra, P.; Tamarit, J. Ll.; Zuriaga, M.; Macovez, R.

    2016-04-01

    We employ dielectric spectroscopy and molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the dipolar dynamics in the orientationally disordered solid phase of (1,1,2,2)tetrachloroethane. Three distinct orientational dynamics are observed as separate dielectric loss features, all characterized by a simply activated temperature dependence. The slower process, associated to a glassy transition at 156 ± 1 K, corresponds to a cooperative motion by which each molecule rotates by 180° around the molecular symmetry axis through an intermediate state in which the symmetry axis is oriented roughly orthogonally to the initial and final states. Of the other two dipolar relaxations, the intermediate one is the Johari-Goldstein precursor relaxation of the cooperative dynamics, while the fastest process corresponds to an orientational fluctuation of single molecules into a higher-energy orientation. The Kirkwood correlation factor of the cooperative relaxation is of the order of one tenth, indicating that the molecular dipoles maintain on average a strong antiparallel alignment during their collective motion. These findings show that the combination of dielectric spectroscopy and molecular simulations allows studying in great detail the orientational dynamics in molecular solids.

  2. Orientational relaxations in solid (1,1,2,2)tetrachloroethane.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, P; Mitsari, E; Romanini, M; Serra, P; Tamarit, J Ll; Zuriaga, M; Macovez, R

    2016-04-28

    We employ dielectric spectroscopy and molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the dipolar dynamics in the orientationally disordered solid phase of (1,1,2,2)tetrachloroethane. Three distinct orientational dynamics are observed as separate dielectric loss features, all characterized by a simply activated temperature dependence. The slower process, associated to a glassy transition at 156 ± 1 K, corresponds to a cooperative motion by which each molecule rotates by 180° around the molecular symmetry axis through an intermediate state in which the symmetry axis is oriented roughly orthogonally to the initial and final states. Of the other two dipolar relaxations, the intermediate one is the Johari-Goldstein precursor relaxation of the cooperative dynamics, while the fastest process corresponds to an orientational fluctuation of single molecules into a higher-energy orientation. The Kirkwood correlation factor of the cooperative relaxation is of the order of one tenth, indicating that the molecular dipoles maintain on average a strong antiparallel alignment during their collective motion. These findings show that the combination of dielectric spectroscopy and molecular simulations allows studying in great detail the orientational dynamics in molecular solids. PMID:27131555

  3. Processing abstract language modulates motor system activity.

    PubMed

    Glenberg, Arthur M; Sato, Marc; Cattaneo, Luigi; Riggio, Lucia; Palumbo, Daniele; Buccino, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that neural systems for perception and action are also engaged during language comprehension. Previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have only been able to demonstrate modulation of action systems during comprehension of concrete language. We provide neurophysiological evidence for modulation of motor system activity during the comprehension of both concrete and abstract language. In Experiment 1, when the described direction of object transfer or information transfer (e.g., away from the reader to another) matched the literal direction of a hand movement used to make a response, speed of responding was faster than when the two directions mismatched (an action-sentence compatibility effect). In Experiment 2, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to study changes in the corticospinal motor pathways to hand muscles while reading the same sentences. Relative to sentences that do not describe transfer, there is greater modulation of activity in the hand muscles when reading sentences describing transfer of both concrete objects and abstract information. These findings are discussed in relation to the human mirror neuron system. PMID:18470821

  4. Relaxation phenomena in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this article we discuss how the assumptions of self-similarity imposed on the distribution of independently relaxing modes, as well as on their amplitude and characteristic times, manifest in the global relaxation phenomena. We also review recent applications of such approach to the description of relaxation phenomena in microemulsions and molecular glasses.

  5. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  6. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  7. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-10-07

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  8. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  9. Influence of microstructure on thermal relaxation in nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    LoBue, M.; Basso, V.; Beatrice, C.; Tiberto, P.; Bertotti, G.

    2001-06-01

    The interplay between activation volumes and microstructure is investigated in nanocrystalline Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9} (Finemet) alloys. Experiments are performed beyond the Curie point of the amorphous matrix, where relaxation effects are relevant. Measurements are analyzed within a theoretical framework where hysteresis and relaxation phenomena are jointly described. In highly crystallized samples magnetization processes are characterized by a unique length scale. In poorly crystallized samples the system behavior is controlled by a distribution of characteristic volumes related to structural disorder. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Dielectric relaxation analysis and Ac conductivity of polyvinyl alcohol/polyacrylonitrile film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Baset, T. A.; Hassen, A.

    2016-10-01

    A film of 0.98 polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/0.02 Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) has been prepared using casting method. The dielectric properties were measured as function of temperature and frequency. The dielectric permittivity of PVA is considerably enhanced by doping with PAN. Different relaxation processes have been recognized within the studied ranges of temperature and frequency. The frequency temperature superposition (FTS) is well verified. Frequency and temperature dependence of Ac conductivity, σac, were studied. The conduction mechanism of pure PVA and PVA doped with PAN are discussed. The activation energy either for relaxation or conduction was calculated. Comparison with similar polymeric materials is discussed.

  11. 12 CFR 211.604 - Data processing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... processing activities under Regulation K (12 CFR part 211). This question has arisen as a result of the fact... (12 CFR part 225) at that time, as the Regulation K authority permitted limited non-financial data... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Data processing activities. 211.604 Section...

  12. 12 CFR 211.604 - Data processing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... processing activities under Regulation K (12 CFR part 211). This question has arisen as a result of the fact... (12 CFR part 225) at that time, as the Regulation K authority permitted limited non-financial data... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Data processing activities. 211.604 Section...

  13. 12 CFR 211.604 - Data processing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... processing activities under Regulation K (12 CFR part 211). This question has arisen as a result of the fact... (12 CFR part 225) at that time, as the Regulation K authority permitted limited non-financial data... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Data processing activities. 211.604 Section...

  14. 12 CFR 211.604 - Data processing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... processing activities under Regulation K (12 CFR part 211). This question has arisen as a result of the fact... (12 CFR part 225) at that time, as the Regulation K authority permitted limited non-financial data... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Data processing activities. 211.604 Section...

  15. 12 CFR 211.604 - Data processing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... processing activities under Regulation K (12 CFR part 211). This question has arisen as a result of the fact... (12 CFR part 225) at that time, as the Regulation K authority permitted limited non-financial data... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Data processing activities. 211.604 Section...

  16. Role of Relaxation on the Giant Permittivity and Electrical Properties of CaCu3Ti4O12 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuetong; Ren, Lulu; Liao, Ruijin; Li, Jianying; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Feipeng

    2016-06-01

    CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics were synthesized under various sintering conditions to investigate the role of relaxation on permittivity and electrical properties. Two relaxation processes that respectively related to grain and to domain boundary at a temperature as low as 223 K were fitted according to the Cole-Cole theory. The results indicate that both relaxations largely account for the giant permittivity of CCTO ceramics. Moreover, the relaxation behaviors of grain and of the grain boundary can be processed via impedance plots that vary from 113 K to 473 K. It is shown that longer sintering duration leads to lower resistance of grain and of grain boundary: e.g., from 3200 Ω to 810 Ω and 1.76 MΩ to 0.48 MΩ, respectively. The activation energy related to grain-boundary relaxation drops from 1.14 eV to 0.80 eV, while the value of grain stays unchanged at about 0.11 eV. The Schottky barrier of the CCTO sample decreases from 0.65 eV to 0.57 eV. It is also proposed that the nonlinearity of current-voltage property for CCTO ceramics may be strongly related to the relaxation processes of grain boundaries.

  17. Theory of the spin relaxation of conduction electrons in silicon.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J L; Wu, M W; Fabian, J

    2010-01-01

    A realistic pseudopotential model is introduced to investigate the phonon-induced spin relaxation of conduction electrons in bulk silicon. We find a surprisingly subtle interference of the Elliott and Yafet processes affecting the spin relaxation over a wide temperature range, suppressing the significance of the intravalley spin-flip scattering, previously considered dominant, above roughly 120 K. The calculated spin relaxation times T1 agree with the spin resonance and spin injection data, following a T(-3) temperature dependence. The valley anisotropy of T1 and the spin relaxation rates for hot electrons are predicted.

  18. Measurement of action spectra of light-activated processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Justin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Upcroft, Jacqui; Upcroft, Peter; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a new experimental technique suitable for measurement of light-activated processes, such as fluorophore transport. The usefulness of this technique is derived from its capacity to decouple the imaging and activation processes, allowing fluorescent imaging of fluorophore transport at a convenient activation wavelength. We demonstrate the efficiency of this new technique in determination of the action spectrum of the light mediated transport of rhodamine 123 into the parasitic protozoan Giardia duodenalis.

  19. Activated Sludge and other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Wei, Li; Chang, Chein-Chi; Zhang, Yuhua; Wei, Dong

    2016-10-01

    This is a literature review for the year 2015 and contains information specifically associated with suspended growth processes including activated sludge, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, and sequencing batch reactors. The review encompasses modeling and kinetics, nutrient removal, system design and operation. Compared to past reviews, many topics show increase in activity in 2015. These include, fate and effect of xenobiotics, industrial wastes treatment with sludge, and pretreatment for the activated sludge. These topics are referred to the degradation of constituents in activated sludge. Other sections include population dynamics, process microbiology give an insight into the activated sludge. The subsection in industrial wastes: converting sewage sludge into biogases was also mentioned.

  20. Activated Sludge and other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Wei, Li; Chang, Chein-Chi; Zhang, Yuhua; Wei, Dong

    2016-10-01

    This is a literature review for the year 2015 and contains information specifically associated with suspended growth processes including activated sludge, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, and sequencing batch reactors. The review encompasses modeling and kinetics, nutrient removal, system design and operation. Compared to past reviews, many topics show increase in activity in 2015. These include, fate and effect of xenobiotics, industrial wastes treatment with sludge, and pretreatment for the activated sludge. These topics are referred to the degradation of constituents in activated sludge. Other sections include population dynamics, process microbiology give an insight into the activated sludge. The subsection in industrial wastes: converting sewage sludge into biogases was also mentioned. PMID:27620082

  1. Different head environments in tarantula thick filaments support a cooperative activation process.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Biasutto, Antonio; Alamo, Lorenzo; Riggs, Claire; Pinto, Antonio; Méndez, Franklin; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2013-11-01

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). Structural analysis of relaxed tarantula thick filaments shows that the RLCs of the interacting free and blocked myosin heads are in different environments. This and other data suggested a phosphorylation mechanism in which Ser-35 of the free head is exposed and constitutively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, whereas the blocked head is hidden and unphosphorylated; on activation, myosin light chain kinase phosphorylates the monophosphorylated free head followed by the unphosphorylated blocked head, both at Ser-45. Our goal was to test this model of phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry of quickly frozen, intact muscles showed that only Ser-35 was phosphorylated in the relaxed state. The location of this constitutively phosphorylated Ser-35 was analyzed by immunofluorescence, using antibodies specific for unphosphorylated or phosphorylated Ser-35. In the relaxed state, myofibrils were labeled by anti-pSer-35 but not by anti-Ser-35, whereas in rigor, labeling was similar with both. This suggests that only pSer-35 is exposed in the relaxed state, while in rigor, Ser-35 is also exposed. In the interacting-head motif of relaxed filaments, only the free head RLCs are exposed, suggesting that the constitutive pSer-35 is on the free heads, consistent with the proposed mechanism. PMID:24209856

  2. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  3. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  4. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-21

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  5. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  6. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  7. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  8. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGES

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  9. Structural and magnetic relaxations of mechanically alloyed Fe-Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiraskova, Y.; Bursik, J.; Turek, I.; Cizek, J.; Prochazka, I.

    2014-10-01

    The Fe-Mo sample mechanically alloyed for 250 h under air atmosphere was exposed to a series of isothermal and isochronal treatments with the aim to follow changes in the structure and magnetic properties regarding relaxations of strains and defects and stability of chemical composition. For this purpose x-ray diffraction, positron annihilation, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectrometry were applied and supplemented by magnetic measurements. The temperatures for the magnetic studies were selected from the thermomagnetic curve of the as-prepared sample. The time interval of isothermal treatments was chosen from 0-300 min. The Mo content in the bcc-Fe(Mo) phase has substantially exceeded the equilibrium solubility limit but it has been found to decrease under the thermal treatment which was reflected by decreasing lattice parameters. The small crystallite size of approximately 10 nm in the initial state starts to grow only after a certain amount of strains induced by severe deformation, due to mechanical alloying being released. This was also reflected in the magnetic parameters. From their time dependences at selected temperatures the characteristic relaxation times were obtained and used for a calculation of the activation enthalpy of relaxation processes.

  10. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  11. Grain growth and structural relaxation of nanocrystalline Bi₂Te₃

    SciTech Connect

    Humphry-Baker, Samuel A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2014-10-21

    Recovery and grain growth behavior is investigated systematically for the nanocrystalline thermoelectric compound bismuth telluride, synthesized by mechanical alloying. During annealing treatments at elevated temperatures, structural evolution is tracked using x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and calorimetry. Below a homologous temperature of about 0.6T{sub m}, grain growth occurs slowly with an activation energy of 89 kJ/mol. However above this temperature grain growth becomes more rampant with an activation energy of 242 kJ/mol. The transition is attributed to a shift from a relaxation or recovery process that includes some reordering of the grain boundary structure, to a more conventional diffusionally-limited grain growth process. By extrapolating the measured grain growth and microstrain evolution kinetics, a thermal budget map is constructed, permitting recommendations for improving the thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline materials processed via a powder route.

  12. Collective relaxation dynamics and crystallization kinetics of the amorphous Biclotymol antiseptic.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pragya; Romanini, Michela; Tamarit, Josep Lluis; Macovez, Roberto

    2015-11-10

    We employ dielectric spectroscopy to monitor the relaxation dynamics and crystallization kinetics of the Biclotymol antiseptic in its amorphous phase. The glass transition temperature of the material as determined by dielectric spectroscopy is Tg = 290 ± 1K. The primary (α) relaxation dynamics is observed to follow a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann temperature dependence, with a kinetic fragility index m = 86 ± 13, which classifies Biclotymol as a relatively fragile glass former. A secondary relaxation is also observed, corresponding to an intramolecular dynamic process of the non-rigid Biclotymol molecule. The crystallization kinetics, measured at four different temperatures above the glass transition temperature, follows an Avrami behavior with exponent virtually equal to n = 2, indicating one-dimensional crystallization into needle-like crystallites, as experimentally observed, with a time-constant nucleation rate. The activation barrier for crystallization is found to be Ea = 115 ± 22 kJ mol(-1).

  13. Collective relaxation dynamics and crystallization kinetics of the amorphous Biclotymol antiseptic.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pragya; Romanini, Michela; Tamarit, Josep Lluis; Macovez, Roberto

    2015-11-10

    We employ dielectric spectroscopy to monitor the relaxation dynamics and crystallization kinetics of the Biclotymol antiseptic in its amorphous phase. The glass transition temperature of the material as determined by dielectric spectroscopy is Tg = 290 ± 1K. The primary (α) relaxation dynamics is observed to follow a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann temperature dependence, with a kinetic fragility index m = 86 ± 13, which classifies Biclotymol as a relatively fragile glass former. A secondary relaxation is also observed, corresponding to an intramolecular dynamic process of the non-rigid Biclotymol molecule. The crystallization kinetics, measured at four different temperatures above the glass transition temperature, follows an Avrami behavior with exponent virtually equal to n = 2, indicating one-dimensional crystallization into needle-like crystallites, as experimentally observed, with a time-constant nucleation rate. The activation barrier for crystallization is found to be Ea = 115 ± 22 kJ mol(-1). PMID:26364713

  14. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  15. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal data and eye-tracking data were collected as indications of students' learning activities. For the verbal data, we applied a fine-grained coding scheme to optimally describe students' learning activities. For the eye-tracking data, we used fixation time and transitions between areas of interest in the process diagrams as indices of learning activities. Various learning activities while studying process diagrams were found that distinguished between more and less successful students. Results showed that between-student variance in comprehension score was highly predicted by meaning making of the process arrows (80%) and fixation time in the main area (65%). Students employed successful learning activities consistently across learning tasks. Furthermore, compared to unsuccessful students, successful students used a more coherent approach of interrelated learning activities for comprehending process diagrams.

  16. Evaluation of Control Parameters for the Activated Sludge Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stall, T. Ray; Sherrard, Josephy H.

    1978-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of the parameters currently being used to design and operate the activated sludge process is presented. The advantages and disadvantages for the use of each parameter are discussed. (MR)

  17. Hold My Calls: An Activity for Introducing the Statistical Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Todd; Poling, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Working with practicing teachers, this article demonstrates, through the facilitation of a statistical activity, how to introduce and investigate the unique qualities of the statistical process including: formulate a question, collect data, analyze data, and interpret data.

  18. Highly cooperative stress relaxation in two-dimensional soft colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Berend; Qi, Weikai; Fokkink, Remco G; van der Gucht, Jasper; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Sprakel, Joris

    2014-10-28

    Stress relaxation in crystalline solids is mediated by the formation and diffusion of defects. Although it is well established how externally generated stresses relax, through the proliferation and motion of dislocations in the lattice, it remains relatively unknown how crystals cope with internal stresses. We investigate, both experimentally and in simulations, how highly localized stresses relax in 2D soft colloidal crystals. When a single particle is actively excited, by means of optical tweezing, a rich variety of highly collective stress relaxation mechanisms results. These relaxation processes manifest in the form of open strings of cooperatively moving particles through the motion of dissociated vacancy-interstitial pairs, and closed loops of mobile particles, which either result from cooperative rotations in transiently generated circular grain boundaries or through the closure of an open string by annihilation of a vacancy-interstitial pair. Surprisingly, we find that the same collective events occur in crystals that are excited by thermal fluctuations alone; a large thermal agitation inside the crystal lattice can trigger the irreversible displacements of hundreds of particles. Our results illustrate how local stresses can induce large-scale cooperative dynamics in 2D soft colloidal crystals and shed light on the stabilization mechanisms in ultrasoft crystals.

  19. [Death in a relaxation tank].

    PubMed

    Rupp, Wolf; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Bohnert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Complete relaxation can be achieved by floating in a darkened, sound-proof relaxation tank filled with salinated water kept at body temperature. Under these conditions, meditation exercises up to self-hypnosis may lead to deep relaxation with physical and mental revitalization. A user manipulated his tank, presumably to completely cut off all optical and acoustic stimuli and accidentally also covered the ventilation hole. The man was found dead in his relaxation tank. The findings suggested lack of oxygen as the cause of death.

