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Sample records for activated stellate cells

  1. Senescence of activated stellate cells limits liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Krizhanovsky, Valery; Yon, Monica; Dickins, Ross A.; Hearn, Stephen; Simon, Janelle; Miething, Cornelius; Yee, Herman; Zender, Lars; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cellular senescence acts as a potent mechanism of tumor suppression; however, its functional contribution to non-cancer pathologies has not been examined. Here we show that senescent cells accumulate in murine livers treated to produce fibrosis, a precursor pathology to cirrhosis. The senescent cells are derived primarily from activated hepatic stellate cells, which initially proliferate in response to liver damage and produce the extracellular matrix deposited in the fibrotic scar. In mice lacking key senescence regulators, stellate cells continue to proliferate, leading to excessive liver fibrosis. Furthermore, senescent activated stellate cells exhibit gene expression profile consistent with cell cycle exit, reduced secretion of extracellular matrix components, enhanced secretion of extracellular matrix degrading enzymes, and enhanced immune surveillance. Accordingly natural killer cells preferentially kill senescent activated stellate cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby facilitating the resolution of fibrosis. Therefore, the senescence program limits the fibrogenic response to acute tissue damage. PMID:18724938

  2. Epigenetic Changes during Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Götze, Silke; Schumacher, Eva C.; Kordes, Claus; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which can participate in liver regeneration and fibrogenesis, have recently been identified as liver-resident mesenchymal stem cells. During their activation HSC adopt a myofibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound changes in the gene expression profile. DNA methylation changes at single genes have been reported during HSC activation and may participate in the regulation of this process, but comprehensive DNA methylation analyses are still missing. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of DNA methylation during in vitro activation of HSC. Methods and Results The analysis of DNA methylation changes by antibody-based assays revealed a strong decrease in the global DNA methylation level during culture-induced activation of HSC. To identify genes which may be regulated by DNA methylation, we performed a genome-wide Methyl-MiniSeq EpiQuest sequencing comparing quiescent and early culture-activated HSC. Approximately 400 differentially methylated regions with a methylation change of at least 20% were identified, showing either hypo- or hypermethylation during activation. Further analysis of selected genes for DNA methylation and expression were performed revealing a good correlation between DNA methylation changes and gene expression. Furthermore, global DNA demethylation during HSC activation was investigated by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay and L-mimosine treatment showing that demethylation was independent of DNA synthesis and thereby excluding a passive DNA demethylation mechanism. Conclusions In summary, in vitro activation of HSC initiated strong DNA methylation changes, which were associated with gene regulation. These results indicate that epigenetic mechanisms are important for the control of early HSC activation. Furthermore, the data show that global DNA demethylation during activation is based on an active DNA demethylation mechanism. PMID:26065684

  3. Immunomodulation of activated hepatic stellate cells by mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parekkadan, Biju; Poll, Daan van; Megeed, Zaki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Tilles, Arno W.; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2007-11-16

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to prevent the development of liver fibrosis in a number of pre-clinical studies. Marked changes in liver histopathology and serological markers of liver function have been observed without a clear understanding of the therapeutic mechanism by which stem cells act. We sought to determine if MSCs could modulate the activity of resident liver cells, specifically hepatic stellate cells (SCs) by paracrine mechanisms using indirect cocultures. Indirect coculture of MSCs and activated SCs led to a significant decrease in collagen deposition and proliferation, while inducing apoptosis of activated SCs. The molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of SC activity by MSCs were examined. IL-6 secretion from activated SCs induced IL-10 secretion from MSCs, suggesting a dynamic response of MSCs to the SCs in the microenvironment. Blockade of MSC-derived IL-10 and TNF-{alpha} abolished the inhibitory effects of MSCs on SC proliferation and collagen synthesis. In addition, release of HGF by MSCs was responsible for the marked induction of apoptosis in SCs as determined by antibody-neutralization studies. These findings demonstrate that MSCs can modulate the function of activated SCs via paracrine mechanisms provide a plausible explanation for the protective role of MSCs in liver inflammation and fibrosis, which may also be relevant to other models of tissue fibrosis.

  4. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  5. Multivesicular stellate cells in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R G; Neuman, M G; Shear, N H; Blendis, L M

    1997-09-01

    Stellate cells have only recently received attention in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We used electron microscopy and morphometry to perform a qualitative and quantitative examination of lipid-storing activity of stellate cells in liver biopsies of 26 patients with noncirrhotic and cirrhotic PBC. Parallel with this study, a comparative analysis of the morphology of stellate cells in 51 patients with livers of normal histology was performed. There was a marked increase in the total number of lipid vesicles in stellate cells in all PBC patients when compared to livers with normal histology. Multiple multivesicular stellate cells were seen in the livers of 21 out of 26 patients with PBC. There were 11 to 28 lipid vesicles per multivesicular stellate cell from 1 micromol/L to 5 micromol/L in diameter per lipid vesicle. Hepatocytes showed little or no steatosis in 24 out of 26 (92%) PBC patients. Multivesicular stellate cells were not seen in female patients with normal liver histology. These results suggest that there is an alteration in hepatic lipid-storage that involves stellate cells in PBC, which could be an early manifestation of this disease. Its significance remains to be determined.

  6. Multivesicular stellate cells in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R G; Neuman, M G; Shear, N; Blendis, L M

    1997-10-01

    Stellate cells have only recently received attention in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We have used electron microscopy and morphometry to perform a qualitative and quantitative examination of lipid-storing activity of stellate cells in liver biopsies of 26 patients with noncirrhotic and cirrhotic PBC. In parallel with this study, a comparative analysis of the morphology of stellate cells in 51 patients with livers of normal histology was performed. There was a marked increased in the total number of lipid vesicles in stellate cells in all PBC patients when compared with livers with normal histology. Multiple multivesicular stellate cells were seen in the livers of 21 of 26 patients with PBC. There were 11 to 28 lipid vesicles per multivesicular stellate cell in sizes of 1 microm to 5 microm in diameter per lipid vesicle. Hepatocytes showed little or no steatosis in 24 of 26 (92%) PBC patients. Multivesicular stellate cells were not seen in female patients with normal liver histology. These results suggest that there is an alteration in hepatic lipid storage that involves stellate cells in PBC that could be an early manifestation of this disease. Its significance remains to be elucidated.

  7. Autophagy Releases Lipid That Promotes Fibrogenesis by Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells in Mice and in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    HERNÁNDEZ–GEA, VIRGINIA; GHIASSI–NEJAD, ZAHRA; ROZENFELD, RAPHAEL; GORDON, RONALD; FIEL, MARIA ISABEL; YUE, ZHENYU; CZAJA, MARK J.; FRIEDMAN, SCOTT L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is associated with depletion of intracellular lipid droplets. When hepatocytes undergo autophagy, intracellular lipids are degraded in lysosomes. We investigated whether autophagy also promotes loss of lipids in hepatic stellate cells to provide energy for their activation and extended these findings to other fibrogenic cells. METHODS We analyzed hepatic stellate cells from C57BL/6 wild-type, Atg7F/F, and Atg7F/F-GFAP-Cre mice, as well as the mouse stellate cell line JS1. Fibrosis was induced in mice using CCl4 or thioacetamide (TAA); liver tissues and stellate cells were analyzed. Autophagy was blocked in fibrogenic cells from liver and other tissues using small interfering RNAs against Atg5 or Atg7 and chemical antagonists. Human pulmonary fibroblasts were isolated from samples of lung tissue from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or from healthy donors. RESULTS In mice, induction of liver injury with CCl4 or TAA increased levels of autophagy. We also observed features of autophagy in activated stellate cells within injured human liver tissue. Loss of autophagic function in cultured mouse stellate cells and in mice following injury reduced fibrogenesis and matrix accumulation; this effect was partially overcome by providing oleic acid as an energy substrate. Autophagy also regulated expression of fibrogenic genes in embryonic, lung, and renal fibroblasts. CONCLUSIONS Autophagy of activated stellate cells is required for hepatic fibrogenesis in mice. Selective reduction of autophagic activity in fibrogenic cells in liver and other tissues might be used to treat patients with fibrotic diseases. PMID:22240484

  8. Hydrogen peroxide activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Noriaki; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2006-10-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) may act as a second messenger to mediate the actions of growth factors and cytokines. But the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation and regulation of cell functions in PSCs remains largely unknown. We here examined the effects of H(2)O(2) on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cell functions in PSCs. PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay. Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. The effects of H(2)O(2) on proliferation, alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production were evaluated. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed. H(2)O(2) at non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 100 microM) induced oxidative stress in PSCs. H(2)O(2) activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor kappaB. In addition, H(2)O(2) activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. H(2)O(2) induced alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression but did not induce proliferation or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. H(2)O(2) did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype. Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and collagen gene expression by H(2)O(2) may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis.

  9. Capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bitencourt, Shanna; Mesquita, Fernanda; Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Júlia; Ferreira, Gabriela; Rizzo, Lucas; Bauer, Moises; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Oliveira, Jarbas

    2014-03-01

    Capsaicin, the active component of chili pepper, has been reported to have antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects on a variety of cell lines. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of capsaicin during HSC activation and maintenance. Activated and freshly isolated HSCs were treated with capsaicin. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The migratory response to chemotactic stimuli was evaluated by a modified Boyden chamber assay. Activation markers and inflammatory cytokines were determined by qPCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Our results show that capsaicin reduces HSC proliferation, migration, and expression of profibrogenic markers of activated and primary mouse HSCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of HSC in vitro. PMID:23955514

  10. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  11. Suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation by microRNA-29b

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, Yumiko; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during the activation of hepatic stellate cells in primary culture. {yields} Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs. {yields} It blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-b mRNAs essential for stellate cell activation. {yields} miR-29b overexpression led stellate cells to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their star-like morphology. {yields} miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the regulation of cellular functions including proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. It has been previously shown that the miR-29 family is involved in regulating type I collagen expression by interacting with the 3'UTR of its mRNA. Here, we investigated the roles of miR-29b in the activation of mouse primary-cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a principal collagen-producing cell in the liver. Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during HSC activation in primary culture. Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs and additionally blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-{beta}, which are key genes involved in the activation of HSCs. Further, overexpression of miR-29b led HSCs to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their quiescent star-like cell morphology. Although phosphorylation of FAK, ERK, and Akt, and the mRNA expression of c-jun was unaffected, miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. These results suggested that miR-29b is involved in the activation of HSCs and could be a candidate molecule for suppressing their activation and consequent liver fibrosis.

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces activation of Ras, Raf-1, MEK and MAPK in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Reimann, T; Hempel, U; Krautwald, S; Axmann, A; Scheibe, R; Seidel, D; Wenzel, K W

    1997-02-10

    The transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblast-like cells and the proliferation of the transdifferentiated cells are controlled by TGF-beta1. Little is known about the intracellular signal transducers of TGF-beta1. In this paper we show that in cultured hepatic stellate cells TGF-beta1 induces activation of Ras, Raf-1, MEK and MAPK p42 and p44. The activation of MAPK depends on the activation of MEK. Our data exclude that the observed effects are mediated by a bFGF or PDGF autocrine loop. PMID:9038360

  13. Class II HDAC Inhibition Hampers Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation by Induction of MicroRNA-29

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, Inge; Eysackers, Nathalie; Onyema, Oscar O.; Van Beneden, Katrien; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello; Odenthal, Margarete; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of a quiescent vitamin A storing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) to a matrix producing, contractile myofibroblast-like activated HSC is a key event in the onset of liver disease following injury of any aetiology. Previous studies have shown that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are involved in the phenotypical changes occurring during stellate cell activation in liver and pancreas. Aims In the current study we investigate the role of class II HDACs during HSC activation. Methods We characterized the expression of the class II HDACs freshly isolated mouse HSCs. We inhibited HDAC activity by selective pharmacological inhibition with MC1568, and by repressing class II HDAC gene expression using specific siRNAs. Results Inhibition of HDAC activity leads to a strong reduction of HSC activation markers α-SMA, lysyl oxidase and collagens as well as an inhibition of cell proliferation. Knock down experiments showed that HDAC4 contributes to HSC activation by regulating lysyl oxidase expression. In addition, we observed a strong up regulation of miR-29, a well-known anti-fibrotic miR, upon treatment with MC1568. Our in vivo work suggests that a successful inhibition of class II HDACs could be promising for development of future anti-fibrotic compounds. Conclusions In conclusion, the use of MC1568 has enabled us to identify a role for class II HDACs regulating miR-29 during HSC activation. PMID:23383282

  14. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor-β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co-cultured adhesive potential of Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc-1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc-1 cells. The expression of TNF-α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, and also in

  15. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Sören V.; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A.; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  16. Stiffening hydrogels for investigating the dynamics of hepatic stellate cell mechanotransduction during myofibroblast activation

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, Steven R.; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Tsai, Shannon J.; Lee, Gi Yun; Mauck, Robert L.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis contributes to nearly half of all deaths in the developed world and is characterized by progressive matrix stiffening. Despite this, nearly all in vitro disease models are mechanically static. Here, we used visible light-mediated stiffening hydrogels to investigate cell mechanotransduction in a disease-relevant system. Primary hepatic stellate cell-seeded hydrogels stiffened in situ at later time points (following a recovery phase post-isolation) displayed accelerated signaling kinetics of both early (Yes-associated protein/Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, YAP/TAZ) and late (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) markers of myofibroblast differentiation, resulting in a time course similar to observed in vivo activation dynamics. We further validated this system by showing that α-SMA inhibition following substrate stiffening resulted in attenuated stellate cell activation, with reduced YAP/TAZ nuclear shuttling and traction force generation. Together, these data suggest that stiffening hydrogels may be more faithful models for studying myofibroblast activation than static substrates and could inform the development of disease therapeutics. PMID:26906177

  17. Stiffening hydrogels for investigating the dynamics of hepatic stellate cell mechanotransduction during myofibroblast activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliari, Steven R.; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Tsai, Shannon J.; Lee, Gi Yun; Mauck, Robert L.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2016-02-01

    Tissue fibrosis contributes to nearly half of all deaths in the developed world and is characterized by progressive matrix stiffening. Despite this, nearly all in vitro disease models are mechanically static. Here, we used visible light-mediated stiffening hydrogels to investigate cell mechanotransduction in a disease-relevant system. Primary hepatic stellate cell-seeded hydrogels stiffened in situ at later time points (following a recovery phase post-isolation) displayed accelerated signaling kinetics of both early (Yes-associated protein/Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, YAP/TAZ) and late (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) markers of myofibroblast differentiation, resulting in a time course similar to observed in vivo activation dynamics. We further validated this system by showing that α-SMA inhibition following substrate stiffening resulted in attenuated stellate cell activation, with reduced YAP/TAZ nuclear shuttling and traction force generation. Together, these data suggest that stiffening hydrogels may be more faithful models for studying myofibroblast activation than static substrates and could inform the development of disease therapeutics.

  18. EPAC activation inhibits acetaldehyde-induced activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cell via Rap1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Wu, Xiaojuan; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation represents an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). Previous studies have demonstrated that the rat HSCs could be significantly activated after exposure to 200 μmol/L acetaldehyde for 48 h, and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathways were also dramatically upregulated in activated HSCs isolated from alcoholic fibrotic rat liver. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for the small Ras-like GTPases Rap, and is being considered as a vital mediator of cAMP signaling in parallel with the principal cAMP target protein kinase A (PKA). Our data showed that both cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC signaling pathways were involved in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Acetaldehyde could reduce the expression of EPAC1 while enhancing the expression of EPAC2. The cAMP analog Me-cAMP, which stimulates the EPAC/Rap1 pathway, could significantly decrease the proliferation and collagen synthesis of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Furthermore, depletion of EPAC2, but not EPAC1, prevented the activation of HSC measured as the production of α-SMA and collagen type I and III, indicating that EPAC1 appears to have protective effects on acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Curiously, activation of PKA or EPAC perhaps has opposite effects on the synthesis of collagen and α-SMA: EPAC activation by Me-cAMP increased the levels of GTP-bound (activated) Rap1 while PKA activation by Phe-cAMP had no significant effects on such binding. These results suggested that EPAC activation could inhibit the activation and proliferation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs via Rap1. PMID:26854595

  19. Neferine inhibits cultured hepatic stellate cell activation and facilitates apoptosis: A possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Juhui; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-10

    Neferine is a major alkaloid component of "Lian Zi Xin", embryos of the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner, Nymphaeaceae. Previous studies have shown that neferine has an inhibitory effect on pulmonary fibrosis through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities and inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB. However, it is unknown whether neferine also has an inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis through inhibition of TGF-β1 and collagen I and facilitation of apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells. This study examined the effects of neferine on cultured hepatic stellate (HSC-T6) cells and explored its possible action mechanisms by means of MTT assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow-cytometric annexin V-PI assay and Hoechst 33258 staining, as well as real-time PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neferine administration (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10μmol/l) significantly decreased the TGF-β1 and collagen I produced in HSC-T6 cells, and increased the HSC-T6 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Neferine treatment for 48h at concentrations of 6 and 10μmol/l significantly increased Bax and caspase 3 mRNAs and proteins, and reduced Bcl2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs and proteins. Our data indicate that neferine efficiently inhibits cultured HSC-T6 cell activation and induces apoptosis by increasing Bax and caspase 3 expression via the mitochondrial pathway.

  20. Neferine inhibits cultured hepatic stellate cell activation and facilitates apoptosis: A possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Juhui; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-10

    Neferine is a major alkaloid component of "Lian Zi Xin", embryos of the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner, Nymphaeaceae. Previous studies have shown that neferine has an inhibitory effect on pulmonary fibrosis through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities and inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB. However, it is unknown whether neferine also has an inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis through inhibition of TGF-β1 and collagen I and facilitation of apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells. This study examined the effects of neferine on cultured hepatic stellate (HSC-T6) cells and explored its possible action mechanisms by means of MTT assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow-cytometric annexin V-PI assay and Hoechst 33258 staining, as well as real-time PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neferine administration (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10μmol/l) significantly decreased the TGF-β1 and collagen I produced in HSC-T6 cells, and increased the HSC-T6 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Neferine treatment for 48h at concentrations of 6 and 10μmol/l significantly increased Bax and caspase 3 mRNAs and proteins, and reduced Bcl2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs and proteins. Our data indicate that neferine efficiently inhibits cultured HSC-T6 cell activation and induces apoptosis by increasing Bax and caspase 3 expression via the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:20969858

  1. Ionone Derivatives from the Mycelium of Phellinus linteus and the Inhibitory Effect on Activated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiow-Chyn; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Pan, Tai-Long; Chen, Fu-An; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Three new γ-ionylideneacetic acid derivatives, phellinulins A–C (1–3), were characterized from the mycelium extract of Phellinus linteus. The chemical structures were established based on the spectroscopic analysis. In addition, phellinulin A (1) was subjected to the examination of effects on activated rat hepatic stellate cells and exhibited significant inhibition of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27164091

  2. Celecoxib derivative OSU-03012 inhibits the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells by inducing cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Zuowei; Luo, Zhongguang; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Liver fibrosis may lead to portal hypertension, liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma, and predominantly results from the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells. OSU‑03012, a non‑cyclooxygenase‑inhibiting celecoxib derivative, has been previously demonstrated to promote apoptosis in certain cell types, however, its function in hepatic fibrosis remains unclear. In the current study, the inhibitory effect of OSU‑03012 on the proliferation of the LX2 human hepatic stellate cell line was evaluated by cell counting kit‑8 assay. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to examine the expression of α‑smooth muscle actin and type I collagen, which are representative of LX2 cell activation. The senescence of LX2 cells was measured by senescence‑associated β‑galactosidase staining, and the cell cycle and apoptosis levels were assessed by flow cytometry. The impact of senescence‑associated signaling on protein expression was assessed by western blot analysis. OSU‑03012 was observed to inhibit cell proliferation and prevent the secretion of profibrotic factors in LX2 cells in a dose‑dependent manner. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that OSU‑03012 inhibited the proliferation and activation of LX2 via the induction of cell senescence at the G1 phase, rather than via cell apoptosis. The induction of senescence may be via the upregulation of p16, p21 and p27. In conclusion, the current study provided insight into the pharmacological mechanisms of OSU‑03012 in preventing the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells through cell senescence. The current study supports the theory that OSU‑03012 is a novel agent for potential use against liver fibrosis.

  3. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Soumya C; Kannan, Anbarasu; Gopal, Ashidha; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy.

  4. NADPH Oxidase NOX4 Mediates Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatocyte Cell Death during Liver Fibrosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Patricia; Mainez, Jèssica; Crosas-Molist, Eva; Roncero, César; Fernández-Rodriguez, Conrado M.; Pinedo, Fernando; Huber, Heidemarie; Eferl, Robert; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Fabregat, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    A role for the NADPH oxidases NOX1 and NOX2 in liver fibrosis has been proposed, but the implication of NOX4 is poorly understood yet. The aim of this work was to study the functional role of NOX4 in different cell populations implicated in liver fibrosis: hepatic stellate cells (HSC), myofibroblats (MFBs) and hepatocytes. Two different mice models that develop spontaneous fibrosis (Mdr2−/−/p19ARF−/−, Stat3Δhc/Mdr2−/−) and a model of experimental induced fibrosis (CCl4) were used. In addition, gene expression in biopsies from chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients or non-fibrotic liver samples was analyzed. Results have indicated that NOX4 expression was increased in the livers of all animal models, concomitantly with fibrosis development and TGF-β pathway activation. In vitro TGF-β-treated HSC increased NOX4 expression correlating with transdifferentiation to MFBs. Knockdown experiments revealed that NOX4 downstream TGF-β is necessary for HSC activation as well as for the maintenance of the MFB phenotype. NOX4 was not necessary for TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), but was required for TGF-β-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Finally, NOX4 expression was elevated in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-derived fibrosis, increasing along the fibrosis degree. In summary, fibrosis progression both in vitro and in vivo (animal models and patients) is accompanied by increased NOX4 expression, which mediates acquisition and maintenance of the MFB phenotype, as well as TGF-β-induced death of hepatocytes. PMID:23049784

  5. Curcumin-induced recovery from hepatic injury involves induction of apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, S; Sudhakaran, P R

    2008-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) undergo activation and transdifferentiation to myofibroblast like cells in liver injury, leading to liver fibrosis. During recovery from injury, activated HSCs may either revert back to quiescent state or undergo apoptosis or both. In the present study, we have examined whether recovery from hepatic injury involves apoptosis of activated HSCs and tested whether curcumin (the yellow pigment from Curcuma longa Linn.) promotes recovery from hepatic injury by inducing apoptosis of these cells. Hepatic injury was induced by CCl4 and apoptosis was studied in HSCs isolated from liver by MTT assay, DNA fragmentation, and DAPI and annexin staining. Hepatic recovery was assessed by measuring hepatic marker activities, such as serum GOT, GPT and protein. Hepatic recovery occurred within 4 weeks after inducing injury in untreated control, whereas curcumin treatment caused hepatic recovery within 2 weeks, as evidenced by the reduction of hepatic marker activities to near normal levels. HSCs isolated from liver of animals treated with curcumin showed maximum apoptotic marker activities in 2nd week, whereas in HSCs from untreated control recovering from injury, maximum apoptosis was observed in 4th week. Induction of apoptosis in vivo during hepatic recovery was also suggested by increase in caspase-3 activity. Treatment of isolated HSCs in culture with curcumin caused apoptosis during later stages confirming that curcumin induced apoptosis of activated HSCs and not in unactivated quiescent HSCs. These results suggested that hepatoprotective effect of curcumin causing recovery from injury involved apoptosis of activated HSCs. PMID:19069843

  6. DNMT1-mediated PTEN hypermethylation confers hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrogenesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Er-Bao; Huang, Cheng; Ma, Tao-Tao; Tao, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Chang; Lv, Xiong-Wen; Li, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during liver fibrogenesis. Phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor, is a negative regulator of this process. PTEN promoter hypermethylation is a major epigenetic silencing mechanism in tumors. The present study aimed to investigate whether PTEN promoter methylation was involved in HSC activation and liver fibrosis. Treatment of activated HSCs with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) decreased aberrant hypermethylation of the PTEN gene promoter and prevented the loss of PTEN expression that occurred during HSC activation. Silencing DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) gene also decreased the PTEN gene promoter methylation and upregulated the PTEN gene expression in activated HSC-T6 cells. In addition, knockdown of DNMT1 inhibited the activation of both ERK and AKT pathways in HSC-T6 cells. These results suggest that DNMT1-mediated PTEN hypermethylation caused the loss of PTEN expression, followed by the activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways, resulting in HSC activation. Highlights: ► PTEN methylation status and loss of PTEN expression ► DNMT1 mediated PTEN hypermethylation. ► Hypermethylation of PTEN contributes to the activation of ERK and AKT pathways.

  7. Etoposide Induces Apoptosis in Activated Human Hepatic Stellate Cells via ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Feng; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Mingming; Wang, Aixiu; Xu, Mingcui; Su, Min; Zhang, Ming; Zhuge, Yuzheng

    2016-01-01

    The activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) plays a vital role in the progression of liver fibrosis, and the induction of HSCs apoptosis may attenuate or reverse fibrogenesis. The therapeutic effects of etoposide(VP-16), a widely used anticancer agent, on HSCs apoptosis and liver fibrosis resolution are still unclear. Here, we report that VP-16 reduced the proliferation of LX-2 cells and led to significantly high levels of apoptosis, as indicated by Annexin V staining and the proteolytic cleavage of the executioner caspase-3 and PARP. Additionally, the unfolded protein response regulators CHOP, BIP, caspase-12, p-eIF2α and IRE1α, which are considered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, were upregulated by VP-16. The strong inhibitory effect of VP-16 on LX-2 cells was mainly dependent on ER stress, which activated JNK signaling pathway. Remarkably, VP-16 treatment decreased the expression of α-SMA and type I collagen and simultaneously increased the ratio of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). In contrast, VP-16 induced significantly more apoptosis in HSCs than in normal hepatocytes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that VP-16 exerts a proapoptotic effect on LX-2 cells and has an antifibrogenic effect on collagen deposition, suggesting a new strategy for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:27680712

  8. ATRA modulates mechanical activation of TGF-β by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Lieberthal, Tyler J.; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is abundant desmoplasia, which is orchestrated by pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and accounts for the majority of the stroma surrounding the tumour. Healthy PSCs are quiescent, but upon activation during disease progression, they adopt a myofibroblast-contractile phenotype and secrete and concomitantly reorganise the stiff extracellular matrix (ECM). Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a potent activator of PSCs, and its activation requires spatiotemporal organisation of cellular and extracellular cues to liberate it from an inactive complex with latent TGF-β binding protein (LTBP). Here we study the mechanical activation of TGF-β by PSCs in vitro by investigating LTBP-1 organisation with fibrillar fibronectin and show that all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), which induces PSC quiescence, down-regulates the ability of PSCs to mechanically organise LTBP-1 and activate TGF-β through a mechanism involving myosin II dependent contractility. Therefore, ATRA inhibits the ability of PSCs to mechanically release active TGF-β, which might otherwise act in an autocrine manner to sustain PSCs in an active state and a tumour-favouring stiff microenvironment. PMID:27375161

  9. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  10. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  11. Connective tissue growth factor production by activated pancreatic stellate cells in mouse alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Alyssa; Brigstock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, inflammation, and scarring, the latter of which is due to excessive collagen deposition by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). The aim of this study was to establish a model of ACP in mice, a species that is usually resistant to the toxic effects of alcohol, and to identify the cell type(s) responsible for production of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a pro-fibrotic molecule. C57Bl/6 male mice received intraperitoneal ethanol injections for three weeks against a background of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Peak blood alcohol levels remained consistently high in ethanol-treated mice as compared to control mice. In mice receiving ethanol plus cerulein, there was increased collagen deposition as compared to other treatment groups as well as increased frequency of α-smooth muscle actin and desmin-positive PSC which also demonstrated significantly enhanced CTGF protein production. Expression of mRNA for collagen α1(I), α-smooth muscle actin or CTGF were all increased and co-localized exclusively to activated PSC in ACP. Pancreatic expression of mRNA for key profibrotic markers were all increased in ACP. In conclusion, a mouse model of ACP has been developed that mimics key pathophysiological features of the disease in humans and which shows that activated PSC are the principal producers of collagen and CTGF. PSC-derived CTGF is thus a candidate therapeutic target in anti-fibrotic strategies for ACP. PMID:20368699

  12. Mechanisms of liver fibrosis associated with experimental Fasciola hepatica infection: roles of Fas2 proteinase and hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis A; Terashima, Angélica; Yi, Pedro; Andrade, Roy; Cubero, Francisco J; Albanis, Efsevia; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Espinoza, Jose R; Friedman, Scott L

    2011-02-01

    We have evaluated the possible mechanisms of liver fibrosis caused by Fasciola hepatica in an animal model and in culture using immortalized human stellate cells. Liver biopsies of F. hepatica-infected rats were performed at wk 8 and 16. Serum-starved LX-2 cells, a human stellate cell line, were exposed to increasing concentrations of Fas2 antigen. The expression of key fibrosis-related genes was evaluated by qRT-PCR. There was a significant correlation between fibrogenic gene expression and both intensity and duration of infection. LX-2 cells exposed to Fas2 showed progressively increased expression of mRNAs for Collagen I, alpha-smooth muscle-actin, platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II; inhibition of Fas2 cysteine proteinase activity by E-64 abrogated these increases, suggesting that the protease activity of Fas2 is involved in fibrogenic stimulation. In summary, F. hepatica infection is associated with up-regulation of mRNAs associated with hepatic fibrogenesis in vivo and in activated hepatic stellate cells.

  13. Novel matrine derivative MD-1 attenuates hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting EGFR activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Ying, Hai-Yan; Qu, Ying; Cai, Xiao-Bo; Xu, Ming-Yi; Lu, Lun-Gen

    2016-09-01

    Matrine (MT), the effective component of Sophora flavescens Ait, has been shown to have anti-inflammation, immune-suppressive, anti-tumor, and anti-hepatic fibrosis activities. However, the pharmacological effects of MT still need to be strengthened due to its relatively low efficacy and short half-life. In the present study, we report a more effective thio derivative of MT, MD-1, and its inhibitory effects on the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both cell culture and animal models. Cytological experiments showed that MD-1 can inhibit the proliferation of HSC-T6 cells with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 62 μmol/L. In addition, MD-1 more strongly inhibits the migration of HSC-T6 cells compared to MT and can more effectively induce G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis. Investigating the biological mechanisms underlying anti-hepatic fibrosis in the presence of MD-1, we found that MD-1 can bind the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of HSC-T6 cells, which can further inhibit the phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream protein kinase B (Akt), resulting in decreased expression of cyclin D1 and eventual inhibition of the activation of HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, in rats with dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis, MD-1 slowed the development and progression of hepatic fibrosis, protecting hepatic parenchymal cells and improving hepatic functions. Therefore, MD-1 is a potential drug for anti-hepatic fibrosis.

  14. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zan, Yanlu; Zhang, Yuxia; Tien, Po

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs.

  15. Gallic Acid Induces Necroptosis via TNF–α Signaling Pathway in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya Ju; Hsu, Shih Lan; Liu, Yi Ting; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lin, Ming Hui; Huang, Shu Jung; Ho, Ja-an Annie; Wu, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (3, 4, 5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA), a natural phenolic acid widely found in gallnuts, tea leaves and various fruits, possesses several bioactivities against inflammation, oxidation, and carcinogenicity. The beneficial effect of GA on the reduction of animal hepatofibrosis has been indicated due to its antioxidative property. However, the cytotoxicity of GA autoxidation causing cell death has also been reported. Herein, we postulated that GA might target activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs), the cell type responsible for hepatofibrosis, to mitigate the process of fibrosis. The molecular cytotoxic mechanisms that GA exerted on aHSCs were then analyzed. The results indicated that GA elicited aHSC programmed cell death through TNF–α–mediated necroptosis. GA induced significant oxidative stress through the suppression of catalase activity and the depletion of glutathione (GSH). Elevated oxidative stress triggered the production of TNF–α facilitating the undergoing of necroptosis through the up-regulation of key necroptotic regulatory proteins TRADD and receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3), and the inactivation of caspase–8. Calmodulin and calpain–1 activation were engaged, which promoted subsequent lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). The TNF–α antagonist (SPD–304) and the RIP1 inhibitor (necrostatin–1, Nec–1) confirmed GA-induced TNFR1–mediated necroptosis. The inhibition of RIP1 by Nec–1 diverted the cell death from necroptosis to apoptosis, as the activation of caspase 3 and the increase of cytochrome c. Collectively, this is the first report indicating that GA induces TNF signaling–triggered necroptosis in aHSCs, which may offer an alternative strategy for the amelioration of liver fibrosis. PMID:25816210

  16. Tetramethylpyrazine Inhibits Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells through Hedgehog Signaling Pathways In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jue; Cao, Gang; Wu, Xin; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a major alkaloid isolated from Ligusticum chuanxiong, has been reported in hepatic fibrosis models. However, the action mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) against hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation as well as the possible mechanisms were evaluated. Methods. Western blot assay was used to detect TMP effects on protein expression of Smo, Patched, Hhip, and Gli and to investigate the effects of TMP on Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, CDK2, Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase expression with cyclopamine supplementation. Results. Our results showed that TMP significantly inhibits the expression of Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2 and changes the HSC cycle by inhibiting the proliferation of HSC. Moreover, TMP has also been shown to decrease the expression of Bcl-2 and increase the expression of Bax in HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, TMP can inhibit the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and the inhibitory effect was intensified after the application of joint treatment with TMP and cyclopamine. Conclusion. TMP may be an effective Hh signaling pathway inhibitor for hepatic fibrosis treatment. PMID:26380286

  17. Amphiregulin activates human hepatic stellate cells and is upregulated in non alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Chad; Sigala, Barbara; Soeda, Junpei; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Morgan, Maelle; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Cabibi, Daniela; Pazienza, Valerio; Selden, Claire; Roskams, Tania; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude A.

    2015-01-01

    Amphiregulin (AR) involvement in liver fibrogenesis and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) regulation is under study. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more severe form non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). Our aim was to investigate ex vivo the effect of AR on human primary HSC (hHSC) and verify in vivo the relevance of AR in NAFLD fibrogenesis. hHSC isolated from healthy liver segments were analyzed for expression of AR and its activator, TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE). AR induction of hHSC proliferation and matrix production was estimated in the presence of antagonists. AR involvement in fibrogenesis was also assessed in a mouse model of NASH and in humans with NASH. hHSC time dependently expressed AR and TACE. AR increased hHSC proliferation through several mitogenic signaling pathways such as EGFR, PI3K and p38. AR also induced marked upregulation of hHSC fibrogenic markers and reduced hHSC death. AR expression was enhanced in the HSC of a murine model of NASH and of severe human NASH. In conclusion, AR induces hHSC fibrogenic activity via multiple mitogenic signaling pathways, and is upregulated in murine and human NASH, suggesting that AR antagonists may be clinically useful anti-fibrotics in NAFLD. PMID:25744849

  18. Stellate Cell Networks in the Teleost Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Matan; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    The folliculostellate cells of the mammalian pituitary are non-endocrine cells that are implicated in long-distance communication and paracrine signaling, but to date, these cells have yet to be characterized in teleosts. We found that the stellate cells of the teleost pituitary share many common attributes with mammalian folliculostellate cells. By labeling of stellate cells in live preparations of tilapia pituitaries we investigated their distribution, association with other endocrine cells and their anatomical and functional coupling. In the pars intermedia, stellate cells were arranged around neuronal bundles and their processes extended into the pars distalis. Within the pars distalis, stellate cells formed close associations with FSH cells and, to a lesser degree, with GH and LH cells, suggesting differential paracrine regulation of the two gonadotrope populations. The production of follistatin by stellate cells further corroborates the notion of a paracrine role on FSH release. We also found stellate cells to form gap junctions that enabled dye transfer to neighboring stellate cells, implicating that these cells form a large-scale network that connects distant parts of the pituitary. Our findings represent the first wide-scale study of stellate cells in teleosts and provide valuable information regarding their functional roles in pituitary function. PMID:27086978

  19. Stellate Cell Networks in the Teleost Pituitary.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    The folliculostellate cells of the mammalian pituitary are non-endocrine cells that are implicated in long-distance communication and paracrine signaling, but to date, these cells have yet to be characterized in teleosts. We found that the stellate cells of the teleost pituitary share many common attributes with mammalian folliculostellate cells. By labeling of stellate cells in live preparations of tilapia pituitaries we investigated their distribution, association with other endocrine cells and their anatomical and functional coupling. In the pars intermedia, stellate cells were arranged around neuronal bundles and their processes extended into the pars distalis. Within the pars distalis, stellate cells formed close associations with FSH cells and, to a lesser degree, with GH and LH cells, suggesting differential paracrine regulation of the two gonadotrope populations. The production of follistatin by stellate cells further corroborates the notion of a paracrine role on FSH release. We also found stellate cells to form gap junctions that enabled dye transfer to neighboring stellate cells, implicating that these cells form a large-scale network that connects distant parts of the pituitary. Our findings represent the first wide-scale study of stellate cells in teleosts and provide valuable information regarding their functional roles in pituitary function. PMID:27086978

  20. Effect of lipid on proliferation and activation of rat hepatic stellate cells (I)

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lun-Gen; Zeng, Min-De; Li, Ji-Qiang; Hua, Jing; Fan, Jian-Gao; Fan, Zhu-Ping; Qiu, De-Kai

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of lipid (triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein, VLDL) on proliferation and activation of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC). METHODS: HSC were isolated and cultured from liver of Wistar rats by in situperfusion with pronase and collagenase and density gradient centrifugation with Nycodenz. HSC proliferation was examined with MTT colorimetric assay. RESULT: Triglyceride of 12.5 mg/L had a promoting effect on proliferation of HSC (P < 0.05), 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L had no effects (P > 0.05), but 400 mg/L had an inhibiting effect (P < 0.01). VLDL of 6.25 and 12.5 mg/L had no effect on proliferation of HSC (P > 0.05), but increased concentration of VLDL could promote the HSC proliferation (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Lipid had an effect on proliferation of HSC. Triglyceride and VLDL may promote HSC proliferation and may be associated with fatty liver and hepatic fibrogenesis. PMID:11819353

  1. Amplified inhibition of stellate cell activation pathways by PPAR-γ, RAR and RXR agonists.

    PubMed

    Sharvit, Efrat; Abramovitch, Shirley; Reif, Shimon; Bruck, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptors (PPAR) ligands such as 15-Δ12,13-prostaglandin L(2) [PJ] and all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) have been shown to inhibit the development of liver fibrosis. The role of ligands of retinoic X receptor (RXR) and its ligand, 9-cis, is less clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of combined treatment of the three ligends, PJ, ATRA and 9-cis, on key events during liver fibrosis in rat primary hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). We found that the anti-proliferative effect of the combined treatment of PJ, ATRA and 9-cis on HSCs was additive. Further experiments revealed that this inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase as demonstrated by FACS analysis. In addition, the combined treatment reduced cyclin D1 expression and increased p21 and p27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that the three ligands down regulated the phosphorylation of mTOR and p70(S6K). The activation of HSCs was also inhibited by the three ligands as shown by inhibition of vitamin A lipid droplets depletion from HSCs. Studies using real time PCR and western blot analysis showed marked inhibition of collagen Iα1 and αSMA by the combination of the three ligands. These findings suggest that the combined use of PJ, ATRA and 9-cis causes inhibition of cell proliferation by cell cycle arrest and down-regulation of fibrotic markers to a greater extent compared to each of the ligands alone. PMID:24098526

  2. Relevance of activated hepatic stellate cells in predicting the development of pediatric liver allograft fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Carla; Reding, Raymond; Quinones, Jorge Abarca; Sokal, Etienne; Rahier, Jacques; Bueno, Javier; Sempoux, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main collagen-producing cells in liver fibrogenesis. With the purpose of analyzing their presence and relevance in predicting liver allograft fibrosis development, 162 liver biopsies of 54 pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients were assessed at 6 months, 3 years, and 7 years after LT. The proportion of activated HSCs, identified by α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) immunostaining, and the amount of fibrosis, identified by picrosirius red (PSR%) staining, were determined by computer-based morphometric analysis. Fibrosis was also staged by using the semiquantitative liver allograft fibrosis score (LAFSc), specifically designed to score fibrosis in the pediatric LT population. Liver allograft fibrosis displayed progression over time by PSR% (P < 0.001) and by LAFSc (P < 0.001). The ASMA expression decreased in the long term, with inverse evolution with respect to fibrosis (P < 0.01). Patients with ASMA-positive HSCs area ≥ 8% at 6 months (n = 20) developed a higher fibrosis proportion compared to those with ASMA-positive HSCs area ≤ 8% (n = 34) at the same period of time and in the long term (P = 0.03 and P < 0.01, respectively), but not at 3 years (P = 0.8). ASMA expression ≥ 8% at 6 months was found to be an independent risk factor for 7-year fibrosis development by PSR% (r(2) = 0.5; P < 0.01) and by LAFSc (r(2) = 0.3; P = 0.03). Furthermore, ASMA expression ≥ 8% at 3 years showed an association with the development of fibrosis at 7 years (P = 0.02). In conclusion, there is a high proportion of activated HSCs in pediatric LT recipients. ASMA ≥ 8% at 6 months seems to be a risk factor for early and longterm fibrosis development. In addition, activated HSCs showed inverse evolution with respect to fibrosis in the long term. Liver Transplantation 22 822-829 2016 AASLD. PMID:26851053

  3. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) ameliorates liver fibrosis via promoting activated stellate cell apoptosis and reversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuting; Liu, Xuejiao; Zhou, Qun; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Xu, Fengyun; Li, Jun

    2015-12-01

    SIRT1 (silent information regulator 1), a conserved NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is closely related with various biological processes. Moreover, the important role of SIRT1 in alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver and HCC had been widely reported. Recently, a novel role of SIRT1 was uncovered in organ fibrosis diseases. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of SIRT1 in liver fibrogenesis. SIRT1 protein was dramatically decreased in CCl4-treated mice livers. Stimulation of LX-2 cells with TGF-β1 also resulted in a significant suppression of SIRT1 protein. Nevertheless, TGF-β1-induced LX-2 cell activation was inhibited by SIRT1 plasmid, and this was accompanied by up-regulation of cell apoptosis-related proteins. Overexpression of SIRT1 also attenuated TGF-β1-induced expression of myofibroblast markers α-SMA and COL1a. However, the important characteristic of the recovery of liver fibrosis is not only the apoptosis of activated stellate cells but also the reversal of the myofibroblast-like phenotype to a quiescent-like phenotype. Restoration of SIRT1 protein was observed in the in vivo spontaneously liver fibrosis reversion model and in vitro MDI (isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin)-induced reversed stellate cells, and forced expression of SIRT1 also promoted the reversal of activated stellate cells. Furthermore, lncRNA MALAT1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1) was increased in liver fibrosis. RNAi-mediated suppression of MALAT1 resulted in a decrease of myofibroblast markers and restoration of SIRT1 protein. These observations suggested that SIRT1 contributed to apoptosis and reversion of activated LX-2 cells and SIRT1 might be regulated by MALAT1 in liver fibrosis. Therefore, SIRT1 could be considered as a valuable therapeutic target for translational studies of liver fibrosis.

  4. Modulation by applied electric fields of Purkinje and stellate cell activity in the isolated turtle cerebellum.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C Y; Nicholson, C

    1986-01-01

    Quasi steady-state electric fields were applied across the isolated turtle cerebellum to study the relationship between applied field, neuronal morphology and the modulation of the neuronal spike firing pattern. Spiking elements were identified electrophysiologically using extracellular recording methods and by subsequent horseradish peroxidase injection, which revealed their dendritic morphology and orientation. The electric field was precisely defined by measuring the voltage gradients induced in the cerebellum by 40 s constant-current pulses. The field was constant in the vertical (dorso-ventral) axis and zero in the horizontal plane, in agreement with theory. Neurones were modulated by applying a sinusoidal field at frequencies between 0.05 and 1.0 Hz. Modulated cells exhibited an increase in firing frequency and fell into one of four classes, depending on the direction of the field that produced the modulation. Thus neurones were excited by: ventricle-directed fields (V modulation), pia-directed fields (P modulation), both of the above (V/P modulation) or showed no consistent modulation (non-modulation). Most Purkinje somata and primary dendrites (nineteen out of twenty-eight) and most Purkinje dendrites (eighteen out of thirty), were V modulated with maximum rate proportional to the peak field intensity. The dendrites of these cells were consistently oriented toward the pia. Among the stellate cells, the lower molecular layer stellates, with dendrites extending predominantly towards the pia, were mostly (nineteen out of thirty-two) V modulated. The mid-molecular layer stellates, which showed much variability in dendritic orientation, were distributed among all four of the modulation classes. The upper molecular layer stellates, with a mostly horizontal dendritic alignment, were mainly (nine out of sixteen) non-modulated. All groups of spiking elements showed a correlation between patterns of modulation by applied fields and dendritic orientation, which

  5. PNPLA3 has retinyl-palmitate lipase activity in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Pirazzi, Carlo; Valenti, Luca; Motta, Benedetta Maria; Pingitore, Piero; Hedfalk, Kristina; Mancina, Rosellina Margherita; Burza, Maria Antonella; Indiveri, Cesare; Ferro, Yvelise; Montalcini, Tiziana; Maglio, Cristina; Dongiovanni, Paola; Fargion, Silvia; Rametta, Raffaela; Pujia, Arturo; Andersson, Linda; Ghosal, Saswati; Levin, Malin; Wiklund, Olov; Iacovino, Michelina; Borén, Jan; Romeo, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    Retinoids are micronutrients that are stored as retinyl esters in the retina and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). HSCs are key players in fibrogenesis in chronic liver diseases. The enzyme responsible for hydrolysis and release of retinyl esters from HSCs is unknown and the relationship between retinoid metabolism and liver disease remains unclear. We hypothesize that the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) protein is involved in retinol metabolism in HSCs. We tested our hypothesis both in primary human HSCs and in a human cohort of subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (N = 146). Here we show that PNPLA3 is highly expressed in human HSCs. Its expression is regulated by retinol availability and insulin, and increased PNPLA3 expression results in reduced lipid droplet content. PNPLA3 promotes extracellular release of retinol from HSCs in response to insulin. We also show that purified wild-type PNPLA3 hydrolyzes retinyl palmitate into retinol and palmitic acid. Conversely, this enzymatic activity is markedly reduced with purified PNPLA3 148M, a common mutation robustly associated with liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma development. We also find the PNPLA3 I148M genotype to be an independent (P = 0.009 in a multivariate analysis) determinant of circulating retinol-binding protein 4, a reliable proxy for retinol levels in humans. This study identifies PNPLA3 as a lipase responsible for retinyl-palmitate hydrolysis in HSCs in humans. Importantly, this indicates a potential novel link between HSCs, retinoid metabolism and PNPLA3 in determining the susceptibility to chronic liver disease. PMID:24670599

  6. Lactoferrin protects against chemical-induced rat liver fibrosis by inhibiting stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Tang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T K; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Liver diseases, which can be caused by alcohol abuse, chemical intoxication, viral hepatitis infection, and autoimmune disorders, are a significant health issue because they can develop into liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Lactoferrin (LF), a siderophilic protein with 2 iron-binding sites, has been demonstrated to possess a multitude of biological functions, including antiinflammation, anticancer, and antimicrobial effects, as well as immunomodulatory-enhancing functions. In the current study, we induced hepatotoxicity in rats with dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) to establish a situation that would enable us to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of LF against hepatic injury. Our results showed that DMN-induced hepatic pathological damage significantly decreased the body weight and liver index, increased the mRNA and protein levels of collagen α-1(I) (ColIα-1) and α-smooth muscle actin, and increased the hydroxyproline content. However, treatment with LF significantly increased body weight and liver index, decreased the mRNA and protein levels of ColIα-1 and α-smooth muscle actin, and suppressed the hydroxyproline content when compared with the DMN-treated group. Liver histopathology also showed that low-dose LF (100mg/kg of body weight) or high-dose LF (300 mg/kg of body weight) could significantly reduce the incidences of liver lesions induced by DMN. These results suggest that the LF exhibits potent hepatoprotection against DMN-induced liver damage in rats and that the hepatoprotective effects of LF may be due to the inhibition of collagen production and to stellate cell activation. PMID:24731632

  7. Tetrandrine regulates hepatic stellate cell activation via TAK1 and NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Jin, Quan; Wu, Yan-Ling; Sun, Peng; Jiang, Shuang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, De-Quan; Zhang, Yu-Jing; Lian, Li-Hua; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the anti-fibrotic mechanism of tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from the Chinese herb, Stephania tetrandra, on the immortalized HSC-T6 rat hepatic stellate cell line. Tetrandrine (0.39-50μM) dose- and time-dependently inhibited HSC-T6 cell viability within 24h and exhibited almost no cytotoxicity at concentrations lower than 6.25μM in the presence of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). At a much high concentration (50μM), tetrandrine caused fatal cytotoxity in both HSCs and hepatocytes. TNF-α time-dependently increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, while a lower concentration of tetrandrine (6.25μM) prior to TNF-α treatment reduced the expression of α-SMA and TNFR-1-associated death domain (TRADD). TNF-α treatment induced TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, which were attenuated by tetrandrine. Furthermore, TNF-α treatment activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and IκB-α degradation. Tetrandrine treatment prior to TNF-α reduced nuclear phosphorylated and total NF-κB p65, while the cytosolic IκB-α and NF-κB p65 levels significantly increased. In addition, treatment with only tetrandrine induced the cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP within a range of higher concentrations. Tetrandrine-induced apoptosis was confirmed by the TUNEL assay and flow-cytometric analysis. Treatment with only tetrandrine markedly reduced α-SMA expression, except for at lower concentrations of tetrandrine. A higher concentration of tetrandrine (25μM) induced a significant increase in JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, NF-κB nuclear translocation and IκB-α degradation. In conclusion, the anti-fibrogenic effects of tetrandrine on HSCs involved a dosage-dependent signaling pathway, based on the tetrandrine concentration, by regulating TAK1, JNK and NF-κB. The present data provides strong evidence for the anti-fibrotic dosage

  8. Activated hepatic stellate cells promote liver cancer by induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells through cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianfeng; Li, Jie; Hong, Zaifa; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical mediators of immunosuppression and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous work indicates that HSCs promote HCC progression by enhancing immunosuppressive cell populations including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). MDSCs are induced by inflammatory cytokines (e.g., prostaglandins) and are important in immune suppression. However, how HSCs mediate expansion of MDSCs is uncertain. Thus, we studied activated HSCs that could induce MDSCs from bone marrow cells and noted that HSC-induced MDSCs up-regulated immunosuppressive activity via iNOS, Arg-1, and IL-4Rα. After treating cells with a COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist, we established that HSC-induced MDSC accumulation was mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 signaling. Furthermore, in vivo animal studies confirmed that inhibition of HSC-derived PGE2 could inhibit HSC-induced MDSC accumulation and HCC growth. Thus, our data show that HSCs are required for MDSC accumulation mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 pathway, and these data are the first to link HSC and MDSC subsets in HCC immune microenvironment and provide a rationale for targeting PGE2 signaling for HCC therapy. PMID:26758420

  9. Proteomic identification of potential Clonorchis sinensis excretory/secretory products capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Hu, Fengyu; Hu, Xuchu; Chen, Wenjun; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrated that Clonorchis sinensis is an important risk factor of hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma. C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (CsESPs) are protein complex including proteases, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic enzymes, which may contribute to pathogenesis of liver fluke-associated hepatobiliary diseases. However, potential CsESP candidates involved into hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma still remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we performed proteomic identification of CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the interaction of CsESPs with LX-2 cell membrane. LX-2 cells could be stimulated by CsESPs from 24 h post incubation (p < 0.05). Specifically, 50 μg/ml of CsESPs showed the strongest effect on cell proliferation in methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay which could also be demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis (p < 0.01). Furthermore, expression level of human type III collagen in LX-2 cells treated with CsESPs was significantly higher than that in control cells measured by molecular beacon and semiquantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR approaches (p < 0.01). Finally, CsESPs before and after incubation with LX-2 cells were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis and matrix associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. Nine proteins with abundance change above threefold were Rho GTPase-activating protein, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va, α-enolase, phospholipase C, interleukin-15, insect-derived growth factor, cytochrome c oxidase subunit VI, DNAH1 protein, and kinesin light chain. Taken together, we identified potential CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells, providing more direct evidences that are previously unknown to accelerate strategies

  10. Curcumin inhibits srebp-2 expression in activated hepatic stellate cells in vitro by reducing the activity of specificity protein-1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qiaohua; Chen, Anping

    2009-12-01

    Elevated levels of cholesterol/low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a risk factor for the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and its associated hepatic fibrosis. However, underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We previously reported that curcumin induced gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma and stimulated its activity, leading to the inhibition of the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the major effector cells during hepatic fibrogenesis. We recently showed that curcumin suppressed gene expression of LDL receptor in activated HSCs in vitro by repressing gene expression of the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), leading to the reduction in the level of intracellular cholesterol in HSCs and to the attenuation of the stimulatory effects of LDL on HSCs activation. The current study aimed at exploring molecular mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits srebp-2 expression in HSCs. Promoter deletion assays, mutagenesis assays, and EMSAs localize a specificity protein-1 (SP-1) binding GC-box in the srebp-2 promoter, which is responsible for enhancing the promoter activity and responding to curcumin in HSCs. Curcumin suppresses gene expression of SP-1 and reduces its trans-activation activity, which are mediated by the activation of PPARgamma. The inhibitory effect of curcumin on SP-1 binding to the GC-box is confirmed by chromatin immuno-precipitation. In summary, our results demonstrate that curcumin inhibits srebp-2 expression in cultured HSCs by activating PPARgamma and reducing the SP-1 activity, leading to the repression of ldlr expression. These results provide novel insights into molecular mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits LDL-induced HSC activation.

  11. Tissue-type plasminogen activator suppresses activated stellate cells through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang-I; Isse, Kumiko; Koral, Kelly; Bowen, William C; Muratoglu, Selen; Strickland, Dudley K; Michalopoulos, George K; Mars, Wendy M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and trans-differentiation into myofibroblast (MFB)-like cells is key for fibrogenesis after liver injury and a potential therapeutic target. Recent studies demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent signaling by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a pro-fibrotic regulator of the MFB phenotype in kidney. This study investigated whether LRP1 signaling by t-PA is also relevant to HSC activation following injury. Primary and immortalized rat HSCs were treated with t-PA and assayed by western blot, MTT, and TUNEL. In vitro results were then verified using an in vivo, acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injury model that examined the phenotype and recovery kinetics of MFBs from wild-type animals vs mice with a global (t-PA) or HSC-targeted (LRP1) deletion. In vitro, in contrast to kidney MFBs, exogenous, proteolytically inactive t-PA suppressed, rather than induced, activation markers in HSCs following phosphorylation of LRP1. This process was mediated by LRP1 as inhibition of t-PA binding to LRP1 blocked the effects of t-PA. In vivo, following acute injury, phosphorylation of LRP1 on activated HSCs occurred immediately prior to their disappearance. Mice lacking t-PA or LRP1 retained higher densities of activated HSCs for a longer time period compared with control mice after injury cessation. Hence, t-PA, an FDA-approved drug, contributes to the suppression of activated HSCs following injury repair via signaling through LRP1. This renders t-PA a potential target for exploitation in treating patients with fibrosis.

  12. Activated hepatic stellate cells are dependent on self-collagen, cleaved by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase for their growth.

