Science.gov

Sample records for activated sealant technology

  1. Advanced supersonic technology fuel tank sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Parker, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Status of the fuel tank simulation and YF-12A flight tests utilizing a fluorosilicone sealant is described. New elastomer sealant development is detailed, and comparisons of high and low temperature characteristics are made to baseline fluorosilicone sealants.

  2. LIQUIDARMOR CM Flashing and Sealant, High Impact Technology Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hun, Diana E.; Bhandari, Mahabir S.

    2016-12-01

    Air leakage is responsible for about 1.1 quads of energy or 6% of the total energy used by commercial buildings in the US. Consequently, infiltration and exfiltration are among the largest envelope-related contributors to the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning loads in commercial buildings. New air sealing technologies have recently emerged that aim to improve the performance of air barrier systems by simplifying their installation procedure. LIQUIDARMORTM CM Flashing and Sealant is an example of these new advanced material technologies. This technology is a spray-applied sealant and liquid flashing and can span gaps that are up to ¼ in. wide without a supporting material. ORNL verified the performance of LIQUIDARMORTM CM with field tests and energy simulations from a building in which LIQUIDARMORTM CM was one of components of the air barrier system. The Homeland Security Training Center (HTC) at the College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, IL, served as the demonstration site. Blower door test results show the average air leakage rate in the demonstration site to be 0.15 cfm/ft2 at 1.57 psf, or 63% lower than the 0.4 cfm at 1.57 psf specified in the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). According to simulation results, HTC lowered its annual heating and cooling cost by about $3,000 or 9% compared to a similar building that lacked an air barrier system. This demonstration project serves as an example of the level of building envelope airtightness that can be achieved by using air barrier materials that are properly installed, and illustrates the energy and financial savings that such an airtight envelope could attain.

  3. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, the Raleigh Housing Authority worked with Building America team, the Advanced Residential Integrated Solutions Collaborative to determine the most cost-effective ways to reduce duct leakage in its low-rise housing units.Two retrofit duct sealing techniques—manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant—were implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. Ihe cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  4. Effect of an Antibacterial Monomer on the Antibacterial Activity of a Pit-and-Fissure Sealant

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yan; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Xiang; Liu, Zhengya; Guo, Huihui; Huang, Li; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based pit-and-fissure sealants are often used to form a barrier on the occlusal surface of molars to treat caries lesions; however, bacteria can remain in the pit and fissures without detection, increasing the risk of secondary caries. Sealants with antimicrobial properties or microbial repellent actions might be advantageous. The aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory effect of a 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB)-incorporated sealant against Streptococcus mutans. MAE-DB (4% wt) was incorporated into a commercially available sealant, Eco-S resin-based pit-and-fissure sealant (Vericom Co., Ltd., Korea); a sealant without MAE-DB served as a negative control, and Clinpro™ Sealant (3M™ ESPE™), a fluoride-releasing resin, was used as a commercial control. The effects of the cured sealants and their eluents on the growth of S. mutans were determined according to colony-forming unit counts and metabolic tests. The effects of the cured sealants on the adherence and membrane integrity of S. mutans were investigated using confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) in conjunction with fluorescent indicators. Compared with the negative control and commercial control, the cured MAE-DB-incorporated pit-and-fissure sealant exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of S. mutans (P < 0.05), whereas the eluents did not show any detectable antibacterial activity. The commercial control also showed no detectable bactericidal activity. Moreover, the aged experimental material retained its property of contact inhibition of biofilm formation. The fluorescence analysis of CLSM images demonstrated that the cured MAE-DB-incorporated sealant could hamper the adherence of S. mutans and exert a detrimental effect on bacterial membrane integrity. The incorporation of MAE-DB can render a pit-and-fissure sealant with contact antibacterial activity after polymerization via influencing the growth, adherence, and membrane integrity of S

  5. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... few quick steps. There is no drilling or scraping of the molars. Your dentist will: Clean the ... Dental sealants. Updated October 19, 2016. ADA.org Web site. www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral- ...

  6. SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES: PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    COWGILL,M.G.; MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; CHERNAENKO,L.M.; NAZARIAN,A.; GRIFFITH,A.; DIASHEV,A.; ENGOY,T.

    2000-06-14

    This first project, under the auspices of the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) forum, Project 1.4-1 Solid Radioactive Waste Storage Technologies, successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a polymer-based coating to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device, was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Ministry of Defence Northern Navy and was deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings of Polibrid 705 were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading bay. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors and exposed to the full 12 month Arctic weather cycle. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at the research laboratory of ICC Nuclide in St. Petersburg. During the 12-month field tests, the sealant coating showed little sign of degradation except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. In the laboratory testing, Polibrid 705 met all the Russian qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities. The Russian technical experts from the Ministry of Defence quickly familiarized themselves with the equipment and were able to identify several areas of potential improvement as deployment of the equipment progressed. The prime among these was the desirability of extending the range of the equipment through enlarged gasoline tanks (to permit extended operational times) and longer

  7. Comparative study of fluoride released and recharged from conventional pit and fissure sealants versus surface prereacted glass ionomer technology

    PubMed Central

    Salmerón-Valdés, Elias Nahum; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Alanis-Tavira, Jorge; Morales-Luckie, Raúl Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Context: The fluoride release of sealants in vitro shows a marked decrease. Giomers are distinguishable from manufactured resin-based sealants and contain prereacted glass-ionomer particles (PRG). Aims: To compare the amounts of fluoride released from the main pit and fissure of a resin-based sealant with that from a Giomer and to assess the abilities of the sealant and the Giomer to recharge when exposed to regular use of fluoride rinse. Materials and Methods: The readings for the fluoride concentration were carried out for 60 days using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. After this period, the samples were recharged using a fluoride mouth rinse. The amount of fluoride released after this recharge was determined for 5 days. The data were analyzed using Student's t- and analysis of variance tests. Results: In general, all materials presented higher fluoride release in the first 24 h; G1 and G4 showed a higher fluoride release in this period. On the other hand, G3 and G1 presented the most constant fluoride release until the 8th day, wherein all the sealants considerably decreased in the amount of fluoride released. Conclusion: G1 and G3 released higher concentrations of fluoride, although no significant differences were found. Giomers recharged in the first 24 h after polymerization presented an improved and sustained fluoride release. PMID:26957792

  8. Efficacy of Light-Activated Sealant on Enamel Demineralization in Orthodontic Patients: An Atomic Force Microscope Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shinaishin, Suzi F; Ghobashy, Safaa A; EL-Bialy, Tarek H

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of (Pro Seal) sealant in preventing enamel decalcification in-vivo and compare its effect with fluoride varnish and unfilled sealant using atomic force microscopy. Materials and Methods: Eight orthodontic patients who were candidates for extraction of all first premolars for orthodontic treatment were recruited to this study. Thirty two premolars (upper and lower) were randomly divided into four groups (n=8) for each group, 4 maxillary and 4 mandibular); Control (no -treatment); Fluoride varnish, Unfilled sealant (Light Bond) and filled sealant (Pro-Seal). After two months the brackets were debonded and the teeth were extracted and prepared for Atomic force microscopic scanning. Each sample was scanned twice at two different scan areas 50 and 10µm at the buccal cervical third of the crown. Images were recorded with slow scan rate and resolution and the mean roughness height and total surface area were calculated for each scan area. Comparison between groups was performed using one way analysis of variance test with level of significance was set to be 0.05. Results: Pro Seal treated samples show the lowest roughness height and total surface area. Conclusion: Pro Seal was the most effective prophylaxis technique in preventing enamel demineralization during orthodontic treatment. PMID:22207889

  9. Antimicrobial activity of a temporary sealant used in endodontic treatment: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Helena Baruffaldi; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; de Uzeda, Milton

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study is aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial action of Coltosol® in direct contact with human saliva. Materials and Methods: Twelve different individuals were selected. Saliva samples were evaluated at four different time periods: Baseline 1 (T1-initial control), T2 (2 h), T4 (24 h after contact with a standardized sample of a coronary sealer) and baseline 2 (T3-final control). Seeded plates were incubated at 37°C in a bacterial incubator for a period of 48–72 h. After the incubation period, the colony forming units were counted, and the results compared. Results: Differences were statistically significant. There was an inhibition of bacterial growth after the first 2 h of contact and an increase in the number of bacteria after 24 h of direct contact between the material and the saliva. Coltosol® presented bacterial growth inhibition in direct contact with saliva. This inhibitory effect tended to decrease over time, as shown by the two periods when the material was in contact with different samples of saliva. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activity of the material is an important feature; however, other physical and chemical properties of the coronary temporary sealer should be considered. PMID:26430372

  10. New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

  11. Chitosan whiskers from shrimp shells incorporated into dimethacrylate-based dental resin sealant.

    PubMed

    Mahapoka, Ekamon; Arirachakaran, Pratanporn; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Rujiravanit, Ratana; Poolthong, Suchit

    2012-01-01

    A resin-based sealant containing chitosan whiskers was developed for use as a pit and fissure sealer. Chitosan whiskers were synthesized and then characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The whiskers were next incorporated into dimethacrylate monomer at various ratios by weight and subsequently analyzed for their antimicrobial and physical properties. The dimethacrylate-based sealant containing chitosan whiskers had a greater antimicrobial activity than control sealant and they were comparable with antimicrobial commercial resin sealants. The inclusion of the whiskers did not reduce the curing depth or degree of double bond conversion and the reduction in hardness was minimal. In conclusion, a resin-based sealant containing chitosan whiskers can be considered an effective antimicrobial pit and fissure sealant.

  12. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  13. Toxicity of coal-tar and asphalt sealants to eastern newts, Notophthalmus viridescens.

    PubMed

    Bommarito, Thomas; Sparling, Donald W; Halbrook, Richard S

    2010-09-01

    Between 1970 and 2000 the concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH) in several lakes across the country increased whereas those of other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) tended to remain stable or declined. Urbanized watersheds experienced greater rises in TPAH concentration compared to non-urban lakes. Sources for urban PAHs include industrial wastes, vehicular exhausts and oil leaks and sealants from pavement surfaces. Both coal-tar and asphalt sealants are used to protect surfaces but runoff from surfaces coated with coal-tar can have mean concentrations of 3500 mg TPAHs kg(-1), much higher than runoff from asphalt-sealed or cement surfaces. Unaltered parent compounds of PAHs can have many lethal and sublethal toxic effects, but oxidation and UV radiation can alter the toxicity of these compounds, sometimes creating degradates that are many times more toxic than parent compounds. The purposes of this study were to determine if coal-tar sealants can be toxic to adult eastern newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) and to compare the toxicity of coal-tar sealant to that of asphalt sealant. Newts were exposed to sediments containing dried sealants ranging from 0 mg kg(-1) to 1500 mg kg(-1) under simultaneous exposure to UV radiation and visible light to determine concentration/response relationships. No significant mortality occurred with any treatment. Significant effects due to sealants included decreased righting ability and diminished liver enzyme activities. Coal-tar sealant was more effective in inducing these changes than was asphalt sealant.

  14. Elastic sealants for surgical applications.

    PubMed

    Annabi, Nasim; Yue, Kan; Tamayol, Ali; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Sealants have emerged as promising candidates for replacing sutures and staples to prevent air and liquid leakages during and after the surgeries. Their physical properties and adhesion strength to seal the wound area without limiting the tissue movement and function are key factors in their successful implementation in clinical practice. In this contribution, the advances in the development of elastic sealants formed from synthetic and natural materials are critically reviewed and their shortcomings are pointed out. In addition, we highlight the applications in which elasticity of the sealant is critical and outline the limitations of the currently available sealants. This review will provide insights for the development of novel bioadhesives with advanced functionality for surgical applications.

  15. Chemical research projects office fuel tank sealants review. [flight testing of fluorosilicone sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Parker, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The status of high-temperature fuel tank sealants for military and potentially commercial supersonic aircraft is examined. The interrelationships of NASA's sealants program comprise synthesis and development of new fluoroether elastomers, sealant prediction studies, flight simulation and actual flight testing of best state-of-the-art fluorosilicone sealants. The technical accomplishments of these projects are reviewed.

  16. Monitoring of sound and carious surfaces under sealants over 44 months.

    PubMed

    Fontana, M; Platt, J A; Eckert, G J; González-Cabezas, C; Yoder, K; Zero, D T; Ando, M; Soto-Rojas, A E; Peters, M C

    2014-11-01

    Although there is strong evidence for the effectiveness of sealants, one major barrier in sealant utilization is the concern of sealing over active caries lesions. This study evaluated detection and monitoring of caries lesions through a clear sealant over 44 mo. Sixty-four 7- to 10-year-old children with at least 2 permanent molars with International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) scores 0-4 (and caries less than halfway through the dentin, radiographically) were examined with ICDAS, DIAGNOdent, and quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) before sealant placement and 1, 12, 24, and 44 mo (except QLF) after. Bitewing radiographs were taken yearly. DIAGNOdent and QLF were able to distinguish between baseline ICDAS before and after sealant placement. There was no significant evidence of ICDAS progression at 12 mo, but there was small evidence of minor increases at 24 and 44 mo (14% and 14%, respectively) with only 2% ICDAS ≥ 5. Additionally, there was little evidence of radiographic progression (at 12 mo = 1%, 24 mo = 3%, and 44 mo = 9%). Sealant retention rates were excellent at 12 mo = 89%, 24 mo = 78%, and 44 mo = 70%. The small risk of sealant repair increased significantly as baseline ICDAS, DIAGNOdent, and QLF values increased. However, regardless of lesion severity, sealants were 100% effective at 12 mo and 98% effective over 44 mo in managing occlusal surfaces at ICDAS 0-4 (i.e., only 4 of 228 teeth progressed to ICDAS ≥ 5 associated with sealants in need of repair and none to halfway or more through the dentin, radiographically). This study suggests that occlusal surfaces without frank cavitation (ICDAS 0-4) that are sealed with a clear sealant can be monitored with ICDAS, QLF, or DIAGNOdent, which may aid in predicting the need for sealant repair.

  17. The safety of fibrin sealants.

    PubMed

    Joch, Christine

    2003-08-01

    Fibrin sealants are prepared from fibrinogen, thrombin and sometimes also factor XIII that have been purified from human plasma. Bovine aprotinin is also included in some preparations. Each of these components has the potential to carry blood-borne pathogens, albeit at a very low frequency. In order to minimize the risk of viral transmission from commercial fibrin sealants, plasma donations undergo a series of procedures that contribute to avoiding, inactivating and eliminating potential contaminants. The procedures for selection and screening of plasma donors, and the testing of donated plasma, incorporates highly sensitive molecular techniques (e.g. PCR testing) and contributes significantly to reducing the theoretical possibility of viral transmission. The starting material for bovine aprotinin is also carefully selected, and the manufacturing process rigorously assessed, to minimize the putative risk of transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathies. The manufacturing process for commercial fibrin sealants comprises a range of procedures, including heat treatment (e.g. pasteurization, dry or vapor heating), filtration, solvent/detergent treatment, precipitation, pH treatment and chromatography. Some steps are an inherent part of the purification process and others (e.g. pasteurization, nanofiltration) are deliberately introduced to inactivate/eliminate potential pathogens. Current manufacturing processes provide a very high degree of safety for fibrin sealants. In 20 years of worldwide use, there have been no known cases of hepatitis or HIV transmission associated with the use of commercial fibrin sealants.

  18. Technology Learning Activities I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Technology Education Association, Reston, VA.

    This guide contains 30 technology learning activities. Activities may contain all or some of the following: an introduction, objectives, materials and equipment, challenges, limitations, notes and investigations, resources and references used, and evaluation ideas. Activity titles are: (1) Occupations in Construction Technology; (2) Designing a…

  19. [Fissure sealants--5 years of use].

    PubMed

    Azul, A M

    1990-01-01

    This study assesses the caries prevalence, retention and cost-effectiveness of a pit and fissure sealant in a children population with 622 cases, 5 years after a single application of an auto-polymerized sealant to permanent molars. The status of the sealant and the presence of caries or restaurations on the sealed teeth was assessed. In a self-controlled group of children, the prevalence of disease (caries and restaurations) was also assessed in non-sealed teeth, for comparison. The sealant application was compared with Class I-restauration with amalgam for cost-effectiveness analysis.

  20. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  1. Ocular surface sealants and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Subir Singh

    2006-07-01

    Tissue adhesives, both synthetic and biologic, have a long history of use in ophthalmology. Cyanoacrylate-based glues have traditionally been the most widely used glues for various purposes. They have been specially useful for treating corneal perforations and have had significantly improved long-term outcomes. More recently, fibrin-based glues have gained a major role as a suture substitute for attaching biologic tissues and as surface sealants. The literature supports expanded use of fibrin glue in this fashion. Other new agents, such as polyethyelene glycols, have been underutilized and hold promise, especially as surface protectants. Numerous other glues are being developed and show promise as ocular surface sealants and protective membranes. Advances in knowledge about tissue adhesives are leading to more effective and efficient ophthalmic care.

  2. Extravehicular activity technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on extravehicular activity technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: extravehicular mobility unit; airlock and EMU support equipment; tools, mobility aids, and workstations; and telerobotic work aids interfaces.

  3. High performance channel injection sealant invention abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.; Salisbury, D. P. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High performance channel sealant is based on NASA patented cyano and diamidoximine-terminated perfluoroalkylene ether prepolymers that are thermally condensed and cross linked. The sealant contains asbestos and, in its preferred embodiments, Lithofrax, to lower its thermal expansion coefficient and a phenolic metal deactivator. Extensive evaluation shows the sealant is extremely resistant to thermal degradation with an onset point of 280 C. The materials have a volatile content of 0.18%, excellent flexibility, and adherence properties, and fuel resistance. No corrosibility to aluminum or titanium was observed.

  4. Sealant research for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Myles, K.M.; Bloom, I.; Krumpelt, M.; Ley, K.L.; Dorris, S.E.; Wagh, A.S.

    1993-11-01

    A suitable sealant must form strong, dense bonds with SOFC components, be compatible, be stable at 1000{degrees}C in SOFC operating environment (H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on anode side, O{sub 2} on cathode side), and be electrically insulating. Two types of sealants are being developed: Rigid (Mg ammonium phosphate cement) for the cell edge, and compliant (borate-based glass-ceramic) for stack-to-manifold joining. Testing of both is reported. Shrinkage of the rigid sealant needs to be reduced. Further testing is underway.

  5. Fibrin Sealant: The Only Approved Hemostat, Sealant, and Adhesive—a Laboratory and Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Spotnitz, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fibrin sealant became the first modern era material approved as a hemostat in the United States in 1998. It is the only agent presently approved as a hemostat, sealant, and adhesive by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The product is now supplied as patches in addition to the original liquid formulations. Both laboratory and clinical uses of fibrin sealant continue to grow. The new literature on this material also continues to proliferate rapidly (approximately 200 papers/year). Methods. An overview of current fibrin sealant products and their approved uses and a comprehensive PubMed based review of the recent literature (February 2012, through March 2013) on the laboratory and clinical use of fibrin sealant are provided. Product information is organized into sections based on a classification system for commercially available materials. Publications are presented in sections based on both laboratory research and clinical topics are listed in order of decreasing frequency. Results. Fibrin sealant remains useful hemostat, sealant, and adhesive. New formulations and applications continue to be developed. Conclusions. This agent remains clinically important with the recent introduction of new commercially available products. Fibrin sealant has multiple new uses that should result in further improvements in patient care. PMID:24729902

  6. Estrogenicity of bisphenol A released from sealants and composites: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Eramo, Stefano; Urbani, Giacomo; Sfasciotti, Gian Luca; Brugnoletti, Orlando; Bossù, Maurizio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Summary This study aims to critically summarize the literature about bisphenol A (BPA), indicate whether and how those risks are real and emphasize how it is eventually possible to prevent them. With this in mind, we should consider nature, risks and control of BPA, as well as its presence and its role in sealants and composites. It is important to note that we will focus on literature exclusively written about the possible estrogenic activity (and not about the general toxicology profile) of BPA or its possible derivatives released from composites and sealants (without mentioning, or covering just briefly, similar activities performed by their components). PMID:22238710

  7. Glass-ceramic sealant for solid oxide fuel cells application: Characterization and performance in dual atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabato, A. G.; Cempura, G.; Montinaro, D.; Chrysanthou, A.; Salvo, M.; Bernardo, E.; Secco, M.; Smeacetto, F.

    2016-10-01

    A glass-ceramic composition was designed and tested for use as a sealant in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) planar stack design. The crystallization behaviour was investigated by calculating the Avrami parameter (n) and the activation energy for crystallization (Ec) was obtained. The calculated values for n and Ec were 3 and 413.5 kJ/mol respectively. The results of thermal analyses indicate that this composition shows no overlap between the sintering and crystallization stages and thus an almost pore-free sealant can be deposited and sintered at 850 °C in air for 30 min. A gas tightness test has been carried out at 800 °C for 1100 h in dual atmosphere (Ar-H2 and air) without recording any leakage. Morphological and crystalline phase analyses were conducted prior and following tests in dual atmospheres in order to assess the compatibility of the proposed sealant with the metallic interconnect.

  8. A comparative study of fluoride release from two different sealants

    PubMed Central

    Ananda, Shimoga-Raju

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The introduction of fluoride releasing sealants and glass ionomer cements as fissure sealants adds another dimension to prevention of pit and fissure caries. The ability of resin sealants and glass ionomer cements to release fluoride on a long term basis to the sealed enamel and the adjacent unsealed pit and fissure and cuspal incline enamel may allow for further reduction in pit and fissure caries experience for children. Hence, the study was conducted to compare the amount of fluoride release in the plaque after placing fluoride releasing pit and fissure sealants and glass ionomer fissure sealants used in Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach. To compare the fluoride release of both the materials at the different time intervals. Material and Methods: A total of 60 school going children were included in this study. Before application of the sealants, baseline plaque fluoride levels were estimated from all the study subjects. After application of sealants again the same was estimated at an interval of 24 hour, 9 days, 2 weeks and 4 weeks. Results: The peak plaque fluoride levels were achieved at 24 hours after application of fissure sealants in all the groups. Conclusions: Within the limitation of the study, the present study indicated that fluoride releasing fissure sealants may act as a source of fluoride in plaque which will help in preventing pit and fissure and smooth surface caries in the tooth sealed with fissure sealants. Key words:Plaque fluoride, pit and fissures sealants, dental caries. PMID:25674315

  9. Laboratory testing of sealants with a marble substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M.C.; Cechner, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Polyurethane and silicone sealants are widely specified for installations with porous substrates such as some stones. However, when a sealant is used against such surfaces, there is a potential for a lack of adequate adhesion, or staining of the tone by misapplication or migration of the liquid components of the sealant system, such as primers or plasticizers in the formulation. Some varieties of marble in particular have been reported to be susceptible to staining and discoloration over time from sealants. Application of new sealant over existing sealants is also of great concern for remedial applications. Determining the level of substrate preparation necessary to achieve adequate bond is critical to the success of the remedial construction project. This paper discusses the development and results of a test program conducted to determine the relative performance of sealants installed on a white marble substrate. The tests performed included wet adhesion tests, accelerated weathering studies, and staining due to plasticizer migration.

  10. Copolymer sealant compositions and method for making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Navjot (Inventor); Leman, John Thomas (Inventor); Whitney, John M. (Inventor); Krabbenhoft, Herman Otto (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Condensation curable poly(fluoroorgano)siloxane-poly(silarylene)siloxane block copolymer compositions having a glass transition temperature not exceeding about -54.degree. C. and excellent solvent resistance have been found useful as sealants. Polyalkoxysilylorgano compounds, such as 1,4-bis[trimethoxysilyl(ethyl)]benzene have been found to be effective as cross-linkers.

  11. Copolymer sealant compositions and method for making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Navjot (Inventor); Leman, John Thomas (Inventor); Whitney, John M. (Inventor); Krabbenhoft, Herman Otto (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Condensation curable poly(fluoroorgano)siloxane-poly(silarylene)siloxane block copolymer compositions having a glass transition temperature not exceeding about -54.degree. C. and excellent solvent resistance have been found useful as sealants. Polyalkoxysilylorgano compounds, such as 1,4-bis[trimethoxysilyl(ethyl)]benzene have been found to be effective as cross-linkers.

  12. Copolymer sealant compositions and method for making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Navjot (Inventor); Leman, John Thomas (Inventor); Whitney, John M. (Inventor); Krabbenhoft, Herman Otto (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Condensation curable poly(fluoroorgano)siloxane-poly(silarylene)siloxane block copolymer compositions having a glass transition temperature not exceeding about -54.degree. C. and excellent solvent resistance have been found useful as sealants. Polyalkoxysilylorgano compounds, such as 1,4-bis[trimethoxysilyl(ethyl)]benzene have been found to be effective as cross-linkers.

  13. Bisphenol A and Dental Sealants: Olea's Response.

    PubMed Central

    Olea, N

    2000-01-01

    Comments on "Determination of bisphenol A and related aromatic compounds released from Bis-GMA-based composites and sealants by high performance liquid chromatography." by ulgar R, Olea-Serrano MF, Novillo-Fertrell A, Rivas A, Pazos P, Pedraza V, Navajas J-M, Olea N. Environ Health Perspect 108:21-27 (2000). PMID:11133410

  14. Methods and preliminary findings of a cost-effectiveness study of glass-ionomer-based and composite resin sealant materials after 2 yr.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Ann S; Chen, Xi; Fan, Mingwen; Frencken, Jo E

    2014-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of glass-carbomer, conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) [without or with heat (light-emitting diode (LED) thermocuring) application], and composite resin sealants were compared after 2 yr in function. Estimated net costs per sealant were obtained from data on personnel time (measured with activity sampling), transportation, materials, instruments and equipment, and restoration costs for replacing failed sealants from a community trial involving 7- to 9-yr-old Chinese children. Cost data were standardized to reflect the placement of 1,000 sealants per group. Outcomes were the differences in the number of dentine caries lesions that developed between groups. The average sealant application time ranged from 5.40 min (for composite resin) to 8.09 min (for LED thermocured HVGIC), and the average cost per sealant for 1,000 performed per group (simulation sample) ranged from $US3.73 (for composite resin) to $US7.50 (for glass-carbomer). The incremental cost-effectiveness of LED thermocured HVGIC to prevent one additional caries lesion per 1,000 sealants performed was $US1,106 compared with composite resin. Sensitivity analyses showed that differences in the cost of materials across groups had minimal impact on the overall cost. Cost and effectiveness data enhance policymakers' ability to address issues of availability, access, and compliance associated with poor oral-health outcomes, particularly when large numbers of children are excluded from care, in economies where oral health services are still developing.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Program Educational Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-13

    Description of educational activities including: EcoCAR2: Plugging In to the Future, EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge, Green Racing, Automotive X Prize, Graduate Technology Automotive Education (GATE), and Hydrogen Education.

  16. Retention of sealants placed by dental technicians without assistance.

    PubMed

    Foreman, F J; Matis, B A

    1991-01-01

    The retention rate of sealants placed by dental auxiliaries has not been studied extensively. This study recorded and compiled the retention rate of sealants placed by Air Force dental technicians over a two-year period. The technicians, who were equivalent to dental assistants, were trained to place the sealants without assistance using the Vac-Ejector (Whaledent International, New York, NY) system for isolation. Five hundred and ninety-nine sealants on 90 patients were evaluated an average of 13.9 months after sealant placement. The overall complete retention rate was 91.0%, with a partial loss rate of 7.0%, and a complete loss rate of 2.0%. These results suggest that pit and fissure sealants can be placed in this cost-effective manner with a relatively high retention rate.

  17. The utilization of dental hygiene students in school-based dental sealant programs.

    PubMed

    Miller, Faith Y

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of childhood caries is important to childrens' overall health. Untreated childhood caries can lead to pain, as in abscesses from prolonged neglect; altered dietary intake; and delays in the development of the permanent teeth if the primary teeth are prematurely lost. In the summer of 2000, funds were provided to various oral health care provider organizations by the Illinois Department of Public Health, Division of Oral Health, to purchase portable equipment to deliver preventive services (i.e., exams, sealants, and oral hygiene education) to second-grade and sixth-grade children who qualified for Medicaid and/or free and reduced-cost lunch programs. The Dental Sealant Grant Program at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale was a unique program that utilized dental hygiene students as the primary human resource. Within the state, the Dental Sealant Grant Program was, at the time of this report, the only grantee sponsored by a stand-alone dental hygiene program (not affiliated with a dental school). Other positive aspects of the dental hygiene-sponsored sealant program were that the supervising dentist was the primary Medicaid provider and a member of the dental hygiene faculty; dental hygiene faculty participated actively as site coordinators and clinicians; and dental hygiene students were given the opportunity to volunteer for the program as a service-learning option.

  18. Anti-Streptococcus mutans property of a chitosan: Containing resin sealant

    PubMed Central

    Rajabnia, Ramazan; Ghasempour, Maryam; Gharekhani, Samane; Gholamhoseinnia, Sepide; Soroorhomayoon, Sepide

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to assess the inhibitory effect of chitosan-containing sealants against Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity of the resin sealant was evaluated by direct contact test following the addition of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 wt% chitosan. At 3, 6, 9, 24 and 48 h, 1 and 3 months, 10 μl of the microbial suspension in contact with resin sealant was cultured to count the number of colonies. Data were analyzed by one-way one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA, and Scheffe test. Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration of chitosan against S. mutans was 2 wt%. At 3 h, bacterial count in the presence of 2–5 wt% chitosan was significantly lower than that at 0 and 1 wt% (P < 0.05). However, this difference in bacterial count between 2 and 3 wt% chitosan and between 4 and 5 wt% chitosan was not significant. At 6 h, the difference in bacterial count between 3 and 4 wt% chitosan was not significant, whereas the remaining groups were significantly different in terms of bacterial count at this time (P < 0.05). At the remaining time points, significant differences were found between 2 wt% chitosan and higher concentrations (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Sealants containing 2–5 wt% chitosan show an antimicrobial property that is intensified by increasing the concentration of chitosan. PMID:27011933

  19. Thermally resistant polymers for fuel tank sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Imide-linked perfluoroalkylene ether polymers, that were developed for the high temperature fuel tank sealant application, are discussed. Modifications of polymer structure and properties were realized through use of a new aromatic dianhydride intermediate containing an ether-linked perfluoroalkylene segment. Tests of thermal, oxidative and hydrolytic stability, fuel resistance, and adhesion are discussed along with tensile strength and elongation results. Efforts to effect a low temperature condensation of amic acid prepolymer to form imide links inside are described.

  20. Cryogenic adhesives and sealants: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.; Olien, N. A.

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of primary documents containing original experimental data on the properties of adhesives and sealants at cryogenic temperatures are presented. The most important references mentioned in each document are cited. In addition, a brief annotation is given for documents considered secondary in nature, such as republications or variations of original reports, progress reports leading to final reports included as primary documents, and experimental data on adhesive properties at temperatures between about 130 K and room temperature.

  1. Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Misture

    2012-09-30

    Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

  2. Marginal Microleakage of Conventional Fissure Sealants and Self-Adhering Flowable Composite as Fissure Sealant in Permanent Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rahimian-Imam, Sara; Fayazi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Application of sealants is a safe and effective way to prevent occlusal caries in the posterior teeth. A successful sealant therapy depends on good isolation. Decreased steps of adhesive application may enable proper isolation and use of self-adhering flowable composites for sealant therapy. This study sought to compare the marginal microleakage of fissure sealants and self-adhering flowable composites in permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 60 extracted human premolar teeth. The teeth were divided randomly into two groups of 30. In the first group, fissure sealant (Clinpro, 3M ESPE, USA) was placed on the teeth. In the second group, self-adhering flowable composite (Vertise Flow, Kerr, USA) was applied as the sealant. Then, both groups were immersed in 0.5% fuchsin dye solution for 24 hours. Sectioned samples were observed with a stereomicroscope for the extent of dye penetration. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 and the Mann-Whitney test (P<0.05). Results: Microleakage in the fissure sealant group was significantly higher than that in the self-adhering flowable composite group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Microleakage was less using self-adhering flowable composite compared to conventional fissure sealant; therefore, self-adhering flowable composite can be used as a suitable fissure sealant in permanent teeth. PMID:26884777

  3. Brain Activities and Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riza, Emel

    2002-01-01

    There are close relationships between brain activities and educational technology. Brain is very important and so complicated part in our bodies. From long time scientists pay attention to that part and did many experiments, but they just reached little information like a drop in the sea. However from time to time they gave us some light to…

  4. The Maine Sealant Manual for School-Based and School-Linked Dental Sealant Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Kneka, Ed.

    This manual is designed for use by school personnel and dental personnel to aid in the development and maintenance of school-based or school-linked dental sealant programs. The sections include (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Guidelines" (school selection, school contacts, dental providers, target grades, and tooth selection…

  5. Viscoseal performance with rarefied-gas sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fundamental study of viscoseals having a rarefied gas as the sealant was conducted. Both experimental and analytical investigations are reported. Three different analytical models were formulated and are described in detail. An experimental investigation was conducted on multiple grooved two-inch diameter viscoseals over a wide range of gas densities and shaft speeds up to 30,000 rpm. Comparisons are presented between actual viscoseal performance and the theoretical predictions for both sealing coefficient and net leakage parameters as functions of the degree of gas rarefication. Recommendations are presented for the use of the analytical models.

  6. Sealant materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this work is to complete the development of soft glass-ceramic sealants for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Among other requirements, the materials must soften at the operation temperature of the fuel cell (600-1000{degrees}C) to relieve stresses between stack components, and their thermal expansions must be tailored to match those of the stack materials. Specific objectives included addressing the needs of industrial fuel cell developers, based on their evaluation of samples we supply, as well as working with commercial glass producers to achieve scaled-up production of the materials without changing their properties.

  7. The role of sutures and fibrin sealant in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Spotnitz, W D; Falstrom, J K; Rodeheaver, G T

    1997-06-01

    Sutures and fibrin sealant are important surgical aids for facilitating wound closure and creating an optimal setting for wound healing. Most commonly, sutures are used to close wounds because suture material provides the mechanical support necessary to sustain closure. A wide variety of suturing material is available, and the surgeon can choose among sutures with a range of attributes to find the one best suited to his or her needs. Considerations when choosing an appropriate suture for wound closure and healing include strength of suture, holding power of tissue, absorbability, risk of infection, and inflammatory reaction associated with the suture material. Other factors to be considered include type of incision, suturing technique, and appearance of wound site. Fibrin sealant, in contrast, is a biologic tissue adhesive that can function as a useful adjunct to sutures. Fibrin sealant can be used in conjunction with sutures or tape to promote optimal wound integrity, or it can be used independently to seal wound sites where sutures cannot control bleeding or would aggravate bleeding. This adhesive can effectively seal tissue planes and eliminate potential spaces. Fibrin sealant has been used clinically in many surgical applications, although an FDA-approved commercially available product does not yet exist in the United States. Clinically, fibrin sealant has resulted in a low rate of infection and has promoted healing. Further study is needed to determine the best fibrin sealant mixtures both to achieve hemostasis and to encourage healing. It may even be desirable to use different sealant formulations for particular clinical situations.

  8. Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Advanced Sealant Systems: Screening Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.; Lewis, Ronad K.; Norman, Ignacio; Chao, Dennis; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Oxidation protection for the Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC consists of three components: silicon carbide coating, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) impregnated into the carbon substrate and a silicon based surface sealant (designated Type A). The Orbiter Type A sealant is being consumed each mission, which results in increased carbon-carbon substrate mass loss, which adversely impacts the mission life of the RCC components. In addition, the sealant loss in combination with launch pad contamination (salt deposit and zinc oxide) results in RCC pinholes. A sealant refurbishment schedule to maintain mission life and minimize affects of pin hole formation has been implemented in the Orbiter maintenance schedule. The objective of this investigation is to develop an advanced sealant system for the RCC that extends the refurbishment schedule by reducing sealant loss/pin hole formation and that can be applied to existing Orbiter RCC components. This paper presents the results of arc jet screening tests conducted on several sealants that are being considered for application to the Orbiter RCC.

  9. Piezoelectric inkjet printing of medical adhesives and sealants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Ryan D.; Gittard, Shaun D.; Byrne, Jacqueline M. H.; Doraiswamy, Anand; Wilker, Jonathan J.; Dunaway, Timothy M.; Crombez, Rene; Shen, Weidian; Lee, Yuan-Shin; Narayan, Roger J.

    2010-07-01

    Piezoelectric inkjet printing is a noncontact process that enables microscale processing of biological materials. In this research summary, the use of piezoelectric inkjet printing for patterning medical adhesives and sealants, including a two-component polyethylene glycol hydrogel-based medical sealant, an N-butyl cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive, and a mussel adhesive protein biological adhesive, is described The effect of Fe(III) on mussel adhesive protein structure was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy. The ability to process microscale patterns of medical sealants and adhesives will provide an improvement in tissue joining, including enhanced tissue integrity, reduced bond lines, and decreased adhesive toxicity. Piezoelectric inkjet deposition of medical adhesives and sealants may be used in wound closure, fracture fixation, and microscale vascular surgery.

  10. Near-infrared imaging of demineralization under sealants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Henry; Simon, Jacob C.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that near-infrared (NIR) reflectance and transillumination imaging can be used to acquire high contrast images of early caries lesions and composite restorative materials. The aim of the study was to determine the optimum NIR wavelengths for imaging demineralized areas under dental sealants. Fifteen natural human premolars and molars with occlusal lesions were used in this in vitro study. Images before and after application of sealants were acquired using NIR reflectance and NIR transillumination at wavelengths of 1300, 1460, and 1500 to 1700 nm. Images were also acquired using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) for comparison. The highest contrast for NIR reflectance was at 1460 nm and 1500 to 1700 nm. These NIR wavelengths are coincident with higher water absorption. The clear Delton sealant investigated was not visible in either copolarization or cross-polarization OCT images. The wavelength region between 1500 and 1700 nm yielded the highest contrast of lesions under sealants for NIR reflectance measurements.

  11. Performance Based Education. Technology Activity Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L., Ed.

    These Technology Activity Modules are designed to serve as an implementation resource for technology education teachers as they integrate technology education with Missouri's Academic Performance Standards and provide a source of activities and activity ideas that can be used to integrate and reinforce learning across the curriculum. The modules…

  12. Fluoride concentration from dental sealants: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Campus, G; Carta, G; Cagetti, M G; Bossù, M; Sale, S; Cocco, F; Conti, G; Nardone, M; Sanna, G; Strohmenger, L; Lingström, P

    2013-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial was performed in schoolchildren (6-7 yrs) to evaluate fluoride concentration in interproximal fluid after the placement of 3 different sealants. The sample consisted of 2,776 children randomly divided: 926 in the high-viscosity Glass-ionomer Cement group (GIC group), 923 in the fluoride Resin-based group (fluoride-RB group), and 927 in the no-fluoride Resin-based group (RB group). In total, 2,640 children completed the trial. Sealants were applied following manufacturer's instructions. Interproximal fluid samples were collected at baseline and 2, 7, and 21 days after application of sealants, by insertion of a standardized paperpoint into the interproximal mesial space of the sealed tooth for 15 seconds. Fluoride concentration was evaluated by means of a fluoride ion-selective electrode. At 2 days after sealant application, fluoride concentration was significantly higher in GIC and fluoride-RB groups compared with that in the RB group (p < .01). Mean fluoride concentrations after 7 days were 2.54 (SE 0.68) ppm, 0.85 (SE 0.26) ppm, and 0.53 (SE 0.11) ppm for the three groups, respectively. After 21 days, fluoride concentration in the GIC group remained higher than that in the other two groups. High-viscosity GIC sealants increased the fluoride concentrations in interproximal fluid more than did a Resin-based sealant containing fluoride.

  13. Fibrin Sealants in Dura Sealing: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrin sealants are widely used in neurosurgery to seal the suture line, provide watertight closure, and prevent cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the current efficacy and safety literature of fibrin sealants in dura sealing and the prevention/treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Methods A comprehensive electronic literature search was run in the following databases: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Resister of Controlled Trials, clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE/PubMed, and EMBASE. Titles and abstracts of potential articles of interest were reviewed independently by 3 of the authors. Results A total of 1006 database records and additional records were identified. After screening for duplicates and relevance, a total of 78 articles were assessed by the investigators for eligibility. Thirty-eight were excluded and the full-text of 40 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. Seven of these included only safety data and were included in the safety assessment. The remaining 33 articles included findings from 32 studies that enrolled a total of 2935 patients who were exposed to fibrin sealant. Among these 33 studies there were only 3 randomized controlled trials, with the remaining being prospective cohort analysis, case controlled studies, prospective or retrospective case series. One randomized controlled trial, with 89 patients exposed to fibrin sealant, found a greater rate of intraoperative watertight dura closure in the fibrin sealant group than the control group (92.1% versus 38.0%, p<0.001); however, post-operative cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in more fibrin sealant than control patients (6.7% versus 2.0%, p>0.05). Other clinical trials evaluated the effect of fibrin sealant in the postoperative prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. These were generally lower level evidence studies (ie, not prospective, randomized, controlled trials) that were not designed or

  14. Health Occupations. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials on health occupations for students in grades 6-10 consists of a technology education overview, information on use, and instructor's and student's sections. The overview discusses the technology education program and materials. Components of the instructor's and student's sections are…

  15. Retention of a resin-based sealant and a glass ionomer used as a fissure sealant in children with special needs

    PubMed Central

    Nualart-Grollmus, Zacy-Carola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research is to evaluate the retention of sealants of resin and resin-modified ionomeric glass pits and fissures, on first permanent molars of special patients. Material and Methods: The sample was comprised by 32 children. The ages were between 7 and 18 years. The sealing procedure was made with the relative isolation of the molars to be sealed, through the use of cotton rolls. Two molars were sealed with Clinpro Sealant 3M Dental and the others with Vitremer. Checking of the sealants was made after 3 and 6 months of their placement, evaluating with 3 values: TR: Totally Restrained; PR: Partially Restrained; and CL: Completely Lost. Results: 67.18% of the resinous sealants, and 70.31% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful after three months. After six months, 57.81% of the resin-based sealants and 51.56% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful. When performing the Chi-square statistical analysis (P<0.05) no statistical significance was observed after 6 months. Conclusions: The retention of the resin sealant was similar to that of the glass ionomer cement at the end of six months and the retention of sealants on maxillary teeth was higher than on mandibular teeth. Key words:Sealant, glass ionomer, retention, caries, special needs. PMID:25674325

  16. Flow characteristics and sealing ability of fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D M; Kihn, P; von Fraunhofer, J A; Elsabach, A

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between fissure sealant viscosity, leakage prevention and the incidence of void formation of five commercially available pit-and-fissure sealants. Seventy-two intact, caries free human pre-molars and molars were divided into six test groups of 12 teeth each. All teeth were cleaned with a flour of pumice prophylaxis followed by etching for 60 seconds with 37% H3PO4, rinsing for 30 seconds and drying with oil-free air. Five commercial, light-cured fissure sealants and an unfilled version of one sealant were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Teeth were thermal cycled for 5000 cycles from 5-50 degrees C with a one-minute dwell time at each temperature. Silver nitrate staining followed by mesiodistal sectioning was performed. Leakage and void formation were evaluated at X50 optical magnification. Viscosity was assessed by syringing the fissure sealants into short pipettes, allowing free flow for 30 seconds and then light curing for one minute. The length of unfilled capillary was measured with a Vernier gauge. All experimental data was subjected to a one-way ANOVA, and where differences were detected, they were identified by a post hoc Tukey hsd test at a priori alpha = 0.05. Based on the conditions of the study, viscosity and flow characteristics had no effect on sealing ability or void formation.

  17. Selected Technology Lab Activities Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    These materials supplement state guides for junior high or middle school technology education programs. The materials show instructors how to implement 81 hours of new technology-related activities into existing programs. Introductory materials include a rationale, philosophy, and goals for technology education. Areas of instruction are as…

  18. Hemostasis During Urologic Surgery: Fibrin Sealant Compared With Absorbable Hemostat

    PubMed Central

    Albala, David M; Riebman, Jerome B; Kocharian, Richard; Ilie, Bogdan; Albanese, John; Shen, Jessica; Ovington, Liza; Batiller, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, fibrin sealants have been used to achieve hemostasis for nearly two decades. Although their clinical utility was first demonstrated in cardiac surgery, their effectiveness and safety have since been demonstrated to extend to a wide array of procedures. Fibrin sealants typically contain two components—fibrinogen and thrombin—that are combined and delivered simultaneously to a target bleeding site in order to achieve hemostasis. However, many commercial formulations contain other additional components, such as antifibrinolytic agents, that have been associated with adverse outcomes. This subanalysis compares the safety and effectiveness of a fibrin sealant versus an absorbable hemostat for achieving hemostasis during urologic procedures with mild to moderate bleeding. PMID:26028998

  19. Building Technologies Program Key Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-15

    The Building Technologies Program (BTP) employs a balanced approach to making buildings more energy efficient. The three pillars of our program, research and development (R&D), market stimulation, and building and equipment standards, help meet our strategic vision.

  20. Safety and usability of hemostats, sealants, and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Burks, Sandra; Spotnitz, William

    2014-08-01

    Hemostats, sealants, and adhesives are an integral part of surgical patient care. Nurses who have knowledge about these agents can better help ensure safe, efficient surgical patient care. As a caregiver and patient advocate, the perioperative nurse must understand the most current information about these agents and be prepared to facilitate the transfer of this knowledge to all caregivers. Information about these agents, including the contraindications, warnings, and precautions associated with their use as well as their preparation and application, is provided here. Algorithms designed to clarify the best options for using hemostats, sealants, and adhesives are included as well.

  1. Microleakage and shear bond strength of a new sealant containing prereacted glass ionomer particles.

    PubMed

    Durham, Samuel N; Meyers, Erik J; Bailey, Clifton W; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2017-01-01

    A new fluoride-releasing sealant system is claimed to allow easier and faster placement while providing high bond strengths without the need for phosphoric acid etching. A study was designed to compare the microleakage and shear bond strength of a self-etching, Giomer-based sealant system with those of a traditional resin sealant. Group 1 received traditional sealant applied after use of a 35% phosphoric acid etchant; group 2 received Giomer sealant after use of a self-etching primer; and group 3 received Giomer sealant after the addition of an initial phosphoric acid etching step and placement of the primer. The sealants were placed in the occlusal pits and fissures of extracted human third molars, thermocycled, placed in dye, and sectioned. The extent of microleakage (dye penetration) was expressed as a percentage of the cross-sectional length of the sealed interface. The sealants were also bonded to the facial enamel of bovine incisors. Specimens were thermocycled and tested in shear mode in a universal testing machine. The new self-etching sealant demonstrated significantly greater microleakage (P < 0.017) and lower bond strength (P < 0.05) than both the traditional sealant system and the new system when placed with phosphoric acid etchant. Phosphoric acid etching significantly improved the shear bond strength and reduced the microleakage of the new sealant.