  20. Topological constraints on magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Yeates, A R; Hornig, G; Wilmot-Smith, A L

    2010-08-20

    The final state of turbulent magnetic relaxation in a reversed field pinch is well explained by Taylor's hypothesis. However, recent resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the relaxation of braided solar coronal loops have led to relaxed fields far from the Taylor state, despite the conservation of helicity. We point out the existence of an additional topological invariant in any flux tube with a nonzero field: the topological degree of the field line mapping. We conjecture that this constrains the relaxation, explaining why only one of three example simulations reaches the Taylor state. PMID:20868104

  1. Biochemical activities in soil overlying Paraho processed oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Microbial activity development in soil materials placed over processed oil shale is vital to the plant litter decomposition, cycling of nutrients, and soil organic matter accumulation and maintenance. Samples collected in the summers of 1979, 1980, and 1981 from revegetated soil 30-, 61-, and 91-cm deep overlying spent oil shale in the Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado were assayed for dehydrogenease activity with glucose and without glucose, for phosphatase activity, and for acetylene reduction activity. Initial ammonium and nitrite nitrogen oxidation rates and potential denitrification rates were determined in 1981. Zymogenous dehydrogenase activity, phosphatase activity, nitrogenase activity, potential denitrification rates, and direct microscopic counts were lower in surface soil 30 cm deep, and were frequently lower in surface soil 61 cm deep over processed shale than in a surface-disturbed control area soil. Apparently, microbial activities are stressed in these more shallow replaced soils. Soil 61 cm deep over a coarse-rock capillary barrier separating the soil from the spent shale, frequently had improved biochemical activity. Initial ammonium and nitrite nitrogen oxidation rates were lower in all replaced soils than in the disturbed control soil. Soil core samples taken in 1981 were assayed for dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, viable bacteria, and viable fungal propagules. In general, microbial activity decreased quickly below the surface. At depths greater than 45 cm, microbial activities were similar in buried spent shale and surface-disturbed control soil.

  2. Relaxation Techniques for Trauma.

    PubMed

    Scotland-Coogan, Diane; Davis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Physiological symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manifest as increased arousal and reactivity seen as anger outburst, irritability, reckless behavior with no concern for consequences, hypervigilance, sleep disturbance, and problems with focus (American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). In seeking the most beneficial treatment for PTSD, consideration must be given to the anxiety response. Relaxation techniques are shown to help address the physiological manifestations of prolonged stress. The techniques addressed by the authors in this article include mindfulness, deep breathing, yoga, and meditation. By utilizing these techniques traditional therapies can be complemented. In addition, those who are averse to the traditional evidence-based practices or for those who have tried traditional therapies without success; these alternative interventions may assist in lessening physiological manifestations of PTSD. Future research studies assessing the benefits of these treatment modalities are warranted to provide empirical evidence to support the efficacy of these treatments. PMID:27119722

  3. Dehydrogenation processes via C-H activation within alkylphosphines.

    PubMed

    Grellier, Mary; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane

    2012-01-01

    Phosphines are commonly used in organometallic chemistry and are present in a wide variety of catalytic systems. This feature article highlights the advances made in dehydrogenation processes occurring within alkylphosphines, with the aim of further developing catalytic processes involving C-H activation together with potential applications in the field of hydrogen storage. PMID:21956347

  4. 76 FR 19120 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Drawback Process Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Drawback Process... Drawback Process Regulations (CBP Forms 7551, 7552 and 7553). This request for comment is being made... CBP is soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title: Drawback...

  5. 76 FR 44350 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Drawback Process Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register (76 FR 19120) on April 6, 2011, allowing for a 60... SECURITY U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION Agency Information Collection Activities: Drawback Process... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Drawback Process Regulations (CBP Forms 7551,...

  6. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal…

  7. Instructional Transaction Theory: Knowledge Relationships among Processes, Entities, and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, M. David; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of instructional transaction theory focuses on knowledge representation in an automated instructional design expert system. A knowledge structure called PEA-Net (processes, entities, and activities) is explained; the refrigeration process is used as an example; text resources and graphic resources are described; and simulations are…

  8. Nanosecond Relaxation Dynamics of Hydrated Proteins: Water versus protein contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Khodadadi, S; Curtis, J. E.; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-01-01

    We have studied picosecond to nanosecond dynamics of hydrated protein powders using dielectric spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our analysis of hydrogen-atom single particle dynamics from MD simulations focused on main ( main tens of picoseconds) and slow ( slow nanosecond) relaxation processes that were observed in dielectric spectra of similar hydrated protein samples. Traditionally, the interpretation of these processes observed in dielectric spectra has been ascribed to the relaxation behavior of hydration water tightly bounded to a protein and not to protein atoms. Detailed analysis of the MD simulations and comparison to dielectric data indicate that the observed relaxation process in the nanosecond time range of hydrated protein spectra is mainly due to protein atoms. The relaxation processes involve the entire structure of protein including atoms in the protein backbone, side chains, and turns. Both surface and buried protein atoms contribute to the slow processes; however, surface atoms demonstrate slightly faster relaxation dynamics. Analysis of the water molecule residence and dipolar relaxation correlation behavior indicates that the hydration water relaxes at much shorter time scales.

  9. Active Storage Processing in a Parallel File System

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, Evan J.; Fox, Kevin M.; Regimbal, Kevin M.; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2006-01-01

    By creating a processing system within a parallel file system one can harness the power of unused processing power on servers that have very fast access to the disks they are serving. By inserting a module the Lustre file system the Active Storage Concept is able to perform processing with the file system architecture. Results of using this technology are presented as the results of the Supercomputing StorCloud Challenge Application are reviewed.

  10. OCT-based approach to local relaxations discrimination from translational relaxation motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Lev A.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex; Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool for tissue state characterization. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an approach to mapping mechanical properties of tissue based on OCT. One of challenging problems in OCE is elimination of the influence of residual local tissue relaxation that complicates obtaining information on elastic properties of the tissue. Alternatively, parameters of local relaxation itself can be used as an additional informative characteristic for distinguishing the tissue in normal and pathological states over the OCT image area. Here we briefly present an OCT-based approach to evaluation of local relaxation processes in the tissue bulk after sudden unloading of its initial pre-compression. For extracting the local relaxation rate we evaluate temporal dependence of local strains that are mapped using our recently developed hybrid phase resolved/displacement-tracking (HPRDT) approach. This approach allows one to subtract the contribution of global displacements of scatterers in OCT scans and separate the temporal evolution of local strains. Using a sample excised from of a coronary arteria, we demonstrate that the observed relaxation of local strains can be reasonably fitted by an exponential law, which opens the possibility to characterize the tissue by a single relaxation time. The estimated local relaxation times are assumed to be related to local biologically-relevant processes inside the tissue, such as diffusion, leaking/draining of the fluids, local folding/unfolding of the fibers, etc. In general, studies of evolution of such features can provide new metrics for biologically-relevant changes in tissue, e.g., in the problems of treatment monitoring.

  11. Cascading activation from lexical processing to letter-level processing in written word production.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Adam; Falconer, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of language production have identified processes involved in producing language and the presence and type of interaction among those processes. In the case of spoken language production, consensus has emerged that there is interaction among lexical selection processes and phoneme-level processing. This issue has received less attention in written language production. In this paper, we present a novel analysis of the writing-to-dictation performance of an individual with acquired dysgraphia revealing cascading activation from lexical processing to letter-level processing. The individual produced frequent lexical-semantic errors (e.g., chipmunk → SQUIRREL) as well as letter errors (e.g., inhibit → INBHITI) and had a profile consistent with impairment affecting both lexical processing and letter-level processing. The presence of cascading activation is suggested by lower letter accuracy on words that are more weakly activated during lexical selection than on those that are more strongly activated. We operationalize weakly activated lexemes as those lexemes that are produced as lexical-semantic errors (e.g., lethal in deadly → LETAHL) compared to strongly activated lexemes where the intended target word (e.g., lethal) is the lexeme selected for production. PMID:25163539

  12. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  13. Measuring the longitudinal NMR relaxation rates of fast relaxing nuclei using a signal eliminating relaxation filter.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D F; Led, J J

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180 degrees inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180 degrees pulses separated by two variable delays, Delta1 and Delta2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  14. Spin-flip relaxation via optical phonon scattering in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Liu, Lei; Li, Shu-Shen

    2013-12-14

    Based on the spin-orbit coupling admixture mechanism, we theoretically investigate the spin-flip relaxation via optical phonon scattering in quantum dots by considering the effect of lattice relaxation due to the electron-acoustic phonon deformation potential coupling. The relaxation rate displays a cusp-like structure (or a spin hot spot) that becomes more clearly with increasing temperature. We also calculate the relaxation rate of the spin-conserving process, which follows a Gaussian form and is several orders of magnitude larger than that of spin-flip process. Moreover, we find that the relaxation rate displays the oscillatory behavior due to the interplay effects between the magnetic and spatial confinement for the spin-flip process not for the spin-conserving process. The trends of increasing and decreasing temperature dependence of the relaxation rates for two relaxation processes are obtained in the present model.

  15. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. -S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.

    2015-09-29

    We report direct lattice level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in-situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50 GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns) and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ~1 ns. For 80 and 125 GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ~65 GPa. The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density and these quantities are compared to the Livermore Multiscale Strength model as well as various molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Solvent relaxation of oxazine-4 in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görlach, Ekkehard; Gygax, Hansruedi; Lubini, Paolo; Wild, Urs P.

    1995-05-01

    Time resolved and stationary fluorescence spectra of oxazine-4 perchlorate in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) were measured from 80 to 250 K. In the time resolved experiments the relaxation of the polar solvent around the chromophore was observed. Assuming a simple Debye relaxation behavior, relaxation times were extracted and from an Arrhenius analysis an activation energy of E A = 1320 cm -1 was estimated. The temperature dependent steady state fluorescence spectrum could be simulated using the obtained Arrhenius parameters. It was observed that exciting vibrational degrees of freedom in the chromophore leads to an acceleration of the solvent relaxation. As a probable reason a locally heating, caused by vibrational relaxation prior to the reorganization of the solvent shell is discussed.

  17. Dielectric relaxation of thin films of polyamide random copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Natsumi; Fukao, Koji; Sotta, Paul; Long, Didier R.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the relaxation behavior of thin films of a polyamide random copolymer, PA66/6I, with various film thicknesses using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Two dielectric signals are observed at high temperatures, the α process and the relaxation process due to electrode polarization (the EP process). The relaxation time of the EP process has a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann type of temperature dependence, and the glass transition temperature, Tg, evaluated from the EP process agrees very well with the Tg determined from the thermal measurements. The fragility index derived from the EP process increases with decreasing film thickness. The relaxation time and the dielectric relaxation strength of the EP process are described by a linear function of the film thickness d for large values of d , which can be regarded as experimental evidence for the validity of attributing the observed signal to the EP process. Furthermore, there is distinct deviation from this linear law for thicknesses smaller than a critical value. This deviation observed in thinner films is associated with an increase in the mobility and/or diffusion constant of the charge carriers responsible for the EP process. The α process is located in a higher-frequency region than the EP process at high temperatures but merges with the EP process at lower temperatures near the glass transition region. The thickness dependence of the relaxation time of the α process is different from that of the EP process. This suggests that there is decoupling between the segmental motion of the polymers and the translational motion of the charge carriers in confinement.

  18. Relaxation Mechanisms in Hyperpolarized Polycrystalline ^129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelson, G.; Su, T.; Saam, B.

    2002-10-01

    Through spin exchange with optically polarized Rb vapor, it is possible to achieve upwards of 30% nuclear spin polarization in ^129Xe and a corresponding NMR signal some 5 orders of magnitude stronger than typical thermally polarized ^129Xe. Due to such a strong signal, hyperpolarized ^129Xe is being used for several leading-edge technologies (eg. biochemical spectroscopy, MRI, and polarization transfer). We have measured the nuclear spin relaxation rate of polycrystalline hyperpolarized ^129Xe at 77K (well below the freezing point of 160K) in a magnetic field of only a few Gauss and have observed that the hyperpolarization completely survives the freezing process. Furthermore, in this regime we have observed non-exponential spin relaxation that depends strongly on magnetic field, isotopic concentration (between ^129Xe and ^131Xe) and differences in crystallite formation. We present a simple spin-diffusion model that fits and explains the features of the data. Our results agree with the hypothesis that at low fields and temperatures the dominant spin relaxation mechanism is cross-relaxation with ^131Xe on the surface of the crystallites (Gatzke, et al., PRL b70, 690 (1993)).

  19. Dielectric Relaxation of Water in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander A.; Ishai, Paul Ben; Levy, Evgenya

    Whenever water interacts with another dipolar or charged entity, a broadening of the dielectric relaxation peak occurs. This broadening can often be described by the phenomenological Cole-Cole (CC) spectral function. A new approach (Puzenko AA, Ben Ishai P, and Feldman Y, Phys Rev Lett 105:037601, 2010) based on the fractal nature of the time set of the interaction of the relaxing water dipoles with its encompassing matrix has been recently presented showing a fundamental connection between the relaxation time, τ, the broadening parameter, α, and the Kirkwood-Fröhlich correlation function B. Parameters B, τ and α where chosen as the coordinates of a new 3D space. The evolution of the relaxation process due to the variation of external macroscopic parameters (temperature, pressure etc.) represents the trajectory in 3D space. This trajectory demonstrates the connection between the kinetic and structural properties of the water in complex system. It is also shown how the model describes the state of water in two porous silica glasses and in two different types of aqueous solutions: ionic, and non-ionic. The complex dielectric spectra of a series of solutions of sodium chloride and potassium chloride in water have been measured and have been carefully analyzed along with previously measured spectra for aqueous solutions of D-glucose and D-fructose.

  20. Times of metastable droplet relaxation to equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.; Komarov, V. N.; Zaitseva, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    Times of metastable droplet relaxation to their equilibrium state are calculated at saturated vapor pressures, depending on the droplet size. It is shown that for small droplets with radius R = 6 molecular diameters (or ~2 nm) the relaxation times are ~1 ns (which is comparable to the characteristic flight times of rarefied gas molecules). For large droplets with radius R ~ 800 molecular diameters, the relaxation times are as long as 10 μs. At a fixed droplet radius (6 ≤ R ≤ 800), the range of variation in relaxation time from the melting point to the critical temperature does not exceed one order of magnitude: the lower the temperature, the slower the relaxation process.

  1. Time dependent parallel viscosity and relaxation rate of poloidal rotation in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.; Shaing, K.C.; Gormley, R. )

    1994-01-01

    Time dependent ion parallel viscous force in the banana regime with arbitrary inverse aspect ratio [epsilon] is calculated using the eigenfunction approach. The flux surface averaged viscosity is then used to study the relaxation process of the poloidal rotation which leads to oscillatory relaxation behavior. The relaxation rate [nu][sub [ital p

  2. Nonoxidative removal of organics in the activated sludge process

    PubMed Central

    Modin, Oskar; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Hermansson, Malte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activated sludge process is commonly used to treat wastewater by aerobic oxidation of organic pollutants into carbon dioxide and water. However, several nonoxidative mechanisms can also contribute to removal of organics. Sorption onto activated sludge can remove a large fraction of the colloidal and particulate wastewater organics. Intracellular storage of, e.g., polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), triacylglycerides (TAG), or wax esters can convert wastewater organics into precursors for high-value products. Recently, several environmental, economic, and technological drivers have stimulated research on nonoxidative removal of organics for wastewater treatment. In this paper, we review these nonoxidative removal mechanisms as well as the existing and emerging process configurations that make use of them for wastewater treatment. Better utilization of nonoxidative processes in activated sludge could reduce the wasteful aerobic oxidation of organic compounds and lead to more resource-efficient wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27453679

  3. Impact of activation process on fog life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Marie; Burnet, Frédéric; Lac, Christine; Roberts, Greg; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Elias, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Fogs are complex meteorological system dealing with fine scale processes. Subtle interaction between radiative, dynamic, turbulent and microphysic processes can lead to different fog life cycle, which make prediction difficult. The droplets that composed fogs are formed trough the activation of aerosol particles called CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) described by the Köhler theory (Köhler, 1936). The number and distribution of the droplets activated during fog formation is determined by the aerosols particles properties and number and the ambient vapor supersaturation of the atmosphere. In the frame of the PreViBOSS project, an in-situ measurement platform of fog properties at ground level was deployed at SIRTA (Instrumented Site for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Research) during winter 2010 to 2013. Microphysics data supply a detailed characterization of number size spectrum from dry to wet aerosols particles and inform on the abilities of the aerosols particles to act as a CCN. 48 fog events have been studied. Supersaturation critical values and concentrations of CCN have been determined and linked to aerosols properties. The main impact of aerosols size distribution on activation have been pointed out. The study of droplets spectra evolution reveals the major physical processes into fogs and suggests that even if thermodynamic dominates the fog life cycle, activation process seems to have a significant effect. Large eddy simulation of fog run with Meso-NH model allow to explore precisely the interaction between fog physical processes and to quantify activation impact. Supersaturation modelling is a key point, a new pseudo-prognostic scheme (Thouron et al., 2012) is used. Confrontation between a detailed experimental study and three-dimensional fine scale simulation in LES provides an accurate investigation of the impact of activation process on fog life cycle.

  4. The large strain response of polypropylene in multiaxial stretching and stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J.; Caton-Rose, P.; Spencer, P. E.; O'Conner, C.; Martin, P. J.; Menary, G.

    2011-05-01

    In this study, a biaxial testing machine is used to stretch polypropylene sheet at elevated temperatures (150-160° C) in a number of modes, including simultaneous equibiaxial and a sequential mode that consists of planar extension followed by a second perpendicular extension to achieve a final equibiaxial state. On completion of the stretching process the applied forces continue to be monitored to give further data on stress relaxation. A constitutive model is devised that combines the Eyring process and large strain elastic theory. A Guiu-Pratt model, including a single Eyring process, is fitted to the stress relaxation curves and produces values of Eyring parameters. Fits are improved if the initial part of the curve is excluded, indicating that the activation volume derived relates to a process in the relatively long term. In support of this, the strain rate dependence of the loading curves indicates a quite different value of activation volume. A two-process model is derived with parameter values deduced from these two types of fit, and implemented in a finite element package. Its capability of modelling the whole of the stress relaxation curve is explored.

  5. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the dielectric relaxation in a non-crystallizable monohydroxy alcohol in its supercooled liquid and glassy states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlus, S.; Paluch, M.; Nagaraj, M.; Vij, J. K.

    2011-08-01

    = 1750 MPa is almost the same for process II at P = 0.1 MPa. From the results of the activation volume, activation enthalpy, and a comparison of the relaxation times with the g factor, we conclude that both processes I and II are significantly affected by hydrogen bonding and both contribute to the structural relaxation.

  6. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the dielectric relaxation in a non-crystallizable monohydroxy alcohol in its supercooled liquid and glassy states.

    PubMed

    Pawlus, S; Paluch, M; Nagaraj, M; Vij, J K

    2011-08-28

    , for P = 1750 MPa is almost the same for process II at P = 0.1 MPa. From the results of the activation volume, activation enthalpy, and a comparison of the relaxation times with the g factor, we conclude that both processes I and II are significantly affected by hydrogen bonding and both contribute to the structural relaxation.