    PubMed

    Birukawa, Naoko Kubo; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akemi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Nishita, Hiroki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Miyuki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kajiwara, Keiko; Miyazaki, Miyono; Nakashima, Yusuke; Ota, Sigenori; Murakami, Yuya; Tanaka, Yasunobu; Minomi, Kenjiro; Tamura, Yasuaki; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2014-07-18

    Stellate cells are distributed throughout organs, where, upon chronic damage, they become activated and proliferate to secrete collagen, which results in organ fibrosis. An intriguing property of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is that they undergo apoptosis when collagen is resolved by stopping tissue damage or by treatment, even though the mechanisms are unknown. Here we disclose the fact that HSCs, normal diploid cells, acquired dependence on collagen for their growth during the transition from quiescent to active states. The intramolecular RGD motifs of collagen were exposed by cleavage with their own membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The following evidence supports this conclusion. When rat activated HSCs (aHSCs) were transduced with siRNA against the collagen-specific chaperone gp46 to inhibit collagen secretion, the cells underwent autophagy followed by apoptosis. Concomitantly, the growth of aHSCs was suppressed, whereas that of quiescent HSCs was not. These in vitro results are compatible with the in vivo observation that apoptosis of aHSCs was induced in cirrhotic livers of rats treated with siRNAgp46. siRNA against MT1-MMP and addition of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), which mainly inhibits MT1-MMP, also significantly suppressed the growth of aHSCs in vitro. The RGD inhibitors echistatin and GRGDS peptide and siRNA against the RGD receptor αVβ1 resulted in the inhibition of aHSCs growth. Transduction of siRNAs against gp46, αVβ1, and MT1-MMP to aHSCs inhibited the survival signal of PI3K/AKT/IκB. These results could provide novel antifibrosis strategies.

  13. Sedum mexicanum Britt. Induces Apoptosis of Primary Rat Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Chin, Ting-Yu; Lai, Ching-Long; Wang, Wen-Han

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver fibrosis is a significant liver disease in Asian countries. Sedum mexicanum Britt. (SM) has been claimed to have antihepatitis efficacy. In traditional folk medicine, a solution of boiling water-extracted SM (SME) is consumed to prevent and treat hepatitis. However, its efficacy has not yet been verified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of SME on hepatoprotection. Methods. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and hepatocytes (HCs) were isolated from the livers of the rats by enzymatic digestion and density gradient centrifugation. Results. Treating the HCs and aHSCs with SME caused a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of aHSCs but not that of HCs. In addition, treatment with SME resulted in apoptosis of aHSCs, as determined by DAPI analysis and flow cytometry. SME also increased the amount of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in aHSCs. Furthermore, SME treatment induced a dose-dependent reduction in Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax in aHSCs. Conclusions. SME did not cause cytotoxicity in HCs, but it induced apoptosis in aHSCs through the mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. Therefore, SME may possess therapeutic potential for liver fibrosis. PMID:26078767

  14. Calcium signalling in pancreatic stellate cells: Mechanisms and potential roles.

    PubMed

    Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Petersen, Ole H

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic and pancreatic stellate cells may or may not be regarded as stem cells, but they are capable of remarkable transformations. There is less information about stellate cells in the pancreas than in the liver, where they were discovered much earlier and therefore have been studied longer and more intensively than in the pancreas. Most of the work on pancreatic stellate cells has been carried out in studies on cell cultures, but in this review we focus attention on Ca(2+) signalling in stellate cells in their real pancreatic environment. We review current knowledge on patho-physiologically relevant Ca(2+) signalling events and their underlying mechanisms. We focus on the effects of bradykinin in the initial stages of acute pancreatitis, an often fatal disease in which the pancreas digests itself and its surroundings. Ca(2+) signals, elicited in the stellate cells by the action of bradykinin, may have a negative effect on the outcome of the acute disease process and promote the development of chronic pancreatitis. The bradykinin-elicited Ca(2+) signals can be inhibited by blockade of type 2 receptors and also by blockade of Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels. The potential benefits of such pharmacological inhibition for the treatment of pancreatitis are reviewed. PMID:26960936

  15. Bisphosphonates Inhibit Stellate Cell Activity and Enhance Antitumor Effects of Nanoparticle Albumin Bound-Paclitaxel in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Deng, Defeng; Hwang, Rosa F.; Wang, Huamin; Ivan, Cristina; Garza, Raul Joshua; Cohen, Evan; Gao, Hui; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Monroig-Bosque, Paloma del C.; Philip, Bincy; Rashed, Mohammed H.; Aslan, Burcu; Erdogan, Mumin Alper; Gutierrez-Puente, Yolanda; Ozpolat, Bulent; Reuben, James M.; Sood, Anil K.; Logsdon, Craig; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) have been recognized as the principal cells responsible for the production of fibrosis in PDAC. Recently PSCs have been noted to share characteristics with cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage (MML cells). Thus, we tested whether PSCs could be targeted with the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) [pamidronate (Pam) or zoledronic acid (ZA)], which are potent MML cell inhibitors. In addition, we tested NBPs treatment combination with nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) to enhance antitumor activity. In vitro we observed that PSCs possess α-naphthyl butyrate esterase (ANBE) enzyme activity, a specific marker of MML cells. Moreover NBPs inhibited PSCs proliferation, activation, release of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and type I collagen expression. NBPs also induced PSC apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In vivo, NBPs inactivated PSCs; reduced fibrosis; inhibited tumor volume, tumor weight, peritoneal dissemination, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation; and increased apoptosis in an orthotopic murine model of PDAC. These in vivo antitumor effects were enhanced when NBPs were combined with nab-paclitaxel but not gemcitabine (Gem). Our study suggests that targeting PSCs and tumor cells with NBPs in combination with nab-paclitaxel may be a novel therapeutic approach to PDAC. PMID:25193509

  16. Nilotinib induces apoptosis and autophagic cell death of activated hepatic stellate cells via inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Mohamed E; Ghani, Ayaz; Shiha, Gamal E; Ibrahim, Tarek M; Mehal, Wajahat Z

    2013-08-01

    Increasing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) death is a very attractive approach for limiting liver fibrosis. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been shown to have anti-fibrotic properties, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we identified the mechanism of action of the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib in inducing HSC death. Human HSC line (LX-2) and rat HSCs were treated with nilotinib and its predecessor, imatinib, in the absence or presence of various blockers, known to interfere with death signaling pathways. Nilotinib, but not imatinib, induced progressive cell death of activated, but not quiescent, HSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Activated HSCs died through apoptosis, as denoted by increased DNA fragmentation and caspase activation, and through autophagy, as indicated by the accumulation of autophagic markers, light chain (LC)3A-II and LC3B-II. Although inhibition of caspases with Z-VAD-FMK suppressed nilotinib-induced HSCs' apoptosis, there was no increase in HSCs' survival, because autophagy was exacerbated. However, blocking the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening with cyclosporin A completely abolished both apoptosis and autophagy due to nilotinib. Moreover, nilotinib treatment decreased the protein expression of histone deacetylases 1, 2 and 4. Interestingly, pretreament with C646, a selective p300/CBP histone acetyl transferase inhibitor, resulted in diverting nilotinib-induced apoptosis and autophagy towards necrosis. In conclusion, the identification of mPTP as a target of nilotinib in activated HSCs suggests coordination with histone deacetylases inhibition to induce apoptosis and autophagy. Thus, our study provides novel insights into the anti-fibrotic effects of nilotinib.

  17. Antihepatic Fibrosis Effect of Active Components Isolated from Green Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Involves the Inactivation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunge; Jiang, Chunyu; Xia, Xichun; Mu, Teng; Wei, Lige; Lou, Yuntian; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Yuqing; Bi, Xiuli

    2015-07-01

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a vegetable with numerous nutritional properties. In the current study, a total of 23 compounds were isolated from green asparagus, and 9 of these compounds were obtained from this genus for the first time. Preliminary data showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-extracted fraction of green asparagus exerted a stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, giving an IC50 value of 45.52 μg/mL. The biological activities of the different compounds isolated from the EtOAc-extracted fraction with respect to antihepatic fibrosis were investigated further. Four compounds, C3, C4, C10, and C12, exhibited profound inhibitory effect on the activation of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells induced by TNF-α. The activation t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, which led to the production of fibrotic matrix (TGF-β1, activin C) and accumulation of TNF-α, was dramatically decreased by these compounds. The mechanisms by which these compounds inhibited the activation of hepatic stellate cells appeared to be associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, as well as the ERK phosphorylation cascade. PMID:26089141

  18. Antihepatic Fibrosis Effect of Active Components Isolated from Green Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Involves the Inactivation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunge; Jiang, Chunyu; Xia, Xichun; Mu, Teng; Wei, Lige; Lou, Yuntian; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Yuqing; Bi, Xiuli

    2015-07-01

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a vegetable with numerous nutritional properties. In the current study, a total of 23 compounds were isolated from green asparagus, and 9 of these compounds were obtained from this genus for the first time. Preliminary data showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-extracted fraction of green asparagus exerted a stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, giving an IC50 value of 45.52 μg/mL. The biological activities of the different compounds isolated from the EtOAc-extracted fraction with respect to antihepatic fibrosis were investigated further. Four compounds, C3, C4, C10, and C12, exhibited profound inhibitory effect on the activation of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells induced by TNF-α. The activation t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, which led to the production of fibrotic matrix (TGF-β1, activin C) and accumulation of TNF-α, was dramatically decreased by these compounds. The mechanisms by which these compounds inhibited the activation of hepatic stellate cells appeared to be associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, as well as the ERK phosphorylation cascade.

  19. Loss of expression of miR-335 is implicated in hepatic stellate cell migration and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chao; Wu, Chao-Qun; Zhang, Zong-Qi; Yao, Ding-Kang; Zhu, Liang

    2011-07-15

    Activation and migration of resident stellate cells (HSCs) within the hepatic space of Disse play an important role in hepatic fibrosis, which accounts for the increased numbers of activated HSCs in areas of inflammation during hepatic fibrosis. Currently, microRNAs have been found to play essential roles in HSC differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, fat accumulation and collagen production. However, little is known about microRNA mediated HSC activation and migration. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of quiescent HSCs, partially activated HSCs and fully activated HSCs were compared in pairs. Gene ontology (GO) and GO-Map network analysis indicated that the activation of HSCs was regulated by microRNAs. Among them miR-335 was confirmed to be significantly reduced during HSC activation by qRT-PCR, and restoring expression of miR-335 inhibited HSC migration and reduced {alpha}-SMA and collagen type I. Previous study revealed that tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein involved in cell migration, might be a target of miR-335. Therefore, we further studied the TNC expression in miR-335 over-expressed HSCs. Our data showed that exogenous TNC could enhance HSC migration in vitro and miR-335 restoration resulted in a significant inhibition of TNC expression. These results demonstrated that miR-335 restoration inhibited HSC migration, at least in part, via downregulating the TNC expression.

  20. Up-regulation of interleukin-22 mediates liver fibrosis via activating hepatic stellate cells in patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Yuan; Liu, Shuhong; Liu, Yuan; Guo, Chaonan; Li, Hanwei; Li, Wenshu; Jin, Xueyuan; Zhang, Keming; Zhao, Ping; Wei, Lai; Zhao, Jingmin

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is known to play a critical role in liver immunity. However, the role of IL-22 in HCV-associated liver fibrosis is poorly understood. In this study, patients with HCV infection disclosed significant increases in peripheral numbers of IL-22-producing cells as well as in IL-22 plasma levels. In the liver, the increased intrahepatic IL-22(+) cells were positively correlated with fibrotic staging scores and clinical progression from CHC to cirrhosis. Moreover, the majority of IL-22(+) cells were located in fibrotic areas in the liver of patients with cirrhosis and co-localized with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In vitro, administration of IL-22 was accompanied with inhibited LX-2 cell apoptosis, promoted LX-2 cell proliferation, increased expression of α-SMA, and up-regulated collagen production by LX-2 cells. Collectively, our data provide evidence that IL-22 may contribute to the fibrogenesis of HCV-associated liver fibrosis by activating HSCs.

  1. Long non-coding RNA APTR promotes the activation of hepatic stellate cells and the progression of liver fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Fujun; Zheng, Jianjian; Mao, Yuqing; Dong, Peihong; Li, Guojun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Guo, Chuanyong; Liu, Zhanju; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-08-07

    In this study, we aimed at assessing a role of Alu-mediated p21 transcriptional regulator (APTR) in hepatofibrogenesis. APTR was upregulated in fibrotic liver samples and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Knockdown of APTR inhibited the activation of HSCs in vitro and mitigated the accumulation of collagen in vivo. Importantly, APTR silencing could abrogate TGF-β{sub 1}-induced upregulation of α-SMA in HSCs. In addition, inhibition of cell cycle and cell proliferation by APTR knockdown was attenuated by p21 siRNA1 in primary HSCs. Finally, serum APTR levels were increased in patients with liver cirrhosis, indicating a potential biomarker for liver cirrhosis. Collectively, evidence is proposed for a new biological role of APTR in hepatofibrogenesis. - Highlights: • APTR is upregulated in fibrotic liver tissues and activated HSCs. • APTR silencing inhibits HSC activation and the progression of liver fibrosis. • Antifibrotic effect of APTR silencing is achieved by increasing p21.

  2. Thymoquinone attenuates liver fibrosis via PI3K and TLR4 signaling pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ting; Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Wan, Ying; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2013-02-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is the major active compound derived from the medicinal Nigella sativa. In the present study, we investigated the anti-fibrotic mechanism of TQ in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated rat hepatic stellate cells line, T-HSC/Cl-6. T-HSC/Cl-6 cells were treated with TQ (3.125, 6.25 and 12.5μM) prior to LPS (1μg/ml). Our data demonstrated that TQ effectively decreased activated T-HSC/Cl-6 cell viability. TQ significantly attenuated the expression of CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). TQ also significantly inhibited phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. The expression of α-SMA and collagen-I were significantly decreased by TQ. Furthermore, TQ decreased X linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular FLIP (c-FLIPL) expression, which are related with the regulation of apoptosis. Furthermore, TQ significantly increased the survival against LPS challenge in d-galactosamine (d-GlaN)-sensitized mice, and decreased the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), which were in line with in vitro results. Our data demonstrated that TQ attenuates liver fibrosis partially via blocking TLR4 expression and PI3K phosphorylation on the activated HSCs. Therefore, TQ may be a potential candidate for the therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  3. Activation of PPARγ/P53 signaling is required for curcumin to induce hepatic stellate cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Lian, N; Zhang, F; Chen, L; Chen, Q; Lu, C; Bian, M; Shao, J; Wu, L; Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the major event in hepatic fibrogenesis, along with enhancement of cell proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix. Although inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis are potential strategies to block the activation of HSCs, a better understanding of the senescence of activated HSCs can provide a new therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. The antioxidant curcumin, a phytochemical from turmeric, has been shown to suppress HSC activation in vitro and in vivo. The current work was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin on senescence of activated HSCs and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this study, curcumin promoted the expression of senescence marker Hmga1 in rat fibrotic liver. In addition, curcumin increased the number of senescence-associated β-galactosidase-positive HSCs in vitro. At the same time, curcumin induced HSC senescence by elevating the expression of senescence markers P16, P21 and Hmga1, concomitant with reduced abundance of HSC activation markers α-smooth muscle actin and α1(I)-procollagen in cultured HSCs. Moreover, curcumin affected the cell cycle and telomerase activity. We further demonstrated that P53 pharmacological inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) or transfection with P53 siRNA abrogated the curcumin-induced HSC senescence in vitro. Meanwhile, curcumin disruption of P53 leading to increased senescence of activated HSCs was further verified in vivo. Further studies indicated that curcumin promoted the expression of P53 through a PPARγ activation-dependent mechanism. Moreover, promoting PPARγ transactivating activity by a PPARγ agonist 15d-PGJ2 markedly enhanced curcumin induction of senescence of activated HSCs. However, the PPARγ antagonist PD68235 eliminated curcumin induction of HSC senescence. Taken together, our results provided a novel insight into the mechanisms underlying curcumin inhibition of HSC

  4. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors induces a PKC-dependent switch in AMPA receptor subtypes in mouse cerebellar stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; June Liu, Siqiong

    2007-09-01

    The repetitive activation of synaptic glutamate receptors can induce a lasting change in the number or subunit composition of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs). However, NMDA receptors that are present extrasynaptically can also be activated by a burst of presynaptic activity, and thus may be involved in the induction of synaptic plasticity. Here we show that the physiological-like activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs induces a lasting change in the synaptic current, by changing the subunit composition of AMPARs at the parallel fibre-to-cerebellar stellate cell synapse. This extrasynaptic NMDAR-induced switch in synaptic AMPARs from GluR2-lacking (Ca(2+)-permeable) to GluR2-containing (Ca(2+)-impermeable) receptors requires the activation of protein kinase C (PKC). These results indicate that the activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs by glutamate spillover is an important mechanism that detects the pattern of afferent activity and subsequently exerts a remote regulation of AMPAR subtypes at the synapse via a PKC-dependent pathway.

  5. ω-3 PUFAs ameliorate liver fibrosis and inhibit hepatic stellate cells proliferation and activation by promoting YAP/TAZ degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Chang, Yanan; Shi, Zhemin; Han, Xiaohui; Han, Yawei; Yao, Qingbin; Hu, Zhimei; Cui, Hongmei; Zheng, Lina; Han, Tao; Hong, Wei

    2016-07-20

    Elevated levels of the transcriptional regulators Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional coactivators with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), key effectors of the Hippo pathway, have been shown to play essential roles in controlling liver cell fate and the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The dietary intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) has been positively associated with a number of health benefits including prevention and reduction of cardiovascular diseases, inflammation and cancers. However, little is known about the impact of ω-3 PUFAs on liver fibrosis. In this study, we used CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mouse model and found that YAP/TAZ is over-expressed in the fibrotic liver and activated HSCs. Fish oil administration to the model mouse attenuates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. Further study revealed that ω-3 PUFAs down-regulate the expression of pro-fibrogenic genes in activated HSCs and fibrotic liver, and the down-regulation is mediated via YAP, thus identifying YAP as a target of ω-3 PUFAs. Moreover, ω-3 PUFAs promote YAP/TAZ degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Our data have identified a mechanism of ω-3 PUFAs in ameliorating liver fibrosis.

  6. ω-3 PUFAs ameliorate liver fibrosis and inhibit hepatic stellate cells proliferation and activation by promoting YAP/TAZ degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Chang, Yanan; Shi, Zhemin; Han, Xiaohui; Han, Yawei; Yao, Qingbin; Hu, Zhimei; Cui, Hongmei; Zheng, Lina; Han, Tao; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of the transcriptional regulators Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional coactivators with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), key effectors of the Hippo pathway, have been shown to play essential roles in controlling liver cell fate and the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The dietary intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) has been positively associated with a number of health benefits including prevention and reduction of cardiovascular diseases, inflammation and cancers. However, little is known about the impact of ω-3 PUFAs on liver fibrosis. In this study, we used CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mouse model and found that YAP/TAZ is over-expressed in the fibrotic liver and activated HSCs. Fish oil administration to the model mouse attenuates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. Further study revealed that ω-3 PUFAs down-regulate the expression of pro-fibrogenic genes in activated HSCs and fibrotic liver, and the down-regulation is mediated via YAP, thus identifying YAP as a target of ω-3 PUFAs. Moreover, ω-3 PUFAs promote YAP/TAZ degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Our data have identified a mechanism of ω-3 PUFAs in ameliorating liver fibrosis. PMID:27435808

  7. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27420058

  8. Givinostat inhibition of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Gang; Xu, Ling; Wang, Ting; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wen-Ying; Wang, Na; Shi, Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat on proteins related to regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation. METHODS: The cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry were used to observe changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle in hepatic stellate cells treated with givinostat. Western blot was used to observe expression changes in p21, p57, CDK4, CDK6, cyclinD1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 in hepatic stellate cells exposed to givinostat. The scratch assay was used to analyze the effect of givinostat on cell migration. Effects of givinostat on the reactive oxygen species profile, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in JS-1 cells were observed by laser confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Givinostat significantly inhibited JS-1 cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis, leading to cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases. Treatment with givinostat downregulated protein expression of CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin D1, whereas expression of p21 and p57 was significantly increased. The givinostat-induced apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells was mainly mediated through p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Givinostat treatment increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and promoted mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Acetylation of superoxide dismutase (acetyl K68) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (acetyl K310) was upregulated, while there was no change in protein expression. Moreover, the notable beneficial effect of givinostat on liver fibrosis was also confirmed in the mouse models. CONCLUSION: Givinostat has antifibrotic activities via regulating the acetylation of nuclear factor-κB and superoxide dismutase 2, thus inhibiting hepatic stellate cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. PMID:26217084

  9. MicroRNA-378 limits activation of hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrosis by suppressing Gli3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jeongeun; Wang, Sihyung; Kim, Jieun; Rao, Kummara Madhusudana; Park, Soo Yong; Chung, Ildoo; Ha, Chang-Sik; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yun, Yang H.; Jung, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate various cellular processes; however, their role in liver fibrosis is unclear. Here we investigate regulation of miRNAs in chronically damaged fibrotic liver. MiRNA profiling shows that expression of miR-378 family members (miR-378a-3p, miR-378b and miR-378d) declines in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated compared with corn-oil-treated mice. Overexpression of miR-378a-3p, directly targeting Gli3 in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reduces expression of Gli3 and profibrotic genes but induces gfap, the inactivation marker of HSCs, in CCl4-treated liver. Smo blocks transcriptional expression of miR-378a-3p by activating the p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The hepatic level of miR-378a-3p is inversely correlated with the expression of Gli3 in tumour and non-tumour tissues in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Our results demonstrate that miR-378a-3p suppresses activation of HSCs by targeting Gli3 and its expression is regulated by Smo-dependent NF-κB signalling, suggesting miR-378a-3p has therapeutic potential for liver fibrosis. PMID:27001906

  10. MicroRNA-378 limits activation of hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrosis by suppressing Gli3 expression.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Jeongeun; Wang, Sihyung; Kim, Jieun; Rao, Kummara Madhusudana; Park, Soo Yong; Chung, Ildoo; Ha, Chang-Sik; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yun, Yang H; Jung, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate various cellular processes; however, their role in liver fibrosis is unclear. Here we investigate regulation of miRNAs in chronically damaged fibrotic liver. MiRNA profiling shows that expression of miR-378 family members (miR-378a-3p, miR-378b and miR-378d) declines in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated compared with corn-oil-treated mice. Overexpression of miR-378a-3p, directly targeting Gli3 in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reduces expression of Gli3 and profibrotic genes but induces gfap, the inactivation marker of HSCs, in CCl4-treated liver. Smo blocks transcriptional expression of miR-378a-3p by activating the p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The hepatic level of miR-378a-3p is inversely correlated with the expression of Gli3 in tumour and non-tumour tissues in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Our results demonstrate that miR-378a-3p suppresses activation of HSCs by targeting Gli3 and its expression is regulated by Smo-dependent NF-κB signalling, suggesting miR-378a-3p has therapeutic potential for liver fibrosis. PMID:27001906

  11. HS-173, a Novel PI3K Inhibitor, Attenuates the Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells in Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mi Kwon; Ryu, Ye-Lim; Jung, Kyung Hee; Lee, Hyunseung; Lee, Hee Seung; Yan, Hong Hua; Park, Heon Joo; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun–Kyu; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary source of matrix components in liver disease such as fibrosis. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in HSCs has been shown to induce fibrogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the anti-fibrotic activity of a novel imidazopyridine analogue (HS-173) in human HSCs as well as mouse liver fibrosis. HS-173 strongly suppressed the growth and proliferation of HSCs and induced the arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptosis in HSCs. Furthermore, it reduced the expression of extracellular matrix components such as collagen type I, which was confirmed by an in vivo study. We also observed that HS-173 blocked the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, HS-173 suppressed fibrotic responses such as cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by blocking PI3K/Akt signaling. Therefore, we suggest that this compound may be an effective therapeutic agent for ameliorating liver fibrosis through the inhibition of PI3K signaling. PMID:24326778

  12. The hop constituent xanthohumol exhibits hepatoprotective effects and inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells at different levels

    PubMed Central

    Weiskirchen, Ralf; Mahli, Abdo; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid of the female inflorescences of the hop plant. In recent years, various beneficial xanthohumol effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypoglycemic activities, and anticancer effects have been revealed. This review summarizes present studies indicating that xanthohumol also inhibits several critical pathophysiological steps during the development and course of chronic liver disease, including the activation and pro-fibrogenic genotype of hepatic stellate cells. Also the various mechanism of action and molecular targets of the beneficial xanthohumol effects will be described. Furthermore, the potential use of xanthohumol or a xanthohumol-enriched hop extract as therapeutic agent to combat the progression of chronic liver disease will be discussed. It is notable that in addition to its hepatoprotective effects, xanthohumol also holds promise as a therapeutic agent for treating obesity, dysregulation of glucose metabolism and other components of the metabolic syndrome including hepatic steatosis. Thus, therapeutic xanthohumol application appears as a promising strategy, particularly in obese patients, to inhibit the development as well as the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:25999863

  13. Participation of miR-200a in TGF-β1-mediated hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xu; He, Yong; Ma, Tao-Tao; Huang, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is a pivotal event in the initiation and progression of hepatic fibrosis since it mediates transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)-driven extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs modulating messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression, have emerged as key factors to regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although the function of miR-200a has been discussed in many cancers and fibrotic diseases, its role in hepatic fibrosis is still poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate whether miR-200a could attenuate hepatic fibrosis partly through Wnt/β-catenin and TGF-β-dependant mechanisms. Our study found that the expression of endogenous miR-200a was decreased in vitro in TGF-β1-induced HSC activation as well as in vivo in CCl4-induced rat liver fibrosis. Overexpression of miR-200a significantly inhibited α-SMA activity and further affected the proliferation of TGF-β1-dependent activation of HSC. In addition, we identified β-catenin and TGF-β2 as two functional downstream targets for miR-200a. Interestingly, miR-200a specifically suppressed β-catenin in the protein level, whereas miR-200a-mediated suppression of TGF-β2 was shown on both mRNA and protein levels. Our results revealed the critical regulatory role of miR-200a in HSC activation and implied miR-200a as a potential candidate for therapy by deregulation of Wnt/β-catenin and TGFβ signaling pathways, at least in part, via decreasing the expression of β-catenin and TGF-β2.

  14. Hepatic stellate cells contribute to progenitor cells and liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2014-12-01

    Retinoid-storing hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have recently been described as a liver-resident mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) population; however, it is not clear whether these cells contribute to liver regeneration or serve as a progenitor cell population with hepatobiliary characteristics. Here, we purified HSCs with retinoid-dependent fluorescence-activated cell sorting from eGFP-expressing rats and transplanted these GFP(+) HSCs into wild-type (WT) rats that had undergone partial hepatectomy in the presence of 2-acetylaminofluorene (2AAF) or retrorsine, both of which are injury models that favor stem cell-based liver repair. Transplanted HSCs contributed to liver regeneration in host animals by forming mesenchymal tissue, progenitor cells, hepatocytes, and cholangiocytes and elevated direct bilirubin levels in blood sera of GUNN rats, indicating recovery from the hepatic bilirubin-handling defect in these animals. Transplanted HSCs engrafted within the bone marrow (BM) of host animals, and HSC-derived cells were isolated from BM and successfully retransplanted into new hosts with injured liver. Cultured HSCs transiently adopted an expression profile similar to that of progenitor cells during differentiation into bile acid-synthesizing and -transporting hepatocytes, suggesting that stellate cells represent a source of liver progenitor cells. This concept connects seemingly contradictory studies that favor either progenitor cells or MSCs as important players in stem cell-based liver regeneration.

  15. Glutathione levels discriminate between oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta signaling in activated rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    De Bleser, P J; Xu, G; Rombouts, K; Rogiers, V; Geerts, A

    1999-11-26

    Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, human immunodeficiency virus, and liver fibrosis. With respect to liver fibrosis, we have investigated differences in antioxidant enzymes expression in stellate cells (SCs) and parenchymal cells from normal and CCl(4)-treated rat livers. We observed an increase in the expression of catalase in activated SCs. Treatment with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) increased the production of H(2)O(2). Treatment with catalase decreased TGF-beta expression. Addition of H(2)O(2) resulted in increased TGF-beta production. 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole abolished the capacity of SCs to remove H(2)O(2). A paradoxical increase in capacity was observed when the cells were pretreated with diethyl maleate. Treatment with 3-amino-1, 2,4-triazole increased TGF-beta production. A paradoxical decrease of TGF-beta production was observed with diethyl maleate. Treatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine resulted in increased TGF-beta production. TGF-beta decreased the capacity of the SCs to remove H(2)O(2.) An increase in the capacity to remove H(2)O(2) was observed when TGF-beta was removed by neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, our results suggest: 1) a link between cellular GSH levels and TGF-beta production and 2) that cellular GSH levels discriminate whether H(2)O(2) is the result of oxidative stress or acts as second messenger in the TGF-beta signal transduction pathway.

  16. Oxidative stress and hepatic stellate cell activation are key events in arsenic induced liver fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Boyer, James L.; Santra, Amal

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and carcinogen. Exposure to arsenic is associated with development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through ill defined mechanisms. We evaluated hepatic fibrogenesis after long term arsenic exposure in a murine model. BALB/c mice were exposed to arsenic by daily gavages of 6 μg/ gm body weight for 1 year and were evaluated for markers of hepatic oxidative stress and fibrosis, as well as pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and pro-fibrogenic factors at 9 and 12 months. Hepatic NADPH oxidase activity progressively increased in arsenic exposure with concomitant development of hepatic oxidative stress. Hepatic steatosis with occasional collection of mononuclear inflammatory cells and mild portal fibrosis were the predominant liver lesion observed after 9 months of arsenic exposure, while at 12 months, the changes included mild hepatic steatosis, inflammation, necrosis and significant fibrosis in periportal areas. The pathologic changes in the liver were associated with markers of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, matrix reorganization and fibrosis including α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-β1, PDGF-Rβ, pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and pro (α) collagen type I. Moreover, pro-apoptotic protein Bax was dominantly expressed and Bcl-2 was down-regulated along with increased number of TUNEL positive hepatocytes in liver of arsenic exposed mice. Furthermore, HSCs activation due to increased hepatic oxidative stress observed after in vivo arsenic exposure was recapitulated in co-culture model of isolated HSCs and hepatocytes exposed to arsenic. These findings have implications not only for the understanding of the pathology of arsenic related liver fibrosis but also for the design of preventive strategies in chronic arsenicosis. PMID:21134390

  17. Oxidative stress and hepatic stellate cell activation are key events in arsenic induced liver fibrosis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Boyer, James L.; Santra, Amal

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and carcinogen. Exposure to arsenic is associated with development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through ill defined mechanisms. We evaluated hepatic fibrogenesis after long term arsenic exposure in a murine model. BALB/c mice were exposed to arsenic by daily gavages of 6 {mu}g/gm body weight for 1 year and were evaluated for markers of hepatic oxidative stress and fibrosis, as well as pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and pro-fibrogenic factors at 9 and 12 months. Hepatic NADPH oxidase activity progressively increased in arsenic exposure with concomitant development of hepatic oxidative stress. Hepatic steatosis with occasional collection of mononuclear inflammatory cells and mild portal fibrosis were the predominant liver lesion observed after 9 months of arsenic exposure, while at 12 months, the changes included mild hepatic steatosis, inflammation, necrosis and significant fibrosis in periportal areas. The pathologic changes in the liver were associated with markers of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, matrix reorganization and fibrosis including {alpha}-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-{beta}1, PDGF-R{beta}, pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and pro({alpha}) collagen type I. Moreover, pro-apoptotic protein Bax was dominantly expressed and Bcl-2 was down-regulated along with increased number of TUNEL positive hepatocytes in liver of arsenic exposed mice. Furthermore, HSCs activation due to increased hepatic oxidative stress observed after in vivo arsenic exposure was recapitulated in co-culture model of isolated HSCs and hepatocytes exposed to arsenic. These findings have implications not only for the understanding of the pathology of arsenic related liver fibrosis but also for the design of preventive strategies in chronic arsenicosis.

  18. Oxidative stress and hepatic stellate cell activation are key events in arsenic induced liver fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Boyer, James L; Santra, Amal

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and carcinogen. Exposure to arsenic is associated with development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through ill defined mechanisms. We evaluated hepatic fibrogenesis after long term arsenic exposure in a murine model. BALB/c mice were exposed to arsenic by daily gavages of 6 μg/gm body weight for 1 year and were evaluated for markers of hepatic oxidative stress and fibrosis, as well as pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and pro-fibrogenic factors at 9 and 12 months. Hepatic NADPH oxidase activity progressively increased in arsenic exposure with concomitant development of hepatic oxidative stress. Hepatic steatosis with occasional collection of mononuclear inflammatory cells and mild portal fibrosis were the predominant liver lesion observed after 9 months of arsenic exposure, while at 12 months, the changes included mild hepatic steatosis, inflammation, necrosis and significant fibrosis in periportal areas. The pathologic changes in the liver were associated with markers of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, matrix reorganization and fibrosis including α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-β1, PDGF-Rβ, pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and pro(α) collagen type I. Moreover, pro-apoptotic protein Bax was dominantly expressed and Bcl-2 was down-regulated along with increased number of TUNEL positive hepatocytes in liver of arsenic exposed mice. Furthermore, HSCs activation due to increased hepatic oxidative stress observed after in vivo arsenic exposure was recapitulated in co-culture model of isolated HSCs and hepatocytes exposed to arsenic. These findings have implications not only for the understanding of the pathology of arsenic related liver fibrosis but also for the design of preventive strategies in chronic arsenicosis.

  19. Hepatic stellate cells contribute to progenitor cells and liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Retinoid-storing hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have recently been described as a liver-resident mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) population; however, it is not clear whether these cells contribute to liver regeneration or serve as a progenitor cell population with hepatobiliary characteristics. Here, we purified HSCs with retinoid-dependent fluorescence-activated cell sorting from eGFP-expressing rats and transplanted these GFP+ HSCs into wild-type (WT) rats that had undergone partial hepatectomy in the presence of 2-acetylaminofluorene (2AAF) or retrorsine, both of which are injury models that favor stem cell–based liver repair. Transplanted HSCs contributed to liver regeneration in host animals by forming mesenchymal tissue, progenitor cells, hepatocytes, and cholangiocytes and elevated direct bilirubin levels in blood sera of GUNN rats, indicating recovery from the hepatic bilirubin–handling defect in these animals. Transplanted HSCs engrafted within the bone marrow (BM) of host animals, and HSC-derived cells were isolated from BM and successfully retransplanted into new hosts with injured liver. Cultured HSCs transiently adopted an expression profile similar to that of progenitor cells during differentiation into bile acid–synthesizing and –transporting hepatocytes, suggesting that stellate cells represent a source of liver progenitor cells. This concept connects seemingly contradictory studies that favor either progenitor cells or MSCs as important players in stem cell–based liver regeneration. PMID:25401473

  20. Hepatic stellate cells inhibit T cells through active TGFβ1 from a cell-surface-bound latent TGFβ1/GARP complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Qian, Shiguang; Letterio, John J.; Fung, John J.; Lu, Lina; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) inhibit T cells, a process that could help the liver to maintain its immunoprivileged status. HSCs secrete latent TGFβ1, but the detailed mechanisms by which latent TGFβ1 is activated and whether it plays any role in HSC-mediated T-cell suppression remain unclear. Glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP) is a surface marker of activated regulatory T cells (Tregs). GARP binds latent TGFβ1 for its activation, which is critical for Tregs to suppress effector T cells; however, it is still unclear whether GARP is present on HSCs and whether it has any impact on HSC function. In this study, we found that TGFβ1+/− HSCs, which produce reduced levels of TGFβ1, showed decreased potency in inhibiting T cells. We also found that pharmaceutical or genetic inhibition of the TGFβ1 signaling pathway reduced the T-cell-inhibiting activity of HSCs. In addition, using isolated primary HSCs, we demonstrated that GARP was constitutively expressed on HSCs. Blocking GARP function or knocking down GARP expression significantly impaired the potency of HSCs to suppress the proliferation of and IFNγ production from activated T cells, suggesting that GARP is important for HSCs to inhibit T cells. These results demonstrate the unexpected presence of GARP on HSCs and its significance in regard to the ability of HSCs to activate latent TGFβ1 and thereby inhibit T cells. Our study reveals a new mechanism for HSC-mediated immune regulation and potentially for other conditions, such as liver fibrosis, that involve HSC-secreted TGFβ1. PMID:26246140

  1. Adenoviral delivery of an antisense RNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits fibrogenic activities of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Arias, Monica; Lahme, Birgit; Van de Leur, Eddy; Gressner, Axel M; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2002-06-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs as a consequence of the transdifferentiationof hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblasts and is associated with an increased expression and activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. This pluripotent, profibrogenic cytokine stimulates matrix synthesis and decreases matrix degradation, resulting in fibrosis. Thus, blockade of synthesis or sequestering of mature TGF-beta1 is a primary target for the development of antifibrotic approaches. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the administration of adenoviruses constitutively expressing an antisense mRNA complementary to the 3' coding sequence of TGF-beta1 is able to suppress the synthesis of TGF-beta1 in culture-activated hepatic stellate cells. We demonstrate that the adenoviral vehicle directs high-level expression of the transgene and proved that the transduced antisense is biologically active by immunoprecipitation, Western blot, quantitative TGF-beta1 ELISA, and cell proliferation assays. Additionally, the biological function of the transgene was confirmed by analysis of differential activity of TGF-beta1-responsive genes using cell ELISA, Northern blotting, and by microarray technology, respectively. Furthermore, we examined the effects of that transgene on the expression of TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, collagen type alpha1(I), latent transforming growth factor binding protein 1, types I and II TGF-beta receptors, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Our results indicate that the administration of antisense mRNA offers a feasible approach to block autocrine TGF-beta1 signaling in hepatic stellate cells and may be useful and applicable in future to the treatment of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases.

  2. Wnt5a participates in hepatic stellate cell activation observed by gene expression profile and functional assays

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wu-Jun; Hu, Li-Juan; Jian, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Li-Jing; Jiang, Ming; Li, Wei; He, Yi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed genes in quiescent and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and explore their functions. METHODS: HSCs were isolated from the normal Sprague Dawley rats by in suit perfusion of collagenase and pronase and density Nycodenz gradient centrifugation. Total RNA and mRNA of quiescent HSCs, and culture-activated HSCs were extracted, quantified and reversely transcripted into cDNA. The global gene expression profile was analyzed by microarray with Affymetrix rat genechip. Differentially expressed genes were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and analyzed with Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Microarray data were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The function of Wnt5a on human HSCs line LX-2 was assessed with lentivirus-mediated Wnt5a RNAi. The expression of Wnt5a in fibrotic liver of a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrosis rat model was also analyzed with Western blotting. RESULTS: Of the 28 700 genes represented on this chip, 2566 genes displayed at least a 2-fold increase or decrease in expression at a P < 0.01 level with a false discovery rate. Of these, 1396 genes were upregulated, while 1170 genes were downregulated in culture-activated HSCs. These differentially expressed transcripts were grouped into 545 GO based on biological process GO terms. The most enriched GO terms included response to wounding, wound healing, regulation of cell growth, vasculature development and actin cytoskeleton organization. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that Wnt5a signaling pathway participated in the activation of HSCs. Wnt5a was significantly increased in culture-activated HSCs as compared with quiescent HSCs. qRT-PCR validated the microarray data. Lentivirus-mediated suppression of Wnt5a expression in activated LX-2 resulted in significantly impaired proliferation, downregulated expressions of

  3. Down-regulation of FoxO-dependent c-FLIP expression mediates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jung; Sohn, Hee-Young; Yoon, Jeongsook; Park, Sang Ick

    2009-10-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells which contribute to liver fibrosis have represented an important target for antifibrotic therapy. In this study, we found that TRAIL inhibited PI3K/Akt-dependent FoxO phosphorylation and relocated FoxO proteins into the nucleus from the cytosol in activated human hepatic stellate LX-2 cells. The accumulated FoxO proteins in the nucleus led to down-regulation of c-FLIP(L/S) expression, resulting in the activation of apoptosis-related signaling molecules including the activation of caspase-8, -3, and Bid, as well as mitochondrial cytochrome c release. These results were supported by showing that siRNA-mediated knockdown of FoxO led to restoration of c-FLIP(L/S) expression and resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis after treatment of LX-2 cells with TRAIL. Furthermore, c-FLIP(L/S)-transfected LX-2 cells showed the decreased sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our data suggest that sequential activation of FoxO proteins under conditions of suppressed PI3K/Akt signaling by TRAIL can down-regulate c-FLIP(L/S), consequently promoting TRAIL-induced apoptosis in LX-2 cells. Therefore, the present study suggests TRAIL may be an effective strategy for antifibrotic therapy in liver fibrosis. PMID:19470406

  4. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth and improves survival in models of chronic fibrosis via paracrine inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Tong-Chun; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Zhang, Ke-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang-Bo; You, Yang; Tian, Hui; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You

    2015-01-01

    Chronic fibrosis is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis has been linked to cellular processes that promote tumor growth and metastasis. Several recent studies have highlighted the cross-talk between tumor cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs) in HCC. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) is known to attenuate hepatoma cell invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of cytokine secretion by aHSCs. However the underlying mechanism of SYY treatment in reversal of hepatic fibrosis and metastasis of liver cancers is not known. In the current study, a nude mouse model with liver fibrosis bearing orthotopic xenograft was established and we found that SYY could reduce associated fibrosis, inhibit tumor growth and improve survival. In the subcutaneous tumor model with fibrosis, we found that SYY could inhibit liver cancer. In vitro, hepatoma cells incubated with conditioned media (CM) from SYY treated aHSCs showed reduced proliferation, decrease in colony formation and invasive potential. SYY treated group showed altered gene expression, with 1205 genes up-regulated and 1323 genes down-regulated. Gene cluster analysis indicated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) was one of the key genes altered in the expression profiles. PI3K related markers were all significantly down-regulated. ELISA also indicated decreased secretion of cytokines which were regulated by PI3K/AKT signaling after SYY treatment in the hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. These data clearly demonstrate that SYY therapy inhibits HCC invasive and metastatic potential and improves survival in nude mice models with chronic fibrosis background via inhibition of cytokine secretion by activated hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26517671

  5. Wnt Pathway Stabilizes MeCP2 Protein to Repress PPAR-γ in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Soo-Mi; Chi, Feng; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Lai, Keane; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    PPAR-γ is essential for differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and its loss due to epigenetic repression by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) causes HSC myofibroblastic activation mediated in part via Wnt pathway, the key cellular event in liver fibrosis. Decreased miR-132 was previously proposed to promote MeCP2 protein translation for Ppar-γ repression in activated HSC (aHSC). The present study aimed to test this notion and to better understand the mechanisms of MeCP2 upregulation in aHSC. MeCP2 protein is increased on day 3 to 7 as HSC become activated in primary culture on plastic, but this is accompanied by increased but not reduced miR-132 or miR-212 which is also expected to target MeCP2 due to its similar sequence with miR-132. The levels of these mRNAs are decreased 40~50% in aHSCs isolated from experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis but increased 6–8 fold in aHSC from hepatotoxic liver fibrosis in rats. Suppression of either or both of miR132 and miR212 with specific anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (anti-oligo), does not affect MeCP2 protein levels in aHSCs. The Wnt antagonist FJ9 which inhibits HSC activation, increases miR-132/miR-212, reduces MeCP2 and its enrichment at 5’ Ppar-γ promoter, and restores Ppar-γ expression but the anti-oligo do not prevent Ppar-γ upregulation. The pan-NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) also reduces both MeCP2 and stabilized non-(S33/S37/Thr41)-phospho β-catenin and reverts aHSC to quiescent cells but do not affect miR-132/miR-212 levels. Wnt antagonism with FJ9 increases MeCP2 protein degradation in cultured HSC, and FJ9-mediated loss of MeCP2 is rescued by leupeptin but not by proteasome and lysozome inhibitors. In conclusion, canonical Wnt pathway increases MeCP2 protein due to protein stability which in turn represses Ppar-γ and activates HSC. PMID:27214381

  6. Wnt Pathway Stabilizes MeCP2 Protein to Repress PPAR-γ in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Soo-Mi; Chi, Feng; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Lai, Keane; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    PPAR-γ is essential for differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and its loss due to epigenetic repression by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) causes HSC myofibroblastic activation mediated in part via Wnt pathway, the key cellular event in liver fibrosis. Decreased miR-132 was previously proposed to promote MeCP2 protein translation for Ppar-γ repression in activated HSC (aHSC). The present study aimed to test this notion and to better understand the mechanisms of MeCP2 upregulation in aHSC. MeCP2 protein is increased on day 3 to 7 as HSC become activated in primary culture on plastic, but this is accompanied by increased but not reduced miR-132 or miR-212 which is also expected to target MeCP2 due to its similar sequence with miR-132. The levels of these mRNAs are decreased 40~50% in aHSCs isolated from experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis but increased 6-8 fold in aHSC from hepatotoxic liver fibrosis in rats. Suppression of either or both of miR132 and miR212 with specific anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (anti-oligo), does not affect MeCP2 protein levels in aHSCs. The Wnt antagonist FJ9 which inhibits HSC activation, increases miR-132/miR-212, reduces MeCP2 and its enrichment at 5' Ppar-γ promoter, and restores Ppar-γ expression but the anti-oligo do not prevent Ppar-γ upregulation. The pan-NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) also reduces both MeCP2 and stabilized non-(S33/S37/Thr41)-phospho β-catenin and reverts aHSC to quiescent cells but do not affect miR-132/miR-212 levels. Wnt antagonism with FJ9 increases MeCP2 protein degradation in cultured HSC, and FJ9-mediated loss of MeCP2 is rescued by leupeptin but not by proteasome and lysozome inhibitors. In conclusion, canonical Wnt pathway increases MeCP2 protein due to protein stability which in turn represses Ppar-γ and activates HSC. PMID:27214381

  7. Resveratrol Regulates Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells by Modulating NF-κB and the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De-Quan; Sun, Peng; Jin, Quan; Li, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yu-Jing; Wu, Yan-Ling; Nan, Ji-Xing; Lian, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether resveratrol could suppress the hepatic fibrogenesis in activated hepatic stellate cells. The immortalized rat hepatic stellate cells, t-HSC/Cl-6, were treated with resveratrol 1 h prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 μg/mL). Resveratrol decreased t-HSC/Cl-6 cell viability at much lower concentrations within 24 h. Resveratrol pretreatment also decreased the LPS-induced protein expression of α-SMA and collagen I. In addition, resveratrol significantly reduced the protein expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), and the expression of phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylated serine/threonine kinase B (Akt). Moreover, resveratrol markedly blocked the translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in LPS-activated HSCs. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited HSCs activation through stimulating LXRβ, but did not influence LXRα. Overall, we conclude that the antifibrotic effect of resveratrol is the result of blocking NF-κB activation and PI3K/Akt phosphorylation, which inhibits HSC activation to obstruct liver fibrosis. Thus, resveratrol may be a natural agent for preventing hepatic fibrosis.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in purified, uncultured human liver cells and activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Andrew H.; Coll, Mar; Verhulst, Stefaan; Mannaerts, Inge; Øie, Cristina I.; Smedsrød, Bård; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Luttun, Aernout; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Collas, Philippe; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver fibrogenesis – scarring of the liver that can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer – is characterized by hepatocyte impairment, capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. To date, the molecular determinants of a healthy human liver cell phenotype remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we assess the transcriptome and the genome-wide promoter methylome specific for purified, non-cultured human hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs, and investigate the nature of epigenetic changes accompanying transcriptional changes associated with activation of HSCs. Material and methods Gene expression profile and promoter methylome of purified, uncultured human liver cells and culture-activated HSCs were respectively determined using Affymetrix HG-U219 genechips and by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled to promoter array hybridization. Histone modification patterns were assessed at the single-gene level by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR. Results We unveil a DNA-methylation-based epigenetic relationship between hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs despite their distinct ontogeny. We show that liver cell type-specific DNA methylation targets early developmental and differentiation-associated functions. Integrative analysis of promoter methylome and transcriptome reveals partial concordance between DNA methylation and transcriptional changes associated with human HSC activation. Further, we identify concordant histone methylation and acetylation changes in the promoter and putative novel enhancer elements of genes involved in liver fibrosis. Conclusions Our study provides the first epigenetic blueprint of three distinct freshly isolated, human hepatic cell types and of epigenetic changes elicited upon HSC activation. PMID:26353929

  9. Interleukin-22 ameliorates liver fibrogenesis by attenuating hepatic stellate cell activation and downregulating the levels of inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dong-Hong; Guo, Xiao-Yun; Qin, Shan-Yu; Luo, Wei; Huang, Xiao-Li; Chen, Mei; Wang, Jia-Xu; Ma, Shi-Jia; Yang, Xian-Wen; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of interleukin (IL)-22 on hepatic fibrosis in mice and the possible mechanism involved. METHODS: Liver fibrosis was induced in male BALB/c mice by CCl4. Recombinant IL-22 (rmIL-22) was administered intraperitoneally in CCl4-treated mice. Fibrosis was assessed by histology and Masson staining. The activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) was investigated by analysis of α-smooth muscle actin expression. The frequencies of T helper (Th) 22 cells, Th17 cells and Th1 cells, the expression of inflammatory cytokines [IL-22, IL-17A, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-1β] and transcription factors [aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), RAR-related orphan receptor (RORγt), T-bet] mRNA in the liver were investigated. In addition, the plasma levels of IL-22, IL-17A, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were evaluated. RESULTS: Significant elevations in circulating Th22 cells, Th17 cells, Th1 cells, IL-22, IL-17A, and IFN-γ were observed in the hepatic fibrosis group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Treatment with rmIL-22 in mice with hepatic fibrosis ameliorated the severity of hepatic fibrosis, which was confirmed by lower hepatic fibrosis pathological scores (P < 0.01). RmIL-22 decreased the frequencies of Th22 cells (6.71% ± 0.97% vs 8.09% ± 0.74%, P < 0.01), Th17 cells (4.34% ± 0.37% vs 5.71% ± 0.24%, P < 0.01), Th1 cells (3.09% ± 0.49% vs 4.91% ± 0.73%, P < 0.01), and the levels of IL-22 (56.23 ± 3.08 vs 70.29 ± 3.01, P < 0.01), IL-17A (30.74 ± 2.77 vs 45.68 ± 2.71, P < 0.01), and IFN-γ (74.78 ± 2.61 vs 124.89 ± 2.82, P < 0.01). Down-regulation of IL-22, IL-17A, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, AHR RORγt, and T-bet gene expression in the liver was observed in the rmIL-22 group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The frequencies of Th22, Th17 and Th1 cells are elevated in hepatic fibrosis. RmIL-22 can attenuate HSC activation and down-regulate the levels of inflammatory cytokines, thereby ameliorating

  10. Tryptase inhibitor APC 366 prevents hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis induced by tryptase/protease-activated receptor 2 interactions in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Baian; Li, Shengli; Sun, Quan

    2014-06-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by mast cell tryptase. PAR-2 activation augments profibrotic pathways through the induction of extracellular matrix proteins. PAR-2 is widely expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but the role of tryptase/PAR-2 interaction in liver fibrosis is unclear. We studied the development of bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with mast cell tryptase inhibitor APC 366, and showed that APC 366 reduced hepatic fibrosis scores, collagen content and serum biochemical parameters. Reduced fibrosis was associated with decreased expression of PAR-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our findings demonstrate that mast cell tryptase induces PAR-2 activation to augment HSC proliferation and promote hepatic fibrosis in rats. Treatment with tryptase antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease.

  11. Tryptase inhibitor APC 366 prevents hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis induced by tryptase/protease-activated receptor 2 interactions in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Baian; Li, Shengli; Sun, Quan

    2014-06-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by mast cell tryptase. PAR-2 activation augments profibrotic pathways through the induction of extracellular matrix proteins. PAR-2 is widely expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but the role of tryptase/PAR-2 interaction in liver fibrosis is unclear. We studied the development of bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with mast cell tryptase inhibitor APC 366, and showed that APC 366 reduced hepatic fibrosis scores, collagen content and serum biochemical parameters. Reduced fibrosis was associated with decreased expression of PAR-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our findings demonstrate that mast cell tryptase induces PAR-2 activation to augment HSC proliferation and promote hepatic fibrosis in rats. Treatment with tryptase antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:24735816

  12. Dietary Flavonoid Hyperoside Induces Apoptosis of Activated Human LX-2 Hepatic Stellate Cell by Suppressing Canonical NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Liang; Tao, Yongqing; Wang, Suying; Zhi, Dexian

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoside, an active compound found in plants of the genera Hypericum and Crataegus, is reported to exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activities. Induction of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) apoptosis is recognized as a promising strategy for attenuation of hepatic fibrosis. In this study, we investigated whether hyperoside treatment can exert antifibrotic effects in human LX-2 hepatic stellate cells. We found that hyperoside induced apoptosis in LX-2 cells and decreased levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), type I collagen, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Remarkably, hyperoside also inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor NF-κB and altered expression levels of NF-κB-regulated genes related to apoptosis, including proapoptotic genes Bcl-Xs, DR4, Fas, and FasL and anti-apoptotic genes A20, c-IAP1, Bcl-XL, and RIP1. Our results suggest that hyperoside may have potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:27110557

  13. Dietary Flavonoid Hyperoside Induces Apoptosis of Activated Human LX-2 Hepatic Stellate Cell by Suppressing Canonical NF-κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwen; Yue, Zhiwei; Guo, Mengzheng; Fang, Lianying; Bai, Liang; Li, Xinyu; Tao, Yongqing; Wang, Suying; Liu, Qiang; Zhi, Dexian; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoside, an active compound found in plants of the genera Hypericum and Crataegus, is reported to exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activities. Induction of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) apoptosis is recognized as a promising strategy for attenuation of hepatic fibrosis. In this study, we investigated whether hyperoside treatment can exert antifibrotic effects in human LX-2 hepatic stellate cells. We found that hyperoside induced apoptosis in LX-2 cells and decreased levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), type I collagen, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Remarkably, hyperoside also inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor NF-κB and altered expression levels of NF-κB-regulated genes related to apoptosis, including proapoptotic genes Bcl-Xs, DR4, Fas, and FasL and anti-apoptotic genes A20, c-IAP1, Bcl-X L , and RIP1. Our results suggest that hyperoside may have potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:27110557

  14. Egg antigen p40 of Schistosoma japonicum promotes senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells by activation of the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinling; Xu, Tianhua; Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Caiqun; Lyu, Lei; Hu, Bin; Sun, Wei; Duan, Yinong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a serious disease that is characterized by the excess deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are a major source of ECM and serve as a key regulator in liver fibrogenesis. Inactivation of HSCs is essential for liver fibrotic regression. The present study explores the underlying mechanisms of Schistosoma japonicum egg antigen p40 (Sjp40) promoting senescence in HSCs and antifibrosis. For the first time we report that Sjp40 inhibits the activation and proliferation of an immortalized human HSC line (LX-2 cells) and promotes cellular senescence and cell cycle arrest. Sjp40 through action on the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway triggered cellular senescence, while knockdown of p53 or STAT3 partly restored cell senescence. In addition, Sjp40-induced cellular senescence caused LX-2 cells to be more sensitive to a human NK cell line (YT cells). Together these findings provide novel insights into the mechanism of antifibrosis and may have implications for the development of antifibrosis therapies. PMID:27468691

  15. Regulation of E-box DNA binding during in vivo and in vitro activation of rat and human hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, K; Jones, E; Arthur, M; Smart, D; Trim, J; Wright, M; Mann, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to a myofibroblastic phenotype is a key event in liver fibrosis. Identification of transcription factors with activities that are modulated during HSC activation will improve our understanding of the molecular events controlling HSC activation.
AIMS—To determine if changes in E-box DNA binding activity occur during in vitro and in vivo activation of rat and human HSCs and to investigate mechanisms underlying any observed changes.
METHODS—Nuclear extracts were prepared from rat HSCs isolated and cultured from normal and carbon tetrachloride injured rat livers and from HSCs isolated from human liver. EMSA analysis of E-box DNA binding activity was performed on nuclear extracts to determine changes during HSC activation. Western and northern blot analysis of MyoD and Id1 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins was performed to confirm expression in HSC.
RESULTS—HSC activation was associated with inducible expression of two low mobility E-box binding complexes that were immunoreactive with an anti-MyoD antibody. MyoD mRNA expression was found at similar levels in freshly isolated and activated HSCs; in contrast, MyoD protein expression was elevated in activated HSCs. Activation of rat HSCs was accompanied by reduced expression of the inhibitory bHLH protein Id1.
CONCLUSIONS—In vitro and in vivo activation of rat and human HSCs is accompanied by induction of MyoD binding to E-box DNA sequences which appears to be mechanistically associated with elevated MyoD protein expression and reduced expression of the inhibitory Id1 protein. Clarification of the role of MyoD and Id1 proteins in HSC activation and liver fibrogenesis is now required.