  2. Structural Engineering. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide provides technology learning activities designed to prepare students in grades 6-10 to work in the world of the future. The 8-day course provides exploratory, hands-on learning activities and information that can enhance the education of students of all types in an integrated curriculum that provides practical applications of…

  3. Drafting. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials for drafting for students in grades 6-10 consists of an instructor's section and student materials. The instructor's section contains background information, suggested activities, and a list of suggested resources. A lesson plan for the 8-day module includes assignments; equipment, tools,…

  4. Problem Solving. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide provides technology learning activities designed to prepare students in grades 6-10 to work in the world of the future. The 8-day course provides exploratory, hands-on learning activities and information that can enhance the education of students of all types in an integrated curriculum that provides practical applications of…

  5. Dental Pit and Fissure Sealants: Implications for School Health Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack-Brown, K. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    To promote good personal hygiene practices in students, school health personnel must be informed about dental pit and fissure sealants and related programs. Adoption and maintenance of such programs may depend on the success of school health personnel in educating administrators and policymakers. (SM)

  6. Near-IR imaging of demineralization under sealants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that near-IR reflectance and transillumination imaging can be used to acquire high contrast images of early caries lesions and composite restorative materials. The aim of the study was to determine the optimum near-IR wavelengths for imaging demineralized areas under dental sealants. Fifteen natural human premolars and molars with occlusal lesions were used in this in vitro study. Images before and after application of sealants were acquired using near-IR reflectance and near-IR transillumination at wavelengths of 1300 nm, 1460 nm, and 1500 - 1700 nm. Images were also acquired using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography for comparison. The highest contrast for near- IR reflectance was at 1460 nm and 1500 - 1700 nm. These near-IR wavelengths are coincident with higher water absorption. The clear Delton sealant investigated was not visible in either co-polarization or crosspolarization OCT images. The wavelength region between 1500-1700-nm yielded the highest contrast of lesions under sealants for near-IR reflectance measurements.

  7. Introductory Industrial Technology I. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.; And Others

    This guide contains 36 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grades 7 and 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced,…

  8. Introductory Industrial Technology II. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide contains 29 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grade 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced, equipment/supplies,…

  9. Classroom Activities in Transportation: Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This curriculum supplement was designed to correlate directly with "A Guide to Curriculum Planning in Technology Education," published by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. It is also a companion book to three other classroom activity compilations, one in each of the other three major systems of technology--manufacturing,…

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center ECLSS technology activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technology activities are presented. Topics covered include: analytical development; ECLSS modeling approach; example of water reclamation modeling needs; and hardware development and testing.

  11. Bond strength of Bis-GMA and glass ionomer pit and fissure sealants using cyclic fatigue.

    PubMed

    Dewji, H R; Drummond, J L; Fadavi, S; Punwani, I

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the bond strength of glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer sealants compared to Bis-GMA sealants using both static and cyclic fatigue shear testing. Four materials were evaluated: D, a Bis-GMA sealant with 10% phosphoric acid etchant; FC, a resin-modified glass ionomer sealant with 20% polyacrylic acid etchant; FD, a resin-modified glass ionomer sealant with 10% polyacrylic acid etchant; and FSC, a self-cured glass ionomer sealant with no etchant. Gelatin capsules filled with the sealant material were bonded to the enamel surfaces of bovine teeth after appropriate surface conditioning and then tested in shear static and cyclic fatigue. Static and cyclic shear bond strengths, respectively, for each group were (MPa): FC: 21.1+/-2.8 and 17.1+/-3.1; FD: 14.6+/-5.9 and 8.5+/-3.1; D: 10.8+/-4.9 and 4.7+/-2.6; FSC: 8.7 (1.0 and 2.9+/-0.6. The resin-modified glass ionomer sealants had better fatigue bond strength than both Bis-GMA and self-cured glass ionomer sealants with the surface conditioning affecting the bond strength of the resin-modified glass ionomer sealants.

  12. RoboResource Technology Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck, Tom, Comp.; Frye, Ellen, Ed.

    Preparing students to be successful in a rapidly changing world means showing them how to use the tools of technology and how to integrate those tools into all areas of learning. This booklet is divided into three sections: Design Activities, Experiments, and Resources. The design activities ask students to collaborate on design projects. In these…

  13. Direct Spinal Ventral Root Repair following Avulsion: Effectiveness of a New Heterologous Fibrin Sealant on Motoneuron Survival and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Barbizan, Roberta; Seabra Ferreira, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Axonal injuries at the interface between central and peripheral nervous system, such as ventral root avulsion (VRA), induce important degenerative processes, mostly resulting in neuronal and motor function loss. In the present work, we have compared two different fibrin sealants, one derived from human blood and another derived from animal blood and Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, as a promising treatment for this type of injury. Lewis rats were submitted to VRA (L4–L6) and had the avulsed roots reimplanted to the surface of the spinal cord, with the aid of fibrin sealant. The spinal cords were processed to evaluate neuronal survival, synaptic stability, and glial reactivity, 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Sciatic nerves were processed to investigate Schwann cell activity by p75NTR expression (4 weeks after surgery) and to count myelinated axons and morphometric evaluation (12 weeks after surgery). Walking track test was used to evaluate gait recovery, up to 12 weeks. The results indicate that both fibrin sealants are similarly efficient. However, the snake-derived fibrin glue is a potentially safer alternative for being a biological and biodegradable product which does not contain human blood derivatives. Therefore, the venom glue can be a useful tool for the scientific community due to its advantages and variety of applications. PMID:27642524

  14. Development of 400 F sealants for flat plate solar collector construction and installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, L.; Schubert, R. J.

    1980-03-01

    Twenty candidate sealants representing ten different polymer types were evaluated as potential solar collector sealants. Polymer types tested included epichlorohydrin rubber, EPDM rubber, silicone, polysulfide, acrylate rubber, and a fluoroelastomer. Initial screening of sealants consisted of measuring high temperature stability and adhesion retention. Several sealant compositions exhibited satisfactory performance in these tests and were selected for further evaluation. These materials were based on an EPDM rubber, a Viton fluoroelastomer, and silicone polymers. Further testing of these candidate materials included determination of adhesion retention under uv/water/heat conditions, fogging temperature, low temperature flexibility, and physical properties. Four silicone-based materials appeared to be suitable candidates for sealing solar collectors.

  15. Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  16. Influence of calcium chloride and aprotinin in the in vivo biological performance of a composite combining biphasic calcium phosphate granules and fibrin sealant.

    PubMed

    Le Guehennec, Laurent; Goyenvalle, Eric; Aguado, Eric; Pilet, Paul; Spaethe, Reiner; Daculsi, Guy

    2007-08-01

    Highly bioactive biomaterials have been developed to replace bone grafts in orthopedic revision and maxillofacial surgery for bone augmentation. A mouldable, self-hardening material can be obtained by combining TricOs Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Granules and Tissucol Fibrin Sealant. Two components, calcium chloride and antifibrinolytic agents (aprotinin), are essential for the stability of the fibrin clot. The ingrowth of cells in composites combining sealants without calcium chloride or with a low concentration of aprotinin was evaluated in vivo in an experiment on rabbits. Bone colonization was compared using TricOs alone or with the composite made from TricOs and the standard fibrin sealant. Without the addition of calcium chloride, the calcium ions released by the ceramic component interacted with the components of the sealant too late to stabilize the clot. With a low concentration of aprotinin, the degradation of the clot occurred more quickly, leading to the absence of a scaffold on which the bone cells could colonize the composite. Our results indicate that a stable fibrin scaffold is crucial for bone colonization. The low calcium chloride and low aprotinin groups have shown lower bone growth. Further studies will be necessary to determine the minimal amount of antifibrinolytic agent (aprotinin) necessary to allow the same level of osteogenic activity as the TricOs-fibrin glue composite.

  17. Studies of new perfluoroether elastomeric sealants. [for aircraft fuel tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, D. I.; Salisbury, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Channel and filleting sealants were developed successfully from cyano and diamidoxime terminated perfluoro alkylene ether prepolymers. The prepolymers were polymerized, formulated and tested. The polymers and/or formulations therefrom were evaluated as to their physical, mechanical and chemical properties (i.e., specific gravity, hardness, nonvolatile content, corrosion resistance, stress corrosion, pressure rupture resistance, low temperature flexibility, gap sealing efficiency, tensile strength and elongation, dynamic mechanical behavior, compression set, fuel resistance, thermal properties and processability). Other applications of the formulated polymrs and incorporation of the basic prepolymers into other polymeric systems were investigated. A cyano terminated perfluoro alkylene oxide triazine was formulated and partially evaluated. The channel sealant in its present formulation has excellent pressure rupture resistance and surpasses present MIL specifications before and after fuel and heat aging.

  18. Cross Linking and Degradation Mechanisms in Model Sealant Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Kaufman, J.; Ito, T. I.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Model compounds were investigated as to which type of heterocyclic ring is the most advantageous for curing sealants based on perfluoroalkylether chains. The relative thermal, thermal oxidative, hydrolytic, and fuel stability of potential crosslinks were determined. Specifically substituted materials were synthesized and evaluation of their stabilities in air, inert atmosphere, water, and Jet-A fuel at 235 and 325 C was made. Three heterocyclic ring systems were considered, namely, triazine, 1,2,4- and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles.

  19. Compliant sealants for solid oxide fuel cells and other ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, I.D.; Ley, K.L.

    1995-09-26

    A glass or glass-ceramic sealant is described for a SOFC having a coefficient of thermal expansion in the range of from about 8 to about 13{times}10{sup {minus}6}/C and a viscosity of at least 10{sup 3}Pa-s at cell operating temperature. The sealant has a composition of SrO present in the range of from about 5 to about 60 mole percent, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} present in the range of from 0 to about 45 mole percent, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} present in the range from 0 to about 15 mole percent, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} present in the range of from about 15 mole percent to about 80 mole percent, and SiO{sub 2} present in the range of from 0 to about 40 mole percent, wherein the material is a viscous fluid at cell operating temperatures of from about 600 C to about 1000 C. The sealant may also be compounds of CaO present in the range of from 0 to about 35 mole percent, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} present in the range from 0 to about 15 mole percent, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} present in the range of from about 35 mole percent to about 85 mole percent, and SiO{sub 2} present in the range of from 0 to about 30 mole percent. 2 figs.

  20. Compliant sealants for solid oxide fuel cells and other ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Ira D.; Ley, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    A glass or glass-ceramic sealant for a SOFC having a coefficient of thermal expansion in the range of from about 8 to about 13.times.10.sup.-6 /.degree.C. and a viscosity of at least 10.sup.3 Pa-s at cell operating temperature. The sealant has a composition of SrO present in the range of from about 5 to about 60 mole percent, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 present in the range of from 0 to about 45 mole percent, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 present in the range from 0 to about 15 mole percent, B.sub.2 O.sub.3 present in the range of from about 15 mole percent to about 80 mole percent, and SiO.sub.2 present in the range of from 0 to about 40 mole percent, wherein the material is a viscous fluid at cell operating temperatures of from about 600.degree. C. to about 1000.degree. C. The sealant may also be compounds of CaO present in the range of from 0 to about 35 mole percent, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 present in the range from 0 to about 15 mole percent, B.sub.2 O.sub.3 present in the range of from about 35 mole percent to about 85 mole percent, and SiO.sub.2 present in the range of from 0 to about 30 mole percent.

  1. An accelerated exposure and testing apparatus for building joint sealants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. C.; Hunston, D. L.; Tan, K. T.; Hettenhouser, J.; Garver, J. D.

    2013-09-01

    The design, fabrication, and implementation of a computer-controlled exposure and testing apparatus for building joint sealants are described in this paper. This apparatus is unique in its ability to independently control and monitor temperature, relative humidity, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and mechanical deformation. Each of these environmental factors can be controlled precisely over a wide range of conditions during periods of a month or more. Moreover, as controlled mechanical deformations can be generated, in situ mechanical characterization tests can be performed without removing specimens from the chamber. Temperature and humidity were controlled during our experiments via a precision temperature regulator and proportional mixing of dry and moisture-saturated air; while highly uniform UV radiation was attained by attaching the chamber to an integrating sphere-based radiation source. A computer-controlled stepper motor and a transmission system were used to provide precise movement control. The reliability and effectiveness of the apparatus were demonstrated on a model sealant material. The results clearly show that this apparatus provides an excellent platform to study the long-term durability of building joint sealants.

  2. Effect of a surface sealant on the color stability of composite resins after immersion in staining solution.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Lauana Borges; Barreto, Luma Franciélle Cabreira; Miotti, Leonardo Lamberti; Nicoloso, Gabriel Ferreira; Durand, Leticia Brandão

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of surface sealants on the color stability of 2 different composite resins after immersion in coffee. Four groups were created (n = 10): microhybrid composite, microhybrid with surface sealant, nanofilled composite, and nanofilled composite with surface sealant. Half of the specimens of each group were immersed in distilled water and half were immersed in coffee for 48 hours. Color was measured before and after immersion. Groups with surface sealants presented less color variation when compared with the groups without surface sealants. The nanofilled resin specimens presented the greatest color variation within the groups without sealant. The surface sealant positively influenced the color stability of composite resin specimens immersed in coffee. When surface sealant was not applied, the microhybrid specimens had better color stability than the nanofilled.

  3. NASA's Microgravity Technology Report: Summary of Activities 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the 1997 NASA Microgravity Technology Report is to update the Microgravity Research Program's technology development policy and to present and assess current technology related activities and requirements identified within its research and technology disciplines.

  4. 40 CFR 63.6008 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations for puncture sealant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limitations for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.6008 Section... Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources § 63.6008 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations for puncture sealant application affected sources? (a) You must demonstrate...

  5. 40 CFR 63.5988 - What emission limitations must I meet for puncture sealant application affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.5988 Section 63.5988 Protection of Environment... Tire Manufacturing Emission Limitations for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources § 63.5988 What emission limitations must I meet for puncture sealant application affected sources? (a) You...

  6. 40 CFR 63.6002 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for puncture sealant application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with the emission limits for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.6002 Section 63.6002... Sealant Application Affected Sources § 63.6002 How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for puncture sealant application affected sources? (a) You must demonstrate initial...

  7. 40 CFR 63.5988 - What emission limitations must I meet for puncture sealant application affected sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.5988 Section 63.5988 Protection of Environment... Tire Manufacturing Emission Limitations for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources § 63.5988 What emission limitations must I meet for puncture sealant application affected sources? (a) You...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5989 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limitations for puncture sealant application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the emission limitations for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.5989 Section 63.5989... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limitations for Puncture Sealant Application... sealant application affected sources? You must use one of the compliance alternatives in paragraphs...

  9. 40 CFR 63.6008 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations for puncture sealant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the emission limitations for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.6008 Section... Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources § 63.6008 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations for puncture sealant application affected sources? (a) You must demonstrate...

  10. 40 CFR 63.6002 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for puncture sealant application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with the emission limits for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.6002 Section 63.6002... Sealant Application Affected Sources § 63.6002 How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limits for puncture sealant application affected sources? (a) You must demonstrate initial...

  11. 40 CFR 63.5989 - What are my alternatives for meeting the emission limitations for puncture sealant application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the emission limitations for puncture sealant application affected sources? 63.5989 Section 63.5989... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Emission Limitations for Puncture Sealant Application... sealant application affected sources? You must use one of the compliance alternatives in paragraphs...

  12. CAUSES OF POOR SEALANT PERFORMANCE IN SOIL-GAS- RESISTANT FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses causes of poor sealant performance in soil-gas-resistant foundations. ealants for radon-resistant foundation construction must seal the gap between concrete sections. odern sealants have such low permeability that seal performance depends only on the permeabil...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... puncture sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... puncture sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... puncture sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  16. Current Status of Hemostatic Agents and Sealants in Urologic Surgical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kommu, Sashi S; McArthur, Robert; Emara, Amr M; Reddy, Utsav D; Anderson, Christopher J; Barber, Neil J; Persad, Raj A; Eden, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent and near exponential increase in the use of hemostatic agents and sealants to supplement the rapidly evolving methods in the surgical management of urologic patients. This article reviews the use of hemostatic agents and sealants in current urologic practice. PMID:26543429

  17. First Permanent Molar Restoration Differences between Those with or without Dental Sealants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuthy, Raymond A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study examined differences in the number of restorations in permanent, posterior teeth for those children receiving dental sealants with cost sharing when compared to children who do not receive sealants. Results indicated a 51 percent reduction in restoration rates for each quadrant sealed. Findings have implications for cost savings and…

  18. Biodegradable-Polymer-Blend-Based Surgical Sealant with Body-Temperature-Mediated Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Adam M; Lee, Nora G; Casey, Brendan J; Srinivasan, Priya; Sikorski, Michael J; Daristotle, John L; Sandler, Anthony D; Kofinas, Peter

    2015-12-22

    The development of practical and efficient surgical sealants has the propensity to improve operational outcomes. A biodegradable polymer blend is fabricated as a nonwoven fiber mat in situ. After direct deposition onto the tissue of interest, the material transitions from a fiber mat to a film. This transition promotes polymer-substrate interfacial interactions leading to improved adhesion and surgical sealant performance.

  19. Qualification, Demonstration & Validation of Compliant Removers for Aircraft Sealants and Specialty Coatings ESTCP WP-0621

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    materials/ methods to approach sealant removal tasks consistently and effectively, depending upon situation. BUSINESS SENSITIVE 6 TECHNICAL APROACH ...Dem/Val 3 at New River MCAS - V-22 Osprey TECHNICAL APROACH BUSINESS SENSITIVE 5 TECHNICAL APROACH “Toolbox” Approach: Provide end users with...Demonstration Tests (UDRI) - Testing Protocols Parameter Test Test Method Sealant Removal Force Measuring Unit UDRI Proprietary Substrate Damage Potential

  20. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  1. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  2. Effect of Adhesive Application on Sealant Success: A Clinical Study of Fifth and Seventh Generation Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vaibhav; Tangade, Pradeep Shankar; Tirth, Amit; Pal, Sumit Kumar; Lingesha, Chaitra Telgi; Arora, Vikram; Yadav, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the effect of fifth and seventh generation bonding agent on sealant success. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four school children aged six to nine years received sealants in four permanent molars in a split mouth design, such that each patient received sealant in the first permanent molar with fifth generation bonding agent in one arch and seventh generation bonding agent in the other arch; contra-lateral molars were sealed with sealant alone. The evaluation was carried out at baseline, three months, six months and 12 months, according to the criteria by Feigal et al, in 2000. Chi- square test was used to analyze data at P<0.05 level of significance. Results: Statistically significant differences were found for sealant retention between fifth generation and sealant group, and fifth generation and seventh generation groups; whereas, no significant difference was found for sealant retention between seventh generation and sealant group at three, six and 12 months. Conclusion: As separate etch and rinse steps are not required for seventh generation bonding agents, and almost similar results were obtained for both sealant and seventh generation groups, it can be concluded that application of sealant along with a seventh generation bonding agent may enhance sealant success and can be used for caries prevention in preventive programs. PMID:27252754

  3. Bonding Agents in Pit and Fissure Sealants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Usha Mohan; G, Suma

    2009-01-01

    Dental adhesive systems used for bonding dental resins to enamel and dentin have evolved through several "generations," with changes in chemistry, mechanism, number of bottles, application technique, and clinical effectiveness. The trend in the latest generation of dental bonding systems is to reduce the number of components and clinical placement steps. The introduction of i bond, a single-bottle dental adhesive system, is the latest of the new generation materials, and combines etchant, adhesive, and desensitizer in one component. This paper describes different dentin bonding agents, its evolution, mechanism of action and different commercially available dentin bonding agents and their role in the retention of pit and fissure sealant. PMID:25206115

  4. Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Robert L.; Morris, Michael I.; Singh, Suman P.N.

    1991-12-01

    This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety.

  5. Repository Technology Program activities, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Thorpe, R.K.; Knapp, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    Our technical activities in FY 1988 included instrument selection and evaluation, calculational work, and simulator development. Near the end of the fiscal year, we began preparing several topical reports to document our results. This fiscal year, we continued developing three-dimensional numerical simulators to model coupled hydrologic-and mechanical-rock mass responses and, thus, to provide representative numerical tools for understanding and calculating these in situ processes. We also began scoping calculations in the second half of FY 1988 to evaluate ERE design criteria, but this work was redirected late in the year when the DOE/AECL Subsidiary Agreement was set aside. Our work in developing and evaluating experimental techniques focused on total pressure measurements, moisture content measurement, and tracer detection instrumentation for sealing experiments and for rock-mass-response field tests. At the end of the fiscal year, we completed a review of measurement technology for instrumenting migration/sorption tests to help define the technological requirements in these areas. By the end of FY 1988, we had completed a review of the existing codes for simulating reactive transport; we are using the results of this review to help formulate plans for future activities in this area. The following sections describe the major RTP tasks and activities at LLNL in more detail, and they include our FY 1988 accomplishments in these areas. 8 refs., 22 figs.

  6. Selective removal of composite sealants with near-ultraviolet laser pulses of nanosecond duration.

    PubMed

    Louie, Tiffany M; Jones, Robert S; Sarma, Anupama V; Fried, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    It is often necessary to replace pit and fissure sealants and composite restorations. This task is complicated by the necessity for complete removal of the remaining composite to enable suitable adhesion of new composite. Previous studies have shown that 355-nm laser pulses from a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser can selectively remove residual composite after orthodontic bracket removal on enamel surfaces. Our objective is to determine if such laser pulses are suitable for selective removal of composite pit and fissure sealants and restorations. Optical coherence tomography is used to acquire optical cross sections of the occlusal topography nondestructively before sealant application, after sealant application, and after sealant removal. Thermocouples are used to monitor the temperature in the pulp chamber during composite removal under clinically relevant ablation rates, i.e., 30 Hz and 30 mJ/pulse. At an irradiation intensity of 1.3 J/cm2, pit and fissure sealants are completely removed without visible damage to the underlying enamel. At intensities above 1.5 J/cm2, incident laser pulses remove the resin layer while at the same time preferentially etching the surface of the enamel. Temperature excursions in the pulp chamber of extracted teeth are limited to less than 5 degrees C if air-cooling is used during the rapid removal (1 to 2 min) of sealants, water-cooling is not necessary. Selective removal of composite restorative materials is possible without damage to the underlying sound tooth structure.

  7. Toxicity of coal-tar pavement sealants and ultraviolet radiation to Ambystoma Maculatum.

    PubMed

    Bommarito, Thomas; Sparling, Donald W; Halbrook, Richard S

    2010-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can affect amphibians in lethal and many sublethal ways. There are many natural and anthropogenic sources of PAHs in aquatic environments. One potentially significant source is run off from surfaces of parking lots and roads that are protected with coal tar sealants. Coal tar is 50% or more PAH by wet weight and is used in emulsions to treat these surfaces. Break down of sealants can result in contamination of nearby waters. The toxicity of PAHs can be greatly altered by simultaneous exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This study exposes larvae of the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) to determine if coal tar sealant can have negative effects on aquatic amphibians and if coal tar toxicity is influenced by ultraviolet radiation. Spotted salamanders were exposed to 0, 60, 280 and 1500 mg coal tar sealant/kg sediment for 28 days. Half of the animals were exposed to conventional fluorescent lighting only and half were exposed to fluorescent lighting plus ultraviolet radiation. No significant mortality occurred during the experiment. Exposure to sealants resulted in slower rates of growth, and diminished ability to swim in a dose-dependent fashion. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation affected the frequencies of leukocytes and increased the incidence of micronucleated erythrocytes. There was an interactive effect of sealant and radiation on swimming behavior. We conclude that coal-tar sealant and ultraviolet radiation increased sublethal effects in salamanders, and may be a risk to salamanders under field conditions.

  8. The use of fibrin sealant during non-emergency surgery: a systematic review of evidence of benefits and harms.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Steven J; Crawford, Fay; van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Berardi, Andrea; Osei-Assibey, George; Bacelar, Mariana; Salih, Fatima; Wakefield, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrin sealants are used in different types of surgery to prevent the accumulation of post-operative fluid (seroma) or blood (haematoma) or to arrest haemorrhage (bleeding). However, there is uncertainty around the benefits and harms of fibrin sealant use. OBJECTIVES To systematically review the evidence on the benefits and harms of fibrin sealants in non-emergency surgery in adults. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases [MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library (including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Health Technology Assessment database and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials)] were searched from inception to May 2015. The websites of regulatory bodies (the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, the European Medicines Agency and the Food and Drug Administration) were also searched to identify evidence of harms. REVIEW METHODS This review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies using any type of fibrin sealant compared with standard care in non-emergency surgery in adults. The primary outcome was risk of developing seroma and haematoma. Only RCTs were used to inform clinical effectiveness and both RCTs and observational studies were used for the assessment of harms related to the use of fibrin sealant. Two reviewers independently screened all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant studies. Data extraction was undertaken by one reviewer and validated by a second. The quality of included studies was assessed independently by two reviewers using the Cochrane Collaboration risk-of-bias tool for RCTs and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidance for adverse events for observational studies. A fixed-effects model was used for meta-analysis. RESULTS We included 186 RCTs and eight observational studies across 14 surgical specialties and five reports from the regulatory bodies. Most RCTs were judged to be at an

  9. Retention of resin-based filled and unfilled pit and fissure sealants: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V. Rajashekar; Chowdhary, Nagalakshmi; Mukunda, K. S.; Kiran, N. K.; Kavyarani, B. S.; Pradeep, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The most caries-susceptible period of a permanent first molar tooth is the eruption phase, during which the enamel is not fully matured and it is usually difficult for the child to clean the erupting tooth surfaces. Sealing occlusal pits and fissures with resin-based pit and fissure sealants is a proven method to prevent occlusal caries. The difference in the viscosity of the sealants differs in the penetration into pit and fissures and abrasive wear resistance property due to the addition of filler particles. The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare the retention of the resin-based filled (Helioseal F, Ivoclar Vivadent) and unfilled (Clinpro, 3M ESPE) pit and fissure sealants, which is important for their effectiveness. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six children between the age group of 6 and 9 years, with all four newly erupted permanent first molars were selected. Sealants were applied randomly using split mouth design technique on permanent first molars. Evaluation of sealant retention was performed at regular intervals over 12 months, using Simonsen's criteria at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th month. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: At the end of our study period (12th month), 53.57% showed complete retention, 37.50% showed partial retention, and 8.83% showed complete missing of resin-based filled (Helioseal F) pit and fissure sealant. And, 64.29% showed complete retention, 32.14% showed partial retention, and 3.57% showed complete missing of resin-based unfilled (Clinpro) pit and fissure sealant. This difference in retention rates between filled and unfilled pit and fissure sealants was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The difference in retention rates between Helioseal F and Clinpro was not statistically significant, but Clinpro (unfilled) sealant showed slightly higher retention rates and clinically better performance than Helioseal F (filled). PMID:25821368

  10. Reinforced composite sealants for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sonja M.; Federmann, Dirk; Remmel, Josef; Pap, Michael

    Glass-ceramic sealants are commonly used as joining materials for planar solid oxide fuel cells stacks. Several requirements need to be fulfilled by these materials: beside of electrical insulation and appropriate thermal expansion, a good adhesion on the ceramic and metallic components of a SOFC stack is necessary to form a gas-tight joint. Even though the joining process might have been successful, failures and leaks often occur during the stack operation due to fracture of the brittle material under thermal stresses or during thermal cycling of the components. This study focusses on composite materials consisting of a glass matrix based on the system of BaO-CaO-SiO 2 and various filler materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia fibres or particles and silver particles. In order to evaluate a possible reinforcing influence of the filler material of the composite, tensile strength tests were carried out on circular butt joints. The highest strength values were found for the composite material with addition of silver particles, followed by the glass matrix itself without any filler addition and the lowest values were measured for the composite with YSZ particles. SEM investigations of cross-sections of the joints elucidated these results by the microstructure of the glass-ceramic sealants.

  11. Dystrophic heart failure blocked by membrane sealant poloxamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Soichiro; Townsend, Dewayne; Michele, Daniel E.; Favre, Elizabeth G.; Day, Sharlene M.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    2005-08-01

    Dystrophin deficiency causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in humans, an inherited and progressive disease of striated muscle deterioration that frequently involves pronounced cardiomyopathy. Heart failure is the second leading cause of fatalities in DMD. Progress towards defining the molecular basis of disease in DMD has mostly come from studies on skeletal muscle, with comparatively little attention directed to cardiac muscle. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiac myocytes may differ significantly from skeletal myofibres; this is underscored by the presence of significant cardiac disease in patients with truncated or reduced levels of dystrophin but without skeletal muscle disease. Here we show that intact, isolated dystrophin-deficient cardiac myocytes have reduced compliance and increased susceptibility to stretch-mediated calcium overload, leading to cell contracture and death, and that application of the membrane sealant poloxamer 188 corrects these defects in vitro. In vivo administration of poloxamer 188 to dystrophic mice instantly improved ventricular geometry and blocked the development of acute cardiac failure during a dobutamine-mediated stress protocol. Once issues relating to optimal dosing and long-term effects of poloxamer 188 in humans have been resolved, chemical-based membrane sealants could represent a new therapeutic approach for preventing or reversing the progression of cardiomyopathy and heart failure in muscular dystrophy.

  12. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramic sealant formulations for oil field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young; McDaniel, Richard

    2008-10-21

    A sealant for an oil or geothermal well capable of setting within about 3 to about 6 hours at temperatures less than about 250.degree. F. for shallow wells less than about 10,000 feet and deep wells greater than about 10,000 feet having MgO present in the range of from about 9.9 to about 14.5%, KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 present in the range of from about 29.7 to about 27.2%, class C fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 36.3%, class F fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 0%, boric acid or borax present in the range of from about 0.39 to about 1.45%, and water present in the range of from about 20.3 to about 21.86% by weight of the sealant.A method of sealing wells is disclosed as are compositions for very high temperature wells is disclosed as is a composition for treating oil field wastes.

  13. Experimental measure of the tensile strength of biological sealant-collagen association after hepatectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Scotté, M; Dujardin, F; Amelot, A; Azema, P; Leblanc, I; Bouvier, P; Michot, F; Ténière, P

    1996-01-01

    Fibrin sealants are commonly used in liver surgery. The aim of this study was to test the adhesive properties of a biological sealant-collagen bonding, using an experimental model. After hepatectomy in dogs, we measured the rupture stress point of a fibrin clot on the liver cross-section. The tensile strength was 0.28 N, 5 times higher than the force of arterial pressure in a 2-mm-diameter vessel. These results indicate that the adhesion of fibrin sealants is effective to prevent hemorrhage from the liver cross-section after hepatectomy.

  14. Qualification, Demonstration & Validation of Compliant Removers for Aircraft Sealants and Specialty Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    10 Material Selection • Sealant Materials • PR-1422 B-2 (Polysulfide) – AMS-S-8802 • PR-1750 B-2 (Polysulfide... sealant focus • Dem/Val 1 at Hill AFB • F-16 Wing Spar/Pylons • C-130 Sloping Longeron • A- 10 Wing IML • Dem/Val 2 at FRCSE • P-3 OML...Military • Elixaire Sky Restore – Currently in use as aircraft cleaner and solvent – Efforts underway to promote as sealant remover –

  15. Venous gas embolism caused by fibrin sealant application to the prostate during greenlight laser photoselective vaporization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alexander; Vazquez, Rafael

    2015-04-15

    Venous gas embolism is a complication of fibrin sealant application and is a well-described event during various modes of prostate resection. We describe the case of a nitrogen venous gas embolism during Greenlight laser photovaporization of the prostate during the application of fibrin sealant to the operative site for hemostasis. Fibrin sealant application by a compressed gas applicator is a cause of venous air embolism, and this case highlights the need to keep venous gas embolism in mind when compressed gas applicators are used.

  16. Lightweight active controlled primary mirror technology demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzinghi, P.; Bratina, V.; Ferruzzi, D.; Gambicorti, L.; Simonetti, F.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.; Salinari, P.; Lisi, F.; Olivier, M.; Bursi, A.; Gallieni, D.; Biasi, R.; Pereira, J.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacturing and test of a ground demonstrator of an innovative technology able to realize lightweight active controlled space-borne telescope mirror. This analysis is particularly devoted to applications for a large aperture space telescope for advanced LIDAR, but it can be used for any lightweight mirror. For a space-borne telescope the mirror weight is a fundamental parameter to be minimized (less than 15 Kg/m2), while maximizing the optical performances (optical quality better than λ/3). In order to guarantee these results, the best selected solution is a thin glass primary mirror coupled to a stiff CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) panel with a surface active control system. A preliminary design of this lightweight structure highlighted the critical areas that were deeply analyzed by the ground demonstrator: the 1 mm thick mirror survivability on launch and the actuator functional performances with low power consumption. To preserve the mirror glass the Electrostatic Locking technique was developed and is here described. The active optics technique, already widely used for ground based telescopes, consists of a metrology system (wave front sensor, WFS), a control algorithm and a system of actuators to slightly deform the primary mirror and/or displace the secondary, in a closed-loop control system that applies the computed corrections to the mirror's optical errors via actuators. These actuators types are properly designed and tested in order to guarantee satisfactory performances in terms of stroke, force and power consumption. The realized and tested ground demonstrator is a square CFRP structure with a flat mirror on the upper face and an active actuator beneath it. The test campaign demonstrated the technology feasibility and robustness, supporting the next step toward the large and flat surface with several actuators.

  17. Effect of sealants of the sound absorption coefficients of acoustical friable insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayman, J. L.; Lory, M. K.

    1984-10-01

    Acoustical friable insulating materials (AFIM), which often in the past contained asbestos, have been used for sound control since the mid 1930's. Because of their widespread use and the ease of fiber dissemination, friable asbestos materials are considered to be the major source of asbestos fiber contamination in the indoor environment. Encapsulation of asbestos materials with a commercial sealant product is one of several methods used to control potential asbestos exposure in rooms. A sealant product that preserves most of the acoustical properties of the material is preferred in this usage. AFIM sample materials were treated with 6 types of sealants and the effects on normally incident absorption coefficients from 100 to 2500 Hz were measured using a fixed, dual-microphone technique. Penetrating type sealants were found to have a less detrimental effect on sound absorption than those of a bridging type.

  18. Comparison of Microleakage and Penetration Depth between Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Sealants in Primary Second Molar

    PubMed Central

    Chaugule, Vishwas B; Panse, Amey M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Optimal pit and fissure sealing is determined by surface preparation techniques and choice of materials. The performance of pit and fissure sealant materials has been intensively investigated, yet no single product is reported as an ideal sealant. In children, moisture control during cavity preparation is always a big challenge, and hence, hydrophilic sealants have been developed. Aim To compare the microleakage and penetration depth of hydrophilic and hydrophobic sealants using acid-etching on dry and moist surfaces. Materials and methods Recently, extracted 28 2nd primary molars are assigned to two groups (hydrophobic group I; hydrophilic group II) depending on the surface condition (dry group: A1 and B1; moist group: A2 and B2) of 7 teeth in each group. Samples from group A1 and B1 are cleaned and dried with a 3-way syringe and etched with etching gel, and sealant is applied to the fissures and cured with visible light. Sample from A2 and B2 are immersed in 0.1 mL of fresh whole human saliva for 20 seconds and dried using a pellet cotton, and the same procedure is carried out. All samples are subjected to 1000 thermal cycles and sectioned to compare the depth of penetration and microleakage. Sections will be examined under light microscope and analyzed using an image analysis software (SigmaScan). Results The least microleakage was seen with hydrophilic sealant under moist surface condition, and the depth of penetration of hydrophobic sealant was found to be better than that of hydrophilic sealant in both dry and moist surface conditions. Conclusion Hydrophilic pit and fissure sealants showed higher tolerance to saliva contamination with less microleakage, but in terms of penetration ability hydrophobic sealants were found to be superior. How to cite this article Gawali PN, Chaugule VB, Panse AM. Comparison of Microleakage and Penetration Depth between Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Sealants in Primary Second Molar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016

  19. NASA's Microgravity Technology Report, 1996: Summary of Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierk, Isabella

    1996-01-01

    This report covers technology development and technology transfer activities within the Microgravity Science Research Programs during FY 1996. It also describes the recent major tasks under the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program and identifies current technology requirements. This document is consistent with NASA,s Enteprise for the Human Exploration and development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Plan. This annual update reflects changes in the Microgravity Science Research Program's new technology activities and requirements. Appendix A. FY 1996 Advanced Technology Development. Program and Project Descriptions. Appendix B. Technology Development.

  20. Conversion degree, microhardness, microleakage and fluoride release of different fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Kuşgöz, Adem; Tüzüner, Tamer; Ulker, Mustafa; Kemer, Bariş; Saray, Onur

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of conversion (DC), microhardness, microleakage and fluoride release of a nano-filled resin based fissure sealant (Grandio Seal, GS) and compare it with an un-filled resin based fissure sealant (Clinpro, CL) and a glass-ionomer based fissure sealant (Fuji Triage, FT). Disk shaped specimens were prepared from tested fissure sealants to determine the DC, Vicker hardness (VHN) and fluoride release (FR). The DC and VHN of each material was evaluated after 24 h. The cumulative fluoride concentrations were evaluated at 1 h, 6 h, 12 h, 1, 7, 15 and 30 days. For microleakage evaluation, fissure sealants were applied to the etched and dried enamel surfaces of sound third molar teeth according to the manufacturer's instructions (n=10). After the thermocycling and mechanical loading procedures, microleakage assessments were carried out. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc Tukey test, the Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.05). Results revealed differences regarding DC between all groups: FT (89%) > GS (55.02%) > CL (%51.10) (p<0.05). The VHN values were significantly different among all groups in the following order: GS > FT > CL (p<0.05). FT exhibited significantly higher microleakage scores compared to the CL and GS sealants (p<0.05). The FR of FT was significantly greater than CL and GS (p<0.05). Nano-filled resin based sealant can be used as an alternative to other fissure sealant materials because of its superior hardness results and feasible sealing ability.

  1. OMNEX surgical sealant in the extracorporeal repair of renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Roig, Michael; Gorin, Michael A; Castellan, Miguel; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2011-11-01

    OMNEX (Ethicon, Inc.; Somerville, NJ) is a cyanoacrylate-based synthetic surgical sealant. To date, the use of OMNEX has only been described in a limited number of vascular surgery procedures. We present the cases of two patients who underwent successful extracorporeal renal artery aneurysm repair with the aid of OMNEX sealant. This report is the first evidence to suggest the utility of OMNEX in renovascular surgery.

  2. Comparison of the thrombogenicity of internationally available fibrin sealants in an established microsurgical model.

    PubMed

    Frost-Arner, L; Spotnitz, W D; Rodeheaver, G T; Drake, D B

    2001-11-01

    Previous studies comparing the thrombotic complications of cryoprecipitated fibrin sealant containing bovine thrombin on microvascular venous anastomoses in a rat epigastric free flap model revealed deleterious outcomes regarding flap survival with higher concentrations of topical bovine thrombin. This study was designed to compare three internationally available fibrin sealants, one experimental fibrin monomer sealant that does not require thrombin, and human thrombin alone as to their effects on the survival of an established rat epigastric free flap model. Ninety Sprague-Dawley rats (400 to 600 g) were prepared for abdominal surgery, and an epigastric-based skin flap was raised. The single vein draining the flap was clamped, divided, and reconnected using standard microvascular suturing techniques. Before release of the clamps, the chosen additive was applied precisely to the anastomosis. Additional material was then added to the raw surface of the flap. The animals were divided into seven treatment groups, each receiving 1 ml of commercial or investigational fibrin sealant or human thrombin alone: one control group receiving no additive treatment, four fibrin sealant groups receiving treatment with commercial or investigational fibrin sealant preparations, and two groups receiving different concentrations (500 IU/ml and 1000 IU/ml) of human thrombin applied to the anastomoses and the surrounding tissue. Flap survival was assessed at 7 days postoperatively. This study supports the contention that microvascular free flap survival based on microvascular venous anastomotic patency was adversely effected by high concentrations of thrombin. Lower concentrations (500 IU/ml and less) of thrombin did not seem to affect flap survival. One test product was composed of a fibrin monomer sealant, which obviates the need for the thrombin additive. This group's survival rate was not statistically different from that of the control group. Thus, for microvascular anastomoses

  3. Relation Between PAHs and Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealant in Urban Environments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; van Metre, P. C.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2003, coal-tar-based sealant products have come under increased scrutiny as a source of PAHs in urban environments. Sealant (or sealcoat) is the black, shiny substance often applied to asphalt pavement, in particular parking lots and driveways, for esthetic and maintenance purposes. Coal-tar-based sealant, one of the two primary pavement sealant types on the market, typically is 20-35 percent coal-tar pitch, a known carcinogen that is more than 50 percent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The PAH content of the coal-tar-based sealant product is about 1,000 times that of a similar, asphalt-based product, on average. This difference is reflected in regional differences in sealant use and PAH concentrations in pavement dust. In the central and eastern U.S., where the coal-tar-based formulation is prevalent, ΣPAH in mobile particles from sealed pavement have been shown to be about 1,000 times higher than in the western U.S., where the asphalt-based formulation is prevalent (the median ΣPAH concentrations are 2,200 mg/kg in the central and eastern U.S. and 2.1 mg/kg in the western U.S.). Source apportionment modeling indicates that, in the central and eastern U.S., particles from sealed pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs in recently deposited (post-1990) lake sediment, with implications for ecological health, and that coal-tar-based sealant is the primary cause of upward trends in PAHs in U.S. urban lakes. From the standpoint of human health, research indicates that mobile particles from parking lots with coal-tar-based sealant are tracked indoors, resulting in elevated PAH concentrations in house dust. Coal-tar-based sealcoat being applied to an asphalt parking lot at the University of Texas Pickle Research Center.

  4. Comparison of Various Concentrations of Tricalcium Phosphate Nanoparticles on Mechanical Properties and Remineralization of Fissure Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli-Hojjati, Sara; Atai, Mohammad; Haghgoo, Roza; Rahimian-Imam, Sara; Kameli, Somayeh; Ahmaian-Babaki, Fatemeh; Hamzeh, Faezeh; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical properties (flexural strength, micro-shear bond strength) and remineralizing potential of fissure sealants by adding various concentrations of β-tricalcium phosphate nanoparticles. Materials and Methods: This in-vitro study consisted of five experimental groups containing prepared nano-fisssure sealants (1–5 wt.% β-TCP nanoparticles) and two control groups containing a prepared and a commercial fissure sealant. Flexural/micro-shear bond strength values were measured using Zwick test machine. Cavities on sixty healthy premolar teeth were filled with the fissure sealants containing 0–5 wt.% of nano β-TCP. The samples were assessed for remineralization under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post Hoc analysis/HSD were used to analyze the data. Results: There was no significant difference between the flexural strengths/elastic modulus of the 0–5 wt.% nano β-TCP groups (p>0.05). The average flexural strength/elastic modulus of the prepared fissure sealant group (0%) was significantly higher than the commercial fissure sealant group (Clinpro) (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between micro-shear bond strengths of the experimental groups (1–5 wt.%), and between the commercial and the prepared (0%) fissure sealant groups (p>0.05). Examining the samples under SEM showed a significant increase in thickness of the intermediate layer with increasing concentrations of β-TCP nanoparticles (p<0.05). Conclusion: Addition of 1–5 wt.% β-TCP nanoparticles to the fissure sealants significantly increased the remineralization potential without affecting the mechanical properties. PMID:25584048

  5. Patient blood management: use of topical hemostatic and sealant agents.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Sherri

    2013-11-01

    Patient blood management is the scientific use of safe, effective medical and surgical techniques designed to conserve blood, prevent anemia, decrease bleeding, and optimize coagulation in an effort to improve patient outcomes. Perioperative and primary care nurses play a vital role in promoting and making the best use of patient blood management and can play a key role in implementing effective strategies that decrease or eliminate patient exposure to allogeneic blood. The fast and effective minimization of intraoperative bleeding is integral in an effective blood management program. Topical hemostatic and sealant agents can be used to improve blood conservation, reduce overall procedure time, and contribute to faster patient recovery based on specific clinical situations. The proper selection of hemostatic agents can greatly influence the patient's clinical outcomes.

  6. FSA future directions: FSA technology activities in FY86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The silicon material, advanced silicon sheet, device research, and process research activities are explained. There will be no new initiatives. Many activities are targeted for completion and the emphasis will then be on technology transfer. Industrial development of the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) deposition technology is proceeding. Technology transfer and industry funding of sheet development are continuing.

  7. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity: Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This bibliography is divided into three parts and covers: (1) overall economic impact of technological progress and its measurement; (2) technological progress and commercialization of communications satellites; and (3) knowledge additions and earth links from space crew systems.

  8. Teaching the History of Technology. A Cooperative Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, Gregory R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the importance of the historical context of technology and offers a cooperative-learning activity that highlights Elijah McCoy, a black inventor who was a notable contributor to technological development in the 1800s. (JOW)

  9. A hospital cost analysis of a fibrin sealant patch in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Mitra; Ferko, Nicole; Hogan, Andrew; Hollmann, Sarah S; Gangoli, Gaurav; Jamous, Nadine; Batiller, Jonathan; Kocharian, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite hemostat use, uncontrolled surgical bleeding is prevalent. Drawbacks of current hemostats include limitations with efficacy on first attempt and suboptimal ease-of-use. Evarrest® is a novel fibrin sealant patch that has demonstrated high hemostatic efficacy compared with standard of care across bleeding severities. The objective of this study was to conduct a hospital cost analysis of the fibrin sealant patch versus standard of care in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding. Methods The analysis quantified the 30-day costs of each comparator from a hospital perspective. Published US unit costs were applied to resource use (ie, initial treatment, retreatment, operating time, hospitalization, transfusion, and ventilator) reported in four trials. A “surgical” analysis included resources clinically related to the hemostatic benefit of the fibrin sealant patch, whereas a “hospital” analysis included all resources reported in the trials. An exploratory subgroup analysis focused solely on coagulopathic patients defined by abnormal blood test results. Results The surgical analysis predicted cost savings of $54 per patient with the fibrin sealant patch compared with standard of care (net cost impact: −$54 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,320 to $1,213). The hospital analysis predicted further cost savings with the fibrin sealant patch (net cost impact of −$2,846 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,483 to −$5,575). Subgroup analyses suggest that the fibrin sealant patch may provide dramatic cost savings in the coagulopathic subgroup of $3,233 (surgical) and $9,287 (hospital) per patient. Results were most sensitive to operating time and product units. Conclusion In soft tissue and hepatic problematic surgical bleeding, the fibrin sealant patch may result in important hospital cost savings. PMID:27703386

  10. Validity of Sealant Retention as Surrogate for Caries Prevention – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction/Aim To appraise the clinical literature in determining whether loss of complete sealant retention as surrogate endpoint is directly associated with caries occurrence on sealed teeth as its clinical endpoint and to apply the appraised evidence in testing the null-hypothesis that the retention/caries ratio between different types of sealant materials (resin and glass-ionomer cement) is not statistically significant ( = Prentice criterion for surrogate endpoint validity). Methods Databases searched PubMed/Medline, Directory of Open Access Journals; IndMed, Scielo. Systematic reviews were checked for suitable trials. The search terms: “fiss* AND seal*” and “fissure AND sealant” were used. Article selection criteria were: clinical trial reporting on the retention and caries occurrence of resin and/or glass-ionomer cement (GIC) fissure sealed permanent molar teeth; minimum 24-month follow-up period; systematic review or meta-analysis. Datasets and information were extracted from accepted trials. The principle outcome measure was the ratio of Risk of loss of complete retention to the Risk of caries occurrence per sealant type (RCR). Risk of bias was assessed in trials and sensitivity analysis with regard to potential confounding factors conducted. The null-hypothesis was tested by graphical and statistical methods. Results The risk of loss of complete retention of sealant materials was associated with the risk of caries occurrence for resin but not for GIC based sealants. The difference between RCR values of the two sealant types was statistically significant (p<0.05). The null-hypothesis was rejected. Conclusions The current clinical evidence suggests that complete retention of pit and fissure sealants may not be a valid surrogate endpoint for caries prevention as its clinical endpoint. Further research is required to corroborate the current results. PMID:24194861

  11. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The findings are reported of research into the relationships between technological progress and economic development, with emphasis on several ways in which NASA research and development has aided in the accumulation and commercial application of new or improved scientific and technological knowledge.