  7. Signal processing by its coil zipper domain activates IKKγ

    PubMed Central

    Bloor, Stuart; Ryzhakov, Grigor; Wagner, Sebastian; Butler, P. Jonathan G.; Smith, David L.; Krumbach, Rebekka; Dikic, Ivan; Randow, Felix

    2008-01-01

    NF-κB activation occurs upon degradation of its inhibitor I-κB and requires prior phosphorylation of the inhibitor by I-κB kinase (IKK). Activity of IKK is governed by its noncatalytic subunit IKKγ. Signaling defects due to missense mutations in IKKγ have been correlated to its inability to either become ubiquitylated or bind ubiquitin noncovalently. Because the relative contribution of these events to signaling had remained unknown, we have studied mutations in the coil-zipper (CoZi) domain of IKKγ that either impair signaling or cause constitutive NF-κB activity. Certain signaling-deficient alleles neither bound ubiquitin nor were they ubiquitylated by TRAF6. Introducing an activating mutation into those signaling-impaired alleles restored their ubiquitylation and created mutants constitutively activating NF-κB without repairing the ubiquitin-binding defect. Constitutive activity therefore arises downstream of ubiquitin binding but upstream of ubiquitylation. Such constitutive activity reveals a signal-processing function for IKKγ beyond that of a mere ubiquitin-binding adaptor. We propose that this signal processing may involve homophilic CoZi interactions as suggested by the enhanced affinity of CoZi domains from constitutively active IKKγ. PMID:18216269

  8. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  9. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  10. [Indications for relaxation in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Richard, J; Picot, A; de Bus, P; Andreoli, A; Dalakaki, X

    1975-11-01

    On a three years base experience in the geriatiic department of Geneva's University Psychiatric Clinic the paper studies the problem of selecting aged patients to be treated by relaxation according to the method of J. De Ajuriaguerra et M. Cahen. Observations are presented in an attempt to define three main points: a) the role played by relaxation when there is an objective [corrected] impairment of the body's integrity; b) relaxation effect on aged persons neurotic states evolution; c) the reality of considering dementia as a counter-indication of relaxation therapy. These remarks complete those presented previously about the training of therapists in relaxation, the type of control to be organized for them and their patients, the technical management of the cure, the place of relaxation in the post graduate psychiatric training, the effects of the therapy on the patients human environnement behavior in and out of the hospital, the way body is perceived through relaxation by the aged patients and it's consequences on the adjustment of an aging person.

  11. Progressive muscle relaxation, breathing exercises, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Smith, J C

    2001-12-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and breathing exercises. Forty-two students were divided randomly into two groups and taught PMR or breathing exercises. Both groups practiced for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, PMR practitioners displayed greater increments in relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement, while breathing practitioners displayed higher levels of R-State Strength and Awareness. Slight differences emerged at Weeks 1 and 2; major differences emerged at Weeks 4 and 5. A delayed and potentially reinforcing aftereffect emerged for PMR only after five weeks of training--increased levels of Mental Quiet and Joy. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  12. Disentangling ligand migration and heme pocket relaxation in cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Catherine; Mouawad, Liliane; Murail, Samuel; Duchambon, Patricia; Blouquit, Yves; Lavalette, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    In this work we show that ligand migration and active site conformational relaxation can occur independently of each other in hemoproteins. The complicated kinetics of carbon monoxide rebinding with cytochrome P450cam display up to five distinct processes between 77 K and 300 K. They were disentangled by using a combination of three approaches: 1), the competition of the ligand with xenon for the occupation of internal protein cavities; 2), the modulation of the amount of distal steric hindrance within the heme pocket by varying the nature of the substrate; and 3), molecular mechanics calculations to support the proposed heme-substrate relaxation mechanism and to seek internal cavities. In cytochrome P450cam, active site conformational relaxation results from the displacement of the substrate toward the heme center upon photodissociation of the ligand. It is responsible for the long, puzzling bimodal nature of the rebinding kinetics observed down to 77 K. The relaxation rate is strongly substrate-dependent. Ligand migration is slower and is observed only above 135 K. Migration and return rates are independent of the substrate.

  13. Pyocyanin inhibits both nitric oxide-dependent and -independent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Hempenstall, Allison; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Johnson, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    The effects of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin (PCN) on the contractile function of porcine coronary arteries was investigated in vitro. Artery rings (5 mm) were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs' solution for the measurement of isometric tension. The effect of PCN on resting and precontracted coronary arteries was initially investigated with various agents. Arteries were precontracted with prostaglandin (PG) F2α or potassium chloride and endothelium-dependent relaxations were induced by various agents in the presence of PCN. Pyocyanin (0.1-10 μmol/L) evoked small-amplitude, dose-dependent contractions in resting porcine coronary arteries. In addition, PCN amplified the contractile response to PGF2α , but did not alter responses to carbachol. Pyocyanin (0.1-10 μmol/L) significantly inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxations evoked by neurokinin A. Pyocyanin also inhibited relaxations evoked by diethylamine nitric oxide (a nitric oxide donor), forskolin (an adenylate cyclase activator), dibuytyryl-cAMP (a cAMP analogue), 8-bromo-cGMP (a cGMP analogue) and P1075 (a KATP channel activator), but not isoprenaline (β-adrenoceceptor agonist). These results indicate that physiological concentrations of PCN interfere with multiple intracellular processes involved in vascular smooth muscle relaxation, in particular pathways downstream of nitric oxide release. Thus, PCN may alter normal vascular function in patients infected with P. aeruginosa.

  14. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496–502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  15. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496-502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  16. Dielectric relaxation and birefringence study of 7.O5O.7 dimeric liquid crystal compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Debanjan; Paul-Choudhury, Sandip; Alapati, Parameswara Rao; Bhattacharjee, Ayon

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of dielectric relaxation and birefringence phenomenon of dimeric liquid crystal compound with the dependence of temperature was reported in this paper. Homogeneous (HG) and homeotropic (HT) alignment of the cell are introduced to investigate the dielectric relaxation, activation energy and birefringence. Cole-Cole plots analyzed the dielectric relaxation of the dimeric compound. The observed Cole-Cole plots were semi-circular, and the relaxation mechanism obeys the non-Debye type of relaxation behaviour. Slater's perturbation equations have been used to analysis the activation energy of the compound. The birefringence of the compound has positively anisotropy and thin prism mechanism was used to study the anisotropy of the compound.

  17. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  18. Stretched exponential relaxation of piezovoltages in wet bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lianyun; Hou, Zhende; Fu, Donghui; Qin, Qing-Hua; Wang, Yihan

    2015-01-01

    It is important to determine the amplitude and variation characteristics of piezovoltage in wet bone, which can, in turn, be taken as a basis for studying whether electrical signals induced by external forces can affect the growth of bone cells. This work measured the characteristics of piezoelectric effects under dynamic and static loading. The results show that the variations of piezovoltage in wet bone in both loading and load holding periods follow a stretched exponential relaxation law, and the relaxation time constants of the piezovoltages are much larger than those of dry bone. This finding means that the active time of piezovoltage in wet bone is much longer than that of dry bone. Regardless of the loading and load holding processes, continuously increasing deformation in wet bone caused piezoelectric charges to be continuously induced and increased the dielectric constant of wet bone along with the deformation process. In general, compared with piezovoltage in dry bone, that in wet bone had lower amplitude and could exist for a longer duration. It can be inferred, therefore, that piezoelectricity might create coupling with the streaming potential in bone by changing the thickness of the double electrode layer.

  19. Stretched exponential relaxation of piezovoltages in wet bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lianyun; Hou, Zhende; Fu, Donghui; Qin, Qing-Hua; Wang, Yihan

    2015-01-01

    It is important to determine the amplitude and variation characteristics of piezovoltage in wet bone, which can, in turn, be taken as a basis for studying whether electrical signals induced by external forces can affect the growth of bone cells. This work measured the characteristics of piezoelectric effects under dynamic and static loading. The results show that the variations of piezovoltage in wet bone in both loading and load holding periods follow a stretched exponential relaxation law, and the relaxation time constants of the piezovoltages are much larger than those of dry bone. This finding means that the active time of piezovoltage in wet bone is much longer than that of dry bone. Regardless of the loading and load holding processes, continuously increasing deformation in wet bone caused piezoelectric charges to be continuously induced and increased the dielectric constant of wet bone along with the deformation process. In general, compared with piezovoltage in dry bone, that in wet bone had lower amplitude and could exist for a longer duration. It can be inferred, therefore, that piezoelectricity might create coupling with the streaming potential in bone by changing the thickness of the double electrode layer. PMID:25460408

  20. Ambient and focal visual processing of naturalistic activity.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Michelle L; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    When people inspect a picture, they progress through two distinct phases of visual processing: an ambient, or exploratory, phase that emphasizes input from peripheral vision and rapid acquisition of low-frequency information, followed by a focal phase that emphasizes central vision, salient objects, and high-frequency information. Does this qualitative shift occur during dynamic scene viewing? If so, when? One possibility is that shifts to exploratory processing are triggered at subjective event boundaries. This shift would be adaptive, because event boundaries typically occur when activity features change and when activity becomes unpredictable. Here, we used a perceptual event segmentation task, in which people identified boundaries between meaningful units of activity, to test this hypothesis. In two studies, an eye tracker recorded eye movements and pupil size while participants first watched movies of actors engaged in everyday activities and then segmented them into meaningful events. Saccade amplitudes and fixation durations during the initial viewings suggest that event boundaries function much like the onset of a new picture during static picture presentation: Viewers initiate an ambient processing phase and then progress to focal viewing as the event progresses. These studies suggest that this shift in processing mode could play a role in the formation of mental representations of the current environment. PMID:27002550

  1. 23 CFR 450.208 - Coordination of planning process activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR part 500. (e) States may apply asset management principles and techniques in establishing planning... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coordination of planning process activities. 450.208 Section 450.208 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING...

  2. 30 CFR 785.22 - In situ processing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In situ processing activities. 785.22 Section 785.22 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMITS...

  3. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process: Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This document is the appendix for a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Categories discussed include: control test data, trend charts, moving averages, semi-logarithmic plots, probability…

  4. Enhanced Passive and Active Processing of Syllables in Musician Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobert, Julie; Marie, Celine; Francois, Clement; Schon, Daniele; Besson, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of musical expertise in 9-year-old children on passive (as reflected by MMN) and active (as reflected by discrimination accuracy) processing of speech sounds. Musician and nonmusician children were presented with a sequence of syllables that included standards and deviants in vowel frequency,…

  5. Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) for quantitative analysis of conformational dynamics in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Chao, Fa-An; Masterson, Larry R.; Mangia, Silvia; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Seelig, Burckhard; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    NMR relaxation methods probe biomolecular motions over a wide range of timescales. In particular, the rotating frame spin-lock R1ρ and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) R2 experiments are commonly used to characterize μs to ms dynamics, which play a critical role in enzyme folding and catalysis. In an effort to complement these approaches, we introduced the Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) method, where dispersion in rotating frame relaxation rate constants (longitudinal R1ρ and transverse R2ρ) is created by modulating the shape and duration of adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulses. Previously, we showed the ability of the HARD method to detect chemical exchange dynamics in the fast exchange regime (kex ˜ 104-105 s-1). In this article, we show the sensitivity of the HARD method to slower exchange processes by measuring R1ρ and R2ρ relaxation rates for two soluble proteins (ubiquitin and 10C RNA ligase). One advantage of the HARD method is its nominal dependence on the applied radio frequency field, which can be leveraged to modulate the dispersion in the relaxation rate constants. In addition, we also include product operator simulations to define the dynamic range of adiabatic R1ρ and R2ρ that is valid under all exchange regimes. We conclude from both experimental observations and simulations that this method is complementary to CPMG-based and rotating frame spin-lock R1ρ experiments to probe conformational exchange dynamics for biomolecules. Finally, this approach is germane to several NMR-active nuclei, where relaxation rates are frequency-offset independent.

  6. Analysis of pomegranate juice components in rat corpora cavernosal relaxation.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, C V; Gur, S; Abdulkadir, N A; Kartal, M; Karabakan, M; Akdemir, A O; Gökkaya, C S; Cetinkaya, M

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the action of pomegranate juice (PJ) and its five principal phenolic constituents on rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM). Isometric tension studies were performed after precontraction with phenylephrine in CCSM from rats. Relaxant responses to PJ and its constituents ellagic acid (EA), chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, cumaric acid and rutin were investigated. PJ and EA caused CCSM relaxations (94.1 ± 3.7 and 51.3 ± 9.9%), while others induced limited relaxant responses. EA response was not inhibited by L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (100 μM) and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (1 μM). Tetraethylammonium (100 μM) and apamin (10 μM) and nifedipine (10 μM) inhibited EA-induced relaxations at 10(-3) M by 84%, 82% and 78%, respectively. Glibenclamide (10 μM) inhibited EA response (97%, 100 μM). PJ-induced relaxation was not altered by several inhibitors. EA was estimated to be responsible for 13.3% of relaxation caused by PJ. Our study demonstrated that PJ and EA-induced marked relaxations in CCSM. The opening of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels and the inhibition of Ca(2+)-channels regulate the relaxation by EA, but not PJ. EA has a minor contribution to the marked relaxation obtained by PJ, suggesting the presence of other PJ constituents, which induce nitric oxide-independent corporal relaxation. Further studies are needed to examine the potential of PJ in combination with a PDE5 inhibitor in ED.

  7. Enceladus' extreme heat flux as revealed by its relaxed craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Michael T.; Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2012-09-01

    Enceladus' cratered terrains contain large numbers of unusually shallow craters consistent with deformation by viscous relaxation of water ice under conditions of elevated heat flow. Here we use high-resolution topography to measure the relaxation fraction of craters on Enceladus far from the active South Pole. We find that many craters are shallower than expected, with craters as small as 2 km in diameter having relaxation fractions in excess of 90%. These measurements are compared with numerical simulations of crater relaxation to constrain the minimum heat flux required to reproduce these observations. We find that Enceladus' nominal cold surface temperature (70 K) and low surface gravity strongly inhibit viscous relaxation. Under such conditions less than 3% relaxation occurs over 2 Ga even for relatively large craters (diameter 24 km) and high, constant heat fluxes (150 mW m-2). Greater viscous relaxation occurs if the effective temperature at the top of the lithosphere is greater than the surface temperature due to insulating regolith and/or plume material. Even for an effective temperature of 120 K, however, heat fluxes in excess of 150 mW m-2 are required to produce the degree of relaxation observed. Simulations of viscous relaxation of Enceladus' largest craters suggest that relaxation is best explained by a relatively short-lived period of intense heating that decayed quickly. We show that infilling of craters by plume material cannot explain the extremely shallow craters at equatorial and higher northern latitudes. Thus, like Enceladus' tectonic terrains, the cratered regions of Enceladus have experienced periods of extreme heat flux.

  8. The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golon, Danielle K.

    2016-10-03

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) operates as a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey and is 1 of 12 DAACs within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The LP DAAC ingests, archives, processes, and distributes NASA Earth science remote sensing data. These data are provided to the public at no charge. Data distributed by the LP DAAC provide information about Earth’s surface from daily to yearly intervals and at 15 to 5,600 meter spatial resolution. Data provided by the LP DAAC can be used to study changes in agriculture, vegetation, ecosystems, elevation, and much more. The LP DAAC provides several ways to access, process, and interact with these data. In addition, the LP DAAC is actively archiving new datasets to provide users with a variety of data to study the Earth.

  9. Functional brain mapping of the relaxation response and meditation.

    PubMed

    Lazar, S W; Bush, G; Gollub, R L; Fricchione, G L; Khalsa, G; Benson, H

    2000-05-15

    Meditation is a conscious mental process that induces a set of integrated physiologic changes termed the relaxation response. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to identify and characterize the brain regions that are active during a simple form of meditation. Significant (p<10(-7)) signal increases were observed in the group-averaged data in the dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortices, hippocampus/parahippocampus, temporal lobe, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and pre- and post-central gyri during meditation. Global fMRI signal decreases were also noted, although these were probably secondary to cardiorespiratory changes that often accompany meditation. The results indicate that the practice of meditation activates neural structures involved in attention and control of the autonomic nervous system.

  10. Simulation of DNA Supercoil Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ivenso, Ikenna D; Lillian, Todd D

    2016-05-24

    Several recent single-molecule experiments observe the response of supercoiled DNA to nicking endonucleases and topoisomerases. Typically in these experiments, indirect measurements of supercoil relaxation are obtained by observing the motion of a large micron-sized bead. The bead, which also serves to manipulate DNA, experiences significant drag and thereby obscures supercoil dynamics. Here we employ our discrete wormlike chain model to bypass experimental limitations and simulate the dynamic response of supercoiled DNA to a single strand nick. From our simulations, we make three major observations. First, extension is a poor dynamic measure of supercoil relaxation; in fact, the linking number relaxes so fast that it cannot have much impact on extension. Second, the rate of linking number relaxation depends upon its initial partitioning into twist and writhe as determined by tension. Third, the extensional response strongly depends upon the initial position of plectonemes.

  11. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Cheryl A; Smith, Bryan K; DuBose, Katrina D; Greene, J Leon; Bailey, Bruce W; Williams, Shannon L; Ryan, Joseph J; Schmelzle, Kristin H; Washburn, Richard A; Sullivan, Debra K; Mayo, Matthew S; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC) is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI). It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control). Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control), which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Enjoyment ratings for classroom-based lessons were also higher for intervention students. Competing factors, which might influence program results, were not carried out at intervention or control schools or were judged to be minimal. Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity. PMID:18606013

  12. Spin relaxation of iron in mixed state hemoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wajnberg, E; Kalinowski, H J; Bemski, G; Helman, J S

    1986-01-01

    In hemoproteins the relaxation mechanism of iron is Orbach for high spin (HS) and Raman for low spin (LS). We found that in met-hemoglobin and met-myoglobin, under conditions in which the two spin states coexist, both the HS and the LS states relax to the lattice through Orbach-like processes. Alos, very short (approximately 1 ns) and temperature independent transverse relaxation times T2 were estimated. This may result from the unusual electronic structure of mixed states hemoproteins that allows thermal equilibrium and interconversion of the spin states. PMID:3013333

  13. Molecular Relaxations in Supercooled Liquid and Glassy States of Amorphous Quinidine: Dielectric Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Approaches.