Keywords: liver fibrosis; hepatic stellate cell; basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors; MyoD; Id1 PMID:11600477

  16. Septin4_i1 Regulates Apoptosis in Hepatic Stellate Cells through Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ/Akt/B-Cell Lymphoma 2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Jianxin; Sun, Xiaolei; Chen, Jinling; Pan, Jing; Xu, Tianhua; Qin, Yongwei; He, Xingxin; Huang, Caiqun

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has been verified as a potential mechanism to aid in hepatic fibrosis remission. Earlier research suggests that Septin4_i1 may sensitize hepatocellular carcinoma cells to serum starvation-induced apoptosis. Here, we aimed to investigate the effect of Septin4_i1 on HSC apoptosis and explore the associated signaling pathways. We found that Septin4_i1 can induce apoptosis in LX-2 cells and that this is accompanied by an up-regulation in cleaved-caspase-3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression and a down-regulation in α-SMA expression. Over-expression of Septin4_i1 reduced phosphorylated Akt and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression but had no effect on the expression of p53 and death receptor (DR)-5. The decreased expression of Bcl-2 and the increased expression of cleaved-caspase-3 induced by Sept4_i1 could be reversed by GW501516, a PPAR-β/δ agonist that has been reported by others to enhance Akt signaling. In addition, GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR-γ, could also inhibit apoptosis in LX-2 cells induced by Sept4_i1. In conclusion, our data suggest that Sept4_i1 induces HSC apoptosis by inhibiting Akt and Bcl-2 expression and up-regulating PPAR-γ expression. PMID:25527525

  17. Septin4_i1 regulates apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ/Akt/B-cell lymphoma 2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Jianxin; Sun, Xiaolei; Chen, Jinling; Duan, Yinong; Pan, Jing; Xu, Tianhua; Qin, Yongwei; He, Xingxin; Huang, Caiqun

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has been verified as a potential mechanism to aid in hepatic fibrosis remission. Earlier research suggests that Septin4_i1 may sensitize hepatocellular carcinoma cells to serum starvation-induced apoptosis. Here, we aimed to investigate the effect of Septin4_i1 on HSC apoptosis and explore the associated signaling pathways. We found that Septin4_i1 can induce apoptosis in LX-2 cells and that this is accompanied by an up-regulation in cleaved-caspase-3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression and a down-regulation in α-SMA expression. Over-expression of Septin4_i1 reduced phosphorylated Akt and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression but had no effect on the expression of p53 and death receptor (DR)-5. The decreased expression of Bcl-2 and the increased expression of cleaved-caspase-3 induced by Sept4_i1 could be reversed by GW501516, a PPAR-β/δ agonist that has been reported by others to enhance Akt signaling. In addition, GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR-γ, could also inhibit apoptosis in LX-2 cells induced by Sept4_i1. In conclusion, our data suggest that Sept4_i1 induces HSC apoptosis by inhibiting Akt and Bcl-2 expression and up-regulating PPAR-γ expression. PMID:25527525

  18. Soluble egg antigens of Schistosoma japonicum induce senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells by activation of the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinling; Pan, Jing; Wang, Jianxin; Song, Ke; Zhu, Dandan; Huang, Caiqun; Duan, Yinong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Recent findings suggest that senescence of activated HSCs might limit the development of liver fibrosis. Based on previously observed anti-fibrotic effects of soluble egg antigens from Schistosoma japonicum in vitro, we hypothesized that SEA might play a crucial role in alleviating liver fibrosis through promoting senescence of activated HSCs. We show here that SEA inhibited expression of α-SMA and pro-collagen I and promoted senescence of activated HSCs in vitro. In addition, SEA induced an increased expression of P-p53 and p21. Knockdown of p53 inhibited the expression of p21 and failed to induce senescence of activated-HSCs. Phosphorylated STAT3 was elevated upon SEA stimulation, while loss of STAT3 decreased the level of p53 and senescence of HSCs. Results from immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that SOCS3 might be involved in the SEA-induced senescence in HSCs through its interaction with p53. This study demonstrates the potential capacity of SEA in restricting liver fibrosis through promoting senescence in HSCs. Furthermore, a novel STAT3-p53-p21 pathway might participate in the observed SEA-mediated senescence of HSCs. Our results suggest that SEA might carry potential therapeutic effects of restraining liver fibrosis through promoting senescence. PMID:27489164

  19. Soluble egg antigens of Schistosoma japonicum induce senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells by activation of the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinling; Pan, Jing; Wang, Jianxin; Song, Ke; Zhu, Dandan; Huang, Caiqun; Duan, Yinong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Recent findings suggest that senescence of activated HSCs might limit the development of liver fibrosis. Based on previously observed anti-fibrotic effects of soluble egg antigens from Schistosoma japonicum in vitro, we hypothesized that SEA might play a crucial role in alleviating liver fibrosis through promoting senescence of activated HSCs. We show here that SEA inhibited expression of α-SMA and pro-collagen I and promoted senescence of activated HSCs in vitro. In addition, SEA induced an increased expression of P-p53 and p21. Knockdown of p53 inhibited the expression of p21 and failed to induce senescence of activated-HSCs. Phosphorylated STAT3 was elevated upon SEA stimulation, while loss of STAT3 decreased the level of p53 and senescence of HSCs. Results from immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that SOCS3 might be involved in the SEA-induced senescence in HSCs through its interaction with p53. This study demonstrates the potential capacity of SEA in restricting liver fibrosis through promoting senescence in HSCs. Furthermore, a novel STAT3-p53-p21 pathway might participate in the observed SEA-mediated senescence of HSCs. Our results suggest that SEA might carry potential therapeutic effects of restraining liver fibrosis through promoting senescence. PMID:27489164

  20. Pancreatic stellate cells--multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In addition, we have seen great progress in our understanding of the cell biology of PSCs and the interactions between PSCs and other cell types in the pancreas. In response to pancreatic injury or inflammation, quiescent PSCs are activated to myofibroblast-like cells. Recent studies have shown that the activation of intracellular signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinases plays a role in the activation of PSCs. microRNAs might also play a role, because the microRNA expression profiles are dramatically altered in the process of activation. In addition to producing extracellular matrix components such as type I collagen, PSCs have a wide variety of cell functions related to local immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and exocrine and endocrine functions in the pancreas. From this point of view, the interactions between PSCs and other cell types such as pancreatic exocrine cells, endocrine cells, and cancer cells have attracted increasing attention of researchers. PSCs might regulate exocrine functions in the pancreas through the cholecystokinin-induced release of acetylcholine. PSCs induce apoptosis and decrease insulin expression in β-cells, suggesting a novel mechanism of diabetes in diseased pancreas. PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that PSCs induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition and enhance the stem-cell like features of pancreatic cancer cells. In conclusion, PSCs should now be recognized as not only profibrogenic cells but as multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

  1. The antioxidant effect of β-caryophyllene protects rat liver from carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Calleja, Miguel Angel; Vieites, Jose María; Montero-Meléndez, Trinidad; Montero-Meterdez, Trinidad; Torres, María Isabel; Faus, María José; Gil, Angel; Suárez, Antonio

    2013-02-14

    Plant-based whole foods provide thousands of bioactive metabolites to the human diet that reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases. β-Caryophyllene (CAR) is a common constituent of the essential oil of numerous plants, vegetables, fruits and medicinal herbs, and has been used as a flavouring agent since the 1930 s. Here, we report the antioxidant activity of CAR, its protective effect on liver fibrosis and its inhibitory capacity on hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. CAR was tested for the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and as a free radical scavenger. CAR had higher inhibitory capacity on lipid peroxidation than probucol, α-humulene and α-tocopherol. Also, CAR showed high scavenging activities against hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion. The activity of 5-lipoxygenase, an enzyme that actively participates in fibrogenesis, was significantly inhibited by CAR. Carbon tetrachloride-treated rats received CAR at 2, 20 and 200 mg/kg. CAR significantly improved liver structure, and reduced fibrosis and the expression of Col1a1, Tgfb1 and Timp1 genes. Oxidative stress was used to establish a model of HSC activation with overproduction of extracellular matrix proteins. CAR (1 and 10 μm) increased cell viability and significantly reduced the expression of fibrotic marker genes. CAR, a sesquiterpene present in numerous plants and foods, is as a natural antioxidant that reduces carbon tetrachloride-mediated liver fibrosis and inhibits hepatic cell activation.

  2. S-Adenosylmethionine suppresses the expression of Smad3/4 in activated human hepatic stellate cells via Rac1 promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, KANGQI; ZHANG, FENG; WANG, TINGTING; ZOU, XIAOPING; DUAN, XUHONG; CHEN, GUANGXIA; ZHUGE, YUZHENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was able to suppress activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Human LX-2 HSCs were cultured with SAM or NSC23766, and were transfected with plasmids encoding ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) protein or an empty expression vector. Cell proliferation was detected by Cell Counting Kit-8. Cell migration and invasion were determined using the Transwell assay. The expression levels of Rac1 and Smad3/4 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or western blotting. The methylation status of Rac1 promoters was measured by methylation-specific PCR. The results demonstrated that SAM and NSC23766 suppressed the expression of Smad3/4 in LX-2 cells. The overexpression of Rac1 enhanced the proliferation, migration and invasion of LX-2 cells. In addition, compared with the control groups, a marked increase was observed in the protein expression levels of Smad3/4 in the LX-2 cells transfected with Rac1 plasmids. The methylation-specific PCR findings showed that SAM increased the methylation of Rac1 promoters. The results of the present study suggested that Rac1 enhanced the expression of Smad3/4 in activated HSCs; however, this increase may be suppressed by SAM-induced methylation of Rac1 promoters. PMID:26986629

  3. Discovery of cytoglobin and its roles in physiology and pathology of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIZATO, Katsutoshi; THUY, Le Thi Thanh; SHIOTA, Goshi; KAWADA, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (CYGB), a new member of the globin family, was discovered in 2001 as a protein associated with stellate cell activation (stellate cell activation-associated protein [STAP]). Knowledge of CYGB, including its crystal, gene, and protein structures as well as its physiological and pathological importance, has increased progressively. We investigated the roles of oxygen (O2)-binding CYGB as STAP in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to understand the part played by this protein in their pathophysiological activities. Studies involving CYGB-gene-deleted mice have led us to suppose that CYGB functions as a regulator of O2 homeostasis; when O2 homeostasis is disrupted, HSCs are activated and play a key role(s) in hepatic fibrogenesis. In this review, we discuss the rationale for this hypothesis. PMID:26972599

  4. Hepatic Stellate Cells: Protean, Multifunctional, and Enigmatic Cells of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell has surprised and engaged physiologists, pathologists, and hepatologists for over 130 years, yet clear evidence of its role in hepatic injury and fibrosis only emerged following the refinement of methods for its isolation and characterization. The paradigm in liver injury of activation of quiescent vitamin A-rich stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic myofibroblasts has launched an era of astonishing progress in understanding the mechanistic basis of hepatic fibrosis progression and regression. But this simple paradigm has now yielded to a remarkably broad appreciation of the cell's functions not only in liver injury, but also in hepatic development, regeneration, xenobiotic responses, intermediary metabolism, and immunoregulation. Among the most exciting prospects is that stellate cells are essential for hepatic progenitor cell amplification and differentiation. Equally intriguing is the remarkable plasticity of stellate cells, not only in their variable intermediate filament phenotype, but also in their functions. Stellate cells can be viewed as the nexus in a complex sinusoidal milieu that requires tightly regulated autocrine and paracrine cross-talk, rapid responses to evolving extracellular matrix content, and exquisite responsiveness to the metabolic needs imposed by liver growth and repair. Moreover, roles vital to systemic homeostasis include their storage and mobilization of retinoids, their emerging capacity for antigen presentation and induction of tolerance, as well as their emerging relationship to bone marrow-derived cells. As interest in this cell type intensifies, more surprises and mysteries are sure to unfold that will ultimately benefit our understanding of liver physiology and the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. PMID:18195085

  5. Dihydroartemisinin alleviates bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis and hepatic stellate cell activation by interfering with the PDGF-βR/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Chen, Lianyun; Kong, Desong; Shao, Jiangjuan; Wu, Li; Zheng, Shizhong

    2016-05-01

    Liver fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing responses in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which is a pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis, is accompanied by enhanced expressions of a series of marker proteins and pro-fibrogenic signaling molecules. Artemisinin, a powerful antimalarial medicine, is extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua L., and can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the major active metabolite of artemisinin, is able to attenuate lung injury and fibrosis. However, the effect of DHA on liver fibrosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DHA on bile duct ligation-induced injury and fibrosis in rats. DHA improved the liver histological architecture and attenuated collagen deposition in the fibrotic rat liver. Experiments in vitro showed that DHA inhibited the proliferation of HSCs and arrested the cell cycle at the S checkpoint by altering several cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Moreover, DHA reduced the protein expressions of a-SMA, α1 (I) collagen and fibronectin, being associated with interference of the platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGF-βR)-mediated ERK pathway. These data collectively revealed that DHA relieved liver fibrosis possibly by targeting HSCs via the PDGF-βR/ERK pathway. DHA may be a therapeutic antifibrotic agent for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27038258

  6. Transcriptional repression of SIRT1 by protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) in hepatic stellate cells contributes to liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lina; Fan, Zhiwen; Chen, Junliang; Tian, Wenfang; Li, Min; Xu, Huihui; Wu, Xiaoyan; Shao, Jing; Bian, Yaoyao; Fang, Mingming; Xu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial fibrosis represents a key pathological process in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In the liver, fibrogenesis is primarily mediated by activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) transitioning from a quiescent state in response to a host of stimuli. The molecular mechanism underlying HSC activation is not completely understood. Here we report that there was a simultaneous up-regulation of PIAS4 expression and down-regulation of SIRT1 expression accompanying increased hepatic fibrogenesis in an MCD-diet induced mouse model of NASH. In cultured primary mouse HSCs, stimulation with high glucose activated PIAS4 while at the same time repressed SIRT1. Over-expression of PIAS4 directly repressed SIRT1 promoter activity. In contrast, depletion of PIAS4 restored SIRT1 expression in HSCs treated with high glucose. Estrogen, a known NASH-protective hormone, antagonized HSC activation by targeting PIAS4. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting PIAS4 in mice ameliorated MCD diet induced liver fibrosis by normalizing SIRT1 expression in vivo. PIAS4 promoted HSC activation in a SIRT1-dependent manner in vitro. Mechanistically, PIAS4 mediated SIRT1 repression led to SMAD3 hyperacetylation and enhanced SMAD3 binding to fibrogenic gene promoters. Taken together, our data suggest SIRT1 trans-repression by PIAS4 plays an important role in HSC activation and liver fibrosis. PMID:27323886

  7. MicroRNA-122 Inhibits the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines by Targeting the PKR Activator PACT in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is one of the most abundant miRs in the liver. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR-122 plays a role in inflammation in the liver and functions in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which reside in the space of Disse. Here, we showed that the transient inhibition of PKR-activating protein (PACT) expression, by miR-122 or siRNA targeting of PACT, suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-1β, in human HSC LX-2. Sequence and functional analyses confirmed that miR-122 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region of PACT. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that miR-122 blocked NF-κB-nuclear translocation in LX-2 cells. We also showed that conditioned medium from miR-122-transfected LX-2 cells suppressed human monocyte-derived THP-1 cell migration. Taken together, our study indicates that miR-122 may downregulate cytokine production in HSCs and macrophage chemotaxis and that the targeting of miR-122 may have therapeutic potential for preventing the progression of liver diseases. PMID:26636761

  8. Anti-fibrotic effect of thymoquinone on hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Ghazwani, Mohammed; Zhang, Yifei; Gao, Xiang; Fan, Jie; Li, Jiang; Li, Song

    2014-02-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major cell type involved in the production of extracellular matrix in liver. After liver injury, HSCs undergo transdifferentiation process from quiescent state to activated state, which plays an important role in liver fibrosis. Previous studies have shown that thymoquinone (TQ) might have protective effect against liver fibrosis in animal models; however, the underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine whether TQ has any direct effect on HSCs. Our results showed that pretreatment of mice with TQ has protective effect against CCl4-induced liver injury compared to control group (untreated), which is consistent with previous studies. Moreover, our in vivo study showed that COL1A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by TQ treatment. Similarly, in vitro study confirmed that TQ downregulated COL1A1, COL3A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels in activated rat HSCs and LX2 cells, an immortalized human hepatic stellate cell line. Pretreatment with TQ also inhibited the LPS-induced proinflammatory response in LX2 cells as demonstrated by reduced mRNA expression of IL-6 and MCP-1. Mechanistically, inactivation of NF-κB pathway is likely to play a role in the TQ-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory response in HSCs. Finally, we have shown that TQ inhibited the culture-triggered transdifferentiation of freshly isolated rat HSCs as shown by significant downregulation of mRNA expression of several fibrosis-related genes. In conclusion, our study suggests that TQ has a direct effect on HSCs, which may contribute to its overall antifibrotic effect. PMID:24182989

  9. Anti-fibrotic effect of thymoquinone on hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Ghazwani, Mohammed; Zhang, Yifei; Gao, Xiang; Fan, Jie; Li, Jiang; Li, Song

    2014-02-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major cell type involved in the production of extracellular matrix in liver. After liver injury, HSCs undergo transdifferentiation process from quiescent state to activated state, which plays an important role in liver fibrosis. Previous studies have shown that thymoquinone (TQ) might have protective effect against liver fibrosis in animal models; however, the underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine whether TQ has any direct effect on HSCs. Our results showed that pretreatment of mice with TQ has protective effect against CCl4-induced liver injury compared to control group (untreated), which is consistent with previous studies. Moreover, our in vivo study showed that COL1A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by TQ treatment. Similarly, in vitro study confirmed that TQ downregulated COL1A1, COL3A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels in activated rat HSCs and LX2 cells, an immortalized human hepatic stellate cell line. Pretreatment with TQ also inhibited the LPS-induced proinflammatory response in LX2 cells as demonstrated by reduced mRNA expression of IL-6 and MCP-1. Mechanistically, inactivation of NF-κB pathway is likely to play a role in the TQ-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory response in HSCs. Finally, we have shown that TQ inhibited the culture-triggered transdifferentiation of freshly isolated rat HSCs as shown by significant downregulation of mRNA expression of several fibrosis-related genes. In conclusion, our study suggests that TQ has a direct effect on HSCs, which may contribute to its overall antifibrotic effect.

  10. The multiple functions of T stellate/multipolar/chopper cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2011-06-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brainstem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feedforward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO.

  11. The Multiple Functions of T Stellate/Multipolar/Chopper Cells in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brain stem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feed forward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO. PMID:21056098

  12. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1) in acute/chronic pancreatitis, however the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues, and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs. Methods CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues were evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs were examined with realtime-PCR, BrdU assays and Western Blotting. Results In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like-formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal and activated-PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1, did not induce inflammatory-genes expression in activated-PSCs, but induced proliferation. Conclusions CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated-PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory-mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSCs proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated. PMID:24681877

  13. Angiotensin II increases mRNA levels of all TGF-beta isoforms in quiescent and activated rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Alvarez, Paola; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Briones-Orta, Marco A; González-Espinosa, Claudia; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2010-10-01

    AII (angiotensin II) is a vasoactive peptide that plays an important role in the development of liver fibrosis mainly by regulating profibrotic cytokine expression such as TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta). Activated HSCs (hepatic stellate cells) are the major cell type responsible for ECM (extracellular matrix) deposition during liver fibrosis and are also a target for AII and TGF-beta actions. Here, we studied the effect of AII on the mRNA levels of TGF-beta isoforms in primary cultures of rat HSCs. Both quiescent and activated HSCs were stimulated with AII for different time periods, and mRNA levels of TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 isoforms were evaluated using RNaseI protection assay. The mRNA levels of all TGF-beta isoforms, particularly TGF-beta2and TGF-beta3, were increased after AII treatment in activated HSCs. In addition, activated HSCs were able to produce active TGF-beta protein after AII treatment. The mRNA expression of TGF-beta isoforms induced by AII required both ERK1/2 and Nox (NADPH oxidase) activation but not PKC (protein kinase C) participation. ERK1/2 activation induced by AII occurs via AT1 receptors, but independently of either PKC and Nox activation or EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) transactivation. Interestingly, AII has a similar effect on TGF-beta expression in quiescent HSCs, although it has a smaller but significant effect on ERK1/2 activation in these cells.

  14. Morin, a dietary flavonoid, exhibits anti-fibrotic effect and induces apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells by suppressing canonical NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    MadanKumar, Perumal; NaveenKumar, Perumal; Devaraj, Halagowder; NiranjaliDevaraj, Sivasithamparam

    2015-03-01

    In experimental liver fibrosis, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a central role and thus, induction of apoptosis of activated HSCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for liver fibrosis. The present study was designed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the pro-apoptotic effects of morin, a dietary flavonoid, in vitro and in vivo. Culture-activated human HSCs (LX-2 cells) were treated with morin (50 μM) for 24 and 48 h, and the mechanism of cell death induced by morin was evaluated. Also, the anti-fibrotic and pro-apoptotic effect of morin in diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced fibrotic rats were determined. Morin induced apoptosis in cultured LX-2 cells by preventing the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κBp65 (NF-κBp65) by inhibiting NF-κB activation via inhibition of IκBα degradation and thereby suppressing anti-apoptotic proteins and activating caspases. In fibrotic rats, morin treatment resulted in inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling and induction of apoptosis, mainly by downregulating Bcl-2, upregulating Bax and cyt c and by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Translocation of phosphatidylserine to the outer membrane, altered nuclear morphology and DNA fragmentation confirmed the induction of apoptosis by morin. Overall, morin treatment ameliorated experimental liver fibrosis, most likely through induction of apoptosis by inhibiting canonical NF-κB signaling in activated HSCs. It is therefore postulated that morin is a potential therapeutic candidate for liver fibrosis.

  15. Curcumin eliminates oxidized LDL roles in activating hepatic stellate cells by suppressing gene expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qiaohua; Chen, Anping

    2009-11-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is often accompanied by non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and associated with hypercholesterolemia, that is, increased levels of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). Approximately one-third of NASH develops hepatic fibrosis. The role of hypercholesterolemia in T2DM and NASH-associated hepatic fibrogenesis remains obscure. We previously reported that the phytochemical curcumin inhibited the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the major effector cells during hepatic fibrogenesis, and protected the liver from fibrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The aims of this study are to evaluate the role of ox-LDL in activation of HSCs, to assess curcumin effects on eliminating the role of ox-LDL, and to further explore the underlying mechanisms. In this report, we observe that ox-LDL alters the expression of genes closely relevant to HSC activation, which is eliminated by curcumin. Curcumin suppresses gene expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), leading to the blockade of the transport of extracellular ox-LDL into cells. This suppressive effect of curcumin results from the interruption of Wnt signaling and the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). In conclusion, these results support our initial hypothesis and demonstrate that ox-LDL stimulates HSC activation, which is eliminated by curcumin by suppressing lox-1 expression by interrupting Wnt signaling and stimulating PPARgamma activity. These results provide novel insights into the role of ox-LDL in T2DM and NASH-associated hepatic fibrogenesis and mechanisms by which curcumin suppresses ox-LDL-induced HSC activation, as well as the implication of curcumin in the treatment of T2DM and NASH-associated hepatic fibrosis. PMID:19736547

  16. Over-expression of C/EBP-{alpha} induces apoptosis in cultured rat hepatic stellate cells depending on p53 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xueqing; Huang Guangcun; Mei Shuang; Qian Jin; Ji Juling; Zhang Jinsheng

    2009-03-06

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. In our previous studies, CCAAT enhancer binding protein-{alpha} (C/EBP-{alpha}) has been shown to be involved in the activation of HSCs and to have a repression effect on hepatic fibrosis in vivo. However, the mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that the infection of adenovirus vector expressing C/EBP-{alpha} gene (Ad-C/EBP-{alpha}) could induce HSCs apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner by Annexin V/PI staining, caspase-3 activation assay, and flow cytometry. Also, over-expression of C/EBP-{alpha} resulted in the up-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) and P53, while P53 expression was regulated by PPAR-{gamma}. In addition, Fas, FasL, DR4, DR5, and TRAIL were studied. The results indicated that the death receptor pathway was mainly involved and regulated by PPAR-{gamma} and p53 in the process of apoptosis triggered by C/EBP-{alpha} in HSCs.

  17. Chloroquine improved carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis through its inhibition of the activation of hepatic stellate cells: role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Wang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Zhuang, Yun; Wang, Liangzhi; Huang, Xiaodan; Chen, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which is the key process of liver fibrosis. We reasoned that chloroquine, based on its ability to inhibit autophagy, might exert beneficial effects in liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis in rats was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Rats were divided into three groups, a normal control group (N group), model group (M group), and chloroquine group (CQ group). Liver fibrosis in the rats was evaluated by hematoxyline-eosin (H&E) and Masson staining. The activities of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and total bilirubin (TB) were determined using an automated biochemistry analyzer. Total hepatic hydroxyproline levels were determined with a kit. The expressions of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were detected by immunofluorescence staining, and the expressions of LC3-II and p62 were determined by Western blotting. Compared with N group, M group showed impaired liver function, liver fibrosis, increased hydroxyproline content, up-regulated expressions of α-SMA and TGF-β1, which have been reported to be pro-fibrogenic genes in vivo, and increased autophagy flux as indicated by the accumulation of LC3-II and degradation of p62. These changes were attenuated by chloroquine treatment. Chloroquine exerts beneficial effects in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. The mechanism of action includes inhibition of autophagy pathways and inhibition of activation of HSCs. PMID:25177034

  18. Rebound spiking in layer II medial entorhinal cortex stellate cells: Possible mechanism of grid cell function.

    PubMed

    Shay, Christopher F; Ferrante, Michele; Chapman, G William; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Rebound spiking properties of medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) stellate cells induced by inhibition may underlie their functional properties in awake behaving rats, including the temporal phase separation of distinct grid cells and differences in grid cell firing properties. We investigated rebound spiking properties using whole cell patch recording in entorhinal slices, holding cells near spiking threshold and delivering sinusoidal inputs, superimposed with realistic inhibitory synaptic inputs to test the capacity of cells to selectively respond to specific phases of inhibitory input. Stellate cells showed a specific phase range of hyperpolarizing inputs that elicited spiking, but non-stellate cells did not show phase specificity. In both cell types, the phase range of spiking output occurred between the peak and subsequent descending zero crossing of the sinusoid. The phases of inhibitory inputs that induced spikes shifted earlier as the baseline sinusoid frequency increased, while spiking output shifted to later phases. Increases in magnitude of the inhibitory inputs shifted the spiking output to earlier phases. Pharmacological blockade of h-current abolished the phase selectivity of hyperpolarizing inputs eliciting spikes. A network computational model using cells possessing similar rebound properties as found in vitro produces spatially periodic firing properties resembling grid cell firing when a simulated animal moves along a linear track. These results suggest that the ability of mEC stellate cells to fire rebound spikes in response to a specific range of phases of inhibition could support complex attractor dynamics that provide completion and separation to maintain spiking activity of specific grid cell populations. PMID:26385258

  19. Phenotypic changes in mouse pancreatic stellate cell Ca2+ signaling events following activation in culture and in a disease model of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hak; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoan; Logsdon, Craig D; Yule, David I

    2011-02-01

    The specific characteristics of intracellular Ca 2+ signaling and the downstream consequences of these events were investigated in mouse pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in culture and in situ using multiphoton microscopy in pancreatic lobules. PSC undergo a phenotypic transformation from a quiescent state to a myofibroblast-like phenotype in culture. This is believed to parallel the induction of an activated state observed in pancreatic disease such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. By day 7 in culture, the complement of cell surface receptors coupled to intracellular Ca 2+ signaling was shown to be markedly altered. Specifically, protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and 2, responsive to thrombin and trypsin, respectively, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors were expressed only in activated PSC (aPSC). PAR-1, ATP, and PDGF receptor activation resulted in prominent nuclear Ca 2+ signals. Nuclear Ca 2+ signals and aPSC proliferation were abolished by expression of parvalbumin targeted to the nucleus. In pancreatic lobules, PSC responded to agonists consistent with the presence of only quiescent PSC. aPSC were observed following induction of experimental pancreatitis. In contrast, in a mouse model of pancreatic disease harboring elevated K-Ras activity in acinar cells, aPSC were present under control conditions and their number greatly increased following induction of pancreatitis. These data are consistent with nuclear Ca 2+ signaling generated by agents such as trypsin and thrombin, likely present in the pancreas in disease states, resulting in proliferation of "primed" aPSC to contribute to the severity of pancreatic disease.

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits TGF-β-induced fibrogenic responses of hepatic stellate cells by targeting transcriptional coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joong-Yeon; Oh, Min-A; Kim, Won Ho; Sohn, Hee-Young; Park, Sang Ick

    2012-03-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common consequence of various chronic liver injuries, including virus infection and ethanol. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contribute to liver fibrosis through the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including type I alpha collagen (COL1A). The activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates HSCs activation, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we report that AMPK inhibits transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-induced fibrogenic property of HSCs by regulating transcriptional coactivator p300. We treated human (LX-2) and rat (CFSC-2G) HSC lines with TGF-β to induce fibrogenic activation of HSCs. Pharmacological activation of AMPK by treatment with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), metformin, or adiponectin lowered TGF-β-induced expression of COL1A and myofibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Transient transduction of constitutively active AMPKα (caAMPKα) was sufficient to attenuate COL1A and α-SMA expression, whereas an AMPK inhibitor considerably abrogated the inhibitory effect of AICAR on fibrogenic gene expression. Although AMPK significantly suppressed Smad-dependent transcription, it did not affect TGF-β-stimulated phosphorylation, nuclear localization, or DNA-binding activity of Smad2/3. AICAR rather attenuated TGF-β-induced Smad3 interaction with transcriptional coactivator p300 accompanying with reduction of Smad3 acetylation. Moreover, AICAR induced not only physical interaction between AMPK and p300 but also proteasomal degradation of p300 protein. Our data provide substantial evidence that AMPK could be a novel therapeutic target for treatment of liver fibrosis, by demonstrating the underlying mechanism of AMPK-induced antifibrotic function in HSCs.

  1. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H.; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D.; Tuveson, David

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  2. MicroRNA-130a and -130b enhance activation of hepatic stellate cells by suppressing PPARγ expression: A rat fibrosis model study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Le; Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Zhang, Guoyu; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiazhong; Zhang, Yafei; Shang, Hao; Ji, Hong; Chen, Xi; Duan, Yanxia; Li, Yiming

    2015-09-25

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary sources of extracellular matrix (ECM) in normal and fibrotic liver. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) maintains HSCs in a quiescent state, and its downregulation induces HSC activation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can induce PPARγ mRNA degradation, but the mechanism by which miRNAs regulate PPARγ in rat HSCs is unclear. This study aimed to investigate some miRNAs which putatively bind to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of PPARγ mRNA, and increase expression of ECM genes in rat HSCs. In carbon tetrachloride injection (CCl4) and common bile duct ligation (CBDL) liver fibrosis models, miRNAs miR-130a, miR-130b, miR-301a, miR-27b and miR-340 levels were found to be increased and PPARγ expression decreased. Overexpression of miR-130a and miR-130b enhanced cell proliferation by involving Runx3. MiR-130a and miR-130b decreased PPARγ expression by targeting the 3'-UTR of PPARγ mRNA in rat HSC-T6 cells. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) may mediate miR-130a and miR-130b overexpression, PPARγ downregulation, and ECM genes overexpression in cell culture. These findings suggest that miR-130a and miR-130b are involved in downregulation of PPARγ in liver fibrosis. PMID:26255201

  3. Dicliptera Chinensis polysaccharides target TGF-β/Smad pathway and inhibit stellate cells activation in rats with dimethylnitrosamine-induced hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhang, J; Jia, L; Xiao, S

    2016-01-27

    This study aims to study impact of Dicliptera chinensis polysaccharide (DCP) on hepatic fibrosis (HF) and activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Liver fibrosis model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of dimethyl nitrosamines (DMN) in rat. Rats in treatment group were administrated with different concentrations of DCP (0, 100, 300 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome staining were used to assess histo-pathological change. α-SMA, TGF-β1 and pSmad 2/3 were assayed by immuno-histochemistry. HSC-T6 cells were stimulated by recombined rat TGF-β1 (1 ng/mL) to simulate an activating model in vitro and then interfered with DCP (concentration of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 µg/ml). MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation and western blotting was used to detect α-SMA and pSmad 2/3 expression. Results demonstrated that DCP alleviated DMN-induced liver fibrosis in rat and significantly down-regulated TGF-β1 expression, pSmad2/3 and α-SMA in liver tissue in a dose-dependent way. DCP inhibited proliferation and activation of TGF-β1-stimulated HSC-T6 in vitro and significantly down-regulated α-SMA and pSmad2/3 expression. In conclusion, this study revealed that DCP attenuates progression of liver fibrosis through suppressing TGF-β/Smad pathway. DCP is a potential botanical polysaccharide to management liver fibrosis.

  4. Retinoic Acid Ameliorates Pancreatic Fibrosis and Inhibits the Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Mice with Experimental Chronic Pancreatitis via Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guojian; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Deqing; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Xing, Miao; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Xingpeng; Wan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP), induces persistent and permanent damage in the pancreas. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) provide a major source of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition during pancreatic injury, and persistent activation of PSCs plays a vital role in the progression of pancreatic fibrosis. Retinoic acid (RA), a retinoid, has a broad range of biological functions, including regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation, attenuating progressive fibrosis of multiple organs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RA on fibrosis in experimental CP and cultured PSCs. CP was induced in mice by repetitive cerulein injection in vivo, and mouse PSCs were isolated and activated in vitro. Suppression of pancreatic fibrosis upon administration of RA was confirmed based on reduction of histological damage, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and mRNA levels of β-catenin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-Rβ transforming growth factor (TGF)-βRII and collagen 1α1 in vivo. Wnt 2 and β-catenin protein levels were markedly down-regulated, while Axin 2 expression level was up-regulated in the presence of RA, both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear translation of β-catenin was significantly decreased following RA treatment, compared with cerulein-induced CP in mice and activated PSCs. Furthermore, RA induced significant PSC apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, suppressed TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activity and ECM production of PSC via down-regulation of TGFβRII, PDGFRβ and collagen 1α1 in vitro. These results indicate a critical role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in RA-induced effects on CP and PSC regulation and support the potential of RA as a suppressor of pancreatic fibrosis in mice. PMID:26556479

  5. Retinoic Acid Ameliorates Pancreatic Fibrosis and Inhibits the Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Mice with Experimental Chronic Pancreatitis via Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenqin; Jiang, Weiliang; Shen, Jie; Yin, Guojian; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Deqing; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Xing, Miao; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Xingpeng; Wan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP), induces persistent and permanent damage in the pancreas. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) provide a major source of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition during pancreatic injury, and persistent activation of PSCs plays a vital role in the progression of pancreatic fibrosis. Retinoic acid (RA), a retinoid, has a broad range of biological functions, including regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation, attenuating progressive fibrosis of multiple organs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RA on fibrosis in experimental CP and cultured PSCs. CP was induced in mice by repetitive cerulein injection in vivo, and mouse PSCs were isolated and activated in vitro. Suppression of pancreatic fibrosis upon administration of RA was confirmed based on reduction of histological damage, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and mRNA levels of β-catenin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-Rβ transforming growth factor (TGF)-βRII and collagen 1α1 in vivo. Wnt 2 and β-catenin protein levels were markedly down-regulated, while Axin 2 expression level was up-regulated in the presence of RA, both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear translation of β-catenin was significantly decreased following RA treatment, compared with cerulein-induced CP in mice and activated PSCs. Furthermore, RA induced significant PSC apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, suppressed TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activity and ECM production of PSC via down-regulation of TGFβRII, PDGFRβ and collagen 1α1 in vitro. These results indicate a critical role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in RA-induced effects on CP and PSC regulation and support the potential of RA as a suppressor of pancreatic fibrosis in mice. PMID:26556479

  6. Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Stellate Cells: A PARADOXICAL RELATIONSHIP

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2016-01-01

    In physiology, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by most cells for normal function and as a defense mechanism against foreign particles, microbes and viruses. Hepatic macrophages (Kupffer cells), sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are all capable of generating ROS in physiology and pathology. ROS are also produced by infiltrating inflammatory cells during acute and chronic liver injury. Increased levels of ROS have been implicated in apoptotic/necrotic death of hepatocytes, and liver failure. In contrast to causing injury to hepatocytes, ROS and lipid peroxidation products induce transdifferentiation of the quiescent HSCs into an activated highly proliferative myofibroblast-like phenotype. ROS and lipid peroxidation products also stimulate the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) by activated HSCs. Deposition of excessive amounts of ECM is the primary mechanism of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver, and interactions between ROS and HSCs appear to play a major role in this pathology. Although these findings suggest that HSCs are resistant to the injurious actions of ROS, there is compelling evidence demonstrating ROS-induced death of activated HSCs. Detailed mechanistic understanding of such paradoxical interactions between ROS and HSCs will be critical for developing therapies for chronic fibrotic liver disease.

  7. Gradually softening hydrogels for modeling hepatic stellate cell behavior during fibrosis regression.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Soulas, Elizabeth M; Lee, Gi Yun; Wells, Rebecca G; Burdick, Jason A

    2016-06-13

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) presents an evolving set of mechanical cues to resident cells. We developed methacrylated hyaluronic acid (MeHA) hydrogels containing both stable and hydrolytically degradable crosslinks to provide cells with a gradually softening (but not fully degradable) milieu, mimicking physiological events such as fibrosis regression. To demonstrate the utility of this cell culture system, we studied the phenotype of rat hepatic stellate cells, the major liver precursors of fibrogenic myofibroblasts, within this softening environment. Stellate cells that were mechanically primed on tissue culture plastic attained a myofibroblast phenotype, which persisted when seeded onto stiff (∼20 kPa) hydrogels. However, mechanically primed stellate cells on stiff-to-soft (∼20 to ∼3 kPa) hydrogels showed reversion of the myofibroblast phenotype over 14 days, with reductions in cell area, expression of the myofibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and Yes-associated protein/Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (YAP/TAZ) nuclear localization when compared to stellate cells on stiff hydrogels. Cells on stiff-to-soft hydrogels did not fully revert, however. They displayed reduced expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and underwent abnormally rapid re-activation to myofibroblasts in response to re-stiffening of the hydrogels through introduction of additional crosslinks. These features are typical of stellate cells with an intermediate phenotype, reported to occur in vivo with fibrosis regression and re-injury. Together, these data suggest that mechanics play an important role in fibrosis regression and that integrating dynamic mechanical cues into model systems helps capture cell behaviors observed in vivo.

  8. Dioscin alleviates alcoholic liver fibrosis by attenuating hepatic stellate cell activation via the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the activities and underlying mechanisms of dioscin against alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). In vivo liver fibrosis in mice was induced by an alcoholic liquid diet, and in vitro studies were performed on activated HSC-T6 and LX2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide. Our results showed that dioscin significantly attenuated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, improved collagen accumulation, and attenuated inflammation through down-regulating the levels of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α by decreasing Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 expression both in vivo and in vitro. TLR4 overexpression was also decreased by dioscin, leading to the markedly down-regulated levels of MyD88, NF-κB, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen (COL1A1) in cultured HSCs. Suppression of cellular MyD88 by ST2825 or abrogation of NF-κB by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate eliminated the inhibitory effects of dioscin on the levels of TGF-β1, α-SMA and COL1A1. In a word, dioscin exhibited potent effects against ALF via altering TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway, which provided novel insights into the mechanisms of this compound as an antifibrogenic candidate for the treatment of ALF in the future. PMID:26655640

  9. Essential Roles of RNA-binding Protein HuR in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jingjing; Chang, Na; Zhao, Zhongxin; Tian, Lei; Duan, Xianghui; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding protein HuR mediates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced profibrogenic actions. Up-regulation of Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is involved in TGF-β1-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in liver fibrogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of TGF-β1 regulates SphK1 remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the role of HuR in TGF-β1-induced SphK1 expression and identify a new molecular mechanism in liver fibrogenensis. In vivo, HuR expression was increased, translocated to cytoplasm, and bound to SphK1 mRNA in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced mouse fibrotic liver. HuR mRNA expression had a positive correlation with mRNA expressions of SphK1 and fibrotic markers, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen α1(I), respectively. In vitro, up-regulation of SphK1 and activation of HSCs stimulated by TGF-β1 depended on HuR cytoplasmic accumulation. The effects of TGF-β1 were diminished when HuR was silenced or HuR cytoplasmic translocation was blocked. Meanwhile, overexpression of HuR mimicked the effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, TGF-β1 prolonged half-life of SphK1 mRNA by promoting its binding to HuR. Pharmacological or siRNA-induced SphK1 inhibition abrogated HuR-mediated HSC activation. In conclusion, our data suggested that HuR bound to SphK1 mRNA and played a crucial role in TGF-β1-induced HSC activation. PMID:26912347

  10. Essential Roles of RNA-binding Protein HuR in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Transforming Growth Factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingjing; Chang, Na; Zhao, Zhongxin; Tian, Lei; Duan, Xianghui; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-02-25

    RNA-binding protein HuR mediates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced profibrogenic actions. Up-regulation of Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is involved in TGF-β1-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in liver fibrogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of TGF-β1 regulates SphK1 remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the role of HuR in TGF-β1-induced SphK1 expression and identify a new molecular mechanism in liver fibrogenensis. In vivo, HuR expression was increased, translocated to cytoplasm, and bound to SphK1 mRNA in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced mouse fibrotic liver. HuR mRNA expression had a positive correlation with mRNA expressions of SphK1 and fibrotic markers, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen α1(I), respectively. In vitro, up-regulation of SphK1 and activation of HSCs stimulated by TGF-β1 depended on HuR cytoplasmic accumulation. The effects of TGF-β1 were diminished when HuR was silenced or HuR cytoplasmic translocation was blocked. Meanwhile, overexpression of HuR mimicked the effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, TGF-β1 prolonged half-life of SphK1 mRNA by promoting its binding to HuR. Pharmacological or siRNA-induced SphK1 inhibition abrogated HuR-mediated HSC activation. In conclusion, our data suggested that HuR bound to SphK1 mRNA and played a crucial role in TGF-β1-induced HSC activation.

  11. Deficiency of NOX1 or NOX4 Prevents Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis in Mice through Inhibition of Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tian; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Brenner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) play a key role in liver injury and fibrosis. Previous studies demonstrated that GKT137831, a dual NOX1/4 inhibitor, attenuated liver fibrosis in mice as well as pro-fibrotic genes in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) as well as hepatocyte apoptosis. The effect of NOX1 and NOX4 deficiency in liver fibrosis is unclear, and has never been directly compared. HSCs are the primary myofibroblasts in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of NOX1 and NOX4 in liver fibrosis, and investigated whether NOX1 and NOX4 signaling mediates liver fibrosis by regulating HSC activation. Mice were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to induce liver fibrosis. Deficiency of either NOX1 or NOX4 attenuates liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis after CCl4 compared to wild-type mice. NOX1 or NOX4 deficiency reduced lipid peroxidation and ROS production in mice with liver fibrosis. NOX1 and NOX4 deficiency are approximately equally effective in preventing liver injury in the mice. The NOX1/4 dual inhibitor GKT137831 suppressed ROS production as well as inflammatory and proliferative genes induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), or sonic hedgehog (Shh) in primary mouse HSCs. Furthermore, the mRNAs of proliferative and pro-fibrotic genes were downregulated in NOX1 and NOX4 knock-out activated HSCs (cultured on plastic for 5 days). Finally, NOX1 and NOX4 protein levels were increased in human livers with cirrhosis compared with normal controls. Thus, NOX1 and NOX4 signaling mediates the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, including the direct activation of HSC. PMID:26222337

  12. Suppressive effect of microRNA-29b on hepatic stellate cell activation and its crosstalk with TGF-β1/Smad3.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunli; Bu, Shurui; Fan, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    The microRNA (miR)-29 family is closely associated with fibrotic processes by virtue of its low expression in many tissues during organ fibrosis. The present study investigated whether miR-29b overexpression suppressed hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and its interactions with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3), a classical signal transduction pathway contributing to the activation of HSCs. The results showed that transfection of LX-2 (human HSC) cells with miR-29b mimic or pSUPER-Smad3 silencing (si)RNA resulted in significantly increased expression of miR-29b and decreased expression of Smad3. miR-29b overexpression inhibited proliferation of LX-2 cells 24 h after transfection. Both miR-29b overexpression and Smad3 silencing antagonized the effects of TGF-β1 on the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen type I (col-1). Furthermore, infection with miR-29b mimics suppressed Smad3 and TGF-β1 expression, suggesting that miR-29b inhibited LX-2 activation mediated by both Smad3 and TGF-β1. Nevertheless, primary miR-29a/b1, miR-29b2/c and mature miR-29b were downregulated by TGF-β1 and stimulated by Smad3 silencing, suggesting that TGF-β1/Smad3 signalling pathway regulate not just mature miR-29b but also its transcription. In summary, our results show overwhelming evidence corroborating the suppressive effect of miR-29b on TGF-β1-induced LX-2 cell activation. The results also revealed the existence of crosstalk between miR-29b and TGF-β1/Smad3 during LX-2 activation, suggesting a feedback loop between miR-29b and TGF-β1/Smad3 signalling that promotes liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Cell Biochemistry and Function published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Circulating miRNAs as Predictor Markers for Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Progression of HCV-Induced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    El-Ahwany, Eman; Nagy, Faten; Zoheiry, Mona; Shemis, Mohamed; Nosseir, Mona; Taleb, Hoda Abu; El Ghannam, Maged; Atta, Rafaat; Zada, Suher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix that occurs by activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which has been identified as the major driver of liver fibrosis. Several studies confirmed that miRNAs have regulatory effects on the activation of HSCs by affecting the signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to develop non-invasive diagnostic markers by measuring different circulating miRNAs in serum as predictor markers for early diagnosis of liver fibrosis and its progression. Methods In this case-control study, we enrolled 66 subjects with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) with early stage of fibrosis and 65 subjects with CHC with late-stage fibrosis. Also, 40 subjects were included as normal controls. The six main miRNAs, i.e., miR-138, miR-140, miR-143, miR-325, miR-328, and miR-349, were measured using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results In the cases of CHC both with early and late stage of fibrosis, the circulating levels of the six main miRNAs were significantly higher than the levels in the control group. ROC analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of miR-138 were 89.3% and 71.43%, respectively, in the early stage of fibrosis. In the late stage, the sensitivity and specificity of miR-138 were 89.3 and 93.02%, respectively, whereas, for miR-143, they were 75.0 and 88.4%, respectively. Conclusions Circulating miR-138 could serve as a non-invasive biomarker for the detection of early fibrosis. Also, miR-138 and miR-143 could be specific biomarkers for indicating the late stage of liver fibrosis. PMID:26955452

  14. Role of YAP and TAZ in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and in stellate cells associated with cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Morvaridi, Susan; Dhall, Deepti; Greene, Mark I; Pandol, Stephen J; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a fibrotic and inflammatory microenvironment that is formed primarily by activated, myofibroblast-like, stellate cells. Although the stellate cells are thought to contribute to tumorigenesis, metastasis and drug resistance of PDAC, the signaling events involved in activation of the stellate cells are not well defined. Functioning as transcription co-factors, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and its homolog transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) modulate the expression of genes involved in various aspects of cellular functions, such as proliferation and mobility. Using human tissues we show that YAP and TAZ expression is restricted to the centroacinar and ductal cells of normal pancreas, but is elevated in cancer cells. In particular, YAP and TAZ are expressed at high levels in the activated stellate cells of both chronic pancreatitis and PDAC patients as well as in the islets of Langerhans in chronic pancreatitis tissues. Of note, YAP is up regulated in both acinar and ductal cells following induction of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice. These findings indicate that YAP and TAZ may play a critical role in modulating pancreatic tissue regeneration, neoplastic transformation, and stellate cell functions in both PDAC and pancreatitis. PMID:26567630

  15. Role of YAP and TAZ in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and in stellate cells associated with cancer and chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Morvaridi, Susan; Dhall, Deepti; Greene, Mark I.; Pandol, Stephen J.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a fibrotic and inflammatory microenvironment that is formed primarily by activated, myofibroblast-like, stellate cells. Although the stellate cells are thought to contribute to tumorigenesis, metastasis and drug resistance of PDAC, the signaling events involved in activation of the stellate cells are not well defined. Functioning as transcription co-factors, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and its homolog transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) modulate the expression of genes involved in various aspects of cellular functions, such as proliferation and mobility. Using human tissues we show that YAP and TAZ expression is restricted to the centroacinar and ductal cells of normal pancreas, but is elevated in cancer cells. In particular, YAP and TAZ are expressed at high levels in the activated stellate cells of both chronic pancreatitis and PDAC patients as well as in the islets of Langerhans in chronic pancreatitis tissues. Of note, YAP is up regulated in both acinar and ductal cells following induction of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice. These findings indicate that YAP and TAZ may play a critical role in modulating pancreatic tissue regeneration, neoplastic transformation, and stellate cell functions in both PDAC and pancreatitis. PMID:26567630

  16. MicroRNA-130a and -130b enhance activation of hepatic stellate cells by suppressing PPARγ expression: A rat fibrosis model study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Le; Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Zhang, Guoyu; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiazhong; Zhang, Yafei; Shang, Hao; Ji, Hong; Chen, Xi; Duan, Yanxia; Li, Yiming

    2015-09-25

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary sources of extracellular matrix (ECM) in normal and fibrotic liver. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) maintains HSCs in a quiescent state, and its downregulation induces HSC activation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can induce PPARγ mRNA degradation, but the mechanism by which miRNAs regulate PPARγ in rat HSCs is unclear. This study aimed to investigate some miRNAs which putatively bind to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of PPARγ mRNA, and increase expression of ECM genes in rat HSCs. In carbon tetrachloride injection (CCl{sub 4}) and common bile duct ligation (CBDL) liver fibrosis models, miRNAs miR-130a, miR-130b, miR-301a, miR-27b and miR-340 levels were found to be increased and PPARγ expression decreased. Overexpression of miR-130a and miR-130b enhanced cell proliferation by involving Runx3. MiR-130a and miR-130b decreased PPARγ expression by targeting the 3′-UTR of PPARγ mRNA in rat HSC-T6 cells. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) may mediate miR-130a and miR-130b overexpression, PPARγ downregulation, and ECM genes overexpression in cell culture. These findings suggest that miR-130a and miR-130b are involved in downregulation of PPARγ in liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • MiR-130a and miR-130b are increased and PPARγ is decreased in liver fibrosis models. • MiR-130a and miR-130b decreased PPARγ by targeting the 3′-UTR of PPARγ mRNA. • MiR-130a and miR-130b enhanced HSC cell proliferation by involving Runx3. • TGF-β1 may mediate miR-130a and miR-130b overexpression.

  17. Ligustrazine attenuates oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells by interrupting platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor-mediated ERK and p38 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ni, Chunyan; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2012-11-15

    Hepatic fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing reactions with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis. Compelling evidence indicates that oxidative stress is concomitant with liver fibrosis irrespective of the underlying etiology. Natural antioxidant ligustrazine exhibits potent antifibrotic activities, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Our studies were to investigate the ligustrazine effects on HSC activation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative stress in liver fibrogenesis, and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 5 μM significantly stimulated HSC proliferation and expression of marker genes of HSC activation; whereas ligustrazine dose-dependently suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-activated HSCs, and attenuated expression of fibrotic marker genes. Mechanistic investigations revealed that ligustrazine reduced platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor (PDGF-βR) expression and blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase, two downstream effectors of PDGF-βR. Further molecular evidence suggested that ligustrazine interruption of ERK and p38 pathways was dependent on the blockade of PDGF-βR and might be involved in ligustrazine reduction of fibrotic marker gene expression under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation. Furthermore, ligustrazine modulated some proteins critical for HSC activation and ECM homeostasis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HSCs. These data collectively indicated that ligustrazine could attenuate HSC activation caused by oxidative stress, providing novel insights into ligustrazine as a therapeutic option for hepatic fibrosis. Highlights: ► Ligustrazine inhibits oxidative stress-induced HSC activation.

  18. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of activated hepatic stellate cells with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide targeting integrin αvβ3 for staging liver fibrosis in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiyuan; Liu, Huanhuan; Cui, Yanfen; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhongyang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Dengbin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the expression level of integrin αvβ3 on activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) at different stages of liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rat model and the feasibility to stage liver fibrosis by using molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide modified ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (USPIO) specifically targeting integrin αvβ3. Materials and methods All experiments received approval from our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 subjects each, and intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 for either 3, 6, or 9 weeks. Controls (n=10) received pure olive oil. The change in T2* relaxation rate (ΔR2*) pre- and postintravenous administration of RGD-USPIO or naked USPIO was measured by 3.0T clinical MRI and compared by one-way analysis of variance or the Student’s t-test. The relationship between expression level of integrin αvβ3 and liver fibrotic degree was evaluated by Spearman’s ranked correlation. Results Activated HSCs were confirmed to be the main cell types expressing integrin αvβ3 during liver fibrogenesis. The protein level of integrin αv and β3 subunit expressed on activated HSCs was upregulated and correlated well with the progression of liver fibrosis (r=0.954, P<0.001; r=0.931, P<0.001, respectively). After injection of RGD-USPIO, there is significant difference in ΔR2* among rats treated with 0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks of CCl4 (P<0.001). The accumulation of iron particles in fibrotic liver specimen is significantly greater for RGD-USPIO than naked USPIO after being injected with equal dose of iron. Conclusion Molecular MRI of integrin αvβ3 expressed on activated HSCs by using RGD-USPIO may distinguish different liver fibrotic stages in CCl4 rat model and shows promising to noninvasively monitor the progression of the liver fibrosis and therapeutic response to

  19. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  20. Hydrodynamics-based transfection of rat interleukin-10 gene attenuates porcine serum-induced liver fibrosis in rats by inhibiting the activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue-Hong; Chen, Yun-Xin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is the common pathological outcome for the majority of chronic liver diseases. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine that downregulates proinflammatory responses and has a modulatory effect on liver fibrogenesis. However, little is known regarding the effect of rat interleukin‑10 (rIL‑10) gene by hydrodynamics-based transfection (HBT) on liver fibrosis in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the rIL-10 gene by HBT on the progression of liver fibrosis induced by porcine serum (PS) in rats and explore its possible mechanism. Plasmid‑expressing rIL-10 was transferred into rats by HBT and immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR were used to detect the major organ expressing rIL-10. Liver fibrosis was induced in rats by intraperitoneal administration of PS for 8 weeks. Plasmid pcDNA3-rIL-10 solution was administered weekly by HBT starting at the 5th week. Liver function and hepatic histology were examined. The possible molecular mechanisms of rIL-10 gene therapy were assessed in liver tissue and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) co-cultured with BRL cells (a hepatocyte line) in vitro. The results showed rIL-10 expression occurred mainly in the liver following rIL-10 gene transfer by HBT. Maintaining a stable expression of rIL-10 in serum was assessed by repeated administration. The rIL-10 gene treatment attenuated liver inflammation and fibrosis in PS-induced fibrotic rats, reduced the deposition of collagen and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibrotic rats. The in vitro experiment showed that the expression of a-SMA and procollagen type I in HSCs co-cultured with the BRL‑transfected rIL-10 gene were significantly decreased. These findings indicate that rIL-10 gene therapy by HBT attenuates PS-induced liver fibrosis in rats and that its mechanism is associated with rIL-10 inhibiting the activation of HSCs and promoting the degeneration of collagen.