  12. PAH Concentrations Decline Following 2006 Ban on Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealants in Austin, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Metre, P. C.; Mahler, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have concluded that coal-tar-based pavement sealants (CT sealants) are a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in non-industrial urban settings in the United States. In 2006, Austin, TX, became the first jurisdiction in the U.S. to ban the use of CT sealants. We evaluated PAH concentrations following the ban by analyzing sediment cores collected from Lady Bird Lake in 2012; Lady Bird Lake impounds the Colorado River in central Austin and receives runoff from much of the greater Austin area. The mean sum concentration of the 16 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Priority Pollutant PAHs (∑PAH16) in one of two 2012 sediment cores analyzed for PAHs declined 75% from before 2006 (mean of 4 samples=8,090 μg kg-1) to 2012 (mean of 2 samples=2,030 μg kg-1), reversing a 40-year (1959-1999) upward trend in PAH concentrations that was previously documented. The downward trend in PAH concentrations in the seven uppermost 1 cm sampling intervals in the first 2012 core was statistically significant (r=0.93, p-value=0.002). Post-2008 PAH trends in the second 2012 core were similar (significant downward trend in the six uppermost 1 cm sampling intervals and mean 2012 ∑PAH16 of 2,390 μg kg-1); however, pre-2007 sediment did not appear to have been preserved in this core likely because of the effects of flooding on sediment deposition and mixing at this site--the largest flood on the Colorado River in Austin in 20 years was in 2007. On the basis of a comparison of lake-sediment PAH profiles to 22 PAH source profiles, the PAH loading to lake sediment continues to be dominated by CT sealants. The continued dominance of proportional PAH loading by CT sealants in spite of decreased concentrations since 2006 might be because legacy CT sealant and contaminated soils and sediments continue to yield PAHs to runoff. A previous study using source-receptor modeling concluded that CT sealants were the largest PAH source to 40 urban lakes studied in the

  13. NASA's Spaceliner Investment Area Technology Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goals for the third generation launch system are to significantly reduce cost and improve safety over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Spaceliner Investment Area, third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframes, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations, and range. The ASTP program will mature these technologies through both ground and flight system testing. The Spaceliner Investment Area plans to mature vehicle technologies to reduce the implementation risks for future commercially developed reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The plan is to substantially increase the design and operating margins of the third generation RLV (the Space Shuttle is the first generation) by incorporating advanced technologies in propulsion, materials, structures, thermal protection systems, avionics, and power. Advancements in design tools and better characterization of the operational environment will allow improvements in design margins. Improvements in operational efficiencies will be provided through use of advanced integrated health management, operations, and range technologies. The increase in margins will allow components to operate well below their design points resulting in improved component operating life, reliability, and safety which in turn reduces both maintenance and refurbishment costs. These technologies have the potential of enabling horizontal takeoff by reducing the takeoff weight and achieving the goal of airline-like operation. These factors in conjunction with increased flight rates from an expanding market will result in significant improvements in safety

  14. Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

    1998-12-01

    This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24

  15. Aerospace and Flight. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials on aerospace and flight for students in grades 6-10 consists of a technology education overview, information on use, and instructor's and student's sections. The overview discusses the technology education program and materials. Components of the instructor's and student's sections are…

  16. A new fibrin sealant as a three-dimensional scaffold candidate for mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The optimization of an organic scaffold for specific types of applications and cells is vital to successful tissue engineering. In this study, we investigated the effects of a new fibrin sealant derived from snake venom as a scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells, to demonstrate the ability of cells to affect and detect the biological microenvironment. Methods The characterization of CD34, CD44 and CD90 expression on mesenchymal stem cells was performed by flow cytometry. In vitro growth and cell viability were evaluated by light and electron microscopy. Differentiation into osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages was induced. Results The fibrin sealant did not affect cell adhesion, proliferation or differentiation and allowed the adherence and growth of mesenchymal stem cells on its surface. Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide staining demonstrated the viability of mesenchymal stem cells in contact with the fibrin sealant and the ability of the biomaterial to maintain cell survival. Conclusions The new fibrin sealant is a three-dimensional scaffolding candidate that is capable of maintaining cell survival without interfering with differentiation, and might also be useful in drug delivery. Fibrin sealant has a low production cost, does not transmit infectious diseases from human blood and has properties of a suitable scaffold for stem cells because it permits the preparation of differentiated scaffolds that are suitable for every need. PMID:24916098

  17. In vitro study of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on composite resin coated with three surface sealants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da Hye

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although the coating of surface sealants to dental composite resin may potentially reduce bacterial adhesion, there seems to be little information regarding this issue. This preliminary in vitro study investigated the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) on the dental composite resins coated with three commercial surface sealants. Materials and Methods Composite resin (Filtek Z250) discs (8 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness) were fabricated in a mold covered with a Mylar strip (control). In group PoGo, the surfaces were polished with PoGo. In groups PS, OG, and FP, the surfaces polished with PoGo were coated with the corresponding surface sealants (PermaSeal, PS; OptiGuard, OG; Fortify Plus, FP). The surfaces of the materials and S. mutans cells were characterized by various methods. S. mutans adhesion to the surfaces was quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry (n = 9). Results Group OG achieved the lowest water contact angle among all groups tested (p < 0.001). The cell surface of S. mutans tested showed hydrophobic characteristics. Group PoGo exhibited the greatest bacterial adhesion among all groups tested (p < 0.001). The sealant-coated groups showed statistically similar (groups PS and FP, p > 0.05) or significantly lower (group OG, p < 0.001) bacterial adhesion when compared with the control group. Conclusions The application of the surface sealants significantly reduced S. mutans adhesion to the composite resin polished with the PoGo. PMID:28194363

  18. Impact of adhesive and photoactivation method on sealant integrity and polymer network formation.

    PubMed

    Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Pereira, Fabrício Lopes da Rocha; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Braz, Rodivan; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassú Resende; Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira de Assunção; Santos, Alex José Souza dos

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of photoactivation method and hydrophobic resin (HR) application on the marginal and internal adaptation, hardness (KHN), and crosslink density (CLD) of a resin-based fissure sealant. Model fissures were created in bovine enamel fragments (n = 10) and sealed using one of the following protocols: no adhesive system + photoactivation of the sealant using continuous light (CL), no adhesive system + photoactivation of the sealant using the soft-start method (SS), HR + CL, or HR + SS. Marginal and internal gaps and KHN were assessed after storage in water for 24 h. The CLD was indirectly assessed by repeating the KHN measurement after 24 h of immersion in 100% ethanol. There was no difference among the samples with regard to marginal or internal adaptation. The KHN and CLD were similar for samples cured using either photoactivation method. Use of a hydrophobic resin prior to placement of fissure sealants and curing the sealant using the soft-start method may not provide any positive influence on integrity or crosslink density.

  19. Sealant retention is better assessed through colour photographs than through the replica and the visual examination methods.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuan; Fan, Mingwan; Rong, Wensheng; Lo, Edward C M; Bronkhorst, Ewald; Frencken, Jo E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the colour photograph method has a higher level of validity for assessing sealant retention than the visual clinical examination and replica methods. Sealed molars were assessed by two evaluators. The scores for the three methods were compared against consensus scores derived through assessing retention from scanning electron microscopy images (reference standard). The presence/absence (survival) of retained sealants on occlusal surfaces was determined according to the traditional and modified categorizations of retention. Sensitivity, specificity, and Youden-index scores were calculated. Sealant retention assessment scores for visual clinical examinations and for colour photographs were compared with those of the reference standard on 95 surfaces, and sealant retention assessment scores for replicas were compared with those of the reference standard on 33 surfaces. The highest mean Youden-index score for the presence/absence of sealant material was observed for the colour photograph method, followed by that for the replica method; the visual clinical examination method scored lowest. The mean Youden-index score for the survival of retained sealants was highest for the colour photograph method for both the traditional (0.882) and the modified (0.768) categories of sealant retention, whilst the visual clinical examination method had the lowest Youden-index score for these categories (0.745 and 0.063, respectively). The colour photograph method had a higher validity than the replica and the visual examination methods for assessing sealant retention.

  20. NASA's Spaceliner 100 Investment Area Technology Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goals for the third generation launch system are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Spaceliner100 Investment Area, third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframes, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), launch systems, and operations and range. The ASTP program will mature these technologies through ground system testing. Flight testing where required, will be advocated on a case by case basis.

  1. Activities of the Division of Microwave Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewerentz, Birgitta

    1989-11-01

    Multistatic radar technology requirements are very high for antennas, where a maximum of flexibility is desired. Multilobes are often used, or groups of antennas which are electrically operated. Electronics and other electrical equipment were studied for supporting ionizing radiation and several forms of electromagnetic radiation. Ferrite components were studied. For microwave and optical technology, applications are reported. High effect Pulse Microwave radiation (HPM) emitting from an antenna and creating trouble in the electronic equipment, or destruction of this equipment is discussed. The defense against HPM is studied.

  2. Designing Technology Activities that Teach Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Eli M.; Higashi, Ross; Shoop, Robin; Schunn, Christian D.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past three years, the authors have conducted research in middle and high school classrooms in an effort to improve the effectiveness of robotics to teach science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education--their focus has been on math. The authors have found that subtle changes in the design and setup of the lesson make a…

  3. Endoscopic fibrin sealant closure of duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Yeh; Chen, Jui-Hao

    2015-12-07

    Traditionally, perivaterian duodenal perforation can be managed conservatively or surgically. If a large volume of leakage results in fluid collection in the retroperitoneum, surgery may be necessary. Our case met the surgical indication for perivaterian duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation. The patient developed a retroperitoneal abscess after the procedures, and a perivaterian perforation was suggested on computed tomography (CT). CT-guided abscess drainage was performed immediately. We unsuccessfully attempted to close the perforation with hemoclips initially. Subsequently, we used fibrin sealant (Tisseel) injection to occlude the perforation. Fibrin sealant injections have been previously used during endoscopy for wound closure and fistula repair. Based on our report, fibrin sealant injection can be considered as an alternative method for the treatment of ERCP-related type II perforations.

  4. Modification of silicone sealant to improve gamma radiation resistance, by addition of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Giovanni; Burillo, Guillermina

    2013-09-01

    Poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealant (SS) was modified with the addition of different protective compounds to conserve its physical-chemical properties during gamma irradiation. 2-Vinyl naphthalene (2-VN), bisphenol-A (BPA) and poly (vinyl carbazole) (PVK) were used to evaluate radiation protection through the crosslinking effect of radiation. The samples were irradiated with doses from 100 kGy to 500 kGy at room temperature in air, with a 60Co gamma source, and the changes in molecular weight, thermal behavior, elastic properties and infrared spectra (FTIR-ATR) absorbance analysis were determined. The molecular weight of unmodified silicone sealant increases with the absorbed dose because of crosslinking as predominant effect. However, the crosslinking effect was inhibited with the addition of protective agent due to the aromatic compounds present. Modified silicone sealant films present better radiation resistance than unmodified system.

  5. An in-vitro evaluation of mechanical and esthetic properties of orthodontic sealants

    PubMed Central

    Premaraj, Thyagaseely Sheela; Rohani, Nima; Covey, David; Premaraj, Sundaralingam; Hua, Yi; Watanabe, Hidehiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate mechanical and esthetic Properties of two commercially available orthodontic sealants: Opal®Seal (OS) and L.E.D. Pro Seal (PS). Materials and Methods: Discs of each sealant were prepared to test the following properties: Micro hardness, wear resistance and color stability. Samples were randomly selected after the wear test for SEM imaging to analyze surface morphology. Results: OS was significantly harder than PS (P < 0.001). PS was significantly more wear resistant than OS (P < 0.05). PS showed a greater ∆E*ab (increased staining) when placed in wine or coffee showing a significant difference (P < 0.05). SEM showed particle size, shape and distribution were different for PS and OS reflecting the pattern seen on wear surfaces. Conclusion: Both orthodontic sealants are beneficial for protecting enamel. However with better wear properties PS was superior in resisting mechanical stresses. OS was more color stable. PMID:25512729

  6. Extravehicular Activity Technology Development Status and Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Westheimer, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of NASA s current EVA technology effort is to further develop technologies that will be used to demonstrate a robust EVA system that has application for a variety of future missions including microgravity and surface EVA. Overall the objectives will be to reduce system mass, reduce consumables and maintenance, increase EVA hardware robustness and life, increase crew member efficiency and autonomy, and enable rapid vehicle egress and ingress. Over the past several years, NASA realized a tremendous increase in EVA system development as part of the Exploration Technology Development Program and the Constellation Program. The evident demand for efficient and reliable EVA technologies, particularly regenerable technologies was apparent under these former programs and will continue to be needed as future mission opportunities arise. The technological need for EVA in space has been realized over the last several decades by the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station (ISS) programs. EVAs were critical to the success of these programs. Now with the ISS extension to 2028 in conjunction with a current forecasted need of at least eight EVAs per year, the EVA hardware life and limited availability of the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) will eventually become a critical issue. The current EMU has successfully served EVA demands by performing critical operations to assemble the ISS and provide repairs of satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope. However, as the life of ISS and the vision for future mission opportunities are realized, a new EVA systems capability will be needed and the current architectures and technologies under development offer significant improvements over the current flight systems. In addition to ISS, potential mission applications include EVAs for missions to Near Earth Objects (NEO), Phobos, or future surface missions. Surface missions could include either exploration of the Moon or Mars. Providing an

  7. Comparison between visual clinical examination and the replica method for assessments of sealant retention over a 2-year period

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xuan; Chen, Xi; Ye, Lu; Fan, Ming-Wen; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Frencken, Jo E

    2014-01-01

    To compare the levels of agreement and the survival rates of sealant retention for different sealing materials over a 2-year period assessed using the visual clinical examination and replica methods, sealant retention data were obtained by visual clinical examination and from replicas of the same sealed tooth at baseline and at 0.5-, 1- and 2-year evaluation points in 407 children and were compared for agreement using kappa coefficients. Survival curves of retained sealants on occlusal surfaces were created using modified categorisation (fully retained sealants and those having all pits and fissures partly covered with the sealant material versus completely lost sealants that included pit and fissure systems that had ≥1 pit re-exposed) according to the Kaplan–Meier method. The kappa coefficient for the agreement between both assessment methods over the three evaluation time points combined was 0.38 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.35–0.41). More sealant retention was observed from replicas than through visual clinical examination. Cumulative survival curves at the three evaluation times were not statistically significantly higher when assessed from replicas (P=0.47). Using the replica method, more retained sealant material was observed than through visual clinical examination during the 2-year period. This finding did not result in a difference in the survival rates of sealants assessed by the two assessment methods. When replicas cast in die stone are used for assessing sealant retention, the level of reliability of the data is higher than that of data obtained through the commonly used visual clinical examination, particularly if such assessments are conducted over time. PMID:24625469

  8. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    PubMed

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  9. Characterisation and microleakage of a new hydrophilic fissure sealant - UltraSeal XT® hydro™

    PubMed Central

    GÜÇLÜ, Zeynep A.; DÖNMEZ, Nazmiye; HURT, Andrew P.; COLEMAN, Nichola J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study was to characterise the new hydrophilic fissure sealant, UltraSeal XT® hydro™ (Ultradent Products, USA), and to investigate its in vitro resistance to microleakage after placement on conventionally acid etched and sequentially lased and acid etched molars. Material and Methods The sealant was characterised by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and Vickers indentation test. Occlusal surfaces of extracted human molars were either conventionally acid etched (n=10), or sequentially acid etched and laser irradiated (n=10). UltraSeal XT® hydro™ was applied to both groups of teeth which were then subjected to 2,500 thermocycles between 5 and 55°C prior to microleakage assessment by fuchsin dye penetration. Results UltraSeal XT® hydro™ is an acrylate-based sealant that achieved a degree of conversion of 50.6±2.2% and a Vickers microhardness of 24.2±1.5 under standard light curing (1,000 mWcm-2 for 20 s). Fluoride ion release is negligible within a 14-day period. SEM and EDX analyses indicated that the sealant comprises irregular submicron and nano-sized silicon-, barium-, and aluminium-bearing filler phases embedded in a ductile matrix. Laser preconditioning was found to significantly reduce microleakage (Mann-Whitney U test, p<0.001). The lased teeth presented enhanced surface roughness on a 50 to 100 μm scale that caused the segregation and concentration of the filler particles at the enamel-sealant interface. Conclusion Laser preconditioning significantly decreased microleakage and increased enamel surface roughness, which caused zoning of the filler particles at the enamel-sealant interface. PMID:27556205

  10. Effect of intracameral injection of fibrin tissue sealant on the rabbit anterior segment

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Annabel C.Y.; Tan, Donald T.H.; Poh, Rebekah; HM, Htoon; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of intracameral injection of fibrin tissue sealant on the anterior segment structures in a rabbit model. Methods One eye of 10 rabbits received an intracameral injection of fibrin tissue sealant with a thrombin concentration of 500 IU (TISSEEL), and the fellow eye received an intracameral injection of balanced salt solution as a control. The rabbits were followed up with serial slit-lamp examinations, photography, high resolution anterior segment optical coherence tomography scans with pachymetry measurement, and intraocular pressure (IOP) monitoring until complete dissolution of the fibrin sealant. Corneal endothelial cell viability was evaluated using live/dead cell assays. Apoptosis of the cornea and trabecular meshwork were evaluated using TUNEL assays. Ultra-structural examinations of the cornea and trabecular meshwork were performed using electron microscopy. Histology of the trabecular meshwork and iris were analyzed using light microscopy. Results The quantity of the intracameral fibrin sealant was shown to be significantly correlated with increased IOP and pachymetry post-operatively. Complete dissolution of the fibrin sealant occurred between 15 and 30 days. Live/dead cell assays showed no decrease in viability of the corneal endothelium, and TUNEL assays showed no increase in apoptosis of the corneal epithelium, stroma, endothelium, or trabecular meshwork in the eyes with the fibrin sealant. Light and electron microscopy of the anterior segment structures were unremarkable. Conclusion The intracameral use of fibrin glue was associated with a transient increase in IOP and pachymetry. However, there was no evidence of toxicity or structural damage to the corneal endothelium, trabecular meshwork, or iris. PMID:20596250

  11. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  12. Enamel Surface with Pit and Fissure Sealant Containing 45S5 Bioactive Glass.

    PubMed

    Yang, S-Y; Kwon, J-S; Kim, K-N; Kim, K-M

    2016-05-01

    Enamel demineralization adjacent to pit and fissure sealants leads to the formation of marginal caries, which can necessitate the replacement of existing sealants. Dental materials with bioactive glass, which releases ions that inhibit dental caries, have been studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enamel surface adjacent to sealants containing 45S5 bioactive glass (BAG) under simulated microleakage between the material and the tooth in a cariogenic environment. Sealants containing 45S5BAG filler were prepared as follows: 0% 45S5BAG + 50.0% glass (BAG0 group), 12.5% 45S5BAG + 37.5% glass (BAG12.5 group), 25.0% 45S5BAG + 25.0% glass (BAG25.0 group), 37.5% 45S5BAG + 12.5% glass (BAG37.5 group), and 50.0% 45S5BAG + 0% glass (BAG50.0 group). A cured sealant disk was placed over a flat bovine enamel disk, separated by a 60-µm gap, and immersed in lactic acid solution (pH 4.0) at 37 °C for 15, 30, and 45 d. After the storage period, each enamel disk was separated from the cured sealant disk, and the enamel surface was examined with optical 3-dimensional surface profilometer, microhardness tester, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed a significant increase in roughness and a decrease in microhardness of the enamel surface as the proportion of 45S5BAG decreased (P< 0.05). In the scanning electron microscopy images, enamel surfaces with BAG50.0 showed a smooth surface, similar to those in the control group with distilled water, even after prolonged acid storage. Additionally, an etched pattern was observed on the surface of the demineralized enamel with a decreasing proportion of 45S5BAG. Increasing the 45S5BAG filler contents of the sealants had a significant impact in preventing the demineralization of the enamel surface within microgaps between the material and the tooth when exposed to a cariogenic environment. Therefore, despite some marginal leakage, these novel sealants may be effective preventive dental materials for inhibiting

  13. Estimating emissions from adhesives and sealants uses and manufacturing for environmental risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Tolls, Johannes; Gómez, Divina; Guhl, Walter; Funk, Torsten; Seger, Erich; Wind, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) requires that environmental exposure assessments be performed for all uses of dangerous substances that are marketed in the European Union in quantities above 10 tons per year. The quantification of emissions to the environment is a key step in this process. This publication describes the derivation of release factors and gives guidance for estimating use rates for quantifying the emissions from the manufacturing and application of adhesives and sealants. Release factors available for coatings and paints are read across to adhesives or sealants based on similarities between these 2 product groups with regard to chemical composition and to processing during manufacturing and application. The granular emission scenarios in these documents are mapped to the broad emission scenarios for adhesives or sealants. According to the mapping, the worst-case release factors for coatings or paints are identified and assigned to the adhesives or sealants scenarios. The resulting 10 specific environmental release categories (SPERCs) for adhesives and sealants are defined by differentiating between solvent and nonsolvent ingredients and between water-borne and solvent-borne or solvent-free products. These cover the vast majority of the production processes and uses and are more realistic than the 5 relevant emission estimation defaults provided in the REACH guidance. They are accompanied with adhesive or sealant consumption rates in the EU and with guidance for estimating conservative substance use rates at a generic level. The approach of combining conservative SPERC release factors with conservative estimates of substance rates is likely to yield emission estimates that tend to overpredict actual releases. Because this qualifies the approach for use in lower-tier environmental exposure assessment, the Association of the European Adhesive & Sealant Industry

  14. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity. Part 1: Overall economic impact of technological progress: Its measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Investigations were performed at the national economic level to explore the aggregate effects of technological progress on economic growth. Inadequacies in existing marco-economic yardsticks forced the study to focus on the cost savings effects achieved through technological progress. The central questions discussed in this report cover: (1) role of technological progress in economic growth, (2) factors determining the rate of economic growth due to technological progress; (3) quantitative measurements of relationships between technological progress, its determinants, and subsequent economic growth; and (4) effects of research and development activities of the space program. For Part 2, see N72-32174.

  15. Advanced Technology Development for Active Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu; Kurdila, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives include: (1) Develop electro-mechanical/acoustic models of a Helmholtz resonator possessing a compliant diaphragm coupled to a piezoelectric device; (2) Design and fabricate the energy reclamation module and active Helmholtz resonator; (3) Develop and build appropriate energy reclamation/storage circuit; (4) Develop and fabricate appropriate piezoelectric shunt circuit to tune the compliance of the active Helmholtz resonator via a variable capacitor; (5) Quantify energy reclamation module efficiency in a grazing-flow plane wave tube possessing known acoustic energy input; and (6) Quantify actively tuned Helmholtz resonator performance in grazing-flow plane wave tube for a white-noise input

  16. Help with Solving Technological Problems in Project Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herold, Jean-Francois; Ginestie, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    In France, project activities figure predominantly in technology education. The general idea behind learning based on project activity is to allow the pupil to get involved in the activity in question, with the pupil tackling real situations rather than ones of an abstract nature. But too often, we notice that the pedagogical strategies used by…

  17. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  18. Toward a typology of technology users: how older people experience technology's potential for active aging.

    PubMed

    Gjevjon, Edith Roth; Oderud, Tone; Wensaas, Gro H; Moen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines an emerging typology of older users of information and communication technology (ICT) to facilitate active aging. Through inductive data analysis from focus groups, iterative workshops, and personal interviews, we suggest three types of technology users. These types are "the Excluded," "the Entertained," and "the Networker." Clearly, ICT offers several benefits to those who are enthusiastic and frequent users, exemplified as the Entertained and the Networker. Hence, our findings support the notion of technology as a tool to maintain or increase an older person's engagement and activity level. Conversely, for those reluctant, uninterested, or incapable of using ICT, such potentials are limited and imply fewer opportunities for participation in activities.

  19. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  20. Cost analysis of pulmonary lobectomy procedure: comparison of stapler versus precision dissection and sealant

    PubMed Central

    Droghetti, Andrea; Marulli, Giuseppe; Vannucci, Jacopo; Giovanardi, Michele; Bottoli, Maria Caterina; Ragusa, Mark; Muriana, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the direct costs of pulmonary lobectomy hospitalization, comparing surgical techniques for the division of interlobar fissures: stapler (ST) versus electrocautery and hemostatic sealant patch (ES). Methods The cost comparison analysis was based on the clinical pathway and drawn up by collecting the information available from the Thoracic Surgery Division medical team at Mantova Hospital. Direct resource consumption was derived from a previous randomized controlled trial including 40 patients. Use and maintenance of technology, equipment and operating room; administrative plus general costs; and 30-day use of postsurgery hospital resources were considered. The analysis was conducted from the hospital perspective. Results On the average, a patient submitted to pulmonary lobectomy costs €9,744.29. This sum could vary from €9,027 (using ES) to €10,460 (using ST). The overall lower incidence (50% vs 95%, P=0.0001) and duration of air leakage (1.7 days vs 4.5 days, P=0.0001) in the ES group significantly affects the mean time of hospital stay (11.0 days vs 14.3 days) and costs. Cost saving in the ES group was also driven by the lower incidence of complications. The main key cost driver was staff employment (42%), then consumables (34%) and operating room costs (12%). Conclusion There is an overall saving of around €1,432.90 when using ES patch for each pulmonary lobectomy. Among patients undergoing this surgical procedure, ES can significantly reduce air leakage incidence and duration, as well as decrease hospitalization rates. However, further multicenter research should be developed considering different clinical and managerial settings.

  1. Fibrin sealant combined with fibroblasts and platelet-derived growth factor enhance wound healing in excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Mogford, Jon E; Tawil, Bill; Jia, Shengxian; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the fibrinogen-thrombin formulation of fibrin sealant combined with fibroblasts and PDGF-BB enhance cutaneous wound healing. Four formulations varying in fibrinogen and thrombin concentration were applied to full-thickness biopsy wounds in the rabbit ear cutaneous wound healing model with or without cultured rabbit dermal fibroblasts (RDFs; 3 x 10(5) cells/wound) embedded in the fibrinogen component. At post-wounding day 7, there was no difference in the diluted vs. non-diluted formulations for either the promotion of granulation tissue coverage of the open wounds or total granulation tissue area when tested without embedded cells. Including the RDFs, the highest degree of wound coverage by granulation tissue was observed in the combined dilution formulation (17.3 mg/mL fibrinogen, 167 U/mL thrombin; n=10 wounds) that was 167% (p<0.05) of the nondiluted FS containing cells (50 mg/mL fibrinogen, 250 U/mL thrombin; n=10 wounds). Inclusion of fibroblasts increased granulation tissue area within the wounds vs. FS alone (p<0.05) for each diluted formulation although no differences in this parameter were observed within each group (FS alone or with embedded cells). However, addition of the vulnerary growth factor PDGF-BB (3 mg; n=4) with the embedded RDFs in the combined dilution formulation increased granulation tissue area over two-fold (p<0.01) over FS alone. Additionally, the presence of the RDFs promoted incorporation of the granulation tissue with and epithelial migration over the FS suggesting an active interaction between cells delivered to the wound by FS and the host repair cells. The findings suggest the progress of cutaneous defect repair can be enhanced by ex vivo cell delivery in fibrin sealant.

  2. Effects of low-level laser therapy on autogenous bone graft stabilized with a new heterologous fibrin sealant.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Gonçalves, Jéssica Barbosa; Buchaim, Daniela Vieira; de Souza Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo; Pomini, Karina Torres; Barraviera, Benedito; Júnior, Rui Seabra Ferreira; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio; Cestari, Tania Mary; Buchaim, Rogério Leone

    2016-09-01

    Autogenous bone grafts are used to repair bone defects, and the stabilization is needed for bone regeneration. Laser photobiomodulation is a modality of treatment in clinical practice for tissue regeneration, and it has therapeutic effects as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic and modulating cellular activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on an autogenous bone graft integration process stabilized with a new heterologous fibrin sealant. Forty rats were divided into two groups: Autogenous Fibrin Graft (AFG, n=20), in which a 5mm dome osteotomy was conducted in the right parietal bone and the graft was adhered to the left side using fibrin sealant; and Autogenous Fibrin Graft Laser (AFGL, n=20), which was subjected to the same procedures as AFG with the addition of LLLT. The treatment was performed immediately following surgery and then three times a week until euthanasia, using an 830nm laser (30mW, 6J/cm(2), 0.116cm(2), 258.6mW/cm(2), 2.9J). Five animals from each group were euthanized at 10, 20, 30 and 40days postoperative, and the samples were submitted to histomorphological and histomorphometric analysis. Partial bone regeneration occurred, with new bone tissue integrating the graft to the recipient bed and small areas of connective tissue. Comparative analysis of the groups at the same intervals revealed minor interfaces in group AFGL, with statistically significant differences (p<0.05) at all of the analyzed intervals (10days p=0.0087, 20days p=0.0012, 30days p<0.0001, 40days p=0.0142). In conclusion, low-level laser therapy stimulated bone regeneration and accelerated the process of integration of autogenous bone grafts.

  3. Technology to promote and increase physical activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Nina C

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is firmly recommended as part of a multifaceted approach to heart failure (HF) self-management. Unfortunately, research indicates that most patients are less likely to engage in and adhere to such activities. The widespread use of information and communication technology tools and resources offers an innovative and potentially beneficial avenue for increasing physical activity levels in HF patients. This article presents specific ways in which advances in information and communication technologies, including Internet- and mobile-based communications, social media platforms, and self-monitoring health devices, can serve as a means to broadly promote increasing levels of physical activity to improve health outcomes in the HF population.

  4. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  5. Diagnostic Care: Grade 9. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Level 2. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This Technology Learning Activity (TLA) on exploring diagnostic care careers for Grade 9 is designed for use in eight class periods. It gives students experience in using standard health care equipment to perform basic diagnostic procedures. This teacher's edition begins with an overview of technology education. The second section describes…

  6. Therapeutic Care. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series. Level 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This Technology Learning Activity (TLA) for exploring therapeutic care careers is designed for use in eight class periods. It exposes students to the different types of therapeutic care and helps them understand how they can be used to treat and heal. This teacher's edition begins with an overview of technology education. The second section…

  7. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  8. Positive Technology for Healthy Living and Active Ageing.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea; Villani, Daniela; Cipresso, Pietro; Repetto, Claudia; Serino, Silvia; Triberti, Stefano; Brivio, Eleonora; Galimberti, Carlo; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are widely and rapidly spreading in people's daily lives. But what is the possible role of the mass proliferation of digital devices in supporting healthy living and active ageing? Are they useful in fostering personal growth and individual integration of the elderly, by promoting satisfaction, opportunities for action, and self-expression? Rather, do they enhance automation, impose constraints on personal initiative, and result in compulsive consumption of information? In this chapter, we suggest that possible answers to these questions will be offered by the "Positive Technology" approach, i.e., the scientific and applied approach to using technology so that it improves the quality of our personal experiences through its structuring, augmentation, and/or replacement. First, we suggest that it is possible to use technology to manipulate the quality of experience with the goal of increasing wellness and generating strengths and resilience in individuals, organizations, and society. Then, we classify positive technologies according to their effects on these three features of personal experience - Hedonic: technologies used to induce positive and pleasant experiences; Eudaimonic: technologies used to support individuals in reaching engaging and self-actualizing experiences; Social/Interpersonal: technologies used to support and improve the connectedness between individuals, groups, and organizations. Finally, we discuss the possible role of positive technologies for healthy living and active ageing by presenting different practical applications of this approach.

  9. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Operating Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance test. 2. Carbon adsorber (regenerative) to which puncture sealant application spray booth emissions are ducted a. Maintain the total regeneration mass, volumetric flow, and carbon bed temperature at the operating range established during the performance test.b. Reestablish the carbon bed...

  10. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Operating Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... established during the performance test. 2. Carbon adsorber (regenerative) to which puncture sealant... carbon bed temperature at the operating range established during the performance test.b. Reestablish the carbon bed temperature to the levels established during the performance test within 15 minutes of...

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Operating Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance test. 2. Carbon adsorber (regenerative) to which puncture sealant application spray booth emissions are ducted a. Maintain the total regeneration mass, volumetric flow, and carbon bed temperature at the operating range established during the performance test.b. Reestablish the carbon bed...

  12. Effects of porous-hydroxyapatite incorporated into glass-ionomer sealants.

    PubMed

    Shinonaga, Yukari; Arita, Kenji; Nishimura, Takako; Chiu, Szu-Yu; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui; Abe, Yoko; Sonomoto, Mie; Harada, Kyoko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical and chemical properties of a novel glass ionomer cement for use as a pit and fissure sealant containing a porous hydroxyapatite, namely, apatite ionomer cement (AIC). Control sealant samples were used Fuji III (GIC-S). The experiment sealant samples (AIC-S) consisted of porous spherical hydroxyapatite (HApS) particles added at 28 wt% to GIC-S powder. The GIC-S and AIC-S samples were evaluated through mechanical strength measurements, scanning electron microscopy observations, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, fluoride ion release tests, and antibacterial tests. The flexural strength of the AIC-S was significantly higher than that of GIC-S for each period, 1 h, 24 h and 1 year. The fluoride release dose for AIC-S was consistently higher than that for GIC-S. In addition, the antibacterial properties of AIC-S were superior to those of GIC-S. The novel AIC-S may be a more suitable sealant material for pits and fissures with intact and/or infected enamel.

  13. In vitro evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of different pit and fissure sealants

    PubMed Central

    Babaji, Prashant; Vaid, Shivali; Deep, S.; Mishra, Samvit; Srivastava, Madhulika; Manjooran, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Fissure caries is most common in children due to deep pit and fissures. Pit and fissure areas on the occlusal surface of the teeth make them susceptible to dental caries, which need to be prevented or restored. Fissures sealant reduces the risk of occlusal caries. The present study was done to evaluate microleakage and shear bond strength of various fissure sealants. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six extracted molars were randomly allocated equally (n = 12) into three groups with three different sealants to evaluate shear bond strength and microleakage at sealant space. The shear bond strengths was evaluated with one-way analysis of variance and microleakage by Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 18.0 (Chicago: SPSS Inc, 2009). Results: Tetric flow (16.8 MPa) recorded the highest shear bond strength and the difference was statistically significant with enamel loc (12.8 MPa). There was no statistically significant difference in relation to microleakage (P > 0.05) in the tested groups. Conclusions: Tetric flow recorded the highest shear bond strength and the difference was statistically significant with enamel loc. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the groups regarding microleakage. PMID:27652241

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as volatile organic compounds (VOC)) emissions by at... sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95 percent... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Emission Limits for Puncture...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as volatile organic compounds (VOC)) emissions by at... sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95 percent... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits for Puncture...

  16. Effects of aging on surface properties and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans on various fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Cariaga, Tashiana; Müller, Rainer; Rosentritt, Martin; Reischl, Udo; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was the quantification of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on ten widely used pit and fissure sealant materials and the correlation of these findings to surface roughness (R(a)) and surface free energy (SFE). Additionally, changes in streptococcal adhesion and surface parameters after water immersion and artificial aging have been investigated. Circular specimens of ten fissure sealants (seven resin-based composites, two glass ionomers, and one compomer) were made and polished. Surface roughness was determined by perthometer and SFE by goniometer measurements. Sealant materials were incubated with S. mutans suspension (2.5 h, 37 degrees C), and adhering bacteria were quantified by using a biofluorescence assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Surface properties and S. mutans adhesion were measured prior to and after water immersion after 1 and 6 months and after additional thermocycling (5,000 cycles; 5 degrees C/55 degrees C). The tested sealants showed significant differences in S. mutans adhesion prior to and after the applied aging procedures. Aging resulted in slight increases (mostly <0.2 microm) in surface roughness, as well as in significant decreases in SFE and in significantly lower quantities of adhering bacteria. Ketac Bond and UltraSeal XT plus revealed the lowest adhesion potential after artificial aging. In general, the amount of adhering S. mutans was reduced after aging, which may be related to the decline in SFEs.

  17. High-Pressure Fibrin Sealant Foam: An Effective Hemostatic Agent for Treating Severe Parenchymal Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    least 7 days and carefully checked for any preexisting disease before undergoing surgical procedures. The daily food was withdrawn from the surgical...2003;237:871; discussion 876. 31. Jakob H, Campbell CD, Qiu ZK , et al. Use of fibrin sealant for reinforcing arterial anastomoses. J Vasc Surg 1984;1:171

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY OF SEALANTS USED IN HVAC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation of the potential antimicrobial efficacy of sealants used in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems. Recent experiments confirm field experience that duct cleaning alone may not provide adequate protection from regrowth of fu...

  19. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Operating Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... established during the performance test. 2. Carbon adsorber (regenerative) to which puncture sealant... carbon bed temperature at the operating range established during the performance test.b. Reestablish the carbon bed temperature to the levels established during the performance test within 15 minutes of...

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Operating Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... established during the performance test. 2. Carbon adsorber (regenerative) to which puncture sealant... carbon bed temperature at the operating range established during the performance test.b. Reestablish the carbon bed temperature to the levels established during the performance test within 15 minutes of...

  1. Long-Standing Motor and Sensory Recovery following Acute Fibrin Sealant Based Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Junior, Rui Seabra

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus lesion results in loss of motor and sensory function, being more harmful in the neonate. Therefore, this study evaluated neuroprotection and regeneration after neonatal peripheral nerve coaptation with fibrin sealant. Thus, P2 neonatal Lewis rats were divided into three groups: AX: sciatic nerve axotomy (SNA) without treatment; AX+FS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with fibrin sealant derived from snake venom; AX+CFS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with commercial fibrin sealant. Results were analyzed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after lesion. Astrogliosis, microglial reaction, and synapse preservation were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and ultrastructural changes at ventral spinal cord were also investigated. Sensory-motor recovery was behaviorally studied. Coaptation preserved synaptic covering on lesioned motoneurons and led to neuronal survival. Reactive gliosis and microglial reaction decreased in the same groups (AX+FS, AX+CFS) at 4 weeks. Regarding axonal regeneration, coaptation allowed recovery of greater number of myelinated fibers, with improved morphometric parameters. Preservation of inhibitory synaptic terminals was accompanied by significant improvement in the motor as well as in the nociceptive recovery. Overall, the present data suggest that acute repair of neonatal peripheral nerves with fibrin sealant results in neuroprotection and regeneration of motor and sensory axons. PMID:27446617

  2. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... depressions (faults in the enamel) in the biting surfaces of teeth to prevent cavities. (b)...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... depressions (faults in the enamel) in the biting surfaces of teeth to prevent cavities. (b)...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... depressions (faults in the enamel) in the biting surfaces of teeth to prevent cavities. (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... depressions (faults in the enamel) in the biting surfaces of teeth to prevent cavities. (b)...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... depressions (faults in the enamel) in the biting surfaces of teeth to prevent cavities. (b)...

  7. Use of autologous fibrin sealants to treat ganglion cysts: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Kenjiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Higuchi, Fujio; Nagata, Kensei

    2010-04-01

    Two patients underwent arthroscopy-guided injections of autologous fibrin sealants to treat ganglion cysts causing suprascapular nerve palsies. After at least 2 years of follow-up, both patients had no suprascapular nerve symptoms and their external rotation strength had returned to normal. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed no evidence of ganglion cyst recurrence.

  8. EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL EFFICACY OF AN ANTIMICROBIAL-CONTAINING SEALANT ON DUCT LINER AND GALVANIZED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an evaluation of the potential efficacy of an antimicrobial-containing sealant on fibrous-glass duct liner (FGDL) and galvanized steel (GS) as used in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. HVAC systems become dirty to various degr...

  9. Inhibition of enamel demineralization by buffering effect of S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Masayuki; Kakuda, Shinichi; Ida, Yusuke; Toshima, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Masanori; Endo, Kazuhiko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2014-02-01

    The buffering capacity and inhibitory effects on enamel demineralization of two commercially available dental sealants were evaluated in this study. The effects of filler particles were also examined. Disks of enamel and cured sealant materials of BeautiSealant (silica or S-PRG filler) or Teethmate F-1 were incubated in lactic acid solutions (pH 4.0) for 1-6 d. The pH changes and amounts of ions released in the solutions were assessed, and enamel surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The pH of the solution with BeautiSealant (S-PRG filler) was neutralized from pH 4.0 to pH 6.1 (after incubation for 1 d) and from pH 4.0 to pH 6.7 (after incubation for 6 d). In addition, no release of calcium ions was detected and the enamel surface was morphologically intact in scanning electron microscopy images. However, the pH of the solution with Teethmate F-1 remained below pH 4.0 during incubation from days 1 to 6. Calcium release was increased in solutions up to and after 6 d of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the structures of hydroxyapatite rods were exposed at the specimen surfaces as a result of demineralization. Ions released from S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant rapidly buffered the lactic acid solution and inhibited enamel demineralization.

  10. The Use Fibrin Sealant after Spinal Intradural Tumor Surgery: Is It Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Chung, Chun Kee; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objective A fibrin sealant is commonly applied after closure of an incidental or intended durotomy to reduce the complications associated with the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Routine usage might not be essential after closure of an intended durotomy, which has clear cut-margins. We investigated the efficacy of fibrin sealants for primary intradural spinal cord tumor surgery. Methods A retrospective review was performed for 231 consecutive surgically treated patients with primary intradural spinal cord tumors without extradural extension. Fibrin sealants were not used for 47 patients (group I: age, 51.57±16.75 years) and were applied to 184 patients (group II: age, 48.8±14.7 years). The surgical procedures were identical except for the use of a fibrin sealant after closure of the durotomy. The primary outcome was the occurrence of complications (wound problems, hematoma collection, infection, and neurological deterioration). The covariates were age, sex, body mass index, operation time, pre-/postoperative ambulation, number of laminectomies, and type of tumor. Results Schwannoma was the most common pathology (n=134), followed by meningioma (n=35) and ependymoma (n=31). Complications occurred in 13 patients (3 in group I and 10 in group II, p=0.73). The postoperative ambulation status (p<0.01; odds ratio, 28.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.9-120.0) and operation time (p=0.04; cutoff, 229 minutes; sensitivity, 62%; specificity, 72%) were significant factors, whereas the use of a fibrin glue was not (p=0.47). Conclusion The use of a fibrin sealant might not be essential to reduce complications after surgery for primary spinal intradural tumor. PMID:27123027

  11. Effect of enamel sealants on tooth bleaching and on the color stability of the result.

    PubMed

    Corcodel, N; Hassel, A J; Sen, S; Saure, D; Rammelsberg, P; Lux, C J; Zingler, S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of enamel sealants on bleaching of natural teeth by use of 40 % hydrogen peroxide in a dental surgery. The color stability of the results from bleaching was, furthermore, determined 10 months after the bleaching procedure. In a standardized setting, four sealants (Pro Seal(®), Light Bond™ Sealant, Protecto(®), and Clinpro™ XT Varnish) were applied to and removed from human teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Natural teeth served as medium; half of the teeth were sealed and the others served as controls. Hydrogen peroxide gel (40 %; Opalescence Boost; Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA) was used as bleaching agent. Color measurement was performed with a spectroradiometer (Photoresearch PR670) before the bleaching process (T1) and 24 h (T2) and 10 months (T3) after bleaching. The spectroradiometer results were expressed by use of the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color notation. The L*, a*, and b* values of the sealed and the unsealed surfaces were not significantly different at any time during the study (p > 0.05), irrespective of the sealant used. Ten months after the bleaching process, mean L*, a*, and b* values were lower than at 1-day post-bleaching; the mean value of ΔE between 1-day post-bleaching and 10 months post-bleaching was 2.46 (±3.1). The results of the study suggest that the effectiveness of professional tooth whitening is not appreciably affected by the application of the four sealants tested.

  12. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  13. Retention of a Flowable Composite Resin in Comparison to a Conventional Resin-Based Sealant: One-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, M.; Malekafzali, B.; Tadayon, N.; Fallahi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Long-term retention of pit and fissure sealants is crucial for their success. This clinical study evaluated the retention rate of a flowable composite resin (Filtek Supreme XT Flowable Restorative) compared to a conventional resin-based sealant (Concise Light Cure White Sealant) over 12 months. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects aged 6 to 9 years were included in the study. Using a half-mouth design, a total of 80 first permanent molars were sealed with conventional fissure sealant on one side of the mouth and flowable composite on the contralateral side. Clinical evaluation was performed at 3, 6, and 12 months by a single blind examiner and the retention was classified as complete retention, partial loss, or total loss. Results: For both materials, there was no total loss of sealants over 12 months. Partial loss of both materials was observed in one sealant after 3 months. After 6 months, 36 teeth sealed with conventional fissure sealant were intact compared with 37 sealed with a flowable composite, and after 12 months, 33 teeth sealed with conventional fissure sealant were intact compared with 35 that were sealed with a flowable composite. There were no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the two materials regarding the retention rate at each follow-up period. Conclusion: As flowable composite resulted in comparable sealant retention rates, this material could be a good choice for fissure sealant. PMID:21998768

  14. Radiation protection in radiologic technology: Apathy versus active involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.H.

    1982-11-01

    The lack of active participation in radiation protection is a serious problem in Radiologic Technology today. Underlying the problem is professional apathy. An overview of the historical changes, as well as various recent developments in radiology, accentuate the importance of necessary changes in technologists' attitudes and activities. 22 references.

  15. Nuclear Concepts & Technological Issues Institute: Teacher Activity Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Candace C., Ed.; Lunetta, Lois W., Ed.

    For many summers the Radiation Science and Engineering Center at Pennsylvania State University has been the site of a Nuclear Concepts and Technological Issues Institute for secondary school science teachers. As a culminating activity of the institute teachers develop lesson plans, laboratory experiments, demonstrations, or other activities and…

  16. Research and Design. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide provides technology learning activities designed to prepare students in grades 6-10 to work in the world of the future. The 8-day course provides exploratory, hands-on learning activities and information that can enhance the education of students of all types in an integrated curriculum that provides practical applications of…

  17. Automated entry technologies for confined space work activities: A survey.

    PubMed

    Botti, Lucia; Ferrari, Emilio; Mora, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Work in confined spaces poses a significant risk to workers and rescuers involved in the emergency response when an accident occurs. Despite several standards and regulations define the safety requirements for such activities, injuries, and fatalities still occur. Furthermore, the on-site inspections after accidents often reveal that both employers and employees fail to implement safe entry procedures. Removing the risk is possible by avoiding the worker entry, but many activities require the presence of the operator inside the confined space to perform manual tasks. The following study investigates the available technologies for hazardous confined space work activities, e.g., cleaning, inspecting, and maintenance tasks. The aim is to provide a systematic review of the automated solutions for high-risk activities in confined spaces, considering the non-man entry as the most effective confined space safety strategy. Second, this survey aims to provide suggestions for future research addressing the design of new technologies. The survey consists of about 60 papers concerning innovative technologies for confined space work activities. The document review shows that several solutions have been developed and automation can replace the workers for a limited number of hazardous tasks. Several activities still require the manual intervention due to the complex characteristics of confined spaces, e.g., to remove the remains of the automatic cleaning process from the bottom of a tank. The results show that available technologies require more flexibility to adapt to such occupational environments and further research is needed.