    PubMed

    Schammé, Benjamin; Mignot, Mélanie; Couvrat, Nicolas; Tognetti, Vincent; Joubert, Laurent; Dupray, Valérie; Delbreilh, Laurent; Dargent, Eric; Coquerel, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we conduct a comprehensive molecular relaxation study of amorphous Quinidine above and below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) through broadband dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (BDS) experiments and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, as one major issue with the amorphous state of pharmaceuticals is life expectancy. These techniques enabled us to determine what kind of molecular motions are responsible, or not, for the devitrification of Quinidine. Parameters describing the complex molecular dynamics of amorphous Quinidine, such as Tg, the width of the α relaxation (βKWW), the temperature dependence of α-relaxation times (τα), the fragility index (m), and the apparent activation energy of secondary γ relaxation (Ea-γ), were characterized. Above Tg (> 60 °C), a medium degree of nonexponentiality (βKWW = 0.5) was evidenced. An intermediate value of the fragility index (m = 86) enabled us to consider Quinidine as a glass former of medium fragility. Below Tg (< 60 °C), one well-defined secondary γ relaxation, with an apparent activation energy of Ea-γ = 53.8 kJ/mol, was reported. From theoretical DFT calculations, we identified the most reactive part of Quinidine moieties through exploration of the potential energy surface. We evidenced that the clearly visible γ process has an intramolecular origin coming from the rotation of the CH(OH)C9H14N end group. An excess wing observed in amorphous Quinidine was found to be an unresolved Johari-Goldstein relaxation. These studies were supplemented by sub-Tg experimental evaluations of the life expectancy of amorphous Quinidine by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. We show that the difference between Tg and the onset temperature for crystallization, Tc, which is 30 K, is sufficiently large to avoid recrystallization of amorphous Quinidine during 16 months of storage under ambient conditions. PMID:27391029

  14. A quantum mechanical alternative to the Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids.

    PubMed

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-11-21

    The theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups have recently been given a consistent quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate (i.e., coherence-damping) processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in the condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broader temperature range than is commonly thought. PMID:26451661

  15. Competition between activating and inhibitory processes in photobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, Harry; Lubart, Rachel

    1996-01-01

    We discuss light-induced stimulation and inhibition of biological activity by means of three types of competing processes. In the visible region, these competing processes are the formation by photosensitization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which stimulate the redox activity of the respiratory chain (RC) on the one hand, and intramolecular electronic- vibrational energy transfer from an endogenous photosensitizer to an enzyme of the RC, thereby bringing this enzyme into an inactive configuration and paralyzing the RC, on the other hand. Moreover, there is competition between stimulation of the redox activity of the RC by the ROS and a slower process where the enzymes of the RC react with the ROS, again paralyzing the RC. This paralysis of the RC plays a dominant role in photodynamic therapy, where exogenous photosensitizers together with a sufficiently large visible light-energy dose lead to overproduction of ROS. Finally, in the far-red region, there is competition between reactivation of the ATPase ion pumps in the cell membrane and inhibition of the enzymes in the RC as a result of vibrational overtone excitation. Photobioactivation is shown to lead to enhanced transient Ca2+ concentration increase (calcium oscillations) in the cytosol, thereby triggering further biological activity such as afflux of intercellular messengers which open gated ion channels in neighboring cells, producing calcium waves. Addition of ROS scavengers or quenchers such as SOD in the presence of catalase neutralizes photobiomodulation induced by visible light.

  16. Vibrational-translational relaxation in liquid chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Choi, P.-K.; Negishi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic measurements were made in liquid chloroform over the frequency range from 3 MHz to 5 GHz by means of three experimental techniques, pulse-echo overlap, high-resolution Bragg reflection, and Brillouin scattering. The observed velocity dispersion revealed two relaxation processes, one at 650 MHz and the other at 5.1 GHz at 20 °C. They are interpreted in terms of vibrational-translational relaxation. Quantitative analysis of specific heat shows the lowest (261 cm-1) and the second lowest (366 cm-1) fundamental vibrational modes should have a common relaxation time at 50 ps and the group of all above the third mode (667 cm-1) at 290 ps. The present results are combined with recent data obtained by Laubereau et al. with the picosecond spectroscopy technique; a diagram illustrating V-T and V-V energy transfer is presented. A brief comment is given also on V-T and V-V processes in dichloromethane.

  17. The relief of anxiety through relaxing meditation.

    PubMed

    Meares, A

    1976-08-01

    Our sensory input derives from sources in the environment, in our body and in the mind itself. When the sensory input reaches a critical level it is incompletely integrated, and anxiety results. A logical understanding of the cause of anxiety has no therapeutic effect. But the mind itself has the ability to reduce anxiety if suitable circumstances are provided. This can be quite easily achieved in the stillness of mind induced in a simple meditative experience known as Mental Ataraxis. The patient is first shown complete physical relaxation in global fashion. He is then brought to experience the relaxation as part of his whole being so that his mind fully participates in the process. He practises this, starting in a position of slight discomfort which eases as the meditative experience develops. The approach does not involve the patient in doing less work. The lessening of anxiety reduces nervous tension, psychosomatic disorders and defensive distortions of the personality.

  18. Electrochemical relaxation at electrically conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nateghi, M. R.; zarandi, M. B.

    2008-08-01

    In this study, slow relaxation (SR) associated with the electroreduction of polyaniline (PAn) films during polarization to high cathodic potentials was investigated by cyclic voltammetry technique. Anodic voltammetric currents were used as experimental variable to indicate the relaxation occurring in PAn films deposited electrochemically on the Pt electrode surface. The dependence of SR on polymer film thickness, waiting potential, and mobility of the doped anion was investigated. Percolation threshold potential for heteropolyanion doped PAn was estimated to be between 150 and 200 mV depending on polymer thickness on the electrode surface. A new model of the conducting to insulating conversion is described by the percolation theory and mobility gap changes during the process.

  19. Cole-Cole broadening in dielectric relaxation and strange kinetics.

    PubMed

    Puzenko, Alexander; Ishai, Paul Ben; Feldman, Yuri

    2010-07-16

    We present a fresh appraisal of the Cole-Cole (CC) description of dielectric relaxation. While the approach is phenomenological, it demonstrates a fundamental connection between the parameters of the CC dispersion. Based on the fractal nature of the time set representing the interaction of the relaxing dipole with its encompassing matrix, and the Kirkwood-Froehlich correlation factor, a new 3D phase space linking together the kinetic and structural properties is proposed. The evolution of the relaxation process is represented in this phase space by a trajectory, which is determined by the variation of external macroscopic parameters. As an example, the validity of the approach is demonstrated on two porous silica glasses exhibiting a CC relaxation process.

  20. Gaussian Process for Activity Modeling and Anomaly Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Rosenhahn, B.; Yang, M. Ying

    2015-08-01

    Complex activity modeling and identification of anomaly is one of the most interesting and desired capabilities for automated video behavior analysis. A number of different approaches have been proposed in the past to tackle this problem. There are two main challenges for activity modeling and anomaly detection: 1) most existing approaches require sufficient data and supervision for learning; 2) the most interesting abnormal activities arise rarely and are ambiguous among typical activities, i.e. hard to be precisely defined. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to model complex activities and detect anomalies by using non-parametric Gaussian Process (GP) models in a crowded and complicated traffic scene. In comparison with parametric models such as HMM, GP models are nonparametric and have their advantages. Our GP models exploit implicit spatial-temporal dependence among local activity patterns. The learned GP regression models give a probabilistic prediction of regional activities at next time interval based on observations at present. An anomaly will be detected by comparing the actual observations with the prediction at real time. We verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed model on the QMUL Junction Dataset. Furthermore, we provide a publicly available manually labeled ground truth of this data set.

  1. Blockade of processing/activation of caspase-3 by hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Moonil; Park, Kyoungsook; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Seol, Dai-Wu

    2008-10-31

    Tumor hypoxia, which is caused by the rapid proliferation of tumor cells and aberrant vasculature in tumors, results in inadequate supplies of oxygen and nutrients to tumor cells. Paradoxically, these unfavorable growth conditions benefit tumor cell survival, although the mechanism is poorly understood. We have demonstrated for the first time that hypoxia inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis by blocking translocation of Bax from cytosol to the mitochondria in tumor cells. However, it is largely unknown how hypoxia-inhibited Bax translocation attenuates TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that despite its inhibitory activity in TRAIL-induced apoptosis, hypoxia does not affect TRAIL-triggered proximal apoptotic signaling events, including caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage. Instead, hypoxia inhibited processing of caspase-3, leading to incomplete activation of the caspase. Importantly, hypoxia-blocked translocation of Bax to the mitochondria significantly inhibited releasing the mitochondrial factors, such as cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, to the cytosol in response to TRAIL. It is well-known that complete processing/activation of caspase-3 requires Smac/DIABLO released from mitochondria. Therefore, our data indicate that an engagement of the apoptotic mitochondrial events leading to caspase-3 activation is blocked by hypoxia. Our data shed new light on understanding of the apoptotic signal transduction and targets regulated by tumor hypoxia.

  2. Dynamic Stimuli And Active Processing In Human Visual Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Ralph N.

    1990-03-01

    Theories of visual perception traditionally have considered a static retinal image to be the starting point for processing; and has considered processing both to be passive and a literal translation of that frozen, two dimensional, pictorial image. This paper considers five problem areas in the analysis of human visually guided locomotion, in which the traditional approach is contrasted to newer ones that utilize dynamic definitions of stimulation, and an active perceiver: (1) differentiation between object motion and self motion, and among the various kinds of self motion (e.g., eyes only, head only, whole body, and their combinations); (2) the sources and contents of visual information that guide movement; (3) the acquisition and performance of perceptual motor skills; (4) the nature of spatial representations, percepts, and the perceived layout of space; and (5) and why the retinal image is a poor starting point for perceptual processing. These newer approaches argue that stimuli must be considered as dynamic: humans process the systematic changes in patterned light when objects move and when they themselves move. Furthermore, the processing of visual stimuli must be active and interactive, so that perceivers can construct panoramic and stable percepts from an interaction of stimulus information and expectancies of what is contained in the visual environment. These developments all suggest a very different approach to the computational analyses of object location and identification, and of the visual guidance of locomotion.

  3. Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young

    2013-08-20

    Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

  4. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity.

    PubMed

    Bienfait, A; Pla, J J; Kubo, Y; Zhou, X; Stern, M; Lo, C C; Weis, C D; Schenkel, T; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Morton, J J L; Bertet, P

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which an excited quantum system returns to equilibrium. For spins, however, spontaneous emission is generally negligible compared to other non-radiative relaxation processes because of the weak coupling between the magnetic dipole and the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that the rate of spontaneous emission can be greatly enhanced by placing the quantum system in a resonant cavity. This effect has since been used extensively to control the lifetime of atoms and semiconducting heterostructures coupled to microwave or optical cavities, and is essential for the realization of high-efficiency single-photon sources. Here we report the application of this idea to spins in solids. By coupling donor spins in silicon to a superconducting microwave cavity with a high quality factor and a small mode volume, we reach the regime in which spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant mechanism of spin relaxation. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude as the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, demonstrating that energy relaxation can be controlled on demand. Our results provide a general way to initialize spin systems into their ground state and therefore have applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also demonstrate that the coupling between the magnetic dipole of a spin and the electromagnetic field can be enhanced up to the point at which quantum fluctuations have a marked effect on the spin dynamics; as such, they represent an important step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of individual spins to microwave photons. PMID:26878235

  5. Processing activities for STS-91 continue in OPF Bay 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Processing activities for STS-91 continue in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. Two Get Away Special (GAS) canisters are shown after their installation into Discovery's payload bay. At left is G-648, an Canadian Space Agency-sponsored study of manufactured organic thin film by the physical vapor transport method, and the can on the right contains commemorative flags to be flown during the mission. STS-91 is scheduled to launch aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:04 p.m. EDT.

  6. The hydro nuclear services dry active waste processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    There is a real need for a dry active waste processing system that can separate clean trash and recoverable items from radwaste safely and efficiently. This paper reports that Hydro Nuclear Services has produced just such a system and is marketing it as a DAW Segregation/Volume Reduction Process. The system is a unique, semi-automated package of sensitive monitoring instruments of volume reduction equipment that separates clean trash from contaminated and recoverable items in the waste stream and prepares the clean trash for unrestricted release. What makes the HNS system truly unique is its end product - clean trash.

  7. Analysis of the dynamics of relaxation type oscillation in glycolysis of yeast extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Das, J; Busse, H G

    1991-01-01

    In yeasts, the glycolysis may display oscillations of its metabolites while it is converting glucose. The dynamics of the oscillations has been investigated in cytoplasmic extracts of yeast under relaxation type conditions by determining the time course of some of the glycolytic metabolites. The compounds of the nucleotide pool have been identified as fast variables and the glucose derivatives as slow variables of the relaxation type. The period of oscillation has been subdivided into four phases which represent prominent parts of the limit cycle in the phase plane of a slow versus a fast variable. From the reaction processes in these phases, a dynamical picture of the mechanisms of oscillations is suggested. Accordingly, the oscillation results from an alternating activity of the fructose bisphosphate and the polysaccharide synthesis, both of which are coupled to glycolysis via the nucleotide pool. The processes in the phases are analyzed by calculating the rates of the reaction steps in the biochemical pathway. PMID:1832975

  8. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes

    PubMed Central

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J. Michael; Cogdell, Richard J.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub–100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump–probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations. PMID:26903650

  9. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J Michael; Cogdell, Richard J; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-03-15

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub-100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump-probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations. PMID:26903650

  10. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J Michael; Cogdell, Richard J; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-03-15

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub-100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump-probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations.

  11. Competing ultrafast energy relaxation pathways in photoexcited graphene.

    PubMed

    Jensen, S A; Mics, Z; Ivanov, I; Varol, H S; Turchinovich, D; Koppens, F H L; Bonn, M; Tielrooij, K J

    2014-10-01

    For most optoelectronic applications of graphene, a thorough understanding of the processes that govern energy relaxation of photoexcited carriers is essential. The ultrafast energy relaxation in graphene occurs through two competing pathways: carrier-carrier scattering, creating an elevated carrier temperature, and optical phonon emission. At present, it is not clear what determines the dominating relaxation pathway. Here we reach a unifying picture of the ultrafast energy relaxation by investigating the terahertz photoconductivity, while varying the Fermi energy, photon energy and fluence over a wide range. We find that sufficiently low fluence (≲4 μJ/cm(2)) in conjunction with sufficiently high Fermi energy (≳0.1 eV) gives rise to energy relaxation that is dominated by carrier-carrier scattering, which leads to efficient carrier heating. Upon increasing the fluence or decreasing the Fermi energy, the carrier heating efficiency decreases, presumably due to energy relaxation that becomes increasingly dominated by phonon emission. Carrier heating through carrier-carrier scattering accounts for the negative photoconductivity for doped graphene observed at terahertz frequencies. We present a simple model that reproduces the data for a wide range of Fermi levels and excitation energies and allows us to qualitatively assess how the branching ratio between the two distinct relaxation pathways depends on excitation fluence and Fermi energy.

  12. Enhancement of activated sludge disintegration and dewaterability by Fenton process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, G. C.; Isa, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    Municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants produce large amounts of sludge. This excess sludge is an inevitable drawback inherent to the activated sludge process. In this study, the waste activated sludge was obtained from the campus wastewater treatment plant at Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP), Malaysia. Fenton pretreatment was optimized by using the response surface methodology (RSM) to study the effects of three operating conditions including the dosage of H2O2 (g H2O2/kg TS), the molar ratio of H2O2/Fe2+ and reaction time. The optimum operating variables to achieve MLVSS removal 65%, CST reduction 28%, sCOD 11000 mg/L and EPS 500 mg/L were: 1000 g H2O2/kg TS, H2O2/Fe2+ molar ratio 70 and reaction time 45 min. Fenton process was proved to be able to enhance the sludge disintegration and dewaterability.

  13. New method for predicting lifetime of seals from compression-stress relaxation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.; Wise, J.

    1998-06-01

    Interpretation of compression stress-relaxation (CSR) experiments for elastomers in air is complicated by (1) the presence of both physical and chemical relaxation and (2) anomalous diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) effects. For a butyl material, the authors first use shear relaxation data to indicate that physical relaxation effects are negligible during typical high temperature CSR experiments. They then show that experiments on standard CSR samples ({approximately}15 mm diameter when compressed) lead to complex non-Arrhenius behavior. By combining reaction kinetics based on the historic basic autoxidation scheme with a diffusion equation appropriate to disk-shaped samples, they derive a theoretical DLO model appropriate to CSR experiments. Using oxygen consumption and permeation rate measurements, the theory shows that important DLO effects are responsible for the observed non-Arrhenius behavior. To minimize DLO effects, they introduce a new CSR methodology based on the use of numerous small disk samples strained in parallel. Results from these parallel, minidisk experiments lead to Arrhenius behavior with an activation energy consistent with values commonly observed for elastomers, allowing more confident extrapolated predictions. In addition, excellent correlation is noted between the CSR force decay and the oxygen consumption rate, consistent with the expectation that oxidative scission processes dominate the CSR results.

  14. Altered brain activity during pain processing in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Burgmer, Markus; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Gaubitz, Markus; Wessoleck, Erik; Heuft, Gereon; Pfleiderer, Bettina

    2009-01-15

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterized by widespread pain. Studies with functional neuroimaging support the hypothesis of central pain augmentation in FMS. We tested this in our study with a novel paradigm of tonic pain induced by a single stimulus. Tonic pain, in contrast to phasic pain, seems to be a more appropriate experimental approach to study adaptive mechanisms of pain processing in FMS. We hypothesized that brain areas related to the "medial" pain system and the amygdalae will present different activation in patients compared to healthy subjects. An fMRI-block design before, during and after an incision was made in patients with FMS and in healthy controls. Acute pain caused by the incision was measured during the course of the experiment. A 2 factorial model of BOLD-signal changes was designed to explore significant differences of brain activation between both groups during the pain stimulus. Additionally the first Eigenvariates in those areas which show an interaction between both factors were determined over the time course of pain stimulation. Differences of activation in the fronto-cingulate cortex, the supplemental motor areas, and the thalamus were found between both groups with distinct differences in BOLD-signals changes over the time course of pain stimulation, even during anticipation of pain. Our results support the hypothesis that central mechanisms of pain processing in the medial pain system, favourable cognitive/affective factors even during the anticipation of pain, may play an important role for pain processing in patients with FMS. PMID:18848998

  15. Analysis of conductivity and dielectric spectra of Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 with coupled Cole-Cole type anomalous relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. S. K.; Shahid, T. S.; Govindaraj, G.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the crystalline materials seldom show a well-defined dielectric loss peak due to domination of dc conductivity contribution, but effects of loss peaks are seen at high frequencies. Ac electrical data of nano-crystalline Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 synthesised by chemical co-precipitation method show such behaviour. Properly combined and formulated conduction and dielectric relaxation functions are required for such materials. Cole-Cole type relaxation function in the combined conduction and dielectric process is formulated for complex resistivity ρ*(ω), complex permittivity ε*(ω), complex conductivity σ*(ω) and complex electric modulus M*(ω). Conduction and dielectric relaxation are linked to Jonscher's idea of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole' to understand the relaxation dynamics. The physical parameters of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole' formalism are unique for all representations like ρ*(ω), ε*(ω), σ*(ω) and M*(ω). 'Pinned dipole' relaxation time τc related to conduction process and 'free dipole' relaxation time τd related to dielectric process show Arrhenius behaviour with the same activation energy. Correlation of dc conductivity σc with τc and τd indicates the coupled dynamics of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole'. Time-temperature scaling of conduction and dielectric relaxation reveals that the mechanism of coupled dynamics of 'pinned dipole' and 'free dipole' is temperature independent. Hopping of charge carriers with dynamics of disordered cation distribution of host matrix generates a coupled conduction and dielectric relaxation in Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4.

  16. Hydrogen bond fluctuations and dispersive interactions of alcohol/alkane mixtures. An ultrasonic relaxation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, Udo; Behrends, Ralph

    2011-06-01

    The relaxation behaviour of 1-hexanol/n-heptane and 1-dodecanol/n-tetradecane mixtures has been studied at some compositions using ultrasonic attenuation spectrometry in the frequency range 0.4-3000 MHz. All mixtures reveal a relaxation term due to hydrogen network fluctuations. It is discussed in conjunction with the principle dielectric relaxation of alcohol/alkane mixtures, indicating a dynamically micro-heterogeneous liquid structure. The spectra of the long-chain alcohol system display an additional relaxation due to the structural isomerisation of the hydrocarbon chains. In terms of a torsional oscillator model this relaxation reveals the effect of molecular ordering on the enthalpy of activation.