  1. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun; Lim, Chaeseung; Kim, Jungho; Cha, Dae Ryong; Oh, Junseo

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  2. The stellate vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype is induced by IL-1β via the secretion of PGE2 and subsequent cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activation.

    PubMed

    Blirando, Karl; Blaise, Régis; Gorodnaya, Natalia; Rouxel, Clotilde; Meilhac, Olivier; Vincent, Pierre; Limon, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerosis development is associated with morphological changes to intimal cells, leading to a stellate cell phenotype. In this study, we aimed to determine whether and how key pro-atherogenic cytokines present in atherosclerotic plaques (IL-1β, TNFα and IFNγ) could induce this phenotype, as these molecules are known to trigger the transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We found that, IL-1β was the only major inflammatory mediator tested capable of inducing a stellate morphology in VSMCs. This finding was confirmed by staining for F-actin and vinculin at focal adhesions, as these two markers were disrupted only by IL-1β. We then investigated the possible association of this IL-1β-dependent change in morphology with an increase in intracellular cAMP concentration ([cAMP]), using the FRET-based biosensor for cAMP (T)Epac(VV). Experiments in the presence of IL-1β or medium conditioned by IL-1β-treated VSMCs and pharmacological tools demonstrated that the long-term increase in intracellular cAMP concentration was induced by the secretion of an autocrine/paracrine mediator, prostaglandin E₂(PGE₂), acting through the EP4 receptor. Finally, by knocking down the expression of the regulatory subunit PKAR1α, thereby reproducing the effects of IL-1β and PGE₂ on VSMCs, we demonstrated the contribution of PKA activity to the observed behavior of VSMCs. PMID:26403276

  3. CXCL12 induces hepatic stellate cell contraction through a calcium-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Saiman, Yedidya; Agarwal, Ritu; Hickman, DaShawn A; Fausther, Michel; El-Shamy, Ahmed; Dranoff, Jonathan A; Friedman, Scott L; Bansal, Meena B

    2013-09-01

    Liver fibrosis, with subsequent development of cirrhosis and ultimately portal hypertension, results in the death of patients with end-stage liver disease if liver transplantation is not performed. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), central mediators of liver fibrosis, resemble tissue pericytes and regulate intrahepatic blood flow by modulating pericapillary resistance. Therefore, HSCs can contribute to portal hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). We have previously demonstrated that activated HSCs express functional chemokine receptor, CXCR4, and that receptor engagement by its ligand, CXCL12, which is increased in patients with CLD, leads to further stellate cell activation in a CXCR4-specific manner. We therefore hypothesized that CXCL12 promotes HSC contraction in a CXCR4-dependent manner. Stimulation of HSCs on collagen gel lattices with CXCL12 led to gel contraction and myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which was blocked by addition of AMD3100, a CXCR4 small molecule inhibitor. These effects were further mediated by the Rho kinase pathway since both Rho kinase knockdown or Y-27632, a Rho kinase inhibitor, blocked CXCL12 induced phosphorylation of MLC and gel contraction. BAPTA-AM, a calcium chelator, had no effect, indicating that this pathway is calcium sensitive but not calcium dependent. In conclusion, CXCL12 promotes stellate cell contractility in a predominantly calcium-independent fashion. Our data demonstrates a novel role of CXCL12 in stellate cell contraction and the availability of small molecule inhibitors of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis justifies further investigation into its potential as therapeutic target for portal hypertension. PMID:23812037

  4. Liver X Receptors Balance Lipid Stores in Hepatic Stellate Cells via Rab18, a Retinoid Responsive Lipid Droplet Protein

    PubMed Central

    O’Mahony, Fiona; Wroblewski, Kevin; O’Byrne, Sheila M.; Jiang, Hongfeng; Clerkin, Kara; Benhammou, Jihane; Blaner, William S.; Beaven, Simon W.

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are determinants of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis. Freshly isolated HSCs from Lxrαβ−/− mice have increased lipid droplet (LD) size but the functional consequences of this are unknown. Our aim was to determine whether LXRs link cholesterol to retinoid storage in HSCs and how this impacts activation. Primary HSCs from Lxrαβ−/− and wild-type (WT) mice were profiled by gene array during in vitro activation. Lipid content was quantified by HPLC and mass spectroscopy. Primary HSCs were treated with nuclear receptor ligands, transfected with siRNA and plasmid constructs, and analyzed by immunocytochemistry. Lxrαβ−/− HSCs have increased cholesterol and retinyl esters (CEs & REs). The retinoid increase drives intrinsic retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling and activation occurs more rapidly in Lxrαβ−/− HSCs. We identify Rab18 as a novel retinoic acid responsive, lipid droplet associated protein that helps mediate stellate cell activation. Rab18 mRNA, protein, and membrane insertion increase during activation. Both Rab18 GTPase activity and isoprenylation are required for stellate cell lipid droplet loss and induction of activation markers. These phenomena are accelerated in the Lxrαβ−/− HSCs, where there is greater retinoic acid flux. Conversely, Rab18 knockdown retards lipid droplet loss in culture and blocks activation, just like the functional mutants. Rab18 is also induced with acute liver injury in vivo. Conclusion Retinoid and cholesterol metabolism are linked in stellate cells by the LD associated protein, Rab18. Retinoid overload helps explain the pro-fibrotic phenotype of Lxrαβ−/− mice and we establish a pivotal role for Rab18 GTPase activity and membrane insertion in wild-type stellate cell activation. Interference with Rab18 may have significant therapeutic benefit in ameliorating liver fibrosis. PMID:25482505

  5. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  6. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  7. Stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles: An effective platform for catalytic activity tuning

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yao, Qiaofeng; Cao, Hongbin; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of Pt-based nanomaterials for catalysis can be greatly enhanced by coupling morphology engineering to the strategic presence of a second or even third metal. Here we demonstrate the design and preparation of stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles where significant activity difference between the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) may be realized by relegating Ag to the core or by hollowing out the core. In particular the stellated Pt surface, with an abundance of steps, edges, corner atoms, and {111} facets, is highly effective for the ORR but is ineffective for MOR. MOR activity is only observed in the presence of a Ag core through electronic coupling to the stellated Pt shell. The bimetallic Ag-Pt stellates therefore demonstrate the feasibility of tuning a Pt surface for two very different structure sensitive catalytic reactions. Stellated bimetallics may therefore be an effective platform for highly tunable catalyst designs. PMID:24495979

  8. Curcumin, the main active constituent of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), induces apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells by modulating the abundance of apoptosis-related growth factors.

    PubMed

    He, Ya-Jun; Kuchta, Kenny; Lv, Xia; Lin, Yu; Ye, Guo-Rong; Liu, Xu-You; Song, Hui-Dong; Wang, Le-Xin; Kobayashi, Yuta; Shu, Jian-Chang

    2015-11-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of curcumin against hepatic fibrosis, cultured rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC) (HSC-T6) were incubated with curcumin for 24 h, after which apoptosis was measured by flow-cytometry. The protein levels of the pro-apoptotic factors Fas and p53b as well as of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 were monitored by immunocytochemical ABC staining after incubation with curcumin for 24 h. In the case of 20 μM curcumin, not only was the respective apoptosis index increased, but also the abundance of the pro-apoptotic factors Fas and p53 were amplified, whereas that of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 decreased. All these effects were highly reproducible (P<0.05). Consequently, curcumin has an up-regulating effect on pro-apoptotic factors like Fas and p53 as well as a down-regulating effect of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2, thus inducing apoptosis in HSC.

  9. Pancreatic Stellate Cell Models for Transcriptional Studies of Desmoplasia-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mathison, Angela; Liebl, Ann; Bharucha, Jinai; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Lomberk, Gwen; Shah, Vijay; Urrutia, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatic stellate cells are emerging as key players in pathophysiopathological processes underlying the development of pancreatic disease, including pancreatitis and cancer. The cells are scarce in the pancreas making their isolation time and resource use consuming. Methods Therefore, with the ultimate goal of facilitating mechanistic studies, here we report the isolation, characterization, and immortalization of stellate cell lines from rat and mouse origin. Results These cell lines display morphological and molecular markers as well as non-tumorigenic characteristics similar to the frequently used hepatic counterparts. In addition, we have tested their robustness as a model for transcriptional regulatory studies. We find that these cells respond well to TGFβ signaling by triggering a distinct cascade of gene expression, some genes overlap with the TGFβ response of LX2 cells. These cells express several key chromatin proteins and epigenetic regulators involved in the regulation of gene expression, including co-repressors such as Sin3A (short-term repression), HP1 (long-term repression), as well as CBP/p300 (activation). Furthermore, these cells are well suited for Gal4-based transcriptional activation and repression assays. Conclusions The cell model reported here may therefore help fuel investigations in the field of signaling, transcription, and perhaps other studies on similarly exciting cellular processes. PMID:20847583

  10. The inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells proliferation by arctigenin through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest: persistent p27(Kip1) induction by interfering with PI3K/Akt/FOXO3a signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Ao; Wang, Jun; Wu, Mingjun; Zhang, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-15

    Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is vital for the development of fibrosis during liver injury. In this study, we describe that arctigenin (ATG), a major bioactive component of Fructus Arctii, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity via inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-activated HSCs proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which could not be observed in normal human hepatocytes in vitro. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 activities could be strongly inhibited by ATG through down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 expression in early G1 phase arrest. In the ATG-treated HSCs, the expression level of p27(Kip1) and the formation of CDK2-p27(Kip1) complex were also increased. p27(Kip1) silencing significantly attenuated the effect of ATG, including cell cycle arrest and suppression of proliferation in activated HSCs. We also found that ATG suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream transcription factor Forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a), decreased binding of FOXO3a to 14-3-3 protein, and stimulated nuclear translocation of FOXO3a in activated HSCs. Furthermore, knockdown of FOXO3a expression by FOXO3a siRNA attenuated ATG-induced up-regulation of p27(Kip1) in activated HSCs. All the above findings suggested that ATG could increase the levels of p27(Kip1) protein through inhibition of Akt and improvement of FOXO3a activity, in turn inhibited the CDK2 kinase activity, and eventually caused an overall inhibition of HSCs proliferation.

  11. The inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells proliferation by arctigenin through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest: persistent p27(Kip1) induction by interfering with PI3K/Akt/FOXO3a signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Ao; Wang, Jun; Wu, Mingjun; Zhang, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-15

    Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is vital for the development of fibrosis during liver injury. In this study, we describe that arctigenin (ATG), a major bioactive component of Fructus Arctii, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity via inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-activated HSCs proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which could not be observed in normal human hepatocytes in vitro. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 activities could be strongly inhibited by ATG through down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 expression in early G1 phase arrest. In the ATG-treated HSCs, the expression level of p27(Kip1) and the formation of CDK2-p27(Kip1) complex were also increased. p27(Kip1) silencing significantly attenuated the effect of ATG, including cell cycle arrest and suppression of proliferation in activated HSCs. We also found that ATG suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream transcription factor Forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a), decreased binding of FOXO3a to 14-3-3 protein, and stimulated nuclear translocation of FOXO3a in activated HSCs. Furthermore, knockdown of FOXO3a expression by FOXO3a siRNA attenuated ATG-induced up-regulation of p27(Kip1) in activated HSCs. All the above findings suggested that ATG could increase the levels of p27(Kip1) protein through inhibition of Akt and improvement of FOXO3a activity, in turn inhibited the CDK2 kinase activity, and eventually caused an overall inhibition of HSCs proliferation. PMID:25498792

  12. Hedgehog-mediated paracrine interaction between hepatic stellate cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Nan Tang Zhaofeng; Deng Meihai; Zhong Yuesi; Lin Jizong; Yang Xuhui; Xiang Peng; Xu Ruiyun

    2008-07-18

    During liver injury, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can migrate and differentiate into hepatocytes. Hepatic stellate cell (SC) activation is a pivotal event in the development of liver fibrosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that SCs may play an important role in regulating MSC proliferation and differentiation through the paracrine signaling pathway. We demonstrate that MSCs and SCs both express hedgehog (Hh) pathway components, including its ligands, receptors, and target genes. Transwell co-cultures of SCs and MSCs showed that the SCs produced sonic hedgehog (Shh), which enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs. These findings demonstrate that SCs indirectly modulate the activity of MSCs in vitro via the Hh pathway, and provide a plausible explanation for the mechanisms of transplanted MSCs in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  13. Non-linear Membrane Properties in Entorhinal Cortical Stellate Cells Reduce Modulation of Input-Output Responses by Voltage Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Fernando R.; Malerba, Paola; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of voltage fluctuations arising from synaptic activity is a critical component in models of gain control, neuronal output gating, and spike rate coding. The degree to which individual neuronal input-output functions are modulated by voltage fluctuations, however, is not well established across different cortical areas. Additionally, the extent and mechanisms of input-output modulation through fluctuations have been explored largely in simplified models of spike generation, and with limited consideration for the role of non-linear and voltage-dependent membrane properties. To address these issues, we studied fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses in medial entorhinal cortical (MEC) stellate cells of rats, which express strong sub-threshold non-linear membrane properties. Using in vitro recordings, dynamic clamp and modeling, we show that the modulation of input-output responses by random voltage fluctuations in stellate cells is significantly limited. In stellate cells, a voltage-dependent increase in membrane resistance at sub-threshold voltages mediated by Na+ conductance activation limits the ability of fluctuations to elicit spikes. Similarly, in exponential leaky integrate-and-fire models using a shallow voltage-dependence for the exponential term that matches stellate cell membrane properties, a low degree of fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses can be attained. These results demonstrate that fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses is not a universal feature of neurons and can be significantly limited by subthreshold voltage-gated conductances. PMID:25909971

  14. Non-linear Membrane Properties in Entorhinal Cortical Stellate Cells Reduce Modulation of Input-Output Responses by Voltage Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Fernando R; Malerba, Paola; White, John A

    2015-04-01

    The presence of voltage fluctuations arising from synaptic activity is a critical component in models of gain control, neuronal output gating, and spike rate coding. The degree to which individual neuronal input-output functions are modulated by voltage fluctuations, however, is not well established across different cortical areas. Additionally, the extent and mechanisms of input-output modulation through fluctuations have been explored largely in simplified models of spike generation, and with limited consideration for the role of non-linear and voltage-dependent membrane properties. To address these issues, we studied fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses in medial entorhinal cortical (MEC) stellate cells of rats, which express strong sub-threshold non-linear membrane properties. Using in vitro recordings, dynamic clamp and modeling, we show that the modulation of input-output responses by random voltage fluctuations in stellate cells is significantly limited. In stellate cells, a voltage-dependent increase in membrane resistance at sub-threshold voltages mediated by Na+ conductance activation limits the ability of fluctuations to elicit spikes. Similarly, in exponential leaky integrate-and-fire models using a shallow voltage-dependence for the exponential term that matches stellate cell membrane properties, a low degree of fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses can be attained. These results demonstrate that fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses is not a universal feature of neurons and can be significantly limited by subthreshold voltage-gated conductances.

  15. Angiotensin II enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through the interaction between activated hepatic stellate cells and the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakamura, Keishi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shinichi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated by angiotensin II (AngII) facilitate stromal fibrosis and tumor progression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AngII has been known as a growth factor which can promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells. However, in the past, the relationship between AngII and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the microenvironment around cancer and the role of AngII on EMT of cancer cells has not been reported in detail. SDF-1 and its specific receptor, CXCR4, are now receiving attention as a mechanism of cell progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined whether activated HSCs promote tumor fibrogenesis, tumor progression and distant metastasis by mediating EMT via the AngII/AngII type 1 receptor (AT-1) and the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Two human ICC cell lines and a human HSC line, LI-90, express CXCR4. Significantly higher concentration of SDF-1α was released into the supernatant of LI-90 cells to which AngII had been added. SDF-1α increased the proliferative activity of HSCs and enhanced the activation of HSCs as a growth factor. Furthermore, addition of SDF-1α and AngII enhanced the increase of the migratory capability and vimentin expression, reduced E-cadherin expression, and translocated the expression of β-catenin into the nucleus and cytoplasm in ICC cells. Co-culture with HSCs also enhanced the migratory capability of ICC cells. These findings suggest that SDF-1α, released from activated HSCs and AngII, play important roles in cancer progression, tumor fibrogenesis, and migration in autocrine and paracrine fashion by mediating EMT. Our mechanistic findings may provide pivotal insights into the molecular mechanism of the AngII and SDF-1α-initiated signaling pathway that regulates fibrogenesis in cancerous stroma, tumor progression and meta-stasis of tumor cells expressing AT-1 and CXCR4

  16. Clonorchis sinensis lysophospholipase inhibits TGF-β1-induced expression of pro-fibrogenic genes through attenuating the activations of Smad3, JNK2, and ERK1/2 in hepatic stellate cell line LX-2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lina; Shang, Mei; Shi, Mengchen; Zhao, Lu; Lin, Zhipeng; Chen, Tingjin; Wu, Yinjuan; Tang, Zeli; Sun, Hengchang; Yu, Jinyun; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound healing response associated with chronic liver injury. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation is a key event in the development of liver fibrosis. Since helminths have the ability to live for decades in the host by establishing an adaptive relationship in the interplay with its hosts, we hypothesize that whether Clonochis sinensis LysophospholipaseA (CsLysoPLA), a component of excretory/secretory proteins, can attenuate the fibrogenic response by inhibiting activation of LX-2 cells, thereby balancing the pro-fibrotic and anti-fibrotic response during the Clonochis sinensis (C. sinensis) infection. In the present study, LX-2 cells were stimulated with CsLysoPLA in the presence of TGF-β1, and the expressions of collagen type I (COL1A1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) were decreased. In addition, CsLysoPLA significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of LX-2 cells stimulated by TGF-β1. Pretreatment of LX-2 cells with CsLysoPLA attenuated the phosphorylation of Smad3 as well as JNK2 and ERK1/2 in response to the stimulation of TGF-β1. For the first time, our results showed an anti-fibrogenic effect of CsLysoPLA by attenuating the response of LX-2 cells to TGF-β1 through inhibiting the activations of Smad3, ERK1/2, and JNK2. PMID:26486942

  17. Anticytoproliferative effect of Vitamin C on rat hepatic stellate cell

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Chao, Guo; Liang, Minqing; Song, Jianhua; Wu, Ka

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the potential therapeutical benefit of Vitamin (VC), a potent antioxidant, on suppressing proliferation of immortalized rat liver stellate cell line (HSC-T6) in vitro, and to discuss the underlying mechanism. HSC-T6 was co-treated with different concentrations of VC (50, 100, 200 μmol/L) on designed time points. Then, cell viability was assessed by using MTT analysis, and the changes of cytomorphology was observed with apoptosis-specific TUNEL and immunohistochemical stains, as well as the intracellular target genes was determined by using RT-PCR, respectively. As the outcomes, VC-treated HSC-T6 showed significantly inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner when compared to the vehicle control. Cytologically, VC increased TUNEL-labeled positive cells in cultured HSC-T6, which the cell count was greater than vehicle control. Meanwhile, VC-treated HSC-T6 showed elevated immunoreactive for TGF-β1-labeled cells. Moreover, VC contributed to down-regulated expressions of intracellular c-myc, cyclin D1, mTOR mRNAs in HSC-T6. Collectively, these preliminary findings have demonstrated that VC-mediated anti-proliferative effect on HSCs is involved in molecular mechanisms of promoting apoptosis and blocking endogenous collagenation. PMID:27398165

  18. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  19. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  20. MicroRNA-146a-5p Negatively Regulates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and Cell Activation in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhan; Zeng, Zhaochong; Shen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Zhifeng; Dong, Yinying; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is demonstrated to be involved in the hepatic fibrosis. MicroRNA (miR)-146a-5p is a key regulator of the innate immune response. The functional significance of miR-146a-5p during the LPS/TLR4 mediated hepatic fibrosis process remains unclear. In this study, we found that TLR4 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were up-regulated and miR-146a-5p was down-regulated in human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) line LX2 after LPS stimulation. Overexpression of miR-146a-5p inhibited LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion through down-regulating the expression levels of TLR-4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), TNF receptor associated factor-6 (TRAF6) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Knockdown of IRAK1 and TRAF6 also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation. In addition, miR-146a-5p mimic blocked LPS induced TRAF6 dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smad2 activation as well as α-SMA production. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-146a-5p suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and cell activation of HSC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TLR4/TRAF6/JNK pathway. PMID:27399683

  1. Curcumin regulates cell fate and metabolism by inhibiting hedgehog signaling in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Naqi; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Huanhuan; Lu, Chunfeng; Wu, Xiafei; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling becomes activated in chronic liver injury and plays a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are Hh-responsive cells and activation of the Hh pathway promotes transdifferentiation of HSCs into myofibroblasts. Targeting Hh signaling may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of liver fibrosis. We previously reported that curcumin has potent antifibrotic effects in vivo and in vitro, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. This study shows that curcumin downregulated Patched and Smoothened, two key elements in Hh signaling, but restored Hhip expression in rat liver with carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis and in cultured HSCs. Curcumin also halted the nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcription activity of Gli1. Moreover, the Hh signaling inhibitor cyclopamine, like curcumin, arrested the cell cycle, induced mitochondrial apoptosis, reduced fibrotic gene expression, restored lipid accumulation, and inhibited invasion and migration in HSCs. However, curcumin's effects on cell fate and fibrogenic properties of HSCs were abolished by the Hh pathway agonist SAG. Furthermore, curcumin and cyclopamine decreased intracellular levels of adenosine triphosphate and lactate, and inhibited the expression and/or function of several key molecules controlling glycolysis. However, SAG abrogated the curcumin effects on these parameters of glycolysis. Animal data also showed that curcumin downregulated glycolysis-regulatory proteins in rat fibrotic liver. These aggregated data therefore indicate that curcumin modulated cell fate and metabolism by disrupting the Hh pathway in HSCs, providing novel molecular insights into curcumin reduction of HSC activation.

  2. Overexpression of Endoglin Modulates TGF-β1-Signalling Pathways in a Novel Immortalized Mouse Hepatic Stellate Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Hacer; Wasmuth, Hermann E.; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Brenner, David A.; Trautwein, Christian; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Scholten, David

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a major role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Working on primary HSCs requires difficult isolation procedures; therefore we have generated and here characterize a mouse hepatic stellate cell line expressing GFP under control of the collagen 1(I) promoter/enhancer. These cells are responsive to pro-fibrogenic stimuIi, such as PDGF or TGF-β1, and are able to activate intracellular signalling pathways including Smads and MAP kinases. Nevertheless, due to the basal level of activation, TGF-β1 did not significantly induce GFP expression contrasting the TGF-β1 regulated endogenous collagen I expression. We could demonstrate that the accessory TGF-β-receptor endoglin, which is endogenously expressed at very low levels, has a differential effect on signalling of these cells when transiently overexpressed. In the presence of endoglin activation of Smad1/5/8 was drastically enhanced. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased, and the expression of vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin and connective tissue growth factor was upregulated. Endoglin induced a slight increase in expression of the inhibitor of differentiation-2 while the amount of endogenous collagen type I was reduced. Therefore, this profibrogenic cell line with hepatic stellate cell origin is not only a promising novel experimental tool, which can be used in vivo for cell tracing experiments. Furthermore it allows investigating the impact of various regulatory proteins (e.g. endoglin) on profibrogenic signal transduction, differentiation and hepatic stellate cell biology. PMID:23437087

  3. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  4. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  5. Hepatic Stellate Cells and microRNAs in Pathogenesis of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Mio; Bloomston, P. Mark

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by either blocking translation or inducing degradation of target mRNA. miRNAs play essential roles in diverse biological and pathological processes, including development of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a central role in development of hepatic fibrosis and there are intricate regulatory effects of miRNAs on their activation, proliferation, collagen production, migration, and apoptosis. There are multiple differentially expressed miRNAs in activated HSCs, and in this review we aim to summarize current data on miRNAs that participate in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Based on this review, miRNAs may serve as biomarkers for diagnosis of liver disease, as well as markers of disease progression. Most importantly, dysregulated miRNAs may potentially be targeted by novel therapies to treat and reverse progression of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26999230

  6. Transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells in liver is mediated by retinol-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Blomhoff, R.; Berg, T.; Norum, K.R. )

    1988-05-01

    Newly absorbed chylomicron remnant retinyl ester is endocytosed by parenchymal liver cells, and retinol is subsequently transferred to perisinusoidal stellate cells in liver. In the present study, the authors have used several approaches to elucidate the mechanism for the paracrine transfer of retinol between liver parenchymal and stellate cells. In one series of experiments, chylomicrons labeled with ({sup 3}H)retinyl palmitate or with retinyl ({sup 3}H)palimtate were injected intravenously into rats. It was shown that the retinol as well as the palmitate moiety were initially taken up in parenchymal liver cells. However, only the retinol moiety was detected in stellate cells, indicating that the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed before retinol is transferred to stellate cells. It is well known that parenchymal liver cells secrete retinol bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP), and they have recently found that stellate cells do have RBP receptors. Here they report that antibodies against RBP completely block the transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells. These findings indicate that following uptake of chylomicron remnant retinyl ester in parenchymal cells, the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed, and retinol secreted from parenchymal cells on RBP is taken up by stellate cells by means of RBP receptors.

  7. Transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells in liver is mediated by retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Blomhoff, R; Berg, T; Norum, K R

    1988-01-01

    Newly absorbed chylomicron remnant retinyl ester is endocytosed by parenchymal liver cells, and retinol is subsequently transferred to perisinusoidal stellate cells in liver. In the present study we have used several approaches to elucidate the mechanism for the paracrine transfer of retinol between liver parenchymal and stellate cells. In one series of experiments, chylomicrons labeled with [3H]retinyl palmitate or with retinyl [3H]palmitate were injected intravenously into rats. It was shown that the retinol as well as the palmitate moiety were initially taken up in parenchymal liver cells. However, only the retinol moiety was detected in stellate cells, indicating that the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed before retinol is transferred to stellate cells. It is well known that parenchymal liver cells secrete retinol bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP), and we have recently found that stellate cells do have RBP receptors. Here we report that antibodies against RBP completely block the transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells. These findings indicate that following uptake of chylomicron remnant retinyl ester in parenchymal cells, the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed, and retinol secreted from parenchymal cells on RBP is taken up by stellate cells by means of RBP receptors. PMID:3368453

  8. Establishment and characterization of an immortalized rat hepatic stellate cell line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Leng, Xi-Sheng; Zhu, Ji-Ye; Wang, Fu-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play an important role in liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. This study established a new rat HSC cell line LSC-1. Liver ex vivo perfusion with collagenase IV and density gradient centrifugation were used to isolate rat HSC. Cells have been maintained in culture for multiple passages. LSC-1 cell biological characteristics were studied. LSC-1 cell have been maintained in culture over 100 passages. This new HSC cell line express telomerase reverse transcriptase (TRT) and p53, suggesting that it is immortalized spontaneously. LSC-1 cells have a doubling time of 46 hours and their growth is serum-dependent. Karyotypic analysis revealed that LSC-1 cells possess normal chromosome phenotype. Moreover, LSC-1 cells do not grow in soft agar or induce tumors in nude mice, suggesting that they are not transformed. LSC-1 cells express desmin, glial fibrillary acidic proteins (GFAP), collagen type I and III, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). TGF-β1 stimulation increased collagen type I and III expression in LSC-1 cells. Additionally, LSC-1 cells proliferate in response to PDGF-BB, and contract in response to endothelin-1 (ET-1). In summary, LSC-1 cells exhibit activated HSC phenotype characteristics, and therefore are useful tool to study the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. PMID:26722391

  9. Cytoglobin as a Marker of Hepatic Stellate Cell-derived Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play important roles in inflammation, fibrosis and tumorigenesis in chronically inflamed liver. Liver myofibroblasts originate from hepatic stellate cells, portal fibroblasts or mesothelial cells, and they are localized in and around fibrotic septum and portal tracts. Liver myofibroblasts are the source of extracellular matrix materials, including type I collagen and multiple fibrogenic growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor. Although a detailed characterization of the function of individual myofibroblasts has not been conducted, owing to the lack of appropriate cell markers, recent lineage-tracing technology has revealed the limited contribution of myofibroblasts that are derived from portal fibroblasts to various types of liver fibrosis, as compared with the contribution of hepatic stellate cells. In addition, cytoglobin, which is the fourth globin in mammals and function as a local gas sensor, provides a new perspective on the involvement of stellate cells in fibrosis and carcinogenesis, possibly through its anti-oxidative properties and is a promising new marker that discriminates between myofibroblasts derived from stellate cells and those from portal fibroblasts. PMID:26617531

  10. Regulation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Fibrogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of growth factors critically involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing, and endocrine functions. In the liver, several FGFs are produced basally by hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Upon insult to the liver, expression of FGFs in HSCs is greatly upregulated, stimulating hepatocyte regeneration and growth. Various FGF isoforms have also been shown to directly induce HSC proliferation and activation thereby enabling autocrine and paracrine regulation of HSC function. Regulation of HSCs by the endocrine FGFs, namely, FGF15/19 and FGF21, has also recently been identified. With the ability to modulate HSC proliferation and transdifferentiation, targeting FGF signaling pathways constitutes a promising new therapeutic strategy to treat hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27699175

  11. Regulation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Fibrogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of growth factors critically involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing, and endocrine functions. In the liver, several FGFs are produced basally by hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Upon insult to the liver, expression of FGFs in HSCs is greatly upregulated, stimulating hepatocyte regeneration and growth. Various FGF isoforms have also been shown to directly induce HSC proliferation and activation thereby enabling autocrine and paracrine regulation of HSC function. Regulation of HSCs by the endocrine FGFs, namely, FGF15/19 and FGF21, has also recently been identified. With the ability to modulate HSC proliferation and transdifferentiation, targeting FGF signaling pathways constitutes a promising new therapeutic strategy to treat hepatic fibrosis.

  12. Role of ethanol in the regulation of hepatic stellate cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Batey, Robert G; George, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated to suggest an important role of ethanol and/or its metabolites in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related liver disease. In this review, the fibrogenic effects of ethanol and its metabolites on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are discussed. In brief, ethanol interferes with retinoid metabolism and its signaling, induces the release of fibrogenic cytokines such as transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) from HSCs, up-regulates the gene expression of collagen I and enhances type I collagen protein production by HSCs. Ethanol further perpetuates an activated HSC phenotype through extracellular matrix remodeling. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms by which ethanol exerts these pro-fibrogenic effects on HSCs are reviewed. PMID:17109512

  13. Inhibitory effects of capsaicin on hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Xiang; Teng, Yin-Yan; Zhu, Qian-Dong; Zhang, Qi-Yu; Tang, Yin-He

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play an important role in the process of liver fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of capsaicin on HSCs and liver fibrosis. Cultured HSCs were incubated with various concentrations of capsaicin. Cell proliferation was examined using a cell counting kit. Production of hydrogen peroxide was determined using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. The mRNA and protein expression of target genes was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) costaining followed by flow cytometric analysis. A CCl4 rat liver fibrosis model was used to assess in vivo effects of capsaicin by histological examination and measurement of liver fibrosis markers, including hydroxyproline content, serum type III collagen, and hyaluronic acid (HA) levels. Our results show that capsaicin dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation, suppressed cell activation, and decreased hydrogen peroxide production in cultured HSCs. Capsaicin reduced the mRNA levels of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in HSCs. Moreover, capsaicin-induced cell apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Bax, cytochrome c (cyt c), and caspase-3, but reduced levels of Bcl-2. The animal studies further revealed that capsaicin efficiently reduced the extent of liver fibrosis, inhibited HSC proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis. Our findings suggest that capsaicin might inhibit fibrogenesis by inhibiting the activities of HSCs.

  14. Differential effects of arsenic trioxide on chemosensitization in human hepatic tumor and stellate cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between malignant hepatocytes and the surrounding peritumoral stroma is a key modulator of hepatocarcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. To examine the chemotherapy resistance of these two cellular compartments in vitro, we evaluated a well-established hepatic tumor cell line, HepG2, and an adult hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. The aim was to compare the chemosensitization potential of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in combination with sorafenib or fluorouracil (5-FU), in both hepatic tumor cells and stromal cells. Methods Cytotoxicity of ATO, 5-FU, and sorafenib, alone and in combination against HepG2 cells and LX2 cells was measured by an automated high throughput cell-based proliferation assay. Changes in survival and apoptotic signaling pathways were analyzed by flow cytometry and western blot. Gene expression of the 5-FU metabolic enzyme, thymidylate synthase, was analyzed by real time PCR. Results Both HepG2 and LX2 cell lines were susceptible to single agent sorafenib and ATO at 24 hr (ATO IC50: 5.3 μM in LX2; 32.7 μM in HepG2; Sorafenib IC50: 11.8 μM in LX2; 9.9 μM in HepG2). In contrast, 5-FU cytotoxicity required higher concentrations and prolonged (48–72 hr) drug exposure. Concurrent ATO and 5-FU treatment of HepG2 cells was synergistic, leading to increased cytotoxicity due in part to modulation of thymidylate synthase levels by ATO. Concurrent ATO and sorafenib treatment showed a trend towards increased HepG2 cytotoxicity, possibly due to a significant decrease in MAPK activation in comparison to treatment with ATO alone. Conclusions ATO differentially sensitizes hepatic tumor cells and adult hepatic stellate cells to 5-FU and sorafenib. Given the importance of both of these cell types in hepatocarcinogenesis, these data have implications for the rational development of anti-cancer therapy combinations for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:22963400

  15. 1,25-(OH){sub 2}-vitamin D{sub 3} prevents activation of hepatic stellate cells in vitro and ameliorates inflammatory liver damage but not fibrosis in the Abcb4{sup −/−} model

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, Florian P.; Hohenester, Simon; Nagel, Jutta M.; Wimmer, Ralf; Artmann, Renate; Wottke, Lena; Makeschin, Marie-Christine; Mayr, Doris; Rust, Christian; Trauner, Michael; Denk, Gerald U.

    2015-04-03

    Background/Purpose of the study: Vitamin D{sub 3}-deficiency is common in patients with chronic liver-disease and may promote disease progression. Vitamin D{sub 3}-administration has thus been proposed as a therapeutic approach. Vitamin D{sub 3} has immunomodulatory effects and may modulate autoimmune liver-disease such as primary sclerosing cholangitis. Although various mechanisms of action have been proposed, experimental evidence is limited. Here we test the hypothesis that active 1,25-(OH){sub 2}-vitamin D{sub 3} inhibits activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in vitro and modulates liver-injury in vivo. Methods: Proliferation and activation of primary murine HSC were assessed by BrdU- and PicoGreen{sup ®}-assays, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence-microscopy, quantitative-PCR, and zymography following calcitriol-treatment. Wild-type and ATP-binding cassette transporter b4{sup −/−} (Abcb4{sup −/−})-mice received calcitriol for 4 weeks. Liver-damage, inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed by serum liver-tests, Sirius-red staining, quantitative-PCR, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and hydroxyproline quantification. Results: In vitro, calcitriol inhibited activation and proliferation of murine HSC as shown by reduced α-smooth muscle actin and platelet-derived growth factor-receptor-β-protein-levels, BrdU and PicoGreen®-assays. Furthermore, mRNA-levels and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 13 were profoundly increased. In vivo, calcitriol ameliorated inflammatory liver-injury reflected by reduced levels of alanine aminotransferase in Abcb4{sup −/−}-mice. In accordance, their livers had lower mRNA-levels of F4/80, tumor necrosis factor-receptor 1 and a lower count of portal CD11b positive cells. In contrast, no effect on overall fibrosis was observed. Conclusion: Calcitriol inhibits activation and proliferation of HSCs in vitro. In Abcb4{sup −/−}-mice, administration of calcitriol ameliorates inflammatory liver-damage but has

  16. Trefoil Factor 1 Stimulates Both Pancreatic Cancer and Stellate Cells and Increases Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Brandt, Will; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Moore, Tood T.; Wang, Huamin; May, Felicity E.; Westley, Bruce R.; Hwang, Rosa F.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) is a stable secretory protein expressed widely in the gastrointestinal mucosa that is also expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In the current study, we documented the extent and timing of TFF1 expression and investigated the effects of TFF1 on PDAC cells and stellate cells, the primary cells of the PDAC stroma. Methods Trefoil factor 1 expression in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines was analyzed using microarray, quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. The effects of recombinant TFF1 on cell growth, migration, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cell lines and immortalized human pancreatic stellate cells (HPSCs) were analyzed using MTS and Matrigel-coated invasion chambers. In vivo studies were also conducted in which Mpanc-96 cells stably expressing TFF1 were implanted orthotopically into nude mice. Results Trefoil factor 1 was highly increased in preneoplastic lesions. Recombinant TFF1 stimulated motility of both cancer and HPSCs. In contrast, only HPSC cell growth was increased by TFF1. In vivo studies showed that overexpression of TFF1 in PDAC cells did not affect primary tumor growth but greatly increased metastasis. Conclusions The present data demonstrate that TFF1 influences both PDAC cells and stellate cells and stimulates metastasis. PMID:21747314

  17. Modulation of Bcl-x Alternative Splicing Induces Apoptosis of Human Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Mao, Chengqiong; Ming, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide due to chronic viral hepatitis and, more recently, from fatty liver diseases. Activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) represent a key aspect of fibrogenesis and are associated with progressive reduction of HSC apoptosis. Bcl-x, an antiapoptotic member of Bcl-2 gene family, plays a role in apoptosis regulation in mammalian cells. Through alternative splicing, the Bcl-x gene yields two major protein isoforms with opposing functions, antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and proapoptotic Bcl-xS. This study aimed to investigate the role of Bcl-x and its alternate splicing in HSC apoptosis. The results indicated that the expression of Bcl-xL was dramatically higher than Bcl-2 in activated human HSCs. The relative expression of Bcl-xL over Bcl-xS increased gradually when HSCs were activated in cell culture, which was consistent with the increase in apoptosis resistance of activated HSCs. Redirection of Bcl-x splicing by an antisense oligonucleotide from the antiapoptotic isoform to the proapoptotic isoform induced death of HSCs without other apoptosis stimuli. We conclude that Bcl-x plays a role in regulation of HSC apoptosis and modulation of Bcl-x alternative splicing may become a novel molecular therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27579319

  18. Modulation of Bcl-x Alternative Splicing Induces Apoptosis of Human Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lin; Mao, Chengqiong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide due to chronic viral hepatitis and, more recently, from fatty liver diseases. Activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) represent a key aspect of fibrogenesis and are associated with progressive reduction of HSC apoptosis. Bcl-x, an antiapoptotic member of Bcl-2 gene family, plays a role in apoptosis regulation in mammalian cells. Through alternative splicing, the Bcl-x gene yields two major protein isoforms with opposing functions, antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and proapoptotic Bcl-xS. This study aimed to investigate the role of Bcl-x and its alternate splicing in HSC apoptosis. The results indicated that the expression of Bcl-xL was dramatically higher than Bcl-2 in activated human HSCs. The relative expression of Bcl-xL over Bcl-xS increased gradually when HSCs were activated in cell culture, which was consistent with the increase in apoptosis resistance of activated HSCs. Redirection of Bcl-x splicing by an antisense oligonucleotide from the antiapoptotic isoform to the proapoptotic isoform induced death of HSCs without other apoptosis stimuli. We conclude that Bcl-x plays a role in regulation of HSC apoptosis and modulation of Bcl-x alternative splicing may become a novel molecular therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27579319

  19. Ellagic Acid and Embelin Affect Key Cellular Components of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Cancer and Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Lugea, Aurelia; Hui, Hongxiang; Eibl, Guido; Lu, Qing-Yi; Moro, Aune; Lu, Xuyang; Li, Gang; Go, Vay-Liang; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Ellagic acid is a polyphenolic phytochemical present in many fruits and nuts with anti-cancer properties demonstrated in experimental tumor studies. Embelin is a benzoquinone phytochemical isolated from the Japanese herb Ardisiae Japonicae and has been shown to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. We found that ellagic acid and embelin each dose-dependently increased apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells, MIA PaCa-2 and HPAF-II cells, and in pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs) which are progenitors of pancreatic cancer desmoplasia. In each of these cell types, combinations of ellagic acid and embelin at low micromolar concentrations (0.5–3 μM) induced synergistic increases in apoptosis and decreases in proliferation. Ellagic acid decreased NF-κB transcriptional activity, whereas embelin decreased STAT-3 phosphorylation and protein expression of its downstream target survivin, in cancer cells. In vivo dietary ellagic acid alone or in combination with embelin decreased tumor size and tumor cellularity in a subcutaneous (s.c.) xenograft mouse model of pancreatic cancer. These results show that ellagic acid and embelin interact with divergent intracellular signaling pathways resulting in augmentation of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation at low micromolar concentrations for the key cellular components of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:24127740

  20. Canonical Wnt signaling maintains the quiescent stage of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kordes, Claus Sawitza, Iris; Haeussinger, Dieter

    2008-02-29

    It is well known that hepatic stellate cells (HSC) develop into cells, which are thought to contribute to liver fibrogenesis. Recent data suggest that HSC are progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into cells of endothelial and hepatocyte lineages. The present study shows that {beta}-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling is active in freshly isolated HSC of rats. Mimicking of the canonical Wnt pathway in cultured HSC by TWS119, an inhibitor of the glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta}, led to reduced {beta}-catenin phosphorylation, induced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, elevated glutamine synthetase production, impeded synthesis of {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and Wnt5a, but promoted the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, Wnt10b, and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2c. In addition, canonical Wnt signaling lowered DNA synthesis and hindered HSC from entering the cell cycle. The findings demonstrate that {beta}-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling maintains the quiescent state of HSC and, similar to stem and progenitor cells, influences their developmental fate.

  1. Inhibition of endothelin-1-mediated contraction of hepatic stellate cells by FXR ligand.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Wilson, Annette; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Song

    2010-11-11

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) plays an important role in the development of cirrhosis through the increased production of collagen and the enhanced contractile response to vasoactive mediators such as endothelin-1 (ET-1). The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is highly expressed in liver, kidneys, adrenals, and intestine. FXR is also expressed in HSCs and activation of FXR in HSCs is associated with significant decreases in collagen production. However, little is known about the roles of FXR in the regulation of contraction of HSCs. We report in this study that treatment of quiescent HSCs with GW4064, a synthetic FXR agonist, significantly inhibited the HSC transdifferentiation, which was associated with an inhibition of the upregulation of ET-1 expression. These GW4064-treated cells also showed reduced contractile response to ET-1 in comparison to HSCs without GW4064 treatment. We have further shown that GW4064 treatment inhibited the ET-1-mediated contraction in fully activated HSCs. To elucidate the potential mechanism we showed that GW4064 inhibited ET-1-mediated activation of Rho/ROCK pathway in activated HSCs. Our studies unveiled a new mechanism that might contribute to the anti-cirrhotic effects of FXR ligands.

  2. Berberine Inhibition of Fibrogenesis in a Rat Model of Liver Fibrosis and in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Xu, Qihe; Tan, Hor Yue; Hong, Ming; Li, Sha; Yuen, Man-Fung; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To examine the effect of berberine (BBR) on liver fibrosis and its possible mechanisms through direct effects on hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Methods. The antifibrotic effect of BBR was determined in a rat model of bile duct ligation- (BDL-) induced liver fibrosis. Multiple cellular and molecular approaches were introduced to examine the effects of BBR on HSC. Results. BBR potently inhibited hepatic fibrosis induced by BDL in rats. It exhibited cytotoxicity to activated HSC at doses nontoxic to hepatocytes. High doses of BBR induced apoptosis of activated HSC, which was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and Bcl-2/Bax imbalance. Low doses of BBR suppressed activation of HSC as evidenced by the inhibition of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and cell motility. BBR did not affect Smad2/3 phosphorylation but significantly activated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling, which was responsible for the transcriptional inhibition by BBR of profibrogenic factors α-SMA and collagen in HSC. Conclusion. BBR is a promising agent for treating liver fibrosis through multiple mechanisms, at least partially by directly targeting HSC and by inhibiting the AMPK pathway. Its value as an antifibrotic drug in patients with liver disease deserves further investigation. PMID:27239214

  3. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. PMID:27270032

  4. Conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines demonstrate enhanced proliferation and migration in response to IGF-I

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, Ann H.; Gundewar, Chinmay; Said Hilmersson, Katarzyna; Ni, Lan; Saleem, Moin A.; Andersson, Roland

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a key role in the dense desmoplastic stroma associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies on human PSCs have been minimal due to difficulty in maintaining primary PSC in culture. We have generated the first conditionally immortalized human non-tumor (NPSC) and tumor-derived (TPSC) pancreatic stellate cells via transformation with the temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase (hTERT). These cells proliferate at 33°C. After transfer to 37°C, the SV40LT is switched off and the cells regain their primary PSC phenotype and growth characteristics. NPSC contained cytoplasmic vitamin A-storing lipid droplets, while both NPSC and TPSC expressed the characteristic markers αSMA, vimentin, desmin and GFAP. Proteome array analysis revealed that of the 55 evaluated proteins, 27 (49%) were upregulated ≥3-fold in TPSC compared to NPSC, including uPA, pentraxin-3, endoglin and endothelin-1. Two insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) were inversely expressed. Although discordant IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels, IGF-I was found to stimulate proliferation of both NPSC and TPSC. Both basal and IGF-I stimulated motility was significantly enhanced in TPSC compared to NPSC. In conclusion, these cells provide a unique resource that will facilitate further study of the active stroma compartment associated with pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Generation of human conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines. • Temperature-sensitive SV40LT allows switch to primary PSC phenotype characteristics. • Proteome profiling revealed distinct expression patterns between TPSC and NPSC. • Enhanced IGF-I-stimulated proliferation and motility by TPSC compared to NPSC.

  5. Nitric oxide signals are interlinked with calcium signals in normal pancreatic stellate cells upon oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian diffuse stellate cell system comprises retinoid-storing cells capable of remarkable transformations from a quiescent to an activated myofibroblast-like phenotype. Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) attract attention owing to the pivotal role they play in development of tissue fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, little is known about the actual role of PSCs in the normal pancreas. These enigmatic cells have recently been shown to respond to physiological stimuli in a manner that is markedly different from their neighbouring pancreatic acinar cells (PACs). Here, we demonstrate the capacity of PSCs to generate nitric oxide (NO), a free radical messenger mediating, for example, inflammation and vasodilatation. We show that production of cytosolic NO in PSCs is unambiguously related to cytosolic Ca2+ signals. Only stimuli that evoke Ca2+ signals in the PSCs elicit consequent NO generation. We provide fresh evidence for the striking difference between signalling pathways in PSCs and adjacent PACs, because PSCs, in contrast to PACs, generate substantial Ca2+-mediated and NOS-dependent NO signals. We also show that inhibition of NO generation protects both PSCs and PACs from necrosis. Our results highlight the interplay between Ca2+ and NO signalling pathways in cell–cell communication, and also identify a potential therapeutic target for anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:27488376

  6. Oleoylethanolamide, an endogenous PPAR-α ligand, attenuates liver fibrosis targeting hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junde; Li, Lei; Zheng, Zihan; Ren, Jie; Qiu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an endocannabinoid-like molecule, was revealed to modulate lipid metabolism through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) mediated mechanism. In present study, we further investigated the activities and mechanisms of OEA in ameliorating hepatic fibrosis in Sv/129 mice induced by a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet or thioacetamide (TAA) treatment. Liver fibrosis development was assessed by Hematoxylin-eosin and Sirius red staining. Treatment with OEA (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal injection, i.p.) significantly attenuated the progress of liver fibrosis in both two experimental animal models by blocking the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Gene expression analysis of hepatic tissues indicated that OEA inhibited the expression of α-smooth muscle action (α-SMA) and collagen matrix, fibrosis markers, and genes involved in inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. In vitro studies showed that OEA inhibited transforming growth factor β1-stimulated HSCs activation through suppressing Smad2/3 phosphorylation, α-SMA expression and myofibroblast transformation. These improvements could not be observed in PPAR-α knockout mice models with OEA administration, which suggested all the anti-fibrotic effects of OEA in vivo and in vitro were mediated by PPAR-α activation. Collectively, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on modulating hepatic fibrosis development through the inhibition of HSCs activation in liver and therefore may be a potential therapeutic agent for liver fibrosis. PMID:26729705

  7. Vitamin A and insulin are required for the maintenance of hepatic stellate cell quiescence.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Sakai-Sawada, Kaori; Niitsu, Yoshiro; Tamura, Yasuaki

    2016-02-01

    Transdifferentiation of vitamin A-storing hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to vitamin A-depleted myofibroblastic cells leads to liver fibrosis. Vitamin A regulates lipid accumulation and gene transcription, suggesting that vitamin A is involved in the maintenance of HSC quiescence under a physiological condition. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive because there is no appropriate in vitro culture system for quiescent HSCs. Here, we show that treatment of quiescent HSCs with vitamin A partially maintained the accumulation of lipid droplets and expression of quiescent HSC markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor-γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α) and also the expression of myofibroblastic markers (α-smooth muscle actin, heat shock protein 47 and collagen type I). On the other hand, combined treatment with vitamin A and insulin sustained the characteristic of HSC quiescence and completely suppressed the expression of myofibroblastic markers through activation of the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway and increased expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1. These treated HSCs transdifferentiated to myofibroblastic cells under a culture condition with fetal bovine serum. The results suggest an important role of vitamin A and insulin in the maintenance of HSC quiescence under a physiological condition.

  8. Vitamin A and insulin are required for the maintenance of hepatic stellate cell quiescence.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Sakai-Sawada, Kaori; Niitsu, Yoshiro; Tamura, Yasuaki

    2016-02-01

    Transdifferentiation of vitamin A-storing hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to vitamin A-depleted myofibroblastic cells leads to liver fibrosis. Vitamin A regulates lipid accumulation and gene transcription, suggesting that vitamin A is involved in the maintenance of HSC quiescence under a physiological condition. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive because there is no appropriate in vitro culture system for quiescent HSCs. Here, we show that treatment of quiescent HSCs with vitamin A partially maintained the accumulation of lipid droplets and expression of quiescent HSC markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor-γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α) and also the expression of myofibroblastic markers (α-smooth muscle actin, heat shock protein 47 and collagen type I). On the other hand, combined treatment with vitamin A and insulin sustained the characteristic of HSC quiescence and completely suppressed the expression of myofibroblastic markers through activation of the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway and increased expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1. These treated HSCs transdifferentiated to myofibroblastic cells under a culture condition with fetal bovine serum. The results suggest an important role of vitamin A and insulin in the maintenance of HSC quiescence under a physiological condition. PMID:26812497

  9. Anti-fibrotic effect of trans-resveratrol on pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hongjie; Lin, Zesi; Mu, Huaixue; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2015-04-01

    Trans-resveratrol, also known as 3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, is a natural stilbenoid found at high concentration in skins of red grapes and berries. Over the recent years, it has been reported with a variety of beneficial effects such as antioxidant, anti-aging and anti-inflammatory bioactivities; thus often utilized as an active substance in human and veterinary therapeutics. In the current study, we aimed to delineate the mechanism of its anti-fibrotic action by means of various biochemical assays, such as immunofluorescent staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analyses in a cellular model, the LTC-14 cells, which retain essential characteristics and morphological features of primary pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Our results demonstrated that the application of trans-resveratrol as low as 10 μM notably suppressed the mRNA and protein levels of different fibrotic mediators namely alpha-smooth muscle actin, type I collagen and fibronectin in the LTC-14 cells stimulated with transforming growth factor-beta, a well recognized pro-fibrotic inducer. Importantly, the mechanism of the anti-fibrotic action of trans-resveratrol was associated with a decrease in nuclear factor-kappaB activation and protein kinase B phosphorylation. In conclusion, our finding suggests that trans-resveratrol may serve as a therapeutic or an adjuvant agent in anti-fibrotic approaches and/or PSC-relating pathologies.