  18. NASA Stennis Space Center Test Technology Branch Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a short history of NASA Stennis Space Center's Test Technology Laboratory and briefly describes the variety of engine test technology activities and developmental project initiatives. Theoretical rocket exhaust plume modeling, acoustic monitoring and analysis, hand held fire imaging, heat flux radiometry, thermal imaging and exhaust plume spectroscopy are all examples of current and past test activities that are briefly described. In addition, recent efforts and visions focused on accomodating second, third, and fourth generation flight vehicle engine test requirements are discussed.

  19. Experimental Study of the Aging and Self-Healing of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-01

    High operating temperatures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) require that sealant must function at a high temperature between 600oC and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. This paper describes tests to investigate the temporal evolution of the volume fraction of ceramic phases, the evolution of micro-damage, and the self-healing behavior of the glass ceramic sealant used in SOFCs. It was found that after the initial sintering process, further crystallization of the glass ceramic sealant does not stop, but slows down and reduces the residual glass content while boosting the ceramic crystalline content. Under the long-term operating environment, distinct fibrous and needle-like crystals in the amorphous phase disappeared, and smeared/diffused phase boundaries between the glass phase and ceramic phase were observed. Meanwhile, the micro-damage was induced by the cooling-down process from the operating temperature to the room temperature, which can potentially degrade the mechanical properties of the glass/ceramic sealant. The glass/ceramic sealant self-healed upon reheating to the SOFC operating temperature, which can restore the mechanical performance of the glass/ceramic sealant.

  20. Microtensile Bond Strength of Embrace Wetbond Hydrophilic Sealant in Different Moisture Contamination: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Antarmayee; Srilatha, K. T.; Mohanty, Susant; Bhuyan, Sanat K; Bardhan, Debojyoti

    2015-01-01

    Aim Contamination of etched enamel with saliva has been shown to result in sealant failure. Recently, a hydrophilic sealant has been introduced. In absence of documented literature, this in vitro study was undertaken to ascertain the efficacy of Embrace Wet Bond without reduction of microtensile bond strength in the different moisture contamination. Materials and Methods A 5mm block of sealant were built over prepared occlusal surface of 40 non-carious therapeutically extracted third molars which were sectioned into 1mm thick stick and tested using Zwick micro tensile tester. Obtained data were subjected to descriptive analysis, one-way ANOVA and Scheffe’s post-hoc tests. Results Mean microtensile bond strength of Embrace sealant was not significantly lowered in different moisture contamination groups except Group 3 (air drying), which showed very highly significant (p<0.001) decrease in μTBS as compared to Group 1 (non-contaminated). Conclusion Mean μTBS of Embrace sealant remains largely unchanged even in presence of moisture. Owing to its hydrophilic property, this sealant can be a great help in cases where maintaining isolation is difficult. PMID:26393199

  1. PAH volatilization following application of coal-tar-based pavement sealant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Majewski, Michael S.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Foreman, William T.; Braun, Christopher L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Burbank, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Coal-tar-based pavement sealants, a major source of PAHs to urban water bodies, have recently been identified as a source of volatile PAHs to the atmosphere. We tracked the volatilization of PAHs for 1 year after application of a coal-tar-based pavement sealant by measuring gas-phase PAH concentrations above the pavement surface and solid-phase PAH concentrations in sealant scraped from the surface. Gas-phase concentrations at two heights (0.03 and 1.28 m) and wind speed were used to estimate volatilization flux. The sum of the concentrations of eight frequently detected PAHs (ΣPAH8) in the 0.03-m sample 1.6 h after application (297,000 ng m-3) was about 5000 times greater than that previously reported for the same height above unsealed parking lots (66 ng m-3). Flux at 1.6 h after application was estimated at 45,000 μg m-2 h-1 and decreased rapidly during the 45 days after application to 160 μg m-2 h-1. Loss of PAHs from the adhered sealant also was rapid, with about a 50% decrease in solid-phase ΣPAH8 concentration over the 45 days after application. There was general agreement, given the uncertainties, in the estimated mass of ΣPAH8 lost to the atmosphere on the basis of air sampling (2–3 g m-2) and adhered sealant sampling (6 g m-2) during the first 16 days after application, translating to a loss to the atmosphere of one-quarter to one-half of the PAHs in the sealcoat product. Combining the estimated mass of ΣPAH8 released to the atmosphere with a national-use estimate of coal-tar-based sealant suggests that PAH emissions from new coal-tar-based sealcoat applications each year (~1000 Mg) are larger than annual vehicle emissions of PAHs for the United States.

  2. Reasoning about tasks, activities and technology to support collaboration.

    PubMed

    Watts, L A; Monk, A F

    1998-11-01

    An aspect of collaboration described as 'semi-synchronized activity' is discussed as a particular challenge for the task analysis (TA) of collaborative work. TA typically involves the decomposition of work systems into essentially independent component processes between which commodities (information or materials) pass. In collaborative work, people routinely violate the condition of independence by moving seemlessly in and out of synchronization with one another, allowing for both independent and varying levels of conjoint activity. The shift between joint and independent projects is not fixed but managed through more or less explicit awareness of the other people over time. A number of case studies of the effect of communication technologies in telemedical consultation are drawn upon to illustrate the relationship between awareness and synchronization in collaborative work. They show that an analysis of collaborative activity requires a consideration of: (1) the activities constituting work; (2) the interactions between participants required to carry out the activities; (3) who else has access to these activities besides the primary participants in the ongoing work; (4) the contemporaneity of activities; (5) the locations/environments in which the activities are carried out; and (6) the constraints that apply to accessibility and participation within and between these environments. The Comms Usage Diagram is described as a framing notation incorporating these characteristics for a broad, communications-level analysis of collaborative activity. It shows how particular technologies relate to particular phases of work, indexing their effects to collaborative activities in those contexts.

  3. A status of the Turbine Technology Team activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    1992-01-01

    The recent activities of the Turbine Technology Team of the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology is presented. The team consists of members from the government, industry, and universities. The goal of this team is to demonstrate the benefits to the turbine design process attainable through the application of CFD. This goal is to be achieved by enhancing and validating turbine design tools for improved loading and flowfield definition and loss prediction, and transferring the advanced technology to the turbine design process. In order to demonstrate the advantages of using CFD early in the design phase, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) turbines for the National Launch System (NLS) were chosen on which to focus the team's efforts. The Turbine Team activities run parallel to the STME design work.

  4. Enhanced Sealing by Hydrophobic Modification of Alaska Pollock-Derived Gelatin-Based Surgical Sealants for the Treatment of Pulmonary Air Leaks.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Ryo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2016-11-15

    Pulmonary air leaks are medical complications of thoracic surgery for which fibrin sealant is the main treatment. In this study, innovative sealants based on hydrophobically modified Alaska pollock-derived gelatin (hm-ApGltn) and a poly(ethylene)glycol-based 4-armed cross-linker (4S-PEG) have been developed and their burst strengths have been evaluated using fresh rat lung. The developed sealants show higher lung burst strength compared with the nonmodified original ApGltn (Org-ApGltn)-based sealant and a commercial fibrin sealant. The maximum burst strength of the hm-ApGltn-based sealant is 1.6-fold higher than the Org-ApGltn-based sealant (n = 5, p < 0.05), and 2.1-fold higher than the commercial fibrin sealant (n = 5, p < 0.05). Cell culture experiments show that modification of ApGltn with cholesteryl or stearoyl groups effectively enhances anchoring to the cell surface. In addition, binding constants between hm-ApGltn and extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and fibrillin are increased. Therefore, the new hm-ApGltn/4S-PEG-based sealant has the potential for applications in thoracic surgery.

  5. Technology Education Practical Activities for Elementary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedras, Melvin J.; Braukmann, Jim

    This report contains four learning modules designed to support a range of objectives that include increasing technological literacy, and improving written and verbal communication skills, psychomotor skills, computational skills, geometry, analysis, problem solving, and other critical thinking skills. The activities described in each module…

  6. Learner-Interface Interaction for Technology-Enhanced Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Neelu; Khreisat, Laila; Sharma, Kiron

    2009-01-01

    Neelu Sinha, Laila Khreisat, and Kiron Sharma describe how learner-interface interaction promotes active learning in computer science education. In a pilot study using technology that combines DyKnow software with a hardware platform of pen-enabled HP Tablet notebook computers, Sinha, Khreisat, and Sharma created dynamic learning environments by…

  7. Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach geospatial technology activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach (OBIO) in Reston, Virginia, and its Center for Biological Informatics (CBI) in Denver, Colorado, provide leadership in the development and use of geospatial technologies to advance the Nation's biological science activities.

  8. Student Technological Creativity Using Online Problem-Solving Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of online (web-based) creative problem-solving (CPS) activities on student technological creativity and to examine the characteristics of student creativity in the context of online CPS. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted with 107 fourth-grade students in Taiwan. The…

  9. The Secrets of the Iceman. Technology Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    1993-01-01

    This learning activity asks students to use critical thinking skills to imagine life in the late stone age, including the tools and technology that would have existed. Presents the context, the challenge, objectives, resources, material and equipment needs, and evaluation methods. (SK)

  10. Teaching Activities in Science/Society/Technology/Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disinger, John F.; Lisowski, Marylin

    Developed to highlight the interrelationships between and among science, technology, society, and the environment, this guide offers educators ideas and activities, and identifies resources for instruction at the elementary and secondary school level. Introductory comments explain and support the role and importance of environmental education in…

  11. TREATABILITY STUDY BULLETIN: ENZYME-ACTIVATED CELLULOSE TECHNOLOGY - THORNECO, INC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Enzyme-Activated Cellulose Technology developed by Thorneco, Inc. uses cellulose placed into one or more cylindrical towers to remove metals and organic compounds from an aqueous solution. The cellulose is coated with a proprietary enzyme. Operating parameters that can affe...

  12. Laser-welded fused silica substrates using a luminescent fresnoite-based sealant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablos-Martin, A.; Benndorf, G.; Tismer, S.; Mittag, M.; Cismak, A.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Höche, Th.

    2016-06-01

    The laser welding of two fused silica substrates using a fresnoitic glass thin film as a sealant by irradiation with a ns laser is studied. Two different laser parameter sets were compared in terms of bond quality, which include two different laser beam trajectories: linear and wobble (circular) trajectory. The composition of the glass sealant changes with the course of the laser welding, incorporating silica from the substrates. After joining, the bonded samples were exposed to UV light and a very intense emission in the blue spectral range is observed by naked eye, which is due to the crystallization of the fresnoite glass upon the laser irradiation. EDX analysis confirms the crystallization of fresnoite, together with a great enrichment in silica. The formation of a eutectic between both is very plausible. Bond quality and bond strength were evaluated by scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) and tensile test, which results in a tensile stress of 7 MPa.

  13. Use of asphalt emulsion sealants in disposal of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Elmore, M.R.

    1981-07-01

    Studies of asphalt emulsion sealants conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have demonstrated that the sealants are effective in containing radon within uranium tailings. The laboratory and field studies have further demonstrated that radon exhalation from uranium tailings piles can be reduced by greater than 99% to near background levels. Field tests at the tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado confirmed that an 8-cm admix seal containing 22 wt % asphalt could be effectively applied with a cold-mix paver. Other techniques were successfully tested, including a soil stabilizer and a hot, rubberized asphalt seal that was applied with a distributor truck. After the seals were applied and compacted, overburden was applied over the seal to protect the seal from ultraviolet degradation.

  14. The effects of tissue sealants, platelet gels, and growth factors on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brissett, Anthony E; Hom, David B

    2003-08-01

    The improved understanding of wound healing has resulted in the rapid expansion of tissue adhesives, platelet gels, and the use of growth factors. Tissue sealants have been used to close incisions, seal and secure skin flaps, as well as promote hemostasis. Platelet gels have multiple uses that take advantage of their inherent clot-forming ability as well as their potential to release growth factors. Recombinant platelet-derived growth factor has been studied extensively for the treatment of chronic dermal ulcers and shows promise in enhancing wound care. This article will address some recent advancements related to the expanding use of tissue sealants and growth factors to enhance wound healing within the head and neck area.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of the Marginal Sealing Ability of two Commercially Available Pit and Fissure Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Joyson; Rangeeth, Bollam Nammalwar; Sivakumar, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The occlusal surfaces of the teeth usually have pits and fissures which provide a good environment for demineralization with minimal salivary access and make them caries prone. The success of pit and fissure sealing materials is highly dependent on the marginal sealing ability of the fissures. Aim The present study was carried out to evaluate and compare the marginal sealing ability of two commercially available pit and fissure sealants. Materials and Methods A total of 50 human premolar teeth were used in this invitro study. Group 1 included 25 teeth for application of Clinpro sealant and Group 2 included twenty 25 for application of Helioseal F sealant. Samples were stored in artificial saliva for 72 hours before thermocycling. The samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 24 hours. The sectioned samples were examined under an Optical Stereomicroscope and compared in terms of the extent of microleakage based on the amount of dye penetration between the sealant and tooth substance interface. The dye penetration scores in both the groups was statistically analysed using Chi square test and Mann Whitney Test. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results It was seen that in Group 1, 12 samples (48%) had no dye penetration (Grade 0) while in Group 2, 6 samples (24%) demonstrated Grade 0 penetration. Group 2 had the most extensive dye penetration (Grade 3) in 8 of 25 samples (32%) (p=0.014). Conclusion On comparison of the microleakage scores of the groups, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups; indicating a much better performance of Clinpro as compared to Helioseal F. PMID:27790568

  16. Application of Fibrin Glue Sealant After Hepatectomy Does Not Seem Justified

    PubMed Central

    Figueras, Juan; Llado, Laura; Miro, Mónica; Ramos, Emilio; Torras, Jaume; Fabregat, Juan; Serrano, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy, amount of hemorrhage, biliary leakage, complications, and postoperative evolution after fibrin glue sealant application in patients undergoing liver resection. Summary Background Data: Fibrin sealants have become popular as a means of improving perioperative hemostasis and reducing biliary leakage after liver surgery. However, trials regarding its use in liver surgery remain limited and of poor methodologic quality. Patients and Methods: A total of 300 patients undergoing hepatic resection were randomly assigned to fibrin glue application or control groups. Characteristics and debit of drainage and postoperative complications were evaluated. The amount of blood loss, measurements of hematologic parameters liver test, and postoperative evolution (particularly involving biliary fistula and morbidity) was also recorded. Results: Postoperatively, no differences were observed in the amount of transfusion (0.15 ± 0.66 vs. 0.17 ± 0.63 PRCU; P = 0.7234) or in the patients that required transfusion (18% vs. 12%; P = 0.2), respectively, for the fibrin glue or control group. There were no differences in overall drainage volumes (1180 ± 2528 vs. 960 ± 1253 mL) or in days of postoperative drainage (7.9 ± 5 vs. 7.1 ± 4.7). Incidence of biliary fistula was similar in the fibrin glue and control groups, (10% vs. 11%). There were no differences regarding postoperative morbidity between groups (23% vs. 23%; P = 1). Conclusions: Application of fibrin sealant in the raw surface of the liver does not seem justified. Blood loss, transfusion, incidence of biliary fistula, and outcome are comparable to patients without fibrin glue. Therefore, discontinuation of routine use of fibrin sealant would result in significant cost saving. PMID:17414601

  17. Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Embolization with Fibrin Sealant: A Simple and Effective Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Malagari, Katerina; Papathanasiou, Mathildi A.; Gougoulakis, Alexandros; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2003-02-15

    Endovascular treatment of internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms is an attractive alternative to surgical management, because the former is associated with less morbidity and mortality.Embolization with coils or exclusion of the IIA orifice with stent -grafts are the preferred techniques. Although uncommon, technical failures occur with reported aneurysm rupture. Two patients with IIA aneurysms are reported here, where we describe successful occlusion of their IIA aneurysms with the use of fibrin sealant, after initial failure of coil embolization.

  18. Technology in College Unions and Student Activities: A Collection of Technology Resources from the ACUI Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of College Unions International (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents a collection of technology resources from the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) community. Contents include: (1) Podcasting (Jeff Lail); (2) Video Podcasting (Ed Cabellon); (3) Building a Multimedia Production Center (Nathan Byrer); (4) Cloud Computing in the Student Union and Student Activities (TJ…

  19. Millimeter Wave Active Sensing Technology For Self-Contained Munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunton, Andrew J.

    1983-10-01

    Active millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology is playing an increasing role throughout the DoD research and development community in the area of Self Contained Munitions (SCM's), autonomous missiles and armament primarily intended for air and surface launched standoff antiarmor weapon systems. Each type of SCM, which requires fire-and-forget search, detection, discrimination and warhead aiming sensing functions, places varied operational, packaging and performance specifications on its MMW sensor subsystem. This paper attempts to portray the rationale for implementation of active MMW sensing devices into SCM's, along with a description of the spectrum of SCM sensor operational parameters. A treatise of active MMW sensor technologies required for ultimate successful weaponization will include discussions in the areas of signal processing and MMW RF hardware. Ultimately, as active MMW technology matures, the critical trade between complexity, cost and effectiveness must be analyzed for each SCM type. A qualitative discussion in this area will be covered as well, yielding insight into future MMW development areas which require increased heavy emphasis in order to meet the stringent requirements on SCM active MMW sensing subsystems.

  20. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  1. Characterization and the Pattern of Surfaces of Sealant with nano size Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quddos, A.; Samtio, N. H.; Syed, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Nano composite sealant is low viscosity, room temperature cured, opaque and flowable nature. They have variety of uses such as potting, pressure sealant and shock resistant. Most important factor influencing use of fillers in polymer composites is their ability to effectively transfer the applied load in the matrix. The effective utilization of fillers in composites for structural applications depends strongly on the ability to disperse the nano fillers homogeneously in the matrix without damaging them. R-Belite supper epoxy adhesive (RBSEA) were formulated with different nano fillers (KCl, Al2O3, ZrO2, SiO2, ZrO2) at room temperature. The composite were prepared with the 0.02 to 0.10 weight ratios to promote the nucleation of the nanoparticles in the applied sealant. Two main problems which arise in improving the properties are poor dispersion of the fillers in the composite and weak bonding between nano fillers and the matrix. These problems are solved by mechanical and chemical means. It was observed that mechanical properties like tensile strength, elongation hardness etc and thermal properties were also improved with incorporation of nanofillers in the working applied polymer matrix. The dispersion of nano fillers in polymer matrix is studied by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results confirm the presence of nanomaterial in RBSEA/fillers nanocomposites. SEM is also used to characterize the pattern of surfaces with nano size composite materials.

  2. Social Marketing Risk-Framing Approaches for Dental Sealants in Rural American Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Champine, Dorothy; Hoyt, Dee; Lin, Lillian; Salois, Emily; Silvas, Sharon; Tail, Terri Weasel; Williams, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare three variants of a culturally-relevant and theoretically-based message to determine the most influential risk framing approach for improving intention to place dental sealants for preschool children. Design and Sample A convenience sample of adult, American Indian participants (n = 89) attending a community health fair were assigned to view a gain-framed, loss-framed, or mix-framed dental sealant message. Measurements We compared participant's scores on a 46-item survey to determine the relative effect of the frame assignment on seven indices of behavior change. Results The mean difference in participant's stage-of-change scores (x = 1.17, n = 89, sd = 1.90) demonstrated a significant improvement for all groups after watching the dental sealant message t(88) = 5.81, p < .0001, 95% CI [0.77 – 1.57]. Self-efficacy was the only construct for which we detected a statistically significant difference as a function of frame assignment. Overall, the mix-framed message resulted in the highest scores. The gain-framed message was the least influential on four constructs. This finding is in contrast to findings that gain-framed oral health messages are most influential (Gallagher & Updegraff, 2012; O'Keefe & Jensen, 2007). Conclusions Community advisory board members determined to use the mix-framed approach in an oral-health social marketing campaign with a rural, American Indian audience. PMID:26032902

  3. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia Using Surgisis Mesh and Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant is an effective long-term treatment for repair of inguinal hernia. This case series involved 38 adult patients with 51 inguinal hernias treated in a primary care center. Methods: Between December 2002 and May 2005, 38 patients with 45 primary and 6 recurrent inguinal hernias were treated with laparoscopic repair by the total extra-peritoneal mesh placement (TEP) technique using Surgisis mesh secured into place with fibrin sealant. Postoperative complications, incidence of pain, and recurrence were recorded, as evaluated at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 1 year, and with a follow-up questionnaire and telephone interview conducted in May and June 2005. Results: The operations were successfully performed on all patients with no complications or revisions to an open procedure. Average follow-up was 13 months (range, 1 to 30). One hernia recurred (second recurrence of unilateral direct hernia), indicating a 2% recurrence rate. Conclusions: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant can be effectively used to treat primary, recurrent, direct, indirect, and bilateral inguinal hernias in adults without complications and minimal recurrence within 1-year of follow-up. PMID:17575758

  4. Wear of two pit and fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Galo, Rodrigo; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Wear simulations may provide an indication of the clinical performance of pit-and-fissure sealants when associated with primary teeth as counterbody, restricting the involved variables. The aim of this study was to evaluate wear of dental materials used as pit-and-fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth. Materials and Methods: A resinous sealant (Fluroshield®) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer®) were selected in a post-plate design, using as counterbody primary tooth pins (4 × 4 × 2 mm) at 3 and 10 N vertical load, 1 Hz frequency, 900 wear cycles in artificial saliva (n = 15). Attrition coefficient values were obtained and the material and primary tooth volumes were analyzed. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Duncan's test (P < 0.05). Results: Fluroshield® presented the highest attrition coefficient values for the 3 N but these values decreased significantly for the 10 N load. The means for volume loss (3 mm) of the different samples after the wear test were not statistically different for the materials. The volume loss values for the primary teeth were statistically different and there was an increase in volume loss with the increase of the load applied in the wear tests. Conclusions: Differences were also observed with regard to the surface deformation characteristics. The wear rates of primary tooth enamel vary according to the type of material and the load applied during mastication. PMID:24966777

  5. IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Roberts, J.; Paller, M.; Reible, D.

    2010-09-02

    Active capping is a relatively new approach for treating contaminated sediments. It involves applying chemically reactive amendments to the sediment surface. The main role of active caps is to stabilize contaminants in contaminated sediments, lower the bioavailable pool of contaminants, and reduce the release of contaminants to the water column. Metals are common contaminants in many marine and fresh water environments as a result of industrial and military activities. The mobile, soluble forms of metals are generally considered toxic. Induced chemical precipitation of these metals can shift toxic metals from the aqueous phase to a solid, precipitated phase which is often less bioavailable. This approach can be achieved through application of sequestering agents such as rock phosphates, organoclays, zeolites, clay minerals, and biopolymers (e.g., chitosan) in active capping technology. Active capping holds great potential for a more permanent solution that avoids residual risks resulting from contaminant migration through the cap or breaching of the cap. In addition to identifying superior active capping agents, research is needed to optimize application techniques, application rates, and amendment combinations that maximize sequestration of contaminants. A selected set of active capping treatment technologies has been demonstrated at a few sites, including a field demonstration at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. This demonstration has provided useful information on the effects of sequestering agents on metal immobilization, bioavailability, toxicity, and resistance to mechanical disturbance.

  6. Polyethylene Glycol-Based Synthetic Hydrogel Sealant for Closing Vitrectomy Wounds: An In Vivo and Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Sujin; Okamoto, Fumiki; Arai, Mikki; Hirose, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Shinichi; Sugiura, Yoshimi; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We conducted an in vivo study using Dutch pigmented rabbit eyes to test the usefulness of polyethylene glycol (PEG) sealant for the closure of sutureless sclerotomies in microincisional vitrectomy surgery (MIVS). Methods Three-port, 23-gauge vitrectomy was performed on rabbit eyes. After air leakage was confirmed by the application of 0.625% povidone–iodine at the sclerotomy site, PEG sealant was subconjunctivally injected using a 27-gauge needle through conjunctival incisions to cover the sclerotomy wounds, following which it was polymerized by the application of xenon light for 60 seconds. Ophthalmological examinations and intraocular pressure measurements were conducted the day before and 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after surgery. The eyes were enucleated for histological evaluation 7 days after surgery. Results PEG sealant was rapidly polymerized by the application of xenon light after subconjunctival injection, and it firmly sealed the sclerotomies without air leakage, as confirmed by povidone–iodine dropping, in all cases. Conjunctival and scleral wounds closed with PEG sealant were successfully attached and remained intact till the end of the follow-up period. There was no sign of postoperative hypotony or infection in any eye, and no adverse effects of PEG sealant were found. In histological examination, linear scar formation and eosinophilic staining of collagen fibers were observed at the sclerotomy sites, while the sclerotomy tunnels appeared tightly closed. Conclusions PEG sealant can be useful for the closure of sutureless 23-gauge vitrectomy incisions in rabbits. Translational Relevance The PEG sealant may become an effective option for closing vitrectomy incisions including pediatric cases. PMID:27226931

  7. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care.

  8. Evaluation of retention of pit and fissure sealants placed with and without air abrasion pretreatment in 6-8 year old children – An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula

    2017-01-01

    Background The success of pit and fissure sealants is directly related to their retention. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retention of pit and fissure sealants placed using acid etch alone and a combination of air abrasion and acid etch techniques. Material and Methods 50 subjects aged 6-8 years were included in the study. Primary second molars and permanent first molars were sealed in all four quadrants using split mouth design. The right maxillary and mandibular molars (Group A) were treated by acid etching alone while the left maxillary and mandibular molars (Group B) were pretreated with air abrasion followed by acid etching before application of pit and fissure sealant. Retention of sealants was checked using Simonsen’s criteria of sealant retention after three and six months of sealant application. Results There was no significant difference in retention of sealants in Group A and Group B (p<0.05) after three and six months follow up. The difference in sealant retention in primary and permanent molars was not significant (p>0.05). Maxillary molars showed superior retention compared to mandibular molars, which was statistically significant at both three and six months (p<0.05). Conclusions Combining air abrasion pretreatment with subsequent acid etching did not result in statistically significant difference in sealant retention compared to acid etching alone in both primary and permanent molars after 3 and 6 months follow up. An additional air abrasion pretreatment step can be avoided in pediatric patients when placing sealants and the procedure can be completed faster with better behavior management using acid etching alone. Key words:Pit and fissure sealant, acid etching, air abrasion. PMID:28210438

  9. Understanding active and passive users: the effects of an active user using normal, hard and unreliable technologies on user assessment of trust in technology and co-user.

    PubMed

    Montague, Enid; Xu, Jie

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how passive users perceive the trustworthiness of active users and technologies under varying technological conditions. An experimental study was designed to vary the functioning of technologies that active users interacted with, while passive users observed these interactions. Active and passive user ratings of technology and partner were collected. Exploratory data analysis suggests that passive users developed perceptions of technologies based on the functioning of the technology and how the active user interacted with the technology. Findings from this research have implications for the design of technologies in environments where active and passive users interact with technologies in different ways. Future work in this area should explore interventions that lead to enhanced affective engagement and trust calibration.

  10. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  12. The 'Technology - Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire': a version with a technology-related subscale

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Neira, Carlos; López, Oscar L.; Riveros, Rodrigo; Nuñez-Huasaf, Javier; Flores, Patricia; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Information and communication technology (ICT) has become an increasingly important part of daily life. The ability to use technology is becoming essential for autonomous functioning in society. Current functional scales for patients with cognitive impairment do not evaluate the use of technology. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a new version of the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ) that incorporates an ICT subscale. Method A new technology-based subscale was incorporated into the Spanish Version of the ADLQ (SV-ADLQ), entitled The Technology Version of the ADLQ (T-ADLQ). The T-ADLQ was administered to 63 caregivers of dementia patients, 21 proxies of mild cognitive impairment patients and 44 proxies of normal elderly subjects (mean age of the sample ± SD: 73.5 ± 8.30). We analysed the convergent validity, internal consistency, reliability cut-off point, sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ. The results of the T-ADLQ were compared to the SV-ADLQ. Results The T-ADLQ showed significant correlations with the Mini-mental Test (MMSE), the Frontal Assesment Battery (FAB) as well as other measures of functional impairment and dementia severity (MMSE: r = −0.70; FAB: r = −0.65; Functional Assessment Questionnaire: r = 0.77; Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale: r = −0.75; Clinical Dementia Rating Scale: r = 0.72; p<0.001). The T-ADLQ showed a good reliability with a relatively high Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.861). When considering a functional impairment cut-off point greater than 29.25%, the sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ were 82% and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.937 for the T-ADLQ and 0.932 for the original version of the test. Conclusions The T-ADLQ revealed adequate indicators of validity and reliability for the functional assessment of activities of daily living in dementia patients. However, the inclusion of technology items in

  13. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  14. Micro-leakage of a Fissure Sealant Cured Using Quartz-tungsten-halogen and Plasma Arc Light Curing Units

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Soleimani, Ali Asghar; Jafari, Najmeh; Varkesh, Bentolhoda

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Newer curing units such as plasma arc can polymerize the sealants in much shorter curing times. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two different curing units on the micro-leakage of a fissure sealant material. Materials and methods. Sixty two extracted premolars without caries were randomly divided into two groups of 31 samples. Occlusal surfaces of all teeth were cleansed. Then, teeth surfaces were etched by 37% phosphoric acid. After rinsing and drying, occlusal surfaces of teeth were sealed by a fissure sealant. The sealant was then cured using either a halogen light curing unit or a plasma arc curing light. After sealing, the teeth were thermocycled for 500 cycles. The teeth were then sectioned and examined for micro-leakage. Statistical analyses were performed with Mann-Whitney test. Results. There was no significant difference between two groups regarding micro-leakage (P = 0.42). Conclusion. Results showed that there was no significant difference between two different curing units. Therefore, plasma arc unit might be a useful alternative for sealant polymerization. PMID:25587389

  15. Transcutaneous Drainage of Gel-Like Substance after Application of Hydrogel Dural Sealant: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Siman, Homayoun; Techy, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Incidental durotomy (IDT) is a common complication of spinal surgery. The use of collagen matrix graft along with hydrogel dural sealant is a common method of IDT repair. With this method, there have been several reported cases of detrimental dural sealant expansion in the literature. One case study reported an expansion rate greater than 300%; many report neurologic damage. This article reports the clinical course of two patients who developed postoperative transcutaneous drainage of a gel-like substance after the use of a dural sealant, which is a previously unreported complication. Methods The clinical course and treatment outcome of two patients is presented. Results Both patients experienced postoperative transcutaneous drainage of a gel-like substance at the surgical site. Case one began draining this substance on postoperative day 14. This patient required no further intervention, and the drainage ended after 3 mL of a gel-like substance was expressed from his incision while in the clinic. Case two began draining the gel on postoperative day 16. This patient underwent two washout procedures and resolution of the drainage. No infection was ever detected. Conclusions To our knowledge, our patients are the first reported cases of transcutaneous drainage of expanded dural sealant. It is important to take into consideration the unexpected expansion of a dural sealant when using it for the repair of IDT. PMID:26835216

  16. Micro-leakage of a Fissure Sealant Cured Using Quartz-tungsten-halogen and Plasma Arc Light Curing Units.

    PubMed

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Soleimani, Ali Asghar; Jafari, Najmeh; Varkesh, Bentolhoda

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Newer curing units such as plasma arc can polymerize the sealants in much shorter curing times. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two different curing units on the micro-leakage of a fissure sealant material. Materials and methods. Sixty two extracted premolars without caries were randomly divided into two groups of 31 samples. Occlusal surfaces of all teeth were cleansed. Then, teeth surfaces were etched by 37% phosphoric acid. After rinsing and drying, occlusal surfaces of teeth were sealed by a fissure sealant. The sealant was then cured using either a halogen light curing unit or a plasma arc curing light. After sealing, the teeth were thermocycled for 500 cycles. The teeth were then sectioned and examined for micro-leakage. Statistical analyses were performed with Mann-Whitney test. Results. There was no significant difference between two groups regarding micro-leakage (P = 0.42). Conclusion. Results showed that there was no significant difference between two different curing units. Therefore, plasma arc unit might be a useful alternative for sealant polymerization.

  17. Active harmonic filter technology and market assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, S.; Divan, D.; Sutherland, P.

    1998-08-01

    Non-linear loads such as three-phase rectifiers, adjustable speed drives (ASDs), and arcing loads can cause voltage distortion and other power quality problems due to their interaction with the power grid. This report provides a technical and marketing assessment of active harmonic filters, a promising approach to preventing these problems at their source. Although predicting the direction and magnitude of harmonic currents is difficult due to highly interconnected nature of distribution systems, even small harmonic producing loads can result in high levels of harmonic current flow between the utility and a customer and can also cause a resonance problem at sites far removed from the harmonic producing load. The best way to keep voltage distortion low in a utility system is to constrain the harmonic currents at their sources. However, since regulation of harmonic pollution does not provide any additional value to the customer, it is unlikely that any controls will be implemented on a consistent basis in the absence of mandatory requirements. In the United States, a step toward a standard operating practice is the IEEE 519-1992 recommended harmonic standard that provides guidelines for limiting harmonic currents by industrial plants. This report identifies the equipment likely to produce harmonic loads and explains the kinds of problems that harmonic currents can cause in a utility distribution system. It describes possible solutions to these problems, including harmonic filtering and other technologies. The report examines the prospects for wider use of active harmonic filter technology and discusses the important marketing issues for potential active filter marketers and manufacturers, such as the barriers to and drivers of increased use of active filter technology and the price points for active filters.

  18. Active capping technology: a new environmental remediation of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Zhu, Meng-Ying; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yu, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Fang; Yang, Zhong-Zhu; Shen, Liu-Qing

    2016-03-01

    The management and treatment of contaminated sediment is a worldwide problem and poses major technical and economic challenges. Nowadays, various attempts have been committed to investigating a cost-effective way in contaminated sediment restoration. Among the remediation options, in situ capping turns out to be a less expensive, less disruptive, and more durable approach. However, by using the low adsorption capacity materials, traditional caps do not always fulfill the reduction of risks that can be destructive for human health, ecosystem, and even natural resources. Active caps, therefore, are designed to employ active materials (activated carbon, apatite, zeolite, organoclay, etc.) to strengthen their adsorption and degradation capacity. The active capping technology promises to be a permanent and cost-efficient solution to contaminated sediments. This paper provides a review on the types of active materials and the ways of these active materials employed in recent active capping studies. Cap design considerations including site-specific conditions, diffusion/advection, erosive forces, and active material selection that should be noticed in an eligible remediation project are also presented.

  19. An essential primer for understanding the role of topical hemostats, surgical sealants, and adhesives for maintaining hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Gabay, Michael; Boucher, Bradley A

    2013-09-01

    A wide variety of topical hemostats are approved as adjunctive therapies in the maintenance of hemostasis during surgical procedures in which conventional methods are insufficient or not practical. A multidisciplinary approach to the selection and application of these agents requires input from all members of the surgical team including surgeons, perioperative nurses, blood bank specialists, and pharmacists. However, pharmacist knowledge regarding topical hemostats may be limited based on lack of formal education within college of pharmacy curricula as well as their use being predominantly in the operating room setting. Furthermore, some of these agents might be procured through central supply rather than the hospital pharmacy. Topical hemostats include agents that act as a mechanical barrier to bleeding and provide a physical matrix for clotting, biologically active agents that catalyze coagulation, combination therapies, and synthetic sealants and adhesives. Although many of the topical hemostats were approved for use before the requirement for clinical trials, this review provides an overview of the available clinical evidence regarding the appropriate uses and safety considerations associated with these agents. Proper use of these agents is vital to achieving the best clinical outcomes. Specifically, knowledge of the contraindications and potential adverse events associated with topical hemostats can help prevent unwanted outcomes. Therefore, an understanding of the benefits and potential risks associated with these agents will allow hospital pharmacists to assist in the development and implementation of institutional policies regarding the safe and effective use of hemostatic agents commonly used in the surgical suite.

  20. Information Technology Measurement and Testing Activities at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Michael D.; Carnahan, Lisa J.; Carpenter, Robert J.; Flater, David W.; Fowler, James E.; Frechette, Simon P.; Gray, Martha M.; Johnson, L. Arnold; McCabe, R. Michael; Montgomery, Douglas; Radack, Shirley M.; Rosenthal, Robert; Shakarji, Craig M.

    2001-01-01

    Our high technology society continues to rely more and more upon sophisticated measurements, technical standards, and associated testing activities. This was true for the industrial society of the 20th century and remains true for the information society of the 21st century. Over the last half of the 20th century, information technology (IT) has been a powerful agent of change in almost every sector of the economy. The complexity and rapidly changing nature of IT have presented unique technical challenges to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and to the scientific measurement community in developing a sound measurement and testing infrastructure for IT. This measurement and testing infrastructure for the important non-physical and non-chemical properties associated with complex IT systems is still in an early stage of development. This paper explains key terms and concepts of IT metrology, briefly reviews the history of the National Bureau of Standards/National Institute of Standards and Technology (NBS/NIST) in the field of IT, and reviews NIST’s current capabilities and work in measurement and testing for IT. It concludes with a look at what is likely to occur in the field of IT over the next ten years and what metrology roles NIST is likely to play. PMID:27500026

  1. Information Technology Measurement and Testing Activities at NIST.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M D; Carnahan, L J; Carpenter, R J; Flater, D W; Fowler, J E; Frechette, S P; Gray, M M; Johnson, L A; McCabe, R M; Montgomery, D; Radack, S M; Rosenthal, R; Shakarji, C M

    2001-01-01

    Our high technology society continues to rely more and more upon sophisticated measurements, technical standards, and associated testing activities. This was true for the industrial society of the 20th century and remains true for the information society of the 21st century. Over the last half of the 20th century, information technology (IT) has been a powerful agent of change in almost every sector of the economy. The complexity and rapidly changing nature of IT have presented unique technical challenges to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and to the scientific measurement community in developing a sound measurement and testing infrastructure for IT. This measurement and testing infrastructure for the important non-physical and non-chemical properties associated with complex IT systems is still in an early stage of development. This paper explains key terms and concepts of IT metrology, briefly reviews the history of the National Bureau of Standards/National Institute of Standards and Technology (NBS/NIST) in the field of IT, and reviews NIST's current capabilities and work in measurement and testing for IT. It concludes with a look at what is likely to occur in the field of IT over the next ten years and what metrology roles NIST is likely to play.

  2. 76 FR 6839 - ActiveCore Technologies, Inc., Battery Technologies, Inc., China Media1 Corp., Dura Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ActiveCore Technologies, Inc., Battery Technologies, Inc., China Media1 Corp., Dura Products... concerning the securities of Battery Technologies, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports...

  3. SERS-active nanoparticle aggregate technology for tags and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Leif O; Montoya, Velma M; Havrilla, George J; Doorn, Stephen K

    2010-06-03

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to create a modern tagging and sealing technology for international safeguards application. Our passive tagging methods are based on SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates; SERS: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering). These SANAs offer robust spectral barcoding capability in an inexpensive tag/seal, with the possibility of rapid in-field verification that requires no human input. At INMM 2009, we introduced SANAs, and showed approaches to integrating our technology with tags under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Here, we will focus on recent LANL development work, as well as adding additional dimensionality to the barcoding technique. The field of international safeguards employs a broad array of tags, seals, and tamper-indicating devices to assist with identification, tracking, and verification of components and materials. These devices each have unique strengths suited to specific applications, and span a range of technologies from passive metal cup seals and adhesive seals to active, remotely monitored fiber optic seals. Regardless of the technology employed, essential characteristics center around security, environmental and temporal stability, ease of use, and the ability to provide confidence to all parties. Here, we present a new inexpensive tagging technology that will deliver these attributes, while forming the basis of either a new seal, or as a secure layer added to many existing devices. Our approach uses the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) response from SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates, Figure 1) to provide a unique identifier or signature for tagging applications. SANAs are formed from gold or silver nanoparticles in the 40-80 nm size range. A chemical dye is installed on the nanoparticle surface, and the nanoparticles are then aggregated into ensembles of {approx}100 to 500 nm diameter, prior to being coated with silica. The silica shell protects the finished SANA from

  4. Promoting Physical Activity through Hand-Held Computer Technology

    PubMed Central

    King, Abby C.; Ahn, David K.; Oliveira, Brian M.; Atienza, Audie A.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to achieve population-wide increases in walking and similar moderate-intensity physical activities potentially can be enhanced through relevant applications of state-of-the-art interactive communication technologies. Yet few systematic efforts to evaluate the efficacy of hand-held computers and similar devices for enhancing physical activity levels have occurred. The purpose of this first-generation study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing moderate intensity or more vigorous (MOD+) physical activity levels over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults relative to a standard information control arm. Design Randomized, controlled 8-week experiment. Data were collected in 2005 and analyzed in 2006-2007. Setting/Participants Community-based study of 37 healthy, initially underactive adults aged 50 years and older who were randomized and completed the 8-week study (intervention=19, control=18). Intervention Participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their physical activity levels twice per day and provide daily and weekly individualized feedback, goal setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate written physical activity educational materials. Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was assessed via the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Results Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater 8-week mean estimated caloric expenditure levels and minutes per week in MOD+ activity (p<0.04). Satisfaction with the PDA was reasonably high in this largely PDA-naive sample. Conclusions Results from this first-generation study indicate that hand-held computers may be effective tools for increasing initial physical activity levels among underactive adults. PMID:18201644

  5. Aerospace university activity for the development of information and telecommunication and space technologies using the mechanisms of technological platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Loginov, Y. Y.; Zelenkov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    The relevance and perspective of the technological platform "Information and telecommunication and space technology for innovative development of Siberia" with the active participation of the Siberian State Aerospace University are discussed. The technology platform is a form of implementing public-private partnership, a way of mobilizing capacity of stakeholders (government, business, scientific community) and tool for creating science, technology and innovation policy to maintain the innovative development and technological modernization of the economy as part of the development of information and telecommunication and space technology.

  6. Pit and Fissure Sealants in Young Adults: An Evaluation of Placement Time and Retention Rate Using Two Isolation Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    L AD-A139 429 PI AND FSSJR SEAANTS IN YOUNG ADULTS AN EVAUAON I7 D-AUN L OFPLACEMENT ME.U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECHWRIOHT-PATTERSON AFB OH B A MATIS...I ll l l ....1 , , .. .. . ... i TABLE XIV Sealant retention by tooth surface at twelve months ........................ 44 TABLE XV Sealant...cotton - 12- roll isolation and the placement time of an occIusal amalgam restoration using rubber dam isolation in contralater.. l teeth. Fifty-five

  7. Quality Assessment of Information About Pit and Fissure Sealants in Persian Websites in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the increasing use of Internet, there is no supervision over the accuracy and quality of the information provided in the web. To deal with this problem, health specialists should take part in planning, publishing and supervision of online health-related information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of information related to pit and fissure sealants in Persian websites. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, Persian websites providing information about fissure sealants were found using Google search engine. The searched keywords according to the MeSH database were “patient education” and “fissure sealant”. After applying the exclusion criteria, 37 websites out of 500 initial links remained in the study. These websites were evaluated based on a researcher-made checklist. The validity and reliability of the checklist were evaluated and confirmed. Descriptive analysis was applied to report the results of our study using SPSS version 11.5. Results: The average score for the quality of information was 22.46 out of 38. The minimum scores were 16 and 30 and belonged to Pezeshkanemrooz.com and Asa85.blogfa.com , respectively. The results showed that 62.2% of the answers were scored 2–4 and 37.8% were scored 1; therefore, the overall quality of the published content was rated to be moderate for 62.2% and low for 37.8% of the websites. Conclusions: Overall, the quality of information related to fissure sealant provided in Persian websites was good; however, the information given was mostly incomplete and could be improved. The main problems were doubtful credibility and outdated information. PMID:27536329

  8. Reduction of the closure time of postoperative enterocutaneous fistulas with fibrin sealant

    PubMed Central

    Avalos-González, Jorge; Portilla-deBuen, Eliseo; Leal-Cortés, Caridad Aurea; Orozco-Mosqueda, Abel; del Carmen Estrada-Aguilar, María; Velázquez-Ramírez, Gabriela Abigail; Ambriz-González, Gabriela; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Guzmán-Gurrola, Aldo Emmerson; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether the use of fibrin sealant shortens the closure time of postoperative enterocutaneous fistulas (ECFs). METHODS: The prospective case-control study included 70 patients with postoperative ECFs with an output of < 500 mL/d, a fistulous tract of > 2 cm and without any local complication. They were divided into study (n = 23) and control groups (n = 47). Esophageal, gastric and colocutaneous fistulas were monitored under endoscopic visualization, which also allowed fibrin glue application directly through the external hole. Outcome variables included closure time, time to resume oral feeding and morbidity related to nutritional support. RESULTS: There were no differences in mean age, fistula output, and follow-up. Closure-time for all patients of the study group was 12.5 ± 14.2 d and 32.5 ± 17.9 d for the control group (P < 0.001), and morbidity related to nutritional support was 8.6% and 42.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). In patients with colonic fistulas, complete closure occurred 23.5 ± 19.5 d after the first application of fibrin glue, and spontaneous closure was observed after 36.2 ± 22.8 d in the control group (P = 0.36). Recurrences were observed in 2 patients because of residual disease. One patient of each group died during follow-up as a consequence of septic complications related to parenteral nutrition. CONCLUSION: Closure time was significantly reduced with the use of fibrin sealant, and oral feeding was resumed faster. We suggest the use of fibrin sealant for the management of stable enterocutaneous fistulas. PMID:20533600

  9. Performance of a conventional sealant and a flowable composite on minimally invasive prepared fissures.

    PubMed

    Francescut, Paola; Lussi, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Three different fissure preparation procedures were tested and compared to the non-invasive approach using a conventional unfilled sealant and a flowable composite. Eighty permanent molars were selected and divided into 4 groups of 20 teeth each. All the teeth were split into 2 halves, and the exposed fissures were photographed under a microscope (35x) before and after being prepared using the following methods: (I) Er:YAG laser (KEY Laser, KaVo) 600 mJ pulse energy, 6 Hz; (II) diamond bur; (III) Er: YAG laser (KEY Laser, KaVo) 200 mJ pulse energy, 4 Hz; (IV) Control group: Powder jet cleaner (Prophyflex, KaVo, Germany). The pre-and postimages were superimposed in order to evaluate the amount of hard tissue removed. Ten teeth in each group were then acid etched and sealed with an unfilled sealant (Delton opaque, Dentsply), while the remaining 10 teeth were acid etched, primed and bonded (Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) and sealed with a flowable composite (X-flow, DeTrey, Dentsply). Material penetration and microleakage were evaluated after thermocycling (5000 cycles) and staining with methylene blue 5%. ANOVA and Mann-Whitney tests were applied for statistical analysis. The laser 600 mJ and bur eliminated the greatest amount of hard tissue. The control teeth presented the least microleakage when sealed with Delton or X-flow. A correlation between material penetration and microleakage could not be statistically confirmed. Mechanical preparation prior to fissure sealing did not enhance the final performance of the sealant.