  17. High-temperature relaxation in a Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. C.; Han, F. S.

    2003-09-01

    Two relaxational internal friction peaks were found in a (wt%)Fe-25Cr-5Al alloy. The low-temperature peak is related to Zener relaxation and the high-temperature one to grain-boundary relaxation. Their activation energy values are 2.55 (+/-0.14) eV for the Zener peak and 4.07(+/-0.15) eV for the grain-boundary relaxation peak, respectively. Grain-boundary relaxation strength remarkably increases with decreasing grain size, while the Zener peak is independent of the grain size. (

  18. Detection of weak signals through nonlinear relaxation times for a Brownian particle in an electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aquino, J I; Romero-Bastida, M

    2011-07-01

    The detection of weak signals through nonlinear relaxation times for a Brownian particle in an electromagnetic field is studied in the dynamical relaxation of the unstable state, characterized by a two-dimensional bistable potential. The detection process depends on a dimensionless quantity referred to as the receiver output, calculated as a function of the nonlinear relaxation time and being a characteristic time scale of our system. The latter characterizes the complete dynamical relaxation of the Brownian particle as it relaxes from the initial unstable state of the bistable potential to its corresponding steady state. The one-dimensional problem is also studied to complement the description.

  19. Modeling charge relaxation in graphene quantum dots induced by electron-phonon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Sven; Stampfer, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    We study and compare two analytic models of graphene quantum dots for calculating charge relaxation times due to electron-phonon interaction. Recently, charge relaxation processes in graphene quantum dots have been probed experimentally and here we provide a theoretical estimate of relaxation times. By comparing a model with pure edge confinement to a model with electrostatic confinement, we find that the latter features much larger relaxation times. Interestingly, relaxation times in electrostatically defined quantum dots are predicted to exceed the experimentally observed lower bound of ˜100 ns.

  20. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  1. CATCH: physical activity process evaluation in a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, T L; Strikmiller, P K; Stone, E J; Woods, S E; Ehlinger, S S; Romero, K A; Budman, S T

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the process evaluation model for the physical activity intervention component of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) and describes the major procedures used to monitor CATCH PE, the physical education intervention. The paper focuses on CATCH PE teacher training and in-service support as well as on the curriculum implementation. Monitoring training and support included assessing the in-service training workshops and the follow-up on-site assistance provided by staff. Monitoring the implementation included assessing the quantity and quality of CATCH PE instruction in terms of student physical activity engagement and lesson context, the fidelity of the curricular implementation, and the opportunities for other physical activity by children throughout the school day.

  2. Controlled movement processing: superior colliculus activity associated with countermanded saccades.

    PubMed

    Paré, Martin; Hanes, Doug P

    2003-07-23

    We investigated whether the monkey superior colliculus (SC), an important midbrain structure for the regulation of saccadic eye movements, contains neurons with activity patterns sufficient to control both the cancellation and the production of saccades. We used a countermanding task to manipulate the probability that, after the presentation of a stop signal, the monkeys canceled a saccade that was planned in response to an eccentric visual stimulus. By modeling each animal's behavioral responses, with a race between GO and STOP processes leading up to either saccade initiation or cancellation, we estimated that saccade cancellation took on average 110 msec. Neurons recorded in the superior colliculus intermediate layers during this task exhibited the discharge properties expected from neurons closely involved in behavioral control. Both saccade- and fixation-related discharged differently when saccades were counter-manded instead of executed, and the time at which they changed their activity preceded the behavioral estimate of saccade cancellation obtained from the same trials by 10 and 13 msec, respectively. Furthermore, these intervals exceed the minimal amount of time needed for SC activity to influence eye movements. The additional observation that saccade-related neurons discharged significantly less when saccades were countermanded instead of executed suggests that saccades are triggered when these neurons reach a critical activation level. Altogether, these findings provide solid evidence that the superior colliculus contains the necessary neural signals to be directly involved in the decision process that regulates whether a saccade is to be produced.

  3. Controlled movement processing: superior colliculus activity associated with countermanded saccades.

    PubMed

    Paré, Martin; Hanes, Doug P

    2003-07-23

    We investigated whether the monkey superior colliculus (SC), an important midbrain structure for the regulation of saccadic eye movements, contains neurons with activity patterns sufficient to control both the cancellation and the production of saccades. We used a countermanding task to manipulate the probability that, after the presentation of a stop signal, the monkeys canceled a saccade that was planned in response to an eccentric visual stimulus. By modeling each animal's behavioral responses, with a race between GO and STOP processes leading up to either saccade initiation or cancellation, we estimated that saccade cancellation took on average 110 msec. Neurons recorded in the superior colliculus intermediate layers during this task exhibited the discharge properties expected from neurons closely involved in behavioral control. Both saccade- and fixation-related discharged differently when saccades were counter-manded instead of executed, and the time at which they changed their activity preceded the behavioral estimate of saccade cancellation obtained from the same trials by 10 and 13 msec, respectively. Furthermore, these intervals exceed the minimal amount of time needed for SC activity to influence eye movements. The additional observation that saccade-related neurons discharged significantly less when saccades were countermanded instead of executed suggests that saccades are triggered when these neurons reach a critical activation level. Altogether, these findings provide solid evidence that the superior colliculus contains the necessary neural signals to be directly involved in the decision process that regulates whether a saccade is to be produced. PMID:12878689

  4. Materials and Process Activities for NASA's Composite Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polis, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to design, build, and test a full-scale Composite Crew Module (CCM). The overall goal of the CCM project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project s baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. The materials and process activities were prioritized based on a rapid prototype approach. This approach focused developmental activities on design details with greater risk and uncertainty, such as out-of-autoclave joining, over some of the more traditional lamina and laminate building block levels. While process development and associated building block testing were performed, several anomalies were still observed at the full-scale level due to interactions between process robustness and manufacturing scale-up. This paper describes the process anomalies that were encountered during the CCM development and the subsequent root cause investigations that led to the final design solutions. These investigations highlight the importance of full-scale developmental work early in the schedule of a complex composite design/build project.

  5. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  6. Oxidation of DNA bases by tumor promoter-activated processes.

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, K

    1989-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated showing that active oxygen species participate in at least one stage of tumor promotion. Tumor promoters can induce various types of cells to undergo processes that result in formation of active oxygen species. They stimulate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to undergo an oxidative burst that is characterized by rapid formation of .O2- and H2O2. We find that in vitro formation of H2O2 by tumor promoter-activated PMNs correlates with their in vivo first-stage promoting activity. Moreover, two thymidine derivatives are formed in DNA coincubated with tumor promoter-stimulated PMNs: 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (HMdU) and thymidine glycol (dTG). The amounts of HMdU and dTG formed correlate with the first-stage tumor-promoting potencies of the agents used for PMN stimulation and with the amount of H2O2 generated. We find that HMdU is also formed in the DNA of HeLa cells coincubated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-activated PMNs, with the amount of HMdU being proportional to that of TPA used. Even in the absence of PMNs, HMdU is increasingly formed in cellular DNA with increased TPA concentration, although at much lower levels than in the presence of PMNs. When rat liver microsomes are incubated with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a complete carcinogen, H2O2 is also generated. Production of H2O2 increases linearly with increasing concentrations of BaP. Furthermore, HMdU is formed in DNA exposed to BaP-treated microsomes, and its formation is inhibited by catalase. These results suggest that carcinogen-induced processes generating H2O2 are associated with the first-stage promoting activity of complete carcinogens. PMID:2667984

  7. Dynamic relaxation of a liquid cavity under amorphous boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, Andrea; Grigera, Tomás S; Verrocchio, Paolo

    2012-05-28

    The growth of cooperatively rearranging regions was invoked long ago by Adam and Gibbs to explain the slowing down of glass-forming liquids. The lack of knowledge about the nature of the growing order, though, complicates the definition of an appropriate correlation function. One option is the point-to-set (PTS) correlation function, which measures the spatial span of the influence of amorphous boundary conditions on a confined system. By using a swap Monte Carlo algorithm we measure the equilibration time of a liquid droplet bounded by amorphous boundary conditions in a model glass-former at low temperature, and we show that the cavity relaxation time increases with the size of the droplet, saturating to the bulk value when the droplet outgrows the point-to-set correlation length. This fact supports the idea that the point-to-set correlation length is the natural size of the cooperatively rearranging regions. On the other hand, the cavity relaxation time computed by a standard, nonswap dynamics, has the opposite behavior, showing a very steep increase when the cavity size is decreased. We try to reconcile this difference by discussing the possible hybridization between mode-coupling theory and activated processes, and by introducing a new kind of amorphous boundary conditions, inspired by the concept of frozen external state as an alternative to the commonly used frozen external configuration. PMID:22667566

  8. Spectroscopic Studies of the Super Relaxed State of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Nogara, Leonardo; Naber, Nariman; Pate, Edward; Canton, Marcella; Reggiani, Carlo; Cooke, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In the super-relaxed state of myosin, ATPase activity is strongly inhibited by binding of the myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the interacting-heads motif. In the disordered relaxed state myosin heads are not bound to the core of the thick filament and have an ATPase rate that is 10 fold greater. In the interacting-heads motif the two regulatory light chains appear to bind to each other. We have made single cysteine mutants of the regulatory light chain, placed both paramagnetic and fluorescent probes on them, and exchanged them into skinned skeletal muscle fibers. Many of the labeled light chains tended to disrupt the stability of the super-relaxed state, and showed spectral changes in the transition from the disordered relaxed state to the super-relaxed state. These data support the putative interface between the two regulatory light chains identified by cryo electron microscopy and show that both the divalent cation bound to the regulatory light chain and the N-terminus of the regulatory light chain play a role in the stability of the super-relaxed state. One probe showed a shift to shorter wavelengths in the super-relaxed state such that a ratio of intensities at 440nm to that at 520nm provided a measure of the population of the super-relaxed state amenable for high throughput screens for finding potential pharmaceuticals. The results provide a proof of concept that small molecules that bind to this region can destabilize the super-relaxed state and provide a method to search for small molecules that do so leading to a potentially effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:27479128

  9. Spectroscopic Studies of the Super Relaxed State of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Pate, Edward; Canton, Marcella; Reggiani, Carlo; Cooke, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In the super-relaxed state of myosin, ATPase activity is strongly inhibited by binding of the myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the interacting-heads motif. In the disordered relaxed state myosin heads are not bound to the core of the thick filament and have an ATPase rate that is 10 fold greater. In the interacting-heads motif the two regulatory light chains appear to bind to each other. We have made single cysteine mutants of the regulatory light chain, placed both paramagnetic and fluorescent probes on them, and exchanged them into skinned skeletal muscle fibers. Many of the labeled light chains tended to disrupt the stability of the super-relaxed state, and showed spectral changes in the transition from the disordered relaxed state to the super-relaxed state. These data support the putative interface between the two regulatory light chains identified by cryo electron microscopy and show that both the divalent cation bound to the regulatory light chain and the N-terminus of the regulatory light chain play a role in the stability of the super-relaxed state. One probe showed a shift to shorter wavelengths in the super-relaxed state such that a ratio of intensities at 440nm to that at 520nm provided a measure of the population of the super-relaxed state amenable for high throughput screens for finding potential pharmaceuticals. The results provide a proof of concept that small molecules that bind to this region can destabilize the super-relaxed state and provide a method to search for small molecules that do so leading to a potentially effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:27479128

  10. Potassium channel-mediated relaxation to acetylcholine in rabbit arteries.

    PubMed

    Cowan, C L; Palacino, J J; Najibi, S; Cohen, R A

    1993-09-01

    Endothelium-dependent relaxation is associated with smooth muscle hyperpolarization in many arteries which may account for relaxation that persists in the presence of nitric oxide inhibitors such as NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxations of the rabbit thoracic and abdominal aorta and iliac and carotid arteries were studied for the relative contribution of nitric oxide-dependent and -independent mechanisms in rings suspended for measurement of isometric tension. Although relaxation of the thoracic aorta to ACh (10(-6) M) was almost blocked completely by L-NAME (3 x 10(-5) M), the maximal relaxation in the abdominal aorta, carotid and iliac arteries was only reduced by 28, 26 and 62%, respectively. In rings of abdominal aorta, L-NAME blocked the ACh-stimulated (10(-6) M) rise in cyclic GMP verifying that relaxation which persists in L-NAME-treated rings is not mediated by nitric oxide. The L-NAME resistant response was nearly abolished by elevated external K+ in rings of abdominal aorta and carotid artery, suggesting this relaxation may be mediated by a membrane potential sensitive mechanism. Furthermore, tetraethylammonium (10(-3) M) partially and charybdotoxin (5 x 10(-8) M) completely inhibited the remaining L-NAME-resistant relaxation in both abdominal aorta and carotid artery, suggesting a role for Ca(++)-activated K(+)-channels. Blockers of ATP-sensitive K+ channels also inhibited the L-NAME resistant relaxation in the abdominal aorta only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8396636

  11. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  12. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm.

  13. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  14. Relaxed Phylogenetics and Dating with Confidence

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y. W; Phillips, Matthew J

    2006-01-01

    In phylogenetics, the unrooted model of phylogeny and the strict molecular clock model are two extremes of a continuum. Despite their dominance in phylogenetic inference, it is evident that both are biologically unrealistic and that the real evolutionary process lies between these two extremes. Fortunately, intermediate models employing relaxed molecular clocks have been described. These models open the gate to a new field of “relaxed phylogenetics.” Here we introduce a new approach to performing relaxed phylogenetic analysis. We describe how it can be used to estimate phylogenies and divergence times in the face of uncertainty in evolutionary rates and calibration times. Our approach also provides a means for measuring the clocklikeness of datasets and comparing this measure between different genes and phylogenies. We find no significant rate autocorrelation among branches in three large datasets, suggesting that autocorrelated models are not necessarily suitable for these data. In addition, we place these datasets on the continuum of clocklikeness between a strict molecular clock and the alternative unrooted extreme. Finally, we present analyses of 102 bacterial, 106 yeast, 61 plant, 99 metazoan, and 500 primate alignments. From these we conclude that our method is phylogenetically more accurate and precise than the traditional unrooted model while adding the ability to infer a timescale to evolution. PMID:16683862

  15. Role of sympathetic nerve activity in the process of fainting

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Satoshi; Nishimura, Naoki; Mano, Tadaaki

    2014-01-01

    Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery, and the process of syncope progression is here described with two types of sympathetic change. Simultaneous recordings of microneurographically-recorded muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and continuous and noninvasive blood pressure measurement has disclosed what is going on during the course of syncope progression. For vasovagal or neurally mediated syncope, three stages are identified in the course of syncope onset, oscillation, imbalance, and catastrophe phases. Vasovagal syncope is characterized by sympathoexcitation, followed by vagal overcoming via the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Orthostatic syncope is caused by response failure or a lack of sympathetic nerve activity to the orthostatic challenge, followed by fluid shift and subsequent low cerebral perfusion. Four causes are considered for the compensatory failure that triggers orthostatic syncope: hypovolemia, increased pooling in the lower body, failure to activate sympathetic activity, and failure of vasoconstriction against sympathetic vasoconstrictive stimulation. Many pathophysiological conditions have been described from the perspectives of (1) exaggerated sympathoexcitation and (2) failure to activate the sympathetic nerve. We conclude that the sympathetic nervous system can control cardiovascular function, and its failure results in syncope; however, responses of the system obtained by microneurographically-recorded MSNA would determine the pathophysiology of the onset and progression of syncope, explaining the treatment effect that could be achieved by the analysis of this mechanism. PMID:25309444

  16. Empathy and feedback processing in active and observational learning.

    PubMed

    Rak, Natalia; Bellebaum, Christian; Thoma, Patrizia

    2013-12-01

    The feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300 have been related to the processing of one's own and other individuals' feedback during both active and observational learning. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of trait-empathic responding with regard to the modulation of the neural correlates of observational learning in particular. Thirty-four healthy participants completed an active and an observational learning task. On both tasks, the participants' aim was to maximize their monetary gain by choosing from two stimuli the one that showed the higher probability of reward. Participants gained insight into the stimulus-reward contingencies according to monetary feedback presented after they had made an active choice or by observing the choices of a virtual partner. Participants showed a general improvement in learning performance on both learning tasks. P200, FRN, and P300 amplitudes were larger during active, as compared with observational, learning. Furthermore, nonreward elicited a significantly more negative FRN than did reward in the active learning task, while only a trend was observed for observational learning. Distinct subcomponents of trait cognitive empathy were related to poorer performance and smaller P300 amplitudes for observational learning only. Taken together, both the learning performance and event-related potentials during observational learning are affected by different aspects of trait cognitive empathy, and certain types of observational learning may actually be disrupted by a higher tendency to understand and adopt other people's perspectives.

  17. Anomalous diffusion approach to non-exponential relaxation in complex physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Weron, Karina; Weron, Aleksander

    2015-07-01

    We derive the relaxation function from the simple model of two-state systems under memory effects caused by the subordination. The non-exponential relaxation is shown to result from subordination by inverse infinity divisible random processes. The wide class of such random processes includes ordinary α-stable, tempered α-stable, exponential, gamma processes and many others as particular cases. This approach generalizes the Cole-Cole, Cole-Davidson and Havriliak-Negami laws well known in experimental physics of relaxation. The presented considerations discover a direct (one-to-one) relationship between the method of random relaxation rates and the anomalous diffusion approach based on subordination of random processes that are applied for the theory of relaxation phenomena. Moreover, it is found that the space and time clusterizations are responsible on equal foots for power-law memory effects in relaxation of complex physical systems.

  18. RELAXATION IN N-BODY SIMULATIONS OF DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    I use N-body simulations with two mass species of particles to demonstrate that disk galaxy simulations are subject to collisional relaxation at a higher rate than is widely assumed. Relaxation affects the vertical thickness of the disk most strongly, and drives the velocity ellipsoid to a moderately flattened shape similar to that observed for disk stars in the solar neighborhood. The velocity ellipsoid in simulations with small numbers of particles quickly approaches this shape, but shot noise also dominates the in-plane behavior. Simulations with higher, but reachable, numbers of particles relax slowly enough to be considered collisionless, allowing the in-plane dispersions to rise due to spiral activity without heating the vertical motions. Relaxation may have affected many previously published simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxy disks.

  19. Dynamics in supercooled polyalcohols: Primary and secondary relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döß, A.; Paluch, M.; Sillescu, H.; Hinze, G.

    2002-10-01

    We have studied details of the molecular dynamics in a series of pure polyalcohols by means of dielectric spectroscopy and 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). From glycerol to threitol, xylitol and sorbitol a systematic change in the dynamics of the primary and secondary relaxation is found. With increasing molecular weight and fragility an increase in the width of the α-peak is observed. Details of the molecular reorientation process responsible for the α-relaxation were exploited by two-dimensional NMR experiments. It is found that in the same sequence of polyalcohols the appearance of the secondary relaxation changes gradually from a wing type scenario to a pronounced β-peak. From NMR experiments using selectively deuterated samples the molecular origin of the secondary relaxation could be elucidated in more detail.

  20. Some puzzles about logarithmic relaxations and a few possible resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollak, M.