  10. NADPH oxidase signal transduces angiotensin II in hepatic stellate cells and is critical in hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bataller, Ramón; Schwabe, Robert F.; Choi, Youkyung H.; Yang, Liu; Paik, Yong Han; Lindquist, Jeffrey; Qian, Ting; Schoonhoven, Robert; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Lemasters, John J.; Brenner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a pro-oxidant and fibrogenic cytokine. We investigated the role of NADPH oxidase in Ang II–induced effects in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a fibrogenic cell type. Human HSCs express mRNAs of key components of nonphagocytic NADPH oxidase. Ang II phosphorylated p47phox, a regulatory subunit of NADPH oxidase, and induced reactive oxygen species formation via NADPH oxidase activity. Ang II phosphorylated AKT and MAPKs and increased AP-1 DNA binding in a redox-sensitive manner. Ang II stimulated DNA synthesis, cell migration, procollagen α1(I) mRNA expression, and secretion of TGF-β1 and inflammatory cytokines. These effects were attenuated by N-acetylcysteine and diphenylene iodonium, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, Ang II induced upregulation of genes potentially involved in hepatic wound-healing response in a redox-sensitive manner, as assessed by microarray analysis. HSCs isolated from p47phox–/– mice displayed a blunted response to Ang II compared with WT cells. We also assessed the role of NADPH oxidase in experimental liver fibrosis. After bile duct ligation, p47phox–/– mice showed attenuated liver injury and fibrosis compared with WT counterparts. Moreover, expression of smooth muscle α-actin and expression of TGF-β1 were reduced in p47phox–/– mice. Thus, NADPH oxidase mediates the actions of Ang II on HSCs and plays a critical role in liver fibrogenesis. PMID:14597764

  11. Transfer of retinol-binding protein from HepG2 human hepatoma cells to cocultured rat stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Senoo, H; Smeland, S; Malaba, L; Bjerknes, T; Stang, E; Roos, N; Berg, T; Norum, K R; Blomhoff, R

    1993-01-01

    Rat liver stellate cells were cocultured with HepG2 human hepatoma cells, which are known to synthesize and secrete retinol-binding protein (RBP). Transfer of human RBP from HepG2 cells to stellate cells was studied by cryoimmunoelectron microscopy. In stellate cells, human RBP was found on the cell surface and within endosomes. The transfer of human RBP from HepG2 cells to stellate cells was blocked by addition of RBP antibodies to the culture medium. Very little uptake of RBP was observed when fibroblasts were cocultured with HepG2 cells. In a series of experiments, RBP was bound to its putative cell surface receptor at 4 degrees C, and the stellate cells were washed and then incubated at 37 degrees C in order to allow them to internalize a pulse of RBP. About 50% of the RBP was internalized after 6 min of incubation. The RBP-positive vesicles were initially (after 1-2 min) located close to the cell surface and later were found deeper in the cytoplasm. During the first 10 min, RBP was mainly observed in close association with membranes. After 2 hr, however, most RBP was localized in intracellular vesicles at a distance from the vesicular membranes, suggesting that RBP had been released from its receptor. Saturable binding of RBP to liver cells was demonstrated when cells were incubated with 125I-RBP at 4 degrees C and cell-associated radioactivity was determined. The calculated dissociation constant for the specific binding was 12.7 +/- 3.2 nM. A binding assay was also developed for determination of solubilized RBP receptor. Solubilized proteins from the nonparenchymal liver cells bound about 30 times more 125I-labeled RBP than did parenchymal cells (based on mass of cell protein). These data suggest that RBP mediates the paracrine transfer of retinol from hepatocytes to perisinusoidal stellate cells in liver and that stellate cells bind and internalize RBP by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8386378

  12. Targeting of the P2X7 receptor in pancreatic cancer and stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Giannuzzo, Andrea; Saccomano, Mara; Napp, Joanna; Ellegaard, Maria; Alves, Frauke; Novak, Ivana

    2016-12-01

    The ATP-gated receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) is involved in regulation of cell survival and has been of interest in cancer field. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a deadly cancer and new markers and therapeutic targets are needed. PDAC is characterized by a complex tumour microenvironment, which includes cancer and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), and potentially high nucleotide/side turnover. Our aim was to determine P2X7R expression and function in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro as well as to perform in vivo efficacy study applying P2X7R inhibitor in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of PDAC. In the in vitro studies we show that human PDAC cells with luciferase gene (PancTu-1 Luc cells) express high levels of P2X7R protein. Allosteric P2X7R antagonist AZ10606120 inhibited cell proliferation in basal conditions, indicating that P2X7R was tonically active. Extracellular ATP and BzATP, to which the P2X7R is more sensitive, further affected cell survival and confirmed complex functionality of P2X7R. PancTu-1 Luc migration and invasion was reduced by AZ10606120, and it was stimulated by PSCs, but not by PSCs from P2X7(-/-) animals. PancTu-1 Luc cells were orthotopically transplanted into nude mice and tumour growth was followed noninvasively by bioluminescence imaging. AZ10606120-treated mice showed reduced bioluminescence compared to saline-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed P2X7R expression in cancer and PSC cells, and in metaplastic/neoplastic acinar and duct structures. PSCs number/activity and collagen deposition was reduced in AZ10606120-treated tumours. PMID:27513892

  13. Single cell analysis in native tissue: Quantification of the retinoid content of hepatic stellate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Kerstin; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Glaser, Uwe; Markwart, Robby; Bocklitz, Thomas; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are retinoid storing cells in the liver: The retinoid content of those cells changes depending on nutrition and stress level. There are also differences with regard to a HSC’s anatomical position in the liver. Up to now, retinoid levels were only accessible from bulk measurements of tissue homogenates or cell extracts. Unfortunately, they do not account for the intercellular variability. Herein, Raman spectroscopy relying on excitation by the minimally destructive wavelength 785 nm is introduced for the assessment of the retinoid state of single HSCs in freshly isolated, unprocessed murine liver lobes. A quantitative estimation of the cellular retinoid content is derived. Implications of the retinoid content on hepatic health state are reported. The Raman-based results are integrated with histological assessments of the tissue samples. This spectroscopic approach enables single cell analysis regarding an important cellular feature in unharmed tissue.

  14. Xanthohumol uptake and intracellular kinetics in hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, and intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Horst; Motyl, Magdalena; Hellerbrand, Claus; Heilmann, Jörg; Kraus, Birgit

    2011-12-28

    Xanthohumol (XN) is the major prenylated chalcone of hops and hence an ingredient of beer. Despite many advances in understanding of the pharmacology of XN, one largely unresolved issue is its low bioavailability in the human organism. Also, not much is known about its actual concentrations and pharmacokinetics in liver and intestinal cells. Therefore, the uptake, intracellular distribution, and kinetics of XN were studied in various cell types, namely, hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), primary cultured hepatocytes, and colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). Fluorescent microscopy allowed for the first time visualization and tracing of the uptake and intracellular distribution of XN. A rapid accumulation of XN concentrations that were up to >60-fold higher than the concentration present in the ambient culture medium was observed. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed that most XN molecules are bound to cellular proteins, which may alter properties of cellular factors. PMID:22088086

  15. Single cell analysis in native tissue: Quantification of the retinoid content of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Galler, Kerstin; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Glaser, Uwe; Markwart, Robby; Bocklitz, Thomas; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are retinoid storing cells in the liver: The retinoid content of those cells changes depending on nutrition and stress level. There are also differences with regard to a HSC’s anatomical position in the liver. Up to now, retinoid levels were only accessible from bulk measurements of tissue homogenates or cell extracts. Unfortunately, they do not account for the intercellular variability. Herein, Raman spectroscopy relying on excitation by the minimally destructive wavelength 785 nm is introduced for the assessment of the retinoid state of single HSCs in freshly isolated, unprocessed murine liver lobes. A quantitative estimation of the cellular retinoid content is derived. Implications of the retinoid content on hepatic health state are reported. The Raman-based results are integrated with histological assessments of the tissue samples. This spectroscopic approach enables single cell analysis regarding an important cellular feature in unharmed tissue. PMID:27063397

  16. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  17. Phospholipase D1 decreases type I collagen levels in hepatic stellate cells via induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Seo, H-Y; Jang, B-K; Jung, Y-A; Lee, E-J; Kim, H-S; Jeon, J-H; Kim, J-G; Lee, I-K; Kim, M-K; Park, K-G

    2014-06-20

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are major players in liver fibrogenesis. Accumulating evidence shows that suppression of autophagy plays an important role in the development and progression of liver disease. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to yield phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline, was recently shown to modulate autophagy. However, little is known about the effects of PLD1 on the production of type I collagen that characterizes liver fibrosis. Here, we examined whether PLD1 regulates type I collagen levels in HSCs through induction of autophagy. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PLD-1 (Ad-PLD1) reduced type I collagen levels in the activated human HSC lines, hTERT and LX2. Overexpression of PLD1 in HSCs led to induction of autophagy as demonstrated by increased LC3-II conversion and formation of LC3 puncta, and decreased p62 abundance. Moreover, inhibiting the induction of autophagy by treating cells with bafilomycin or a small interfering (si)RNA for ATG7 rescued Ad-PLD1-induced suppression of type I collagen accumulation in HSCs. The effects of PLD on type I collagen levels were not related to TGF-β/Smad signaling. Furthermore, treatment of cells with PA induced autophagy and inhibited type I collagen accumulation. The present study indicates that PLD1 plays a role in regulating type I collagen accumulation through induction of autophagy. PMID:24802400

  18. Depletion of β-arrestin2 in hepatic stellate cells reduces cell proliferation via ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wu-Yi; Song, Yang; Hu, Shan-Shan; Wang, Qing-Tong; Wu, Hua-Xun; Chen, Jing-Yu; Wei, Wei

    2013-05-01

    β-Arrestins are multifunctional adaptor proteins. Recently, some new roles of β-arrestins in regulating intracellular signaling networks have been discovered, which regulate cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Though, the role of β-arrestins expression in the pathology of hepatic fibrosis remains unclear. In this study, the possible relationship between the expression of β-arrestins with the experimental hepatic fibrosis and the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were investigated. Porcine serum induced liver fibrosis was established in this study. At five time points, the dynamic expression of β-arrestin1, β-arrestin2, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in rat liver tissues, was measured by immunohistochemical staining, double immunofluorescent staining, and Western blotting. This study showed that aggravation of hepatic fibrosis with gradually increasing expression of β-arrestin2 in the hepatic tissues, but not β-arrestin1. Further, as hepatic fibrosis worsens, β-arrestin2-expressing activated HSCs accounts for an increasingly larger percentage of all activated HSCs. And the expression of β-arrestin2 had a significant positive correlation with the expression of α-SMA, an activated HSCs marker. In vitro studies, the dynamic expression of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 in platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) stimulated HSCs was assessed by Western blotting. The expression of β-arrestin2 was remarkably increased in PDGF-BB stimulated HSCs. Furthermore, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique was used to explore the effect of β-arrestins on the proliferation of HSCs and the activation of ERK1/2. Transfection of siRNA targeting β-arrestin2 mRNA (siβ-arrestin2) into HSCs led to a 68% and 70% reduction of β-arrestin2 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. siβ-arrestin2 abolished the effect of PDGF-BB on the proliferation of HSCs. In addition, siβ-arrestin2 exerted the inhibition of the activation of ERK1/2 in HSCs. The

  19. Copper ions stimulate the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via oxygen stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, San-qing; Zhu, Hui-yun; Lin, Jian-guo; Su, Tang-feng; Liu, Yan; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effect of copper ions on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the role of oxidative stress in this process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of hepatic fibrosis in Wilson's disease. LX-2 cells, a cell line of human HSCs, were cultured in vitro and treated with different agents including copper sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) for different time. The proliferation of LX-2 cells was measured by non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β subunit (PDGFβR), ELISA to determine the level of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), dichlorofluorescein assay to measure the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid hydroperoxide assay to quantify the level of lipid peroxide (LPO). The results showed that copper sulfate over a certain concentration range could promote the proliferation of LX-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect was most manifest when LX-2 cells were treated with copper sulfate at a concentration of 100 μmol/L for 24 h. Additionally, copper sulfate could dose-dependently increase the levels of ROS and LPO, and decrease the ratio of GSH/GSSG in LX-2 cells. The copper-induced increase in mRNA and protein expression of PDGFβR was significantly inhibited in LX-2 cells pre-treated with NAC, a precursor of GSH, and this phenomenon could be reversed by the intervention of BSO, an inhibitor of NAC. It was concluded that copper ions may directly stimulate the proliferation of HSCs via oxidative stress. Anti-oxidative stress therapies may help suppress the copper-induced activation and proliferation of HSCs.

  20. The possible role of NS3 protease activity of hepatitis C virus on fibrogenesis and miR-122 expression in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Khanizadeh, S; Ravanshad, M; Hosseini, S Y; Davoodian, P; Zadeh, A N; Sabahi, F; Sarvari, J; Khanlari, Z; Hasani-Azad, M

    2016-01-01

    The various roles of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protein in viral pathogenesis are emphasized, especially in the progression of fibrosis and tumors. The levels of miR-122 have been widely accepted as a critical factor in viral pathogenesis and disease progression. However, the possible correlation between miR-122 levels and fibrosis state has been less investigated. Therefore, in this study, plasmids expressing protease competent and protease mutated non-structural proteins 3 (NS3) were transfected into LX-2 cell line. Subsequently, the total RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was performed to measure the expression level of miR-122, collagen type 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1), alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and tissue inhibitor of metaloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1). Moreover, the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) levels in the supernatants of transfected cells were evaluated by ELISA. The gene expression analysis of fibrotic genes and TGF-β cytokine in LX-2 cells showed that protease competent NS3 had a significant fibrogenic impact when compared to protease defective NS3 or GFP control plasmids (P <0.001). The results also demonstrated that the expression of miR-122 was downregulated in both versions of the cells transfected with NS3 plasmids (P <0.01) irrespective of protease function. These results suggested that the protease function of NS3 protein is a crucial factor for the induction of hepatic fibrosis but it doesn't play a complete role in the expression of miR-122. PMID:27640434

  1. The Role of Embryonic Stem Cell-expressed RAS (ERAS) in the Maintenance of Quiescent Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakhaei-Rad, Saeideh; Nakhaeizadeh, Hossein; Götze, Silke; Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Hoffmann, Michèle J; Franke, Manuel; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Scheller, Jürgen; Piekorz, Roland P; Häussinger, Dieter; Ahmadian, Mohammad R

    2016-04-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were recently identified as liver-resident mesenchymal stem cells. HSCs are activated after liver injury and involved in pivotal processes, such as liver development, immunoregulation, regeneration, and also fibrogenesis. To date, several studies have reported candidate pathways that regulate the plasticity of HSCs during physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we analyzed the expression changes and activity of the RAS family GTPases and thereby investigated the signaling networks of quiescent HSCs versus activated HSCs. For the first time, we report that embryonic stem cell-expressed RAS (ERAS) is specifically expressed in quiescent HSCs and down-regulated during HSC activation via promoter DNA methylation. Notably, in quiescent HSCs, the high level of ERAS protein correlates with the activation of AKT, STAT3, mTORC2, and HIPPO signaling pathways and inactivation of FOXO1 and YAP. Our data strongly indicate that in quiescent HSCs, ERAS targets AKT via two distinct pathways driven by PI3Kα/δ and mTORC2, whereas in activated HSCs, RAS signaling shifts to RAF-MEK-ERK. Thus, in contrast to the reported role of ERAS in tumor cells associated with cell proliferation, our findings indicate that ERAS is important to maintain quiescence in HSCs.

  2. Study on antifibrotic effects of curcumin in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Lian; Lin, Chia-Yu; Chi, Chin-Wen; Huang, Yi-Tsau

    2009-07-01

    Suppression of activation or fibrogenesis and induction of apoptosis, in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have been proposed as therapeutic strategies against liver fibrosis. Curcumin, an active compound isolated from yellow curry pigment of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), has been demonstrated to be an effective anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compound. In this study, we investigated the in vitro antifibrogenic effects of curcumin on HSCs at the concentration range of (1-40 microM). A cell line of rat HSCs (HSC-T6) was stimulated with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). The inhibitory effects of curcumin (1.25 approximately 10 microM) on fibrosis-related markers including alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and collagen were assessed. In addition, the induction effects of curcumin (20 approximately 40 microM) on apoptosis in HSC-T6 cells were also assessed by Hoechst and propidium iodide stains. Curcumin (1.25 approximately 10 microM) concentration-dependently suppressed TGF-beta1-induced alpha-SMA expression and collagen deposition in HSC-T6 cells, without cytotoxicity. Whereas, higher concentrations of curcumin (20 approximately 40 microM) induced cell apoptosis and cytochrome c release in HSC-T6 cells. Our results suggest that curcumin exerted antifibrotic effects, possibly through two different mechanisms depending on its concentrations. At lower concentrations (1.25 approximately 10 microM), curcumin exerted antifibrogenic effects, whereas at higher concentrations (20 approximately 40 microM), curcumin exerted induction of apoptosis in HSCs. PMID:19152370

  3. miR-1273g-3p modulates activation and apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells by directly targeting PTEN in HCV-related liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xuemin; Fu, Na; Du, Jinghua; Wang, Rongqi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Suxian; Du, Huijuan; Wang, Baoyu; Zhang, Yuguo; Sun, Dianxing; Nan, Yuemin

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis. However, the functions of miRNA in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver fibrosis remain unclear. In this study, we systematically analyzed the microarray data of the serum miRNA in patients with HCV-induced hepatic fibrosis. Among 41 dysregulated miRNA, miR-1273g-3p was the most significantly upregulated miRNA and correlated with the stage of liver fibrosis. Overexpression of miR-1273g-3p could inhibit translation of PTEN, increase the expression of α-SMA, Col1A1, and reduce apoptosis in HSCs. Hence, we conclude that miR-1273g-3p might affect the activation and apoptosis of HSCs by directly targeting PTEN in HCV-related liver fibrosis. PMID:27423040

  4. Endotoxin-stimulated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells Induce Autophagy in Hepatocytes as a Survival Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dangi, Anil; Huang, Chao; Tandon, Ashish; Stolz, Donna; Wu, Tong; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) produce many cytokines including IFNβ, TNFα, and IL6, strongly inhibit DNA synthesis, but induce apoptosis of a small number of hepatocytes. In vivo administration of LPS (up to 10 mg/mL) causes modest inflammation and weight loss in rats but not mortality. We determined whether LPS-stimulated HSCs instigate mechanisms of hepatocyte survival. Rats received 10 mg/kg LPS (i.p.) and determinations were made at 6 h. In vitro, HSCs were treated with 100 ng/mL LPS till 24 h. The medium was transferred to hepatocytes, and determinations were made at 0-12 h. Controls were HSC-conditioned medium or medium-containing LPS. LPS treatment of rats caused autophagy in hepatocytes, a physiological process for clearance of undesirable material including injured or damaged organelles. This was accompanied by activation of c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) and apoptosis of ~4-5% of hepatocytes. In vitro, LPS-conditioned HSC medium (LPS/HSC) induced autophagy in hepatocytes but apoptosis of only ~10% of hepatocytes. While LPS/HSC stimulated activation of JNK (associated with cell death), it also activated NFkB and ERK1/2 (associated with cell survival). LPS-stimulated HSCs produced IFNβ, and LPS/HSC-induced autophagy in hepatocytes and their apoptosis were significantly inhibited by anti-IFNβ antibody. Blockade of autophagy, on the other hand, strongly augmented hepatocyte apoptosis. While LPS-stimulated HSCs cause apoptosis of a subpopulation of hepatocytes by producing IFNβ, they also induce cell survival mechanisms, which may be of critical importance in resistance to liver injury during endotoxemia.

  5. ATGL and CGI-58 are lipid droplet proteins of the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, Thomas O; Grumet, Lukas; Taschler, Ulrike; Hartler, Jürgen; Heier, Christoph; Woblistin, Aaron; Pajed, Laura; Kollroser, Manfred; Rechberger, Gerald; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Günter; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2015-10-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contain large amounts of vitamin A [in the form of retinyl esters (REs)] as well as other neutral lipids such as TGs. During times of insufficient vitamin A availability, RE stores are mobilized to ensure a constant supply to the body. To date, little is known about the enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of neutral lipid esters, in particular of REs, in HSCs. In this study, we aimed to identify LD-associated neutral lipid hydrolases by a proteomic approach using the rat stellate cell line HSC-T6. First, we loaded cells with retinol and FAs to promote lipid synthesis and deposition within LDs. Then, LDs were isolated and lipid composition and the LD proteome were analyzed. Among other proteins, we found perilipin 2, adipose TG lipase (ATGL), and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58), known and established LD proteins. Bioinformatic search of the LD proteome for α/β-hydrolase fold-containing proteins revealed no yet uncharacterized neutral lipid hydrolases. In in vitro activity assays, we show that rat (r)ATGL, coactivated by rat (r)CGI-58, efficiently hydrolyzes TGs and REs. These findings suggest that rATGL and rCGI-58 are LD-resident proteins in HSCs and participate in the mobilization of both REs and TGs.

  6. ATGL and CGI-58 are lipid droplet proteins of the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6[S

    PubMed Central

    Eichmann, Thomas O.; Grumet, Lukas; Taschler, Ulrike; Hartler, Jürgen; Heier, Christoph; Woblistin, Aaron; Pajed, Laura; Kollroser, Manfred; Rechberger, Gerald; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Günter; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contain large amounts of vitamin A [in the form of retinyl esters (REs)] as well as other neutral lipids such as TGs. During times of insufficient vitamin A availability, RE stores are mobilized to ensure a constant supply to the body. To date, little is known about the enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of neutral lipid esters, in particular of REs, in HSCs. In this study, we aimed to identify LD-associated neutral lipid hydrolases by a proteomic approach using the rat stellate cell line HSC-T6. First, we loaded cells with retinol and FAs to promote lipid synthesis and deposition within LDs. Then, LDs were isolated and lipid composition and the LD proteome were analyzed. Among other proteins, we found perilipin 2, adipose TG lipase (ATGL), and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58), known and established LD proteins. Bioinformatic search of the LD proteome for α/β-hydrolase fold-containing proteins revealed no yet uncharacterized neutral lipid hydrolases. In in vitro activity assays, we show that rat (r)ATGL, coactivated by rat (r)CGI-58, efficiently hydrolyzes TGs and REs. These findings suggest that rATGL and rCGI-58 are LD-resident proteins in HSCs and participate in the mobilization of both REs and TGs. PMID:26330055

  7. ATGL and CGI-58 are lipid droplet proteins of the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, Thomas O; Grumet, Lukas; Taschler, Ulrike; Hartler, Jürgen; Heier, Christoph; Woblistin, Aaron; Pajed, Laura; Kollroser, Manfred; Rechberger, Gerald; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Günter; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2015-10-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contain large amounts of vitamin A [in the form of retinyl esters (REs)] as well as other neutral lipids such as TGs. During times of insufficient vitamin A availability, RE stores are mobilized to ensure a constant supply to the body. To date, little is known about the enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of neutral lipid esters, in particular of REs, in HSCs. In this study, we aimed to identify LD-associated neutral lipid hydrolases by a proteomic approach using the rat stellate cell line HSC-T6. First, we loaded cells with retinol and FAs to promote lipid synthesis and deposition within LDs. Then, LDs were isolated and lipid composition and the LD proteome were analyzed. Among other proteins, we found perilipin 2, adipose TG lipase (ATGL), and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58), known and established LD proteins. Bioinformatic search of the LD proteome for α/β-hydrolase fold-containing proteins revealed no yet uncharacterized neutral lipid hydrolases. In in vitro activity assays, we show that rat (r)ATGL, coactivated by rat (r)CGI-58, efficiently hydrolyzes TGs and REs. These findings suggest that rATGL and rCGI-58 are LD-resident proteins in HSCs and participate in the mobilization of both REs and TGs. PMID:26330055

  8. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  9. Hop bitter acids exhibit anti-fibrogenic effects on hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saugspier, Michael; Dorn, Christoph; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Gehrig, Manfred; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-04-01

    Female inflorescences of the hop plant Humulus lupulus L. contain a variety of secondary metabolites with bitter acids (BA) as quantitatively dominating secondary metabolites. The use of hops in beer brewing has a long history due to the antibacterial effects of the BA and their typical bitter taste. Furthermore, hop cones are used in traditional medicine and for pharmaceutical purposes. Recent studies indicate that BA may affect activity of the transcription factor NFκB. NFκB plays a key role in the activation process of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which is the key event of hepatic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BA on HSC (activation) and their potential to inhibit molecular processes involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. HSC were isolated from murine and human liver tissue and incubated with a characterized fraction of bitter acids purified from a CO(2) hop extract. At a concentration of 25μg/ml BA started to induce LDH leakage. Already at lower concentrations BA lead to a dose dependent inhibition of HSC proliferation and inhibited IκB-α-phosphorylation, nuclear p65 translocation and binding activity in a dose dependent way (up to 10μg/ml). Accordingly, the same BA-doses inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory and NFκB regulated genes as MCP-1 and RANTES, but did not affect expression of genes not related to NFκB signaling. In addition to the effect on activated HSC, BA inhibited the in vitro activation process of freshly isolated HSC as evidenced by delayed expression of collagen I and α-SMA mRNA and protein. Together, these findings indicate that BA inhibit NFκB activation, and herewith the activation and development of profibrogenic phenotype of HSC. Thus, bitter acids appear as potential functional nutrients for the prevention or treatment hepatic fibrosis in chronic liver disease.

  10. Islet Stellate Cells Isolated from Fibrotic Islet of Goto-Kakizaki Rats Affect Biological Behavior of Beta-Cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Fei; Chen, Bi-Jun; Li, Wei; Li, Ling; Zha, Min; Zhou, S; Bachem, M G; Sun, Zi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We previously isolated islet stellate cells (ISCs) from healthy Wistar rat islets. In the present study, we isolated "already primed by diabetic environment" ISCs from islets of Goto-Kakizaki rats, determined the gene profile of these cells, and assessed the effects of these ISCs on beta-cell function and survival. We detected gene expression of ISCs by digital gene expression. INS-1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, and insulin production were measured after being treated with ISCs supernatant (SN). We observed the similar expression pattern of ISCs and PSCs, but 1067 differentially expressed genes. Insulin production in INS-1 cells cultured with ISC-SN was significantly reduced. The 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-positive INS-1 cells treated with ISC-SN were decreased. Propidium iodide- (PI-) positive INS-1 cells were 2.6-fold higher than those in control groups. Caspase-3 activity was increased. In conclusion, ISCs presented in fibrotic islet of GK rats might be special PSCs, which impaired beta-cell function and proliferation and increased beta-cell apoptosis.

  11. Islet Stellate Cells Isolated from Fibrotic Islet of Goto-Kakizaki Rats Affect Biological Behavior of Beta-Cell

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Fei; Chen, Bi-Jun; Li, Wei; Li, Ling; Zha, Min; Zhou, S.; Bachem, M. G.; Sun, Zi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We previously isolated islet stellate cells (ISCs) from healthy Wistar rat islets. In the present study, we isolated “already primed by diabetic environment” ISCs from islets of Goto-Kakizaki rats, determined the gene profile of these cells, and assessed the effects of these ISCs on beta-cell function and survival. We detected gene expression of ISCs by digital gene expression. INS-1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, and insulin production were measured after being treated with ISCs supernatant (SN). We observed the similar expression pattern of ISCs and PSCs, but 1067 differentially expressed genes. Insulin production in INS-1 cells cultured with ISC-SN was significantly reduced. The 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine-positive INS-1 cells treated with ISC-SN were decreased. Propidium iodide- (PI-) positive INS-1 cells were 2.6-fold higher than those in control groups. Caspase-3 activity was increased. In conclusion, ISCs presented in fibrotic islet of GK rats might be special PSCs, which impaired beta-cell function and proliferation and increased beta-cell apoptosis. PMID:26697502

  12. Sorafenib induces autophagic cell death and apoptosis in hepatic stellate cell through the JNK and Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huiyao; Zhang, Di; Shi, Junli; Wang, Yan; Chen, Lei; Guo, Yongze; Ma, Junji; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Huiqing

    2016-03-01

    Increasing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) death is an attractive approach for limiting liver fibrosis. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sorafenib on HSCs. LX2 cells were incubated with sorafenib and a variety of inhibitors of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. Electron microscopy was used to observe autophagosomes. Inhibitors and siRNA were used to examine the role of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K and JNK pathways. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that rat HSCs treated with 5 μmol/l sorafenib accumulated residual digested material and empty or autophagic vacuoles. Incubating LX2 cells with lysosomal protease inhibitors increased the accumulation of LC3-II, indicating that sorafenib enhances autophagic flux in HSCs. Autophagy may precede apoptosis. Lower concentrations of sorafenib and a shorter treatment time resulted in the dominance of autophagic cell death over apoptosis. Further analysis showed that Beclin 1 is inactivated by the caspases induced by sorafenib during apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy in LX2 cells using 3-methyladenine treatment or siRNA-mediated knockdown of Atg5 resulted in a marked increase in apoptosis. Finally, sorafenib induced programmed cell death by attenuation and activation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K and JNK signaling. Sorafenib-induced cell death is mediated by both autophagy and apoptosis. Elucidation of the signaling pathways activated by sorafenib could potentially lead to novel antifibrosis therapies for chronic liver diseases. PMID:26629768

  13. Liver Fibrosis and Protection Mechanisms Action of Medicinal Plants Targeting Apoptosis of Hepatocytes and Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E.; González-Garza, Maria Teresa; Rodríguez-Montalvo, Carlos; Cruz-Vega, Delia Elva

    2014-01-01

    Following chronic liver injury, hepatocytes undergo apoptosis leading to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Consequently, activated HSC proliferate and produce excessive extracellular matrix, responsible for the scar formation. The pandemic trend of obesity, combined with the high incidence of alcohol intake and viral hepatitis infections, highlights the urgent need to find accessible antifibrotic therapies. Treatment strategies should take into account the versatility of its pathogenesis and act on all the cell lines involved to reduce liver fibrosis. Medicinal plants are achieving popularity as antifibrotic agents, supported by their safety, cost-effectiveness, and versatility. This review will describe the role of hepatocytes and HSC in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and detail the mechanisms of modulation of apoptosis of both cell lines by twelve known hepatoprotective plants in order to reduce liver fibrosis. PMID:25505905

  14. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-12-14

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway.

  15. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José

    2015-01-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  16. Interferon-γ Triggers Hepatic Stellate Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation through MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yan; Xiang, Jianbin; Chen, Zongyou; Wang, Lianfu; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) interact with immune cells to actively participate in regulating immune response in the liver which is mediated by the effector molecules, including B7-H1. We demonstrated here that expression of B7-H1 on HSCs was markedly enhanced by interferon-(IFN-) γ stimulation. IFN-γ stimulated HSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation via induction of T-cell apoptosis (22.1% ± 1.6%). This immunosuppressive effect was inhibited by preincubation with an anti-B7-H1 antibody, or inhibitor of the MEK/ERK pathway inhibited IFN-γ mediated expression of B7-H1. Thus, regulation of B7-H1 expression on HSCs by IFN-γ represents an important mechanism that regulates immune responses in the liver favoring tolerogenicity rather than immunogenicity. Involvement of MEK/ERK pathway provides a novel target for therapeutic approaches. PMID:23737812

  17. The improving effects on hepatic fibrosis of interferon-γ liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinghua; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Feng; Lu, Weiyue; Wang, Jiyao; Guo, Chuanyong

    2012-07-01

    No satisfactory anti-fibrotic therapies have yet been applied clinically. One of the main reasons is the inability to specifically target the responsible cells to produce an available drug concentration and the side-effects. Exploiting the key role of the activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both hepatic fibrogenesis and over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), we constructed targeted sterically stable liposomes (SSLs) modified by a cyclic peptide (pPB) with affinity for the PDGFR-β to deliver interferon (IFN)-γ to HSCs. The pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed satisfactory size distribution. In vitro pPB-SSL could be taken up by activated HSCs. The study of tissue distribution via living-body animal imaging showed that the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ mostly accumulated in the liver until 24 h. Furthermore, the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed more significant remission of hepatic fibrosis. In vivo the histological Ishak stage, the semiquantitative score for collagen in fibrotic liver and the serum levels of collagen type IV-C in fibrotic rats treated with pPB-SSL-IFN-γ were less than those treated with SSL-IFN-γ, IFN-γ and the control group. In vitro pPB-SSL-IFN-γ was also more effective in suppressing activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated HSCs. Thus the data suggest that pPB-SSL-IFN-γ might be a more effective anti-fibrotic agent and a new opportunity for clinical therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  18. Therapeutic targeting of the PDGF and TGF-beta-signaling pathways in hepatic stellate cells by PTK787/ZK22258.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuqing; Wen, Xiao Ming; Lui, Eric Lik Hang; Friedman, Scott L; Cui, Wei; Ho, Nancy Pei Shan; Li, Lei; Ye, Tao; Fan, Sheung Tat; Zhang, Hui

    2009-10-01

    Stimulation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is an essential pathway of proliferation and fibrogenesis, respectively, in liver fibrosis. We provide evidence that PTK787/ZK222584 (PTK/ZK), a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor that blocks vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), significantly inhibits PDGF receptor expression, as well as PDGF-simulated HSC proliferation, migration and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p70S6 kinase. Interestingly, PTK/ZK also antagonizes the TGF-beta1-induced expression of VEGF and VEGFR1. Furthermore, PTK/ZK downregulates TGF-beta receptor expression, which is associated with reduced Akt, ERK and p38MAPK phosphorylation. Furthermore, PDGF-induced TGF-beta1 expression is inhibited by PTK/ZK. These findings provide evidence that PTK/ZK targets multiple essential pathways of stellate cell activation that provoke proliferation and fibrogenesis. Our study underscores the potential use of PTK/ZK as an antifibrotic drug in chronic liver disease. PMID:19668241

  19. Adiponectin Reduces Hepatic Stellate Cell Migration by Promoting Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani-Moghadam, Mehdi; Wang, Jianhua; Ho, Vikki; Iseli, Tristan J.; Alzahrani, Badr; Xu, Aimin; Van der Poorten, David; Qiao, Liang; George, Jacob; Hebbard, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are central players in liver fibrosis that when activated, proliferate, migrate to sites of liver injury, and secrete extracellular matrix. Obesity, a known risk factor for liver fibrosis is associated with reduced levels of adiponectin, a protein that inhibits liver fibrosis in vivo and limits HSC proliferation and migration in vitro. Adiponectin-mediated activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits HSC proliferation, but the mechanism by which it limits HSC migration to sites of injury is unknown. Here we sought to elucidate how adiponectin regulates HSC motility. Primary rat HSCs were isolated and treated with adiponectin in migration assays. The in vivo actions of adiponectin were examined by treating mice with carbon tetrachloride for 12 weeks and then injecting them with adiponectin. Cell and tissue samples were collected and analyzed for gene expression, signaling, and histology. Serum from patients with liver fibrosis was examined for adiponectin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) protein. Adiponectin administration into mice increased TIMP-1 gene and protein expression. In cultured HSCs, adiponectin promoted TIMP-1 expression and through binding of TIMP-1 to the CD63/β1-integrin complex reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase to limit HSC migration. In mice with liver fibrosis, adiponectin had similar effects and limited focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Finally, in patients with advanced fibrosis, there was a positive correlation between serum adiponectin and TIMP-1 levels. In sum, these data show that adiponectin stimulates TIMP-1 secretion by HSCs to retard their migration and contributes to the anti-fibrotic effects of adiponectin. PMID:25575598

  20. Deregulation of energy metabolism promotes antifibrotic effects in human hepatic stellate cells and prevents liver fibrosis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Swathi; Potter, James J; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Sur, Surojit; Hamilton, James P; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Mezey, Esteban; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-15

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis result from uncontrolled secretion and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are activated by liver injury and inflammation. Despite the progress in understanding the biology liver fibrogenesis and the identification of potential targets for treating fibrosis, development of an effective therapy remains elusive. Since an uninterrupted supply of intracellular energy is critical for the activated-HSCs to maintain constant synthesis and secretion of ECM, we hypothesized that interfering with energy metabolism could affect ECM secretion. Here we report that a sublethal dose of the energy blocker, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) facilitates phenotypic alteration of activated LX-2 (a human hepatic stellate cell line), into a less-active form. This treatment-dependent reversal of activated-LX2 cells was evidenced by a reduction in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen secretion, and an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases. Mechanistically, 3-BrPA-dependent antifibrotic effects involved down-regulation of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme, ATP5E, and up-regulation of glycolysis, as evident by elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, lactate production and its transporter, MCT4. Finally, the antifibrotic effects of 3-BrPA were validated in vivo in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Results from histopathology & histochemical staining for collagen and α-SMA substantiated that 3-BrPA promotes antifibrotic effects in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that sublethal, metronomic treatment with 3-BrPA blocks the progression of liver fibrosis suggesting its potential as a novel therapeutic for treating liver fibrosis.

  1. Fibrogenic response of hepatic stellate cells in ovariectomised rats exposed to ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Bobowiec, R; Wojcik, M; Jaworska-Adamu, J; Tusinska, E

    2013-02-01

    The discrepancy about the role of estrogens in hepatic fibrogenesis and lack of studies addressed of ketogenic diet (KD) on hepatic stellate cells (HSC), prompted us to investigate the activity of HSC in control, KD- and thioacetamide (TAA)-administrated rats with different plasma concentration of estradiol (E2). HSC were isolated by the collagenase perfusion methods and separated by the Percoll gradient centrifugation. After the 4(th) and 8(th) day of incubation, lysates of HSC and the media were collected for further analysis. The HSC derived from KD-rats released remarkably more transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 than cells obtained from animals fed with a standard diet. The ovariectomy of KD-rats markedly intensified the secretion of this fibrogenic cytokine on the 8(th) day of incubation (201.33 ±1 7.15 pg/ml). In HSC of rats exposed to E2, the TGF-β1 concentration did not exceed 157 ± 34.39 pg/ml. In respect to the collagen type I, the HSC obtained from ovariectomised KD-rats released an augmented amount of this ECM protein after the 8(th) day of culture (1.83 ± 0.14 U/ml). In the same time, higher quantities of ASMA appeared in the KD rats (1.41 ± 0.3 pg/mg protein). Exposition of rats to E2 did not markedly decrease the amount of ASMA. In summary, KD was able to induce morphological and functional changes in HSC, especially derived from rats deprived of ovarian estrogens. However, the preservation of E2 in ovariectomised rats didn't substantially alter the activation of HSC.

  2. Hypoxic stellate cells of pancreatic cancer stroma regulate extracellular matrix fiber organization and cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Sada, Masafumi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Horioka, Kohei; Okumura, Takashi; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-03-28

    Desmoplasia and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer mutually affect each other and create a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Here, we show that microenvironment remodeling by hypoxic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promotes cancer cell motility through alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) fiber architecture. Three-dimensional (3-D) matrices derived from PSCs under hypoxia exhibited highly organized parallel-patterned matrix fibers compared with 3-D matrices derived from PSCs under normoxia, and promoted cancer cell motility by inducing directional migration of cancer cells due to the parallel fiber architecture. Microarray analysis revealed that procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) in PSCs was the gene that potentially regulates ECM fiber architecture under hypoxia. Stromal PLOD2 expression in surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PLOD2 in PSCs blocked parallel fiber architecture of 3-D matrices, leading to decreased directional migration of cancer cells within the matrices. In conclusion, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced PLOD2 expression in PSCs creates a permissive microenvironment for migration of cancer cells through architectural regulation of stromal ECM in pancreatic cancer.

  3. Fine structure of the cell clusters in the cochlear nerve root: stellate, granule, and mitt cells offer insights into the synaptic organization of local circuit neurons.

    PubMed

    Hutson, K A; Morest, D K

    1996-07-29

    The small cell shell of the cochlear nucleus contains a complex integrative machinery which can be used to study the roles of interneurons in sensory processing. The cell clusters in the cochlear nerve root of the chinchilla provide the simplest example of this structure. Reported here are the neuronal architecture and synaptic organization of the three principal cell types and the three distinctive neuropil structures that could be characterized with the Nissl and Golgi methods and electron microscopy. Granule cells were characterized by several dendrites with claw-like terminals that received synaptic contacts from multiple excitatory mossy fiber rosettes. Given their relatively large number and their prolific parallel fiber synapses, the granule cells provide a suitable substrate for a tangential spread of excitatory activity, which could build to considerable proportions. The mitt cells had a thickened, single dendrite, its terminal branches arranged in a shape reminiscent of a baseball catcher's mitt. The dendritic mitt enclosed an enormous, convoluted mossy fiber rosette forming many excitatory synapses on just one cell. This could provide for a discrete, comparatively fast input-output relay of signals. Small stellate cells had longer, radiating dendrites that engaged the synaptic nests. These nests were strung in long strands, containing heterogeneous synapses from putative excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Given the prevalence of the synaptic nests, the small stellate cells appear to have the greatest integrative capacity. They provide the main output of the synaptic nests.

  4. TRPM7 channel regulates PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via PI3K and ERK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ling Zhan, Shuxiang; Huang, Cheng; Cheng, Xi; Lv, Xiongwen; Si, Hongfang; Li, Jun

    2013-11-01

    TRPM7, a non-selective cation channel of the TRP channel superfamily, is implicated in diverse physiological and pathological processes including cell proliferation. Recently, TRPM7 has been reported in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Here, we investigated the contribution role of TRPM7 in activated HSC-T6 cell (a rat hepatic stellate cell line) proliferation. TRPM7 mRNA and protein were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot in rat model of liver fibrosis in vivo and PDGF-BB-activated HSC-T6 cells in vitro. Both mRNA and protein of TRPM7 were dramatically increased in CCl{sub 4}-treated rat livers. Stimulation of HSC-T6 cells with PDGF-BB resulted in a time-dependent increase of TRPM7 mRNA and protein. However, PDGF-BB-induced HSC-T6 cell proliferation was inhibited by non-specific TRPM7 blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or synthetic siRNA targeting TRPM7, and this was accompanied by downregulation of cell cycle proteins, cyclin D1, PCNA and CDK4. Blockade of TRPM7 channels also attenuated PDGF-BB induced expression of myofibroblast markers as measured by the induction of α-SMA and Col1α1. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT, associated with cell proliferation, decreased in TRPM7 deficient HSC-T6 cells. These observations suggested that TRPM7 channels contribute to perpetuated fibroblast activation and proliferation of PDGF-BB induced HSC-T6 cells via the activation of ERK and PI3K pathways. Therefore, TRPM7 may constitute a useful target for the treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Upregulation of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in the fibrotic livers from CCl{sub 4}-treated rats. • Increasing expression of TRPM7 mRNA and protein during HSC activation. • Blockade of TRPM7 inhibited the PDGF-BB induced proliferation of HSC-T6 cells. • Blockade of TRPM7 decreased α-SMA and Col1α1 expressions in activated HSC-T6 cells. • TRPM7 up-regulation contributes to the activation of ERK and AKT pathways.

  5. Aqueous Date Flesh or Pits Extract Attenuates Liver Fibrosis via Suppression of Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Reduction of Inflammatory Cytokines, Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Angiogenic Markers in Carbon Tetrachloride-Intoxicated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rasheed, Nouf M.; Attia, Hala A.; Mohamad, Raeesa A.; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M.; Al-Amin, Maha A.; AL-Onazi, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Previous data indicated the protective effect of date fruit extract on oxidative damage in rat liver. However, the hepatoprotective effects via other mechanisms have not been investigated. This study was performed to evaluate the antifibrotic effect of date flesh extract (DFE) or date pits extract (DPE) via inactivation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reducing the levels of inflammatory, fibrotic and angiogenic markers. Coffee was used as reference hepatoprotective agent. Liver fibrosis was induced by injection of CCl4 (0.4 mL/kg) three times weekly for 8 weeks. DFE, DPE (6 mL/kg), coffee (300 mg/kg), and combination of coffee + DFE and coffee + DPE were given to CCl4-intoxicated rats daily for 8 weeks. DFE, DPE, and their combination with coffee attenuated the elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. The increased levels of transforming growth factor-β1 and collagen deposition in injured liver were alleviated by both extracts. CCl4-induced expression of α-smooth muscle actin was suppressed indicating HSCs inactivation. Increased angiogenesis was ameliorated as revealed by reduced levels and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD31. We concluded that DFE or DPE could protect liver via different mechanisms. The combination of coffee with DFE or DPE may enhance its antifibrotic effects. PMID:25945106

  6. Metadoxine prevents damage produced by ethanol and acetaldehyde in hepatocyte and hepatic stellate cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Ruiz, M C; Bucio, L; Correa, A; Souza, V; Hernández, E; Gómez-Quiroz, L E; Kershenobich, D

    2001-11-01

    Metadoxine (pyridoxine-pyrrolidone carboxylate) has been reported to improve liver function tests in alcoholic patients. In the present work we have investigated the effect of metadoxine on some parameters of cellular damage in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells in culture treated with ethanol and acetaldehyde. HepG2 and CFSC-2G cells were treated with 50 mM ethanol or 175 microM acetaldehyde as initial concentration in the presence or absence of 10 microg ml(-1) of metadoxine. Twenty-four hours later reduced and oxidized glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, collagen secretion and IL-6, IL-8 and TNF- alpha secretion were determined. Our results suggest that metadoxine prevents glutathione depletion and the increase in lipid peroxidation damage caused by ethanol and acetaldehyde in HepG2 cells. In hepatic stellate cells, metadoxine prevents the increase in collagen and attenuated TNF- alpha secretion caused by acetaldehyde. Thus, metadoxine could be useful in preventing the damage produced in early stages of alcoholic liver disease as it prevents the redox imbalance of the hepatocytes and prevents TNF- alpha induction, one of the earliest events in hepatic damage. PMID:11712874

  7. Folliculo-stellate cells - potential mediators of the inflammaging-induced hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in healthy elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Ivan; Ugrenović, Slađana; Ljubomirović, Miljana; Vasović, Ljiljana; Cukuranović, Rade; Stefanović, Vladisav

    2014-10-01

    Some evidence has suggested that, with age, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis becomes less resilient, leading to higher glucocorticoids nocturnal levels and a flattening of the circadian profiles. Such age-related changes in the activity of the HPA axis has overexposed the brain and peripheral organs to the effects of the glucocorticoids, increasing the morbidity and mortality rates of the elderly. Debate among scientists regarding the contributions of HPA axis age-related changes of impaired feedback regulation vs. direct overactivation persists. Supporters of impaired feedback regulation assumed that this effect might be the consequence of the hippocampal age-related neuronal loss and the reduction of the number of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors. On the other hand, healthy elderly individuals are characterized by an increase of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α, and the development of a chronic low-grade inflammatory state, known as inflammaging. Cytokines central to inflammaging send signals to the brain, activate HPA axis, and, by increased cortisol secretion, down-regulate inflammaging in a process known as anti-inflammaging. Even as these cytokines act at the level of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, they are hampered by the intact blood-brain barrier. Further, the corticotropes in the anterior pituitary do not express cytokine receptors, and the density of folliculo-stellate cells generally increases with age. Therefore, we assumed that folliculo-stellate cells were the target structures through which the elevated levels of cytokines, as a part of the inflammaging phenomenon, would cause the overactivation of the HPA axis in healthy elderly individuals. Folliculo-stellate cells are non-endocrine cells that were originally considered to act as supporting cells for the endocrine cells. Despite the fact that FS cells do not produce any of the established hormones of the anterior pituitary, they

  8. Distinct proteomic features of two fibrogenic liver cell populations: hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bosselut, Nelly; Housset, Chantal; Marcelo, Paulo; Rey, Colette; Burmester, Thorsten; Vinh, Jöelle; Vaubourdolle, Michel; Cadoret, Axelle; Baudin, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    In chronic liver diseases, the accumulation of extracellular matrix leading to fibrosis is caused by myofibroblasts, the origins of which are debatable. We performed a comparative proteomic study to identify markers and gain insight into distinct functions of myofibroblasts derived either from hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or from portal mesenchymal cells. After isolation from normal liver and culture in similar conditions, myofibroblastic HSCs (MF-HSCs) presented enlarged cytoplasms whereas portal myofibroblasts (PMFs) were more proliferative, and formed more stress fibers. The two cell types were subjected to comparative analyses by 2-D MS/MS. Six proteins were overexpressed in PMFs, with myofibroblast-related typical functions. Among them, cofilin-1 showed the greatest difference in expression and a lower pI than expected. Immunoblot demonstrated higher levels of phosphorylation, a modification of the protein implicated in stress fiber formation. Eleven proteins, mostly involved in stress response, were overexpressed in MF-HSCs. Cytoglobin had the highest level of overexpression, as confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR, immunoblot and immunocytochemical analyses. These results identify cytoglobin as the best marker for distinguishing MF-HSCs from PMFs and suggest different functions for the two cell populations in the liver wound healing response, with a prominent role for PMFs in scar formation.

  9. Hepatic uptake of (TH)retinol bound to the serum retinol binding protein involves both parenchymal and perisinusoidal stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blomhoff, R.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.

    1985-11-05

    We have studied the hepatic uptake of retinol bound to the circulating retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. Labeled complex was obtained from the plasma of donor rats that were fed radioactive retinol. When labeled retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex was injected intravenously into control rats, about 45% of the administered dose was recovered in liver after 56 h. Parenchymal liver cells were responsible for an initial rapid uptake. Perisinusoidal stellate cells initially accumulated radioactivity more slowly than did the parenchymal cells, but after 16 h, these cells contained more radioactivity than the parenchymal cells. After 56 h, about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in liver was present in stellate cells. For the first 2 h after injection, most of the radioactivity in parenchymal cells was recovered as unesterified retinol. The radioactivity in the retinyl ester fraction increased after a lag period of about 2 h, and after 5 h more than 60% of the radioactivity was recovered as retinyl esters. In stellate cells, radioactivity was mostly present as retinyl esters at all time points examined. Uptake of retinol in both parenchymal cells and stellate cells was reduced considerably in vitamin A-deficient rats. Less than 5% of the injected dose of radioactivity was found in liver after 5-6 h (as compared to 25% in control rats), and the radioactivity recovered in liver from these animals was mostly in the unesterified retinol fraction. Studies with separated cells in vitro suggested that both parenchymal and stellate cells isolated from control rats were able to take up retinol from the retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. This uptake was temperature dependent.

  10. Chloride channels in stellate cells are essential for uniquely high secretion rates in neuropeptide-stimulated Drosophila diuresis.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Pablo; Terhzaz, Selim; Romero, Michael F; Davies, Shireen A; Blumenthal, Edward M; Dow, Julian A T

    2014-09-30

    Epithelia frequently segregate transport processes to specific cell types, presumably for improved efficiency and control. The molecular players underlying this functional specialization are of particular interest. In Drosophila, the renal (Malpighian) tubule displays the highest per-cell transport rates known and has two main secretory cell types, principal and stellate. Electrogenic cation transport is known to reside in the principal cells, whereas stellate cells control the anion conductance, but by an as-yet-undefined route. Here, we resolve this issue by showing that a plasma membrane chloride channel, encoded by ClC-a, is exclusively expressed in the stellate cell and is required for Drosophila kinin-mediated induction of diuresis and chloride shunt conductance, evidenced by chloride ion movement through the stellate cells, leading to depolarization of the transepithelial potential. By contrast, ClC-a knockdown had no impact on resting secretion levels. Knockdown of a second CLC gene showing highly abundant expression in adult Malpighian tubules, ClC-c, did not impact depolarization of transepithelial potential after kinin stimulation. Therefore, the diuretic action of kinin in Drosophila can be explained by an increase in ClC-a-mediated chloride conductance, over and above a resting fluid transport level that relies on other (ClC-a-independent) mechanisms or routes. This key segregation of cation and anion transport could explain the extraordinary fluid transport rates displayed by some epithelia.

  11. Clonorchis sinensis ferritin heavy chain triggers free radicals and mediates inflammation signaling in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Xie, Zhizhi; Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Ren, Mengyu; Shang, Mei; Lei, Huali; Tian, Yanli; Li, Shan; Liang, Pei; Chen, Tingjin; Liang, Chi; Xu, Jin; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2015-02-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by direct and continuous contact with Clonorchis sinensis, is associated with hepatobiliary damage, inflammation, periductal fibrosis, and the development of cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells respond to liver injury through production of proinflammatory mediators which drive fibrogenesis; however, their endogenous sources and pathophysiological roles in host cells were not determined. C. sinensis ferritin heavy chain (CsFHC) was previously confirmed as a component of excretory/secretory products and exhibited a number of extrahepatic immunomodulatory properties in various diseases. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern and biological role of CsFHC in C. sinensis. CsFHC was expressed throughout life stages of C. sinensis. More importantly, we found that treatment of human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2 with CsFHC triggered the production of free radicals via time-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The increase in free radicals substantially promoted the degradation of cytosolic IκBα and nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits (p65 and p50). CsFHC-induced NF-κB activation was markedly attenuated by preincubation with specific inhibitors of corresponding free radical-producing enzyme or the antioxidant. In addition, CsFHC induced an increased expression level of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and IL-6, in NF-κB-dependent manner. Our results indicate that CsFHC-triggered free radical-mediated NF-κB signaling is an important factor in the chronic inflammation caused by C. sinensis infection.