  10. Collector sealants and breathing. Final Report, 25 September 1978-31 December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M A; Luck, R M; Yeoman, F A; Navish, Jr, F W

    1980-02-20

    The objectives of this program were: (1) to investigate the pertinent properties of a variety of possible sealants for solar collectors and identify the most promising candidates, and (2) to study the effect of breathing in flat-plate, thermal solar collector units. The study involved two types of sealants, Class PS which includes preformed seals or gaskets and Class SC which includes sealing compounds or caulks. It was the intent of the study to obtain data regarding initial properties of candidate elastomers from manufacturers and from the technical literature and to use those sources to provide data pertaining to endurance of these materials under environmental service conditions. Where necessary, these data were augmented by experimental measurements. Environmental stresses evaluated by these measurements included elevated temperatures, moisture, ultraviolet light, ozone and oxygen, and fungus. The second major area of the work involved a study of the effects of materials used and design on the durability of solar collectors. Factors such as design, fabrication, materials of construction, seals and sealing techniques and absorber plate coatings were observed on actual field units removed from service. Such phenomena as leakage, corrosion and formation of deposits on glazing and absorber plate were noted. An evaluation of the properties of several desiccants was made in order to providemeans to mitigate the deleterious effects of water on collector life. Adsorbents for organic degradation products of sealants were also investigated in order to protect the glazing and absorber plate from deposited coatings. Since adsorbents and desiccants in general tend to take up both water and organic decomposition products, relative affinities of a number of these agents for water and for organic compounds were determined . Results are presented in detail.

  11. On the diagnosis and management of neurocutaneous syndrome, a toxicity disorder from dental sealants.

    PubMed

    Amin, Omar M

    2004-09-01

    Neurocutaneous syndrome, a newly discovered toxicity disorder, is characterized by neurological sensations, pain, depleted energy, and memory loss as well as itchy cutaneous lesions that may invite various opportunistic infections. Components in the calcium hydroxide dental sealants Dycal, Life and Sealapex have been identified as sources of the observed symptoms. Sulfonamide and neurological toxicity issues are discussed, and three case histories are presented. Additional notes on zinc oxide, Fynal, IRM, and Sultan U/P sealers are also included. Diagnostic and management protocols at the Parasitology Center, Inc., are proposed.

  12. Anaphylactic reaction after systemic application of aprotinin triggered by aprotinin-containing fibrin sealant.

    PubMed

    Kober, Benjamin J; Scheule, Albertus M; Voth, Vladimir; Deschner, Norbert; Schmid, Eckhard; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2008-08-01

    We report a 67-yr-old male after multiple surgical procedures for treatment of arterial occlusive disease who suffered an anaphylactic reaction after administration of aprotinin (Trasylol) prior to urgent coronary artery bypass surgery. The patient had been treated with aprotinin-containing fibrin sealant in 2004 and in 2007, 2 wk before coronary artery bypass surgery. The postoperative serologic screening revealed positive results for qualitative aprotinin-specific IgG, highly elevated quantitative aprotinin-specific IgG and moderately elevated aprotinin-specific IgE antibodies.

  13. Treatment of post-prostatectomy rectourethral fistula with fibrin sealant (Quixil™) injection: a novel application.

    PubMed

    Verriello, V; Altomare, M; Masiello, G; Curatolo, C; Balacco, G; Altomare, D F

    2010-12-01

    Rectourethral fistulas in adults is a rare but potentially devastating postoperative condition requiring complex and demanding surgery. Fibrin glue treatment has been used with some success in anal and rectovaginal fistulas, and in the case we present here this indication has been extended to a postoperative rectourethral fistula following radical prostatectomy. For the first time, to our knowledge, a fibrin sealant (Quixil) was injected into the fistula tract, and a rectal mucosal flap was used to close the internal opening. The fistula healed in few weeks, and the patient is symptom free after 1 year of follow-up.

  14. Present status of some technological activities supporting the MOLCARE project

    SciTech Connect

    Torazza, A.; Rocchini, G.; Scagliotti, M.

    1996-12-31

    The development of MCFC stack technology is carried out at Ansaldo Ricerche in the framework of the MOLCARE project, a cooperation with Spanish companies under a partial UE funding, while a specific research program concerning the physico-chemical characterization of materials is performed jointly by CISE and ENEL. The project includes the development, the construction and the testing of a full scale 100 kW prototype, the assessment of stack technology on subscale stacks, the mathematical modelling of the MCFC based plants and the basic researches. The aim of the basic researches, carried out on single cells, is to improve the effectiveness and durability of both the active and the hardware materials. The Ansaldo stack technology is based on external manifolding. The full scale 100 kW prototype will be integrated with the sensible heat reformer and other ancillary equipments according to the {open_quote}Compact Unit (CU){close_quotes} concept. These technical choices stress requirements for manifold gasket configuration. electrolyte migration control, {Delta}p management and porous component compaction.

  15. Insider Threat Study: Illicit Cyber Activity in the Information Technology and Telecommunications Sector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Insider Threat Study: Illicit Cyber Activity in the Information Technology and Telecommunications Sector Eileen Kowalski...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Insider Threat Study: Illicit Cyber Activity in the Information Technology and Telecommunications Sector 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Insider Threat Study: Illicit Cyber Activity in the Information Technology and Telecommunications Sector Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1

  16. Formulation and Characterization of Poloxamine-based Hydrogels as Tissue Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunhee; Lee, Jeoung Soo; Webb, Ken

    2012-01-01

    In-situ crosslinkable polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based polymers play an increasing role in surgical practice as sealants that provide a barrier to fluid/gas leakage and adhesion formation. This study investigated the gelation behavior and physical properties of hydrogels formed from homogeneous and blended solutions of two acrylated poloxamines (Tetronics® T1107 and T904) of varying molecular weight and hydrophilic/lipophilic balance relative to a PEG control. Hydrogels were formed by reverse thermal gelation at physiological temperature (T1107-containing formulations) and covalent crosslinking by Michael-type addition with dithiothreitol. All poloxamine-based hydrogels exhibited thermosensitive behavior and achieved significantly reduced swelling, increased tensile properties, and increased tissue bond strength relative to the PEG hydrogel at physiological temperature. Swelling and tensile properties of all poloxamine-based hydrogels were significantly greater at 37 °C relative to 4 °C, suggesting that their improved physical properties derive from cooperative crosslinking by both noncovalent and covalent mechanisms. Poloxamine-based hydrogels were cytocompatible and underwent hydrolytic degradation over 2 to 5 weeks depending on their T1107/T904 composition. In conclusion, select poloxamine-based hydrogels possess a number of properties potentially beneficial to tissue sealant applications including substantial increase in viscosity between room/physiological temperatures, resistance to cell adhesion, and maintenance of stable volume during equilibration. PMID:22406506

  17. Creep Behavior of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-02

    High operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells require that sealant must function at high temperature between 600o and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. It should be noted that creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 800oC, which exceeds the glass transition temperature Tg for most glass ceramic materials. The goal of the study is to develop a creep model to capture the creep behavior of glass ceramic materials at high temperature and to investigate the effect of creep of glass ceramic sealant materials on stresses in glass seal and on the various interfaces of glass seal with other layers. The self-consistent creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the stresses in various parts. The stress in glass seals were released due to its creep behavior during the operating environments.

  18. Injectible candidate sealants for fetal membrane repair: Bonding and toxicity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bilic, Grozdana; Brubaker, Carrie; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Mallik, Ajit S.; Quinn, Thomas M.; Haller, Claudia; Done, Elisa; Gucciardo, Leonardo; Zeisberger, Steffen M.; Zimmermann, Roland; Deprest, Jan; Zisch, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to test injectible surgical sealants that are biocompatible with fetal membranes, eventually for closure of iatrogenic membrane defects. Study Design Dermabond, Histoacryl, Tissucol fibrin glue, and three types of in situ forming poly(ethylene glycol)-based polymer hydrogels were tested for acute toxicity upon direct contact with fetal membranes for 24h. For determination of elution toxicity, extracts of sealants were incubated on amnion cell cultures for 72h. Bonding and toxicity was assessed through morphological and/or biochemical analysis. Results Extracts of all adhesives were non-toxic for cultured cells. However, only Tissucol and one type of poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel, mussel-mimetic tissue adhesive, showed efficient, non-disruptive, non-toxic bonding to fetal membranes. Mussel-mimetic tissue adhesive applied over membrane defects created with a 3.5 mm trocar accomplished leak-proof closure that withstood membrane stretch in an in vitro model. Conclusion A synthetic hydrogel-type tissue adhesive emerged as potential sealing modality for iatrogenic membrane defects that merits further evaluation in vivo. PMID:20096254

  19. In vivo evaluation of a new sealant material on a rat lung air leak model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Sekine, T; Nakamura, T; Shimizu, Y

    2001-01-01

    The ability of an albumin-based hydrogel sealant (ABHS) to prevent air leakage through the suture line after pulmonary surgery was evaluated by comparison with that of a fibrin glue (FG). As an air-leak model, a rat lung was used in which a standard incision was made and the burst pressure for ABHS and FG was measured. The average burst pressures at time 0 for the FG and ABHS groups were 30.8+/-15.2 and 77.5 +/-19.1 mmHg, respectively. At Day 3, the value of ABHS (76.3 +/- 15.8 mmHg) was still significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of FG (60.0 +/- 21.9 mmHg). At Day 7, no statistical difference was observed between the FG group(71.2 +/- 18.6 mmHg) and the ABHS group(88.8 +/- 11.7 mmHg). Histological examination of the incision at Day 14 revealed that neither sealant was not visible at the incision site, and there was no evidence of adverse tissue reaction. It was concluded that ABHS had good sealing properties and is an alternative to FG for air leakage treatment in pulmonary surgery.

  20. Radon penetration of concrete slab cracks, joints, pipe penetrations, and sealants.

    PubMed

    Nielson, K K; Rogers, V C; Holt, R B; Pugh, T D; Grondzik, W A; de Meijer, R J

    1997-10-01

    Radon movement through 12 test slabs with different cracks, pipe penetrations, cold joints, masonry blocks, sealants, and tensile stresses characterized the importance of these anomalous structural domains. Diffusive and advective radon transport were measured with steady-state air pressure differences controlled throughout the deltaP = 0 to 60 Pa range. Diffusion coefficients (deltaP = 0) initially averaged 6.5 x 10(-8) m2 s(-1) among nine slabs with only 8% standard deviation, but increased due to drying by 0.16% per day over a 2-y period to an average of 2.0 x 10(-7) m2 s(-1). An asphalt coating reduced diffusion sixfold but an acrylic surface sealant had no effect. Diffusion was 42 times higher in solid masonry blocks than in concrete and was not affected by small cracks. Advective transport (deltaP < or = 60 Pa) was negligible for the slabs (10(-16) m2 permeability), pipe penetrations, and caulked gaps, but was significant for cracks, disturbed pipe penetrations, cold joints, masonry blocks, and concrete under tensile stress. Crack areas calculated to be as small as 10(-7) m2 significantly increased radon advection. Algebraic expressions predict air velocity and effective crack width from enhanced radon transport and air pressures. Masonry blocks, open cracks, and slab cold joints enhance radon penetration but stressed slabs, undisturbed pipe penetrations, and sealed cracks may not.

  1. Analysis of anticaries potential of pit and fissures sealants containing amorphous calcium phosphate using synchrotron microtomography.

    PubMed

    Delben, A C B; Cannon, M; Vieira, A E M; Basso, M D; Danelon, M; Santo, M R E; Stock, S R; Xiao, X; De Carlo, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the anticaries potential of pit and fissure sealants containing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) by synchrotron microtomography. Bovine enamel blocks (4×4 mm; n=50) were selected through surface hardness (Knoop) analysis. Slabs were obtained through cross-sections taken 1 mm from the border of the enamel. Five indentations, spaced 100 μm apart, were made 300 μm from the border. Ten specimens were prepared for each tested material (Ultraseal XT plus TM, Aegis, Embrace, Vitremer and Experimental Sealant). The materials were randomly attached to the sectioned surfaces of the enamel blocks and fixed with sticky wax. The specimens were submitted to pH cycling. After that, the surface hardness (SH1) was determined, and the blocks were submitted to synchrotron microcomputed tomography analysis to calculate the mineral concentration (ΔgHAp cm(-3)) at different areas of the enamel. The comparison between the SH1 and ΔgHAp cm(-3) showed a correlation for all groups (r=0.840; p<0.001). The fluoride groups presented positive values of ΔgHAp cm(-3), indicating a mineral gain that was observed mainly in the outer part of the enamel. The ACP showed mineral loss in the outer enamel compared with fluoride groups, although it inhibited the demineralization in the deeper areas of enamel. The combination of two remineralizing agents (fluoride and ACP) was highly effective in preventing demineralization.

  2. Impact of dewatering technologies on specific methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Batstone, Damien J; Lu, Yang; Jensen, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    Dewatering methods for recuperative thickening and final dewatering can potentially impact methanogenic activity and microbial community. This influences both the feasibility of recuperative thickening to increase solids residence time within a digester, and the utilisation of dewatered digestate as inoculum for new digesters. Thickening technology can reduce methanogenic activity through either air contact (rotary drum, DAF, or belt filter press), or by lysing cells through shear (centrifuge). To assess this, two plants with recuperative thickening (rotary drum) in their anaerobic digester, and five without recuperative thickening, had specific methanogenic activity tested in all related streams, including dewatering feed, thickened return, final cake, and centrate. All plants had high speed centrifuges for final dewatering. The digester microbial community was also assessed through 16s pyrotag sequencing and subsequent principal component analysis (PCA). The specific methanogenic activity of all samples was in the expected range of 0.2-0.4 gCOD gVS(-1)d(-1). Plants with recuperative thickening did not have lower digester activity. Centrifuge based dewatering had a significant and variable impact on methanogenic activity in all samples, ranging between 20% and 90% decrease but averaging 54%. Rotary drum based recuperative thickening had a far smaller impact on activity, with a 0% per-pass drop in activity in one plant, and a 20% drop in another. However, the presence of recuperative thickening was a major predictor of overall microbial community (PC1, p = 0.0024). Microbial community PC3 (mainly driven by a shift in methanogens) was a strong predictor for sensitivity in activity to shear (p = 0.0005, p = 0.00001 without outlier). The one outlier was related to a plant producing the wettest cake (17% solids). This indicates that high solids is a potential driver of sensitivity to shear, but that a resilient microbial community can also bestow resilience

  3. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  4. The Benchmark Active Controls Technology Model Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Durham, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model is a part of the Benchmark Models Program (BMP). The BMP is a NASA Langley Research Center program that includes a series of models which were used to study different aeroelastic phenomena and to validate computational fluid dynamics codes. The primary objective of BACT testing was to obtain steady and unsteady loads, accelerations, and aerodynamic pressures due to control surface activity in order to calibrate unsteady CFD codes and active control design tools. Three wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) have been completed. The first and parts of the second and third tests focused on collecting open-loop data to define the model's aeroservoelastic characteristics, including the flutter boundary across the Mach range. It is this data that is being presented in this paper. An extensive database of over 3000 data sets was obtained. This database includes steady and unsteady control surface effectiveness data, including pressure distributions, control surface hinge moments, and overall model loads due to deflections of a trailing edge control surface and upper and lower surface

  5. Actively Cooled SLMS(TM) Technology for HEL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.; Reily, Jack C.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Haight, Harlan J.; Tucker, John; Wright, Ernest R.; Hogue, William D.

    2005-01-01

    Mr. Jacoby is the Chief Scientist for Schafer's Lightweight Optical Systems business area with twenty four years experience in laser and optical systems for space and military applications. He and colleague Dr. Goodman conceived and developed Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technologies for space applications from the extreme UV to FAR IR wavelengths. Schafer has demonstrated two different methods for actively cooling our Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technology. Direct internal cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through the continuous open cell core of the SLMS(TM) mirror. Indirect external cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through a CTE matched Cesic square-tube manifold that was bonded to the back of the mirror in the center. Testing was done in the small 4-foot thermal/vacuum chamber located at the NASA/MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Seven thermal diodes were located over the front side of the 5 inch diameter mirror and one was placed on the outlet side of the Cesic manifold. Results indicate that the mirror reaches steady state at 82K in less than four minutes for both cooling methods. The maximum temperature difference of the eight diodes was less than 200 mK when the mirror was internally cooled and covered with MLI to insulate it from the large 300 K aluminum plate that was used to mount it.

  6. Using LiDAR technology in forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Akay, Abdullah Emin; Oğuz, Hakan; Karas, Ismail Rakip; Aruga, Kazuhiro

    2009-04-01

    Managing natural resources in wide-scale areas can be highly time and resource consuming task which requires significant amount of data collection in the field and reduction of the data in the office to provide the necessary information. High performance LiDAR remote sensing technology has recently become an effective tool for use in applications of natural resources. In the field of forestry, the LiDAR measurements of the forested areas can provide high-quality data on three-dimensional characterizations of forest structures. Besides, LiDAR data can be used to provide very high quality and accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for the forested areas. This study presents the progress and opportunities of using LiDAR remote sensing technology in various forestry applications. The results indicate that LiDAR based forest structure data and high-resolution DEMs can be used in wide-scale forestry activities such as stand characterizations, forest inventory and management, fire behaviour modeling, and forest operations.

  7. Comparison of Exams for Active Learning Technologies vs. Traditional Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornstra, Andrew; Djordjevic, Branislav; Dworzecka, Maria

    2017-01-01

    George Mason University has first semester (PHYS-160) and second semester (PHYS-260) physics course which consist of two sections. One is a traditional lecture style format (TRAD) and the other is a newer format which is a take on the ``flipped'' classroom. This newer style is referred to as Active Learning with Technologies (ALT). This course style has been in place for several years and has been studied before within George Mason University for final grade differences. These studies suggested that the ALT sections performed better, but grade weighting consistency, test time, and test content were not strictly controlled. The purpose of this study is to cross-examine the performance of students in these different class formats during Fall 2016 (PHYS-260) and Spring 2015 (PHYS-160) on very nearly identical exams over identical test times while controlling for almost every variable.

  8. Technologies for imaging neural activity in large volumes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Na; Freeman, Jeremy; Smith, Spencer L.

    2017-01-01

    Neural circuitry has evolved to form distributed networks that act dynamically across large volumes. Collecting data from individual planes, conventional microscopy cannot sample circuitry across large volumes at the temporal resolution relevant to neural circuit function and behaviors. Here, we review emerging technologies for rapid volume imaging of neural circuitry. We focus on two critical challenges: the inertia of optical systems, which limits image speed, and aberrations, which restrict the image volume. Optical sampling time must be long enough to ensure high-fidelity measurements, but optimized sampling strategies and point spread function engineering can facilitate rapid volume imaging of neural activity within this constraint. We also discuss new computational strategies for the processing and analysis of volume imaging data of increasing size and complexity. Together, optical and computational advances are providing a broader view of neural circuit dynamics, and help elucidate how brain regions work in concert to support behavior. PMID:27571194

  9. NASA'S information technology activities for the 90's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Lee; Erickson, Dan

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) is completing an extensive assessment of its nearly five hundred million dollars of proposed space technology development work. The budget is divided into four segments which are as follows: (1) the base research and technology program; (2) the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI); (3) the Exploration Technology Program (ETP); and (4) the High Performance Computing Initiative (HPCI). The programs are briefly discussed in the context of Astrotech 21.

  10. Canada s activities on space debris mitigation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikanpour, D.

    The threat of space debris to space activities is exponentially rising. Canada, as a space-faring nation having significant investment in space and astronauts participating in space missions, has recognized the risks arising from it and has been active as a participant in understanding and mitigate the problem. Since 1992, Canada has been involved with the creation of a sub-committee on space debris under the government's Interdepartmental Committee on Space (ICS) to deal with the policy and international cooperation on space debris. On the research front, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has been coordinating the related researches within Canada. This paper outlines the major Canadian research activities on space debris and mitigation technologies along with CSA's future plan on the subject. Canadian research activities on space debris are in 3 major areas: (1) Measurement and modeling of space debris: The work has been led by the CSA (Space Technologies) with participations from research institutes and universities. The experiments cover the analysis and computational modeling of the space debris flux at orbital altitudes of interest for space activities. (2) Space debris mitigation: The technology for mitigating space debris is of key research interest and measures have been taken in the design and launch of LEO earth observation spacecraft, such as RADARSAT. RADARSAT-1, launched in 1995 and still operating, was one of the first commercial spacecraft to consider the effect of orbital debris in its design. Not only was the spacecraft designed to withstand a possible impact on orbit, and not be a source of debris from latches and tie-down mechanisms, but the launch of RADARSAT-1 was also delayed by 25 seconds in a very tight launch window, to avoid a possible impact on orbit. The design for the follow-on RADARSAT-2 spacecraft includes features to protect its Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna against possible impact damage due to space debris as well as include

  11. The effect of surface sealants with different filler content on microleakage of Class V resin composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Hepdeniz, Ozge Kam; Temel, Ugur Burak; Ugurlu, Muhittin; Koskan, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Microleakage is still one of the most cited reasons for failure of resin composite restorations. Alternative methods to prevent microleakage have been investigated increasingly. The aim of this study is to evaluate the microleakage in Class V resin composite restorations with or without application of surface sealants with different filler content. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces with the coronal margins located in enamel and the cervical margins located in dentin. The cavities restored with an adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan) and resin composite (Clearfil Majesty ES-2, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). Teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 h and separated into four groups according to the surface sealants (Control, Fortify, Fortify Plus, and G-Coat Plus). The teeth were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5–55° C), immersed in basic fuchsine, sectioned, and analyzed for dye penetration using stereomicroscope. The data were submitted to statistical analysis by Kruskal–Wallis and Bonferroni–Dunn test. Results: The results of the study indicated that there was minimum leakage at the enamel margins of all groups. Bonferroni–Dunn tests revealed that Fortify and GC-Coat groups showed significantly less leakage than the Control group and the Fortify Plus group at dentin margins in lingual surfaces (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The all surface sealants used in this study eliminated microleakage at enamel margins. Moreover, unfilled or nanofilled surface sealants were the most effective in decreasing the degree of marginal microleakage at dentin margins. However, viscosity and penetrability of the sealants could be considered for sealing ability besides composition. PMID:27095890

  12. Using Scientific Detective Videos to Support the Design of Technology Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Kuang-Chao; Fan, Szu-Chun; Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Chu, Yih-hsien

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effect of scientific detective video as a vehicle to support the design of technology activities by technology teachers. Ten graduate students, including current and future technology teachers, participated in a required technology graduate course that used scientific detective videos as a pedagogical tool to motivate…

  13. Agricultural Science and Technology Teachers' Perceptions of iPod and Mp3 Technology Integration into Curricular and Cocurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Miller, Kimberly A.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe agricultural science and technology teachers' reaction to iPod and mp3 technology use and potential use in both curricular and cocurricular activities. A total of 112 unique respondents provided written responses to open-ended questions. Study findings reveal that agricultural science and technology…

  14. Teachers as Co-Designers of Technology-Rich Learning Activities for Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outcomes. A case-study method was used to investigate:…

  15. Sociotechnical Cultural Activity: Expanding an Understanding of Emergent Technology Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degennaro, Donna

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the evolving participation of instructors and learners in an after-school web page-design course intended to improve technology practices. Defined here as technology fluency, these practices emerge through a highly fluctuating dance among social interactions with others and with the technology. In this digital divide…

  16. Caries detection methods: can they aid decision making for invasive sealant treatment?

    PubMed

    Pereira, A C; Verdonschot, E H; Huysmans, M C

    2001-01-01

    The decision to place sealants is a difficult one, and it has been suggested that in a low risk population it may be efficient to wait until caries is detected in the fissure. An invasive sealant technique with fissure preparation may then be indicated. The diagnostic method used in the indication of such a procedure should accurately detect both dentine caries and sound fissures: high sensitivity for dentine caries (at D3 threshold) with high specificity for enamel caries (at D1 threshold). The aims of this study were to assess the diagnostic performance of selected diagnostic methods at normal cut-offs for traditional dentine caries detection and at reduced cut-offs in relation to the desired performance mentioned above, and to assess whether fissure opening allows for accurate visual detection of dentinal caries. Data were obtained from 230 occlusal sites of 101 extracted human molar teeth. Diagnostic methods used on the entire sample were: visual inspection, electrical conductance measurements and laser fluorescence measurements. The sample was then divided into two groups. Group 1 was subjected to visual inspection after application of a dye. Group 2 was subjected to visual inspection after fissure opening only, and after subsequent dye application. Validation was performed by histological investigation. The results with cut-offs normally used in dentine caries detection were roughly in accordance with the literature, except for laser fluorescence. The sensitivity of visual inspection for dentinal caries (D3) was 17% before and 70% after fissure opening. Using reduced cut-offs, a 100% sensitivity (D3) was achieved with 2 methods, but this also resulted in 63 or 87% false positive diagnoses of sound surfaces. Visual inspection and electrical methods both showed a moderate to high sensitivity (D3) with a higher than 50% specificity (D1). It was concluded that visual inspection and electrical methods at reduced cut-offs may aid the indication of invasive sealant

  17. Self-etch bonding agent beneath sealant: Bond strength for laser-irradiated enamel

    PubMed Central

    Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Giuntini, Jackelline de Lemes; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Gomes-Silva, Jaciara Miranda; Torres, Carolina Paes; Galo, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin-based pit-and-fissure sealant (Fluroshield [F], Dentsply/Caulk) associated with either an etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB], 3M/ESPE) or a two-step self-etch adhesive system (Adper SE Plus [SE], 3M/ESPE) on Er: YAG laser-irradiated enamel. Materials and Methods: Seventeen sound third molar crowns were embedded in acrylic resin, and the mesial–distal enamel surfaces were flattened. The enamel sites were irradiated with a 2.94-μm wavelength Er: YAG laser (120 mJ, 4 Hz, noncontact mode/17 mm, 20 s). The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups according to the bonding technique: I - 37% phosphoric acid etching + SB + F; II - SE + F and III - F applied to acid-etched enamel, without an intermediate layer of bonding agent. In all of the groups, a 3-mm diameter enamel-bonding site was demarcated and the sealant cylinders were bonded. After 24 hours in distilled water, the shear bond strength was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The debonded specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope to assess the failure modes. Results: The mean SBS values in MPa were I = 6.39 (±1.44); II = 9.50 (±2.79); and III = 5.26 (±1.82). No statistically significant differences were observed between groups I and III; SE/F presented a significantly higher SBS than that of the other groups (P = 0.001). With regard to the failure mode, groups I (65%) and II (75%) presented adhesive failures, while group III showed 50% adhesive failure. Cohesive failure did not occur. Conclusion: The application of the two-step self-etch bonding agent (Adper SE Plus) beneath the resin pit-and-fissure sealant placement resulted in a significantly higher bond strength for the Er:YAG laser-irradiated enamel. PMID:24926208

  18. Development of 400/sup 0/F sealants for flat plate solar collector construction and installation. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, L.; Schubert, R.J.

    1980-03-01

    Twenty candidate sealants representing ten different polymer types were evaluated as potential solar collector sealants. Polymer types tested included epichlorohydrin rubber, EPDM rubber, silicone, polysulfide, acrylate rubber, and a fluoroelastomer. Initial screening of sealants consisted of measuring high temperature stability and adhesion retention. Several sealant compositions exhibited satisfactory performance in these tests and were selected for further evaluation. These materials were based on an EPDM rubber, a Viton fluoroelastomer, and silicone polymers. Further testing of these candidate materials included determination of adhesion retention under uv/water/heat conditions, fogging temperature, low temperature flexibility, and physical properties. Four silicone-based materials appeared to be suitable candidates for sealing solar collectors. These include Dow Corning 90-006-02 and 3120, General Electric 1200, and PR-1939 from Products Research and Chemical Corporation.

  19. Determinations of PCB within a project to develop cleanup methods for PCB-containing elastic sealant used in outdoor joints between concrete blocks in buildings.

    PubMed

    Sundahl, M; Sikander, E; Ek-Olausson, B; Hjorthage, A; Rosell, L; Tornevall, M

    1999-08-01

    Determinations of PCB were carried out as part of a project aimed at developing cleanup methods for PCB-containing elastic sealant used in outdoor joints between concrete blocks. The goals of the project were to develop methods, which minimise the spread of PCB to the outdoor environment and to indoor air, and which keep the PCB levels as low as reasonably possible in the workplace environment whilst removing the elastic sealant. The following PCB determinations were carried out: (1) concentration in the elastic sealant; (2) concentration in the concrete close to the sealant; (3) concentration in soil; (4) concentration in the indoor air; and (5) concentration in the air in the workplace environment. The cleanup process consisted of a number of different steps: (1) cutting the elastic sealant with an oscillating knife; (2) grinding the concrete with a mechanical machine; (3) sawing the concrete with a mechanical saw and (4) cutting the concrete with a mechanical chisel. In all these different steps a high capacity vacuum cleaner connected to the machines was used. The elastic sealant contained 4.7 to 8.1% total PCB of a technical product with a composition most similar to Clophene A40. The concrete close to the sealant (first 2 mm) contained 0.12 and 1.7% total PCB at two different places. The pattern of the PCB in the concrete resembled that of the sealant. PCB concentrations in the soil from the ground close to the building were 0.1 and 0.3 ppm at two different places before the remedial action. The source of the PCB in the soil is most likely the sealant as the PCB pattern is similar for the two materials. The PCB levels in the workplace air at the beginning of the project, when the techniques were not fully developed, were generally above the occupational exposure limit of 10 micrograms m-3 (up to 120 micrograms m-3). Later when the techniques were optimised to better take care of dust and gases produced during the cutting and grinding etc., the levels were

  20. SST Technology Follow-On Program-Phase 2. Development and Evaluation of Fuel Tank Sealants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-15

    progressively poorer as the temperature increases. Under conditions of high temperature and pressure, they tend to revert to a gummy mass. In 1967, Dow...34XE MS~ 4I’A - -- -40 4- _- LCR wRN~E$O 7ANAk Oxr-W ALOJ6 kwe$ A iAND Bas~E W wA1jpLrro A 4 j N C 0 L N 61 A S’ 4-T r otc - AT 7 iE -, . 1 - -MLS Ar...and the development of liquid, 100% solids, mercaptan-terminated, polysulfide polymqrs offered a new formulating tool. The standard lead peroxide-cured

  1. Greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation technology performance: Activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. Report for November 1997--September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Piccot, S.D.; Kirchgessner, D.A.

    1998-12-31

    The paper describes the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Technology Verification Center`s mission, operational characteristics, and current activities in the natural gas industry, solid waste landfill industry, energy industries, and microelectronics industry. It also outlines the Center`s future plans and gives results of a recent phosphoric acid fuel cell verification at two landflls in the US. It describes how technology vendors, developers, users, and others can utilize the Center`s testing, analysis, and outreach activities and outlines the types of technologies planned for testing over the next 3 to 5 years.

  2. Engineering and Technology Challenges for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    After more than fifty years of space activities, the near-Earth environment is polluted with man-made orbital debris. The collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in 2009 signaled a potential collision cascade effect, also known as the "Kessler Syndrome", in the environment. Various modelling studies have suggested that the commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be sufficient to stabilize the future debris population. Active debris removal must be considered to remediate the environment. This paper summarizes the key issues associated with debris removal and describes the technology and engineering challenges to move forward. Fifty-four years after the launch of Sputnik 1, satellites have become an integral part of human society. Unfortunately, the ongoing space activities have left behind an undesirable byproduct orbital debris. This environment problem is threatening the current and future space activities. On average, two Shuttle window panels are replaced after every mission due to damage by micrometeoroid or orbital debris impacts. More than 100 collision avoidance maneuvers were conducted by satellite operators in 2010 to reduce the impact risks of their satellites with respect to objects in the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. Of the four known accident collisions between objects in the SSN catalog, the last one, collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in 2009, was the most significant. It was the first ever accidental catastrophic destruction of an operational satellite by another satellite. It also signaled the potential collision cascade effect in the environment, commonly known as the "Kessler Syndrome," predicted by Kessler and Cour-Palais in 1978 [1]. Figure 1 shows the historical increase of objects in the SSN catalog. The majority of the catalog objects are 10 cm and larger. As of April 2011, the total objects tracked by the SSN sensors were more than 22,000. However, approximately 6000 of

  3. Percutaneous BioOrganic Sealing of Duodenal Fistulas: Case Report and Review of Biological Sealants with Potential Use in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Leeper, William R.; Tamrazi, Anobel

    2015-08-15

    Biological sealants are being increasingly used in a variety of surgical specialties for their hemostatic and sealing capabilities. However, their use in interventional radiology has not been widely reported. The authors describe a case of duodenal perforation occurring after 15 years of gastric bypass surgery, in whom surgical diversion was unsuccessfully attempted and the leakage was successfully controlled using percutaneous administration of a combination of biological and organic sealants.

  4. Educational Technology as a Subversive Activity: Questioning Assumptions Related to Teaching and Leading with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger-Ross, Matthew J.; Holcomb, Lori B.

    2012-01-01

    The use of educational technologies is grounded in the assumptions of teachers, learners, and administrators. Assumptions are choices that structure our understandings and help us make meaning. Current advances in Web 2.0 and social media technologies challenge our assumptions about teaching and learning. The intersection of technology and…

  5. How to change GEBCO outreach activities with Information technologies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, E.; Park, K.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1995, when National Geographic Information Project began, we have great advance in mapping itself and information service on the earth surface in Korea whether paper maps or online service map. By reviewing geological and mine-related information service in current and comparisons of demands, GEBCO outreach master plan has been prepared. Information service cannot be separated from data production and on dissemination policies. We suggest the potential impact of the changes in information technologies such as mobile service and data fusion, and big data on GEBCO maps based. Less cost and high performance in data service will stimulate more information service; therefore it is necessary to have more customer-oriented manipulation on the data. By inquiring questionnaire, we can draw the potential needs on GEBCO products in various aspects: such as education, accessibility. The gap between experts and non-experts will decrease by digital service from the private and public organizations such as international academic societies since research funds and policies tend to pursue "openness" and "interoperability" among the domains. Some background why and how to prepare outreach activities in GEBCO will be shown.

  6. Coal-tar pavement sealants might substantially increase children's PAH exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, E. Spencer; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary ingestion has been identified repeatedly as the primary route of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), seven of which are classified as probable human carcinogens (B2 PAHs) by the U.S. EPA. Humans are exposed to PAHs through ingestion of cooked and uncooked foods, incidental ingestion of soil and dust, inhalation of ambient air, and absorption through skin. Although PAH sources are ubiquitous in the environment, one recently identified PAH source stands out: Coal-tar-based pavement sealant—a product applied to many parking lots, driveways, and even playgrounds primarily in the central, southern, and eastern U.S.—has PAH concentrations 100–1000 times greater than most other PAH sources. It was reported recently that PAH concentrations in house dust in residences adjacent to parking lots with coal-tar-based sealant were 25 times higher than in residences adjacent to unsealed asphalt parking lots.

  7. Dextran/Albumin hydrogel sealant for Dacron(R) vascular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lisman, Anna; Butruk, Beata; Wasiak, Iga; Ciach, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the authors describe a novel type of hydrogel coating prepared from the copolymer of human serum albumin and oxidized dextran. The material was designed as a hydrogel sealant for polyester (Dacron®)-based vascular grafts. Dextran was chosen as a coating material due to its anti-thrombogenic properties. Prepared hydrogels were compared with similar, already known biomaterial made from gelatine with the same cross-linking agent. Obtained hydrogels, prepared from various ratios of oxidized dextran/albumin or oxidized dextran/gelatine, showed different cross-linking densities, which caused differences in swelling, degradation rate and mechanical properties. Permeability tests confirmed the complete tightness of the hydrogel-modified prosthesis. Results showed that application of the hydrogel coating provided leakage-free prosthesis and eliminated the need of pre-clotting.

  8. New techniques in the treatment of common perianal diseases: stapled hemorrhoidopexy, botulinum toxin, and fibrin sealant.

    PubMed

    Singer, Marc; Cintron, Jose

    2006-08-01

    There have been several recent advances in the treatment of common perianal diseases. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a procedure of hemorrhoidal fixation, combining the benefits of rubber band ligation into an operative technique. The treatment of anal fissure has typically relied upon internal sphincterotomy; however, it carries a risk of incontinence. The injection of botulinum toxin represents a new form of sphincter relaxation, without division of any sphincter muscle; morbidity is minimal and results are promising. For the treatment of fistula in a fistulotomy remains the gold standard, however, it carries significant risk of incontinence. Use of fibrin sealant to treat fistulae has been met with variable success. It offers sealing of the tract, and then provides scaffolding for native tissue ingrowth.

  9. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

  10. The Teacher as Re-Designer of Technology Integrated Activities for an Early Literacy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2013-01-01

    Though popular among children outside of school, Dutch teachers often struggle to offer technology integrated activities in the kindergarten classroom. Because involving teachers in development of technology integrated activities can support their implementation, this study examines teachers in the role of re-designing such activities. Two case…

  11. Influence of etching time and bonding strategies on the microshear bond strength of self- and light-cured pit-and-fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassú Resende; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of extended etching and bonding strategies on the microshear bond strength of three sealant materials. Two pit-and-fissure sealants [FluroShield, Dentsply (light-cured) and AlphaSeal, DFL (self-cured)] and one light-cured flowable composite resin (Permaflo, Ultradent) were evaluated according to different enamel etching times (15 s or 30 s) and bonding procedures (no adhesive application, application of primer/hydrophobic resin or hydrophobic resin only). Intact enamel blocks were obtained from bovine teeth and sealed via the tested protocols. After 24 h, the microshear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Failure modes were classified by stereomicroscopy. Data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and to Tukey's test (α=0.05). There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) among the materials. Permaflo showed higher bond strength when etched for 30 s alone. Enamel overetching decreased the bond strength of the light-cured sealant. Primer/bond previous treatment improved bond performance for AlphaSeal. In conclusion, from the tested conditions, all sealant materials presented similar bond strength values in relation to bonding protocol and etching time. The flowable composite can be used as a pit-and-fissure sealant. The use of a three-step adhesive system was essential for the self-cured sealant application.

  12. Sintering behavior of lanthanide-containing glass-ceramic sealants for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, Ashutosh; Reddy, Allu Amarnath; Pascual, Maria J.; Gremillard, Laurent; Malchere, Annie; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2012-05-01

    This article reports on the influence of different lanthanides (La, Nd, Gd and Yb) on sintering behavior of alkaline-earth aluminosilicate glass-ceramics sealants for their application in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). All the glasses have been prepared by melt-quench technique. The in situ follow up of sintering behavior of glass powders has been done by high temperature - environmental scanning electron microscope (HT-ESEM) and hot-stage microscope (HSM) while the crystalline phase evolution and assemblage has been analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the glass compositions exhibit a glass-in-glass phase separation followed by two stage sintering resulting in well sintered glass powder compacts after heat treatment at 850 C for 1 h. Diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) based phases constituted the major crystalline part in glass-ceramics followed by some minor phases. The increase in lanthanide content in glasses suppressed their tendency towards devitrification, thus, resulting in glass-ceramics with high amount of residual glassy phase (50-96 wt.%) which is expected to facilitate their self-healing behavior during SOFC operation. The electrical conductivity of the investigated glass-ceramics varied between (1.19 and 7.33) x 10{sup -7} S cm{sup -1} (750-800 C), and depended on the ionic field strength of lanthanide cations. Further experimentation with respect to the long term thermal and chemical stability of residual glassy phase under SOFC operation conditions along with high temperature viscosity measurements will be required in order to elucidate the potential of these glass-ceramics as self-healing sealants.

  13. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethrope, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  14. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  15. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  16. Active and Passive Technology Integration: A Novel Approach for Managing Technology's Influence on Learning Experiences in Context-Aware Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, Teemu H.; Nygren, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Technology integration is the process of overcoming different barriers that hinder efficient utilisation of learning technologies. The authors divide technology integration into two components based on technology's role in the integration process. In active integration, the technology integrates learning resources into a learning space, making it…

  17. Advanced Technological Education Program: 1995 Awards and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    The Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program promotes exemplary improvement in advanced technological education at the national and regional level through support of curriculum development and program improvement at the undergraduate and secondary school levels, especially for technicians being educated for the high performance workplace of…

  18. Teachers' Activities in Technology-Based Mathematics Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on high school mathematics teachers and what they do when they use digital technology in their lessons. It is essentially a discursive paper but it uses data from a project on teachers using technology to illustrate points. The main aim of the paper is to present an holistic account of factors influencing teachers' practice. A…

  19. How Does Technology-Enabled Active Learning Affect Undergraduate Students' Understanding of Electromagnetism Concepts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Belcher, John

    2005-01-01

    Educational technology supports meaningful learning and enables the presentation of spatial and dynamic images, which portray relationships among complex concepts. The Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) involves media-rich software for simulation and visualization in freshman…

  20. The Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Program: Funding Issues and Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program, to better reflect its expanded mission. The NITRD Program is composed of 12 agencies; its members work in collaboration to increase the overall effectiveness and productivity of federal information technology (IT) R&D. A National Coordinating Office coordinates the activities of the NITRD Program and reports to OSTP and the National Science and Technology

  1. Scientific and Technological Information Activity in China (White Paper on Science and Technology : No.1, 1986.5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Translated By Joho Kanri Editorial Committee

    This is a translation of Chapter 4 : Information Systems of Volume 5 : Environment and Resources in the first number of White Paper on Science and Technology edited in May 1986 by State Scientific and Technological Commission (SSTC). Scientific and technological information activity in China has progressed by keeping close cooperation among the Institute for Scientific and Technological Information in China (ISTIC) as a core organization, 33 information institutes under the control of each ministrial commission of The State Council and 35 information institutes of the local governments and cities. As a result of having promoted the information activities along with the guiding principle decided by the 5th National Conference on Scientific and Technological Information in July 1980, information business could be made a great contribution to political decision, national projects and economy stressing plan, technology introduction, etc. The Scientific and Technological Information Bureau of SSTC as a coordinating body proposed the following subjects as an important item for promoting future information business in China: standardization of abstract journals, bringing up of investigators and researchers, production of data bases and consolidation of international online retrieval services, step by step introduction of a charging system for information service, etc.

  2. Mobile satellite communications technology - A summary of NASA activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutzi, E. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies in recent years indicate that future high-capacity mobile satellite systems are viable only if certain high-risk enabling technologies are developed. Accordingly, NASA has structured an advanced technology development program aimed at efficient utilization of orbit, spectrum, and power. Over the last two years, studies have concentrated on developing concepts and identifying cost drivers and other issues associated with the major technical areas of emphasis: vehicle antennas, speech compression, bandwidth-efficient digital modems, network architecture, mobile satellite channel characterization, and selected space segment technology. The program is now entering the next phase - breadboarding, development, and field experimentation.

  3. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  4. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  5. PAH concentrations in lake sediment decline following ban on coal-tar-based pavement sealants in Austin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Mahler, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have concluded that coal-tar-based pavement sealants are a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban settings in large parts of the United States. In 2006, Austin, TX, became the first jurisdiction in the U.S. to ban the use of coal-tar sealants. We evaluated the effect of Austin’s ban by analyzing PAHs in sediment cores and bottom-sediment samples collected in 1998, 2000, 2001, 2012, and 2014 from Lady Bird Lake, the principal receiving water body for Austin urban runoff. The sum concentration of the 16 EPA Priority Pollutant PAHs (∑PAH16) in dated core intervals and surficial bottom-sediment samples collected from sites in the lower lake declined about 44% from 1998–2005 to 2006–2014 (means of 7980 and 4500 μg kg–1, respectively), and by 2012–2014, the decline was about 58% (mean of 3320 μg kg–1). Concentrations of ∑PAH16 in bottom sediment from two of three mid-lake sites decreased by about 71 and 35% from 2001 to 2014. Concentrations at a third site increased by about 14% from 2001 to 2014. The decreases since 2006 reverse a 40-year (1959–1998) upward trend. Despite declines in PAH concentrations, PAH profiles and source-receptor modeling results indicate that coal-tar sealants remain the largest PAH source to the lake, implying that PAH concentrations likely will continue to decline as stocks of previously applied sealant gradually become depleted.

  6. Enamel pretreatment with Er:YAG laser: effects on the microleakage of fissure sealant in fluorosed teeth

    PubMed Central

    Kianimanesh, Nasrin; Shayeghi, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microleakage and penetration of fissure sealant in permanent molar teeth with fluorosis after pretreatment of the occlusal surface. Materials and Methods A total of 120 third molars with mild dental fluorosis were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 20). The tooth surfaces were sealed with an unfilled resin fissure sealant (FS) material. The experimental groups included: 1) phosphoric acid etching (AE) + FS (control); 2) AE + One-Step Plus (OS, Bisco) + FS; 3) bur + AE + FS; 4) bur + AE + OS + FS; 5) Er:YAG laser + AE + FS; and 6) Er:YAG laser + AE + OS + FS. After thermocycling, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% fuchsin and sectioned. Proportions of mircoleakage (PM) and unfilled area (PUA) were measured by digital microscope. Results Overall, there were significant differences among all groups in the PM (p = 0.00). Group 3 showed the greatest PM, and was significantly different from groups 2 to 6 (p < 0.05). Group 6 showed the lowest PM. Pretreatment with Er:YAG with or without adhesive led to less PM than bur pretreatment. There were no significant differences among groups in PUA. Conclusions Conventional acid etching provided a similar degree of occlusal seal in teeth with fluorosis compared to those pretreated with a bur or Er:YAG laser. Pretreatment of pits and fissures with Er:YAG in teeth with fluorosis may be an alternative method before fissure sealant application. PMID:25110641

  7. Determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in bituminous emulsion sealants using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Isacsson, Ulf

    2006-12-22

    The possibility of quantitative determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in bituminous emulsion sealants was investigated using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The target analytes studied were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-, m-, and o-xylene (BTEX) as well as 1,3,5- and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Experimental factors influencing HS-SPME efficiency were studied (sample-headspace equilibration time, extraction time and sample matrix effects). A HS-SPME method using surrogate matrix was developed. The detection limit was estimated as approximately 0.1 ppmw for the target analytes investigated. Good linearity was observed (R(2)>0.997) for all calibration curves obtained. The repeatability of the method (RSD, relative standard deviation) was found less than 10%. The accuracy of the method given by recovery of spiked samples was between 99 and 116%. The HS-SPME method developed was applied to two commercially available bituminous emulsion sealants. External calibration and standard addition approaches were investigated, and statistical paired t-test was performed. The contents of target aromatic hydrocarbons in the sealants studied varied from approximately 0.4 to 150 ppmw. The method developed shows potential as a tool for the determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in emulsified bituminous materials.

  8. Characterization of mechanics and cytocompatibility of fibrin-genipin annulus fibrosus sealant with the addition of cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Guterl, Clare C; Torre, Olivia M; Purmessur, Devina; Dave, Khyati; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Hecht, Andrew C; Nicoll, Steven B; Iatridis, James C

    2014-09-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for a biomaterial sealant capable of repairing small annulus fibrosus (AF) defects. Causes of these defects include painful intervertebral disc herniations, microdiscectomy procedures, morbidity associated with needle puncture injury from discography, and future nucleus replacement procedures. This study describes the enhancements of a fibrin gel through genipin crosslinking (FibGen) and the addition of the cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), fibronectin and collagen. The gel's performance as a potential AF sealant is assessed using a series of in vitro tests. FibGen gels with CAMs had equivalent adhesive strength, gene expression, cytomorphology, and cell proliferation as fibrin alone. However, FibGen gels had enhanced material behaviors that were tunable to higher shear stiffness values and approximated human annulus tissue as compared with fibrin alone, were more dimensionally stable, and had a slower in vitro degradation rate. Cytomorphology of human AF cells cultured on FibGen gels exhibited increased elongation compared with fibrin alone, and the addition of CAMs to FibGen did not significantly affect elongation. This FibGen gel offers the promise of being used as a sealant material to repair small AF defects or to be used in combination with other biomaterials as an adhesive for larger defects.