    2014-08-20

    Three subjects are examined in connection with the relaxation of an electron glass. 1. In most cases the experimental decay time τ is found to relate to a history of the system rather than to the time it takes to reach equilibrium. The reason is that in a non-ergodic system equilibrium cannot be reached in any experiment but the knowledge of an equilibrium property is essential in evaluating the time to reach it. 2. An alternative theory is proposed for the interpretation of aging experiments. The proposed theory is deemed to better represent the physics and is more in keeping with the relaxation theory. 3. A current relaxation theory for the electron glass fails to take into account a certain renewal process during the evolution of the relaxation, namely the possibility of fast transitions following a slow transition. Ramifications of such a neglect are explored.

  1. Anisotropic spin relaxation in graphene.

    PubMed

    Tombros, N; Tanabe, S; Veligura, A; Jozsa, C; Popinciuc, M; Jonkman, H T; van Wees, B J

    2008-07-25

    Spin relaxation in graphene is investigated in electrical graphene spin valve devices in the nonlocal geometry. Ferromagnetic electrodes with in-plane magnetizations inject spins parallel to the graphene layer. They are subject to Hanle spin precession under a magnetic field B applied perpendicular to the graphene layer. Fields above 1.5 T force the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic contacts to align to the field, allowing injection of spins perpendicular to the graphene plane. A comparison of the spin signals at B=0 and B=2 T shows a 20% decrease in spin relaxation time for spins perpendicular to the graphene layer compared to spins parallel to the layer. We analyze the results in terms of the different strengths of the spin-orbit effective fields in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions and discuss the role of the Elliott-Yafet and Dyakonov-Perel mechanisms for spin relaxation. PMID:18764351

  2. Drilling to investigate processes in active tectonics and magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J.; Evans, J.; Toy, V.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Clarke, A.; Eichelberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coordinated drilling efforts are an important method to investigate active tectonics and magmatic processes related to faults and volcanoes. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) recently sponsored a series of workshops to define the nature of future continental drilling efforts. As part of this series, we convened a workshop to explore how continental scientific drilling can be used to better understand active tectonic and magmatic processes. The workshop, held in Park City, Utah, in May 2013, was attended by 41 investigators from seven countries. Participants were asked to define compelling scientific justifications for examining problems that can be addressed by coordinated programs of continental scientific drilling and related site investigations. They were also asked to evaluate a wide range of proposed drilling projects, based on white papers submitted prior to the workshop. Participants working on faults and fault zone processes highlighted two overarching topics with exciting potential for future scientific drilling research: (1) the seismic cycle and (2) the mechanics and architecture of fault zones. Recommended projects target fundamental mechanical processes and controls on faulting, and range from induced earthquakes and earthquake initiation to investigations of detachment fault mechanics and fluid flow in fault zones. Participants working on active volcanism identified five themes: the volcano eruption cycle; eruption sustainability, near-field stresses, and system recovery; eruption hazards; verification of geophysical models; and interactions with other Earth systems. Recommended projects address problems that are transferrable to other volcanic systems, such as improved methods for identifying eruption history and constraining the rheological structure of shallow caldera regions. Participants working on chemical geodynamics identified four major themes: large igneous provinces (LIPs), ocean islands, continental hotspot tracks and rifts, and

  3. Topology Synthesis of Structures Using Parameter Relaxation and Geometric Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.

    2007-01-01

    Typically, structural topology optimization problems undergo relaxation of certain design parameters to allow the existence of intermediate variable optimum topologies. Relaxation permits the use of a variety of gradient-based search techniques and has been shown to guarantee the existence of optimal solutions and eliminate mesh dependencies. This Technical Publication (TP) will demonstrate the application of relaxation to a control point discretization of the design workspace for the structural topology optimization process. The control point parameterization with subdivision has been offered as an alternative to the traditional method of discretized finite element design domain. The principle of relaxation demonstrates the increased utility of the control point parameterization. One of the significant results of the relaxation process offered in this TP is that direct manufacturability of the optimized design will be maintained without the need for designer intervention or translation. In addition, it will be shown that relaxation of certain parameters may extend the range of problems that can be addressed; e.g., in permitting limited out-of-plane motion to be included in a path generation problem.

  4. Locating Melody Processing Activity in Auditory Cortex with Magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Roy D; Andermann, Martin; Uppenkamp, Stefan; Rupp, André

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for isolating the brain activity associated with melodic pitch processing. The magnetoencephalograhic (MEG) response to a four note, diatonic melody built of French horn notes, is contrasted with the response to a control sequence containing four identical, "tonic" notes. The transient response (TR) to the first note of each bar is dominated by energy-onset activity; the melody processing is observed by contrasting the TRs to the remaining melodic and tonic notes of the bar (2-4). They have uniform shape within a tonic or melodic sequence which makes it possible to fit a 4-dipole model and show that there are two sources in each hemisphere--a melody source in the anterior part of Heschl's gyrus (HG) and an onset source about 10 mm posterior to it, in planum temporale (PT). The N1m to the initial note has a short latency and the same magnitude for the tonic and the melodic sequences. The melody activity is distinguished by the relative sizes of the N1m and P2m components of the TRs to notes 2-4. In the anterior source a given note elicits a much larger N1m-P2m complex with a shorter latency when it is part of a melodic sequence. This study shows how to isolate the N1m, energy-onset response in PT, and produce a clean melody response in the anterior part of auditory cortex (HG).

  5. Locating Melody Processing Activity in Auditory Cortex with Magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Roy D; Andermann, Martin; Uppenkamp, Stefan; Rupp, André

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for isolating the brain activity associated with melodic pitch processing. The magnetoencephalograhic (MEG) response to a four note, diatonic melody built of French horn notes, is contrasted with the response to a control sequence containing four identical, "tonic" notes. The transient response (TR) to the first note of each bar is dominated by energy-onset activity; the melody processing is observed by contrasting the TRs to the remaining melodic and tonic notes of the bar (2-4). They have uniform shape within a tonic or melodic sequence which makes it possible to fit a 4-dipole model and show that there are two sources in each hemisphere--a melody source in the anterior part of Heschl's gyrus (HG) and an onset source about 10 mm posterior to it, in planum temporale (PT). The N1m to the initial note has a short latency and the same magnitude for the tonic and the melodic sequences. The melody activity is distinguished by the relative sizes of the N1m and P2m components of the TRs to notes 2-4. In the anterior source a given note elicits a much larger N1m-P2m complex with a shorter latency when it is part of a melodic sequence. This study shows how to isolate the N1m, energy-onset response in PT, and produce a clean melody response in the anterior part of auditory cortex (HG). PMID:27080677

  6. The amiodarone derivative 2-methyl-3-(3,5-diiodo-4-carboxymethoxybenzyl)benzofuran (KB130015) opens large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels and relaxes vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Guido; Heller, Regine; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2007-01-26

    2-methyl-3-(3,5-diiodo-4-carboxymethoxybenzyl)benzofuran (KB130015) has been developed to retain the antiarrhythmic properties of the parent molecule amiodarone but to eliminate its undesired side effects. In patch-clamp experiments, KB130015 activated large-conductance, Ca2+-activated BK(Ca) channels formed by hSlo1 (alpha) subunits in HEK 293 cells. Channels were reversibly activated by shifting the open-probability/voltage (P(o)/V) relationship by about -60 mV in 3 muM intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]in). No effect on the single-channel conductance was observed. KB130015-mediated activation of BK(Ca) channels was half-maximal at 20 microM with a Hill coefficient of 2.8. BK(Ca) activation by KB130015 did not require the presence of Ca2+ and still occurred with saturating (100 microM) [Ca2+]in. Effects of the prototypic BK(Ca) activator NS1619 (1,3-dihydro-1-[2-hydroxy-5-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-benzimidazol-2-one) and those of KB130015 were not additive suggesting that both activators may at least partially share a common mechanism of action. KB130015-mediated activation was observed also for BK(Ca) channels from insects and for human BK(Ca) channels with already profoundly left-shifted voltage-dependence. In contrast, human intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated channels were inhibited by KB130015. Using segments of porcine pulmonary arteries, KB130015 induced endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, half-maximal at 43 microM KB130015. Relaxation was inhibited by 1 mM tetraethylammonium, suggesting that KB130015 can activate vascular smooth muscle type BK(Ca) channels under physiological conditions. Interestingly, the shift in the P(o)/V relationship was considerably stronger (-90 mV in 3 microM [Ca2+]in) for BK(Ca) channels containing Slo-beta1 subunits. Thus, KB130015 belongs to a novel class of BK(Ca) channel openers that exert an effect depending on the subunit composition of the channel complex.

  7. Urothelium muscarinic activation phosphorylates CBSSer227 via cGMP/PKG pathway causing human bladder relaxation through H2S production

    PubMed Central

    d’Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Mitidieri, Emma; Fusco, Ferdinando; Russo, Annapina; Pagliara, Valentina; Tramontano, Teresa; Donnarumma, Erminia; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cirino, Giuseppe; Russo, Giulia; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The urothelium modulates detrusor activity through releasing factors whose nature has not been clearly defined. Here we have investigated the involvement of H2S as possible mediator released downstream following muscarinic (M) activation, by using human bladder and urothelial T24 cell line. Carbachol stimulation enhances H2S production and in turn cGMP in human urothelium or in T24 cells. This effect is reversed by cysthationine-β-synthase (CBS) inhibition. The blockade of M1 and M3 receptors reverses the increase in H2S production in human urothelium. In T24 cells, the blockade of M1 receptor significantly reduces carbachol-induced H2S production. In the functional studies, the urothelium removal from human bladder strips leads to an increase in carbachol-induced contraction that is mimicked by CBS inhibition. Instead, the CSE blockade does not significantly affect carbachol-induced contraction. The increase in H2S production and in turn of cGMP is driven by CBS-cGMP/PKG-dependent phosphorylation at Ser227 following carbachol stimulation. The finding of the presence of this crosstalk between the cGMP/PKG and H2S pathway downstream to the M1/M3 receptor in the human urothelium further implies a key role for H2S in bladder physiopathology. Thus, the modulation of the H2S pathway can represent a feasible therapeutic target to develop drugs for bladder disorders. PMID:27509878

  8. Urothelium muscarinic activation phosphorylates CBS(Ser227) via cGMP/PKG pathway causing human bladder relaxation through H2S production.

    PubMed

    d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Mitidieri, Emma; Fusco, Ferdinando; Russo, Annapina; Pagliara, Valentina; Tramontano, Teresa; Donnarumma, Erminia; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cirino, Giuseppe; Russo, Giulia; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The urothelium modulates detrusor activity through releasing factors whose nature has not been clearly defined. Here we have investigated the involvement of H2S as possible mediator released downstream following muscarinic (M) activation, by using human bladder and urothelial T24 cell line. Carbachol stimulation enhances H2S production and in turn cGMP in human urothelium or in T24 cells. This effect is reversed by cysthationine-β-synthase (CBS) inhibition. The blockade of M1 and M3 receptors reverses the increase in H2S production in human urothelium. In T24 cells, the blockade of M1 receptor significantly reduces carbachol-induced H2S production. In the functional studies, the urothelium removal from human bladder strips leads to an increase in carbachol-induced contraction that is mimicked by CBS inhibition. Instead, the CSE blockade does not significantly affect carbachol-induced contraction. The increase in H2S production and in turn of cGMP is driven by CBS-cGMP/PKG-dependent phosphorylation at Ser(227) following carbachol stimulation. The finding of the presence of this crosstalk between the cGMP/PKG and H2S pathway downstream to the M1/M3 receptor in the human urothelium further implies a key role for H2S in bladder physiopathology. Thus, the modulation of the H2S pathway can represent a feasible therapeutic target to develop drugs for bladder disorders. PMID:27509878

  9. A process activity monitor for AOS/VS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckosky, R. A.; Lindley, S. W.; Chapman, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    With the ever increasing concern for computer security, users of computer systems are becoming more sensitive to unauthorized access. One of the initial security concerns for the Shuttle Management Information System was the problem of users leaving their workstations unattended while still connected to the system. This common habit was a concern for two reasons: it ties up resources unnecessarily and it opens the way for unauthorized access to the system. The Data General MV/10000 does not come equipped with an automatic time-out option on interactive peripherals. The purpose of this memorandum is to describe a system which monitors process activity on the system and disconnects those users who show no activity for some time quantum.

  10. Periodic changes of the activity of processes in Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Variations of the Earth jovimagnetic latitude on Jupiter are preferred in solar-driven changes of reflective properties of clouds and haze on Jupiter. Because of the orbit eccentricity (e=0,048450) the northern hemisphere receives 21% greater solar energy flow to the atmosphere, because Jupiter is in the perihelia near the time of the summer solstice. Results of our studies showed that the ratio of the brightness of the northern and southern tropical and temperate regions is evident factor of the photometric activity of the Jupiter's atmospheric processes. The obtained from the analysis of observational data for the period from 1962 to 2015 existence of variations of activity factor of the planet hemispheres with a period of 11.86 years has allowed us to talk about an existence of the seasonal reconstruction of the physical parameters of Jupiter's atmosphere.

  11. Dynamics of Johari-Goldstein β relaxation and its universal relation to α relaxation in bulk metallic glasses by mechanical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xuebang Guo, Lijun; Liu, C. S.

    2014-06-14

    The dynamics of the Johari–Goldstein (JG) β relaxation and the α relaxation in bulk metallic glasses (MGs) has been investigated by using mechanical spectroscopy combined with the Coupling Model. The β relaxations of MGs exhibit different behaviors such as peaks, humps, and excess wings due to the different fluctuations of the chemical interactions among the constituting atoms. A universal correlation between the β relaxation and the α relaxation is generally found by their activation energies and relaxation times as well as the non-exponentiality parameter of the α relaxation, which can be predicted quantitatively from the Coupling Model. Based on the quasi-point defects theory, a correlation factor χ shows a broad peak along with the β relaxation, suggesting that the concentration and the correlation degree of the string-like configurations involved in the β relaxation vary with increasing temperature, which challenges the previous view that the system is in an iso-configuration state below T{sub g} and may shed new light on the nature of the JG β relaxation in metallic glasses.

  12. Processing activities for STS-91 continue in OPF Bay 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Processing activities for STS-91 continue in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. The payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery is relatively empty as installation of the Get Away Special (GAS) canisters begins. Two GAS canisters can be seen in the center of the photograph. On the left is G-648, a Canadian Space Agency-sponsored study on manufactured organic thin film by the physical vapor transport method, and on the right is a can with hundreds of commemorative flags to be flown on the mission. STS-91 is scheduled to launch aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:04 p.m. EDT.

  13. Least cost process design for granular activated carbon adsorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Narbaitz, R.M.; Benedek, A.

    1983-10-01

    Although toxic organics may be removed from industrial effluents by activated carbon adsorbers, the cost of this process is relatively high. Also, adsorber design is complex because of the unsteady-state nature of the process and the numerous operational variables. A package of computer programs has been developed to help to minimise the ultimate cost of 4 types of column configurations. It determines the effect of treatment facility costs of different values for design and operational variables, such as empty bed contact time (EBCT), hydraulic loading, and column configurations. The results of a sample problem indicated that the optimum EBCT for all the column configurations was significantly higher than values typically used by designers.

  14. Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) Microcapsules Dispersed in a Silicone Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Taigyoo; OBrien, Emmett; Lizotte, Jeremy R.; Glass, Thomas E.; Ward, Thomas C.; Long, Timothy E.; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-01-01

    The dielectric relaxation behavior of poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) dispersed in a cured polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) matrix as microcapsules was investigated over multiple thermal cycles and at varying concentrations. The copolymer microcapsules contained an isopentane core. In the PDMS matrix this copolymer displayed a pronounced relaxation signal at temperatures above the glass transition of the copolymers due to Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) relaxation. The mechanism of MWS relaxation interpreted by the Havriliak-Negami and Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts relaxation functions was found to be very similar to previous studies of neat polyacrylonitrile and its copolymer. The activation energy of the relaxation decreased over successive thermal cycling coincident with a decreasing strength of the relaxation. These observations were attributed to the decreasing concentration of nitrile groups due to intramolecular cyclizations.

  15. Intrinsic correlation between β-relaxation and spatial heterogeneity in a metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Zhu, F; Nguyen, H K; Song, S X; Aji, Daisman P B; Hirata, A; Wang, H; Nakajima, K; Chen, M W

    2016-01-01

    β-relaxation has long been attributed to localized motion of constituent molecules or atoms confined to isolated regions in glasses. However, direct experimental evidence to support this spatially heterogeneous scenario is still missing. Here we report the evolution of nanoscale structural heterogeneity in a metallic glass during β-relaxation by utilizing amplitude-modulation dynamic atomic force microscopy. The successive degeneration of heterogeneity during β-relaxation can be well described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation. The characteristic relaxation time and activation energy of the heterogeneity evolution are in accord with those of excess enthalpy release by β-relaxation. Our study correlates β-relaxation with nanoscale spatial heterogeneity and provides direct evidence on the structural origins of β-relaxation in metallic glasses. PMID:27158084

  16. Intrinsic correlation between β-relaxation and spatial heterogeneity in a metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, F.; Nguyen, H. K.; Song, S. X.; Aji, Daisman P. B.; Hirata, A.; Wang, H.; Nakajima, K.; Chen, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    β-relaxation has long been attributed to localized motion of constituent molecules or atoms confined to isolated regions in glasses. However, direct experimental evidence to support this spatially heterogeneous scenario is still missing. Here we report the evolution of nanoscale structural heterogeneity in a metallic glass during β-relaxation by utilizing amplitude-modulation dynamic atomic force microscopy. The successive degeneration of heterogeneity during β-relaxation can be well described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation. The characteristic relaxation time and activation energy of the heterogeneity evolution are in accord with those of excess enthalpy release by β-relaxation. Our study correlates β-relaxation with nanoscale spatial heterogeneity and provides direct evidence on the structural origins of β-relaxation in metallic glasses.

  17. Intrinsic correlation between β-relaxation and spatial heterogeneity in a metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, F.; Nguyen, H. K.; Song, S. X.; Aji, Daisman P. B.; Hirata, A.; Wang, H.; Nakajima, K.; Chen, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    β-relaxation has long been attributed to localized motion of constituent molecules or atoms confined to isolated regions in glasses. However, direct experimental evidence to support this spatially heterogeneous scenario is still missing. Here we report the evolution of nanoscale structural heterogeneity in a metallic glass during β-relaxation by utilizing amplitude-modulation dynamic atomic force microscopy. The successive degeneration of heterogeneity during β-relaxation can be well described by the Kohlrausch–Williams–Watts equation. The characteristic relaxation time and activation energy of the heterogeneity evolution are in accord with those of excess enthalpy release by β-relaxation. Our study correlates β-relaxation with nanoscale spatial heterogeneity and provides direct evidence on the structural origins of β-relaxation in metallic glasses. PMID:27158084

  18. Active Chemical Sensing With Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosangi, Rakesh; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2009-05-01

    We present an active-perception strategy to optimize the temperature program of metal-oxide sensors in real time, as the sensor reacts with its environment. We model the problem as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), where actions correspond to measurements at particular temperatures, and the agent is to find a temperature sequence that minimizes the Bayes risk. We validate the method on a binary classification problem with a simulated sensor. Our results show that the method provides a balance between classification rate and sensing costs.