  12. HEPATIC STELLATE CELL LIPID DROPLETS: A SPECIALIZED LIPID DROPLET FOR RETINOID STORAGE

    PubMed Central

    Blaner, William S.; O’Byrne, Sheila M.; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn; Kluwe, Johannes; D’Ambrosio, Diana; Jiang, Hongfeng; Schwabe, Robert F.; Hillman, Elizabeth M.C.; Piantedosi, Roseann; Libien, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The majority of retinoid (vitamin A and its metabolites) present in the body of a healthy vertebrate is contained within lipid droplets present in the cytoplasm of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Two types of lipid droplets have been identified through histological analysis of HSCs within the liver: smaller droplets bounded by a unit membrane and larger membrane-free droplets. Dietary retinoid intake but not triglyceride intake markedly influences the number and size of HSC lipid droplets. The lipids present in rat HSC lipid droplets include retinyl ester, triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, cholesterol, phospholipids and free fatty acids. Retinyl ester and triglyceride are present at similar concentrations, and together these two classes of lipid account for approximately three-quarters of the total lipid in HSC lipid droplets. Both adipocyte-differentiation related protein and TIP47 have been identified by immunohistochemical analysis to be present in HSC lipid droplets. Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), an enzyme responsible for all retinyl ester synthesis within the liver, is required for HSC lipid droplet formation, since Lrat-deficient mice completely lack HSC lipid droplets. When HSCs become activated in response to hepatic injury, the lipid droplets and their retinoid contents are rapidly lost. Although loss of HSC lipid droplets is a hallmark of developing liver disease, it is not known whether this contributes to disease development or occurs simply as a consequence of disease progression. Collectively, the available information suggests that HSC lipid droplets are specialized organelles for hepatic retinoid storage and that loss of HSC lipid droplets may contribute to the development of hepatic disease. PMID:19071229

  13. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  14. Intracellular calcium signals regulate growth of hepatic stellate cells via specific effects on cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Elwy M.; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Sheung, Nina; Yu, Jin; Amaya, Maria Jimina; Nathanson, Michael H.; Dranoff, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are important mediators of liver fibrosis. Hormones linked to downstream intracellular Ca2+ signals upregulate HSC proliferation, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. Nuclear and cytosolic Ca2+ signals may have distinct effects on cell proliferation, so we expressed plasmid and adenoviral constructs containing the Ca2+ chelator parvalbumin (PV) linked to either a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES) to block Ca2+ signals in distinct compartments within LX-2 immortalized human HSC and primary rat HSC. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs each targeted to the appropriate intracellular compartment and blocked Ca2+ signals only within that compartment. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs inhibited HSC growth. Furthermore, blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca2+ signals arrested growth at the G2/mitosis (G2/M) cell-cycle interface and prevented the onset of mitosis. Blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca2+ signals downregulated phosphorylation of the G2/M checkpoint phosphatase Cdc25C. Inhibition of calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) had identical effects on LX-2 growth and Cdc25C phosphorylation. We propose that nuclear and cytosolic Ca2+ are critical signals that regulate HSC growth at the G2/M checkpoint via CaMK II-mediated regulation of Cdc25C phosphorylation. These data provide a new logical target for pharmacological therapy directed against progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:19131107

  15. Hepatic stellate cells undermine the allostimulatory function of liver myeloid dendritic cells via STAT3-dependent induction of IDO

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, Tina L.; Dangi, Anil; Matta, Benjamin M.; Huang, Chao; Stolz, Donna B.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical for hepatic wound repair and tissue remodeling. They also produce cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the maintenance of hepatic immune homeostasis and the inherent tolerogenicity of the liver. The functional relationship between HSCs and the professional migratory APCs in the liver, i.e. dendritic cells (DCs), has not been evaluated. Here, we report that murine liver DCs co-localize with HSCs in vivo under normal, steady-state conditions, and cluster with HSCs in vitro. In vitro, HSCs secrete high levels of DC chemoattractants, such as MIP1α and MCP-1, as well as cytokines that modulate DC activation, including TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. Culture of HSCs with conventional liver myeloid (m) DCs resulted in increased IL-6 and IL-10 secretion compared to that of either cell population alone. Co-culture also resulted in enhanced expression of co-stimulatory (CD80, CD86) and co-inhibitory (B7-H1) molecules on mDCs. HSC-induced mDC maturation required cell-cell contact and could be blocked, in part, by neutralizing MIP1α or MCP-1. HSC-induced mDC maturation was dependent on activation of STAT3 in mDCs and in part on HSC-secreted IL-6. Despite up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, mDCs conditioned by HSCs demonstrated impaired ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, which was independent of B7-H1, but dependent upon HSC-induced STAT3 activation and subsequent up-regulation of IDO. In conclusion, by promoting IDO expression, HSCs may act as potent regulators of liver mDCs and function to maintain hepatic homeostasis and tolerogenicity. PMID:22962681

  16. Graptopetalum Paraguayense Ameliorates Chemical-Induced Rat Hepatic Fibrosis In Vivo and Inactivates Stellate Cells and Kupffer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Jen; Chang, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Hsieh, Shur-Jong; Wu, Yi-Chin; Lai, Jin-Mei; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Background Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP) is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury rats. Methods Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP) by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. Results Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. Conclusions The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:23335984

  17. The Unfolded Protein Response Plays a Predominant Homeostatic Role in Response to Mitochondrial Stress in Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsin-Yuan; Waldron, Richard T.; Gong, Raymond; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Pandol, Stephen J.; Lugea, Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are key participants in the stroma of pancreatic cancer, secreting extracellular matrix proteins and inflammatory mediators. Tumors are poorly vascularized, creating metabolic stress conditions in cancer and stromal cells that necessitate adaptive homeostatic cellular programs. Activation of autophagy and the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR) have been described in hepatic stellate cells, but the role of these processes in PaSC responses to metabolic stress is unknown. We reported that the PI3K/mTOR pathway, which AMPK can regulate through multiple inputs, modulates PaSC activation and fibrogenic potential. Here, using primary and immortalized mouse PaSC, we assess the relative contributions of AMPK/mTOR signaling, autophagy and the UPR to cell fate responses during metabolic stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial uncoupler rottlerin at low doses (0.5–2.5 μM) was added to cells cultured in 10% FBS complete media. Mitochondria rapidly depolarized, followed by altered mitochondrial dynamics and decreased cellular ATP levels. This mitochondrial dysfunction elicited rapid, sustained AMPK activation, mTOR pathway inhibition, and blockade of autophagic flux. Rottlerin treatment also induced rapid, sustained PERK/CHOP UPR signaling. Subsequently, high doses (>5 μM) induced loss of cell viability and cell death. Interestingly, AMPK knock-down using siRNA did not prevent rottlerin-induced mTOR inhibition, autophagy, or CHOP upregulation, suggesting that AMPK is dispensable for these responses. Moreover, CHOP genetic deletion, but not AMPK knock-down, prevented rottlerin-induced apoptosis and supported cell survival, suggesting that UPR signaling is a major modulator of cell fate in PaSC during metabolic stress. Further, short-term rottlerin treatment reduced both PaSC fibrogenic potential and IL-6 mRNA expression. In contrast, expression levels of the angiogenic factors HGF and VEGF

  18. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  19. The bHLH Transcription Factor Hand2 Marks Hepatic Stellate Cells in Zebrafish: Analysis of Stellate Cell Entry into the Developing Liver

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chunyue; Evason, Kimberley J.; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are liver-specific mesenchymal cells that play vital roles in liver development and injury. Our knowledge of HSC biology is limited by the paucity of in vivo data. HSCs and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) reside in close proximity and interactions between these two cell types are potentially critical for their development and function. Here we introduce a transgenic zebrafish line, Tg(hand2:EGFP), that labels HSCs. We find that zebrafish HSCs share many similarities with their mammalian counterparts, including morphology, location, lipid storage, gene expression profile, and increased proliferation and matrix production in response to an acute hepatic insult. Using the Tg(hand2:EGFP) line, we conducted time course analyses during development to reveal that HSCs invade the liver after SECs do. However, HSCs still enter the liver in mutants that lack most endothelial cells including SECs, indicating that SECs are not required for HSC differentiation or their entry into the liver. In the absence of SECs, HSCs become abnormally associated with hepatic biliary cells, suggesting that SECs influence HSC localization during liver development. We analyzed factors that regulate HSC development and show that inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling significantly reduces the number of HSCs that enter the liver. We also performed a pilot chemical screen and identified two compounds that affect HSC numbers during development. Conclusion Our work provides the first comprehensive description of HSC development in zebrafish and reveals the requirement of SECs in HSC localization. The Tg(hand2:EGFP) line represents a unique tool for in vivo analysis and molecular dissection of HSC behavior. PMID:22488653

  20. MicroRNA-199a and -214 as potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic stellate cells in pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kuninty, Praneeth R.; Bojmar, Linda; Tjomsland, Vegard; Larsson, Marie; Storm, Gert; Östman, Arne; Sandström, Per; Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key precursor cells for cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in pancreatic tumor stroma. In this study, we explored miRNA as therapeutic targets in tumor stroma and found miR-199a-3p and miR-214-3p induced in patient-derived pancreatic CAFs and TGF-β-activated human PSCs (hPSCs). Inhibition of miR-199a/-214 using hairpin inhibitors significantly inhibited TGFβ-induced differentiation markers (e.g. α-SMA, collagen, PDGFβR), migration and proliferation. Furthermore, heterospheroids of Panc-1 and hPSCs attained smaller size with hPSCs transfected with anti-miR-199a/-214 compared to control anti-miR. The conditioned medium obtained from TGFβ-activated hPSCs induced tumor cell growth and endothelial cell tube formation. Interestingly, these inductions were abrogated in hPSCs transfected with anti-miR-199a or miR-214. Moreover, IPA analyses revealed signaling pathways related to miR-199a (TP53, mTOR, Smad1) and miR-214 (PTEN, Bax, ING4). Taken together, this study reveals miR-199a-3p and miR-214-3p as major regulators of PSC activation and PSC-induced pro-tumoral effects, representing them as key therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26918939

  1. TIMP-1 mediates TGF-β-dependent crosstalk between hepatic stellate and cancer cells via FAK signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-A; Kim, Min-Jin; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-Shin; Lim, Woosung; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Yhong Sheen, Yhun

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling plays a key role in progression and metastasis of HCC. This study was undertaken to gain the proof of concept of a small-molecule inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor kinase, EW-7197 as a potent anti-cancer therapy for HCC. We identified tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as one of the secreted proteins of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and a key mediator of TGF-β-mediated crosstalk between HSCs and HCC cells. TGF-β signaling led to increased expression of TIMP-1, which activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling via its interaction with CD63. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling using EW-7197 significantly attenuated the progression and intrahepatic metastasis of HCC in an SK-HEP1-Luc orthotopic-xenograft mouse model. In addition, EW-7197 inhibited TGF-β-stimulated TIMP-1 secretion by HSCs as well as the TIMP-1-induced proliferation, motility, and survival of HCC cells. Further, EW-7197 interrupted TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and Akt signaling, leading to significant reductions in the motility and anchorage-independent growth of HCC cells. In conclusion, we found that TIMP-1 mediates TGF-β-regulated crosstalk between HSCs and HCC cells via FAK signaling. In addition, EW-7197 demonstrates potent in vivo anti-cancer therapeutic activity and may be a potential new anti-cancer drug of choice to treat patients with liver cancer. PMID:26549110

  2. The interplay of the Notch signaling in hepatic stellate cells and macrophages determines the fate of liver fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ruchi; van Baarlen, Joop; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) known as "master producers" and macrophages as "master regulators", are the key cell types that strongly contribute to the progression of liver fibrosis. Since Notch signaling regulates multiple cellular processes, we aimed to study the role of Notch signaling in HSCs differentiation and macrophages polarization and to evaluate its implication in liver fibrogenesis. Notch pathway components were found to be significantly upregulated in TGFβ-activated HSCs, inflammatory M1 macrophages, and in mouse and human fibrotic livers. Interestingly, inhibition of Notch using a selective γ-secretase inhibitor, Avagacestat, significantly inhibited TGFβ-induced HSC activation and contractility, and suppressed M1 macrophages. Additionally, Avagacestat inhibited M1 driven-fibroblasts activation and fibroblasts-driven M1 polarization (nitric oxide release) in fibroblasts and macrophages co-culture, and conditioned medium studies. In vivo, post-disease treatment with Avagacestat significantly attenuated fibrogenesis in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mouse model. These effects were attributed to the reduction in HSCs activation, and inhibition of inflammatory M1 macrophages and upregulation of suppressive M2 macrophages. These findings suggest that Notch signaling plays a crucial role in HSC activation and M1/M2 polarization of macrophages in liver fibrosis. These results provide new insights for the development of novel therapies against liver fibrosis through modulation of Notch signaling.

  3. The interplay of the Notch signaling in hepatic stellate cells and macrophages determines the fate of liver fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ruchi; van Baarlen, Joop; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) known as “master producers” and macrophages as “master regulators”, are the key cell types that strongly contribute to the progression of liver fibrosis. Since Notch signaling regulates multiple cellular processes, we aimed to study the role of Notch signaling in HSCs differentiation and macrophages polarization and to evaluate its implication in liver fibrogenesis. Notch pathway components were found to be significantly upregulated in TGFβ-activated HSCs, inflammatory M1 macrophages, and in mouse and human fibrotic livers. Interestingly, inhibition of Notch using a selective γ-secretase inhibitor, Avagacestat, significantly inhibited TGFβ-induced HSC activation and contractility, and suppressed M1 macrophages. Additionally, Avagacestat inhibited M1 driven-fibroblasts activation and fibroblasts-driven M1 polarization (nitric oxide release) in fibroblasts and macrophages co-culture, and conditioned medium studies. In vivo, post-disease treatment with Avagacestat significantly attenuated fibrogenesis in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mouse model. These effects were attributed to the reduction in HSCs activation, and inhibition of inflammatory M1 macrophages and upregulation of suppressive M2 macrophages. These findings suggest that Notch signaling plays a crucial role in HSC activation and M1/M2 polarization of macrophages in liver fibrosis. These results provide new insights for the development of novel therapies against liver fibrosis through modulation of Notch signaling. PMID:26658360

  4. Tetrandrine stimulates the apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells and ameliorates development of fibrosis in a thioacetamide rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming-Fu; Lian, Li-Hua; Piao, Dong-Ming; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effect of tetrandrine on liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide in rats in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: In vitro study: we investigated the effect of tetrandrine on the apoptosis of rat hepatic stellate cells transformed by simian virus 40 (T-HSC/Cl-6), which retains the features of activated cells. In vivo study: hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats by thioacetamide. Tetrandrine was given orally to rats at doses of 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg for 4 wk compared with intraperitoneal injection of interferon-г. RESULTS: In vitro study: 5, 10 or 25 μg/mL of tetrandrine-induced activation of caspase-3 in t-HSC/Cl-6 cells occurred dose-dependently. In vivo study: tetrandrine treatment as well as interferon-г significantly ameliorated the development of fibrosis as determined by lowered serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (T-Bil) and the levels of liver hydroxyproline (Hyp), hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN) and also improved histological findings. The effects of tetrandrine at the concentration of 20 mg/kg were better than the other concentration groups. CONCLUSION: Tetrandrine promotes the apoptosis of activated HSCs in vitro. Tetrandrine administration can prevent liver fibrosis and liver damage induced by thioacetamide in rats in vivo, indicating that it might exert a direct effect on rat HSCs. PMID:17451202

  5. The use of nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to hepatic stellate cells for treating liver fibrosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hien T T; Dong, Zhixia; Su, Lin; Boyer, Cyrille; George, Jacob; Davis, Thomas P; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-05-20

    Polymeric nanoparticles are designed to transport and deliver nitric oxide (NO) into hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) for the potential treatment of both liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. The nanoparticles, incorporating NO donor molecules (S-nitrosoglutathione compound), are designed for liver delivery, minimizing systemic delivery of NO. The nanoparticles are decorated with vitamin A to specifically target HSCs. We demonstrate, using in vitro and in vivo experiments, that the targeted nanoparticles are taken up specifically by rat primary HSCs and the human HSC cell line accumulating in the liver. When nanoparticles, coated with vitamin A, release NO in liver cells, we find inhibition of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), fibrogenic genes associated with activated HSCs expression in primary rat liver and human activated HSCs without any obvious cytotoxic effects. Finally, NO-releasing nanoparticles targeted with vitamin A not only attenuate endothelin-1 (ET-1) which elicites HSC contraction but also acutely alleviates haemodynamic disorders in bile duct-ligated-induced portal hypertension evidenced by decreasing portal pressure (≈20%) and unchanging mean arterial pressure. This study clearly shows, for the first time, the potential for HSC targeted nanoparticle delivery of NO as a treatment for liver diseases with proven efficacy for alleviating both liver fibrosis and portal hypertension.

  6. Nonmuscle myosin II regulates migration but not contraction in rat hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Cathy C; Lakner, Ashley M; Yengo, Christopher M; Schrum, Laura W

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify and characterize the function of nonmuscle myosin II (NMM II) isoforms in primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). METHODS: Primary HSCs were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats by pronase/collagenase digestion. Total RNA and protein were harvested from quiescent and culture-activated HSCs. NMM II isoform (II-A, II-B and II-C) gene and protein expression were measured by RealTime polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses respectively. NMM II protein localization was visualized in vitro using immunocytochemical analysis. For in vivo assessment, liver tissue was harvested from bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats and NMM IIisoform expression determined by immunohistochemistry. Using a selective myosin II inhibitor and siRNA-mediated knockdown of each isoform, NMM II functionality in primary rat HSCs was determined by contraction and migration assays. RESULTS: NMM II-A and II-B mRNA expression was increased in culture-activated HSCs (Day 14) with significant increases seen in all pair-wise comparisons (II-A: 12.67 ± 0.99 (quiescent) vs 17.36 ± 0.78 (Day 14), P < 0.05; II-B: 4.94 ± 0.62 (quiescent) vs 13.90 ±0.85 (Day 14), P < 0.001). Protein expression exhibited similar expression patterns (II-A: 1.87 ± 2.50 (quiescent) vs 58.64 ± 8.76 (Day 14), P < 0.05; II-B: 1.17 ± 1.93 (quiescent) vs 103.71 ± 21.73 (Day 14), P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in NMM II-C mRNA and protein expression between quiescent and activated HSCs. In culture-activated HSCs, NMM II-A and II-B merged with F-actin at the cellular periphery and throughout cytoplasm respectively. In vitro studies showed increased expression of NMM II-B in HSCs activated by BDL compared to sham-operated animals. There were no apparent increases of NMM II-A and II-C protein expression in HSCs during hepatic BDL injury. To determine the contribution of NMM II-A and II-B to migration and contraction, NMM II-A and II-B expression were downregulated with siRNA. NMM II

  7. Embryonic liver fordin is involved in glucose glycolysis of hepatic stellate cell by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wei; Ye, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of embryonic liver fordin (ELF) in liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) glucose glycolysis. METHODS The expression of ELF and the glucose glycolysis-related proteins were evaluated in activated HSCs. siRNA was used to silence ELF expression in activated HSCs in vitro and the subsequent changes in PI3K/Akt signaling and glucose glycolysis-related proteins were observed. RESULTS The expression of ELF increased remarkably in HSCs of the fibrosis mouse model and HSCs that were cultured for 3 wk in vitro. Glucose glycolysis-related proteins showed an obvious increase in the activated HSCs, such as phosphofructokinase, platelet and glucose transporter 1. ELF-siRNA, which perfectly silenced the expression of ELF in activated HSCs, led to the induction of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Moreover, pAkt, which is an important downstream factor in PI3K/Akt signaling, showed a significant change in response to the ELF silencing. The expression of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and ECM components decreased remarkably when the PI3K/Akt signaling was blocked by Ly294002 in the activated HSCs. CONCLUSION ELF is involved in HSC glucose glycolysis by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling. PMID:27784964

  8. Periostin down-regulation attenuates the pro-fibrogenic response of hepatic stellate cells induced by TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Li; Shejiao, Dai; Fenrong, Chen; Gang, Zhao; Lei, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by an exacerbated accumulation of deposition of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis. Periostin has been shown to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and apoptosis; however, the involvement of periostin and its role in transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced HSC activation remains unclear. We used RT-PCR and Western blot to evaluate the expression level of periostin in hepatic fibrosis tissues and HSCs, respectively. Cell proliferation was determined using the Cell Proliferation ELISA BrdU kit, cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry. The expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen I, TGF-β1, p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 were determined by western blot. Our study found that periostin was up-regulated in liver fibrotic tissues and activated HSCs. In addition, siRNA-periostin suppressed TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation. The HSC transfected with siRNA-periostin significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced expression levels of α-SMA and collagen I. Furthermore, TGF-β1 stimulated the expression of periostin, and siRNA-periostin attenuated TGF-β1-induced Smad2/3 activation in HSCs. These results suggest that periostin may function as a novel regulator to modulate HSC activation, potentially by promoting the TGF-β1/Smad signalling pathway, and propose a strategy to target periostin for the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  9. IGF-I induces senescence of hepatic stellate cells and limits fibrosis in a p53-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Iguchi, Genzo; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Takahashi, Michiko; Suda, Kentaro; Bando, Hironori; Matsumoto, Ryusaku; Yoshida, Kenichi; Odake, Yukiko; Ogawa, Wataru; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis determines patient prognosis; however, effective treatment for fibrosis has not been established. Oxidative stress and inflammation activate hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promote fibrosis. In contrast, cellular senescence inhibits HSCs’ activity and limits fibrosis. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of IGF-I on NASH and cirrhotic models and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. We demonstrate that IGF-I significantly ameliorated steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in a NASH model, methionine-choline-deficient diet-fed db/db mice and ameliorated fibrosis in cirrhotic model, dimethylnitrosamine-treated mice. As the underlying mechanisms, IGF-I improved oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in the liver. In addition, IGF-I receptor was strongly expressed in HSCs and IGF-I induced cellular senescence in HSCs in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, in mice lacking the key senescence regulator p53, IGF-I did not induce cellular senescence in HSCs or show any effects on fibrosis. Taken together, these results indicate that IGF-I induces senescence of HSCs, inactivates these cells and limits fibrosis in a p53-dependent manner and that IGF-I may be applied to treat NASH and cirrhosis. PMID:27721459

  10. The Role of Lipin-1 in the Regulation of Fibrogenesis and TGF-β Signaling in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chang Ho; Kim, Kyu Min; Yang, Ji Hye; Cho, Sam Seok; Kim, Seung Jung; Shin, Sang Mi; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2016-09-01

    The adipogenic transcriptional regulation was reported to inhibit transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which constitute the main fibrogenic cell type in the liver. Lipin-1 exhibits a dual function: an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphatidate to diacylglycerol and a transcriptional regulator. However, the involvement of Lipin-1 in the regulation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling and fibrogenesis in HSCs is not fully understood. Here, we showed that Lipin-1 was downregulated in activated primary HSCs and TGF-β-treated LX-2 cells, immortalized human HSC cell lines. The downregulation of Lipin-1 by TGF-β was not dependent on altered mRNA stability but rather on protein stability. Treatment of LX-2 cells with the proteasome inhibitor led to the accumulation of Lipin-1. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in Lipin-1 polyubiquitination. Overexpression of Lipin-1 attenuated TGF-β-induced fibrogenic gene expression. In addition, Lipin-1 inhibited TGF-β-mediated activation of Sma and Mad-related family (SMAD), a major transcription factor that transduces intracellular signals from TGF-β. Resveratrol, a well-known natural polyphenolic antioxidant, is known to inhibit liver fibrosis, although its mechanism of action remains unknown. Our data showed that resveratrol significantly increased the levels of Lipin-1 protein and mRNA in HSCs. Further investigation revealed that resveratrol blocked the polyubiquitination of Lipin-1. Resveratrol inhibited TGF-β-induced fibrogenic gene expression. TGF-β-induced SMAD binding element-luciferase reporter activity was significantly diminished by resveratrol with a simultaneous decrease in SMAD3 phosphorylation. Consistently, knockdown of the Lipin-1 gene using siRNA abolished the inhibitory effect of resveratrol. We conclude that Lipin-1 can antagonize HSC activation through the inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD signaling and that resveratrol may affect Lipin-1 gene induction and

  11. Inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on collagen synthesis and cell proliferation in human stellate cells from pancreatic head adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have described an increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in pancreatic cancer, but the role of COX-2 in tumour development and progression is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine expression of COX-2 in cancer cells and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer specimens, and to explore the role of PGE2 in pancreatic stellate cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Methods Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence was performed on slides from whole sections of tissue blocks using antibodies against COX-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) were isolated from surgically resected tumour tissue by the outgrowth method. Cells were used between passages 4 and 8. Collagen synthesis was determined by [3H]-proline incorporation, or by enzyme immunoassay measurement of collagen C-peptide. DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine in DNA. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) was determined by radioimmunoassay. Collagen 1A1 mRNA was determined by RT-qPCR. Results Immunohistochemistry staining showed COX-2 in pancreatic carcinoma cells, but not in stromal cells. All tumours showed positive staining for αSMA in the fibrotic stroma. Cultured PSC expressed COX-2, which could be further induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), epidermal growth factor (EGF), thrombin, and PGE2, but not by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ). Indirect coculture with the adenocarcinoma cell line BxPC-3, but not HPAFII or Panc-1, induced COX-2 expression in PSC. Treatment of PSC with PGE2 strongly stimulated cAMP accumulation, mediated by EP2 receptors, and also stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Treatment of PSC with PGE2 or forskolin suppressed both TGFβ-stimulated collagen synthesis and PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Conclusions The present results show that COX-2 is mainly produced in carcinoma cells and suggest that the cancer cells are the main source of PGE2 in pancreatic

  12. Adipose triglyceride lipase is involved in the mobilization of triglyceride and retinoid stores of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Taschler, Ulrike; Schreiber, Renate; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Grabner, Gernot F.; Romauch, Matthias; Wolinski, Heimo; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) store triglycerides (TGs) and retinyl ester (RE) in cytosolic lipid droplets. RE stores are degraded following retinoid starvation or in response to pathogenic stimuli resulting in HSC activation. At present, the major enzymes catalyzing lipid degradation in HSCs are unknown. In this study, we investigated whether adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is involved in RE catabolism of HSCs. Additionally, we compared the effects of ATGL deficiency and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) deficiency, a known RE hydrolase (REH), on RE stores in liver and adipose tissue. We show that ATGL degrades RE even in the presence of TGs, implicating that these substrates compete for ATGL binding. REH activity was stimulated and inhibited by comparative gene identification-58 and G0/G1 switch gene-2, respectively, the physiological regulators of ATGL activity. In cultured primary murine HSCs, pharmacological inhibition of ATGL, but not HSL, increased RE accumulation. In mice globally lacking ATGL or HSL, RE contents in white adipose tissue were decreased or increased, respectively, while plasma retinol and liver RE levels remained unchanged. In conclusion, our study shows that ATGL acts as REH in HSCs promoting the degradation of RE stores in addition to its established function as TG lipase. HSL is the predominant REH in adipocytes but does not affect lipid mobilization in HSCs. PMID:25732851

  13. Mesothelial cells give rise to hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts via mesothelial-mesenchymal transition in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuchang; Wang, Jiaohong; Asahina, Kinji

    2013-02-01

    In many organs, myofibroblasts play a major role in the scarring process in response to injury. In liver fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are thought to transdifferentiate into myofibroblasts, but the origins of both HSCs and myofibroblasts remain elusive. In the developing liver, lung, and intestine, mesothelial cells (MCs) differentiate into specific mesenchymal cell types; however, the contribution of this differentiation to organ injury is unknown. In the present study, using mouse models, conditional cell lineage analysis has demonstrated that MCs expressing Wilms tumor 1 give rise to HSCs and myofibroblasts during liver fibrogenesis. Primary MCs, isolated from adult mouse liver using antibodies against glycoprotein M6a, undergo myofibroblastic transdifferentiation. Antagonism of TGF-β signaling suppresses transition of MCs to mesenchymal cells both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that MCs undergo mesothelial-mesenchymal transition and participate in liver injury via differentiation to HSCs and myofibroblasts. PMID:23345421

  14. Global analysis of protein expression and phosphorylation levels in nicotine-treated pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor in pancreatic disease, however, the biochemical mechanisms correlating smoking with pancreatic dysfunction remain poorly understood. Strategies using multiplexed isobaric tag-based mass spectrometry facilitate the study of drug-induced perturbations on biological systems. Here, we present the first large scale analysis of the proteomic and phosphoproteomic alterations in pancreatic stellate cells following treatment with two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands: nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. We treated cells with nicotine or α-bungarotoxin for 12hr in triplicate and compared alterations in protein expression and phosphorylation levels to mock treated cells using a tandem mass tag (TMT9plex)-based approach. Over 8,100 proteins were quantified across all nine samples of which 46 were altered in abundance upon treatment with nicotine. Proteins with increased abundance included those associated with neurons, defense mechanisms, indicators of pancreatic disease and lysosomal proteins. In addition, we measured differences for ∼16,000 phosphorylation sites across all nine samples using a titanium dioxide-based strategy, of which 132 sites were altered with nicotine and 451 with α-bungarotoxin treatment. Many altered phosphorylation sites were involved in nuclear function and transcriptional events. This study supports the development of future targeted investigations to establish a better understanding for the role of nicotine and associated receptors in pancreatic disease. PMID:26265067

  15. Hepatic stellate cell-expressed endosialin balances fibrogenesis and hepatocyte proliferation during liver damage

    PubMed Central

    Mogler, Carolin; Wieland, Matthias; König, Courtney; Hu, Junhao; Runge, Anja; Korn, Claudia; Besemfelder, Eva; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Komljenovic, Dorde; Dooley, Steven; Schirmacher, Peter; Longerich, Thomas; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to injury reflecting the critical balance between liver repair and scar formation. Chronic damage leads to progressive substitution of liver parenchyma by scar tissue and ultimately results in liver cirrhosis. Stromal cells (hepatic stellate cells [HSC] and endothelial cells) have been proposed to control the balance between liver fibrosis and regeneration. Here, we show that endosialin, a C-type lectin, expressed in the liver exclusively by HSC and portal fibroblasts, is upregulated in liver fibrosis in mouse and man. Chronic chemically induced liver damage resulted in reduced fibrosis and enhanced hepatocyte proliferation in endosialin-deficient (ENKO) mice. Correspondingly, acute-liver-damage-induced hepatocyte proliferation (partial hepatectomy) was increased in ENKO mice. A candidate-based screen of known regulators of hepatocyte proliferation identified insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) as selectively endosialin-dependent hepatocyte mitogen. Collectively, the study establishes a critical role of HSC in the reciprocal regulation of fibrogenesis vs. hepatocyte proliferation and identifies endosialin as a therapeutic target in non-neoplastic settings. PMID:25680861

  16. Hepatic stellate cell-expressed endosialin balances fibrogenesis and hepatocyte proliferation during liver damage.

    PubMed

    Mogler, Carolin; Wieland, Matthias; König, Courtney; Hu, Junhao; Runge, Anja; Korn, Claudia; Besemfelder, Eva; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Komljenovic, Dorde; Dooley, Steven; Schirmacher, Peter; Longerich, Thomas; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2015-02-13

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to injury reflecting the critical balance between liver repair and scar formation. Chronic damage leads to progressive substitution of liver parenchyma by scar tissue and ultimately results in liver cirrhosis. Stromal cells (hepatic stellate cells [HSC] and endothelial cells) have been proposed to control the balance between liver fibrosis and regeneration. Here, we show that endosialin, a C-type lectin, expressed in the liver exclusively by HSC and portal fibroblasts, is upregulated in liver fibrosis in mouse and man. Chronic chemically induced liver damage resulted in reduced fibrosis and enhanced hepatocyte proliferation in endosialin-deficient (EN(KO)) mice. Correspondingly, acute-liver-damage-induced hepatocyte proliferation (partial hepatectomy) was increased in EN(KO) mice. A candidate-based screen of known regulators of hepatocyte proliferation identified insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) as selectively endosialin-dependent hepatocyte mitogen. Collectively, the study establishes a critical role of HSC in the reciprocal regulation of fibrogenesis vs. hepatocyte proliferation and identifies endosialin as a therapeutic target in non-neoplastic settings.

  17. Hepatic stellate cell-expressed endosialin balances fibrogenesis and hepatocyte proliferation during liver damage.

    PubMed

    Mogler, Carolin; Wieland, Matthias; König, Courtney; Hu, Junhao; Runge, Anja; Korn, Claudia; Besemfelder, Eva; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Komljenovic, Dorde; Dooley, Steven; Schirmacher, Peter; Longerich, Thomas; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2015-03-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to injury reflecting the critical balance between liver repair and scar formation. Chronic damage leads to progressive substitution of liver parenchyma by scar tissue and ultimately results in liver cirrhosis. Stromal cells (hepatic stellate cells [HSC] and endothelial cells) have been proposed to control the balance between liver fibrosis and regeneration. Here, we show that endosialin, a C-type lectin, expressed in the liver exclusively by HSC and portal fibroblasts, is upregulated in liver fibrosis in mouse and man. Chronic chemically induced liver damage resulted in reduced fibrosis and enhanced hepatocyte proliferation in endosialin-deficient (EN(KO)) mice. Correspondingly, acute-liver-damage-induced hepatocyte proliferation (partial hepatectomy) was increased in EN(KO) mice. A candidate-based screen of known regulators of hepatocyte proliferation identified insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) as selectively endosialin-dependent hepatocyte mitogen. Collectively, the study establishes a critical role of HSC in the reciprocal regulation of fibrogenesis vs. hepatocyte proliferation and identifies endosialin as a therapeutic target in non-neoplastic settings. PMID:25680861

  18. Connective tissue growth factor hammerhead ribozyme attenuates human hepatic stellate cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Run-Ping; Brigstock, David R

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of hammerhead ribozyme targeting connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) on human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function. METHODS: CCN2 hammerhead ribozyme cDNA plus two self-cleaving sequences were inserted into pTriEx2 to produce pTriCCN2-Rz. Each vector was individually transfected into cultured LX-2 human HSCs, which were then stimulated by addition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 to the culture medium. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA levels for CCN2 or collagen I, while protein levels of each molecule in cell lysates and conditioned medium were measured by ELISA. Cell-cycle progression of the transfected cells was assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: In pTriEx2-transfected LX-2 cells, TGF-β1 treatment caused an increase in the mRNA level for CCN2 or collagen I, and an increase in produced and secreted CCN2 or extracellular collagen I protein levels. pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells showed decreased basal CCN2 or collagen mRNA levels, as well as produced and secreted CCN2 or collagen I protein. Furthermore, the TGF-β1-induced increase in mRNA or protein for CCN2 or collagen I was inhibited partially in pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells. Inhibition of CCN2 using hammerhead ribozyme cDNA resulted in fewer of the cells transitioning into S phase. CONCLUSION: Endogenous CCN2 is a mediator of basal or TGF-β1-induced collagen I production in human HSCs and regulates entry of the cells into S phase. PMID:19673024

  19. Role of methionine adenosyltransferase α2 and β phosphorylation and stabilization in human hepatic stellate cell trans-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Komal; Donoyan, Shant; Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Park, Sunhee

    2015-05-01

    Myofibroblastic trans-differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is an essential event in the development of liver fibrogenesis. These changes involve modulation of key regulators of the genome and the proteome. Methionine adenosyltransferases (MAT) catalyze the biosynthesis of the methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) from methionine. We have previously shown that two MAT genes, MAT2A and MAT2B (encoding MATα2 and MATβ proteins respectively), are required for HSC activation and loss of MAT2A transcriptional control favors its up-regulation during trans-differentiation. Hence MAT genes are intrinsically linked to the HSC machinery during activation. In the current study, we have identified for the first time, post-translational modifications in the MATα2 and MATβ proteins that stabilize them and favor human HSC trans-differentiation. Culture-activation of human HSCs induced the MATα2 and MATβ proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we identified phosphorylation sites in MATα2 and MATβ predicted to be phosphorylated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members (ERK1/2, V-Raf Murine Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homolog B1 [B-Raf], MEK). Phosphorylation of both proteins was enhanced during HSC activation. Blocking MEK activation lowered the phosphorylation and stability of MAT proteins without influencing their mRNA levels. Silencing ERK1/2 or B-Raf lowered the phosphorylation and stability of MATβ but not MATα2. Reversal of the activated human HSC cell line, LX2 to quiescence lowered phosphorylation and destabilized MAT proteins. Mutagenesis of MATα2 and MATβ phospho-sites destabilized them and prevented HSC trans-differentiation. The data reveal that phosphorylation of MAT proteins during HSC activation stabilizes them thereby positively regulating trans-differentiation.

  20. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human hepatic stellate cells treated with natural taurine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Wu, Fa-Sheng; Tang, Yan-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression of genes and proteins between natural taurine (NTau)‑treated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and control cells as well as the underlying mechanism of NTau in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis. A microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to analyze the proliferation of NTau‑treated HSCs. Flow cytometry was performed to compare the apoptosis rate between NTau-treated and non‑treated HSCs. Proteomic analysis using a combination of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Microarray analysis was performed to investigate the differential expression of genes and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to validate the results. The experimental findings obtained demonstrated that NTau decreased HSC proliferation, resulting in an increased number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a reduced number of cells in the S phase. Flow cytometric analysis showed that NTau-treated HSCs had a significantly increased rate of apoptosis when compared with the non‑treated control group. A total of 15 differentially expressed proteins and 658 differentially expressed genes were identified by 2DE and MS, and microarray analysis, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) functional analysis indicated that these genes and proteins were enriched in the function clusters and pathways related to cell proliferation, cellular apoptosis and oxidation. The transcriptome and proteome analyses of NTau-treated HSCs demonstrated that NTau is able to significantly inhibit cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis, highlighting its potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23525364

  1. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human hepatic stellate cells treated with natural taurine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Wu, Fa-Sheng; Tang, Yan-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression of genes and proteins between natural taurine (NTau)‑treated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and control cells as well as the underlying mechanism of NTau in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis. A microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to analyze the proliferation of NTau‑treated HSCs. Flow cytometry was performed to compare the apoptosis rate between NTau-treated and non‑treated HSCs. Proteomic analysis using a combination of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Microarray analysis was performed to investigate the differential expression of genes and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to validate the results. The experimental findings obtained demonstrated that NTau decreased HSC proliferation, resulting in an increased number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a reduced number of cells in the S phase. Flow cytometric analysis showed that NTau-treated HSCs had a significantly increased rate of apoptosis when compared with the non‑treated control group. A total of 15 differentially expressed proteins and 658 differentially expressed genes were identified by 2DE and MS, and microarray analysis, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) functional analysis indicated that these genes and proteins were enriched in the function clusters and pathways related to cell proliferation, cellular apoptosis and oxidation. The transcriptome and proteome analyses of NTau-treated HSCs demonstrated that NTau is able to significantly inhibit cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis, highlighting its potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  2. Extracellular matrix composition significantly influences pancreatic stellate cell gene expression pattern: role of transgelin in PSC function.

    PubMed

    Apte, Minoti V; Yang, Lu; Phillips, Phoebe A; Xu, Zhihong; Kaplan, Warren; Cowley, Mark; Pirola, Romano C; Wilson, Jeremy S

    2013-09-15

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are responsible for the fibrotic matrix of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In vitro protocols examining PSC biology have usually involved PSCs cultured on plastic, a nonphysiological surface. However, PSCs cultured on physiological matrices, e.g., Matrigel (normal basement membrane) and collagen (fibrotic pancreas), may have distinctly different behaviors compared with cells cultured on plastic. Therefore, we aimed to 1) compare PSC gene expression after culture on plastic, Matrigel, and collagen I; 2) validate the gene array data for transgelin, the most highly dysregulated gene in PSCs grown on activating vs. nonactivating matrices, at mRNA and protein levels; 3) examine the role of transgelin in PSC function; and 4) assess transgelin expression in human chronic pancreatitis sections. Culture of PSCs on different matrices significantly affected their gene expression pattern. 146, 619, and 432 genes, respectively, were differentially expressed (P < 0.001) in PSCs cultured on collagen I vs. Matrigel, Matrigel vs. plastic, and collagen I vs. plastic. The highest fold change (12.5-fold upregulation) in gene expression in cells on collagen I vs. Matrigel was observed for transgelin (an actin stress fiber-associated protein). Transgelin was significantly increased in activated PSCs vs. quiescent PSCs. Silencing transgelin expression decreased PSC proliferation and also reduced platelet-derived growth factor-induced PSC migration. Notably, transgelin was highly expressed in chronic pancreatitis in stromal areas and periacinar spaces but was absent in acinar cells. These findings suggest that transgelin is a potentially useful target protein to modulate PSC function so as to ameliorate pancreatic fibrosis. PMID:23868411

  3. Corona-directed nucleic acid delivery into hepatic stellate cells for liver fibrosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengping; Wang, Chunming; Zha, Yinhe; Hu, Wei; Gao, Zhongfei; Zang, Yuhui; Chen, Jiangning; Zhang, Junfeng; Dong, Lei

    2015-03-24

    Strategies to modify nanoparticles with biological ligands for targeted drug delivery in vivo have been widely studied but met with limited clinical success. A possible reason is that, in the blood circulation, serum proteins could rapidly form a layer of protein "corona" on the vehicle surface, which might block the modified ligands and hamper their targeting functions. We speculate that strategies for drug delivery can be designed based upon elegant control of the corona formation on the vehicle surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate a retinol-conjugated polyetherimine (RcP) nanoparticle system that selectively recruited the retinol binding protein 4 (RBP) in its corona components. RBP was found to bind retinol, and direct the antisense oligonucleotide (ASO)-laden RcP carrier to hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which play essential roles in the progression of hepatic fibrosis. In both mouse fibrosis models, induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and bile duct ligation (BDL), respectively, the ASO-laden RcP particles effectively suppressed the expression of type I collagen (collagen I), and consequently ameliorated hepatic fibrosis. Such findings suggest that this delivery system, designed to exploit the power of corona proteins, can serve as a promising tool for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  4. Modified citrus pectin stops progression of liver fibrosis by inhibiting galectin-3 and inducing apoptosis of stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Abu-Elsaad, Nashwa M; Elkashef, Wagdi Fawzi

    2016-05-01

    Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is a pH modified form of the dietary soluble citrus peel fiber known as pectin. The current study aims at testing its effect on liver fibrosis progression. Rats were injected with CCl4 (1 mL/kg, 40% v/v, i.p., twice a week for 8 weeks). Concurrently, MCP (400 or 1200 mg/kg) was administered daily in drinking water from the first week in groups I and II (prophylactic model) and in the beginning of week 5 in groups III and IV (therapeutic model). Liver function biomarkers (ATL, AST, and ALP), fibrosis markers (laminin and hyaluronic acid), and antioxidant biomarkers (reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were measured. Stained liver sections were scored for fibrosis and necroinflammation. Additionally, expression of galectin-3 (Gal-3), α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, collagen (Col)1A1, caspase (Cas)-3, and apoptosis related factor (FAS) were assigned. Modified pectin late administration significantly (p < 0.05) decreased malondialdehyde (MDA), TIMP-1, Col1A1, α-SMA, and Gal-3 levels and increased levels of FAS, Cas-3, GSH, and SOD. It also decreased percentage of fibrosis and necroinflammation significantly (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that MCP can attenuate liver fibrosis through an antioxidant effect, inhibition of Gal-3 mediated hepatic stellate cells activation, and induction of apoptosis. PMID:27010252

  5. Growth arrest and decrease of alpha-SMA and type I collagen expression by palmitic acid in the rat hepatic stellate cell line PAV-1.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Armand; Sapin, Vincent; Dif, Nicolas; Chassard, Christophe; Darcha, Claude; Marcand-Sauvant, Julie; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Rock, Edmond; Dechelotte, Pierre; Sauvant, Patrick

    2006-05-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by an activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). During primary culture HSC evolve from a quiescent into an activated phenotype which is characterized by alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) up-regulation, increase in cell growth, and extracellular matrix secretion. HSC culture with trans-resveratrol can lead to deactivation of myofibroblast-like HSC. We used an HSC line, PAV-1, to check the role of retinol and palmitic acid in the deactivation process of HSC. Using mass and metabolic-based methods, Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays, we demonstrated that treatment with palmitic acid (75 muM) alone or in combination with retinol (2 muM) significantly decreased cell proliferation and alpha-SMA expression. We also established that the association of both compounds strongly decreased collagen type I expression. Our results suggest the potential use of palmitic acid alone or in combination with retinol to induce HSC deactivation.

  6. Characterization and sub-cellular localization of GalNAc-binding proteins isolated from human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yaogang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Hanjie; Zhang, Jiaxu; Sun, Xiu-Xuan; Chen, Wentian; Bian, Huijie; Li, Zheng

    2015-12-25

    Although the expression levels of total GalNAc-binding proteins (GNBPs) were up-regulated significantly in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated with transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1), yet little is known about the precise types, distribution and sub-cellular localization of the GNBPs in HSCs. Here, 264 GNBPs from the activated HSCs and 257 GNBPs from the quiescent HSCs were identified and annotated. A total of 46 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly up-regulated and 40 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly down-regulated in the activated HSCs. For example, the GNBPs (i.e. BTF3, COX17, and ATP5A1) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were up-regulated, and those (i.e. FAM114A1, ENO3, and TKT) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were down-regulated in the activated HSCs. The motifs of the isolated GNBPs showed that Proline residue had the maximum preference in consensus sequences. The western blotting showed the expression levels of COX17, and PRMT1 were significantly up-regulated, while, the expression level of CLIC1(B5) was down-regulated in the activated HSCs and liver cirrhosis tissues. Moreover, the GNBPs were sub-localized in the Golgi apparatus of HSCs. In conclusion, the precision alteration of the GNBPs referred to pathological changes in liver fibrosis/cirrhosis may provide useful information to find new molecular mechanism of HSC activation and discover the biomarkers for diagnosis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis as well as development of new anti-fibrotic strategies.

  7. Distribution of vitamin A-storing lipid droplets in hepatic stellate cells in liver lobules--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Nobuyo; Senoo, Haruki

    2003-03-01

    To investigate the storage mechanisms of vitamin A, we examined the liver of adult polar bears and arctic foxes, which physiologically store a large amount of vitamin A, by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) morphometry, gold chloride staining, fluorescence microscopy for the detection of autofluorescence of vitamin A, staining with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), Masson's trichrome, and Ishii and Ishii's silver impregnation. HPLC revealed that the polar bears and arctic foxes contained 1.8-1.9 x 10(4) nmol total retinol (retinol plus retinyl esters) per gram liver. In the arctic foxes, the composition of the retinyl esters was found to be 51.1% palmitate, 26.6% oleate, 15.4% stearate, and 7% linoleate. The hepatic stellate cells of the arctic animals were demonstrated by TEM to contain the bulk of the vitamin A-lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. The liver lobules of the arctic animals showed a zonal gradient in the storage of vitamin A. The gradient was expressed as a symmetric crescendo-decrescendo profile starting at the periportal zone, peaking at the middle zone, and sloping down toward the central zone in the liver lobule. The density (i.e., cell number per area) of hepatic stellate cells was essentially the same among the zones. The gradient and the composition of the retinyl esters in storing vitamin A were not changed by differences in the vitamin A amount in the livers. These results indicate that the heterogeneity of vitamin A-storage capacity in hepatic stellate cells of arctic foxes and polar bears is genetically determined. PMID:12552640

  8. Impact by pancreatic stellate cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition and pancreatic cancer cell invasion: Adding a third dimension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karnevi, Emelie; Rosendahl, Ann H; Hilmersson, Katarzyna Said; Saleem, Moin A; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-15

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with a highly abundant stroma and low-grade inflammation. In the local tumour microenvironment, elevated glucose levels, the presence of tumour-associated stellate cells and macrophages are hypothesised to promote the tumour progression and invasion. The present study investigated the influence by the microenvironment on pancreatic cancer cell invasion in vitro. After co-culture with tumour-associated pancreatic stellate cells (TPSCs), pancreatic cancer cells displayed up to 8-fold reduction in levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers E-cadherin and ZO-1, while β-catenin and vimentin levels were increased. A 3D organotypic model showed that TPSCs stimulated pancreatic cancer cell invasion, both as single cell (PANC-1) and cohort (MIAPaCa-2) invasion. The combined presence of TPSCs and M2-like macrophages induced invasion of the non-invasive BxPC-3 cells. High glucose conditions further enhanced changes in EMT markers as well as the cancer cell invasion. In summary, co-culture with TPSCs induced molecular changes associated with EMT in pancreatic cancer cells, regardless of differentiation status, and the organotypic model demonstrated the influence of microenvironmental factors, such as glucose, stellate cells and macrophages, on pancreatic cancer cell invasion. PMID:27443257

  9. Intercellular communication within the rat anterior pituitary gland: X. Immunohistocytochemistry of S-100 and connexin 43 of folliculo-stellate cells in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Mabuchi, Yoshio; Sakuma, Eisuke; Horiuchi, Osamu; Yashiro, Takashi; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Hashimoto, Yasuo; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Herbert, Damon C; Soji, Tsuyoshi

    2004-05-01

    Since Rinehart and Farquhar reported the presence of agranulated cells in the anterior pituitary gland in 1953, the functions of the folliculo-stellate cell remain to be clarified. Intercellular junctions have been described in the monkey, rat, and teleost anterior pituitary glands, indicating the existence of cell-to-cell communication within the organ. We pointed to their possible role in the rapid dissemination of information through a complex interconnecting system of follicles involving gap junctions. The gap junctional/folliculo-stellate cellular network was essential in the maturation and regulation of the pituitary gland system such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. It has been was shown that a network participated in the conduction of electrophysiological information over a long distance using the ion Ca(++), which propagates to other folliculo-stellate cells by signaling through gap junctions. Sixty-day-old male rats were used in this study for light microscopic immunohistochemistry of S-100 protein, type I collagen, and connexin 43, and for electron microscopy to observe the morphological relationships between the cellular networks of folliculo-stellate cells and granulated pituitary cells. Clusters of anti-S-100 protein-positive cells were clearly observed in a region of the hypophysis tentatively named the transition zone. Anti-S-100 protein-positive cells and their cytoplasmic processes were also present in the anterior lobe and assembled together to form follicular lumina. Type I collagen was clearly shown outlining the incomplete lobular or ductule-like structure making cell cords in the anterior pituitary gland. Numerous microvilli were present within the follicular lumen while around the lumina, junctional specializations including gap junctions were positive for the connexin 43 protein. A nonuniform distribution of the connexin 43-positive sites were observed. Small or dot-shaped positive sites were noted where two clusters of cells

  10. Electrical consequences of spine dimensions in a model of a cortical spiny stellate cell completely reconstructed from serial thin sections.

    PubMed

    Segev, I; Friedman, A; White, E L; Gutnick, M J

    1995-06-01

    We built a passive compartmental model of a cortical spiny stellate cell from the barrel cortex of the mouse that had been reconstructed in its entirety from electron microscopic analysis of serial thin sections (White and Rock, 1980). Morphological data included dimensions of soma and all five dendrites, neck lengths and head diameters of all 380 spines (a uniform neck diameter of 0.1 micron was assumed), locations of all symmetrical and asymmetrical (axo-spinous) synapses, and locations of all 43 thalamocortical (TC) synapses (as identified from the consequences of a prior thalamic lesion). In the model, unitary excitatory synaptic inputs had a peak conductance change of 0.5 nS at 0.2 msec; conclusions were robust over a wide range of assumed passive-membrane parameters. When recorded at the soma, all unitary EPSPs, which were initiated at the spine heads, were relatively iso-efficient; each produced about 1 mV somatic depolarization regardless of spine location or geometry. However, in the spine heads there was a twentyfold variation in EPSP amplitudes, largely reflecting the variation in spine neck lengths. Synchronous activation of the TC synapses produced a somatic depolarization probably sufficient to fire the neuron; doubling or halving the TC spine neck diameters had only minimal effect on the amplitude of the composite TC-EPSP. As have others, we also conclude that from a somato-centric viewpoint, changes in spine geometry would have relatively little direct influence on amplitudes of EPSPs recorded at the soma, especially for a distributed, synchronously activated input such as the TC pathway. However, consideration of the detailed morphology of an entire neuron indicates that, from a dendro-centric point of view, changes in spine dimension can have a very significant electrical impact on local processing near the sites of input.

  11. TGF-β1-elevated TRPM7 channel regulates collagen expression in hepatic stellate cells via TGF-β1/Smad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ling; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Wu, Baoming; Ma, Taotao; Liu, Xuejiao; Zhu, Qian; Zhan, Shuxiang; Li, Jun

    2014-10-15

    Transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into myofibroblasts plays a critical role in the development of liver fibrosis, since myofibroblasts are the key cells responsible for excessive deposition of ECM proteins. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a non-selective cation channel with protein serine/threonine kinase activity, has been demonstrated to function in the proliferation of activated HSCs. Here, we investigated the functional role of TRPM7 in collagen deposition in activated HSC-T6 cells (a rat hepatic stellate cell line). TRPM7 mRNA and protein were measured by Real-time PCR and Western blot in TGF-β1-activated HSC-T6 cells in vitro. Results demonstrated that TRPM7 protein was dramatically increased in fibrotic human livers. Stimulation of HSC-T6 cells with TGF-β1 increased TRPM7 mRNA and protein level in a time-dependent manner. Nevertheless, TGF-β1-elicited upregulation of TRPM7 in HSC-T6 cells was abrogated by SB431542 (TGF-β1 receptor blocker) or SIS3 (inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation). Additionally, blockade of TRPM7 channels with non-specific TRPM7 blocker 2-APB or synthetic siRNA targeting TRPM7 attenuated TGF-β1-induced expression of myofibroblast markers, as measured by the induction of α-SMA and Col1α1. Silencing TRPM7 also increased the ratio of MMPs/TIMPs by increasing MMP-13 expression and decreasing TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels. Strikingly, phosphorylation of p-Smad2 and p-Smad3, associated with collagen production, was decreased in TRPM7 deficient HSC-T6 cells. These observations suggested that TGF-β1 elevates TRPM7 expression in HSCs via Smad3-dependant mechanisms, which in turn contributes Smad protein phosphorylation, and subsequently increases fibrous collagen expression. Therefore, TRPM7 may constitute a useful target for the treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Upregulation of TRPM7 protein in human fibrotic livers • Upregulation of TRPM7 by TGF-β1 elicited Smad signaling in HSC-T6 cells

  12. Synaptic relationships between a multipolar stellate cell and a pyramidal neuron in the rat visual cortex. A combined Golgi-electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Peters, A; Proskauer, C C

    1980-04-01

    Two synapsing and impregnated neurons in the rat visual cortex have been examined by a combined Golgi-electron microscope technique in which the Golgi precipitate is replaced by gold particles. One of the neurons is a stellate cell with smooth dendrites and a well impregnated axon, while the other is a layer III pyramidal neuron. Light microscopy showed some boutons from the axonal plexus of the stellate cell closely apposed to the soma and dendrites of the pyramid and it was predicted that synapses were present at these sites. An electron microscopic examination of serial thin sections, in which the profiles of the impregnated neurons are marked by their content of gold particles, showed most of these predicted synapses to exist. Indeed, axon terminals of the stellate cell formed five symmetric synapses with the cell body of the pyramid, one with the apical dendritic shaft and three with basal dendrites. Reasons are given for believing these synapses to be inhibitory. In addition, it was found that one of the axon terminals of the stellate cell synapsed with one of that cell's own dendrites. The significance of this finding is discussed.

  13. Morin ameliorates chemically induced liver fibrosis in vivo and inhibits stellate cell proliferation in vitro by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    MadanKumar, Perumal; NaveenKumar, Perumal; Manikandan, Samidurai; Devaraj, Halagowder; NiranjaliDevaraj, Sivasithamparam

    2014-06-01

    The anti-fibrotic effect of morin was examined in LX-2 cells (culture-activated human hepatic stellate cells) and in diethylnitrosamine induced rat model of liver fibrosis. The in vitro study was designed to determine whether morin affects the survival of cultured LX-2 cells, while the in vivo study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-fibrotic efficacy of morin on diethylnitrosamine induced liver fibrosis in male albino Wistar rat. The activities of liver function enzymes in serum, liver lipid peroxide levels, activities of serum antioxidant enzymes and liver architecture were monitored to cast light on the antioxidant and hepatoprotective nature of morin. To establish the anti-fibrotic effects of morin, the levels of key Wnt signaling molecules which are strongly associated with the signal transduction pathway of HSC activation were measured. Overall, from the in vitro results, it was observed that morin at 50 μM concentration inhibited the proliferation of cultured LX-2 cells, inhibited Wnt signaling and induced G1 cell cycle arrest. The in vivo results further confirmed that morin by downregulating the expressions of GSK-3β, β-catenin and cyclin D1 ameliorated DEN-induced liver fibrosis. Hence morin could be employed as a promising chemopreventive natural supplement for liver fibrosis.

  14. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  15. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  16. (Latent) transforming growth factor beta in liver parenchymal cells, its injury-dependent release, and paracrine effects on rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, S; Michel, K; Gressner, A M

    1998-04-01

    Cultured parenchymal liver cells (PC) were recently recognized to contain (latent) transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) while the expression of TGF-beta mRNA remains controversial. This study was designed to analyze PC in different microenvironments (liver in situ, highly purified, isolated, and cultured PC) regarding the qualitative and quantitative content of mature and latent TGF-beta protein (immunostainings, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], and enzyme-labeled fluorescence [ELF] technique). The results were compared with its gene expression (reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]). In all microenvironments, PC contained latent TGF-beta, which was partially activated after cell isolation and culture. The amount of total TGF-beta (mature plus latent) of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and of latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP) were shown to decrease during culture. In contrast, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 mRNA and LTBP-1 and -3 mRNA expression were first detectable after culture. Permeabilization of cell membranes in whole liver and of isolated PC with streptolysin O or carbon tetrachloride, respectively, released TGF-beta, a part of which was integrated in the large latent complex as estimated by analytical gel filtration chromatography. The TGF-beta released by damaged PC induces paracrine effects on hepatic stellate cell cultures. It stimulates hyaluronan synthesis and antagonizes the effect of mitogenic factor(s) of PC on [3H]thymidine incorporation. The results strongly suggest that the main part of hepatocellular TGF-beta is not generated by de novo synthesis but from uptake into the liver in vivo. The immunodetection of preexisting mature TGF-beta after isolation of the cells is probably caused by intracellular activation of latent TGF-beta. The injury-dependent discharge of TGF-beta from PC might be an important mechanism for initiation and perpetuation of various forms of chronic human liver diseases.

  17. The endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) selectively induces oxidative stress-mediated cell death in hepatic stellate cells but not in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wojtalla, Alexandra; Herweck, Frank; Granzow, Michaela; Klein, Sabine; Trebicka, Jonel; Huss, Sebastian; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Schildberg, Frank Alexander; Knolle, Percy Alexander; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Singer, Manfred Vincenz; Zimmer, Andreas; Siegmund, Sören Volker

    2012-04-15

    The endocannabinoid system is a crucial regulator of hepatic fibrogenesis. We have previously shown that the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is a lipid mediator that blocks proliferation and induces death in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type in the liver, but not in hepatocytes. However, the effects of other endocannabinoids such as N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) have not yet been investigated. The NADA-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase was mainly expressed in sympathetic neurons in portal tracts. Its expression pattern stayed unchanged in normal or fibrotic liver. NADA dose dependently induced cell death in culture-activated primary murine or human HSCs after 2-4 h, starting from 5 μM. Despite caspase 3 cleavage, NADA-mediated cell death showed typical features of necrosis, including ATP depletion. Although the cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, or transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V, member 1 were expressed in HSCs, their pharmacological or genetic blockade failed to inhibit NADA-mediated death, indicating a cannabinoid-receptor-independent mechanism. Interestingly, membrane cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin inhibited AEA- but not NADA-induced death. NADA significantly induced reactive oxygen species formation in HSCs. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) significantly decreased NADA-induced cell death. Similar to AEA, primary hepatocytes were highly resistant against NADA-induced death. Resistance to NADA in hepatocytes was due to high levels of GSH, since GSH depletion significantly increased NADA-induced death. Moreover, high expression of the AEA-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in hepatocytes also conferred resistance towards NADA-induced death, since pharmacological or genetic FAAH inhibition significantly augmented hepatocyte death. Thus the selective induction of cell death in HSCs proposes NADA as a novel antifibrogenic mediator.