  9. Characterization of Mechanics and Cytocompatibility of Fibrin-Genipin Annulus Fibrosus Sealant with the Addition of Cell Adhesion Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Guterl, Clare C.; Torre, Olivia M.; Purmessur, Devina; Dave, Khyati; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Hecht, Andrew C.; Nicoll, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for a biomaterial sealant capable of repairing small annulus fibrosus (AF) defects. Causes of these defects include painful intervertebral disc herniations, microdiscectomy procedures, morbidity associated with needle puncture injury from discography, and future nucleus replacement procedures. This study describes the enhancements of a fibrin gel through genipin crosslinking (FibGen) and the addition of the cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), fibronectin and collagen. The gel's performance as a potential AF sealant is assessed using a series of in vitro tests. FibGen gels with CAMs had equivalent adhesive strength, gene expression, cytomorphology, and cell proliferation as fibrin alone. However, FibGen gels had enhanced material behaviors that were tunable to higher shear stiffness values and approximated human annulus tissue as compared with fibrin alone, were more dimensionally stable, and had a slower in vitro degradation rate. Cytomorphology of human AF cells cultured on FibGen gels exhibited increased elongation compared with fibrin alone, and the addition of CAMs to FibGen did not significantly affect elongation. This FibGen gel offers the promise of being used as a sealant material to repair small AF defects or to be used in combination with other biomaterials as an adhesive for larger defects. PMID:24684314

  10. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  11. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

    1999-09-30

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  12. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    1999-10-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  13. 3 CFR - Designation of the National Science and Technology Council to Coordinate Certain Activities Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Technology Council to CoordinateCertain Activities Under the Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Designation of the National Science and Technology Council to Coordinate Certain Activities Under the Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984...

  14. Modeling Active Engagement and Technology Integration: Learning to Teach Literacy Skills and Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modla, Virginia B.; Wake, Donna Glenn

    2007-01-01

    The authors detail technology-based active literacy strategies that they employed with preservice teachers to enhance their skill and comfort level in providing appropriate technology-supported literacy instruction to future students. They examine four theoretical and pragmatic threads to include in course design: active learning, open-ended…

  15. Understanding Chemistry Professors' Use of Educational Technologies: An Activity Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahveci, Ajda; Gilmer, Penny J.; Southerland, Sherry A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the influences on chemistry professors' use of educational technology. For this, we use activity theory to focus on two university chemistry professors and the broader activity system in which they work. We analyse their beliefs and past experiences related to teaching, learning, and technology as well as…

  16. Education Technologies in Addressing the Problem of Forming the Socially Active Individual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of technological support of the educational process in solving the problem of forming the socially active individual. The authors studied the value of the category "social activity" and analyzed educational technologies that have an impact on its formation. The obtained results gave the possibility…

  17. Technology and Engineering Education Students' Perceptions of Hands-On and Hands-Off Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sianez, David M.; Fugere, Madeleine A.; Lennon, Carter A.

    2010-01-01

    Technology and engineering education students responded to a survey regarding hands-on and hands-off activities. First, the students listed hands-on and hands-off activities and what characterized the two types of activities. Activities such as building or assembling something as well as working manually with tools were viewed as hands-on. Passive…

  18. Industrial Technology. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of the series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides activities for teaching industrial arts/technology education. The activities are intended to present energy…

  19. Active Learning Methods and Technology: Strategies for Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coorey, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The demands in higher education are on the rise. Charged with teaching more content, increased class sizes and engaging students, educators face numerous challenges. In design education, educators are often torn between the teaching of technology and the teaching of theory. Learning the formal concepts of hierarchy, contrast and space provide the…

  20. An overview of NASA's activities in micro-nano technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocky, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    An examination of how mass is used in spacecraft design indicates that technology efforts directed only to reduce the mass of electronics, both digital and analog will not significantly reduce the mass of a spacecraft, regardless of how much success those efforts achieve.

  1. Integrated imaging sensor systems with CMOS active pixel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, G.; Cunningham, T.; Ortiz, M.; Heynssens, J.; Sun, C.; Hancock, B.; Seshadri, S.; Wrigley, C.; McCarty, K.; Pain, B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses common approaches to CMOS APS technology, as well as specific results on the five-wire programmable digital camera-on-a-chip developed at JPL. The paper also reports recent research in the design, operation, and performance of APS imagers for several imager applications.

  2. Technology, Active Learning, and Retention in General Education Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Inessa; Chahine, Iman; Garrett, Lauretta; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Difficulties in general education mathematics courses may be attributed to many factors, primarily low proficiency in symbol manipulation, a perception that mathematics is an area which eludes mastery, a lack of engagement and effective practice. Educational technology can be a powerful aid in overcoming these factors. This work describes the…

  3. Powering up Technology from Passive Access to Active Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Shay

    2015-01-01

    For many educators, working with students who were deaf or hard of hearing was the need to have "access." Access to technology was the tool of choice for providing integration that has come to be so much more than gadgets. It is intercurricular--math software incorporates reading, science websites support language skills. It is…

  4. Database of Industrial Technological Information in Kanagawa : Networks for Technology Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akira; Shindo, Tadashi

    This system is one of the databases which require participation by its members and of which premise is to open all the data in it. Aiming at free technological cooperation and exchange among industries it was constructed by Kanagawa Prefecture in collaboration with enterprises located in it. The input data is 36 items such as major product, special and advantageous technology, technolagy to be wanted for cooperation, facility and equipment, which technologically characterize each enterprise. They are expressed in 2,000 characters and written by natural language including Kanji except for some coded items. 24 search items are accessed by natural language so that in addition to interactive searching procedures including menu-type it enables extensive searching. The information service started in Oct., 1986 covering data from 2,000 enterprisen.

  5. Heat-activated heat-pump development and potential application of Stirling-engine technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, P. D.; West, C. D.

    1982-06-01

    Presented is a brief overview of the heat-activated heat pump technology development program being carried out with emphasis on the Stirling engine technology projects. The major projects are reviewed as they were formulated and carried out under the previous product development guidelines. The revised technology development focus and current status of those major hardware projects are discussed. The key issues involved in applying Stirling engine technology to heat pump equipment are assessed. The approach and planned future activities to address those issues are described. Also included are brief descriptions of two projects in this area supported by the Gas Research Institute.

  6. Delayed cerebrospinal fluid leak after watertight dural closure with a polyethylene glycol hydrogel dural sealant in posterior fossa surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Jito, Junya; Nitta, Naoki; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel sealant recently has been approved as an adjunct to sutured dural closure in Japan. We treated consecutive six patients with PEG hydrogel sealant in posterior fossa operation. Three of six cases suffered delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak after watertight dural closure with the PEG hydrogel sealant, although there was no leak case which was treated with fibrin glue, before 2 years until the adoption of the new material. These patients underwent posterior fossa craniotomy and discharged without remarkable CSF leak. The pseudomeningocele under the occipital wound caused the CSF leak occurr from 5th to 7th week postoperatively. All CSF leak cases needed surgical repair. At the repair, the PEG hydrogel was liquefied and almost absorbed. A fistula on the closure line and a dead space after the absorption of the PEG hydrogel was observed. When the absorbable PEG hydrogel sealant plugs in small gaps of sutured dura, its properties to prevent adhesion might suppress healing process of dural closure, so that CSF could leak through the gaps and collect as a pseudomeningocele in the dead space after absorption of the PEG hydrogel. In posterior fossa surgery a PEG hydrogel sealant should be applied when dural edges are closed tightly without any gaps.

  7. Evaluation of asbestos exposure within the automotive repair industry: a study involving removal of asbestos-containing body sealants and drive clutch replacement.

    PubMed

    Blake, Charles L; Dotson, G Scott; Harbison, Raymond D

    2008-12-01

    Two independent assessments were performed of airborne asbestos concentrations generated during automotive repair work on vintage vehicles . The first involved removal of asbestos-containing seam sealant, and the second involved servicing of a drive clutch. Despite the relatively high concentrations (5.6-28%) of chrysotile fibers detected within bulk samples of seam sealant, the average asbestos concentration for personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples during seam sealant removal was 0.006 f/cc (fibers/cubic centimeter of air). Many other air samples contained asbestos at or below the analytical limit of detection (LOD). Pneumatic chiseling of the sealant material during removal resulted in 69% of area air samples containing asbestos. Use of this impact tool liberated more asbestos than hand scraping. Asbestos fibers were only detected in air samples collected during the installation of a replacement clutch. The highest asbestos corrected airborne fiber concentration observed during clutch installation was 0.0028 f/cc. This value is approximately 100 times lower than Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.1f/cc. The airborne asbestos concentrations observed during the servicing of vintage vehicles with asbestos-containing seam sealant and clutches are comparable to levels reported for repair work involving brake components and gaskets.

  8. Research Activities of Advanced Propulsion Technology in JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Takeshi

    The rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine is studied for the next space transportation in JAXA. The engine realizes a higher effective specific impulse than that of the conventional rocket engines. Engine model combustion tests were conducted in the ejector-jet mode at a sea-level static-air condition and in the ramjet mode at a Mach 4 flight condition. Flight tests with the CAMUI hybrid rocket are planed for the ejector-jet system design technology. Aerodynamic tests and combustor tests are conducted to modify the engine design technologies. Studies on the high enthalpy flow, the light weight material and the vitiation effect on the engine performances are also conducted.

  9. Physical activity in physical education: teacher or technology effects.

    PubMed

    Grissom, Traci; Ward, Phillip; Martin, Beth; Leenders, Nicole Y J M

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed if wearing a heart rate monitor influenced student activity levels in elementary physical education. Data were analyzed for 4 students using an alternating treatment design to assess differential effects between accelerometer activity counts obtained from students when wearing the heart rate monitor and when they were not wearing the monitor. Results show that (a) there was no difference in activity counts between the 2 conditions, (b) boys had higher means than girls, and (c) the variance between more and less active boys was greater than the variance among the girls.

  10. Technology and Teaching: Promoting Active Learning Using Individual Response Technology in Large Introductory Psychology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poirier, Christopher R.; Feldman, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Individual response technology (IRT), in which students use wireless handsets to communicate real-time responses, permits the recording and display of aggregated student responses during class. In comparison to a traditional class that did not employ IRT, students using IRT performed better on exams and held positive attitudes toward the…

  11. Evaluation of a fissure sealant program as part of community-based teaching and training.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Philippus J; Kroon, Jeroen; White, John G

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995 the Department of Community Dentistry of the University of Pretoria has been involved in the rendering of mobile primary oral health care services to children in the Hammanskraal area of Gauteng, South Africa, as part of their students' community-based training. Mokonyama Primary School was identified as the first school where a primary oral health care service could be rendered. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact (outcomes) of a fissure sealant program on the dentition status of the school children. Seven years after the implementation of the program, the dentition status of children at Mokonyama was compared with that of a comparable group of children from the same area who were not exposed to the program. The results showed that the decayed, missing, and filled teeth in the primary dentition (dmft) in the six-year-old group in Mokonyama (1.74) did not differ significantly from the dmft (1.43) of the control group (p = 0.49). The decayed, missing, and filled teeth in the permanent dentition (DMFT) of 0.59 for the fifteen-year-old group in Mokonyama, however, differed significantly (p = 0.0001) from the DMFT of the control group (2.38). Fifteen-year-old children in Mokonyama had 75.2 percent fewer caries than their counterparts in the control group.

  12. Two-year follow-up in patients treated with emphysematous lung sealant for advanced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Mordechai R; Refaely, Yael; Maimon, Nimrod; Rosengarten, Dror; Fruchter, Oren

    2013-11-01

    Endoscopic lung volume-reduction therapy for emphysema has been associated with therapeutic responses smaller in magnitude and less durable than surgical volume reduction (LVRS). Bronchoscopic emphysematous lung sealant (ELS) therapy has been shown to produce improvements in pulmonary function similar to surgery at 1 year. This case series summarizes safety and efficacy data of all patients from the initial ELS study out to 2 years. Between 1 and 2 years, there were three all-cause adverse events requiring hospitalization. One patient went on to successful lung transplant. Improvements relative to baseline in spirometry (change in FEV1: + 14.3 ± 33.1%; change in FVC: + 5.8 ± 23.2%) and diffusing capacity (change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide: + 10.6 ± 20.6%) were observed at 2 years. An exponential model fit to FEV₁ data at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months predicted improvements from a baseline of > 5% out to 4.1 years, similar to what has been reported following surgery. This report confirms long-term safety and efficacy following ELS therapy in advanced emphysema. Studies in a larger cohort are needed to define the role of ELS therapy in the treatment algorithm of patients with this condition.

  13. A randomised trial of lung sealant versus medical therapy for advanced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Come, Carolyn E; Kramer, Mordechai R; Dransfield, Mark T; Abu-Hijleh, Muhanned; Berkowitz, David; Bezzi, Michela; Bhatt, Surya P; Boyd, Michael B; Cases, Enrique; Chen, Alexander C; Cooper, Christopher B; Flandes, Javier; Gildea, Thomas; Gotfried, Mark; Hogarth, D Kyle; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Leeds, William; Liesching, Timothy; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marquette, Charles; Mularski, Richard A; Pinto-Plata, Victor M; Pritchett, Michael A; Rafeq, Samaan; Rubio, Edmundo R; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Stratakos, Grigoris; Sy, Alexander; Tsai, Larry W; Wahidi, Momen; Walsh, John; Wells, J Michael; Whitten, Patrick E; Yusen, Roger; Zulueta, Javier J; Criner, Gerard J; Washko, George R

    2015-09-01

    Uncontrolled pilot studies demonstrated promising results of endoscopic lung volume reduction using emphysematous lung sealant (ELS) in patients with advanced, upper lobe predominant emphysema. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ELS in a randomised controlled setting.Patients were randomised to ELS plus medical treatment or medical treatment alone. Despite early termination for business reasons and inability to assess the primary 12-month end-point, 95 out of 300 patients were successfully randomised, providing sufficient data for 3- and 6-month analysis.57 patients (34 treatment and 23 control) had efficacy results at 3 months; 34 (21 treatment and 13 control) at 6 months. In the treatment group, 3-month lung function, dyspnoea, and quality of life improved significantly from baseline when compared to control. Improvements persisted at 6 months with >50% of treated patients experiencing clinically important improvements, including some whose lung function improved by >100%. 44% of treated patients experienced adverse events requiring hospitalisation (2.5-fold more than control, p=0.01), with two deaths in the treated cohort. Treatment responders tended to be those experiencing respiratory adverse events.Despite early termination, results show that minimally invasive ELS may be efficacious, yet significant risks (probably inflammatory) limit its current utility.

  14. Investigation of Performance of SCN-1 Pure Glass as Sealant Used in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-03-01

    As its name implies, self-healing glass seal has the potential of restoring its mechanical properties upon being reheated to stack operating temperature, even when it has experienced some cooling induced damage/crack at room temperature. Such a self-healing feature is desirable for achieving high seal reliability during thermal cycling. On the other hand, self-healing glass is also characterized by its low mechanical stiffness and high creep rate at the typical operating temperature of SOFCs. Therefore, from a design’s perspective, it is important to know the long term geometric stability and thermal mechanical behaviors of the self-healing glass under the stack operating conditions. These predictive capabilities will guide the design and optimization of a reliable sealing system that potentially utilizes self-healing glass as well as other ceramic seal components in achieving the ultimate goal of SOFC. In this report, we focused on predicting the effects of various generic seal design parameters on the stresses in the seal. For this purpose, we take the test cell used in the leakage test for compliant glass seals conducted in PNNL as our initial modeling geometry. The effect of the ceramic stopper on the geometry stability of the self-healing glass sealants is studied first. Then we explored the effect of various interfaces such as stopper and glass, stopper and PEN, as well stopper and IC plate, on the geometry stability and reliability of glass during the operating and cooling processes.

  15. More Than a Leak Sealant. The Mechanical Properties of Callose in Pollen Tubes1

    PubMed Central

    Parre, Elodie; Geitmann, Anja

    2005-01-01

    While callose is a well-known permeability barrier and leak sealant in plant cells, it is largely unknown whether this cell wall polymer can also serve as a load-bearing structure. Since callose occurs in exceptionally large amounts in pollen, we assessed its role for resisting tension and compression stress in this cell. The effect of callose digestion in Solanum chacoense and Lilium orientalis pollen grains demonstrated that, depending on the species, this cell wall polymer represents a major stress-bearing structure at the aperture area of germinating grains. In the pollen tube, it is involved in cell wall resistance to circumferential tension stress, and despite its absence at the growing apex, callose is indirectly involved in the establishment of tension stress resistance in this area. To investigate whether or not callose is able to provide mechanical resistance against compression stress, we subjected pollen tubes to local deformation by microindentation. The data revealed that lowering the amount of callose resulted in reduced cellular stiffness and increased viscoelasticity, thus indicating clearly that callose is able to resist compression stress. Whether this function is relevant for pollen tube mechanics, however, is unclear, as stiffened growth medium caused a decrease in callose deposition. Together, our data provide clear evidence for the capacity of cell wall callose to resist tension and compression stress, thus demonstrating that this amorphous cell wall substance can have a mechanical role in growing plant cells. PMID:15618431

  16. Usefulness of a new gelatin glue sealant system for dural closure in a rat durotomy model.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shuko; Ikada, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Watertight dural closure is imperative after neurosurgical procedures, because inadequately treated leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can have serious consequences. We used a rat durotomy model to test the usefulness of a new gelatin glue as a dural sealant in a rat model of transdural CSF leakage. All rats were randomly divided into one of the following three treatment groups: no application (control group: N = 18), application of fibrin glue (fibrin glue group: N = 18), and application of the new gelatin glue (new gelatin glue group: N = 18). The craniotomy side was re-opened, and CSF leakage was checked and recorded at 1, 7, and 28 days postoperatively. The new gelatin glue was adequate for stopping CSF leakage; no leakage was observed at postoperative days 1 or 7, and leakage was observed in only one rat at postoperative day 28. This result was statistically significant when compared to the control group (P = 0.002, P = 0.015, P = 0.015, respectively). The pathologic score of the new gelatin group was not different from that of the control or fibrin glue groups. We conclude that our new gelatin glue provides effective watertight closure 1, 7, and 28 days after operation in the rat durotomy model.

  17. INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ON PROPERTIES OF IONOMERIC AND RESIN SEALANT MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Correr, Gisele Maria; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Alves, Marcelo Correa; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of environmental conditions on the degradation of ionomeric and resin sealant materials. Material and Methods: FluroShield, Vitremer, and Ketac Molar disc-shaped specimens (n=18/material) were prepared, polished, subjected to initial hardness and roughness readings. Six discs of each material were randomly assigned to one of three different storage solutions: 0.3% citric acid (CA), demineralization solution (DE), and remineralization solution (RE). The specimens were individually immersed in 3 mL of the test solutions, which were daily changed. After 15 days of storage, new surface roughness and hardness readings were done. Fluoride release in the solutions was measured within 15 days. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's and Contrast tests (α=0.05). Results: The storage in CA increased the roughness of Vitremer and Ketac Molar. A significant reduction in hardness was observed for all materials after storage in all solutions. For all materials, the greatest amounts of fluoride release occurred during the 1st day. FluroShield presented the same patterns of fluoride release in all solutions. Ketac Molar and Vitremer released the highest amounts of fluoride in the CA solution. Conclusions: Ionomeric materials are more susceptible to degradation than resin-based materials under acidic conditions. Acidic conditions lead to a higher fluoride release from ionomeric materials. PMID:19668988

  18. PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

    2001-02-25

    The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

  19. PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

    2001-02-25

    The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

  20. A chrome-free conversion coating and sealant for aluminum and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bibber, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    For over fifty years, chromates have been the standard against which other conversion coatings and/or sealants have been judged. Due to current environmental and safety concerns, they are being removed from use. This paper presents neutral salt-spray, filiform primer adhesion and electrical conductivity data on a commercial chromate-free, inorganic and non-toxic conversion coating used with a new and unique sealing emulsion. The seal is an organic water based emulsion which when dried on a permanganate based conversion coated aluminum surface will be polymerized, or cured, when heated to 250--300 F for 20 seconds or longer. The higher the temperature, or period of time, the greater the degree of polymerization. The polymerized film is as electrically conductive as chromate films and easily accepts and bonds to applied primers. For in-service repair a conventional heat-gun maybe used. For large surfaces, any other conventional heat source may be used. The 6061-T6, 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 series wrought alloys were tested and directly compared to current chromate based conversion coatings. The tests showed equivalent or superior results in all cases.

  1. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

    2000-10-31

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  2. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    2000-11-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  3. How different types of users develop trust in technology: a qualitative analysis of the antecedents of active and passive user trust in a shared technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Le, Kim; Deitermann, Annika; Montague, Enid

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antecedents of trust in technology for active users and passive users working with a shared technology. According to the prominence-interpretation theory, to assess the trustworthiness of a technology, a person must first perceive and evaluate elements of the system that includes the technology. An experimental study was conducted with 54 participants who worked in two-person teams in a multi-task environment with a shared technology. Trust in technology was measured using a trust in technology questionnaire and antecedents of trust were elicited using an open-ended question. A list of antecedents of trust in technology was derived using qualitative analysis techniques. The following categories emerged from the antecedent: technology factors, user factors, and task factors. Similarities and differences between active users and passive user responses, in terms of trust in technology were discussed.

  4. How different types of users develop trust in technology: A qualitative analysis of the antecedents of active and passive user trust in a shared technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Le, Kim; Deitermann, Annika; Montague, Enid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antecedents of trust in technology for active users and passive users working with a shared technology. According to the prominence-interpretation theory, to assess the trustworthiness of a technology, a person must first perceive and evaluate elements of the system that includes the technology. An experimental study was conducted with 54 participants who worked in two-person teams in a multi-task environment with a shared technology. Trust in technology was measured using a trust in technology questionnaire and antecedents of trust were elicited using an open-ended question. A list of antecedents of trust in technology was derived using qualitative analysis techniques. The following categories emerged from the antecedent: technology factors, user factors, and task factors. Similarities and differences between active users and passive user responses, in terms of trust in technology were discussed. PMID:24882059

  5. Working Group 5: Measurements technology and active experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E.; Barfield, J. N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Feynman, J.; Quinn, J. N.; Roberts, W.; Stone, N.; Taylor, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Technology issues identified by working groups 5 are listed. (1) New instruments are needed to upgrade the ability to measure plasma properties in space. (2) Facilities should be developed for conducting a broad range of plasma experiments in space. (3) The ability to predict plasma weather within magnetospheres should be improved and a capability to modify plasma weather developed. (4) Methods of control of plasma spacecraft and spacecraft plasma interference should be upgraded. (5) The space station laboratory facilities should be designed with attention to problems of flexibility to allow for future growth. These issues are discussed.

  6. Physiological and technological considerations for Mars mission extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, James M.; Sedej, Melaine M.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of the suit is a function of the needs of human physiology, the ambient environment outside the suit, and the type of activity to be accomplished while in the suit. The physiological requirements that must be provided for in the Martian Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suit will be reviewed. The influence of the Martian environment on the EVA suit and EVA capabilities is elaborated, and the Martian environment is compared with the lunar environment. The differences that may influence the EVA design are noted. The type, nature, and duration of activities to be done in transit to Mars and on the Martian surface will be evaluated and the impact of these activities on the requirements for EVA systems will be discussed. Furthermore, the interaction between Martian surface transportation systems and EVA systems will be covered. Finally, options other than EVA will be considered such as robotics, nonanthropometric suits, and vehicles with anthropometric extremities or robotic end effectors.

  7. Technology trends, energy prices affect worldwide rig activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rappold, K.

    1995-09-25

    The major worldwide offshore rig markets have improved slightly this year, while the onshore markets generally lagged slightly. Offshore rig utilization rates have remained strong worldwide, with some areas reaching nearly 100%. Total worldwide offshore rig (jack ups, semisubmersible, drillships, submersibles, and barges) utilization was about 86%. Offshore drilling activity is driven primarily by oil and natural gas price expectations. Natural gas prices tend to drive North American offshore drilling activity, including the shallow waters in the Gulf of Mexico. International offshore drilling activity and deepwater projects in the Gulf of Mexico are more closely tied to oil prices. The paper discusses US rig count, directional drilling activity, jack up rig demand, semisubmersibles demand, rig replacement costs, and new construction.

  8. Industrial Technology. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of a series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides learning activities for teachers to use with students in industrial arts/technology education. Each of the 17…

  9. The effect of internal teat sealant products (Teatseal and Orbeseal) on intramammary infection, clinical mastitis, and somatic cell counts in lactating dairy cows: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rabiee, A R; Lean, I J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of internal teat sealant products containing bismuth subnitrate (Teatseal and Orbeseal; Pfizer Animal Health, West Ryde, Australia) when used alone, or in the presence of antibiotic dry cow therapy (ADCT), before or at drying off on the incidence of new intramammary infections (IMI), clinical mastitis, and milk somatic cell count (SCC) during lactation. The literature search identified 18 English-language publications on the use of Teatseal in dairy cattle. A total of 12 studies with 17 subtrials or comparisons including 13 positive control subtrials (internal teat sealant and ADCT vs. ADCT) and 4 negative control subtrials (internal teat sealant vs. untreated) examining IMI were included in the analysis. Internal teat sealants, alone or in the presence of ADCT, reduced the risk of acquiring new IMI after calving by 25% [risk ratio (RR)=0.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67 to 0.83]. Internal teat sealants reduced the risk of IMI by 73% compared with untreated cows (RR=0.27; 95% CI: 0.13 to 0.55). The results of both meta-analyses of IMI, with positive and negative controls, were heterogeneous [I(2) (a statistic that describes the proportion of total variation in study effect estimates that is due to heterogeneity)=65.4 and 92.1%]. No farm or cow factors studied significantly contributed to the heterogeneity of the results. A total of 16 studies (21 subtrials), including 14 positive control subtrials and 7 negative control subtrials, examining clinical mastitis were included in the analysis. Internal teat sealants alone and in the presence of ADCT reduced the risk of clinical mastitis after calving in lactating cows by 29% (RR=0.71; 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.82), and 48% (RR=0.52; 95% CI: 0.37 to 0.75), respectively. The results of the meta-analysis on clinical mastitis with positive controls were homogeneous (I(2)=33.6%), whereas the results of studies with negative controls were heterogeneous (I(2)=60.4%). No farm

  10. Emplotment, Embodiment, Engagement: Narrative Technology in Support of Physical Education, Sport and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a keynote lecture delivered at the International Association of Physical Education in Higher Education 2011 Conference, University of Limerick, on the sub theme: "Technologies in Support of Physical Education, Sport, and Physical Activity." The paper outlines and illustrates a framework: narrative technology, which can be…

  11. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    MINWALL HJ

    2011-04-08

    Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

  12. The Potential of Using Virtual Reality Technology in Physical Activity Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasco, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality technology has been successfully used for learning purposes. The purposes of the article are to examine current research on the role of virtual reality in physical activity settings and discuss potential application of using virtual reality technology to enhance learning in physical education. The article starts…

  13. Synthesizing Technology Adoption and Learners' Approaches towards Active Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kevin; Cheung, George; Wan, Kelvin; Brown, Ian; Luk, Green

    2015-01-01

    In understanding how active and blended learning approaches with learning technologies engagement in undergraduate education, current research models tend to undermine the effect of learners' variations, particularly regarding their styles and approaches to learning, on intention and use of learning technologies. This study contributes to further…

  14. Technology Transfer Activities of NASA/MSFC: Enhancing the Southeast Region's Production Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1998-01-01

    The researcher was charged with the task of developing a simplified model to illustrate the impact of how NASA/MSFC technology transfer activities contribute to shifting outward the Southeast region's and the nation's productive capacity. The report is a background of the impact of technological growth on the nation's production possibility frontier (ppf).

  15. Utilizing Technology to Improve the Administration of Instructional Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Bridget; Burdette, Trey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide examples of how technology is being used in one university to increase the organization and effectiveness of instructional physical activity programs (IPAPs). The article outlines ways in which technology can organize materials for students, instructors, and programs. Additionally, the article describes…

  16. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  17. Comparison of Clinical Success of Applying a Kind of Fissure Sealant on the Lower Permanent Molar Teeth in Dry and Wet Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarian, Tahereh; Baghi, Saeid; Alipoor, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Fissure sealant therapy is among the most effective methods of preventing dental caries. However, it is lengthy and isolation of the teeth is difficult in this procedure especially in young children. Using new hydrophilic fissure sealant may reduce such problems. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the clinical success of a hydrophilic fissure sealant on the lower permanent molar teeth in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Method This clinical trial assessed 31 patients (mean age 8.13±1.77 years) who needed fissure sealant therapy on their first or second mandibular permanent molar. Having performed dental prophylaxis, the teeth were etched and rinsed. Then one of the two was randomly selected and sealed with smartseal & loc in isolated and dry conditions; while, the other was wetted on the etched enamel by using a saliva-contaminated micro brush, and was then sealed with the same fissure as the first tooth. Six and 12 months later, two independent observers examined the clinical success of sealant through checking the marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, and anatomical form. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software, version 16. The bivariate Chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used to compare the clinical success of the two treatment methods. Results There was a high interpersonal reliability between the two examiners (K= 0.713). After 12 months, 90.3% clinical success was observed in dry conditions and 83.9% in wet conditions for smartseal & loc; however, the difference was not statistically significant (p= 0.0707). Conclusion According to the results of this study, it seems that using new hydrophilic fissure sealant can reduce technical sensitivities and consequently decreases the apprehensions on saliva contamination of etched enamel during treatment procedures. PMID:26331144

  18. Effect of Family Income on the Relationship Between Parental Education and Sealant Prevalence, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Al Agili, Dania E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We examined the association between sealant prevalence and parental education for different levels of family income, controlling for other covariates. Methods We combined data from 2005–2006, 2007–2008, and 2009–2010 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The study sample was 7,090 participants aged 6 to 19 years. Explanatory variables, chosen on the basis of Andersen and Aday’s framework of health care utilization, were predisposing variables — child’s age, sex, race/ethnicity, and parental education (high school diploma); enabling variables — family income (<100% of the federal poverty level [FPL]; 100%–200% of the FPL; and >200% of the FPL), health insurance status, and regular source of medical care; and a need variable — future need for care (perceived child health status is excellent/very good, good, fair/poor). We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses and included a term for interaction between education and income in the multivariate model. We report significant findings (P ≤ .05). Results Sealant prevalence was associated with all explanatory variables in bivariate and multivariate analyses. In bivariate analyses, higher parental education and family income were independently associated with higher sealant prevalence. In the multivariate analysis, higher parental education was associated with sealant prevalence among higher income children, but not among low-income children (<100% FPL). Sealant prevalence was higher among children with parental education greater than a high school diploma versus less than a high school diploma in families with income ≥100% FPL. Conclusion Our findings suggest that income modifies the association of parental education on sealant prevalence. Recognition of this relationship may be important for health promotion efforts. PMID:26312383

  19. Application of fibrin sealant at the urethrovesical anastomosis in robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: does it enable earlier Foley catheter and Jackson-Pratt drain removal?

    PubMed

    Flury, Sarah C; Starnes, Danielle N; Steers, William D

    2008-01-01

    Leakage at the urethrovesical anastomosis in the post-operative period can result in morbidity including ileus. We examined the effectiveness of using a fibrin sealant at the anastomosis to limit urine leakage thereby facilitating earlier Jackson-Pratt drain and Foley catheter removal following robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALRP). Forty consecutive patients underwent RALRP by one surgeon at our institution. The first 20 patients underwent standard operation and served as the control group. The subsequent 20 patients underwent the same operation with addition of fibrin sealant following a running absorbable sutured urethrovesical anastomosis. The two groups were compared for age (60.5 vs. 58.2 years), pre-operative PSA (5.23 vs. 4.71), Gleason score (6.3 vs. 6.5), stage at resection, and prostate size at resection (51.7 vs. 47.7 g). Wilcoxon rank sum test determined no statistically significant differences in the groups. Patients in the fibrin sealant group had 1.3 versus 2.1 days with a Jackson-Pratt drain, 9.75 versus 12.1 days with a catheter, and an average of 38.6 versus 63.2 cc of drainage per shift. Catheters were removed when a cystogram demonstrated no extravasation of contrast. Two patients in the control group and no patients in the fibrin sealant group had large-volume leakage and ileus post-operatively. In patients undergoing RALRP, application of fibrin sealant at the urethrovesical anastomosis appears to facilitate sealing, thereby allowing earlier removal of the JP drain, by 0.8 days, and the Foley catheter, by 2.35 days, than in controls. No patients in the fibrin sealant group suffered post-operative ileus. This adjunct may be especially useful early in the learning process to reduce morbidity.

  20. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program - Biocatalysis research activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, R.

    1984-01-01

    The activities of the Biocatalysis Research Activity are organized into the Biocatalysis and Molecular Modeling work elements and a supporting planning and analysis function. In the Biocatalysis work element, progress is made in developing a method for stabilizing genetically engineered traits in microorganisms, refining a technique for monitoring cells that are genetically engineered, and identifying strains of fungi for highly efficient preprocessing of biomass for optimizing the efficiency of bioreactors. In the Molecular Modeling work element, a preliminary model of the behavior of enzymes is developed. A preliminary investigation of the potential for synthesizing enzymes for use in electrochemical processes is completed. Contact with industry and universities is made to define key biocatalysis technical issues and to broaden the range of potential participants in the activity. Analyses are conducted to identify and evaluate potential concepts for future research funding.

  1. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program - Biocatalysis research activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R.

    1984-04-01

    The activities of the Biocatalysis Research Activity are organized into the Biocatalysis and Molecular Modeling work elements and a supporting planning and analysis function. In the Biocatalysis work element, progress is made in developing a method for stabilizing genetically engineered traits in microorganisms, refining a technique for monitoring cells that are genetically engineered, and identifying strains of fungi for highly efficient preprocessing of biomass for optimizing the efficiency of bioreactors. In the Molecular Modeling work element, a preliminary model of the behavior of enzymes is developed. A preliminary investigation of the potential for synthesizing enzymes for use in electrochemical processes is completed. Contact with industry and universities is made to define key biocatalysis technical issues and to broaden the range of potential participants in the activity. Analyses are conducted to identify and evaluate potential concepts for future research funding.

  2. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  3. Active Dust Mitigation Technology for Thermal Radiators for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M. R.; Hopkins, J. W.; Holloway, N. M. H.; Connell, J. W.; Chen, A.; Irwin, S. A.; Case, S. O.; VanSuetendael, N. J.; Snyder, S. J.; Clements, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Dust accumulation on thermal radiator surfaces planned for lunar exploration will significantly reduce their efficiency. Evidence from the Apollo missions shows that an insulating layer of dust accumulated on radiator surfaces could not be removed and caused serious thermal control problems. Temperatures measured at different locations in the magnetometer on Apollo 12 were 38 C warmer than expected due to lunar dust accumulation. In this paper, we report on the application of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) technology being developed in our NASA laboratory and applied to thermal radiator surfaces. The EDS uses electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces generated by a grid of electrodes running a 2 micro A electric current to remove dust particles from surfaces. Working prototypes of EDS systems on solar panels and on thermal radiators have been successfully developed and tested at vacuum with clearing efficiencies above 92%. For this work EDS prototypes on flexible and rigid thermal radiators were developed and tested at vacuum.

  4. Cellulose Electro-Active Paper: From Discovery to Technology Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Zafar; Kim, Heung Soo; Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2014-09-01

    Cellulose electro-active paper (EAPap) is an attractive material of electro-active polymers (EAPs) family due to its smart characteristics. EAPap is thin cellulose film coated with metal electrodes on both sides. Its large displacement output, low actuation voltage and low power consumption can be used for biomimetic sensors/actuators and electromechanical system. Because cellulose EAPap is ultra-lightweight, easy to manufacture, inexpensive, biocompatible, and biodegradable, it has been employed for many applications such as bending actuator, vibration sensor, artificial muscle, flexible speaker, and can be advantageous in areas such as micro-insect robots, micro-flying objects, microelectromechanical systems, biosensors, and flexible displays.

  5. Young Children: Active Learners in a Technological Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, June L., Ed.; Shade, Daniel D., Ed.

    This book addresses the issues of appropriate use of computers with young children and how children and early childhood educators interact with the computer in early childhood settings. Part 1, "Young Children as Active Learners," contains chapter 1: "Listen to the Children: Observing Young Children's Discoveries with the…

  6. Practical Design Activities for Your Technology Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeihiser, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how he and his class get involved in doing project designs within their school district every year. The author relates how they have done design projects for local townships and boroughs, non-profit organizations, Eagle Scout projects, and much more. The author relates how these activities have been such…

  7. Efficacy of a Topical Gelatin-Thrombin Matrix Sealant in Reducing Postoperative Drainage Following Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan You; Lee, Osung; Han, Ho Sung; Kim, Gang-Un; Lee, Chee Kean; Kang, Sung Shik; Lee, Myung Ho; Cho, Hyeon Guk; Kim, Ho-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective fusion level(s)-, age-, and gender-matched analysis. Purpose To determine whether the application of a topical gelatin-thrombin matrix sealant (Floseal) at the end of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) can reduce the amount of postoperative hemorrhage. Overview of Literature The effect of the matrix sealant in decreasing postoperative hemorrhage following ACDF has not been reported. Methods Matrix sealant was (n=116, study group) or was not applied (n=58, control group) at the end of ACDF. Patients were selected by 1:2 matching criteria of fusion level(s), age, and gender. Seven parameters described below were compared between the two groups. Results The total drain amount for the first 24 hours (8±9 versus 27±22 mL), total drain amount until the 8-hour drainage decreased to ≤10 mL (8±10 versus 33±26 mL), and the total drain amount until 6 AM on the first postoperative day (7±8 versus 24±20 mL) were significantly lower in the study group than the control group (all p<0.001). The time for the 8-hour drainage to decrease to ≤10 mL was significantly lower in the study group (10±5 versus 26±14 hours, p<0.001). The 8-hour drainage decreased to ≤10 mL on the operation day in most patients (88%) in the study group versus mostly on the first (48%) or second (33%) postoperative day in the control group (p<0.001). The total drain amount until 6 AM on the first postoperative day was 0 mL in 43% of patients in the study group and in 7% in the control group (p<0.001). No patient in either group required hematoma evacuation. Conclusions Application of the topical matrix sealant at the end of ACDF can significantly reduce the amount of postoperative hemorrhage. PMID:26713124

  8. Measuring the rupture stress point of biological sealant-collagen bonding: validation of a technique used after hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Michot, F; Scotte, M; Dujardin, F; Hoebeke, Y; Le Blanc, I; Amelot, A; Azema, P; Bouvier, P

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to measure the rupture stress point of a fibrin clot situated on a liver, in realistic surgical conditions. The experimental method was carried out with a machined wooden cylinder bonded on the liver, connected with a wire to a setup and pulled at a constant speed, and a sensor was placed on the wire measuring the applied strength. This method, realized in the dog, made it possible to validate a precise and reproducible method designed for testing the adhesive characteristics of biological sealant-collagen bonding on the liver.

  9. Quantitative phase imaging technologies to assess neuronal activity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Active neurons tends to have a different dynamical behavior compared to resting ones. Non-exhaustively, vesicular transport towards the synapses is increased, since axonal growth becomes slower. Previous studies also reported small phase variations occurring simultaneously with the action potential. Such changes exhibit times scales ranging from milliseconds to several seconds on spatial scales smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Therefore, QPI systems are of particular interest to measure neuronal activity without labels. Here, we report the development of two new QPI systems that should enable the detection of such activity. Both systems can acquire full field phase images with a sub nanometer sensitivity at a few hundreds of frames per second. The first setup is a synchronous combination of Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) and Fluorescence wide field imaging. The latter modality enables the measurement of neurons electrical activity using calcium indicators. In cultures, FF-OCT exhibits similar features to Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM), except from complex computational reconstruction. However, FF-OCT is of particular interest in order to measure phase variations in tissues. The second setup is based on a Quantitative Differential Interference Contrast setup mounted in an epi-illumination configuration with a spectrally incoherent illumination. Such a common path interferometer exhibits a very good mechanical stability, and thus enables the measurement of phase images during hours. Additionally, such setup can not only measure a height change, but also an optical index change for both polarization. Hence, one can measure simultaneously a phase change and a birefringence change.

  10. NASA Activities as they Relate to Microwave Technology for Aerospace Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses current NASA activities and plans as they relate to microwave technology for aerospace communications. The presentations discusses some examples of the aforementioned technology within the context of the existing and future communications architectures and technology development roadmaps. Examples of the evolution of key technology from idea to deployment are provided as well as the challenges that lay ahead regarding advancing microwave technology to ensure that future NASA missions are not constrained by lack of communication or navigation capabilities. The presentation closes with some examples of emerging ongoing opportunities for establishing collaborative efforts between NASA, Industry, and Academia to encourage the development, demonstration and insertion of communications technology in pertinent aerospace systems.

  11. Modern and prospective technologies for weather modification activities: A look at integrating unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axisa, Duncan; DeFelice, Tom P.

    2016-09-01

    Present-day weather modification technologies are scientifically based and have made controlled technological advances since the late 1990s, early 2000s. The technological advances directly related to weather modification have primarily been in the decision support and evaluation based software and modeling areas. However, there have been some technological advances in other fields that might now be advanced enough to start considering their usefulness for improving weather modification operational efficiency and evaluation accuracy. We consider the programmatic aspects underlying the development of new technologies for use in weather modification activities, identifying their potential benefits and limitations. We provide context and initial guidance for operators that might integrate unmanned aircraft systems technology in future weather modification operations.

  12. Visual Sensor Technology for Advanced Surveillance Systems: Historical View, Technological Aspects and Research Activities in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Foresti, Gian Luca; Micheloni, Christian; Piciarelli, Claudio; Snidaro, Lauro

    2009-01-01

    The paper is a survey of the main technological aspects of advanced visual-based surveillance systems. A brief historical view of such systems from the origins to nowadays is given together with a short description of the main research projects in Italy on surveillance applications in the last twenty years. The paper then describes the main characteristics of an advanced visual sensor network that (a) directly processes locally acquired digital data, (b) automatically modifies intrinsic (focus, iris) and extrinsic (pan, tilt, zoom) parameters to increase the quality of acquired data and (c) automatically selects the best subset of sensors in order to monitor a given moving object in the observed environment. PMID:22574011

  13. Use of a Thrombin Fibrin Sealant in Reducing Blood Loss in Revision Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ghoz, Ali; Al-Khateeb, Hesham; Rajkumar, Shanmugasundaram; Tavares, Shawn; Andrade, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We present a retrospective evaluation assessing the use of a novel fibrin sealant, Quixil® (OMRIX Biopharmaceuticals S.A.) in reducing blood transfusions following revision total hip replacement surgery. Forty four patients underwent revision total hip replacement surgery using Quixil®, while 45 patients underwent revision total hip replacement surgery without the use of Quixil®. The duration of surgery and patient demographics were similar in both groups. Average blood loss was 1,010ml in the Quixil® group versus 1,021ml in the non-Quixil group. The use of cell saver and intra-operative blood transfusion were similar in both groups. The mean pre-operative Haemoglobin was 13.0 g/dl in the Quixil® group versus 12.4 g/dl in the non-Quixil group. The mean post-operative haemoglobin was 10.2 g/dl and 9.1 g/dl in the Quixil® and non-Quixil groups respectively. There was no difference in the blood transfused post-operatively between the two groups. Total units of blood transfused in Quixil® versus non-Quixil group were 60 verus 86. Total units of intra-operative blood transfused in Quixil® versus non-Quixil group were 16 versus 23. The use of fibrin tissue adhesive in revision total hip arthroplasty seems to be an effective and reliable means to reduce blood-transfusion requirements and prevent post-operative decreases in hemoglobin. PMID:27468998

  14. Keyboarding and Computer Application. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide is designed to prepare students in grades 6-10 to work in the world of the future. The 8-day course provides exploratory, hands-on learning activities and information that can enhance the education of students of all types in an integrated curriculum that provides practical applications of academic skills. The guide contains…

  15. Keys to active ageing: new communication technologies and lifelong learning.

    PubMed

    Díaz-López, M Del Pilar; López-Liria, Remedios; Aguilar-Parra, José M; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the creation and implementation of an ICT education program for the elderly in various Active Participation Centers in Almería (Spain), assessing its impact on quality of life. From a randomized sample of 200 individuals over the age of 55. Results reveal a high degree of participant satisfaction (76.6 %), as well as improvements in quality of life as compared to the control group after the 3 month program health factor: p = 0.004; leisure and activity factor: p = 0.001; Satisfaction with Life Factor: p < 0.001. The analysis conducted to determine the influence of age and gender on quality of life indicates that there are statistically significant differences in regards to age (the younger groups had higher scores) and gender (the males). This study may serve to facilitate similar works that promotes on-going education in different locations and across the lifespan.

  16. Benefits assessment of active control technology and related cockpit technology for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Two main-rotor active control concepts, one incorporating multicyclic actuators located just below the swashplate, and the other providing for the actuators and power supplies to be located in the rotating frame are considered. Each design concept is integrated with cockpit controllers and displays appropriate to the actuation concept in each case. The benefits of applying the defined ACT/RCT concepts to rotorcraft are quantified by comparison to the baseline model 412 helicopter. These benefits include, in the case of one active control concept; (1) up to 91% reduction in 4/rev hub shears; (2) a flight safety failure rate of 1.96 x 10 to the 8th power failures per flight-hour; (3) rotating controls/rotor hub drag reduction of 40%; (4) a 9% reduction in control system weight; and (5) vibratory deicing. The related cockpit concept reduces pilot workload for critical mission segments as much as 178% visual and 25% manual.

  17. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  18. Student Activity Ideas for the Technology Sequence Systems and Foundation Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This publication provides single-page outlines of brief ideas for high school student activities in each of the System and Foundation Courses of the New York State technology sequence. The idea outlines are provided as a resource to assist teachers in the development of student learning activities. The six courses for which ideas are presented are…

  19. Effects of a Physical Education Supportive Curriculum and Technological Devices on Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily Dean; Sullivan, Eileen C.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education supportive curriculum and technological devices, heart rate monitor (HRM) and pedometer (PED), on physical activity. A single-subject ABAB research design was used to examine amount and level of participation in physical activity among 106 suburban fourth and fifth…

  20. Student Attitudes in the Transition to an Active-Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Brooks, Bill J.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in student perceptions to a novel technology-based, active-learning pedagogy using a custom, sophisticated, personal response system called WISE were studied over the first five years it was used. Students tended to view active learning more favorably over time, particularly in regards to statements that required them to be interpretive of…

  1. Science and Technology Librarians: User Engagement and Outreach Activities in the Area of Scholarly Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Lutishoor; Speer, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the findings of a survey completed by ACRL/STS [Association of College and Research Libraries/Science and Technology Section] members on scholarly communication issues. In particular it identifies the percentage of their daily activities that are spent in support of scholarly communication activities; extent of change of job…

  2. BULK VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    ARD KE

    2011-04-11

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  3. Space-Based Astronomy: An Educator Guide with Activities for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, Gregory L.