  19. Measuring permeability and stress relaxation of young cement paste by beam bending

    SciTech Connect

    Vichit-Vadakan, W.; Scherer, George W

    2003-12-01

    When a saturated rod of a porous material is deflected in three-point bending, two types of time-dependent relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body, and viscoelastic (VE) relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the VE stress relaxation function of the sample. We report the early-age evolution of permeability, elastic modulus, and stress relaxation function for Type III Portland cement paste with water-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.45, 0.50, and 0.55. The stress relaxation function is shown to preserve its shape during aging; that function is numerically transformed into the creep function.

  20. Behavioral activation system modulation on brain activation during appetitive and aversive stimulus processing

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán-Tomás, Ana; Belloch, Vicente; Parcet, Maria-Antònia; Ávila, César

    2010-01-01

    The reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposed the behavioral activation system (BAS) as a neurobehavioral system that is dependent on dopamine-irrigated structures and that mediates the individual differences in sensitivity and reactivity to appetitive stimuli associated with BAS-related personality traits. Theoretical developments propose that high BAS sensitivity is associated with both enhanced appetitive stimuli processing and the diminished processing of aversive stimuli. The objective of this study was to analyze how individual differences in BAS functioning were associated with brain activation during erotic and aversive picture processing while subjects were involved in a simple goal-directed task. Forty-five male participants took part in this study. The task activation results confirm the activation of the reward and punishment brain-related structures while viewing erotic and aversive pictures, respectively. The SR scores show a positive correlation with activation of the left lateral prefrontal cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex and the right occipital cortex while viewing erotic pictures, and a negative correlation with the right lateral prefrontal cortex and the left occipital cortex while viewing aversive pictures. In summary, the SR scores modulate the activity of the cortical areas in the prefrontal and the occipital cortices that are proposed to modulate the BAS and the BIS-FFFS. PMID:20147458

  1. Behavioral activation system modulation on brain activation during appetitive and aversive stimulus processing.

    PubMed

    Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán-Tomás, Ana; Belloch, Vicente; Parcet, Maria-Antònia; Avila, César

    2010-03-01

    The reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposed the behavioral activation system (BAS) as a neurobehavioral system that is dependent on dopamine-irrigated structures and that mediates the individual differences in sensitivity and reactivity to appetitive stimuli associated with BAS-related personality traits. Theoretical developments propose that high BAS sensitivity is associated with both enhanced appetitive stimuli processing and the diminished processing of aversive stimuli. The objective of this study was to analyze how individual differences in BAS functioning were associated with brain activation during erotic and aversive picture processing while subjects were involved in a simple goal-directed task. Forty-five male participants took part in this study. The task activation results confirm the activation of the reward and punishment brain-related structures while viewing erotic and aversive pictures, respectively. The SR scores show a positive correlation with activation of the left lateral prefrontal cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex and the right occipital cortex while viewing erotic pictures, and a negative correlation with the right lateral prefrontal cortex and the left occipital cortex while viewing aversive pictures. In summary, the SR scores modulate the activity of the cortical areas in the prefrontal and the occipital cortices that are proposed to modulate the BAS and the BIS-FFFS.

  2. Behavioral activation system modulation on brain activation during appetitive and aversive stimulus processing.

    PubMed

    Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán-Tomás, Ana; Belloch, Vicente; Parcet, Maria-Antònia; Avila, César

    2010-03-01

    The reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposed the behavioral activation system (BAS) as a neurobehavioral system that is dependent on dopamine-irrigated structures and that mediates the individual differences in sensitivity and reactivity to appetitive stimuli associated with BAS-related personality traits. Theoretical developments propose that high BAS sensitivity is associated with both enhanced appetitive stimuli processing and the diminished processing of aversive stimuli. The objective of this study was to analyze how individual differences in BAS functioning were associated with brain activation during erotic and aversive picture processing while subjects were involved in a simple goal-directed task. Forty-five male participants took part in this study. The task activation results confirm the activation of the reward and punishment brain-related structures while viewing erotic and aversive pictures, respectively. The SR scores show a positive correlation with activation of the left lateral prefrontal cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex and the right occipital cortex while viewing erotic pictures, and a negative correlation with the right lateral prefrontal cortex and the left occipital cortex while viewing aversive pictures. In summary, the SR scores modulate the activity of the cortical areas in the prefrontal and the occipital cortices that are proposed to modulate the BAS and the BIS-FFFS. PMID:20147458

  3. Deconvolution of the relaxations associated with local and segmental motions in poly(methacrylate)s containing dichlorinated benzyl moieties in the ester residue.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Díaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Riande, Evaristo; Gargallo, Ligia; Radic, Deodato

    2005-09-15

    The relaxation behavior of poly(2,3-dichlorobenzyl methacrylate) is studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy in the frequency range of 10(-1)-10(9) Hz and temperature interval of 303-423 K. The isotherms representing the dielectric loss of the glassy polymer in the frequency domain present a single absorption, called beta process. At temperatures close to Tg, the dynamical alpha relaxation already overlaps with the beta process, the degree of overlapping increasing with temperature. The deconvolution of the alpha and beta relaxations is facilitated using the retardation spectra calculated from the isotherms utilizing linear programming regularization parameter techniques. The temperature dependence of the beta relaxation presents a crossover associated with a change in activation energy of the local processes. The distance between the alpha and beta peaks, expressed as log(fmax;beta/fmax;alpha) where fmax is the frequency at the peak maximum, follows Arrhenius behavior in the temperature range of 310-384 K. Above 384 K, the distance between the peaks remains nearly constant and, as a result, the a onset temperature exhibited for many polymers is not reached in this system. The fraction of relaxation carried out through the alpha process, without beta assistance, is larger than 60% in the temperature range of 310-384 K where the so-called Williams ansatz holds. PMID:16392594

  4. Deconvolution of the relaxations associated with local and segmental motions in poly(methacrylate)s containing dichlorinated benzyl moieties in the ester residue.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Díaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Riande, Evaristo; Gargallo, Ligia; Radic, Deodato

    2005-09-15

    The relaxation behavior of poly(2,3-dichlorobenzyl methacrylate) is studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy in the frequency range of 10(-1)-10(9) Hz and temperature interval of 303-423 K. The isotherms representing the dielectric loss of the glassy polymer in the frequency domain present a single absorption, called beta process. At temperatures close to Tg, the dynamical alpha relaxation already overlaps with the beta process, the degree of overlapping increasing with temperature. The deconvolution of the alpha and beta relaxations is facilitated using the retardation spectra calculated from the isotherms utilizing linear programming regularization parameter techniques. The temperature dependence of the beta relaxation presents a crossover associated with a change in activation energy of the local processes. The distance between the alpha and beta peaks, expressed as log(fmax;beta/fmax;alpha) where fmax is the frequency at the peak maximum, follows Arrhenius behavior in the temperature range of 310-384 K. Above 384 K, the distance between the peaks remains nearly constant and, as a result, the a onset temperature exhibited for many polymers is not reached in this system. The fraction of relaxation carried out through the alpha process, without beta assistance, is larger than 60% in the temperature range of 310-384 K where the so-called Williams ansatz holds.

  5. Stress relaxation in pulsed DC electromigration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringler, I. J.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    When a high current density is applied to a conductor, it activates several driving forces for mass transport that can lead to device failure, the most prominent of which is electromigration. However, there are other driving forces operating as well that can counteract or add to the effects of electromigration. A major driving force is a stress gradient that is developed as a response to electromigration in the presence of a blocking boundary condition. When the electrical stress is interrupted by pulsing DC measurements at low frequency, relaxation of the stress is observed through longer lifetime.

  6. Characterization of structural relaxation in inorganic glasses using length dilatometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Erick

    The processes that govern how a glass relaxes towards its thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium state are major factors in understanding glass behavior near the glass transition region, as characterized by the glass transition temperature (Tg). Intrinsic glass properties such as specific volume, enthalpy, entropy, density, etc. are used to map the behavior of the glass network below in and near the transition region. The question of whether a true thermodynamic second order phase transition takes place in the glass transition region is another pending question. Linking viscosity behavior to entropy, or viewing the glass configuration as an energy landscape are just a couple of the most prevalent methods used for attempting to understand the glass transition. The structural relaxation behavior of inorganic glasses is important for more than scientific reasons, many commercial glass processing operations including glass melting and certain forms of optical fabrication include significant time spent in the glass transition region. For this reason knowledge of structural relaxation processes can, at a minimum, provide information for annealing duration of melt-quenched glasses. The development of a predictive model for annealing time prescription has the potential to save glass manufacturers significant time and money as well as increasing volume throughput. In optical hot forming processes such as precision glass molding, molded optical components can significantly change in shape upon cooling through the glass transition. This change in shape is not scientifically predictable as of yet though manufacturers typically use empirical rules developed in house. The classification of glass behavior in the glass transition region would allow molds to be accurately designed and save money for the producers. The work discussed in this dissertation is comprised of the development of a dilatometric measurement and characterization method of structural relaxation. The measurement and

  7. A rational design strategy of the novel topoisomerase II inhibitors for the synthesis of the 4-O-(2-pyrazinecarboxylic)-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin with antitumor activity by diminishing the relaxation reaction of topoisomerase II-DNA decatenation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Lu; Li, Hong-Mei; Wang, Duan-Ji; Li, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Tao; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2014-06-01

    A rational design strategy of the novel podophyllum topoisomerase II (Topo II) inhibitors for the synthesis of the esterification and amidation substituted 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (DMEP) derivates was developed in order to discover the potential antitumor prodrug. Firstly, according to the structure-activity relationship, drug combination principle and bioisosterism, the -COO- and the -NH- bond substituents at the 4 position of cycloparaffin would be a great modification direction to improve antitumor activity of 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (DMEP). Secondly, from the prodrug principle view, the esterification and amidation at the C-4 position of DMEP would be two useful structure modifications for improve solubility. Thirdly, from the activity pocket in Topo II-DNA cleavage complex point of view, a series of heterocyclic with pharmacological activity were chosen as module for improving antitumor activity by binding with Topo II. Finally, nine novel esterification and amidation DMEP derivates were designed and synthesized for the potential Topo II inhibitors with the superior biological activity. All the novel compounds exhibited promising in vitro antitumor activity, especially 4-O-(2-pyrazinecarboxylic)-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (compound 1). The antitumor activity of compound 1 against tumor cell line HeLa (i.e., the IC50 value of 0.60 ± 0.20 μM), A549 (i.e., the IC50 value of 3.83 ± 0.08 μM), HepG2 (i.e., the IC50 value of 1.21 ± 0.05 μM), and BGC-823 (i.e., the IC50 value of 4.15 ± 1.13 μM) was significantly improved by 66, 16, 12, and 6 times than that of the clinically important podophyllum anticancer drug etoposide (i.e., the IC50 values of 15.32 ± 0.10, 59.38 ± 0.77, 67.25 ± 7.05, and 30.74 ± 5.13 μM), respectively. Compound 1 could arrest HeLa cell cycle G2/M and induce apoptosis by strongly diminishing the relaxation reaction of Topo II-DNA decatenation. The correctness of rational drug design was strictly demonstrated by the

  8. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  9. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  10. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism.

    PubMed

    Carati, A; Benfenati, F; Galgani, L

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  11. Spin relaxation in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A review is given on theoretical grounds and typical experimental appearances of spin dynamics and relaxation in solids containing randomly distributed nuclear and/or electronic spins. Brief content is as follows. Disordered and magnetically diluted systems. General outlines of the spin transport theory. Random walks in disordered systems (RWDS). Observable values in phase spin relaxation, free induction decay (FID). Interrelation of longitudinal and transversal relaxation related to dynamics of occupancies and phases. Occupation number representation for equations of motion. Continuum media approximation and inapplicability of moment expansions. Long-range transitions vs percolation theory. Concentration expansion as a general constructive basis for analytical methods. Scaling properties of propagators. Singular point. Dynamical and kinematical memory in RWDS. Ways of regrouping of concentration expansions. CTRW and semi-phenomenology. Coherent medium approximation for nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities. Combining of memory functions and cumulant expansions for calculation of FID. Path integral representations for RWDS. Numerical simulations of RWDS. Spin dynamics in magnetically diluted systems with low Zeeman and medium low dipole temperatures. Cluster expansions, regularization of dipole interactions and spectral dynamics.

  12. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  13. Advanced modeling of polymer non-linear stress relaxation - poly (methylmethacrylate) and polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, José R. S.; Cruz Pinto, José J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Sound models of temperature- and strain-dependent non-linear stress relaxation are still lacking. Very recent work has shown that focusing on polymers' local, non-affine, strains and stresses provides an adequate basis for developing such models and accurately predicting experimental stress relaxation moduli, the values of meaningful physical parameters and long time behavior, from experiments spanning only a few hours. A new modeling strategy that explicitly considers such non-affine local stresses and strains was applied to two amorphous polymers - a poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and a bisphenol-A polycarbonate, PC. The results support a view of the stress relaxation process where a temperature-dependent, truncated, approximately log-normal distribution of local cooperative (or clustering) transitions are involved, at and above a minimum (or primitive) relaxor size. Within this view, cooperativity (via the average and maximum cluster sizes) increases with decreasing temperatures. Beyond the reasonable agreement with the experiments, the model succeeds in predicting (1) the effect of increases in the fully relaxed modulus, E∞, as in semi-crystalline or strongly cross-linked polymers, (2) the strict inapplicability of time-temperature and strain-time super-positions, (3) an extended, Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts, type of relaxation response, spanning 12 or more time decades, and (4) specific, meaningful, physical parameters: a minimum activation energy (close to those of corresponding β-type transitions), the (occupied + free) volume of the primitive relaxor, and the approximate crossover temperature, Tc, and frequency, νc both of critical importance in condensed matter dynamics. The model also has the potential of incorporating the effect of changes in free volume and allows very fast computations, irrespective of the experimental time scale.

  14. Magnetic relaxation in Zn(PO3)2·Er(PO3)3 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendáč, M.; Tibenská, K.; Čižmár, E.; Tkáč, V.; Orendáčová, A.; Holubová, J.; Černošek, Z.; Černošková, E.

    2016-08-01

    The results of experimental studies of alternating (ac) magnetic susceptibility and specific heat of Zn(PO3)2·Er(PO3)3 glass are reported. Despite a high concentration of magnetic Er(III) ions the analysis of ac susceptibility ruled out the formation of a spin glass state in the used range of temperatures. Two relaxation processes were identified. The first one is thermally activated with a crossover in its temperature dependence observed at nominally 7 K. The relaxation at lower temperatures seems to be governed by a direct process with pronounced effect of phonon bottleneck. Striking deceleration of spin dynamics with increasing temperature found above 7 K is tentatively attributed to overcoming Ioffe - Regel crossover and strong scattering of acoustic phonons on local modes. Simplified prediction derived from a soft-mode-dynamics model confirms the presence of the boson peak observed in specific heat data and reasonably predicts the temperature of the crossover. The second process is consistent with a cross - tunneling relaxation. The obtained results suggest that magnetic doping of glasses and studying magnetic relaxation may represent an alternative tool for the investigation of lattice modes in glasses.

  15. Dynamic relaxation of a levitated nanoparticle from a non-equilibrium steady state.

    PubMed

    Gieseler, Jan; Quidant, Romain; Dellago, Christoph; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuation theorems are a generalization of thermodynamics on small scales and provide the tools to characterize the fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities in non-equilibrium nanoscale systems. They are particularly important for understanding irreversibility and the second law in fundamental chemical and biological processes that are actively driven, thus operating far from thermal equilibrium. Here, we apply the framework of fluctuation theorems to investigate the important case of a system relaxing from a non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium. Using a vacuum-trapped nanoparticle, we demonstrate experimentally the validity of a fluctuation theorem for the relative entropy change occurring during relaxation from a non-equilibrium steady state. The platform established here allows non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to be studied experimentally for arbitrary steady states and can be extended to investigate quantum fluctuation theorems as well as systems that do not obey detailed balance.

  16. Relaxation of terrace-width distributions: Physical information from Fokker Planck time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Ajmi BH.; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    Recently some of us have constructed a Fokker-Planck formalism to describe the equilibration of the terrace-width distribution of a vicinal surface from an arbitrary initial configuration. However, the meaning of the associated relaxation time, related to the strength of the random noise in the underlying Langevin equation, was rather unclear. Here we present a set of careful kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate convincingly that the time constant shows activated behavior with a barrier that has a physically plausible dependence on the energies of the governing microscopic model. Remarkably, the rate-limiting step for relaxation in the far-from-equilibrium regime is the generation of kink-antikink pairs, involving the breaking of three lateral bonds on a cubic {0 0 1} surface, in contrast to the processes breaking two bonds that dominate equilibrium fluctuations. After an initial regime, the Fokker-Planck time at least semiquantitatively tracks the actual physical time.

  17. Kinetic processes in the plasma sheet observed during auroral activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, Matthew Owen

    In this dissertation we analyze plasma sheet magnetic field and plasma data observed during varying levels of auroral activity from very small, isolated events known as pseudobreakups to large, global events known as substorms. The plasma and magnetic field data are taken from instruments onboard the WIND spacecraft while it traverses the near-Earth plasma sheet. Simultaneous global auroral images from POLAR/UVI allow us to determine the auroral activity level. The goal of this dissertation is to provide the most complete set of plasma sheet observations during auroral activity currently available. The kinetic aspects of the plasma dynamics which have largely been ingnored in other works are emphasized here. We have the capability to resolve changes in the three dimensional ion distribution functions with a time resolution comparable to or faster than the local ion gyroperiod. In addition, we consider the typically neglected electron dynamics when relating plasma sheet processes to the aurora. We find that the plasma sheet signatures of both pseudobreakups and substorms appear very similar. During both types of events, increases in auroral precipitation into the ionosphere are associated with large amplitude, high frequency magnetic field fluctuations, large Earthward ion < v>, increases in the fluxes of high energy ions and electrons, and hardening of the electron spectrum. Both ion and electron distributions appear to be composed of multiple components. Electromagnetic waves with power at frequencies up to and above the local proton gyrofrequency area also observed. Additionally, the ion distributions can change significantly in one gyroperiod. Together, these results imply that the microphysical processes occurring in the plasma sheet during pseudobreakups and substorms are the same and that kinetic effects are important. Therefore, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) cannot adequately describe the physics occurring during large ion < v> events.

  18. In situ determination of surface relaxivities for unconsolidated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Markus; Galvosas, Petrik; Brox, Timothy I.; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-08-01

    NMR relaxometry has developed into a method for rapid pore-size determination of natural porous media. Nevertheless, it is prone to uncertainties because of unknown surface relaxivities which depend mainly on the chemical composition of the pore walls as well as on the interfacial dynamics of the pore fluid. The classical approach for the determination of surface relaxivities is the scaling of NMR relaxation times by surface to volume ratios measured by gas adsorption or mercury intrusion. However, it is preferable that a method for the determination of average pore sizes uses the same substance, water, as probe molecule for both relaxometry and surface to volume measurements. One should also ensure that in both experiments the dynamics of the probe molecule takes place on similar length scales, which are in the order of some microns. Therefore, we employed NMR diffusion measurements with different observation times using bipolar pulsed field gradients and applied them to unconsolidated sediments (two purified sands, two natural sands, and one soil). The evaluation by Mitra's short-time model for diffusion in restricted environments yielded information about the surface to volume ratios which is independent of relaxation mechanisms. We point out that methods based on NMR diffusometry yield pore dimensions and surface relaxivities consistent with a pore space as sampled by native pore fluids via the diffusion process. This opens a way to calibrate NMR relaxation measurements with other NMR techniques, providing information about the pore-size distribution of natural porous media directly from relaxometry.