  18. Functional Study of miR-27a in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells by Proteomic Analysis: Comprehensive View and a Role in Myogenic Tans-Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuhua; Zhang, Jinsheng; Wang, Wenwen; Ji, Juling

    2014-01-01

    We previous reported that miR-27a regulates lipid metabolism and cell proliferation during hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation. To further explore the biological function and underlying mechanisms of miR-27a in HSCs, global protein expression affected by overexpression of miR-27a in HSCs was analyzed by a cleavable isotope-coded affinity tags (cICAT) based comparative proteomic approach. In the present study, 1267 non-redundant proteins were identified with unique accession numbers (score ≥1.3, i.e. confidence ≥95%), among which 1171 were quantified and 149 proteins (12.72%) were differentially expressed with a differential expression ratio of 1.5. We found that up-regulated proteins by miR-27a mainly participate in cell proliferation and myogenesis, while down-regulated proteins were the key enzymes involved in de novo lipid synthesis. The expression of a group of six miR-27a regulated proteins was validated and the function of one miR-27a regulated protein was further validated. The results not only delineated the underlying mechanism of miR-27a in modulating fat metabolism and cell proliferation, but also revealed a novel role of miR-27a in promoting myogenic tans-differentiation during HSCs activation. This study also exemplified proteomics strategy as a powerful tool for the functional study of miRNA. PMID:25265485

  19. Role of TGF-β signaling in differentiation of mesothelial cells to vitamin A-poor hepatic stellate cells in liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuchang; Lua, Ingrid; French, Samuel W; Asahina, Kinji

    2016-02-15

    Mesothelial cells (MCs) form a single layer of the mesothelium and cover the liver surface. A previous study demonstrated that, upon liver injury, MCs migrate inward from the liver surface and give rise to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in biliary fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) or myofibroblasts in CCl4-induced fibrosis. The present study analyzed the role of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling in mesothelial-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and the fate of MCs during liver fibrosis and its regression. Deletion of TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) gene in cultured MCs suppressed TGF-β-mediated myofibroblastic conversion. Conditional deletion of Tgfbr2 gene in MCs reduced the differentiation of MCs to HSCs and myofibroblasts in the BDL and CCl4 models, respectively, indicating that the direct TGF-β signaling in MCs is responsible to MMT. After BDL and CCl4 treatment, MC-derived HSCs and myofibroblasts were distributed near the liver surface and the thickness of collagen was increased in Glisson's capsule beneath the liver surface. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that MC-derived HSCs and myofibroblasts store little vitamin A lipids and have fibrogenic phenotype in the fibrotic livers. MCs contributed to 1.4 and 2.0% of activated HSCs in the BDL and CCl4 models, respectively. During regression of CCl4-induced fibrosis, 20% of MC-derived myofibroblasts survived in the liver and deactivated to vitamin A-poor HSCs. Our data indicate that MCs participate in capsular fibrosis by supplying vitamin A-poor HSCs during a process of liver fibrosis and regression.

  20. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 inhibits hepatic stellate cell proliferation through MAPK pathway in liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Li, Bin; Gan, Run

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a crucial role in liver fibrosis, which is a pathological process characterized by extracellular matrix accumulation. NR4A2 is a nuclear receptor belonging to the NR4A subfamily and vital in regulating cell growth, metabolism, inflammation and other biological functions. However, its role in HSCs is unclear. We analyzed NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver and stimulated HSCs compared with control group and studied the influence on cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis and MAPK pathway after NR4A2 knockdown. NR4A2 expression was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses. NR4A2 expression was significantly lower in fibrotic liver tissues and PDGF BB or TGF-β stimulated HSCs compared with control group. After NR4A2 knockdown α-smooth muscle actin and Col1 expression increased. In addition, NR4A2 silencing led to the promotion of cell proliferation, increase of cell percentage in S phase and reduced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, P38 and JNK in HSCs. These results indicate that NR4A2 can inhibit HSC proliferation through MAPK pathway and decrease extracellular matrix in liver fibrogenesis. NR4A2 may be a promising therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. PMID:26713258

  1. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 inhibits hepatic stellate cell proliferation through MAPK pathway in liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Li, Bin; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a crucial role in liver fibrosis, which is a pathological process characterized by extracellular matrix accumulation. NR4A2 is a nuclear receptor belonging to the NR4A subfamily and vital in regulating cell growth, metabolism, inflammation and other biological functions. However, its role in HSCs is unclear. We analyzed NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver and stimulated HSCs compared with control group and studied the influence on cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis and MAPK pathway after NR4A2 knockdown. NR4A2 expression was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses. NR4A2 expression was significantly lower in fibrotic liver tissues and PDGF BB or TGF-β stimulated HSCs compared with control group. After NR4A2 knockdown α-smooth muscle actin and Col1 expression increased. In addition, NR4A2 silencing led to the promotion of cell proliferation, increase of cell percentage in S phase and reduced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, P38 and JNK in HSCs. These results indicate that NR4A2 can inhibit HSC proliferation through MAPK pathway and decrease extracellular matrix in liver fibrogenesis. NR4A2 may be a promising therapeutic target for liver fibrosis.

  2. Morin ameliorates chemically induced liver fibrosis in vivo and inhibits stellate cell proliferation in vitro by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    MadanKumar, Perumal; NaveenKumar, Perumal; Manikandan, Samidurai; Devaraj, Halagowder; NiranjaliDevaraj, Sivasithamparam

    2014-06-01

    The anti-fibrotic effect of morin was examined in LX-2 cells (culture-activated human hepatic stellate cells) and in diethylnitrosamine induced rat model of liver fibrosis. The in vitro study was designed to determine whether morin affects the survival of cultured LX-2 cells, while the in vivo study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-fibrotic efficacy of morin on diethylnitrosamine induced liver fibrosis in male albino Wistar rat. The activities of liver function enzymes in serum, liver lipid peroxide levels, activities of serum antioxidant enzymes and liver architecture were monitored to cast light on the antioxidant and hepatoprotective nature of morin. To establish the anti-fibrotic effects of morin, the levels of key Wnt signaling molecules which are strongly associated with the signal transduction pathway of HSC activation were measured. Overall, from the in vitro results, it was observed that morin at 50 μM concentration inhibited the proliferation of cultured LX-2 cells, inhibited Wnt signaling and induced G1 cell cycle arrest. The in vivo results further confirmed that morin by downregulating the expressions of GSK-3β, β-catenin and cyclin D1 ameliorated DEN-induced liver fibrosis. Hence morin could be employed as a promising chemopreventive natural supplement for liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • In vivo and in vitro results revealed the active participation of Wnt signaling. • Morin at 50 μM inhibited LX-2 cell proliferation by suppressing Wnt signaling. • Morin exhibited hepatoprotective effects against DEN induced liver fibrosis. • Morin inhibited HSC activation in vivo by downregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  3. Silencing tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) with short interfering RNA reveals a role for TIMP-1 in hepatic stellate cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Fowell, Andrew J.; Collins, Jane E.; Duncombe, Dale R.; Pickering, Judith A.; Rosenberg, William M.C.; Benyon, R. Christopher

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis. {yields} We used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. {yields} Specific silencing of TIMP-1, but not TIMP-2, significantly reduces HSC proliferation and is associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation. {yields} TIMP-1 is localised in part to the HSC nucleus. {yields} TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. -- Abstract: Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis through the secretion of fibrillar collagens and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2. TIMPs are believed to promote hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting both matrix degradation and apoptosis of HSC. In other cell types, there is evidence that TIMP-1 has effects on proliferation, however the role of TIMPs in the regulation of HSC proliferation remains unexplored. Therefore, we have used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 and -2 siRNA were highly effective, producing peak target protein knockdown compared to negative control siRNA of 92% and 63%, respectively. Specific silencing of TIMP-1, using siRNA, significantly reduced HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 was localised in part to the HSC nucleus and TIMP-1 siRNA resulted in loss of both cytoplasmic and nuclear TIMP-1. Attenuated proliferation was associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation and was partially rescued by addition of recombinant TIMP-1. We have revealed a novel autocrine mitogenic effect of TIMP-1 on HSC, which may involve Akt-dependent and specific nuclear mechanisms of action. We suggest that TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. Moreover

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced hepatic stellate cell apoptosis through calcium-mediated JNK/P38 MAPK and Calpain/Caspase-12 pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Yarui; Wang, Huan; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jun

    2014-09-01

    Recent reports considered that it was the disturbance of calcium homeostasis and the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) apoptosis and promoted fibrosis resolution. However, the signal-transducing events that are activated by ER stress after HSCs activation were incompletely understood. In this study, we induced ER stress with thapsigargin (TG), and determined the activation of calpain and the cleavage of caspase by analyzing the protein levels and the correspondingly increased intracellular calcium levels and the induction of the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. Moreover, the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK were followed by the activation of the executioner caspases, caspase-3. As expected, preventing an increase in intracellular calcium levels using intracellular calcium chelators, EGTA, and BAPTA/AM, could substantially inhibit the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, abolish the activation of calpains, namely caspase-12, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and provide significant protection for TG-treated activated HSCs. Interestingly, pretreatment with p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190, JNK inhibitor SP600125, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK, or calpain inhibitors calpeptin, significantly reduced the cell apoptosis and the cleavage of caspase-12 and caspase-3. However, pretreatment with z-VAD-FMK failed to reduce the activation of calpain. Additionally, pretreatment with SB202190 and SP600125 also decreased the expression of CHOP. Importantly, PDGF-induced collagen Col1α1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), markers for the perpetuation phase of HSCs activation, were inhibited in TG-treated activated HSCs. These findings showed that the Calpain/Caspase-12 activation induced by ER stress and the JNK/p38 MAPK phosphorylation induced by the increase of intracellular calcium concentration releasing from ER are the novel signaling pathway underlying the molecular mechanism of fibrosis

  5. IL-13 promotes the proliferation of rat pancreatic stellate cells through the suppression of NF-{kappa}B/TGF-{beta}{sub 1} pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Satoshi; Mashima, Hirosato; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Sugano, Kentaro

    2010-02-26

    In chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a central role in tissue fibrogenesis. Transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and the Th2 lymphokines such as interleukin (IL)-13 are major profibrogenic cytokines in many organs. Activated PSCs produce various inflammatory cytokines including TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. In this study, we investigated whether IL-13 affects pancreatic fibrogenesis by modulating the functions of PSCs. IL-13 promoted PSCs proliferation without activation through the suppression of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. IL-13 enhanced Stat6 phosphorylation in PSCs but Stat6 was not involved in the suppression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. IL-13 inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B, and the expression of mutant I-{kappa}B reproduced the suppression of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and promoted PSCs proliferation. Taken together, we demonstrated that IL-13 promotes PSCs proliferation through the suppression of the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B, resulting in the decrease of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. This finding provides an unequivocal evidence of IL-13 participation in pancreatic fibrosis, illustrating a new strategy for chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  7. Ultrastructural changes in lactotrophs and folliculo-stellate cells in the ovine pituitary during the annual reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Christian, H C; Imirtziadis, L; Tortonese, D

    2015-04-01

    In seasonal mammals living in temperate zones, photoperiod regulates prolactin secretion, such that prolactin plasma concentrations peak during the summer months and are lowest during the winter. In sheep, a short-day breeder, circulating prolactin has important modulatory effects on the reproductive system via inhibitory actions on pituitary gonadotrophs and hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone release. The exact cellular mechanisms that account for the chronic hypersecretion of prolactin during the summer is not known, although evidence supports an intrapituitary mechanism regulated by melatonin. Folliculo-stellate (FS) cells are non-endocrine cells that play a crucial role in paracrine communication within the pituitary and produce factors controlling prolactin and gonadotrophin release. The present study examined the morphology of the FS and lactotroph cell populations and their distribution in the sheep pituitary during the annual reproductive cycle. Ovine pituitary glands were collected in the winter (breeding season; BS) and summer (nonbreeding season; NBS) and were prepared for quantitative electron microscopy to assess the effects of season on FS and lactotroph cell density, morphology and distribution, as well as on junctional contacts between cells. It was found that lactotrophs in the NBS are larger in size and contain more numerous PRL granules than lactotrophs in the BS. FS cells were also larger in the NBS compared to BS and showed altered morphology such that, in the BS, long cell processes surrounded clusters of adjacent secretory cells. Although no significant change in the number of junctions was observed between lactotrophs and FS cells, or lactotrophs and gonadotrophs, there was a significant increase in the number of adherens junctions between lactotrophs and between FS cells. These findings demonstrate seasonal plasticity in the morphology of lactotrophs and FS cells that reflect changes in PRL secretion. PMID:25650820

  8. Chronic Hyperglycemia Induces Trans-Differentiation of Human Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Enhances the Malignant Molecular Communication with Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Katalin; Baghy, Kornélia; Spisák, Sándor; Szanyi, Szilárd; Tulassay, Zsolt; Zalatnai, Attila; Löhr, J.-Matthias; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Firneisz, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is linked to pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized a role for pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in the hyperglycemia induced deterioration of pancreatic cancer and therefore studied two human cell lines (RLT-PSC, T3M4) in hyperglycemic environment. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of chronic hyperglycemia (CHG) on PSCs was studied using mRNA expression array with real-time PCR validation and bioinformatic pathway analysis, and confirmatory protein studies. The stress fiber formation (IC: αSMA) indicated that PSCs tend to transdifferentiate to a myofibroblast-like state after exposure to CHG. The phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 was increased with a consecutive upregulation of CDC25, SP1, cFOS and p21, and with downregulation of PPARγ after PSCs were exposed to chronic hyperglycemia. CXCL12 levels increased significantly in PSC supernatant after CHG exposure independently from TGF-β1 treatment (3.09-fold with a 2.73-fold without TGF-β1, p<0.05). The upregualtion of the SP1 transcription factor in PSCs after CHG exposure may be implicated in the increased CXCL12 and IGFBP2 production. In cancer cells, hyperglycemia induced an increased expression of CXCR4, a CXCL12 receptor that was also induced by PSC’s conditioned medium. The receptor-ligand interaction increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 resulting in activation of MAP kinase pathway, one of the most powerful stimuli for cell proliferation. Certainly, conditioned medium of PSC increased pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and this effect could be partially inhibited by a CXCR4 inhibitor. As the PSC conditioned medium (normal glucose concentration) increased the ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation, we concluded that PSCs produce other factor(s) that influence(s) pancreatic cancer behaviour. Conclusions Hyperglycemia induces increased CXCL12 production by the PSCs, and its receptor, CXCR4 on cancer cells. The ligand-receptor interaction activates MAP kinase signaling

  9. Caffeine protects against alcohol-induced liver fibrosis by dampening the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Dai, Xuefei; Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, He; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Yang, Yan; Li, Jun; Lv, Xiongwen

    2015-04-01

    Alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF) is characterized by hyperplasia of extracellular matrix under long-term alcohol stimulation. Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation plays an important role in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Caffeine, as the main active component of coffee and tea, was widely consumed in daily life. It was always a thought that caffeine can reduce the probability of suffering from liver diseases. In this study, we attempt to validate the hypothesis that caffeine inhibits activation of HSCs which were isolated from rat ALF model. The rats were gavaged by ethanol to establish ALF model and then treated with different concentrations of caffeine or colchicine. Serum was collected to measure the contents of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN), N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and type IV collagen (CIV). Then liver tissues were obtained for hematoxylin-eosin staining and Sirius-red staining. Others were treated through liver perfusion to isolate primary rat HSCs. Interestingly, we found that caffeine significantly decreased ALT, AST, HA, LN, PIIINP and CIV levels and reversed liver fibrosis in rat ALF models. Results of immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and western blot indicated that caffeine could reduce fibrosis and inhibit cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway in HSC. Caffeine has a preventive effect on ALF. The mechanism may be interpreted that caffeine inhibits the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway through adenosine A2A receptors in HSC.

  10. Fuzheng Huayu Recipe Ameliorates Liver Fibrosis by Restoring Balance between Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qin; Wang, Yu-Qin; Li, Guang-Ming; Duan, Xiao-Yan; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) depending on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) reflects the key event of liver fibrosis. Contrastively, mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) of HSCs facilitates the fibrosis resolution. Here we investigated the effect of Fuzheng Huayu (FZHY) recipe, a Chinese herbal decoction made of Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Semen Persicae, Cordyceps sinensis, Pollen Pini, and Gynostemma pentaphyllum, on liver fibrosis concerning the balance of EMT and MET in HSCs. In contrast to the increased TGF-β 1/BMP-7 ratio in activated HSCs, FZHY administration induced significant upregulation of BMP-7 and downregulation of TGF-β 1 at both transcription and translation levels. Restoration of TGF-β 1/BMP-7 ratio inhibited the expression of p38 MAPK and phosphorylated p38 MAPK, resulting in the reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) as characterized by the abolishment of EMT markers (α-SMA and desmin) and reoccurrence of MET marker (E-cadherin). In vivo treatment of FZHY recipe also demonstrated the statistical reduction of activated HSCs with EMT phenotype, which attenuated the carbon tetrachloride- (CCl4-) induced liver fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner. These findings may highlight a novel antifibrotic role of FZHY recipe on the basis of rebalancing EMT and MET in HSCs. PMID:26881209

  11. Hydrogels with Differential and Patterned Mechanics to Study Stiffness-Mediated Myofibroblastic Differentiation of Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guvendiren, Murat; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Wells, Rebecca G.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    The differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into myofbroblasts is a key event in liver fibrosis. Due to the local stiffening of the extracellular matrix (ECM) during fibrosis, it is of great interest to develop mimics that can be used to investigate the cellular response to changes in mechanics. Here, we used a step-wise hydrogel crosslinking technique, where macromolecules are crosslinked using a sequence of addition then UV light-mediated radical crosslinking, to generate hydrogels with tunable stiffness. Freshly isolated HSCs remained rounded with lipid droplets and high levels of PPARγ expression on soft substrates (E~2 kPa); however, HSCs spread, lost their lipid droplets, and expressed high levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen on stiff substrates (E~ 24 kPa). Similarly, fully differentiated cells reverted to a quiescent state when plated on soft substrates. Stiffness-induced differentiation of HSCs was enhanced in the presence of exogenous TGF-β1, a dominant signal in fibrosis. When the UV-induced secondary crosslinking was restricted with a photomask to spatially control mechanics, HSCs responded based on the local hydrogel stiffness, although they remained quiescent on stiff substrates if the stiff feature size was not sufficient to allow cell spreading. This hydrogel system permits the investigation of HSC response to materials with diverse levels and spatially heterogeneous mechanical properties. PMID:24361340

  12. HIV and HCV Co-Culture Promotes Profibrogenic Gene Expression through an Epimorphin-Mediated ERK Signaling Pathway in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Qin, Enqiang; Zhou, Junnian; Zhao, Juanjuan; Nie, Weimin; Jiang, Tianjun; Chen, Weiwei; Wu, Dan; Huang, Lei; Liu, Liying; Lv, Liping; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Fusheng

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated fibrosis in patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been a major cause of mortality in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) era. However, the role of co-infection in accelerating the progression of liver fibrosis, particularly with regard to the effects of co-infection on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), remains unclear. We hypothesized that HIV and HCV induce liver fibrosis synergistically by altering the regulation of epimorphin production, and thereby indirectly alter HSC function. Here, we examined the effects of epimorphin on HSC proliferation and invasion, and the changes in fibrogenesis-related gene activity in HSCs (LX2) in the presence of inactivated CXCR4-tropic HIV and HCV (JFH1). The combination of HIV and HCV significantly increased epimorphin expression, which increased the proliferation and invasion capabilities of HSCs. Epimorphin also induced the expression of profibrogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent manner. These data indicated that the effects of HIV/HCV co-infection on hepatic fibrosis might be mediated in part by EPM. Strategies to limit the expression of EPM might represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent the progression of hepatic fibrosis during HIV/HCV co-infection. PMID:27362846

  13. HIV and HCV Co-Culture Promotes Profibrogenic Gene Expression through an Epimorphin-Mediated ERK Signaling Pathway in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Qin, Enqiang; Zhou, Junnian; Zhao, Juanjuan; Nie, Weimin; Jiang, Tianjun; Chen, Weiwei; Wu, Dan; Huang, Lei; Liu, Liying; Lv, Liping; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Fusheng

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated fibrosis in patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been a major cause of mortality in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) era. However, the role of co-infection in accelerating the progression of liver fibrosis, particularly with regard to the effects of co-infection on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), remains unclear. We hypothesized that HIV and HCV induce liver fibrosis synergistically by altering the regulation of epimorphin production, and thereby indirectly alter HSC function. Here, we examined the effects of epimorphin on HSC proliferation and invasion, and the changes in fibrogenesis-related gene activity in HSCs (LX2) in the presence of inactivated CXCR4-tropic HIV and HCV (JFH1). The combination of HIV and HCV significantly increased epimorphin expression, which increased the proliferation and invasion capabilities of HSCs. Epimorphin also induced the expression of profibrogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent manner. These data indicated that the effects of HIV/HCV co-infection on hepatic fibrosis might be mediated in part by EPM. Strategies to limit the expression of EPM might represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent the progression of hepatic fibrosis during HIV/HCV co-infection. PMID:27362846

  14. In vitro structure-toxicity relationship of chalcones in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Katharina; Dutta, Subhajit; Wolff, Horst; Genton, Marc G; Kraus, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), the major prenylated chalcone from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), has received much attention within the last years, due to its multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, pro-apoptotic, anti-bacterial and anti-adhesive effects. However, there exists a huge number of metabolites and structurally-related chalcones, which can be expected, or are already known, to exhibit various effects on cells. We have therefore analyzed the effects of XN and 18 other chalcones in a panel, consisting of multiple cell-based assays. Readouts of these assays addressed distinct aspects of cell-toxicity, like proliferation, mitochondrial health, cell cycle and other cellular features. Besides known active structural elements of chalcones, like the Michael system, we have identified several moieties that seem to have an impact on specific effects and toxicity in human liver cells in vitro. Based on these observations, we present a structure-toxicity model, which will be crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms of wanted effects and unwanted side-effects of chalcones. PMID:26201061

  15. In vitro structure-toxicity relationship of chalcones in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Katharina; Dutta, Subhajit; Wolff, Horst; Genton, Marc G; Kraus, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), the major prenylated chalcone from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), has received much attention within the last years, due to its multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, pro-apoptotic, anti-bacterial and anti-adhesive effects. However, there exists a huge number of metabolites and structurally-related chalcones, which can be expected, or are already known, to exhibit various effects on cells. We have therefore analyzed the effects of XN and 18 other chalcones in a panel, consisting of multiple cell-based assays. Readouts of these assays addressed distinct aspects of cell-toxicity, like proliferation, mitochondrial health, cell cycle and other cellular features. Besides known active structural elements of chalcones, like the Michael system, we have identified several moieties that seem to have an impact on specific effects and toxicity in human liver cells in vitro. Based on these observations, we present a structure-toxicity model, which will be crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms of wanted effects and unwanted side-effects of chalcones.

  16. Effect of pentoxifylline on arachidonic acid metabolism, neutral lipid synthesis and accumulation during induction of the lipocyte phenotype by retinol in murine hepatic stellate cell.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Carla C A; Paviani, Ernani R; Cruz, Lavínia A; Guma, Fátima C R; Borojevic, Radovan; Guaragna, Regina M

    2003-12-01

    In liver fibrosis, the quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are activated to proliferate and express the activated myofibroblast phenotype, losing fat droplets and the stored vitamin A, and depositing more extracellular matrix. Therapeutic strategies for liver fibrosis are focused on HSC. Pentoxifylline (PTF), an analog of the methylxanthine, prevents the biochemical and histological changes associated with animal liver fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotypic change of myofibroblasts into quiescent lipocytes by PTF and/or retinol, using a permanent cell line GRX that represents murine HSC. We studied the action of both drugs on the synthesis of neutral lipids, activity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), release of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandins synthesis. Accumulation and synthesis of neutral lipids was dependent upon association of retinol with PTF. PTF (0.5 mg/mL) alone did not induce lipid accumulation and synthesis, but in cells induced by physiologic concentration of retinol (1-2.5 microM), it increased the quantity of stored lipids. Retinol and PTF (5 microM and 0.1 mg/mL, respectively) had a synergistic effect on neutral lipid synthesis and accumulation. In higher PTF concentrations (0.5 and 0.7 mg/ml), the synthesis was stimulated but accumulation decreased. Membrane-associated PLA2 activity decreased after PTF treatment, which increased the AA release 8 fold, and significantly increased the production of PGE2, but not of PGF2. However, when in presence of retinol, we observed a slightly higher increase in PGE2 and PGF2a production. In conclusion, PTF treatment generated an excess of free AA. We propose that retinol counteracts the action of PTF on the AA release and PGs production, even though both drugs stimulated the lipocyte induction in the HSC. PMID:14674680

  17. Functional and structural specific roles of activity-driven BDNF within circuits formed by single spiny stellate neurons of the barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian-Quan; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, June; Nair, Anand S.; Petrus, Dan P.; Zhang, Chunzhao

    2014-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays key roles in several neurodevelopmental disorders and actions of pharmacological treatments. However, it is unclear how specific BDNF’s effects are on different circuit components. Current studies have largely focused on the role of BDNF in modification of synaptic development. The precise roles of BDNF in the refinement of a functional circuit in vivo remain unclear. Val66Met polymorphism of BDNF may be associated with increased risk for cognitive impairments and is mediated at least in part by activity-dependent trafficking and/or secretion of BDNF. Using mutant mice that lacked activity-driven BDNF expression (bdnf-KIV), we previously reported that experience regulation of the cortical GABAergic network is mediated by activity-driven BDNF expression. Here, we demonstrate that activity-driven BDNF’s effects on circuits formed by the layer IV spiny stellate cells are highly specific. Structurally, dendritic but not axonal morphology was altered in the mutant. Physiologically, GABAergic but not glutamatergic synapses were severely affected. The effects on GABA transmission occurs via presynaptic alteration of calcium-dependent release probability. These results suggest that neuronal activity through activity-driven BDNF expression, can selectively regulate specific features of layer IV circuits in vivo. We postulate that the role of activity-dependent BDNF is to modulate the computational ability of circuits that relate to the gain control (i.e., feed-forward inhibition); whereas the basic wiring of circuits relevant to the sensory pathway is spared. Gain control modulation within cortical circuits has broad impact on cognitive processing and brain state-transitions. Cognitive behavior and mode is determined by brain states, thus the studying of circuit alteration by endogenous BDNF provides insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of diseases mediated by BDNF. PMID:25414642

  18. Carvedilol Improves Inflammatory Response, Oxidative Stress and Fibrosis in the Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Rats by Regulating Kuppfer Cells and Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Renata Ferreira de Carvalho; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Miguel, Emilio de Castro; Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and antifibrotic effects of carvedilol (CARV) in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury. Methods Liver injury was induced by gavage administration of alcohol (7 g/kg) for 28 consecutive days. Eighty Wistar rats were pretreated with oral CARV at 1, 3, or 5 mg/kg or with saline 1 h before exposure to alcohol. Liver homogenates were assayed for interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level as well as for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity and liver triglyceride (TG) levels were also assayed. Immunohistochemical analyses of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B/ligand (RANK/RANKL), suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS1), the Kupffer cell marker IBA-1 (ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) expression were performed. Confocal microscopy analysis of IL-1β and NF-κB expression and real-time quantitative PCR analysis for TNFα, PCI, PCIII, and NF-κB were performed. Results CARV treatment (5 mg/kg) during the alcohol exposure protocol was associated with reduced steatosis, hepatic cord degeneration, fibrosis and necrosis, as well as reduced levels of AST (p < 0.01), ALT (p < 0.01), TG (p < 0.001), MPO (p < 0.001), MDA (p < 0.05), and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α, both p < 0.05), and increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (p < 0.001) and GSH (p < 0.05), compared to the alcohol-only group. Treatment with CARV 5 mg/kg also reduced expression levels of COX-2, RANK, RANKL, IBA-1, and ICAM-1 (all p < 0.05), while increasing expression of SOCS1, SOD-1, and GPx-1 (all p < 0.05) and decreasing expression of IL-1β and NF-κB (both, p < 0.05). Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that mRNA production of TNF

  19. Reconstruction of hepatic stellate cell-incorporated liver capillary structures in small hepatocyte tri-culture using microporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Junichi; Sudo, Ryo; Masuda, Genta; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    In liver sinusoids, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) locate the outer surface of microvessels to form a functional unit with endothelia and hepatocytes. To reconstruct functional liver tissue in vitro, formation of the HSC-incorporated sinusoidal structure is essential. We previously demonstrated capillary formation of endothelial cells (ECs) in tri-culture, where a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) microporous membrane was intercalated between the ECs and hepatic organoids composed of small hepatocytes (SHs), i.e. hepatic progenitor cells, and HSCs. However, the high thickness and low porosity of the membranes limited heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which are essential to form HSC-EC hybrid structures. Here, we focused on the effective use of the thin and highly porous poly( d, l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microporous membranes in SH-HSC-EC tri-culture to reconstruct the HSC-incorporated liver capillary structures in vitro. First, the formation of EC capillary-like structures was induced on Matrigel-coated PLGA microporous membranes. Next, the membranes were stacked on hepatic organoids composed of small SHs and HSCs. When the pore size and porosity of the membranes were optimized, HSCs selectively migrated to the EC capillary-like structures. This process was mediated in part by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signalling. In addition, the HSCs were located along the outer surface of the EC capillary-like structures with their long cytoplasmic processes. In the HSC-incorporated capillary tissues, SHs acquired high levels of differentiated functions, compared to those without ECs. This model will provide a basis for the construction of functional, thick, vascularized liver tissues in vitro.

  20. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Maroteaux, Matthieu; Liu, Siqiong June

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA2-lacking AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents displayed an inwardly rectifying current-voltage (I-V) relationship due to blockade by cytoplasmic spermine at depolarized potentials. We found that the inclusion of 100 µm Alexa Fluor dye, but not 10 µm, in the pipette solution led to a gradual increase in the amplitude of EPSCs at +40 mV and a change in the I-V relationship from inwardly rectifying to more linear. In mice exposed to an acute stress, AMPARs switched to GluA2-containing receptors, and 100 µm Alexa Fluor 594 did not alter the I-V relationship of synaptic currents. Therefore, a high concentration of Alexa Fluor dye changed the I-V relationship of EPSCs at GluA2-lacking AMPAR synapses. PMID:27280156

  1. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA2-lacking AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents displayed an inwardly rectifying current–voltage (I–V) relationship due to blockade by cytoplasmic spermine at depolarized potentials. We found that the inclusion of 100 µm Alexa Fluor dye, but not 10 µm, in the pipette solution led to a gradual increase in the amplitude of EPSCs at +40 mV and a change in the I–V relationship from inwardly rectifying to more linear. In mice exposed to an acute stress, AMPARs switched to GluA2-containing receptors, and 100 µm Alexa Fluor 594 did not alter the I–V relationship of synaptic currents. Therefore, a high concentration of Alexa Fluor dye changed the I–V relationship of EPSCs at GluA2-lacking AMPAR synapses. PMID:27280156

  2. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Maroteaux, Matthieu; Liu, Siqiong June

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA2-lacking AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents displayed an inwardly rectifying current-voltage (I-V) relationship due to blockade by cytoplasmic spermine at depolarized potentials. We found that the inclusion of 100 µm Alexa Fluor dye, but not 10 µm, in the pipette solution led to a gradual increase in the amplitude of EPSCs at +40 mV and a change in the I-V relationship from inwardly rectifying to more linear. In mice exposed to an acute stress, AMPARs switched to GluA2-containing receptors, and 100 µm Alexa Fluor 594 did not alter the I-V relationship of synaptic currents. Therefore, a high concentration of Alexa Fluor dye changed the I-V relationship of EPSCs at GluA2-lacking AMPAR synapses.

  3. Characterization of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced rat liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, Anusha Hemamali; Izawa, Takeshi; Wijesundera, Kavindra Kumara; Golbar, Hossain M; Tanaka, Miyuu; Ichikawa, Chisa; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2013-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which can express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in normal rat livers, play important roles in hepatic fibrogenesis through the conversion into myofibroblasts (MFs). Cellular properties and possible derivation of GFAP-expressing MFs were investigated in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced rat liver injury and subsequent fibrosis. Seven-week-old male F344 rats were injected with TAA (300mg/kg BW, once, intraperitoneally), and were examined on post single injection (PSI) days 1-10 by the single and double immunolabeling with MF and stem cell marker antibodies. After hepatocyte injury in the perivenular areas on PSI days 1 and 2, the fibrotic lesion consisting of MF developed at a peak on PSI day 3, and then recovered gradually by PSI day 10. MFs expressed GFAP, and also showed co-expressions such cytoskeletons (MF markers) as vimentin, desmin and α-SMA in varying degrees. Besides MFs co-expressing vimentin/desmin, desmin/α-SMA or α-SMA/vimentin, some GFAP positive MFs co-expressed with nestin or A3 (both, stem cell markers), and there were also MFs co-expressing nestin/A3. However, there were no GFAP positive MFs co-expressing RECA-1 (endothelial marker) or Thy-1 (immature mesenchymal cell marker). GFAP positive MFs showed the proliferating activity, but they did not undergo apoptosis. However, α-SMA positive MFs underwent apoptosis. These findings indicate that HSCs can proliferate and then convert into MFs with co-expressing various cytoskeletons for MF markers, and that the converted MFs may be derived partly from the stem cell lineage. Additionally, well-differentiated MFs expressing α-SMA may disappear by apoptosis for healing. These findings shed some light on the pathogenesis of chemically induced hepatic fibrosis.

  4. MicroRNA‑200a suppresses epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition in rat hepatic stellate cells via GLI family zinc finger 2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fujun; Zheng, Yihu; Hong, Weilong; Chen, Bicheng; Dong, Peihong; Zheng, Jianjian

    2015-12-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have an important role in liver fibrosis. Epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is promoted by the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, is involved in the activation of HSCs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) have been reported to be involved in the progression of liver fibrosis. A previous study indicated that the activation of HSCs was suppressed by miR‑200a via targeting transforming growth factor‑β2 and β‑catenin. However, whether miR‑200a is able to regulate the EMT in HSCs has remained elusive. The present study revealed that miR‑200a was decreased in vitro and in vivo during liver fibrosis. Furthermore, miR‑200a overexpression resulted in the inhibition of proliferation, α‑SMA expression and extracellular matrix production of activated HSCs. Of note, miR‑200a overexpression reduced myofibroblastic markers, including α‑SMA, type I collagen and desmin, and increased the epithelial cell marker E‑cadherin. These results were further confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. Further study showed that the expression of genes associated with Hh signaling, including Hhip, Shh and Gli1, were not affected by miR‑200a. However, Gli2, a downstream signaling protein of the Hh pathway, was inhibited by miR‑200a and confirmed as a target of miR‑200a using a dual luciferase reporter assay. In addition, the inhibition of the Hh pathway by miR‑200a resulted in an increase of BMP‑7 and Id2 as well as a reduction of Snai1 and S100A4. Collectively, the results of the present study demonstrated that miR‑200a suppressed the EMT process in HSCs, at least in part, via Gli2. PMID:26499180

  5. Gene profile of chemokines on hepatic stellate cells of schistosome-infected mice and antifibrotic roles of CXCL9/10 on liver non-parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yue-jin; Luo, Jie; Lu, Qiao; Zhou, Ying; Wu, Hai-wei; Zheng, Dan; Ren, Yong-ya; Sun, Ke-yi; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Zhao-song

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in the development of liver fibrosis caused by schistosomiasis. Chemokines were widely expressed and involved in cellular activation, proliferation and migration in inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, little is known about the expressions of chemokines on HSCs in the schistosoma infection. In addition, the roles of chemokines in pathogenesis of liver fibrosis are not totally clear. In our study, we used microarray to analyze the temporal gene expressions of primary HSCs isolated from mice with both acute and chronic schistosomiasis. Our microarray data showed that most of the chemokines expressed on HSCs were upregulated at 3 weeks post-infection (p.i) when the egg granulomatous response was not obviously evoked in the liver. However, some of them like CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 were subsequently decreased at 6 weeks p.i when the granulomatous response reached the peak. In the chronic stage, most of the differentially expressed chemokines maintained persistent high-abundances. Furthermore, several chemokines including CCR2, CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, CXCR4, CCL2, CCL5, CCL21, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were expressed by HCSs and the abundances of them were changed following the praziquantel treatment in the chronic stage, indicating that chemokines were possibly necessary for the persistence of the chronic stage. In vitro experiments, hepatic non-parenchymal cells, primary HSCs and human HSCs line LX-2 were stimulated by chemokines. The results showed that CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not CXCL11 or CXCL4, significantly inhibited the gene expressions of Col1α1, Col3α1 and α-SMA, indicating the potential anti-fibrosis effect of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in schistosomiasis. More interestingly, soluble egg antigen (SEA) of Schistosoma japonicum was able to inhibit transcriptional expressions of some chemokines by LX-2 cells, suggesting that SEA was capable of regulating the expression pattern of chemokine family and modulating the hepatic immune

  6. CD248/endosialin critically regulates hepatic stellate cell proliferation during chronic liver injury via a PDGF-regulated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Annika; Aldridge, Victoria; Haldar, Debashis; Naylor, Amy J; Weston, Christopher J; Hedegaard, Ditte; Garg, Abhilok; Fear, Janine; Reynolds, Gary M; Croft, Adam P; Henderson, Neil C; Buckley, Christopher D; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction CD248 (endosialin) is a stromal cell marker expressed on fibroblasts and pericytes. During liver injury, myofibroblasts are the main source of fibrotic matrix. Objective To determine the role of CD248 in the development of liver fibrosis in the rodent and human setting. Design CD248 expression was studied by immunostaining and quantitative PCR in both normal and diseased human and murine liver tissue and isolated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Hepatic fibrosis was induced in CD248−/− and wild-type controls with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment. Results Expression of CD248 was seen in normal liver of humans and mice but was significantly increased in liver injury using both immunostaining and gene expression assays. CD248 was co-expressed with a range of fibroblast/HSC markers including desmin, vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in murine and human liver sections. CD248 expression was restricted to isolated primary murine and human HSC. Collagen deposition and α-SMA expression, but not inflammation and neoangiogenesis, was reduced in CD248−/− mice compared with wild-type mice after CCl4 treatment. Isolated HSC from wild-type and CD248−/− mice expressed platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFR-α) and PDGFR-β at similar levels. As expected, PDGF-BB stimulation induced proliferation of wild-type HSC, whereas CD248−/− HSC did not demonstrate a proliferative response to PDGF-BB. Abrogated PDGF signalling in CD248−/− HSC was confirmed by significantly reduced c-fos expression in CD248−/− HSC compared with wild-type HSC. Conclusions Our data show that deletion of CD248 reduces susceptibility to liver fibrosis via an effect on PDGF signalling, making it an attractive clinical target for the treatment of liver injury. PMID:26078290

  7. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase V regulates TGF-β response in hepatic stellate cells and the progression of steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Yoshihiro; Mori, Kanako; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Kiso, Shinichi; Yoshida, Yuichi; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Ishii, Mayuko; Moriwaki, Kenta; Kawada, Norifumi; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2012-06-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V), catalyzing β1-6 branching in asparagine-linked oligosaccharides, is one of the most important glycosyltransferases involved in tumor metastasis and carcinogenesis. Although the expression of GnT-V is induced in chronic liver diseases, the biological meaning of GnT-V in the diseases remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GnT-V on the progression of chronic hepatitis, using GnT-V transgenic (Tg) mice fed a high fat and high cholesterol (HFHC) diet, an experimental model of murine steatohepatitis. Although enhanced hepatic lymphocytes infiltration and fibrosis were observed in wild-type (WT) mice fed the HFHC diet, they were dramatically prevented in Tg mice. In addition, the gene expression of inflammatory Th1 cytokines in the liver was significantly decreased in Tg mice than WT mice. Inhibition of liver fibrosis was due to the dysfunction of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which play pivotal roles in liver fibrosis through the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Although TGF-β1 signaling was enhanced in Tg mouse-derived HSCs (Tg-HSCs) compared with WT mouse-derived HSCs (WT-HSCs), collagen expression was significantly reduced in Tg-HSCs. As a result from DNA microarray, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) expression, known as a negative feedback signal for TGF-β1, was significantly elevated in Tg-HSCs compared with WT-HSCs. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the product of COX2, production was also significantly elevated in Tg-HSCs. COX2 inhibition by celecoxib decreased PGE2 and increased collagen expression in Tg-HSCs. In conclusion, GnT-V prevented steatohepatitis progression through modulating lymphocyte and HSC functions. PMID:22294551

  8. miR-181b Promotes hepatic stellate cells proliferation by targeting p27 and is elevated in the serum of cirrhosis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Baocan; Li, Wenxi; Guo, Kun; Xiao, Yongtao; Wang, Yuqin; Fan, Jiangao

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-181a and miR-181b, especially, miR-181b could be induced by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) in hepatic stellate cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-181b could promote HSC-T6 cell proliferation by directly targeting the negative cell regulator-p27 in HSC-T6 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-181b was identified as potential serum diagnostic marker for liver cirrhosis patients. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs, as a kind of negative gene regulators, were demonstrated to be involved in many types of diseases. In this study, we found that transforming growth factor-beta 1 could induce the expression of miR-181a and miR-181b, and miR-181b increased in the much higher folds than miR-181a. Because of the important role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in HSC activation and liver cirrhosis, we investigate the effect of miR-181a and miR-181b on HSC proliferation. The results showed that miR-181b could promote HSC-T6 cell proliferation by regulating cell cycle. Further study showed p27, the cell cycle regulator, was the direct target of miR-181b in HSC-T6 cell. But miR-181a had no effects on HSC-T6 cell proliferation and cell cycle, and did not target p27. Interestingly, miR-181b is elevated significantly in serum of liver cirrhosis cases comparing to that of normal persons, whereas miR-181a expression was in the similar level with that of normal persons. These results suggested that miR-181b could be induced by TGF-{beta}1 and promote the growth of HSCs by directly targeting p27. The elevation of miR-181b in serum suggested that it may be potential diagnostic biomarkers for cirrhosis. As for miR-181a, it may work in TGF-{beta}1 pathway by a currently unknown mechanism.

  9. A new approach to the determination of the stellate neuron activity function in rat's brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymenko, O.; Oleinick, A.; Amatore, C.; Svir, I.

    2008-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of a mathematical modelling of NO· release by neurons and its transport in the brain by diffusion. The model is applied to analyze the experimental data on NO· release from a neuron monitored during its patch-clamp stimulation by an ultramicroelectrode introduced into a slice of living rat’s brain. The neuron activity function was obtained by numerical deconvolution of the experimental data using the response function of the electrode to an instantaneous spike of neuronal activity. The Gaussian decomposition of NO· release activity function allows qualitative and quantitative conclusions to be drawn about neuron activity. Since the integral activity function is readily obtained by deconvolution, the decomposition can be performed using other more relevant descriptions of NO· bursts emerging from active neurons.

  10. Characterization of the MMP/TIMP Imbalance and Collagen Production Induced by IL-1β or TNF-α Release from Human Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Sacha; Gicquel, Thomas; Bodin, Aude; Lagente, Vincent; Boichot, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation has an important role in the development of liver fibrosis in general and the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in particular. It is known that HSCs are themselves able to produce cytokines and chemokines, and that this production may be a key event in the initiation of fibrogenesis. However, the direct involvement of cytokines and chemokines in HSC (self-)activation remains uncertain. In this study, the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and β, TNF-α, and IL-8 on the activation state of HSCs were examined, in comparison to the pro-fibrogenic mediator TGF-β1. LX-2 cells were stimulated for 24 or 48 hours with recombinant human form of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and β, TNF-α, and IL-8, and also the pro-fibrogenic mediator TGF-β1. Two drugs were also evaluated, the anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody infliximab and the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra, regarding their inhibitory effects. In LX-2 human HSC, treatment with TGF-β1 are associated with downregulation of the metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3, with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, collagen type I α1, collagen type IV α1, α-SMA, endothelin-1 and PDGF-BB. Cytokines and chemokines expression were found to be downregulated, excepting IL-6. In contrast, we observed that LX-2 exposure to IL-1, TNF-α and IL-8 can reverse the phenotype of pro-fibrogenic activated cells. Indeed, MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9 were found elevated, associated with downregulation of α-SMA and/or PDGF-BB, and a greater expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1 and CCL2. Lastly, we found that infliximab and anakinra successfully inhibits effects of TNF-α and IL-1 respectively in LX-2 cells. Infliximab and anakinra may be of value in preclinical trials in chronic liver disease. Overall, our results suggest that (i) pro-inflammatory mediators exert complex effects in HSCs via an MMP/TIMP imbalance, and (ii) targeting IL-1 signaling may be a potentially valuable

  11. Epigenetic regulation of connective tissue growth factor by microRNA-214 delivery in exosomes from mouse or human hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Charrier, Alyssa; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Ruju; Yu, Bo; Agarwal, Kitty; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Lee, L. James; Paulaitis, Michael E; Brigstock, David R

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) drives fibrogenesis in hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Here we show that CCN2 up-regulation in fibrotic or steatotic livers, or in culture-activated or ethanol-treated primary mouse HSC is associated with a reciprocal down-regulation of microRNA-214 (miR-214). By using protector or reporter assays to investigate the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of CCN2 mRNA, we found that induction of CCN2 expression in HSC by fibrosis-inducing stimuli was due to reduced expression of miR-214 which otherwise inhibited CCN2 expression by directly binding to the CCN2 3′-UTR. Additionally, miR-214 was present in HSC exosomes, which were bi-membrane vesicles, 50–150nm in diameter, negatively charged (−26mV), and positive for CD9. MiR-214 levels in exosomes but not in cell lysates were reduced by pre-treatment of the cells with the exosome inhibitor, GW4869. Co-culture of miR-214-transfected donor HSC with CCN2 3′-UTR luciferase reporter-transfected recipient HSC resulted in miR-214- and exosome-dependent regulation of a wild type CCN2 3′-UTR reporter but not of a mutant CCN2 3′-UTR reporter lacking the miR-214 binding site. Exosomes from HSC were a conduit for uptake of miR-214 by primary mouse hepatocytes. Down-regulation of CCN2 expression by miR-214 also occurred in human LX-2 HSC, consistent with a conserved miR-214 binding site in the human CCN2 3′-UTR. MiR-214 in LX-2 cells was shuttled via exosomes to recipient LX-2 cells or human HepG2 hepatocytes, resulting in suppression of CCN2 3′-UTR activity or expression of CCN2 downstream targets, including αSMA or collagen. Experimental fibrosis in mice was associated with reduced circulating miR-214 levels. Conclusion Exosomal transfer of miR-214 is a paradigm for the regulation of CCN2-dependent fibrogenesis and identifies fibrotic pathways as targets of epigenetic regulation by exosomal miRs. PMID:24122827

  12. Contact-dependent depletion of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is a novel mechanism of myeloid-derived suppressor cell induction operating in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Resheq, Yazid J; Li, Ka-Kit; Ward, Stephen T; Wilhelm, Annika; Garg, Abhilok; Curbishley, Stuart M; Blahova, Miroslava; Zimmermann, Henning W; Jitschin, Regina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mackensen, Andreas; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) represent a unique cell population with distinct immunosuppressive properties that have been demonstrated to shape the outcome of malignant diseases. Recently, human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) have been reported to induce monocytic-MDSC from mature CD14(+) monocytes in a contact-dependent manner. We now report a novel and unexpected mechanism by which CD14(+)HLADR(low/-) suppressive cells are induced by catalase-mediated depletion of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation of CD14(+) monocytes with catalase led to a significant induction of functional MDSC compared with media alone, and H2O2 levels inversely correlated with MDSC frequency (r = -0.6555, p < 0.05). Catalase was detected in primary HSC and a stromal cell line, and addition of the competitive catalase inhibitor hydroxylamine resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of MDSC induction and concomitant increase of H2O2 levels. The NADPH-oxidase subunit gp91 was significantly increased in catalase-induced MDSC as determined by quantitative PCR outlining the importance of oxidative burst for the induction of MDSC. These findings represent a so far unrecognized link between immunosuppression by MDSC and metabolism. Moreover, this mechanism potentially explains how stromal cells can induce a favorable immunological microenvironment in the context of tissue oxidative stress such as occurs during cancer therapy.

  13. MiR-29b inhibits collagen maturation in hepatic stellate cells through down-regulating the expression of HSP47 and lysyl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yifei; Ghazwani, Mohammed; Li, Jiang; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B.; He, Fengtian; Fan, Jie; Xie, Wen; Li, Song

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Enhanced HSP47 and LOX expression is associated with decreased miR-29b level in liver fibrosis. • miR-29b down-regulates HSP47 and LOX expression. • The suppression of HSP47 and LOX by miR-29b is mediated by putative sites at their 3′-UTRs. • miR-29b inhibits extracellular LOX activity and collagen maturation. - Abstract: Altered expression of miR-29b is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of liver fibrosis. We and others previously demonstrated that miR-29b down-regulates the expression of several extracellular-matrix (ECM) genes including Col 1A1, Col 3A1 and Elastin via directly targeting their 3′-UTRs. However, whether or not miR-29b plays a role in the post-translational regulation of ECM biosynthesis has not been reported. Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) are known to be essential for ECM maturation. In this study we have demonstrated that expression of HSP47 and LOX was significantly up-regulated in culture-activated primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), TGF-β stimulated LX-2 cells and liver tissue of CCl{sub 4}-treated mice, which was accompanied by a decrease of miR-29b level. In addition, over-expression of miR-29b in LX-2 cells resulted in significant inhibition on HSP47 and LOX expression. Mechanistically, miR-29b inhibited the expression of a reporter gene that contains the respective full-length 3′-UTR from HSP47 and LOX gene, and this inhibitory effect was abolished by the deletion of a putative miR-29b targeting sequence from the 3′-UTRs. Transfection of LX-2 cells with miR-29b led to abnormal collagen structure as shown by electron-microscopy, presumably through down-regulation of the expression of molecules involved in ECM maturation including HSP47 and LOX. These results demonstrated that miR-29b is involved in regulating the post-translational processing of ECM and fibril formation.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 induction by diethyldithiocarbamate is regulated via Akt and ERK/miR222/ETS-1 pathways in hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianhui; Wang, Ping; Cong, Min; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Lin; Li, Hongyi; Zhai, Qingling; Li, Zhuo; Jia, Jidong; You, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays an important role in fibrolysis by degrading excessively deposited collagen I and III. We previously demonstrated that diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) up-regulates MMP-1 in hepatic stellate cells via the ERK1/2 and Akt signalling pathways. In the current study, we attempted to further explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of MMP-1. We treated a co-cultured system that included hepatocytes (C3A) and hepatic stellate cells (LX-2) with DDC. The data revealed that the transcriptional factor ETS-1, which is an important regulator of MMP-1, was up-regulated in LX-2 cells following DDC treatment. Furthermore, the up-regulation of MMP-1 by DDC has been abrogated through employing si-ETS-1 to block expression of ETS-1. We found that DDC significantly inhibited the expression of miR-222 in LX-2 cells. We transfected miR-222 mimic into LX-2 cells and then co-cultured the cells with C3A. The up-regulation of ETS-1 and MMP-1 in LX-2 cells treated with DDC were inhibited after miR-222 mimic transfection. These data indicate that DDC up-regulated MMP-1 in LX-2 cells through the miR-222/ETS-1 pathway. Finally, we treated the co-cultured system with an Akt inhibitor (T3830) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126). Both T3830 and U0126 blocked the suppression of miR-222 by DDC in LX-2. Collectively, these data indicate that DDC up-regulated MMP-1 in LX-2 cells through the Akt and ERK/miR-222/ETS-1 pathways. Our study provides experimental data that will aid the control of the process of fibrolysis in liver fibrosis prevention and treatment. PMID:27412967

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 induction by diethyldithiocarbamate is regulated via Akt and ERK/miR222/ETS-1 pathways in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianhui; Wang, Ping; Cong, Min; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Lin; Li, Hongyi; Zhai, Qingling; Li, Zhuo; Jia, Jidong; You, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays an important role in fibrolysis by degrading excessively deposited collagen I and III. We previously demonstrated that diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) up-regulates MMP-1 in hepatic stellate cells via the ERK1/2 and Akt signalling pathways. In the current study, we attempted to further explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of MMP-1. We treated a co-cultured system that included hepatocytes (C3A) and hepatic stellate cells (LX-2) with DDC. The data revealed that the transcriptional factor ETS-1, which is an important regulator of MMP-1, was up-regulated in LX-2 cells following DDC treatment. Furthermore, the up-regulation of MMP-1 by DDC has been abrogated through employing si-ETS-1 to block expression of ETS-1. We found that DDC significantly inhibited the expression of miR-222 in LX-2 cells. We transfected miR-222 mimic into LX-2 cells and then co-cultured the cells with C3A. The up-regulation of ETS-1 and MMP-1 in LX-2 cells treated with DDC were inhibited after miR-222 mimic transfection. These data indicate that DDC up-regulated MMP-1 in LX-2 cells through the miR-222/ETS-1 pathway. Finally, we treated the co-cultured system with an Akt inhibitor (T3830) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126). Both T3830 and U0126 blocked the suppression of miR-222 by DDC in LX-2. Collectively, these data indicate that DDC up-regulated MMP-1 in LX-2 cells through the Akt and ERK/miR-222/ETS-1 pathways. Our study provides experimental data that will aid the control of the process of fibrolysis in liver fibrosis prevention and treatment.

  16. RAS inhibitors decrease apoptosis of acinar cells and increase elimination of pancreatic stellate cells after in the course of experimental chronic pancreatitis induced by dibutyltin dichloride.

    PubMed

    Madro, A; Korolczuk, A; Czechowska, G; Celiński, K; Słomka, M; Prozorow-Król, B; Korobowicz, E

    2008-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease, in which the exocrine function of the gland is gradually lost and fibrosis develops due to repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of RAS inhibitors on the apoptosis of acinar cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) elimination in experimental CP induced by dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC). CP was induced by administration of DBTC to the femoral vein. Simultaneously captopril, losartan, enalapril and lisinopril were administered intraperitoneally. The rats were decapitated after 60 days and tissue of pancreas was collected. In rats treated by DBTC the features of inflammatory infiltration, ductal lumen dilatation, fibrosis were found. Strong reactivity with caspase2(L) and clusterin-beta antibodies was observed in areas of fibrosis. In animals treated with RAS inhibitors inflammatory changes and fibrosis were less severe. In groups of rats treated with DBTC and RAS inhibitors immunoreactivity of caspase(2L) and clusterin-beta was weak. Positive immunostaining against smooth muscle actine and desmin was observed in the elongated cells (PSC-s). This reaction was weak in groups of rat treated with DBTC and RAS inhibitors. Treatment of CP rats with RAS inhibitors alleviate apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells and induces PSCs elimination. PMID:18812642

  17. The induction of human myeloid derived suppressor cells through hepatic stellate cells is dose-dependently inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors nilotinib, dasatinib and sorafenib, but not sunitinib.