    This educator's guide features activities for science, mathematics, and technology education. The activities in this curriculum guide were developed based on the hands-on approach. The guide starts with introductory information and is followed by five units: (1) "The Atmospheric Filter"; (2) "The Electromagnetic Spectrum"; (3)…

  4. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  5. Exploration of Tensions in a Mobile-Technology Supported Fieldtrip: An Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chen, Fei-Ching; Yang, Jie-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze how mobile technologies were incorporated and implemented in an outdoor learning activity. Two classes of primary school students participated in the experiment. Using activity theory as an analytical framework, it is found that underlying tensions provided rich insights into system dynamics and that…

  6. Hydraulic actuation technology for full- and semi-active railway suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodall, Roger; Freudenthaler, Gerhard; Dixon, Roger

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes a simulation study that provides a comprehensive comparison between full-active and semi-active suspensions for improving the vertical ride quality of railway vehicles. It includes an assessment of the ride quality benefits that can theoretically be achieved with idealised devices, and also examines the impact of real devices based upon hydraulic actuation technology.

  7. Decision-Making concerning Ethical Issues of Science and Technology: A Series of Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Constance M.; Schlenker, Richard M.

    Procedures are outlined for aiding students in clarifying values and making decisions. Activities are included which were selected to sensitize students to some current situations that involve making technological, scientific, or bioethical decisions. The five activities are concerned with the following problematic situations: (1) government…

  8. Technology Development Report: CDDF, Dual Use Partnerships, SBIR/STTR: Fiscal Year 2003 Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The FY2003 NASA John C. Stennis Stennis Space Center (SSC) Technology Development Report provides an integrated report of all technology development activities at SSC. This report actually combines three annual reports: the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) Program Report, Dual Use Program Report, and the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Report. These reports are integrated in one document to summarize all technology development activities underway in support of the NASA missions assigned to SSC. The Dual Use Program Report provides a summary review of the results and status of the nine (9) Dual Use technology development partnership projects funded and managed at SSC during FY2003. The objective of these partnership projects is to develop or enhance technologies that will meet the technology needs of the two NASA SSC Mission Areas: Propulsion Test and Earth Science Applications. During FY2003, the TDTO managed twenty (20) SBIR Phase II Projects and two (2) STTR Phase II Projects. The SBIR contracts support low TRL technology development that supports both the Propulsion Test and the Earth Science Application missions. These projects are shown in the SBIR/STTR Report. In addition to the Phase II contracts, the TDTO managed ten (10) SBIR Phase I contracts which are fixed price, six month feasibility study contracts. These are not listed in this report. Together, the Dual Use Projects and the SBIR/STTR Projects constitute a technology development partnership approach that has demonstrated that success can be achieved through the identification of the technical needs of the NASA mission and using various available partnership techniques to maximize resource utilization to achieve mutual technology goals. Greater use of these partnership techniques and the resource leveraging they provide, is a goal of the TDTO, providing more support to meet the technology development needs of the mission areas at

  9. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  10. Hollow mesoporous titania microspheres: New technology and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhenliang; Wei, Wenrui; Wang, Litong; Hong, Ruoyu

    2015-12-01

    Hollow titania microspheres (HTS) were fabricated via a sol-gel process by coating the hydrolysis product of titanium tetrabutoxide (TBOT) onto the amino (-NH2) modified porous polystyrene cross-linked divinyl benzene (PS-DVB) microspheres under changing atmospheric pressure, followed by calcination in nitrogen and air atmosphere. Particularly, the atmospheric pressure was continuously and regularly changed during the formation process of PS-DVB@TiO2 microspheres. Then the TiO2 particles were absorbed into the pores and onto the surface of PS-DVB as well. The resultant HTS (around 2 μm in diameter) featured a high specific surface area (84.37 m2/g), anatase crystal and stable hollow microsphere structure, which led to high photocatalysis activity. The photocatalytic degradation of malachite green (MG) organic dye solution was conducted under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, which showed a high photocatalytic ability (81% of MG was degraded after UV irradiation for 88 min). Therefore, it could be potentially applied for the treatment of wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants.

  11. Efficacy of denture cleaners on the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence of sealant agent coupled denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Köroğlu, Ayşegül; Şahin, Onur; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Deniz, Şule Tuğba; Karacan Sever, Nurdan; Özkan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of denture cleansers on the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence of surface sealant agent coupled denture base resins. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated from 2 polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) (Meliodent; Acron MC) and 1 polyamide (Deflex) denture base materials, coated with a sealant agent (Palaseal) and divided into 4 groups (n=10) according to overnight cleaning procedures: distilled water (control), 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and two different sodium perborate (Corega; Rapident). The surface roughness values were measured with a profilometer before (Ra0) and after 90 days immersion in denture cleaners (Ra1). Specimens were incubated with Candida albicans suspension and Candida colony- forming units (CFU) (Cfu/mm) were counted. Significant differences were found, between the Ra0 and Ra1 values of 5% NaOCl applied Acron MC, Deflex and also Rapident applied Deflex groups (p<0.05). Denture cleaning procedures had no significant effects on the quantitiy of Candida albicans.

  12. MBCP biphasic calcium phosphate granules and tissucol fibrin sealant in rabbit femoral defects: the effect of fibrin on bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Le Guehennec, Laurent; Goyenvalle, Eric; Aguado, Eric; Pilet, Paul; Bagot D'Arc, Maurice; Bilban, Melitta; Spaethe, Reiner; Daculsi, Guy

    2005-01-01

    An ageing population implies an increase in bone and dental diseases, which are in turn a source of numerous handicaps. These pathologies are an expensive burden for the European health system. As no specific bioactive materials are efficient enough to cope with this burden, we have to develop an injectable, mouldable, self-hardening bone substitute to support bone tissue reconstruction and augmentation. New, highly bioactive and suitable biomaterials have been developed to replace bone grafts in orthopedic revision and maxillofacial surgery for bone augmentation. These mouldable, self-hardening materials are based on the association of MBCP Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Granules and Tissucol Fibrin Sealant. The in vivo evaluation of ingrowth in relation to the composite was made in an experiment on rabbits. The results indicate that in the presence of fibrin sealant, newly-formed bone developed at a small distance from the surface of the calcium phosphate ceramic. Two different bone apposition processes were identified. Without the fibrin component (MBCP group), bone rested directly on the surface of the granules. This observation is commonly described as osteoconduction in calcium phosphate materials. On the contrary, the presence of the fibrinogen component seemed to modify this standard osteoconduction phenomenon: the newly-formed bone essentially grew at a distance from the surface of the granules, on the fibrillar network, and could be considered as an inductive phenomenon for osteogenic cell differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells.

  13. The impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry; Kaynes, Ian; Lee, Ben; Sparrow, James

    1993-01-01

    The findings of an investigation conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle are summarized. Important points concerning structural technology considerations implicit in applying active controls technology in new aircraft are summarized. These points are well founded and based upon information received from within the aerospace industry and government laboratories, acquired by sponsoring workshops which brought together experts from contributing and interacting technical disciplines, and obtained by conducting a case study to independently assess the state of the technology. The paper concludes that communication between technical disciplines is absolutely essential in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  14. Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin

    2003-01-01

    This article begins by drawing on literature to examine the various definitions of "technology" and "technique." Following a discussion of the origin of technology in education, the remaining sections of the article focus on the relationships and interaction between: (1) machines and technique; (2) science and technique; (3)…

  15. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of 30 works of children's literature that support the topic of technology and its influences on readers' daily lives. Notes some stories tell about a time when simple tools enabled individuals to accomplish tasks, and others feature visionaries who used technology to create buildings, bridges, roads, and inventions. Considers…

  16. Harpoon technology development for the active removal of space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, Roger; Tuttle, Sean; Barraclough, Simon

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary empirical testing and numerical modelling carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of using a harpoon in an ADR application. Empirical testing involving the impact of blunt and conical shaped steel tips into 3 mm Al plate showed that the ballistic limit varies in proportion to the tip circumference, with conical shapes resulting in a higher relative ballistic limit due to the additional energy required for petaling. The creation of secondary debris was also monitored. It was found that blunt shapes created a plug during penetration as a result of shearing around the periphery of the projectile, whilst conical tips resulted in minor spalling and fragmentation. Preliminary oblique impact testing with conical and blunt tips showed that the ballistic limit increases with obliquity at a greater rate for blunt tips than conical ones. Impact testing of 3 mm Al plate with conical projectiles at low temperatures showed a more brittle fracture mode when compared with targets impacted at room temperature. As such, the fragmentation and spalling evident in room temperature targets was absent. The energy required to perforate the cooled plates also increased. Impact testing of Al panel obstructed with fixed heat pipes showed that the harpoon could successfully penetrate a target panel with such an obstruction due to shearing of the pipe flange. Testing of two lock on mechanisms showed that both a spring activated and integrated toggle could reliably open upon impact. This testing also used a tensile testing machine to show that both designs could withstand the force expected during deorbiting manoeuvres after impact with Al H/C panels. A parametric simulation comparing the diameter of conical tips with ballistic limits showed a good agreement with the predictions of De Marre's formula for normal impact. This suggests that the ballistic limit of plates impacted by conical projectiles can be successfully extrapolated with limited

  17. NASA's Advanced Propulsion Technology Activities for Third Generation Fully Reusable Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (OASTT) established the following three major goals, referred to as "The Three Pillars for Success": Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps, and Access to Space. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. focuses on future space transportation technologies under the "Access to Space" pillar. The Propulsion Projects within ASTP under the investment area of Spaceliner100, focus on the earth-to-orbit (ETO) third generation reusable launch vehicle technologies. The goals of Spaceliner 100 is to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The ETO Propulsion Projects in ASTP, are actively developing combination/combined-cycle propulsion technologies that utilized airbreathing propulsion during a major portion of the trajectory. System integration, components, materials and advanced rocket technologies are also being pursued. Over the last several years, one of the main thrusts has been to develop rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) technologies. The focus has been on conducting ground tests of several engine designs to establish the RBCC flowpaths performance. Flowpath testing of three different RBCC engine designs is progressing. Additionally, vehicle system studies are being conducted to assess potential operational space access vehicles utilizing combined-cycle propulsion systems. The design, manufacturing, and ground testing of a scale flight-type engine are planned. The first flight demonstration of an airbreathing combined cycle propulsion system is envisioned around 2005. The paper will describe the advanced propulsion technologies that are being being developed under the ETO activities in the ASTP program. Progress, findings, and future activities for the propulsion technologies will be discussed.

  18. The effect of using different rinsing angles on the micro-tensile bond strength of the sealant to the etched enamel

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Nakhjavani, Yahya Baradaran; Ahmadi, Rahil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Attempts to enhance bond strength of the sealant have been among the most important sides of dental research. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of using different rinsing angles on the micro-tensile bond strength of the sealant to the etched enamel. Settings and Design: Experimental study. Materials and Methods: Sixty first-premolars were randomly assigned to six groups based on the rinsing angle applied (15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°). Following etching and rinsing, a 4-mm height build up of sealant material was created. Bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks (1 × 1 mm), which were subjected to micro-tensile bond strength, testing at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and post-hoc Tukey test. Results: The tensile bond strength in specimens rinsed at 90° were statistically higher compared to those rinsed at 15° and 30° (P < 0.05), and increasing the angle from 15° to 90° was correlated with a reduction in the number of specimens with adhesive failures. Conclusions: Rinsing the conditioned enamel surface at 90° may improve the bond strength and retention of the sealant. PMID:24808698

  19. The effect of using different rinsing angles on the micro-tensile bond strength of the sealant to the etched enamel

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Nakhajavani, Yahya Baradaran; Ahmadi, Rahil

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Attempts to enhance bond strength of the sealant have been among the most important sides of dental research. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of using different rinsing angles on the micro-tensile bond strength of the sealant to the etched enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty first-premolars were randomly assigned to six groups based on the rinsing angle applied (15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75° and 90°). Following etching and rinsing, a 4-mm height build-up of sealant material was created. Bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks (1 mm × 1 mm), which were subjected to micro-tensile bond strength, testing at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and post-hoc Tukey test. Results: The tensile bond strength in specimens rinsed at 90° were statistically higher compared to those rinsed at 15° and 30° (P < 0.05) and increasing the angle from 15° to 90° was correlated with a reduction in the number of specimens with adhesive failures. Conclusions: Rinsing the conditioned enamel surface at 90° may improve the bond strength and retention of the sealant. PMID:24015011

  20. Report to Congress on the Activities of the DoD Office of Technology Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    industrial base—providing synergistic benefits to all partners. Formulation of a Liposomal Transdermal Vaccine System and Other Novel Pharmaceuticals In...vaccine technology to devise an effective , safe, and easily administered delivery mechanism for vaccination. The WRAIR-MTPPI team’s first patented needle...into the private sector of the United States in order to enhance the national technology and industrial base, reinvestment, and conversion activities. We

  1. Development and evaluation of sealing technologies for photovoltaic panels

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Hosking, F.M.; Baca, P.M.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to develop and evaluate low temperature glass sealing technologies for photovoltaic applications. This work was done as part of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) No. SC95/01408. The sealing technologies evaluated included low melting temperature glass frits and solders. Because the glass frit joining required a material with a melting temperature that exceeded the allowable temperature for the active elements on the photovoltaic panels a localized heating scheme was required for sealing the perimeter of the glass panels. Thermal and stress modeling were conducted to identify the feasibility of this approach and to test strategies designed to minimize heating of the glass panel away from its perimeter. Hardware to locally heat the glass panels during glass frit joining was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. The same hardware could be used to seal the glass panels using the low temperature solders. Solder adhesion to the glass required metal coating of the glass. The adhesion strength of the solder was dependent on the surface finish of the glass. Strategies for improving the polyisobutylene (PIB) adhesive currently being used to seal the panels and the use of Parylene coatings as a protective sealant deposited on the photovoltaic elements were also investigated. Starting points for further work are included.

  2. Activity Theory as a Framework for Investigating District-Classroom System Interactions and Their Influences on Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Anika Ball

    2012-01-01

    Technology implementation research indicates that teachers' beliefs and knowledge, as well as a host of institutional factors, can influence technology integration. Drawing on third-generation activity theory, this article conceptualizes technology implementation as a network of planning and integration activities carried out by technology…

  3. Caries-Preventive Effect of High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer and Resin-Based Fissure Sealants on Permanent Teeth: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2016-01-01

    Background Glass-ionomers are traditionally regarded to be inferior to resin as fissure sealants in protecting teeth from dental caries, due to their comparatively lower retention rate. Unlike low-viscosity glass-ionomers, high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) are placed as sealants by pressing the material into pits and fissures with a petroleum-jelly-coated index finger. Hence, HVGIC sealants are assumed to penetrate pits and fissures deeper, resulting in a higher material retention rate, which may increase its caries-preventive effect. Methods The aim of this review was to answer the question as to whether, in patients with fully erupted permanent molar teeth, HVGIC based fissure sealants are less effective to protect against dental carious lesions in occlusal pits and fissures than resin-based fissure sealants? A systematic literature search in eight databases was conducted. Heterogeneity of accepted trials and imprecision of the established evidence were assessed. Extracted sufficiently homogenous datasets were pooled by use of a random-effects meta-analysis. Internal trial validity was evaluated. The protocol of this systematic review was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO / Nr.: CRD42015016007). Results Seven clinical trials were provisionally included for further review. Of these, one was excluded. Seven trial reports reporting on six trials were accepted. From these, 11 datasets were extracted and pooled in four meta-analyses. The results suggest no statistically significant differences after up to 48 months and borderline significant differences in favour of HVGIC sealants after 60 months (RR 0.29; 95% CI: 0.09–0.95; p = 0.04 / RD -0.07; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.01). The point estimates and upper confidence levels after 24, 36, 48 and 60 months of RR 1.36; RR 0.90; RR 0.62; RR 0.29 and 2.78; 1.67; 1.21; 0.95, respectively, further suggest a chronological trend in favour of HVGIC above resin

  4. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F.

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  5. Active Assistance Technology for Health-Related Behavior Change: An Interdisciplinary Review

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Catriona M; Powell, John; Payne, Thomas H; Ainsworth, John; Boyd, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Information technology can help individuals to change their health behaviors. This is due to its potential for dynamic and unbiased information processing enabling users to monitor their own progress and be informed about risks and opportunities specific to evolving contexts and motivations. However, in many behavior change interventions, information technology is underused by treating it as a passive medium focused on efficient transmission of information and a positive user experience. Objective To conduct an interdisciplinary literature review to determine the extent to which the active technological capabilities of dynamic and adaptive information processing are being applied in behavior change interventions and to identify their role in these interventions. Methods We defined key categories of active technology such as semantic information processing, pattern recognition, and adaptation. We conducted the literature search using keywords derived from the categories and included studies that indicated a significant role for an active technology in health-related behavior change. In the data extraction, we looked specifically for the following technology roles: (1) dynamic adaptive tailoring of messages depending on context, (2) interactive education, (3) support for client self-monitoring of behavior change progress, and (4) novel ways in which interventions are grounded in behavior change theories using active technology. Results The search returned 228 potentially relevant articles, of which 41 satisfied the inclusion criteria. We found that significant research was focused on dialog systems, embodied conversational agents, and activity recognition. The most covered health topic was physical activity. The majority of the studies were early-stage research. Only 6 were randomized controlled trials, of which 4 were positive for behavior change and 5 were positive for acceptability. Empathy and relational behavior were significant research themes in

  6. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    PubMed

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  7. Marginal integrity of pit and fissure sealants. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the marginal adaptation before and after in vitro thermal and mechanical stressing.

    PubMed

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Favez, Valerie; Campos, Edson A; Krejci, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    This research quantitatively evaluated the marginal adaptation of pit and fissure sealants. The occlusal surfaces of 48 intact, caries-free human molars were cleaned with an air-abrasion unit. The teeth were then randomly divided into eight groups of six teeth each according to the type of enamel conditioning, sealant material applied and curing unit used. After applying either 40% phosphoric acid gel (K-etch, Kuraray Co) or a self-etching primer adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Co), sealant materials of two viscosities were applied (Teethmate F-1 and Protect-Liner-F, Kuraray Co) and cured with halogen (Optilux 500, Demetron) or plasma arc (Apollo-95E, Dental & Medical Diagnostic Systems, Ltd) curing units. The marginal adaptation of the pit and fissure sealant restorations was evaluated by using a computer-assisted quantitative margin analysis in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on epoxy replicas before and after thermal and mechanical stressing of the teeth. The results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a confidence level of 95% (p=0.05). A post-hoc Tukey HSD-test was used for multiple pairwise comparisons between groups. The null hypothesis was that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups that were tested in this study. The statistically significant differences between groups were more pronounced after loading. In most cases, the self-etching adhesive system (SE Bond) proved as effective as phosphoric acid etching (K-etch). The low viscosity sealant material (Teethmate F-1), in most cases, exhibited better marginal adaptation than the high viscosity material (Protect-Liner F). The high viscosity material performed equally well only when used in combination with the self-etching primer adhesive system as an intermediate layer. The halogen curing unit (Optilux 500) led to better marginal adaptation than the plasma arc curing unit (Apollo 95E), especially after thermal and mechanical

  8. Effect of affordable technology on physical activity levels and mobility outcomes in rehabilitation: a protocol for the Activity and MObility UsiNg Technology (AMOUNT) rehabilitation trial

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Leanne; van den Berg, Maayken; Lindley, Richard I; Crotty, Maria; McCluskey, Annie; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Smith, Stuart T; Schurr, Karl; Killington, Maggie; Bongers, Bert; Howard, Kirsten; Heritier, Stephane; Togher, Leanne; Hackett, Maree; Treacy, Daniel; Dorsch, Simone; Wong, Siobhan; Scrivener, Katharine; Chagpar, Sakina; Weber, Heather; Pearson, Ross; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction People with mobility limitations can benefit from rehabilitation programmes that provide a high dose of exercise. However, since providing a high dose of exercise is logistically challenging and resource-intensive, people in rehabilitation spend most of the day inactive. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of the addition of affordable technology to usual care on physical activity and mobility in people with mobility limitations admitted to inpatient aged and neurological rehabilitation units compared to usual care alone. Methods and analysis A pragmatic, assessor blinded, parallel-group randomised trial recruiting 300 consenting rehabilitation patients with reduced mobility will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to intervention or control groups. The intervention group will receive technology-based exercise to target mobility and physical activity problems for 6 months. The technology will include the use of video and computer games/exercises and tablet applications as well as activity monitors. The control group will not receive any additional intervention and both groups will receive usual inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation care over the 6-month study period. The coprimary outcomes will be objectively assessed physical activity (proportion of the day spent upright) and mobility (Short Physical Performance Battery) at 6 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include: self-reported and objectively assessed physical activity, mobility, cognition, activity performance and participation, utility-based quality of life, balance confidence, technology self-efficacy, falls and service utilisation. Linear models will assess the effect of group allocation for each continuously scored outcome measure with baseline scores entered as a covariate. Fall rates between groups will be compared using negative binomial regression. Primary analyses will be preplanned, conducted while masked to group allocation and use an

  9. Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

  10. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070 Section 872.6070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070 Section 872.6070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or...

  12. Current mHealth Technologies for Physical Activity Assessment and Promotion

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Context Novel mobile assessment and intervention capabilities are changing the face of physical activity (PA) research. A comprehensive systematic review of how mobile technology has been used for measuring PA and promoting PA behavior change is needed. Evidence acquisition Article collection was conducted using six databases from February to June 2012 with search terms related to mobile technology and PA. Articles that described the use of mobile technologies for PA assessment, sedentary behavior assessment, and/or interventions for PA behavior change were included. Articles were screened for inclusion and study information was extracted. Evidence synthesis Analyses were conducted from June to September 2012. Mobile phone–based journals and questionnaires, short message service (SMS) prompts, and on-body PA sensing systems were the mobile technologies most utilized. Results indicate that mobile journals and questionnaires are effective PA self-report measurement tools. Intervention studies that reported successful promotion of PA behavior change employed SMS communication, mobile journaling, or both SMS and mobile journaling. Conclusions mHealth technologies are increasingly being employed to assess and intervene on PA in clinical, epidemiologic, and intervention research. The wide variations in technologies used and outcomes measured limit comparability across studies, and hamper identification of the most promising technologies. Further, the pace of technologic advancement currently outstrips that of scientific inquiry. New adaptive, sequential research designs that take advantage of ongoing technology development are needed. At the same time, scientific norms must shift to accept “smart,” adaptive, iterative, evidence-based assessment and intervention technologies that will, by nature, improve during implementation. PMID:24050427

  13. [Effects of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection's activated carbon adsorption technology on officinal components].

    PubMed

    Zhou, En-li; Wang, Ren-jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Wei; Xu, Dian-hong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Bi, Yu-an; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    With the diversion rate of ginkgolide A, B, K as comprehensive evaluation indexes, the amount of activated carbon, ad- sorption time, mix rate, and adsorption temperature were selected as factors, orthogonal design which based on the evaluation method of information entropy was used to optimize activated carbon adsorption technology of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection. Opti- mized adsorption conditions were as follows: adsorbed 30 min with 0.2% activated carbon in 25 °C, 40 r ·min⁻¹, validation test re- sult display. The optimum extraction condition was stable and feasible, it will provide a basis for ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection' activated carbon adsorption process.

  14. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    Rollo, Megan E; Aguiar, Elroy J; Williams, Rebecca L; Wynne, Katie; Kriss, Michelle; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided. PMID:27853384

  15. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Megan E; Aguiar, Elroy J; Williams, Rebecca L; Wynne, Katie; Kriss, Michelle; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided.

  16. Recommendations for Technology Development and Validation Activities in Support of the Origins Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Richard W. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Office of Space Science (OSS) has initiated mission concept studies and associated technology roadmapping activities for future large space optical systems. The scientific motivation for these systems is the study of the origins of galaxies, stars, planetary systems and, ultimately, life. Collectively, these studies are part of the 'Astronomical Search for Origins and Planetary Systems Program' or 'Origins Program'. A series of at least three science missions and associated technology validation flights is currently envisioned in the time frame between the year 1999 and approximately 2020. These would be the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), a 10-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer; the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), a space-based infrared optimized telescope with aperture diameter larger than four meters; and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), an 80-meter baseline-nulling Michelson interferometer described in the Exploration of Neighboring Planetary Systems (ExNPS) Study. While all of these missions include significant technological challenges, preliminary studies indicate that the technological requirements are achievable. However, immediate and aggressive technology development is needed. The Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT) is the primary sponsor of NASA-unique technology for missions such as the Origins series. For some time, the OSAT Space Technology Program has been developing technologies for large space optical systems, including both interferometers and large-aperture telescopes. In addition, technology investments have been made by other NASA programs, including OSS; other government agencies, particularly the Department of Defense; and by the aerospace industrial community. This basis of prior technology investment provides much of the rationale for confidence in the feasibility of the advanced Origins missions. In response to the enhanced interest of both the user community and senior NASA management in large

  17. An Evidence-Based Adoption of Technology Model for Remote Monitoring of Elders’ Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    What benefit will new technologies offer if they are inadequately or not used? This work presents a meta-synthesis of adoption of technology related findings from four innovative monitoring intervention research studies with older adults and their informal and/or formal caregivers. Each study employed mixed methods analyses that lead to an understanding of the key variables that influenced adoption of telephone and Internet based wireless remote monitoring technologies by elders and their caregivers. The studies were all conducted in “real world” homes ranging from solo residences to multi-story independent living residential buildings. Insights gained came from issues not found in controlled laboratory environments but in the complex interplay of family-elder-staff dynamics around balancing safety and independence. Findings resulted in an adoption of technology model for remote monitoring of elders’ daily activities derived from evidence based research to advance both practical and theoretical development in the field of gerontechnology. PMID:21423843

  18. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  20. Pre-Service Teachers' Learning Styles and Preferences towards Instructional Technology Activities and Collaborative Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusop, Farrah Dina; Sumari, Melati

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate pre-service teachers' learning styles and their preferences with respect to 15 technology-based instructional activities and collaborative work tasks. Felder and Silverman's online Index of Learning Style (ILS) and a questionnaire were used to measure students' learning styles and…

  1. Sodium technology activities at HEDL in support of fast reactor development and the FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.M.

    1984-02-27

    Activities of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory are presented. A brief description of FFTF and some highlights of reactor operations are reviewed. The sodium technology work at HEDL is summarized by discussing several facets of the program and their tie-ins to breeder reactor development.

  2. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.J.

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  3. Using an Activity to Simulate the Dangers of Multitasking with Technology while Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaros, Edward J.; Xu, Renmei; Londt, Susan

    2012-01-01

    People are increasingly trying to multitask while walking. Text messaging while walking is a significant area for concern. The number of text messages sent is expected to be more than 8 trillion in 2012. Texting is becoming so commonplace that people use this technology while engaged in other activities. The dangers of multitasking have hit the…

  4. Using Activity Theory and its Principle of Contradictions to Guide Research in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Manzanares, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how activity theory (AT) and its principle of contradictions may be relied on to guide research in educational technology. The paper begins with a theoretical overview of AT and of its principle of contradictions. It follows with a synthesis of studies that have used AT as a lens to study information and communication…

  5. Machine Shop I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section B--Basic and Related Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains eight learning activity packets (LAPs) for the "basic and related technology" instructional area of a Machine Shop I course. The eight LAPs cover the following topics: basic mathematics, blueprints, rules, micrometer measuring tools, Vernier measuring tools, dial indicators, gaging and inspection tools, and…

  6. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  7. Multi-Media and Technology Tools: Curriculum and Activities for Idaho Business Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, Marty; Kitchel, K. Allen; Allen, Tacey

    This guide contains information, curriculum, and activities that provide business teachers with a tool for using the World Wide Web, multimedia, and technology to enhance their programs. The opening sections contain the following: computer use policy, multimedia fact sheet, tips on using Netscape Navigator, directory of educational resources on…

  8. Rockets: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational guide discusses rockets and includes activities in science, mathematics, and technology. It begins with background information on the history of rocketry, scientific principles, and practical rocketry. The sections on scientific principles and practical rocketry focus on Sir Isaac Newton's Three Laws of Motion. These laws explain…

  9. Index to NASA tech briefs, 1973. [technology transfer of research and development activities chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Short announcements of technology derived from the research and development activities of NASA or the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission are issued to encourage commercial application. Emphasis is placed on information considered likely to be transferrable across industrial, regional, or disciplinary lines. Abstracts and indexes are given.

  10. Technological and Traditional Drawing Approaches Encourage Active Engagement in Histology Classes for Science Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogdell, Barbara; Torsney, Ben; Stewart, Katherine; Smith, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote more active engagement of science undergraduates in histology practical classes some technology-based innovations were introduced. First, an interactive pre-lab tutorial was set up using an electronic handset voting system, where guidance on tissue analysis was given. Second, a web-based resource where students could access…

  11. Teachers' Knowing How to Use Technology: Exploring a Conceptual Framework for Purposeful Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Tony; Denning, Tim; Higgins, Chris; Loveless, Avril

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project to apply and validate a conceptual framework of clusters of purposeful learning activity involving ICT tools. The framework, which is based in a socio-cultural perspective, is described as "DECK", and comprises the following major categories of the use of digital technologies to support learning:…

  12. Agriculture Education SimFarm(TM). Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This Technology Learning Activity (TLA) for agriculture education in grades 6-10 is designed to help students learn the basic terminology of a farm system while they experience the responsibility of keeping a profitable farm in operation through use of the interactive SimFarm software. Introductory materials provide an overview of technology…

  13. Information and Communication Technologies Used by Undergraduate Students in their Academic and Socialization Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera-Batista, Miguel A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, Maria Dolores

    2008-01-01

    The growth of availability and access to Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in higher education in Mexico is a fact. Nevertheless, not much is known about how students use these resources in their school and social activities. A survey to obtain information about how undergraduates use web resources and cell phones was designed and…

  14. Interactive Whiteboards and All That Jazz: Analysing Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Howard; Beauchamp, Gary; Jones, Sonia; Kennewell, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The term "orchestration", has been used to describe the teacher's role in activity settings incorporating interactive technologies. This musical analogy suggests pre-planned manipulation of events to generate "performance" leading to learning. However, in two recent projects we have observed how effective teaching and learning…

  15. Suited for Spacewalking: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Technology Education, Mathematics, and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; George, Jane A. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Technology Education, Mathematics, and Science National Aeronautics and Space Administration Office of Human Resources and Education Education Division Washington, DC Education Working Group NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, Texas This publication is in the Public Domain and is not protected by copyright. Permission is not required for duplication.

  16. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2016-12-20

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (eg. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated Conserved Sequence-guided Repressor Inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Fibrin sealant for closure of mucosal penetration at the cardia during peroral endoscopic myotomy: A retrospective study at a single center

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Gang; Linghu, En-Qiang; Li, Hui-Kai

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the efficacy and safety of fibrin sealant for closure of mucosal penetration at the cardia during peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). METHODS Twenty-four patients who underwent POEM and experienced mucosal injury of the cardia during the procedure were retrospectively identified. Of the 24 patients, 21 had mucosal penetration and 3 had only slight mucosal damage without penetration. The 21 patients with mucosal penetration received fibrin sealant for closure at the site of penetration. Penetration-related characteristics, treatment, and recovery were reviewed for all 21 patients to assess the efficacy and safety of fibrin sealant for closure of mucosal penetration at the cardia. Clinical data, including general characteristics, procedure-related parameters, Eckardt scores, lower esophageal sphincter pressures (LESP), and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) results, were analyzed to determine their influence on treatment success after mucosal penetration during POEM. RESULTS All 21 patients had a solitary mucosal penetration in the cardia (12 in esophageal region of the cardia, 9 in the stomach region of the cardia, and 1 in both the esophageal and stomach regions). Twelve had a hole-like penetration and 9 had a linear penetration. For those with a hole-like penetration, the mean size was 0.14 cm2 (0.02-0.32 cm2). For those with a linear penetration, the median size was 0.37 cm (0.10-1.00 cm). Closure of the mucosal penetration using fibrin sealant was performed successfully in all 21 patients (two patients required 5 mL fibrin sealant, and the remaining 19 patients required 2.5 mL). Two patients had a nasogastric tube placed for five days after POEM; the remaining 19 patients were kept fasting for 3 d. All 21 patients were discharged after a median of 5 d (range: 5-7 d) postoperatively. During a median 42 mo (range: 9-62 mo) follow-up, all 21 patients with a mucosal penetration successfully healed without the occurrence of infection, ulcer, or esophagitis

  18. Design Brief--Packaging: More than Just a Box! Communications: Getting the Message across with Advertising. Technology Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Each technology learning activity in this article includes content description, objectives, required materials, challenge, and evaluation questions. Subjects are designing product packages and communication through advertising. (SK)

  19. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  20. Treatment of 213 patients with Symptomatic Tarlov Cysts by CT-guided Percutaneous Injection of Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kieran; Oaklander, Anne Louise; Elias, Gavin; Kathuria, Sudhir; Long, Donlin M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the safety and efficacy of intervention in patients with symptomatic Tarlov cysts by percutaneous, CT-guided two-needle cyst aspiration and fibrin sealant injection. Materials and Methods This study was designed to assess outcomes in patients who underwent CT-guided aspiration and injection of one or more sacral Tarlov cysts at Johns Hopkins Hospital between the years of 2003 and 2013. In all, 289 cysts were treated in 213 consecutive patients. All of these patients were followed for at least six months; 90% were followed for one year and 83% were followed for three to six years. The aspiration-injection procedure employed two needles and was carried out with local anesthesia and intravenous analgesia. In the fibrin injection stage of the procedure, a commercially available fibrin sealant was injected into the cyst through the deep needle (Tisseel VH; Baxter Healthcare, Westlake Village, California). Results One year post-procedure, excellent results had been obtained in 104 patients (54.2% of patients followed) and good or satisfactory results had been obtained in 53 patients (27.6%). Thus, 157 patients (81.8%) in all were initially satisfied with the outcome of treatment. At three to six years post-procedure, 74.0% of patients followed were satisfied with treatment. There were no significant complications. Conclusions The aspiration-injection technique described herein constitutes a safe and efficacious treatment option that holds promise for relieving cyst-related symptoms in many patients with very small risk. PMID:26405086

  1. Persons with moderate Alzheimer's disease use simple technology aids to manage daily activities and leisure occupation.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Renna, Caterina; Pinto, Katia; De Vanna, Floriana; Caffò, Alessandro O; Stasolla, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    Two studies assessed technology-aided programs to support performance of daily activities and selection/activation of music items with patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease. In Study I, four patients were presented with activity-related pictorial instructions via a computer fitted with inexpensive, commercial software. In Study II, four patients were (a) presented with different music options and (b) allowed to select and activate the preferred option via a microswitch response. Study I showed that each patient learned to perform the two activities available with percentages of correct responses exceeding 85 by the end of the intervention. Study II showed that all patients learned to choose and activate music options. Psychology students, employed in a social validation check, scored the patients' behavior within the program better than their behavior in a control situation. The relevance and usability of simplified pictorial-instruction programs and music choice programs for patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease were discussed.

  2. Adhesive complex coacervate inspired by the sandcastle worm as a sealant for fetoscopic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Sarbjit

    Inspired by the Sandcastle Worm, biomimetic of the water-borne adhesive was developed by complex coacervation of the synthetic copolyelectrolytes, mimicking the chemistries of the worm glue. The developed underwater adhesive was designed for sealing fetal membranes after fetoscopic surgery in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and sealing neural tissue of a fetus in aminiotic sac for spina bifida condition. Complex coacervate with increased bond strength was created by entrapping polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-dA) monomer within the cross-linked coacervate network. Maximum shear bond strength of ~ 1.2 MPa on aluminum substrates was reached. The monomer-filled coacervate had complex flow behavior, thickening at low shear rates and then thinning suddenly with a 16-fold drop in viscosity at shear rates near 6 s-1. The microscale structure of the complex coacervates resembled a three-dimensional porous network of interconnected tubules. This complex coacervate adhesive was used in vitro studies to mimic the uterine wall-fetal membrane interface using a water column with one end and sealed with human fetal membranes and poultry breast, and a defect was created with an 11 French trocar. The coacervate adhesive in conjunction with the multiphase adhesive was used to seal the defect. The sealant withstood an additional traction of 12 g for 30-60 minutes and turbulence of the water column without leakage of fluid or slippage. The adhesive is nontoxic when in direct contact with human fetal membranes in an organ culture setting. A stable complex coacervate adhesive for long-term use in TTTS and spina bifida application was developed by methacrylating the copolyelectrolytes. The methacrylated coacervate was crosslinked chemically for TTTS and by photopolymerization for spina bifida. Tunable mechanical properties of the adhesive were achieved by varying the methacrylation of the polymers. Varying the amine to phosphate (A/P) ratio in the coacervate formation

  3. Technology solutions to support supervisory activities and also to provide information access to the society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, D.; Mello, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inmetro's data about the conformity of certificated products, process and services are, usually, displayed at fragmented databases of difficult access for several reasons, for instance, the lack of computational solutions which allow this kind of access to its users. A discussion about some of the technological solutions to support supervisory activities by the appropriate regulatory bodies and also to provide information access to society in general is herein presented, along with a theoretical explanation of the pros and cons of such technologies to the conclusion that a mobile platform seems to be the best tool for the requirements of Inmetro.

  4. Effects of Shared Active Surface Technology on the Communication and Speech of Two Preschool Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Jason C.; Fefer, Sarah A.

    2017-01-01

    Shared active surface (SAS) technology can be described as a supersized tablet computer for multiple simultaneous users. SAS technology has the potential to resolve issues historically associated with learning via single-user computer technology. This study reports findings of a SAS on the social communication and nonsocial speech of two preschool…

  5. Technology Efficacy in Active Prosthetic Knees for Transfemoral Amputees: A Quantitative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Amr M.; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have presented technological ensembles of active knee systems for transfemoral prosthesis. Other studies have examined the amputees' gait performance while wearing a specific active prosthesis. This paper combined both insights, that is, a technical examination of the components used, with an evaluation of how these improved the gait of respective users. This study aims to offer a quantitative understanding of the potential enhancement derived from strategic integration of core elements in developing an effective device. The study systematically discussed the current technology in active transfemoral prosthesis with respect to its functional walking performance amongst above-knee amputee users, to evaluate the system's efficacy in producing close-to-normal user performance. The performances of its actuator, sensory system, and control technique that are incorporated in each reported system were evaluated separately and numerical comparisons were conducted based on the percentage of amputees' gait deviation from normal gait profile points. The results identified particular components that contributed closest to normal gait parameters. However, the conclusion is limitedly extendable due to the small number of studies. Thus, more clinical validation of the active prosthetic knee technology is needed to better understand the extent of contribution of each component to the most functional development. PMID:25110727

  6. Focused-ion-beam post-processing technology for active devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Chyng Wen; Lau, Fat Kit; Zhao, Xin; Penty, Richard; White, Ian

    2006-09-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) etching technology is a highly efficient post-processing technique with the functionality to perform sputter etching and deposition of metals or insulators by means of a computer-generated mask. The high resolution and the ability to remove material directly from the sample in-situ make FIB etching the ideal candidate for device prototyping of novel micro-size photonic component design. Furthermore, the fact that arbitrary profile can be etched directly onto a sample without the need to prepare conventional mask and photolithography process makes novel device research with rapid feedback from characterisation to design activities possible. In this paper, we present a concise summary of the research work in Cambridge based on FIB technology. We demonstrate the applicability of focussed ion beam post processing technology to active photonic devices research. Applications include the integration of advanced waveguide architectures onto active photonic components. We documents details on the integration of lens structure on tapered lasers, photonic crystals on active SOA-integrated waveguides and surface profiling of low-cost gain-guided vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. Furthermore, we discuss additional functions of FIB in the measurement of buried waveguide structures or the integration of total-internal-reflection (TIR) mirror in optical interconnect structures.

  7. Geographic Information Technologies as an outreach activity in geo-scientific education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maman, Shimrit; Isaacson, Sivan; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a decline in the rates of examinees in the academic track that were entitled to an enhanced matriculation certificate in scientific-technological education was reported in Israel. To confront this problem the Earth and Planetary Image Facility (EPIF) at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev fosters interdisciplinary exploration through educational programs that make use of the facility and its equipment and enable the empowerment of the community by understanding and appreciating science and technology. This is achieved by using Geographic Information Technologies (GIT) such as remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for geo-physical sciences in activities that combine theoretical background with hands-on activities. Monitoring Earth from space by satellites, digital atlases and virtual-based positioning applications are examples for fusion of spatial information (geographic) and technology that the activity is based on. GIT opens a new chapter and a recent history of Cartography starting from the collection of spatial data to its presentation and analysis. GIS have replaced the use of classical atlas books and offer a variety of Web-based applications that provide maps and display up-to-date imagery. The purpose of this workshop is to expose teachers and students to GITs which are applicable in every classroom. The activity imparts free geographic information systems that exist in cyberspace and accessible to single users as the Israeli national GIS and Google earth, which are based on a spatial data and long term local and global satellite imagery coverage. In this paper, our "Think global-Map Local" activity is presented. The activity uses GIS and change detection technologies as means to encourage students to explore environmental issues both around the globe and close to their surroundings. The students detect changes by comparing multi temporal images of a chosen site and learn how to map the alterations and produce change

  8. A 12-month clinical evaluation of pit-and-fissure sealants placed with and without etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems in newly-erupted teeth

    PubMed Central

    NOGOURANI, Maryam Karami; JANGHORBANI, Mohsen; KHADEM, Parvin; JADIDI, Zahra; JALALI, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this one-year clinical study was to investigate the effect of two adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond, a two-step etch-and-rinse and Clearfil SE Bond, a two-step self-etch system) on pit-and-fissure sealant retention in newly-erupted teeth. This study compared the success of the sealants in mesial and distopalatal grooves with and without these two adhesive systems. Material and Methods In a clinical trial, 35 children aged 6-8 years undergoing sealant placement were recruited. This one-year clinical study scored 70 mesial and 70 distopalatal sealants of newly-erupted permanent maxillary first molar, with a split-mouth design. All children received sealant alone in one permanent maxillary molar tooth. Children were randomized into two groups. One group received Self-Etch (SE) bond plus sealant and the other group received Single Bond plus sealant in another permanent maxillary molar tooth. Clinical evaluation at 3, 6 and 12 months was performed and the retention was studied in terms of the success and failure. Results The success rate of sealant in the distopalatal groove, using SEB at 3, 6 and 12 months was 93.3% (95% CI: 68.0, 99.8), 73.3% (95% CI: 44.9, 92.2) and 66.7% (95% CI: 38.4, 88.2), respectively. It was greater than that of the distopalatal groove in SB group with a success rate of 62.5% (95% CI: 35.4, 84.8), 31.3% (95% CI: 11.8, 58.7) and 31.3% (95% CI: 11.8, 58.7), at the three evaluation periods. The success rate of sealant in the mesial groove using SEB was 86.6% (95% CI: 59.5, 98.3), 53.3% (95% CI: 26.6, 78.7) and 53.3% (95% CI: 26.6, 78.7), while this was 100% (95% CI: 79.4, 100.0), 81.3% (95% CI: 54.4, 96.0) and 81.3% (95% CI: 54.4, 96.0) using SB, at 3, 6 and 12-month evaluation periods. Conclusions These results support the use of these two bonding agents in pit-and-fissure sealants under both isolated and contaminated conditions. Further, SE bond seemed to be less sensitive to moisture contamination. PMID:22858703

  9. Recent Cooperative Research Activities of HDD and Flexible Media Transport Technologies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Kyosuke

    This paper presents the recent status of industry-university cooperative research activities in Japan on the mechatronics of information storage and input/output equipment. There are three research committees for promoting information exchange on technical problems and research topics of head-disk interface in hard disk drives (HDD), flexible media transport and image printing processes which are supported by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineering (JSME), the Japanese Society of Tribologists (JAST) and the Japan Society of Precision Engineering (JSPE). For hard disk drive technology, the Storage Research Consortium (SRC) is supporting more than 40 research groups in various different universities to perform basic research for future HDD technology. The past and present statuses of these activities are introduced, particularly focusing on HDD and flexible media transport mechanisms.

  10. Feasibility of popular m-health technologies for activity tracking among individuals with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Barre, Laura K; Bartels, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    Obesity prevalence is nearly double among individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder, compared with the general population. Emerging mobile health (m-health) technologies are increasingly available and offer the potential to support lifestyle interventions targeting weight loss, yet the practical feasibility of using these technologies in this high-risk group has not been established. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of popular m-health technologies for activity tracking among overweight and obese individuals with SMI. We provided wearable activity monitoring devices (FitBit [San Francisco, CA] Zip™ or Nike Inc. [Beaverton, OR] FuelBand) and smartphones (Apple [Cupertino, CA] iPhone(®) 4S) for accessing the smartphone application for each device to participants with SMI enrolled in a weight loss program. Feasibility of these devices was measured by the frequency of use over time. Acceptability was measured through qualitative follow-up interviews with participants. Ten participants with SMI wore the devices for a mean of 89% (standard deviation=13%) of the days in the study. Five participants wore the devices 100% of the time. Participants reported high satisfaction, stating the devices were easy to use, helpful for setting goals, motivational, and useful for self-monitoring. Several participants liked the social connectivity feature of the devices where they could see each other's progress on the smartphone application, noting that "friendly" competition increased motivation to be more physically active. This study supports using popular m-health technologies for activity tracking among individuals with SMI. These findings can inform the design of weight loss interventions targeting this vulnerable patient population.

  11. Tera-node Network Technology (TASK 4) Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA) final report

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, John; Bannister, Joe

    2000-03-15

    The TNT project developed software technologies in scalable personal telecommunications (SPT), Reservation Protocol 2 (RSVP2), Scalable Computing Infrastructure (SCOPE), and Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA). SPT = developed many innovative protocols to support the use of videoconferencing applications on the Internet. RSVP2 = developed a new reference model and further standardization of RSVP. SCOPE = developed dynamic resource discovery techniques and distributed directory services in support of resource allocation for large distributed systems and computations. NIA = provided policy, operational, and support to the transitioning Internet.

  12. Feasibility of Popular m-Health Technologies for Activity Tracking Among Individuals with Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Barre, Laura K.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Obesity prevalence is nearly double among individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder, compared with the general population. Emerging mobile health (m-health) technologies are increasingly available and offer the potential to support lifestyle interventions targeting weight loss, yet the practical feasibility of using these technologies in this high-risk group has not been established. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of popular m-health technologies for activity tracking among overweight and obese individuals with SMI. We provided wearable activity monitoring devices (FitBit [San Francisco, CA] Zip™ or Nike Inc. [Beaverton, OR] FuelBand) and smartphones (Apple [Cupertino, CA] iPhone® 4S) for accessing the smartphone application for each device to participants with SMI enrolled in a weight loss program. Feasibility of these devices was measured by the frequency of use over time. Acceptability was measured through qualitative follow-up interviews with participants. Ten participants with SMI wore the devices for a mean of 89% (standard deviation=13%) of the days in the study. Five participants wore the devices 100% of the time. Participants reported high satisfaction, stating the devices were easy to use, helpful for setting goals, motivational, and useful for self-monitoring. Several participants liked the social connectivity feature of the devices where they could see each other's progress on the smartphone application, noting that “friendly” competition increased motivation to be more physically active. This study supports using popular m-health technologies for activity tracking among individuals with SMI. These findings can inform the design of weight loss interventions targeting this vulnerable patient population. PMID:25536190

  13. Laboratory demonstration of a primary active mirror for space with the LATT: large aperture telescope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Vettore, Christian; d'Amato, Francesco; Xompero, Marco; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Patauner, Christian; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; Duò, Fabrizio; Pucci, Mauro; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Maresi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The LATT project is an ESA contract under TRP programme to demonstrate the scalability of the technology from ground-based adaptive mirrors to space active primary mirrors. A prototype spherical mirror based on a 40 cm diameter 1 mm thin glass shell with 19 contactless, voice-coil actuators and co-located position sensors have been manufactured and integrated into a final unit with an areal density lower than 20 kg/m2. Laboratory tests demonstrated the controllability with very low power budget and the survival of the fragile glass shell exposed to launch accelerations, thanks to an electrostatic locking mechanism; such achievements pushes the technology readiness level toward 5. With this prototype, the LATT project explored the feasibility of using an active and lightweight primary for space telescopes. The concept is attractive for large segmented telescopes, with surface active control to shape and co-phase them once in flight. In this paper we will describe the findings of the technological advances and the results of the environmental and optical tests.