  19. Disturbed Paraspinal Reflex Following Prolonged Flexion-Relaxation and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Ellen L.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Repeated measures experimental study of the effect of flexion-relaxation, recovery, and gender on paraspinal reflex dynamics. Objective. To determine the effect of prolonged flexion-relaxation and recovery time on reflex behavior in human subjects. Summary of Background Data. Prolonged spinal flexion has been shown to disturb the paraspinal reflex activity in both animals and human beings. Laxity in passive tissues of the spine from flexion strain may contribute to desensitization of mechanoreceptors. Animal studies indicate that recovery of reflexes may take up to several hours. Little is known about human paraspinal reflex behavior following flexion tasks or the recovery of reflex behavior following the flexion tasks. Methods. A total of 25 subjects performed static flexionrelaxation tasks. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were recorded before and immediately after flexion-relaxation and after a recovery period. Reflexes were quantified from systems identification analyses of electromyographic response in relation to pseudorandom force disturbances applied to the trunk. Results. Trunk angle measured during flexion-relaxation postures was significantly higher following static flexion-relaxation tasks (P < 0.001), indicating creep deformation of passive supporting structures in the trunk. Reflex response was diminished following flexion-relaxation (P < 0.029) and failed to recover to baseline levels during 16 minutes of recovery. Conclusion. Reduced reflex may indicate that the spine is less stable following prolonged flexion-relaxation and, therefore, susceptible to injury. The absence of recovery in reflex after a substantial time indicates that increased low back pain risk from flexion-relaxation may persist after the end of the flexion task. PMID:16582860

  20. Atomistic simulations of activated processes in nanoparticles synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giberti, Federico; Galli, Giulia

    Core-shell and Janus nanopartices are promising building blocks for new, highly efficient solar cells. One of the most common synthetic pathways to produce such nanostructures is the use of cation exchange reactions. Although widely used, these procedures are not completely understood. We employed classical Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to understand these transformation at the molecular level; in particular we investigated the conversion from CdSe (sphalerite) to PbSe (rocksalt) NPs with 2-3 nm diameter. In order to recover the equilibrium free energy surfaces we used state of the art enhanced sampling techniques, including Metadynamics. The formation of hybrid core-shell structures resulted to be an activated process, where the limiting step is the transition of a sphalerite to a rocksalt PbSe nucleus. We found that the barrier height and the stability of the two phases depend on the size of the PbSe nucleus, suggesting that the process could proceed via a two step mechanism, where a small sphalerite nucleus is formed first, and it then transforms to a rocksalt nucleus. Our results give insight into possible manipulation processes at the molecular scale, which could be used to stabilize metastable NPs and tune their physical and chemical properties. This work was supported by the DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46262.

  1. Supporting the process of removing humic substances on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Olesiak, Paulina; Stępniak, Longina

    2014-01-01

    This study is focused on biosorption process used in water treatment. The process has a number of advantages and a lot of research has been done into its intensification by means of ultrasonic modification of solutions. The study carried out by the authors leads to the conclusion that sonication of organic solutions allows for extension of the time of operation of carbon beds. For the analysis of the results obtained during the sorption of humic substances (HS) from the solution dependencies UV/UV₀ or DOC/DOC₀ were used. In comparative studies the effectiveness of sorption and sonosorption (UV/UV₀) shows that the share of ultrasounds (US) is beneficial for extension of time deposit, both at a flow rate HS solution equal to 1 m/h and 5 m/h. Analysis of the US impact sorption on HS sorption in a biological fluidized bed, both prepared from biopreparat and the activated sludge confirms the higher efficiency compared to sonobiosorption than biosorption. These results confirm the degree of reduction UV₂₅₄/UV₀ and DOC/DOC₀ for the same processes. EMS index also confirms the improvement of HSbiodegradation by sludge microorganisms.

  2. Imaging Active Surface Processes in Barnacle Adhesive Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joel P; Burden, Daniel K; Fears, Kenan P; Barlow, Daniel E; So, Christopher R; Burns, Justin; Miltenberg, Benjamin; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittshof, Daniel; Spillmann, Christopher M; Wahl, Kathryn J; Tender, Leonard M

    2016-01-19

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) and voltammetry were used simultaneously to monitor Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite barnacles reattached and grown on gold-coated glass slides in artificial seawater. Upon reattachment, SPRI revealed rapid surface adsorption of material with a higher refractive index than seawater at the barnacle/gold interface. Over longer time periods, SPRI also revealed secretory activity around the perimeter of the barnacle along the seawater/gold interface extending many millimeters beyond the barnacle and varying in shape and region with time. Ex situ experiments using attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed that reattachment of barnacles was accompanied by adsorption of protein to surfaces on similar time scales as those in the SPRI experiments. Barnacles were grown through multiple molting cycles. While the initial reattachment region remained largely unchanged, SPRI revealed the formation of sets of paired concentric rings having alternately darker/lighter appearance (corresponding to lower and higher refractive indices, respectively) at the barnacle/gold interface beneath the region of new growth. Ex situ experiments coupling the SPRI imaging with optical and FTIR microscopy revealed that the paired rings coincide with molt cycles, with the brighter rings associated with regions enriched in amide moieties. The brighter rings were located just beyond orifices of cement ducts, consistent with delivery of amide-rich chemistry from the ducts. The darker rings were associated with newly expanded cuticle. In situ voltammetry using the SPRI gold substrate as the working electrode revealed presence of redox active compounds (oxidation potential approx 0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl) after barnacles were reattached on surfaces. Redox activity persisted during the reattachment period. The results reveal surface adsorption processes coupled to the complex secretory and chemical activity under barnacles as they construct

  3. Imaging Active Surface Processes in Barnacle Adhesive Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joel P; Burden, Daniel K; Fears, Kenan P; Barlow, Daniel E; So, Christopher R; Burns, Justin; Miltenberg, Benjamin; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittshof, Daniel; Spillmann, Christopher M; Wahl, Kathryn J; Tender, Leonard M

    2016-01-19

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) and voltammetry were used simultaneously to monitor Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite barnacles reattached and grown on gold-coated glass slides in artificial seawater. Upon reattachment, SPRI revealed rapid surface adsorption of material with a higher refractive index than seawater at the barnacle/gold interface. Over longer time periods, SPRI also revealed secretory activity around the perimeter of the barnacle along the seawater/gold interface extending many millimeters beyond the barnacle and varying in shape and region with time. Ex situ experiments using attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed that reattachment of barnacles was accompanied by adsorption of protein to surfaces on similar time scales as those in the SPRI experiments. Barnacles were grown through multiple molting cycles. While the initial reattachment region remained largely unchanged, SPRI revealed the formation of sets of paired concentric rings having alternately darker/lighter appearance (corresponding to lower and higher refractive indices, respectively) at the barnacle/gold interface beneath the region of new growth. Ex situ experiments coupling the SPRI imaging with optical and FTIR microscopy revealed that the paired rings coincide with molt cycles, with the brighter rings associated with regions enriched in amide moieties. The brighter rings were located just beyond orifices of cement ducts, consistent with delivery of amide-rich chemistry from the ducts. The darker rings were associated with newly expanded cuticle. In situ voltammetry using the SPRI gold substrate as the working electrode revealed presence of redox active compounds (oxidation potential approx 0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl) after barnacles were reattached on surfaces. Redox activity persisted during the reattachment period. The results reveal surface adsorption processes coupled to the complex secretory and chemical activity under barnacles as they construct

  4. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  5. 40 CFR 57.205 - Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. 57.205 Section 57.205 Protection of Environment... Application and the NSO Process § 57.205 Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. (a) In the event an SO2 SIP limit is relaxed subsequent to EPA approval or issuance...

  6. 40 CFR 57.205 - Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. 57.205 Section 57.205 Protection of Environment... Application and the NSO Process § 57.205 Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. (a) In the event an SO2 SIP limit is relaxed subsequent to EPA approval or issuance...

  7. 40 CFR 57.205 - Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. 57.205 Section 57.205 Protection of Environment... Application and the NSO Process § 57.205 Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. (a) In the event an SO2 SIP limit is relaxed subsequent to EPA approval or issuance...

  8. 40 CFR 57.205 - Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. 57.205 Section 57.205 Protection of Environment... Application and the NSO Process § 57.205 Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. (a) In the event an SO2 SIP limit is relaxed subsequent to EPA approval or issuance...

  9. 40 CFR 57.205 - Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. 57.205 Section 57.205 Protection of Environment... Application and the NSO Process § 57.205 Submission of supplementary information upon relaxation of an SO2 SIP emission limitation. (a) In the event an SO2 SIP limit is relaxed subsequent to EPA approval or issuance...

  10. Relaxation Models for Glassy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay

    In this thesis we explore some models based on constrained dynamics to understand the origin and ubiquity of the stretched exponential relaxation q(t) = exp(-(t/tau)^{ beta}). The first chapter has a pedagogical introduction to this field. Then we explore two models based primarily on constraints to see whether they would exhibit a stretched exponential relaxation. The first is a sliding block type of model based on a child's puzzle which has blocks and vacancies. The blocks can move only when they are nearest neighbor to a vacancy. We simulate random walk of the blocks and explore the relaxation behavior to equilibrium. We obtain three regimes of relaxation. In the short time regime (where the constraints are strong) we see a stretched exponential behavior. The intermediate time regime is best described as a simple random walk and we obtain a power law (with exponent 1/2). The long time behavior is a simple exponential, as expected. We do a Monte Carlo simulation of random walk on a bond-diluted hypercube. The site-diluted version of this model was suggested by Campbell as an explanation of the relaxation behavior seen in spin glasses. We come to it from the perspective of a system which exemplifies only constraints and nothing else (we have hard constraints with {cal H} = 0). We see that the relaxation to equilibrium is exponential for all p >=q 1/2 and below that it is a stretched exponential. In fact, the beta decreases as p decreases and attains a value of 1/4 at the percolation threshold of p = 1/n, where n is the dimensionality of the hypercube. We also do a calculation for determining the probability of connectivity for finite graphs. This demonstrates that the usual numerical results provided in graph theory, which are in the limit of infinite graphs, are not accurate for finite graphs. The final chapter has a conclusion. We also propose a model based on random graphs and percolation for studying sliding block kind of models.

  11. AVIRIS and TIMS data processing and distribution at the land processes distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, G. R.; Myers, J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Government has initiated the Global Change Research program, a systematic study of the Earth as a complete system. NASA's contribution of the Global Change Research Program is the Earth Observing System (EOS), a series of orbital sensor platforms and an associated data processing and distribution system. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the archiving, production, and distribution system for data collected by the EOS space segment and uses a multilayer architecture for processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data. The first layer consists of the spacecraft ground stations and processing facilities that receive the raw data from the orbiting platforms and then separate the data by individual sensors. The second layer consists of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC) that process, distribute, and archive the sensor data. The third layer consists of a user science processing network. The EOSDIS is being developed in a phased implementation. The initial phase, Version 0, is a prototype of the operational system. Version 0 activities are based upon existing systems and are designed to provide an EOSDIS-like capability for information management and distribution. An important science support task is the creation of simulated data sets for EOS instruments from precursor aircraft or satellite data. The Land Processes DAAC, at the EROS Data Center (EDC), is responsible for archiving and processing EOS precursor data from airborne instruments such as the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), the Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), and Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS, TIMS, and TMS are flown by the NASA-Ames Research Center ARC) on an ER-2. The ER-2 flies at 65000 feet and can carry up to three sensors simultaneously. Most jointly collected data sets are somewhat boresighted and roughly registered. The instrument data are being used to construct data sets that simulate the spectral and spatial

  12. Linking Plagioclase Zoning Patterns to Active Magma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Neill, O. K.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plagioclase, one of the most common and abundant mineral phases in volcanic products, will vary in composition in response to changes in temperature, pressure, composition of the ambient silicate melt, and melt H2O concentration. Changes in these parameters may cause dissolution or growth of plagioclase crystals, forming characteristic textural and compositional variations (zoning patterns), the complete core-to-rim sequence of which describes events experienced by an individual crystal from its nucleation to the last moments of its growth. Plagioclase crystals in a typical volcanic rock may look drastically dissimilar despite their spatial proximity and the fact that they have erupted together. Although they shared last moments of their growth during magma ascent and eruption, their prior experiences could be very different, as plagioclase crystals often come from different domains of the same magma system. Distinguishing similar zoning patterns, correlating them across the entire population of plagioclase crystals, and linking these patterns to specific perturbations in the magmatic system may provide additional perspective on the variety, extent, and timing of magma processes at active volcanic systems. Examples of magma processes, which may be distinguished based on plagioclase zoning patterns, include (1) cooling due to heat loss, (2) heating and/or pressure build up due to an input of new magmatic material, (3) pressure drop in response to magma system depressurization, and (4) crystal transfer between different magma domains/bodies. This review will include contrasting examples of zoning patters from recent eruptions of Karymsky, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Augustine and Cleveland Volcanoes in Alaska, as well as from the drilling into an active magma body at Krafla, Iceland.

  13. Relaxation behavior of oxygen deficient strontium manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Namita Thakur, Awalendra Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Conduction behavior of nanocrystalline oxygen deficient ceramic-SrMnO{sub 3–δ}(δ∼0.14) has been studied. The structural analysis of nano-SrMnO{sub 2.86} follows hexagonal unit cell structure with P6{sub 3}/mmc (194) space group belonging to 6/mmm point group with 4H – layered type hexagonal-cubic layers. The system have lattice parameters; a = 5.437(92) Å, c = 9.072(92) Å, c/a∼1.66 (85) with α =90° γ= 120° and cell volume, V= 232.35(18). The relaxation times estimated from complex impedance and modulus relaxation spectrum, show the thermally activated system with corresponding activation energies as 0.66 eV and 0.51 eV The stretching factor ‘β’ from the scaled modulus spectrum shows the poly-dispersive non-Debye nature of the system. The hopping number ‘n’ shows the influence of ionic charge carriers which controls the conduction mechanism of nano-SrMnO{sub 2.86}.

  14. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: consequences of chromatin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Miller, Daniel G.; Tawil, Rabi; Filippova, Galina N.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review In recent years we have seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the disease mechanism underlying facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the disease mechanism and to discuss the observations supporting the possibility of a developmental defect in this disorder. Recent findings In the majority of cases FSHD is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array (FSHD1). This results in local chromatin relaxation and stable expression of the DUX4 retrogene in skeletal muscle, but only when a polymorphic DUX4 polyadenylation signal is present. In some cases (FSHD2), D4Z4 chromatin relaxation and stable DUX4 expression occurs in the absence of D4Z4 array contraction. DUX4 is a germline transcription factor and its expression in skeletal muscle leads to activation of early stem cell and germline programs and transcriptional activation of retroelements. Summary Recent studies have provided a plausible disease mechanism for FSHD where FSHD results from inappropriate expression of the germline transcription factor DUX4. The genes regulated by DUX4 suggest several mechanisms of muscle damage, and provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets that should be investigated in future studies. PMID:22892954

  15. [Effects of quantum nonlocality in the water activation process].

    PubMed

    Zatsepina, O V; Stekhin, A A; Yakovleva, G V

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic alterations of the magnetic flux density of the water volume, activated with structurally stressed calcium carbonate in micellar form have been investigated. The phase of the associated water was established to exhibit electrical and magnetic properties, recorded by in B&E meter in the frequency range of 5Hz - 2kHz. Alterations in water Eh (redox) potential and the magnetic flux density B testify to synchronous auto-oscillatory changes. This gives evidence of non-linearity of the relationship between auto-oscillatory processes excited in the water; and reflects the nonlocal in time the relationship between the states of water, manifesting in a change of water activity on the 1st and 2nd day in negative time. The mechanism of action of associated water phase is shown to be described by de Broglie concept of matter waves with taking into account delocalized in time states of phase of electron wave packet in accordance with the transactional interpretation of quantum physics. PMID:24749297

  16. Coordinated Activities of Human Dicer Domains in Regulatory RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Enbo; Zhou, Kaihong; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The conserved ribonuclease Dicer generates microRNAs and short interfering RNAs that guide gene silencing in eukaryotes. The specific contributions of human Dicer's structural domains to RNA product length and substrate preference are incompletely understood, due in part to the difficulties of Dicer purification. Here we show that active forms of human Dicer can be assembled from recombinant polypeptides expressed in bacteria. Using this system, we find that three distinct modes of RNA recognition give rise to Dicer's fidelity and product length specificity. The first involves anchoring one end of a dsRNA helix within the PAZ domain, which can assemble in trans with Dicer's catalytic domains to reconstitute an accurate but non-substrate-selective dicing activity. The second entails non-specific RNA binding by the double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD), an interaction that is essential for substrate recruitment in the absence of the PAZ domain. The third mode of recognition involves hairpin RNA loop recognition by the helicase domain, which ensures efficient processing of specific substrates. These results reveal distinct interactions of each Dicer domain with different RNA structural features, and provide a facile system for investigating the molecular mechanisms of human miRNA biogenesis. PMID:22727743

  17. [Effects of quantum nonlocality in the water activation process].

    PubMed

    Zatsepina, O V; Stekhin, A A; Yakovleva, G V

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic alterations of the magnetic flux density of the water volume, activated with structurally stressed calcium carbonate in micellar form have been investigated. The phase of the associated water was established to exhibit electrical and magnetic properties, recorded by in B&E meter in the frequency range of 5Hz - 2kHz. Alterations in water Eh (redox) potential and the magnetic flux density B testify to synchronous auto-oscillatory changes. This gives evidence of non-linearity of the relationship between auto-oscillatory processes excited in the water; and reflects the nonlocal in time the relationship between the states of water, manifesting in a change of water activity on the 1st and 2nd day in negative time. The mechanism of action of associated water phase is shown to be described by de Broglie concept of matter waves with taking into account delocalized in time states of phase of electron wave packet in accordance with the transactional interpretation of quantum physics.

  18. Preparation process of active enzymolysis polypeptides from seahorse bone meal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhanzhi; Xu, Yongjian; Su, Yuting

    2014-09-01

    The preparation process of protein enzymolysis technology for the three-spot seahorse (Hippocampus trimaculatus Leach) degreased bone meal was developed. Two enzymes with better enzymolysis effect were selected from the five proteases, and the optimization condition of the Alkaline Protease is temperature - 54.7°C, pH - 9, duration of 6 h, the acquired rate of polypeptides was 11.77%; and that of Trypsin is temperature - 45°C, pH - 8.8, and duration of 4 h, and the rate was 11.49% by Response Surface Methodology. The strategy of compound enzymes was "Trypsin + Alkaline Protease". The selected preparation process of active polypeptides by the compound enzymolysis technology acquired rate of polypeptides was 14.41 ± 0.16%, increased about 3% of acquired rate of polypeptides and 2.6-4.5% of the free radical scavenging rate than those of the single enzyme. The increased antioxidant capacity mainly came from the increased concentration of polypeptide in II(#) peak, which increased about 10% of the free radical scavenging rate. The strategy of selected compound enzymes can effectively improve the utilization rate of seahorse protein.

  19. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  20. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.