  14. HybridPLAY: A New Technology to Foster Outdoors Physical Activity, Verbal Communication and Teamwork.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Diego José; Boj, Clara; Portalés, Cristina

    2016-04-23

    This paper presents HybridPLAY, a novel technology composed of a sensor and mobile-based video games that transforms urban playgrounds into game scenarios. With this technology we aim to stimulate physical activity and playful learning by creating an entertaining environment in which users can actively participate and collaborate. HybridPLAY is different from other existing technologies that enhance playgrounds, as it is not integrated in them but can be attached to the different elements of the playgrounds, making its use more ubiquitous (i.e., not restricted to the playgrounds). HybridPLAY was born in 2007 as an artistic concept, and evolved after different phases of research and testing by almost 2000 users around the world (in workshops, artistic events, conferences, etc.). Here, we present the temporal evolution of HybridPLAY with the different versions of the sensors and the video games, and a detailed technical description of the sensors and the way interactions are produced. We also present the outcomes after the evaluation by users at different events and workshops. We believe that HybridPLAY has great potential to contribute to increased physical activity in kids, and also to improve the learning process and monitoring at school centres by letting users create the content of the apps, leading to new narratives and fostering creativity.

  15. [The contribution of Web 2.0 technologies to the empowerment of active patients].

    PubMed

    Oliver-Mora, Martí; Iñiguez-Rueda, Lupicinio

    2017-03-01

    The Spanish health system has recently been marked by the emergence of more active patients who are characterized as being better informed about their disease, having a more participatory attitude, wanting to have a greater influence in making decisions about their health and asserting their rights as patients. Therefore, this article aims to report on how the introduction of Web 2.0 technologies can contribute to the empowering of more active patients. To achieve this, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients and representatives of patient associations who have used Web 2.0 technologies to interact with other patients or to communicate with health professionals. From the results obtained, we highlight the fact that Web 2.0 technologies provide greater access to health-related information, improve communication between patients and health professionals, and enable the creation of new spaces of interaction among patients. All of the facts above contribute to the formation of a more active role on the part of patients.

  16. HybridPLAY: A New Technology to Foster Outdoors Physical Activity, Verbal Communication and Teamwork

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Diego José; Boj, Clara; Portalés, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents HybridPLAY, a novel technology composed of a sensor and mobile-based video games that transforms urban playgrounds into game scenarios. With this technology we aim to stimulate physical activity and playful learning by creating an entertaining environment in which users can actively participate and collaborate. HybridPLAY is different from other existing technologies that enhance playgrounds, as it is not integrated in them but can be attached to the different elements of the playgrounds, making its use more ubiquitous (i.e., not restricted to the playgrounds). HybridPLAY was born in 2007 as an artistic concept, and evolved after different phases of research and testing by almost 2000 users around the world (in workshops, artistic events, conferences, etc.). Here, we present the temporal evolution of HybridPLAY with the different versions of the sensors and the video games, and a detailed technical description of the sensors and the way interactions are produced. We also present the outcomes after the evaluation by users at different events and workshops. We believe that HybridPLAY has great potential to contribute to increased physical activity in kids, and also to improve the learning process and monitoring at school centres by letting users create the content of the apps, leading to new narratives and fostering creativity. PMID:27120601

  17. Perceived difficulties using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: influence on activity and participation.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2010-12-01

    Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common difficulties were related to the use of telecommunication and computers. Despite these difficulties, a majority still used most objects and services independently. Twenty-six participants (72%) perceived that their difficulties using ET influenced their everyday activities and their possibility to participate at home and in the community. The results indicate that rehabilitation following an ABI should consider whether clients' use of ET influences their activity and participation and adopt interventions accordingly. The results also indicate that difficulties using ET need to be considered in the design of community services to prevent societal barriers.

  18. Determination of bisphenol A and related aromatic compounds released from bis-GMA-based composites and sealants by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Pulgar, R; Olea-Serrano, M F; Novillo-Fertrell, A; Rivas, A; Pazos, P; Pedraza, V; Navajas, J M; Olea, N

    2000-01-01

    Most of the composites and sealants used in dentistry are based on bisphenol A diglycidylether methacrylate (Bis-GMA). Reports revealed that in situ polymerization is not complete and that free monomers can be detected by different analytic methods. Concerns about the estrogenicity of bisphenol A (BPA) and other aromatic components leached from commercial products have been expressed. We studied biphenolic components eluted from seven composites and one sealant before and after in vitro polymerization using HPLC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and we investigated how pH modifications affect the leaching of these components. We found BPA (maximal amount 1.8 microg/mg dental material), its dimethacrylate derivative (Bis-DMA, 1.15 microg/mg), bisphenol A diglycidylether (6. 1 microg/mg), Bis-GMA (2.0 microg/mg), and ethoxylate and propoxylate of bisphenol A in media in which samples of different commercial products were maintained under controlled pH and temperature conditions. Our results confirm the leaching of estrogenic monomers into the environment by Bis-GMA-based composites and sealants in concentrations at which biologic effects have been demonstrated in in vivo experimental models. The main issue with implications for patient care and dentist responsibility is to further determine the clinical relevance of this estrogenic exposure. Images Figure 1 PMID:10620520

  19. Evaluation of western shale-oil residue as an additive to petroleum asphalt for use as a pavement crack and joint sealant material

    SciTech Connect

    Harnsberger, P.M.; Wolf, J.M.; Robertson, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of using a distillation residue from Green River Formation (western) shale oil as an additive to a petroleum asphalt for use as a crack and joint filler material in portland cement concrete and asphaltic pavements. A commercially available rubberized asphalt crack and joint filler material was also tested for comparison. ASTM specification tests for sealant materials used in concrete and asphalt pavements were performed on the sealant materials. Portland cement concrete briquets prepared with an asphalt material sandwiched between two concrete wafers were tested in a stress-relaxation experiment to evaluate the relaxation and recovery properties of the sealant materials. The results show that the shale-oil modified petroleum asphalts and the neat petroleum asphalt do not pass the extension portion of the ASTM test; however, there is indication of improvement in the adhesive properties of the shale-oil modified asphalts. There is also evidence that the addition of shale-oil residue to the petroleum asphalt, especially at the 20% level, improves the relaxation and recovery properties compared with the petroleum asphalt.

  20. Changes in Caries Experience, Untreated Caries, Sealant Prevalence, and Preventive Behavior Among Third-Graders in New York State, 2002–2004 and 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Vinicius; Kandhari, Priyanka; Moss, Mark; Jolaoso, I. Adeyemi

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study assessed changes in caries experience, untreated caries, sealant prevalence, and preventive behavior among third-grade children in New York State to monitor progress toward state health objectives. Methods We analyzed children's data from the 2002–2004 (n=10,865) and 2009–2012 (n=6,758) New York State Oral Health Survey. We calculated differences in weighted percentages and 95% confidence intervals for caries experience, untreated caries, sealant prevalence, and preventive behavior. We used logistic regression procedures to assess the independent effects and interaction terms on dental caries experience. Results The percentage of children with dental caries and untreated caries decreased from 54.1% and 33.0% in 2002–2004 to 45.2% and 23.6% in 2009–2012, respectively. While this decrease was not uniform across income subgroups, the prevalence of sealants, a key measure of the use of preventive services, increased significantly from 16.7% to 36.0% among lower-income children. Conclusions Measurable improvement in reducing dental caries prevalence among third-grade children has been made in New York State, but this improvement was not uniform across subgroups. Specifically, disease prevalence among lower-income children remained high, underscoring the need to strengthen existing programs and identify additional policy and programmatic interventions. PMID:26346760

  1. Homeroom Activities in a College of Technology Based on the Master Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchida, Kunihiiko; Murata, Hideaki; Yuji, Junichiro

    Homeroom (HR) activities have an important role in engineering education at technical colleges. Yatsushiro National College of Technology has made a master plan for them and has been putting the plan into practical use since 2002. This plan is comprehensive and has two main categories, social education and career guidance, both being composed of three sub-categories (e.g., self-understanding and making future plans) . Based on the master plan, each HR teacher makes his own plan for HR activities for his classroom at the beginning of the academic year. We have reached a consensus to share our practice and to improve HR activities for years to come. We also recognize that to carry out HR activities based on a master plan that reflects the school's educational goals is essential in order to train students who are well-prepared, both as engineers and as humans.

  2. Enhancing Earth Science And IT Literacy Through Environmental Science Information Technology Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuff, K. E.; Molinaro, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Environmental Science Information Technology Activities (ESITA) program provides grades 9 and 10 students with under-represented minority backgrounds in the East San Francisco Bay Area with real-world opportunities to learn about and apply information technologies through a series of project-based activities related to environmental science. Supported by the NSF Information Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, ESITA activities engage students in the use of newly acquired information technology (IT) skills and understandings while performing air and water quality research investigations. One project that ESITA students have become involved in relates to the currently relevant issue of elevated levels of lead found in drinking waters in Washington, D.C. Students based in the Bay Area have initiated and maintained E-mail correspondence with children who attend elementary schools in the D.C. area. After receiving a thorough explanation of required sampling procedures devised by the Bay Area students, the elementary school children have sent 500 ml water samples from their homes and schools to Berkeley along with information about the locations from which the water samples were collected. These samples were then prepared for lead analysis at Lawrence Hall of Science by ESITA students, who used resulting data to perform a preliminary assessment of the geospatial distribution of lead trouble spots throughout Washington, DC. Later, ESITA student scientists will work with students from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health to develop surveys and questionnaires that generate high quality information useful with regard to assessing the impact of the current lead crisis on younger children in the Washington, D.C. area. Through the application of new understandings to current, real-world environmental problems and issues such as that related to lead, positive changes in students' attitudes towards IT and science have occurred, which accompany

  3. Multiple Behavior Change in Diet and Activity: A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Mobile Technology

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; McFadden, H.G.; Vaughn, Jocelyn; Kozak, Andrea T.; Smith, Malaina; Moller, Arlen C.; Epstein, Leonard H.; DeMott, Andrew; Hedeker, Donald; Siddique, Juned; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many patients exhibit multiple chronic disease risk behaviors. Research provides little information about advice that can maximize simultaneous health behavior changes. Methods To test which combination of diet and activity advice maximizes healthy change, we randomized 204 adults with elevated saturated fat and low fruit/vegetable intakes, high sedentary leisure time and low physical activity to one of four treatments: increase fruit/vegetable and physical activity; decrease fat and sedentary leisure; decrease fat and increase physical activity; increase fruit/vegetable and decrease sedentary leisure. Treatments provided three weeks of remote coaching supported by mobile decision support technology and financial incentives. During treatment, incentives were contingent on using the mobile device to self-monitor and attain behavioral targets; during follow-up they were contingent only on recording. The outcome was standardized, composite improvement on the four diet and activity behaviors at end of treatment and five month follow-up. Results Of those randomized, 200 (98%) completed follow-up. The increase fruit/vegetable and decrease sedentary leisure treatment improved more than the other 3 treatments (p<.001). Specifically, fruit/vegetables increased from 1.2 servings/day to 5.5; sedentary leisure decreased from 219.2 minutes/day to 89.3; saturated fat decreased from 12.0% of calories consumed to 9.5%. Differences between treatment groups were maintained through follow-up. Traditional dieting (decrease fat and increase physical activity) improved less than the other 3 treatments (p<.001). Conclusions Remote coaching supported by mobile technology and financial incentives holds promise to improve diet and activity. Targeting fruits/vegetables and sedentary leisure together maximizes overall adoption and maintenance of multiple healthy behavior changes. PMID:22636824

  4. [The use of assistive technology in the daily activities of children with disabilities].

    PubMed

    Varela, Renata Cristina Bertolozzi; Oliver, Fátima Corrêa

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this study is to understand the use of assistive technology in the everyday life of children with disabilities, based on the concept of everyday life as a space for expression of particularity and generality of individuals. It was developed from documentary research of medical records, application of a form, observation of daily activities of children and their families and semi-structured interviews. Five children were studied, representatives in age, sex, diagnosis and use of technological resources, who were attended in primary healthcare units in São Paulo. The resources are used in homes, schools and other environments and their use is influenced by family and social relations and by the possibility of accessing products and services. It was established that the everyday activities and the use of resources are organized according to the time, space, ways in which children and, mainly, their caregivers act, showing the presence of pragmatism, economy and spontaneity typical of everyday life. The results revealed elements that can guide the practice of professionals working with assistive technology and can contribute to enable the appraisal of providing equipment in the Unified Health System.

  5. Persuasive Technology in Mobile Applications Promoting Physical Activity: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Matthews, John; Win, Khin Than; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Freeman, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Persuasive technology in mobile applications can be used to influence the behaviour of users. A framework known as the Persuasive Systems Design model has been developed for designing and evaluating systems that influence the attitudes or behaviours of users. This paper reviews the current state of mobile applications for health behavioural change with an emphasis on applications that promote physical activity. The inbuilt persuasive features of mobile applications were evaluated using the Persuasive Systems Design model. A database search was conducted to identify relevant articles. Articles were then reviewed using the Persuasive Systems Design model as a framework for analysis. Primary task support, dialogue support, and social support were found to be moderately represented in the selected articles. However, system credibility support was found to have only low levels of representation as a persuasive systems design feature in mobile applications for supporting physical activity. To ensure that available mobile technology resources are best used to improve the wellbeing of people, it is important that the design principles that influence the effectiveness of persuasive technology be understood.

  6. Mission activities planning for a Hermes mission by means of AI-technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pape, U.; Hajen, G.; Schielow, N.; Mitschdoerfer, P.; Allard, F.

    1993-01-01

    Mission Activities Planning is a complex task to be performed by mission control centers. AI technology can offer attractive solutions to the planning problem. This paper presents the use of a new AI-based Mission Planning System for crew activity planning. Based on a HERMES servicing mission to the COLUMBUS Man Tended Free Flyer (MTFF) with complex time and resource constraints, approximately 2000 activities with 50 different resources have been generated, processed, and planned with parametric variation of operationally sensitive parameters. The architecture, as well as the performance of the mission planning system, is discussed. An outlook to future planning scenarios, the requirements, and how a system like MARS can fulfill those requirements is given.

  7. Creating experiential learning activities using Web 2.0 tools and technologies: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brixey, Juliana J; Warren, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    Learning is no longer an internal individual activity but occurs through networks and connections. The aim of this project was to teach online health informatics students to use Web 2.0 tools and technologies to form networks and connections through experiential learning assignments. Web 2.0 tools and technologies were evaluated using a criteria checklist prior to implementation for students enrolled in health informatics classes at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Health informatics students have developed competencies using an instant message service, blogging, concept mapping, social bookmarking, and interacting a virtual environment. In the future, health care professionals will have to work in rapidly changing environments and keep abreast of new innovations and tools, learn to use those tools, and to teach others about the tools.

  8. Overview of NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program Technology Development Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffman, Billy; Hardage, Donna; Minor, Jody

    2003-01-01

    Reducing size and weight of spacecraft, along with demanding increased performance capabilities, introduces many uncertainties in the engineering design community on how spacecraft and spacecraft systems will perform in space. The engineering design community is forever behind on obtaining and developing new tools and guidelines to mitigate the harmful effects of the space environment. Adding to this complexity is the push to use Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and shrinking microelectronics behind less shielding utilizing new materials. The potential usage of unproven technologies such as large solar sail structures and nuclear electric propulsion introduces new requirements to develop new engineering tools. In order to drive down these uncertainties, NASA s SEE Program provides resources for technology development to accommodate or mitigate these harmful environments on spacecraft. This paper will describe the current SEE Program's, currently funded activities and possible future developments.

  9. The Detour of an Obstetric Technology: Active Management of Labor Across Cultures.

    PubMed

    Maffi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Active management of labor (AML) is an obstetric technology developed in Ireland in the 1970s to accelerate labor in nulliparous women. This technology achieved rapid success in Great Britain and in English-speaking countries outside America, which adopted it before many other states around the world. In this article, I explore AML's technical and social characteristics when it was first designed, and then examine its local inflections in a Jordanian and a Swiss maternity hospital to shed light on the ways its transnational circulation modifies its script. I argue that its application is shaped by local material constraints and specific sociocultural configurations, gender regimes, and hospital cultures. Finally, I make a comparative analysis of AML practices in these two settings and in the foundational textbook to disentangle the technical and sociocultural components modeling its local applications.

  10. Video streaming technologies using ActiveX and LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoiu, M.; Rat, C. L.; Panoiu, C.

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the possibilities of remote image processing through data exchange between two programming technologies: LabVIEW and ActiveX. ActiveX refers to the process of controlling one program from another via ActiveX component; where one program acts as the client and the other as the server. LabVIEW can be either client or server. Both programs (client and server) exist independent of each other but are able to share information. The client communicates with the ActiveX objects that the server opens to allow the sharing of information [7]. In the case of video streaming [1] [2], most ActiveX controls can only display the data, being incapable of transforming it into a data type that LabVIEW can process. This becomes problematic when the system is used for remote image processing. The LabVIEW environment itself provides little if any possibilities for video streaming, and the methods it does offer are usually not high performance, but it possesses high performance toolkits and modules specialized in image processing, making it ideal for processing the captured data. Therefore, we chose to use existing software, specialized in video streaming along with LabVIEW and to capture the data provided by them, for further use, within LabVIEW. The software we studied (the ActiveX controls of a series of media players that utilize streaming technology) provide high quality data and a very small transmission delay, ensuring the reliability of the results of the image processing.

  11. Technologies That Assess the Location of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sherar, Lauren B; Sanders, James P; Sanderson, Paul W; Esliger, Dale W

    2015-01-01

    Background The location in which physical activity and sedentary behavior are performed can provide valuable behavioral information, both in isolation and synergistically with other areas of physical activity and sedentary behavior research. Global positioning systems (GPS) have been used in physical activity research to identify outdoor location; however, while GPS can receive signals in certain indoor environments, it is not able to provide room- or subroom-level location. On average, adults spend a high proportion of their time indoors. A measure of indoor location would, therefore, provide valuable behavioral information. Objective This systematic review sought to identify and critique technology which has been or could be used to assess the location of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Methods To identify published research papers, four electronic databases were searched using key terms built around behavior, technology, and location. To be eligible for inclusion, papers were required to be published in English and describe a wearable or portable technology or device capable of measuring location. Searches were performed up to February 4, 2015. This was supplemented by backward and forward reference searching. In an attempt to include novel devices which may not yet have made their way into the published research, searches were also performed using three Internet search engines. Specialized software was used to download search results and thus mitigate the potential pitfalls of changing search algorithms. Results A total of 188 research papers met the inclusion criteria. Global positioning systems were the most widely used location technology in the published research, followed by wearable cameras, and radio-frequency identification. Internet search engines identified 81 global positioning systems, 35 real-time locating systems, and 21 wearable cameras. Real-time locating systems determine the indoor location of a wearable tag via the known location of

  12. Space technology: A study of the significance of recognition for innovators of spinoff technologies. 1993 activities/1994, 1995 plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the past 30 years as NASA has conducted technology transfer programs, it has gained considerable experience - particularly pertaining to the processes. However, three areas have not had much scrutiny: the examination of the contributions of the individuals who have developed successful spinoffs, the commercial success of the spinoffs themselves, and the degree to which they are understood by the public. In short, there has been limited evaluation to measure the success of technology transfer efforts mandated by Congress. Research conducted during the first year of a three-year NASA grant to the United States Space Foundation has taken the initial steps toward measuring the success of methodologies to accomplish that Congressionally-mandated technology transfer. In particular, the US Space Foundation, in cooperation with ARAC, technology transfer experts; JKA, a nationally recognized themed entertainment design company; and top evaluation consultants, inaugurated and evaluated a fresh approach including commercial practices to encourage, motivate, and energize technology transfer by: recognizing already successful efforts (Space Technology Hall of Fame Award), drawing potential business and industrial players into the process (Space Commerce Expo), and informing and motivating the general public (Space Technology Hall of Fame public venues). The first year's efforts are documented and directions for the future are outlined.

  13. A status of the activities of the NASA/MSFC pump stage technology team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R.; Williams, R.; Dakhoul, Y.

    1992-07-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology was established to aid the transfer of CFD related advancements among academia, government agencies, and industry. The specific goals of the Consortium are to develop CFD methodologies necessary to solve propulsion problems, to validate these methodologies, and to apply these methodologies in the design process. To accomplish these goals, a team of experts in various related fields was formed, a schedule of activities necessary to meet the goals was generated, and funding for the activities was obtained from NASA. During the past year (Mar. 1991 - Mar. 1992) the team's activities have focused on preliminary code validation and on the design of an advanced impeller. Six codes were used to calculate the flow in a Rocketdyne 0.3 flow coefficient inducer, and the results were compared to L2F data available for the inducer. This activity identified shortcomings in the experimental data sets and in the analytical solutions which must be surmounted in any future team activity. The design of the advanced impeller relied heavily on CFD results to obtain an optimized geometry. The optimized geometry was analyzed using four different codes, at design and off-design conditions. Activities for the next year include the optimization of a tandem blade impeller design, benchmark of CFD codes for diffuser and volute flows, the collection of L2F data for 'state-of-the-art' impeller and inducer, and the verification of the advanced pump team impeller design in a water rig.

  14. A status of the activities of the NASA/MSFC pump stage technology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Williams, R.; Dakhoul, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology was established to aid the transfer of CFD related advancements among academia, government agencies, and industry. The specific goals of the Consortium are to develop CFD methodologies necessary to solve propulsion problems, to validate these methodologies, and to apply these methodologies in the design process. To accomplish these goals, a team of experts in various related fields was formed, a schedule of activities necessary to meet the goals was generated, and funding for the activities was obtained from NASA. During the past year (Mar. 1991 - Mar. 1992) the team's activities have focused on preliminary code validation and on the design of an advanced impeller. Six codes were used to calculate the flow in a Rocketdyne 0.3 flow coefficient inducer, and the results were compared to L2F data available for the inducer. This activity identified shortcomings in the experimental data sets and in the analytical solutions which must be surmounted in any future team activity. The design of the advanced impeller relied heavily on CFD results to obtain an optimized geometry. The optimized geometry was analyzed using four different codes, at design and off-design conditions. Activities for the next year include the optimization of a tandem blade impeller design, benchmark of CFD codes for diffuser and volute flows, the collection of L2F data for 'state-of-the-art' impeller and inducer, and the verification of the advanced pump team impeller design in a water rig.

  15. Application of chromatography technology in the separation of active components from nature derived drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H-Y; Jiang, J-G

    2010-11-01

    Chromatography technology has been widely applied in various aspects of the pharmacy research on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This paper reviews literatures, published in the past decades, on the separation of active component from TCM using chromatography technology. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC), rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), affinity chromatography (AC), and bio-chromatography (BC) are introduced in detail. Compared to high performance of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), analysis time and solvent loss are significantly reduced by UPLC with increase in resolution and sensitivity. Some ingredients from nature derived drugs can be separated more completely by HSCCC, which has remarkable characteristics such as low cost, simple operation and no pollution. Trace components from complex systems can be selectively and efficiently separated and purified by AC, This feature makes it effective in isolation and identification of active components of Chinese herbs. Interference of some impurities could be excluded by BC. Active ingredients that are difficult to be separated by normal method can be acquired by SFC. Currently, application of novel chromatography techniques in TCM is still in the exploratory stage and many problems, such as preparation of stationary phase and detection, need to be solved.

  16. A brief overview of computational structures technology related activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.

    1992-05-01

    The presentation gives a partial overview of research and development underway in the Structures Division of LeRC, which collectively is referred to as the Computational Structures Technology Program. The activities in the program are diverse and encompass four major categories: (1) composite materials and structures; (2) probabilistic analysis and reliability; (3) design optimization and expert systems; and (4) computational methods and simulation. The approach of the program is comprehensive and entails exploration of fundamental theories of structural mechanics to accurately represent the complex physics governing engine structural performance, formulation, and implementation of computational techniques and integrated simulation strategies to provide accurate and efficient solutions of the governing theoretical models by exploiting the emerging advances in computer technology, and validation and verification through numerical and experimental tests to establish confidence and define the qualities and limitations of the resulting theoretical models and computational solutions. The program comprises both in-house and sponsored research activities. The remainder of the presentation provides a sample of activities to illustrate the breadth and depth of the program and to demonstrate the accomplishments and benefits that have resulted.

  17. Development of active edge pixel sensors and four-side buttable modules using vertical integration technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiolo, A.; Andricek, L.; Moser, H.-G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Terzo, S.; Weigell, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present an R&D activity focused on the development of novel modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The modules consist of n-in-p pixel sensors, 100 or 200 μm thick, produced at VTT (Finland) with an active edge technology, which considerably reduces the dead area at the periphery of the device. The sensors are interconnected with solder bump-bonding to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, and characterised with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 5 ×1015neq /cm2. We will also report on the R&D activity to obtain Inter Chip Vias (ICVs) on the ATLAS read-out chip in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT. This step is meant to prove the feasibility of the signal transport to the newly created readout pads on the backside of the chips allowing for four side buttable devices without the presently used cantilever for wire bonding. The read-out chips with ICVs will be interconnected to thin pixel sensors, 75 μm and 150 μm thick, with the Solid Liquid Interdiffusion (SLID) technology, which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding.

  18. Activities of the NASA sponsored SRI technology applications team in transferring aerospace technology to the public sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berke, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    The organization and functions of an interdisciplinary team for the application of aerospace generated technology to the solution of discrete technological problems within the public sector are presented. The interdisciplinary group formed at Stanford Research Institute, California is discussed. The functions of the group are to develop and conduct a program not only optimizing the match between public sector technological problems in criminalistics, transportation, and the postal services and potential solutions found in the aerospace data base, but ensuring that appropriate solutions are acutally utilized. The work accomplished during the period from July 1, 1970 to June 30, 1971 is reported.

  19. Apollo Program Summary Report: Synopsis of the Apollo Program Activities and Technology for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Overall program activities and the technology developed to accomplish lunar exploration are discussed. A summary of the flights conducted over an 11-year period is presented along with specific aspects of the overall program, including lunar science, vehicle development and performance, lunar module development program, spacecraft development testing, flight crew summary, mission operations, biomedical data, spacecraft manufacturing and testing, launch site facilities, equipment, and prelaunch operations, and the lunar receiving laboratory. Appendixes provide data on each of the Apollo missions, mission type designations, spacecraft weights, records achieved by Apollo crewmen, vehicle histories, and a listing of anomalous hardware conditions noted during each flight beginning with Apollo 4.

  20. Influence of Gelatin-Thrombin Matrix Tissue Sealant on Bacterial Colony Formation and Risk of Pelvic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Michael J.; Vázquez-Torres, Andres; Frank, Daniel N.; McCollister, Bruce D.; Henthorn, Patrick K.; Ir, Diana; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Guy, Michael S.; Anwar, Hiba Q.; Behbakht, Kian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Gelatin-thrombin matrix (GTM) tissue sealant use was previously identified as an independent predictor of pelvic infection following hysterectomies. We aim to elucidate contributing factors by assessing influence of GTM on bacterial colony formation and characterizing bacteria present at the vaginal cuff. Methods. Escherichia coli was incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and pelvic washings with and without GTM to assess influence on colony formation. Pelvic washings of the vaginal cuff were collected from hysterectomies occurring from June through October 2015. In vitro techniques, 16S rRNA gene qPCR, and 16S amplicon sequencing were performed with washings to characterize bacteria at the vaginal cuff. Results. Mean bacterial colony formation in PBS was greater for E. coli incubated in the presence of GTM (1.48 × 107 CFU/mL) versus without (9.95 × 105 CFU/mL) following 20-hour incubation (p = 0.001). Out of 61 pelvic washings samples, 3 were culture positive (≥5000 CFU/mL) with Enterococcus faecalis. Conclusion. In vitro experiments support a facilitating role of GTM on colony formation of E. coli in PBS. However, given the negative results of surgical site washings following adequate disinfection, the role of GTM in promoting posthysterectomy pelvic infections may be limited. Analysis of pelvic washings revealed presence of E. faecalis, but results were inconclusive. Further studies are recommended. PMID:27199534

  1. Fibrin sealants from fresh or fresh/frozen plasma as scaffolds for in vitro articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dare, Emma V; Griffith, May; Poitras, Philippe; Wang, Tao; Dervin, Geoffrey F; Giulivi, Antonio; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2009-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate human CryoSeal fibrin glue derived from single units of plasma as scaffolds for articular cartilage tissue engineering. Human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated into genipin cross-linked fibrin glue derived from individual units of fresh or frozen plasma using the CryoSeal fibrin sealant (FS) system. The constructs were cultured for up to 7 weeks in vitro under low (5%) or normal (21%) oxygen. Chondrocyte viability was >90% within the fibrin gels. Hypoxia induced significant increases in collagen II and Sox9 gene expression and a significant decrease in collagen I. A significant increase in collagen II was detected in fresh plasma-derived cultures, while only collagen I was significantly increased in frozen plasma cultures. Significant increases in total glycosaminoglycan and collagen were detected in the extracellular matrix secreted by the encapsulated chondrocytes. A significant increase in compression modulus was only observed for fresh plasma-derived gels, which is likely explained by a greater amount of collagen type I detected after 7 weeks in frozen compared to fresh plasma gels. Our results indicate that CryoSeal fibrin glue derived from fresh plasma is suitable as a tissue engineering scaffold for human articular chondrocytes, and therefore should be evaluated for autologous articular cartilage regeneration.

  2. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services.

  3. Optogenetics and thermogenetics: technologies for controlling the activity of targeted cells within intact neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jacob G; Garrity, Paul A; Boyden, Edward S

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, interest has grown in the ability to manipulate, in a temporally precise fashion, the electrical activity of specific neurons embedded within densely wired brain circuits, in order to reveal how specific neurons subserve behaviors and neural computations, and to open up new horizons on the clinical treatment of brain disorders. Technologies that enable temporally precise control of electrical activity of specific neurons, and not these neurons' neighbors-whose cell bodies or processes might be just tens to hundreds of nanometers away-must involve two components. First, they require as a trigger a transient pulse of energy that supports the temporal precision of the control. Second, they require a molecular sensitizer that can be expressed in specific neurons and which renders those neurons specifically responsive to the triggering energy delivered. Optogenetic tools, such as microbial opsins, can be used to activate or silence neural activity with brief pulses of light. Thermogenetic tools, such as thermosensitive TRP channels, can be used to drive neural activity downstream of increases or decreases in temperature. We here discuss the principles underlying the operation of these two recently developed, but widely used, toolboxes, as well as the directions being taken in the use and improvement of these toolboxes.

  4. Increasing physical activity through health-enabling technologies: the project "being strong without violence".

    PubMed

    Scharnweber, Corinna; Ludwig, Wolfram; Marschollek, Michael; Pein, Wolfgang; Schack, Peter; Schubert, Reiner; Haux, Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of adiposity in children numerous schools are introducing prevention programmes. Among these is "Gewaltlos Starksein" ("Being strong without violence"), a project of Hauptschule Sophienstraße Braunschweig, Germany (a general education secondary school for grades 5-10). This study aims to discover possible increases in activity through "Gewaltlos Starksein" where health-enabling technologies play a major role. A prospective intervention study with a span of 1.5 years was designed to measure this increase in activity. Partners in this study were Hauptschule Sophienstraße as the intervention group and Grund- und Hauptschule Pestalozzistraße as control group. Data collection was performed using a multi-sensor device, and questionnaires. Confirmatory data analysis of average metabolic equivalent (METs) yielded no significant results. Exploratory analysis showed interesting results, especially concerning the number of steps during leisure time. Descriptive analysis of questionnaires showed that all children enjoy physical activity. There were differences in sports team participation, open-air games and club affiliation. The study could not prove that the intervention "Gewaltlos Starksein" improves physical activity in children. However, the increased leisure activity step count indicates that "Gewaltlos Starksein" has positive effects on children's behaviour. This should be investigated in a further study in cooperation with psychologists.

  5. Accuracy and Adoption of Wearable Technology Used by Active Citizens: A Marathon Event Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Suleder, Julian; Zowalla, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background Today, runners use wearable technology such as global positioning system (GPS)–enabled sport watches to track and optimize their training activities, for example, when participating in a road race event. For this purpose, an increasing amount of low-priced, consumer-oriented wearable devices are available. However, the variety of such devices is overwhelming. It is unclear which devices are used by active, healthy citizens and whether they can provide accurate tracking results in a diverse study population. No published literature has yet assessed the dissemination of wearable technology in such a cohort and related influencing factors. Objective The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine the adoption of wearable technology by runners, especially “smart” devices and (2) to investigate on the accuracy of tracked distances as recorded by such devices. Methods A pre-race survey was applied to assess which wearable technology was predominantly used by runners of different age, sex, and fitness level. A post-race survey was conducted to determine the accuracy of the devices that tracked the running course. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate whether age, sex, fitness level, or track distance were influencing factors. Recorded distances of different device categories were tested with a 2-sample t test against each other. Results A total of 898 pre-race and 262 post-race surveys were completed. Most of the participants (approximately 75%) used wearable technology for training optimization and distance recording. Females (P=.02) and runners in higher age groups (50-59 years: P=.03; 60-69 years: P<.001; 70-79 year: P=.004) were less likely to use wearables. The mean of the track distances recorded by mobile phones with combined app (mean absolute error, MAE=0.35 km) and GPS-enabled sport watches (MAE=0.12 km) was significantly different (P=.002) for the half-marathon event. Conclusions A great variety of vendors (n=36) and devices

  6. Using Active Learning to Identify Health Information Technology Related Patient Safety Events.

    PubMed

    Fong, Allan; Howe, Jessica L; Adams, Katharine T; Ratwani, Raj M

    2017-01-18

    The widespread adoption of health information technology (HIT) has led to new patient safety hazards that are often difficult to identify. Patient safety event reports, which are self-reported descriptions of safety hazards, provide one view of potential HIT-related safety events. However, identifying HIT-related reports can be challenging as they are often categorized under other more predominate clinical categories. This challenge of identifying HIT-related reports is exacerbated by the increasing number and complexity of reports which pose challenges to human annotators that must manually review reports. In this paper, we apply active learning techniques to support classification of patient safety event reports as HIT-related. We evaluated different strategies and demonstrated a 30% increase in average precision of a confirmatory sampling strategy over a baseline no active learning approach after 10 learning iterations.

  7. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite by solution plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiulan; Xu, QiuCheng; Ge, Chao; Su, Nan; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Huihong; Zhu, Shoufeng; Xu, Yanqiu; Cheng, Jiexu

    2017-01-27

    In this paper, Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were prepared by solution plasma technology. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) were used to verify their chemical composition. The size and morphology of the Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These results indicate that about 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and dispersed on the pyramid-like ZnO (20-60 nm) surface. Photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) demonstrates that the Pt (5 wt%)-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite has better photocatalytic activity than commercial P25 because Pt NPs restrain the photogenerated electron/hole recombination and increase the catalyst activity.

  8. [Technology of production and biological activity of toothpaste from Rubus idaeus].

    PubMed

    Bakuridze, A D; Nikolaev, S M; Tsurtsumiia, I G; Berashvili, D T

    2009-09-01

    Composition and the technology of manufacturing of toothpaste from extract of blackberry with anti-inflammatory activity have been developed. Toothpaste contains the following ingredients (g): Blackberry extract - 3.0 5.0 7.0 Aluminum hydroxide - 30,0 Glycerin - 10,0 Sodim carboxymethylcellulose - 1,5 Sodium laurilsulfate - 2,0 Calcium glycerophosphate - 1,5 Sodium monofluorophosphate - 1.0 Titanium dioxide - 1,0 Perfume - 1,0 Sorbit - 1,0 Purified water to 100 ml. Toothpaste containing 3%, 5% and 7% of blackberry extract possesses higher antioedemic activity and has mild influence on alteration and proliferation processes. This allows us to recommend researched toothpaste for application.

  9. Technology Awareness Workshop on Active Combustion Control (ACC) in Propulsion Systems: JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Technology Awareness Seminar on Active Combustion Control (ACC) in Propulsion Systems' was held 12 November 1997 at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio. The objectives of the seminar were: 1) Define the need and potential of ACC to meet future requirements for gas turbines and ramjets; 2) Explain general principles of ACC and discuss recent successes to suppress combustion instabilities, increase combustion efficiency, reduce emission, and extend flammability limits; 3) Identify R&D barriers/needs for practical implementation of ACC; 4) Explore potential for improving coordination of future R&D activities funded by various government agencies. Over 40 individuals representing senior management from over 20 industry and government organizations participated. This document summarizes the presentations and findings of this seminar.

  10. Vision based assistive technology for people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As'ari, M. A.; Sheikh, U. U.

    2012-04-01

    The rapid development of intelligent assistive technology for replacing a human caregiver in assisting people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs) promises in the reduction of care cost especially in training and hiring human caregiver. The main problem however, is the various kinds of sensing agents used in such system and is dependent on the intent (types of ADLs) and environment where the activity is performed. In this paper on overview of the potential of computer vision based sensing agent in assistive system and how it can be generalized and be invariant to various kind of ADLs and environment. We find that there exists a gap from the existing vision based human action recognition method in designing such system due to cognitive and physical impairment of people with dementia.

  11. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite by solution plasma technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiulan; Xu, QiuCheng; Ge, Chao; Su, Nan; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Huihong; Zhu, Shoufeng; Xu, Yanqiu; Cheng, Jiexu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were prepared by solution plasma technology. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) were used to verify their chemical composition. The size and morphology of the Pt-ZnO hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These results indicate that about 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and dispersed on the pyramid-like ZnO (20-60 nm) surface. Photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) demonstrates that the Pt (5 wt%)-ZnO hybrid nanocomposite has better photocatalytic activity than commercial P25 because Pt NPs restrain the photogenerated electron/hole recombination and increase the catalyst activity.

  12. Developing technology-enhanced active learning for medical education: challenges, solutions, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Lewis, Joy H; Bennett, Thomas; Carrasco, Noel; Brysacz, Stanley; Makin, Inder Raj S; Hutman, Ryan; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-04-01

    Growing up in an era of video games and Web-based applications has primed current medical students to expect rapid, interactive feedback. To address this need, the A.T. Still University-School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (Mesa) has developed and integrated a variety of approaches using technology-enhanced active learning for medical education (TEAL-MEd) into its curriculum. Over the course of 3 years (2010-2013), the authors facilitated more than 80 implementations of games and virtual patient simulations into the education of 550 osteopathic medical students. The authors report on 4 key aspects of the TEAL-MEd initiative, including purpose, portfolio of tools, progress to date regarding challenges and solutions, and future directions. Lessons learned may be of benefit to medical educators at academic and clinical training sites who wish to implement TEAL-MEd activities.

  13. Activities involving aeronautical, space science, and technology support for minority institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report addressed the activities with which the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity (ICBO) was involved over the past 12 months. ICBO was involved in the design and development of a CARES Student Tracking System Software (CARES). Cares is intended to provide an effective means of maintaining relevant current and historical information on NASA-funded students through a range of educational program initiatives. ICBP was extensively involved in the formation of a minority university consortium amd implementation of collaborative research activities by the consortium as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth/Earth Observing System. ICBO was involved in the formation of an HBCU/MI Consortium to facilitate technology transfer efforts to the small and minority business community in their respective regions.

  14. Neuroadaptive technology enables implicit cursor control based on medial prefrontal cortex activity

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Thorsten O.; Krol, Laurens R.; Birbaumer, Niels P.; Gramann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of today’s human–machine interaction is limited by a communication bottleneck as operators are required to translate high-level concepts into a machine-mandated sequence of instructions. In contrast, we demonstrate effective, goal-oriented control of a computer system without any form of explicit communication from the human operator. Instead, the system generated the necessary input itself, based on real-time analysis of brain activity. Specific brain responses were evoked by violating the operators’ expectations to varying degrees. The evoked brain activity demonstrated detectable differences reflecting congruency with or deviations from the operators’ expectations. Real-time analysis of this activity was used to build a user model of those expectations, thus representing the optimal (expected) state as perceived by the operator. Based on this model, which was continuously updated, the computer automatically adapted itself to the expectations of its operator. Further analyses showed this evoked activity to originate from the medial prefrontal cortex and to exhibit a linear correspondence to the degree of expectation violation. These findings extend our understanding of human predictive coding and provide evidence that the information used to generate the user model is task-specific and reflects goal congruency. This paper demonstrates a form of interaction without any explicit input by the operator, enabling computer systems to become neuroadaptive, that is, to automatically adapt to specific aspects of their operator’s mindset. Neuroadaptive technology significantly widens the communication bottleneck and has the potential to fundamentally change the way we interact with technology. PMID:27956633

  15. Lithographically patterned thin activated carbon films as a new technology platform for on-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lu; Nitta, Naoki; Yushin, Gleb

    2013-08-27

    Continuous, smooth, visibly defect-free, lithographically patterned activated carbon films (ACFs) are prepared on the surface of silicon wafers. Depending on the synthesis conditions, porous ACFs can either remain attached to the initial substrate or be separated and transferred to another dense or porous substrate of interest. Tuning the activation conditions allows one to change the surface area and porosity of the produced carbon films. Here we utilize the developed thin ACF technology to produce prototypes of functional electrical double-layer capacitor devices. The synthesized thin carbon film electrodes demonstrated very high capacitance in excess of 510 F g(-1) (>390 F cm(-3)) at a slow cyclic voltammetry scan rate of 1 mV s(-1) and in excess of 325 F g(-1) (>250 F cm(-3)) in charge-discharge tests at an ultrahigh current density of 45,000 mA g(-1). Good stability was demonstrated after 10,000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles. The high values of the specific and volumetric capacitances of the selected ACF electrodes as well as the capacity retention at high current densities demonstrated great potential of the proposed technology for the fabrication of various on-chip devices, such as micro-electrochemical capacitors.

  16. Naturalistic Assessment of Everyday Activities and Prompting Technologies in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Seelye, Adriana M.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Cook, Diane J.; Crandall, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) often have difficulty performing complex instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), which are critical to independent living. In this study, amnestic multi-domain MCI (N = 29), amnestic single-domain MCI (N = 18), and healthy older participants (N = 47) completed eight scripted IADLs (e.g., cook oatmeal on the stove) in a smart apartment testbed. We developed and experimented with a graded hierarchy of technology-based prompts to investigate both the amount of prompting and type of prompts required to assist individuals with MCI in completing the activities. When task errors occurred, progressive levels of assistance were provided, starting with the lowest level needed to adjust performance. Results showed that the multi-domain MCI group made more errors and required more prompts than the single-domain MCI and healthy older adult groups. Similar to the other two groups, the multi-domain MCI group responded well to the indirect prompts and did not need a higher level of prompting to get back on track successfully with the tasks. Need for prompting assistance was best predicted by verbal memory abilities in multi-domain amnestic MCI. Participants across groups indicated that they perceived the prompting technology to be very helpful. PMID:23351284

  17. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  18. Analysis of up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter technology in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoming; Liu, Jincui; Li, Shaowen; Biney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Problems have been found in the traditional post-positioned down-flow biological activated carbon filter (DBACF), such as microorganism leakage and low biodegradability. A pilot test was carried out to place a BACF between the sediment tank and the sand filter; a new technology of dual media up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter (UBACF) was developed. Results showed that in terms of the new process, the up-flow mode was better than the down-flow. Compared with the DBACF, the problem of microorganism leakage could be well resolved with the UBACF process by adding disinfectant before the sand filtration, and a similar adsorption effect could be obtained. For the tested raw water, the COD(Mn) and NH3-N removal rate was 54.6% and 85.0%, respectively, similar to the waterworks with the DBACF process. The UBACF greatly enhanced oxygen supply capability and mass transfer rate via aeration, and the NH3-N removal ability was significantly improved from 1.5 mg/L to more than 3 mg/L. Influent to the UBACF with higher turbidity could be coped with through the primary filtration of the ceramisite layer combined with fluid-bed technology, which gave the carbon bed a low-turbidity environment of less than 1.0 NTU. The backwashing parameters and carbon abrasion rate of the two processes were almost the same.

  19. Using Health Information Technology to Foster Engagement: Patients' Experiences with an Active Patient Health Record.

    PubMed

    Rief, John J; Hamm, Megan E; Zickmund, Susan L; Nikolajski, Cara; Lesky, Dan; Hess, Rachel; Fischer, Gary S; Weimer, Melissa; Clark, Sunday; Zieth, Caroline; Roberts, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) typically employ "passive" communication strategies, such as non-personalized medical text, rather than direct patient engagement in care. Currently there is a call for more active PHRs that directly engage patients in an effort to improve their health by offering elements such as personalized medical information, health coaches, and secure messaging with primary care providers. As part of a randomized clinical trial comparing "passive" with "active" PHRs, we explore patients' experiences with using an "active" PHR known as HealthTrak. The "passive" elements of this PHR included problem lists, medication lists, information about patient allergies and immunizations, medical and surgical histories, lab test results, health reminders, and secure messaging. The active arm included all of these elements and added personalized alerts delivered through the secure messaging platform to patients for services coming due based on various demographic features (including age and sex) and chronic medical conditions. Our participants were part of the larger clinical trial and were eligible if they had been randomized to the active PHR arm, one that included regular personalized alerts. We conducted focus group discussions on the benefits of this active PHR for patients who are at risk for cardiovascular disease. Forty-one patients agreed to participate and were organized into five separate focus group sessions. Three main themes emerged from the qualitatively analyzed focus groups: participants reported that the active PHR promoted better communication with providers; enabled them to more effectively partner with their providers; and helped them become more proactive about tracking their health information. In conclusion, patients reported improved communication, partnership with their providers, and a sense of self-management, thus adding insights for PHR designers hoping to address low adoption rates and other patient barriers to the development

  20. Treatment with activated water by GlidArc technology of bacteria producing Biofouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Ghita, S.; Sabau, A.; Hnatiuc, M.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Wartel, M.

    2015-02-01

    Corrosion in marine environment is an actual problem, being a complex dynamic process influenced mainly by physical, chemical, microbiological and mechanical parameters. Around 70% of the maintenance costs of a ship are associated with the corrosion protection. Times for maintenance related to this phenomenon are greater than 80% of the total repair. Reducing this cost would be a significant saving, and an effective treatment can reduce times related to ships repairing. Biofouling is a main cause of corrosion and for its reduction different methods could be applied, especially in the first part of its production. The atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas have been gaining an ever increasing interest for different biodecontamination applications and present potential utilisation in the control of biofouling and biodeterioration. They have a high efficiency of the antimicrobial treatment, including capacity to eradicate microbial biofilms. The adhesion microbial biofilm is mainly influenced by presence of bacteria from the liquid environment. That is why this work concerns the study of annihilation of maximum amount of bacteria from sea water, by using GlidArc technology that produces non-thermal plasma. Bacteria suspended in sea water are placed in contact with activated water. This water is activated by using GlidArc working in humid air. Experimental results refer to the number of different activated and inactivated marine organisms and their evolution, present in solution at certain time intervals after mixing different amounts of seawater with plasma activated water.