    PubMed

    Heine, Annkristin; Schilling, Judith; Grünwald, Barbara; Krüger, Achim; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Held, Stefanie Andrea Erika; Garbi, Natalio; Kurts, Christian; Brossart, Peter; Knolle, Percy; Diehl, Linda; Höchst, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Increased numbers of immunosuppressive myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) correlate with a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used as standard therapy for the treatment of several neoplastic diseases. However, TKIs not only exert effects on the malignant cell clone itself but also affect immune cells. Here, we investigate the effect of TKIs on the induction of MDSCs that differentiate from mature human monocytes using a new in vitro model of MDSC induction through activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). We show that frequencies of monocytic CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) MDSCs derived from mature monocytes were significantly and dose-dependently reduced in the presence of dasatinib, nilotinib and sorafenib, whereas sunitinib had no effect. These regulatory effects were only observed when TKIs were present during the early induction phase of MDSCs through activated HSCs, whereas already differentiated MDSCs were not further influenced by TKIs. Neither the MAPK nor the NFκB pathway was modulated in MDSCs when any of the TKIs was applied. When functional analyses were performed, we found that myeloid cells treated with sorafenib, nilotinib or dasatinib, but not sunitinib, displayed decreased suppressive capacity with regard to CD8+ T cell proliferation. Our results indicate that sorafenib, nilotinib and dasatinib, but not sunitinib, decrease the HSC-mediated differentiation of monocytes into functional MDSCs. Therefore, treatment of cancer patients with these TKIs may in addition to having a direct effect on cancer cells also prevent the differentiation of monocytes into MDSCs and thereby differentially modulate the success of immunotherapeutic or other anti-cancer approaches. PMID:26786874

  18. Short Hairpin RNA Causes the Methylation of Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor II Promoter and Silencing of the Target Gene in Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Wook; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zern, Mark A; Rossi, John J.; Wu, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) in plant and animal cells. RNA dependent DNA methylation (RdDM) accounts for TGS in plants, but it is unclear whether siRNA induces RdDM in mammalian cells. To determine whether stable expression of short hairpin siRNA (shRNA) induces DNA methylation in mammalian cells, we transduced rat hepatic stellate SBC10 cells with lentiviral vectors which encode an U6 promoter-driven shRNA expression cassette homologous to the transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβRII) promoter region. Sequencing analysis of bisulfite-modified genomic DNA showed the methylation of cytosine residues both in CpG dinucleotides and non-CpG sites around the target region of the TGFβRII promoter in SBC10 cells transduced with the promoter-targeting lentiviral vector. In these cells, real-time RT-PCR showed a decrease in TGFβRII mRNA levels which were reversed by treatment with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine. Our results demonstrate that recombinant lentivirus-mediated shRNA delivery resulted in the methylation of the homologous promoter area in mammalian cells, and this approach may be used as a tool for transcriptional gene silencing by epigenetic modification of mammalian cell promoters. PMID:17533113

  19. Schistosoma japonicum egg antigen up-regulates fibrogenesis and inhibits proliferation in primary hepatic stellate cells in a concentration-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Wang, Mi; Lu, Xiao-Dan; Zhang, Shu-Juan; Tang, Wang-Xian

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different concentrations of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) egg antigen on fibrogenesis and apoptosis in primary hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). METHODS: A mouse model of schistosomiasis-associated liver fibrosis (SSLF) was established by infecting mice with schistosomal cercaria via the abdomen. HSCs were isolated from SSLF mice by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, and their identity was confirmed by immunofluorescence double staining of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin. The growth inhibitory effect and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of S. japonicum egg antigen for primary HSCs (24 h) were determined using a cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The expression levels of α-SMA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMOL/LP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in HSCs in response to different concentrations of S. japonicum egg antigen were detected by Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The levels of phospho-P38 (P-P38), phospho-Jun N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and phospho-Akt (P-AKT) in HSCs were detected by Western blotting. RESULTS: An SSLF mouse model was established, and primary HSCs were successfully isolated and cultured. S. japonicum egg antigen inhibited HSC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 of the S. japonicum egg antigen was 244.53 ± 35.26 μg/mL. S. japonicum egg antigen enhanced α-SMA expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and enhanced TIMP-1 expression at the mRNA level in HSCs (P < 0.05), whereas the expression of MMOL/LP-9 was attenuated at both the mRNA and protein levels in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.05). A high concentration of S. japonicum egg antigen enhanced P-P38, P-JNK and P-AKT activation (P < 0.05). The changes in α-SMA and MMOL/LP-9 expression induced by S. japonicum egg antigen were closely correlated with P-P38 and P-JNK activation (P < 0.05). The attenuation of MMOL/LP-9

  20. Farnesoid X Receptor Critically Determines the Fibrotic Response in Mice but Is Expressed to a Low Extent in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells and Periductal Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fickert, Peter; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Moustafa, Tarek; Wagner, Martin; Zollner, Gernot; Halilbasic, Emina; Stöger, Ulrike; Arrese, Marco; Pizarro, Margarita; Solís, Nancy; Carrasco, Gonzalo; Caligiuri, Alessandra; Sombetzki, Martina; Reisinger, Emil; Tsybrovskyy, Oleksiy; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Pinzani, Massimo; Trauner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), may play a pivotal role in liver fibrosis. We tested the impact of genetic FXR ablation in four different mouse models. Hepatic fibrosis was induced in wild-type and FXR knock-out mice (FXR−/−) by CCl4 intoxication, 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine feeding, common bile duct ligation, or Schistosoma mansoni (S.m.)-infection. In addition, we determined nuclear receptor expression levels (FXR, pregnane X receptor (PXR), vitamin D receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), small heterodimer partner (SHP)) in mouse hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), portal myofibroblasts (MFBs), and human HSCs. Cell type-specific FXR protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in five mouse models and prototypic human fibrotic liver diseases. Expression of nuclear receptors was much lower in mouse and human HSCs/MFBs compared with total liver expression with the exception of vitamin D receptor. FXR protein was undetectable in mouse and human HSCs and MFBs. FXR loss had no effect in CCl4-intoxicated and S.m.-infected mice, but significantly decreased liver fibrosis of the biliary type (common bile duct ligation, 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine). These data suggest that FXR loss significantly reduces fibrosis of the biliary type, but has no impact on non-cholestatic liver fibrosis. Since there is no FXR expression in HSCs and MFBs in liver fibrosis, our data indicate that these cells may not represent direct therapeutic targets for FXR ligands. PMID:19910507

  1. Microtransplantation of cellular membranes from squid stellate ganglion reveals ionotropic GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luca; Limon, Agenor; Palma, Eleonora; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-02-01

    The squid has been the most studied cephalopod, and it has served as a very useful model for investigating the events associated with nerve impulse generation and synaptic transmission. While the physiology of squid giant axons has been extensively studied, very little is known about the distribution and function of the neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate inhibitory transmission at the synapses. In this study we investigated whether γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activates neurotransmitter receptors in stellate ganglia membranes. To overcome the low abundance of GABA-like mRNAs in invertebrates and the low expression of GABA in cephalopods, we used a two-electrode voltage clamp technique to determine if Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with cell membranes from squid stellate ganglia responded to GABA. Using this method, membrane patches containing proteins and ion channels from the squid's stellate ganglion were incorporated into the surface of oocytes. We demonstrated that GABA activates membrane receptors in cellular membranes isolated from squid stellate ganglia. Using the same approach, we were able to record native glutamate-evoked currents. The squid's GABA receptors showed an EC(50) of 98 μmol l(-1) to GABA and were inhibited by zinc (IC(50) = 356 μmol l(-1)). Interestingly, GABA receptors from the squid were only partially blocked by bicuculline. These results indicate that the microtransplantation of native cell membranes is useful to identify and characterize scarce membrane proteins. Moreover, our data also support the role of GABA as an ionotropic neurotransmitter in cephalopods, acting through chloride-permeable membrane receptors.

  2. Indole-3-carbinol enhances the resolution of rat liver fibrosis and stimulates hepatic stellate cell apoptosis by blocking the inhibitor of κB kinase α/inhibitor of κB-α/nuclear factor-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Ping, Jie; Gao, Ai-mei; Qin, Hai-quan; Wei, Xiao-ning; Bai, Jing; Liu, Lian; Li, Xiao-hai; Li, Rui-wen; Ao, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2011-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in liver fibrosis, and the clearance of activated HSC by apoptosis is associated with the resolution of liver fibrosis. The development of strategies that promote this process in a selective way is therefore important. We evaluated the effects of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a nutritional component derived from vegetables from the Brassica family, on liver fibrosis and HSC apoptosis. The in vivo therapeutic effects of I3C were monitored in three rat models of liver fibrosis induced by porcine serum, bile duct ligation, or multiple hepatotoxic factors, and its proapoptotic effect and molecular mechanism were studied in vitro in HSC-T6, a rat HSC line. The results showed that I3C treatment significantly reduced the number of activated HSC in the livers of rats with liver fibrosis. In histopathology, I3C reduced hepatocyte degeneration and necrosis, accelerated collagen degradation, and promoted the reversal of liver fibrosis. I3C prescribed to HSC-T6 resulted in morphologic alterations typical of apoptosis and DNA cleavage to a nucleosomal ladder. Moreover, I3C significantly increased the HSC-T6 apoptosis rate and the expression ratio of Bax to Bcl-2. High-throughput protein array analysis indicated that the tumor necrosis factor-α/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signal pathway participated in I3C-induced HSC-T6 apoptosis. Western blot and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay confirmed that I3C inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB kinase α and inhibitor of κB-α and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In conclusion, I3C could promote the reverse process of liver fibrosis in vivo and induce apoptosis of activated HSC in vitro, which indicates the use of I3C as a potential therapeutic agent in liver fibrosis treatment.

  3. Liver Injury and the Activation of the Hepatic Myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Joy X; Török, Natalie J

    2013-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound healing process, the end result of chronic liver injury elicited by different noxious stimuli. Activated hepatic stellate cells or myofibroblasts and portal myofibroblasts are considered as the main producers of the extracellular matrix in the liver. Upon liver injury the quiescent stellate cells transdifferentiate into myofibroblasts a process highlighted by the loss of vitamin A stores, upregulation of interstitial type collagens, smooth muscle α actin, matrix metalloproteinases, proteoglycans, and the induction of cell survival pathways. Activation of hepatic stellate cells is a result of a complex interplay between the parenchymal cells, immune cells, extracellular matrix mechanics and extrahepatic milieu such as the gut microbiome. In this review we will focus on the pathomechanism of stellate cell activation following chronic liver injury; with the aim of identifying possible treatment targets for anti-fibrogenic agents.

  4. A family of delayed rectifier Kv1 cDNAs showing cell type-specific expression in the squid stellate ganglion/giant fiber lobe complex.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, J J; Liu, T I; Gilly, W F

    1997-07-01

    Squid giant axons are formed by giant fiber lobe (GFL) neurons of the stellate ganglion (SG). Other large motoneurons in the SG form a parallel system. A small family of cDNAs (SqKv1A-D) encoding Kv1 alpha-subunits was identified in a squid (Loligo opalescens) SG/GFL library. Members have distinct 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) and initial coding regions, but beyond a certain point (nucleotide 34 of SqKv1A) only nine differences exist. 3' UTRs are identical. Predicted alpha-subunits are nearly identical, and only the N termini differ significantly, primarily in length. RNase protection assays that use RNA isolated from specific SG regions show that SqKv1A mRNA is expressed prominently in the GFL but not in the SG proper. SqKv1B yields the opposite pattern. SqKv1D also is expressed only in the SG. SqKv1C expression was not detectable. In situ hybridizations confirm these results and reveal that SqKv1B mRNA is abundant in many large neurons of the SG, whereas SqKv1D expression is limited to small isolated clusters of neurons. SqKv1A and B are thus the predominant Kv1 mRNAs in the SG/GFL complex. Activation properties of SqKv1A and B channels expressed in oocytes are very similar to one another and compare favorably with properties of native delayed rectifier channels in GFL neurons and large SG neurons. The Kv1 complement in these squid neurons thus seems to be relatively simple. Several differences exist between cloned and native channels, however, and may reflect differences in the cellular environments of oocytes and neurons.

  5. Role of interleukin-1 and its antagonism of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and liver fibrosis in the Abcb4-/- mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Florian P; Wimmer, Ralf; Wottke, Lena; Artmann, Renate; Nagel, Jutta M; Carranza, Manuel O; Mayr, Doris; Rust, Christian; Fickert, Peter; Trauner, Michael; Gerbes, Alexander L; Hohenester, Simon; Denk, Gerald U

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the interleukin-1 (IL-1) pathway as a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis in vitro and in vivo using the ATP-binding cassette transporter b4-/- (Abcb4-/-) mouse model. METHODS: Female and male Abcb4-/- mice from 6 to 13 mo of age were analysed for the degree of cholestasis (liver serum tests), extent of liver fibrosis (hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining) and tissue-specific activation of signalling pathways such as the IL-1 pathway [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. For in vivo experiments, murine hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated via pronase-collagenase perfusion followed by density gradient centrifugation using female mice. Murine HSCs were stimulated with up to 1 ng/mL IL-1β with or without 2.5 μg/mL Anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, respectively. The proliferation of murine HSCs was assessed via the BrdU assay. The toxicity of Anakinra was evaluated via the fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDH) assay. In vivo 8-wk-old Abcb4-/- mice with an already fully established hepatic phenotype were treated with Anakinra (1 mg/kg body-weight daily intraperitoneally) or vehicle and liver injury and liver fibrosis were evaluated via serum tests, qPCR, hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining. RESULTS: Liver fibrosis was less pronounced in males than in female Abcb4-/- animals as defined by a lower hydroxyproline content (274 ± 64 μg/g vs 436 ± 80 μg/g liver, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U-test) and lower mRNA expression of the profibrogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP) (1 ± 0.41 vs 0.66 ± 0.33 fold, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). Reduced liver fibrosis was associated with significantly lower levels of F4/80 mRNA expression (1 ± 0.28 vs 0.71 ± 0.41 fold, respectively; n = 12-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test) and significantly lower IL-1β mRNA expression levels (1 ± 0.38 vs 0.44 ± 0.26 fold, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.001; Mann

  6. Immunohistochemical study of the neuropeptides in the stellate ganglion of the water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nasu, T; De Ocampo, G; Molina, H A; Tateyama, S; Morimoto, M

    2000-05-01

    The localization of some neuropeptides including neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), galanin (Gal), methionine enkephalin (M-ENK), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity was studied in the stellate ganglion (SG) of water buffalo. NPY, SP, Gal and TH immunoreactivities were present in almost all of the ganglion cells. NPY, SP, Gal, SP, CGRP, VIP and M-ENK immunoreactive nerve fibers were also seen in the SG. The localization and pattern of distribution of these peptides in the water buffalo stellate ganglion were compared with those in stellate ganglia of other mammalian species.

  7. Calcium channel blockers ameliorate iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis by altering iron transport and stellate cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xin; Chang, Yanzhong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chu, Xi; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Wang, Na; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2016-06-15

    Liver fibrosis is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with iron overload. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) can antagonize divalent cation entry into renal and myocardial cells and inhibit fibrogenic gene expression. We investigated the potential of CCBs to resolve iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis. Kunming mice were assigned to nine groups (n=8 per group): control, iron overload, deferoxamine, high and low dose verapamil, high and low dose nimodipine, and high and low dose diltiazem. Iron deposition and hepatic fibrosis were measured in mouse livers. Expression levels of molecules associated with transmembrane iron transport were determined by molecular biology approaches. In vitro HSC-T6 cells were randomized into nine groups (the same groups as the mice). Changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and metalloproteinase expression in cells were detected to assess the anti-fibrotic effects of CCBs during iron overload conditions. We found that CCBs reduced hepatic iron content, intracellular iron deposition, the number of hepatic fibrotic areas, collagen expression levels, and hydroxyproline content. CCBs rescued abnormal expression of α1C protein in L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (LVDCC) and down-regulated divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) expression in mouse livers. In iron-overloaded HSC-T6 cells, CCBs reduced iron deposition, inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). CCBs are potential therapeutic agents that can be used to address hepatic fibrosis during iron overload. They resolve hepatic fibrosis probably correlated with regulating transmembrane iron transport and inhibiting HSC growth. PMID:27095094

  8. The tiptop/teashirt genes regulate cell differentiation and renal physiology in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, Barry; Hu, Nan; Fauquier, Teddy; Caubit, Xavier; Fasano, Laurent; Skaer, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The physiological activities of organs are underpinned by an interplay between the distinct cell types they contain. However, little is known about the genetic control of patterned cell differentiation during organ development. We show that the conserved Teashirt transcription factors are decisive for the differentiation of a subset of secretory cells, stellate cells, in Drosophila melanogaster renal tubules. Teashirt controls the expression of the water channel Drip, the chloride conductance channel CLC-a and the Leukokinin receptor (LKR), all of which characterise differentiated stellate cells and are required for primary urine production and responsiveness to diuretic stimuli. Teashirt also controls a dramatic transformation in cell morphology, from cuboidal to the eponymous stellate shape, during metamorphosis. teashirt interacts with cut, which encodes a transcription factor that underlies the differentiation of the primary, principal secretory cells, establishing a reciprocal negative-feedback loop that ensures the full differentiation of both cell types. Loss of teashirt leads to ineffective urine production, failure of homeostasis and premature lethality. Stellate cell-specific expression of the teashirt paralogue tiptop, which is not normally expressed in larval or adult stellate cells, almost completely rescues teashirt loss of expression from stellate cells. We demonstrate conservation in the expression of the family of tiptop/teashirt genes in lower insects and establish conservation in the targets of Teashirt transcription factors in mouse embryonic kidney. PMID:23404107

  9. Grid cell firing patterns may arise from feedback interaction between intrinsic rebound spiking and transverse traveling waves with multiple heading angles

    PubMed Central

    Hasselmo, Michael E.; Shay, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a model using cellular resonance and rebound properties to model grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex. The model simulates the intrinsic resonance properties of single layer II stellate cells with different frequencies due to the hyperpolarization activated cation current (h current). The stellate cells generate rebound spikes after a delay interval that differs for neurons with different resonance frequency. Stellate cells drive inhibitory interneurons to cause rebound from inhibition in an alternate set of stellate cells that drive interneurons to activate the first set of cells. This allows maintenance of activity with cycle skipping of the spiking of cells that matches recent physiological data on theta cycle skipping. The rebound spiking interacts with subthreshold oscillatory input to stellate cells or interneurons regulated by medial septal input and defined relative to the spatial location coded by neurons. The timing of rebound determines whether the network maintains the activity for the same location or shifts to phases of activity representing a different location. Simulations show that spatial firing patterns similar to grid cells can be generated with a range of different resonance frequencies, indicating how grid cells could be generated with low frequencies present in bats and in mice with knockout of the HCN1 subunit of the h current. PMID:25400555

  10. Grid cell firing patterns may arise from feedback interaction between intrinsic rebound spiking and transverse traveling waves with multiple heading angles.

    PubMed

    Hasselmo, Michael E; Shay, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a model using cellular resonance and rebound properties to model grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex. The model simulates the intrinsic resonance properties of single layer II stellate cells with different frequencies due to the hyperpolarization activated cation current (h current). The stellate cells generate rebound spikes after a delay interval that differs for neurons with different resonance frequency. Stellate cells drive inhibitory interneurons to cause rebound from inhibition in an alternate set of stellate cells that drive interneurons to activate the first set of cells. This allows maintenance of activity with cycle skipping of the spiking of cells that matches recent physiological data on theta cycle skipping. The rebound spiking interacts with subthreshold oscillatory input to stellate cells or interneurons regulated by medial septal input and defined relative to the spatial location coded by neurons. The timing of rebound determines whether the network maintains the activity for the same location or shifts to phases of activity representing a different location. Simulations show that spatial firing patterns similar to grid cells can be generated with a range of different resonance frequencies, indicating how grid cells could be generated with low frequencies present in bats and in mice with knockout of the HCN1 subunit of the h current.

  11. MeCP2 silencing of LncRNA H19 controls hepatic stellate cell proliferation by targeting IGF1R.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Jing; Liu, Li-Ping; Tao, Hui; Hu, Wei; Shi, Peng; Deng, Zi-Yu; Li, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) plays a key role in liver fibrosis. However, the potential mechanism of MeCP2 in liver fibrosis remains unclear. Early reports suggest that LncRNA H19 is important epigenetic regulator with critical roles in cell proliferation, but its role in hepatic fibrosis remains elusive. Sprague-Dawley rats liver fibrosis was generated by 12-weeks treatment with CCl4 intraperitoneal injection. HSC-T6 cells were used in vitro study. The expression levels of MeCP2, H19, IGF1R, α-SMA, and Col1A1 were estimated by Western blotting, qRT-PCR and Immunohistochemistry. HSC-T6 cells were transfected with MeCP2-siRNA, pEGF-C1-MeCP2, pEX-3-H19, and H19-siRNA. Finally, cell proliferation ability was assessed by the MTT assay. Here, we found that H19 was significantly down-regulated in HSCs and fibrosis tissues, and an opposite pattern is observed for MeCP2 and IGF1R. Silencing of MeCP2 blocked HSCs proliferation. Knockdown of MeCP2 elevated H19 expression in activated HSCs, and over-expression of MeCP2 inhibited H19 expression in activated HSCs. Moreover, we investigated the effect of H19 on IGF1R expression. Overexpression of H19 in HSCs repressed the expression of IGF1R, and an opposite pattern is observed for H19 silenced. In addition, we reported that overexpression of H19 inhibited the TGF-β1-induced proliferation of HSCs. Furthermore, MeCP2 negative regulation of H19 by targeting the protein IGF1R. Taken together, these results demonstrated that MeCP2 silencing of H19 can alter the IGF1R overexpression, thus contributing to HSCs proliferation. These data could suggest the development of combination therapies that target the MeCP2. PMID:27350269

  12. Computer detection of stellate lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The three primary signs for which radiologists search when screening mammograms for breast cancer are stellate lesions, microcalcifications, and circumscribed lesions. Stellate lesions are of particular importance, as they are almost always associated with a malignancy. Further, they are often indicated only by subtle architectural distortions and so are in general easier to miss than the other signs. We have developed a method for the automatic detection of stellate lesions in digitized mammograms, and have tested them on image data where the presence or absence of malignancies is known. We extract image features from the known images, use them to grow binary decision trees, and use those trees to label each pixel of new mammograms with its probability of being located on an abnormality. The primary feature for the detection of stellate lesions is ALOE, analysis of local oriented edges, which is derived from an analysis of the histogram of edge orientations in local windows. Other features, based on the Laws texture energy measures, have been developed to respond to normal tissue, and so improve the false alarm performance of the entire system.

  13. Stellate excision of malignancies on the auricles.

    PubMed

    Bumsted, R M; Ceilley, R I

    1980-01-01

    Primary excision of malignancies on the auricles with the standard "wedge technique" may produce lateral protrusion of the helix. A stellate-type excision eliminates the possibility of this undesirable effect and allows the surgeon to close large defects in the helix. The technique is described in detail.

  14. Mechanisms of action of acetaldehyde in the up-regulation of the human α2(I) collagen gene in hepatic stellate cells: key roles of Ski, SMAD3, SMAD4, and SMAD7.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Arellanes-Robledo, Jaime; Hernández-Nazara, Zamira; Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Inagaki, Yutaka; Rojkind, Marcos; Lakshman, M Raj

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol-induced liver fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis is a leading cause of death. Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, up-regulates expression of the human α2(I) collagen gene (COL1A2). Early acetaldehyde-mediated effects involve phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD3/4-containing complexes that bind to COL1A2 promoter to induce fibrogenesis. We used human and mouse hepatic stellate cells to elucidate the mechanisms whereby acetaldehyde up-regulates COL1A2 by modulating the role of Ski and the expression of SMADs 3, 4, and 7. Acetaldehyde induced up-regulation of COL1A2 by 3.5-fold, with concomitant increases in the mRNA (threefold) and protein (4.2- and 3.5-fold) levels of SMAD3 and SMAD4, respectively. It also caused a 60% decrease in SMAD7 expression. Ski, a member of the Ski/Sno oncogene family, is colocalized in the nucleus with SMAD4. Acetaldehyde induces translocation of Ski and SMAD4 to the cytoplasm, where Ski undergoes proteasomal degradation, as confirmed by the ability of the proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin to blunt up-regulation of acetaldehyde-dependent COL1A2, but not of the nonspecific fibronectin gene (FN1). We conclude that acetaldehyde up-regulates COL1A2 by enhancing expression of the transactivators SMAD3 and SMAD4 while inhibiting the repressor SMAD7, along with promoting Ski translocation from the nucleus to cytoplasm. We speculate that drugs that prevent proteasomal degradation of repressors targeting COL1A2 may have antifibrogenic properties.

  15. A bioinformatic and mechanistic study elicits the antifibrotic effect of ursolic acid through the attenuation of oxidative stress with the involvement of ERK, PI3K/Akt, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in human hepatic stellate cells and rat liver

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenhua; Shi, Feng; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Li, Bimin; Zhang, Kunhe; Zhang, Xinhua; Ouyang, Canhui; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are a predominant mediator of redox homeostasis in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Ursolic acid (UA) is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with various pharmacological activities, but the molecular targets and underlying mechanisms for its antifibrotic effect in the liver remain elusive. This study aimed to computationally predict the molecular interactome and mechanistically investigate the antifibrotic effect of UA on oxidative stress, with a focus on NOX4 activity and cross-linked signaling pathways in human HSCs and rat liver. Drug–drug interaction via chemical–protein interactome tool, a server that can predict drug–drug interaction via chemical–protein interactome, was used to predict the molecular targets of UA, and Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery was employed to analyze the signaling pathways of the predicted targets of UA. The bioinformatic data showed that there were 611 molecular proteins possibly interacting with UA and that there were over 49 functional clusters responding to UA. The subsequential benchmarking data showed that UA significantly reduced the accumulation of type I collagen in HSCs in rat liver, increased the expression level of MMP-1, but decreased the expression level of TIMP-1 in HSC-T6 cells. UA also remarkably reduced the gene expression level of type I collagen in HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, UA remarkably attenuated oxidative stress via negative regulation of NOX4 activity and expression in HSC-T6 cells. The employment of specific chemical inhibitors, SB203580, LY294002, PD98059, and AG490, demonstrated the involvement of ERK, PI3K/Akt, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in the regulatory effect of UA on NOX4 activity and expression. Collectively, the antifibrotic effect of UA is partially due to the oxidative stress attenuating effect through manipulating NOX4 activity and expression. The results

  16. A bioinformatic and mechanistic study elicits the antifibrotic effect of ursolic acid through the attenuation of oxidative stress with the involvement of ERK, PI3K/Akt, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in human hepatic stellate cells and rat liver.

    PubMed

    He, Wenhua; Shi, Feng; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Li, Bimin; Zhang, Kunhe; Zhang, Xinhua; Ouyang, Canhui; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are a predominant mediator of redox homeostasis in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Ursolic acid (UA) is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with various pharmacological activities, but the molecular targets and underlying mechanisms for its antifibrotic effect in the liver remain elusive. This study aimed to computationally predict the molecular interactome and mechanistically investigate the antifibrotic effect of UA on oxidative stress, with a focus on NOX4 activity and cross-linked signaling pathways in human HSCs and rat liver. Drug-drug interaction via chemical-protein interactome tool, a server that can predict drug-drug interaction via chemical-protein interactome, was used to predict the molecular targets of UA, and Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery was employed to analyze the signaling pathways of the predicted targets of UA. The bioinformatic data showed that there were 611 molecular proteins possibly interacting with UA and that there were over 49 functional clusters responding to UA. The subsequential benchmarking data showed that UA significantly reduced the accumulation of type I collagen in HSCs in rat liver, increased the expression level of MMP-1, but decreased the expression level of TIMP-1 in HSC-T6 cells. UA also remarkably reduced the gene expression level of type I collagen in HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, UA remarkably attenuated oxidative stress via negative regulation of NOX4 activity and expression in HSC-T6 cells. The employment of specific chemical inhibitors, SB203580, LY294002, PD98059, and AG490, demonstrated the involvement of ERK, PI3K/Akt, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in the regulatory effect of UA on NOX4 activity and expression. Collectively, the antifibrotic effect of UA is partially due to the oxidative stress attenuating effect through manipulating NOX4 activity and expression. The results suggest that

  17. Liver Fibrosis Occurs Through Dysregulation of MyD88-dependent Innate B cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Manoj; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Velazquez, Victoria M.; Tedesco, Dana; Elrod, Elizabeth; Han, Jin-Hwan; Sharma, Prachi; Ibegbu, Chris; Gewirtz, Andrew; Anania, Frank; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.; Grakoui, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease mediated by activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) leads to liver fibrosis. Here, we postulated that the immune regulatory properties of HSCs might promote the profibrogenic activity of B cells. Fibrosis is completely attenuated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated B cell deficient μMT mice showing that B cells are required. The retinoic acid produced by HSCs augmented B cell survival, plasma cell marker CD138 expression, and IgG production. These activities were reversed following the addition of the retinoic acid inhibitor, LE540. Transcriptional profiling of fibrotic liver B cells revealed an increased expression of genes related to NF-κB activation, proinflammatory cytokine production and CD40 signaling suggesting that these B cells are activated and may be acting as inflammatory cells. Biological validation experiments also revealed increased activation (CD44 and CD86 expressions), constitutive IgG production and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP1-α. Likewise targeted deletion of B-cell-intrinsic MyD88 signaling, an innate adaptor with involvement in RA signaling, resulted in reduced infiltration of migratory CD11c+ dendritic cells and Ly6C++ monocytes, and hence reduced liver pathology. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that liver fibrosis occurs through a mechanism of HSC-mediated augmentation of innate B cell activity and highlight B cells as an important ‘first responders’ of the intrahepatic immune environment. PMID:25711908

  18. Stellate ganglion blockade-techniques and modalities.

    PubMed

    Ghai, A; Kaushik, T; Wadhera, R; Wadhera, S

    2016-01-01

    Stellate ganglion block (SGB) is utilized in the diagnosis and management of various vascular disorders and sympathetically mediated pain in upper extremity, head and neck. The stellate ganglion lies medial to the scalene muscles, lateral to longus coli muscle, esophagus, trachea and recurrent laryngeal nerve, anterior to C7 transverse process and prevertebral fascia, superior to the subclavian artery and posterior to vertebral vessels. Consequently, inadvertent placement of the needle tip into these soft tissues and vessels occur with blind technique. Henceforth, various interventional modalities are being used for SGB, these have been reviewed in this paper. Various techniques of SGB have been described, and vary from the use of standard blind technique to the use of fluoroscopy, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radio nucleotide tracers. However, these techniques may not be practical in a clinical setting, insofar as they are time consuming, costly, and may involve radiation exposure. The use of fluoroscopy does not visualize the blood vessels close to the stellate ganglion. Ultrasounds are the alternative. They help in visualization of soft tissues to prevent complications and help in deposition of drug subfascially, under direct visual control. PMID:27363208

  19. Utility of stellate ganglion block in atypical facial pain: a case report and consideration of its possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shanthanna, Harsha

    2013-01-01

    We present this report of a young patient with chronic severe atypical facial pain who was successfully controlled with stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance. The patient had a history of severe disabling, unilateral, facial neuropathic pain with minimal response to analgesic medications. Upon assessment the patient had features suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia, although postherpetic neuralgia could not be ruled out. As a diagnostic test intervention, stellate ganglion block was tried under ultrasound guidance. The patient showed significant improvement in pain control and functional disability lasting beyond 10 weeks. Subsequent blocks reinforced the analgesia. Atypical facial pain has several differential diagnoses. The involvement of sympathetic system in its causation or sustenance is uncertain. Stellate ganglion block achieves sympathetic block of cervicofacial structures, and its blockade has been shown to affect chronic pain conditions. Although its mechanism is not clear, one has to consider its possible role in conditions of stress apart from directly controlling the sympathetic activity. There is certainly a role in exploring the potential benefits of stellate ganglion block in such clinical conditions. The technique of stellate block under ultrasound is also described, as it influences the safety and precision of the block. PMID:24065993

  20. Modulation of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia by treadmill exercise of stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Gavrilovic, Ljubica; Spasojevic, Natasa; Dronjak, Sladjana

    2012-03-01

    The sympatho-adrenal system represents one of the main systems involved in the response to stressful events because its stress-induced activation results in an increased release of catecholamines. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenal system, adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia being two components of this system. This study aimed at investigating physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase in the adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20-min treadmill exercise for 12 weeks, using TaqMan RT-PCR assay. Chronic psychosocial stress decreased gene expression of the examined enzymes in the adrenal medulla and treadmill exercise did not lead to further modulation of the corresponding gene expression. On the other hand, chronic psychosocial stress produced a significant increase of TH (about 51%) and DBH (about 103%) gene expression in stellate ganglia, while treadmill exercise decreased gene expression of these enzymes to control levels in psychosocially stressed rats. Our data indicate that treadmill exercise leads to a decreased gene transcription of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in stellate ganglia and attenuation of cardiac noradrenaline production in stressful situations. Reduction of catecholamine synthesis in stellate ganglia may be linked to the beneficial effects of treadmill exercise on cardiovascular system in stressed animals.

  1. Liver injury-on-a-chip: microfluidic co-cultures with integrated biosensors for monitoring liver cell signaling during injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Patel, Dipali; Kwa, Timothy; Haque, Amranul; Matharu, Zimple; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Gao, Yandong; Diehl, Anna Mae; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Tissue injury triggers complex communication between cells via secreted signaling molecules such as cytokines and growth factors. Discerning when and where these signals begin and how they propagate over time is very challenging with existing cell culture and analysis tools. The goal of this study was to develop new tools in the form of microfluidic co-cultures with integrated biosensors for local and continuous monitoring of secreted signals. Specifically, we focused on how alcohol injury affects TGF-β signaling between two liver cell types, hepatocytes and stellate cells. Activation of stellate cells happens early during liver injury and is at the center of liver fibrosis. We demonstrated that alcohol injury to microfluidic co-cultures caused significantly higher levels of stellate cell activation compared to conditioned media and transwell injury experiments. This highlighted the advantage of the microfluidic co-culture: placement of two cell types in close proximity to ensure high local concentrations of injury-promoting secreted signals. Next, we developed a microsystem consisting of five chambers, two for co-culturing hepatocytes with stellate cells and three additional chambers containing miniature aptamer-modified electrodes for monitoring secreted TGF-β. Importantly, the walls separating microfluidic chambers were actuatable; they could be raised or lowered to create different configurations of the device. The use of reconfigurable microfluidics and miniature biosensors revealed that alcohol injury causes hepatocytes to secrete TGF-β molecules, which diffuse over to neighboring stellate cells and trigger production of additional TGF-β from stellate cells. Our results lend credence to the emerging view of hepatocytes as active participants of liver injury. Broadly speaking, our microsystem makes it possible to monitor paracrine crosstalk between two cell types communicating via the same signaling molecule (e.g. TGF-β). PMID:26480303

  2. Tetramethylpyrazine reduces inflammation in liver fibrosis and inhibits inflammatory cytokine expression in hepatic stellate cells by modulating NLRP3 inflammasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiafei; Zhang, Feng; Xiong, Xin; Lu, Chunfeng; Lian, Naqi; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2015-04-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is concomitant with liver inflammation, which has been highlighted as significant treatment of chronic liver disease. We previously demonstrated that tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), the effective component of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort, can inhibit the activation of HSCs and consequential anti-hepatic fibrosis. In this study, our work demonstrated that TMP improved liver histological architecture, decreased hepatic enzyme levels and attenuated collagen deposition in the rat fibrotic liver. In addition, TMP significantly protected the liver from CCl4-caused injury and fibrogenesis by suppressing inflammation with reducing levels of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), NLRP3, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Experiments in vitro showed that TMP inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression in HSCs associated with disrupting platelet-derived growth factor-b receptor (PDGF-βR)/NLRP3/caspase1 pathway. These data collectively indicate that TMP can attenuate liver inflammation in liver fibrosis and possibly by targeting HSCs via PDGF-βR/NLRP3/caspase1 pathway. It provides novel mechanistic insights into TMP as a potential therapeutic remedy for hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25847612

  3. VLPs of Leptopilina boulardi share biogenesis and overall stellate morphology with VLPs of the heterotoma clade.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Gwenaelle; Rajwani, Roma; Paddibhatla, Indira; Morales, Jorge; Govind, Shubha

    2011-09-01

    Viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) of insect parasitoids modify host-parasite interactions. The Drosophila wasp, Leptopilina heterotoma, produce 300 nm spiked VLPs that bind to the host's blood cells via surface projections. L. heterotoma is a generalist wasp that attacks over a dozen Drosophila species. Oviposition introduces VLPs into the hemolymph of Drosophila larvae. VLPs lyse hemocytes and obliterate immune signaling in infected larval hosts. L. boulardi, a member of a distinct Leptopilina clade, is a specialist, whose host range is limited to the melanogaster group. As a step toward understanding a potential relationship between venom contents and host range in these wasps, we used electron microscopy to characterize VLPs from the virulent L. boulardi-17 (Lb-17) strain. While the Lb-17 VLPs can neither lyse blood cells nor suppress host defense, their biogenesis is surprisingly similar to that of L. heterotoma. Like L. heterotoma VLPs, L. boulardi VLPs are stellate; but they have fewer spikes, each spike being significantly longer than the spikes in L. heterotoma VLPs. The Lb-17 VLPs possess a dimple, making them clearly distinct from L. heterotoma VLPs. We discuss the significance of these cross-clade differences in VLP morphologies in relation to their biological activities and the host range of the wasp. PMID:21704090

  4. Displaced avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament: Treated by stellate steel plate fixation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lijun; Tian, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: The open reduction with internal fixation is an effective approach for treatment of avulsion fracture of posterior cruciate ligament. The previously used internal fixation materials including hollow screws, absorbable screw, tension bands and sutures have great defects such as insufficient fixation strength, susceptibility to re-fracture, etc. Stellate steel plate is novel material for internal fixation which has unique gear-like structure design. We used stellate steel plate for treatment of displaced avulsion fractures of posterior cruciate ligament in this study. Materials and Methods: 14 patients (9 men, 5 women; aged, 19–35 years; mean age, 28 years) with displaced avulsion fractures of the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament were retrospectively analyzed between June 2009 and June 2011. The mean duration from injury to the operation was 8.3 days (range 6–15 days). All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of a stellate steel plate (DePuy, Raynham, MA 02767, USA). The Lysholm-Tegner knee function score criteria were used to analyze results. Results: The mean followup was 24.6 months (range 18–32 months). After 6 months, all the fractures healed and knee joint activity was normal, with no knee stiffness or instability. The Lysholm-Tegner scores were 97.1 ± 1.7 points at the final followup. Conclusion: Owing to its unique gear structure, the stellate steel plate design can effectively fix an avulsion fracture block and it is a simple operation with short postoperative rehabilitation time and firm fixation. PMID:26015605

  5. Fine structure and Ca-ATPase activity of the stratum intermedium cells during odontogenesis in gars, Lepisosteus, Actinopterygii.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Ichiro; Ishiyama, Mikio

    2002-01-01

    This is the first report on the stratum intermedium in vertebrates other than mammals. The aim of this study is to elucidate the fine structure and cytochemical features of the stratum intermedium during the stages of enameloid formation in Lepisosteus. Inner dental epithelium, stratum intermedium, stellate reticulum, and outer dental epithelium are consistently present in the tooth germs of Lepisosteus. The stratum intermedium cells are oval in shape, contain elliptical nuclei, and extend many small processes. It is implied that the structure of the enamel organ is different among actinopterygians, and that constitution of the enamel organ in Lepisosteus resembles that in higher vertebrates. Marked Ca-ATPase activity is observed at the cell membrane of the stratum intermedium cells, suggesting that the cells are involved in calcium transport during the stages of enameloid formation.

  6. Detecting transforming growth factor-β release from liver cells using an aptasensor integrated with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Haque, Amranul; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    We developed a cell-culture/biosensor platform consisting of aptamer-modified Au electrodes integrated with reconfigurable microfluidics for monitoring of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), an important inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokine. Aptamers were thiolated, labeled with redox reporters, and self-assembled on gold surfaces. The biosensor was determined to be specific for TGF-β1 with an experimental detection limit of 1 ng/mL and linear range extending to 250 ng/mL. Upon determining figures of merit, aptasensor was miniaturized and integrated with human hepatic stellate cells inside microfluidic devices. Reconfigurable microfluidics were developed to ensure that seeding of "sticky" stromal cells did not foul the electrode and compromise sensor performance. This microsystem with integrated aptasensors was used to monitor TGF-β1 release from activated stellate cells over the course of 20 h. The electrochemical response went down upon infusing anti-TGF-β1 antibodies into the microfluidic devices containing activated stellate cells. To further validate aptasensor responses, stellate cells were stained for markers of activation (e.g., alpha smooth muscle actin) and were also tested for presence of TGF-β1 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the importance of TGF-β1 as a fibrogenic signal, a microsystem with integrated biosensors for local and continuous detection of TGF-β1 may prove to be an important tool to study fibrosis of the liver and other organs.

  7. Stellate nonhereditary idiopathic foveomacular retinoschisis concomitant to exudative maculopathies.

    PubMed

    Casalino, G; Upendran, M; Bandello, F; Chakravarthy, U

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo report the clinical course of patients presenting with stellate nonhereditary idiopathic foveomacular retinoschisis (SNIFR) concomitant with exudative maculopathies.MethodsRetrospective case series. Multimodal imaging findings, including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were reviewed. Genetic testing for the RS1 gene was performed in one patient.ResultsWe identified two female patients who fit the definition of SNIFR and presented with concomitant neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD). In both the patients, SD-OCT showed exudative macular features and splitting (bilateral in patient 1, unilateral in patient 2) of the outer plexiform layer (OPL) in the macula with no other evidence of hereditary or an acquired predisposing condition. Genetic testing excluded mutation of RS1 gene in patient 1. The fundi of both the patients showed characteristic signs of active choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and following anti-VEGF treatment, visual acuity improved and CNV-related exudative changes resolved. However, the split along the OPL remained unaltered.ConclusionsSNIFR may be associated with n-AMD. It is important to recognise the presence of retinoschisis when there is other exudative pathology as the former may be misinterpreted as intraretinal fluid, prompting unnecessary treatment. PMID:26915743

  8. Cell sedimentation with gravity activation.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, G; Goldman-Leikin, R; Reid, D

    1988-12-01

    Murine monoclonal antibody T101 has been coupled to thinly polymer-coated heavy alloy particles (LaMn2Ge2). These conjugates are coupled to cultured cells of the human T-cell leukemia line RPMI 8402 (T8402). The sedimentation velocities of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached are measured. After determining the mean radii of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached, one may compute a mean number of 33 particles attached to a cell. Independently one may compute a mean number of 144 particles/cell for surface saturation. The Appendix handles the underlying theory in three parts: number of particles/cell, saturation number of particles/cell, and resolution for gravity activation. Regarding the latter, cell radii from 4 to 10 microns and particle radii from 0.01 to 1 micron are considered.

  9. An ultrastructural study of the stellate ganglion of the pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemestrina).

    PubMed Central

    Leong, S K; Wong, W C

    1989-01-01

    The stellate ganglia of Macaca nemestrina were studied with the electron microscope, using the conventional and chromate-dichromate methods of aldehyde fixation. The principal neurons are multipolar and mostly mononucleated. They measure between 10 and 50 microns in their average somal diameters. The organelles of the perikaryon are arranged in perinuclear, intermediate and peripheral zones. Unusual organelles consisting of stacks of closely apposed paired membranes, with or without dense bodies studded on their surfaces, are encountered. Nuclear eccentricity is a regular feature of the neuron and the nuclear membrane shows a varying degree of invagination. All parts of the neurons are surrounded by satellite or Schwann cells though dendritic surfaces in direct contact with the basal lamina associated with the satellite cells are not uncommonly seen. Features peculiar to dendrites have been described. Structures resembling dendritic growth cones are present in abundance. Most synapses are axodendritic; axosomatic synapses are much less frequently encountered. While most synapses are of the simple type, complex types are also present. Desmosome-like junctional complexes exist between dendrites, dendrites and somata and axons and dendrites. Differences between Schwann cells of myelinated axons and those of myelinated axons and satellite cells have been noted. In addition to an abundance of macrophages, other connective tissue cells such as mast cells, fibroblasts and plasma cells are also present. Degenerative profiles observed include neuronal cell bodies and cell processes, especially dendrites. They are phagocytosed by the satellite cells and macrophages. The presence of degenerative profiles, chromatolytic neurons and structures resembling dendritic growth cones in the normal stellate ganglion has been discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Figs. 19

  10. Propofol postsynaptically suppresses stellate neuron excitability in the entorhinal cortex by influencing the HCN and TREK-2 channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Pan, Ke; Zhu, Dan; Li, Yuping; Tao, Guocai

    2016-04-21

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) provides a majority of the excitatory inputs to the hippocampus and is part of the neural circuitry that is involved in memory formation. Although many studies have investigated the effects of propofol in the hippocampus, the function of propofol in the EC remains unclear. Here, using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we found that propofol induced a postsynaptic outward current and dramatically suppressed the firing rates in the entorhinal stellate neurons, the axons of which form the perforant pathway and relay the main inputs to hippocampus. Propofol-induced inhibition in the EC was mediated by a dual ionic mechanism, including both HCN channel inhibition and TREK-2 channel activation, which form a subtype of two-pore-domain K(+) channels. The inhibitory action of propofol observed in the EC might provide a mechanism for the anesthetic effect of propofol. Considering the crucial role of the EC in learning and memory, our findings may provide insight into the acute amnesic effect induced by propofol.

  11. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be considered a

  12. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be considered a

  13. Effects of Fluvastatin on Characteristics of Stellate Ganglion Neurons in a Rabbit Model of Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Jun; Li, Guang-Ping; Li, Jian; Chen, Yan; Wang, Xing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stellate ganglion (SG) plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases. The electrical activity of SG neurons is involved in the regulation of the autonomic nervous system. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of fluvastatin on the electrophysiological characteristics of SG neurons in a rabbit model of myocardial ischemia (MI). Methods: The MI model was induced by abdominal subcutaneous injections of isoproterenol in rabbits. Using whole-cell patch clamp technique, we studied the characteristic changes of ion channels and action potentials (APs) in isolated SG neurons in control group (n = 20), MI group (n = 20) and fluvastatin pretreated group (fluvastatin group, n = 20), respectively. The protein expression of sodium channel in SG was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Results: MI and the intervention of fluvastatin did not have significantly influence on the characteristics of delayed rectifier potassium channel currents. The maximal peak current density of sodium channel currents in SG neurons along with the characteristics of activation curves, inactivation curves, and recovery curves after inactivation were changed in the MI group. The peak current densities of control group, MI group, and fluvastatin group (n = 10 in each group) were −71.77 ± 23.22 pA/pF, −126.75 ± 18.90 pA/pF, and −86.42 ± 28.30 pA/pF, respectively (F = 4.862, P = 0.008). Fluvastatin can decrease the current amplitude which has been increased by MI. Moreover, fluvastatin induced the inactivation curves and post-inactive recovery curves moving to the position of the control group. But the expression of sodium channel-associated protein (Nav1.7) had no significantly statistical difference among the three groups. The percentages of Nav1.7 protein in control group, MI group, and fluvastatin group (n = 5 in each group) were 21.49 ± 7.33%, 28.53 ± 8.26%, and 21.64 ± 2.78%, respectively (F = 1.495, P = 0.275). Moreover, MI reduced the electrical

  14. [Meiotic gynogenesis in the stellate, Russian sturgeon and sterlet].

    PubMed

    Rekubratskiĭ, A V; Grunina, A S; Barmintsev, V A; Golovanova, T S; Chudinov, O S; Abramova, A B; Panchenko, N S; Kupchenko, S A

    2003-01-01

    Diploid gynogenetic progenies were obtained in the stellate sturgeon Acipenser stellatus, Russian sturgeon A. gueldenstaedtii, and sterlet A. ruthenus by means of insemination of the eggs with UV-irradiated spermatozoa and suppression of the second meiotic division by heat shock. The gynogenetic nature of experimental fish was confirmed by RAPD-PCR analysis of DNA. Effective photoreactivation of UV-induced lesions of spermatozoa was shown in the case of illumination of the fertilized eggs with visible light. This phenomenon should be taken into account when determining the doses of irradiation that allow inactivation of the male chromosomes and incubating gynogenetic embryos. Gynogenetic stellate and Russian sturgeons are viable and can be reared in order to study the mechanism of sex determination in sturgeons. PMID:12722590

  15. Acoustofluidic Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Nissly, Ruth Helmus; Ren, Liqiang; Ozcelik, Adem; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-12-15

    Selective isolation of cell subpopulations with defined biological characteristics is crucial for many biological studies and clinical applications. In this work, we present the development of an acoustofluidic fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) device that simultaneously performs on-demand, high-throughput, high-resolution cell detection and sorting, integrated onto a single chip. Our acoustofluidic FACS device uses the "microfluidic drifting" technique to precisely focus cells/particles three dimensionally and achieves a flow of single-file particles/cells as they pass through a laser interrogation region. We then utilize short bursts (150 μs) of standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW) triggered by an electronic feedback system to sort fluorescently labeled particles/cells with desired biological properties. We have demonstrated continuous isolation of fluorescently labeled HeLa cells from unlabeled cells at a throughput of ∼1200 events/s with a purity reaching 92.3 ± 3.39%. Furthermore, 99.18% postsort cell viability indicates that our acoustofluidic sorting technique maintains a high integrity of cells. Therefore, our integrated acoustofluidic FACS device is demonstrated to achieve two-way cell sorting with high purity, biocompatibility, and biosafety. We believe that our device has significant potential for use as a low-cost, high-performance, portable, and user-friendly FACS instrument.

  16. The Role of Mesothelial Cells in Liver Development, Injury, and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lua, Ingrid; Asahina, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Mesothelial cells (MCs) cover the surface of visceral organs and the parietal walls of cavities, and they synthesize lubricating fluids to create a slippery surface that facilitates movement between organs without friction. Recent studies have indicated that MCs play active roles in liver development, fibrosis, and regeneration. During liver development, the mesoderm produces MCs that form a single epithelial layer of the mesothelium. MCs exhibit an intermediate phenotype between epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells. Lineage tracing studies have indicated that during liver development, MCs act as mesenchymal progenitor cells that produce hepatic stellate cells, fibroblasts around blood vessels, and smooth muscle cells. Upon liver injury, MCs migrate inward from the liver surface and produce hepatic stellate cells or myofibroblast depending on the etiology, suggesting that MCs are the source of myofibroblasts in capsular fibrosis. Similar to the activation of hepatic stellate cells, transforming growth factor β induces the conversion of MCs into myofibroblasts. Further elucidation of the biological and molecular changes involved in MC activation and fibrogenesis will contribute to the development of novel approaches for the prevention and therapy of liver fibrosis. PMID:26934883

  17. An M₁₈L₂₄ stellated cuboctahedron through post-stellation of an M₁₂L₂₄ core.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-Fu; Sato, Sota; Fujita, Makoto

    2012-03-11

    Platonic and Archimedean polyhedra, well-known to mathematicians, have been recently constructed by chemists at a molecular scale by defining the vertices and the edges with metal ions (M) and organic ligands (L), respectively. Here, we report the first synthesis of a concave-surface 'stellated polyhedron', constructed by extending the faces of its precursor polyhedron until they intersect, forming additional nodes. Our approach involves the formation of an M(12)L(24) cuboctahedron core, the linkers of which each bear a pendant ligand site that is subsequently able to bind an additional metal centre to form the stellated M(18)L(24) cuboctahedron. During this post-stellation process, the square faces of the M(12)L(24) core are closed by coordination of the pendant moieties to the additional metal centres, but they are re-opened on removing these metals ions from the vertices. This behaviour is reminiscent of the analogous metal-triggered gate opening-closing switches found in spherical virus capsids.

  18. All-In-One: Advanced preparation of Human Parenchymal and Non-Parenchymal Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Melanie; Driftmann, Sabrina; Kleinehr, Kathrin; Kaiser, Gernot M.; Mathé, Zotlan; Treckmann, Juergen-Walter; Paul, Andreas; Skibbe, Kathrin; Timm, Joerg; Canbay, Ali; Gerken, Guido; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Broering, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver cells are key players in innate immunity. Thus, studying primary isolated liver cells is necessary for determining their role in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In particular, the quantity and quality of isolated cells are crucial to their function. Our aim was to isolate a large quantity of high-quality human parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells from a single liver specimen. Methods Hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and stellate cells were isolated from liver tissues by collagenase perfusion in combination with low-speed centrifugation, density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic-activated cell sorting. The purity and functionality of cultured cell populations were controlled by determining their morphology, discriminative cell marker expression, and functional activity. Results Cell preparation yielded the following cell counts per gram of liver tissue: 2.0±0.4×107 hepatocytes, 1.8±0.5×106 Kupffer cells, 4.3±1.9×105 liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and 3.2±0.5×105 stellate cells. Hepatocytes were identified by albumin (95.5±1.7%) and exhibited time-dependent activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Kupffer cells expressed CD68 (94.5±1.2%) and exhibited phagocytic activity, as determined with 1μm latex beads. Endothelial cells were CD146+ (97.8±1.1%) and exhibited efficient uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Hepatic stellate cells were identified by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (97.1±1.5%). These cells further exhibited retinol (vitamin A)-mediated autofluorescence. Conclusions Our isolation procedure for primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells resulted in cell populations of high purity and quality, with retained physiological functionality in vitro. Thus, this system may provide a valuable tool for determining liver function and disease. PMID:26407160

  19. Hexon modification to improve the activity of oncolytic adenovirus vectors against neoplastic and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schmidt, Christoph Q Andreas; Wortmann, Andreas; Bachem, Max G; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Stellate Elements of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, G.; Bonaccorsi, S.; Robbins, L. G.; Pimpinelli, S.

    1994-01-01

    Repeated elements are remarkably important for male meiosis and spermiogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Pairing of the X and Y chromosomes is mediated by the ribosomal RNA genes of the Y chromosome and X chromosome heterochromatin, spermiogenesis depends on the fertility factors of the Y chromosome. Intriguingly, a peculiar genetic system of interaction between the Y-linked crystal locus and the X-linked Stellate elements seem to be also involved in male meiosis and spermiogenesis. Deletion of the crystal element of the Y, via an interaction with the Stellate elements of the X, causes meiotic abnormalities, gamete-genotype dependent failure of sperm development (meiotic drive), and deposition of protein crystals in spermatocytes. The current hypothesis is that the meiotic abnormalities observed in cry(-) males is due to an induced overexpression of the normally repressed Ste elements. An implication of this hypothesis is that the strength of the abnormalities would depend on the amount of the Ste copies. To test this point we have genetically and cytologically examined the relationship of Ste copy number and organization to meiotic behavior in cry(-) males. We found that heterochromatic as well as euchromatic Ste repeats are functional and that the abnormality in chromosome condensation and the frequency of nondisjunction are related to Ste copy number. Moreover, we found that meiosis is disrupted after synapsis and that cry-induced meiotic drive is probably not mediated by Ste. PMID:7896100

  1. Tracking and treating activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, N.H.; Nadithe, V.; Elsayed, M.; Merkel, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation, T cells of various subsets are the most important mediators in cell-mediated immune responses. Activated T cells play an important role in immune system related diseases such as chronic inflammatory diseases, viral infections, autoimmune disease, transplant rejection, Crohn disease, diabetes, and many more. Therefore, efforts have been made to both visualize and treat activated T cells specifically. This review summarizes imaging approaches and selective therapeutics for activated T cells and gives an outlook on how tracking and treating can be combined into theragnositc agents for activated T cells. PMID:24660025

  2. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  3. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  4. Identification of 6-octadecynoic acid from a methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist.

    PubMed

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Nakai, Naomi; Kawachi, Atsushi; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Neffati, Mohamed; Akita, Toru; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Mori, Naoki; Irie, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Masaya

    2013-10-18

    6-Octadecynoic acid (6-ODA), a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified in the methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Fibrogenesis caused by hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by PPARγ whose ligands are clinically used for the treatment of diabetes. Plant extracts of Marrubium vulgare L., were screened for activity to inhibit fibrosis in the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6 using Oil Red-O staining, which detects lipids that typically accumulate in quiescent hepatic stellate cells. A methanol extract with activity to stimulate accumulation of lipids was obtained. This extract was found to have PPARγ agonist activity using a luciferase reporter assay. After purification using several chromatographic methods, 6-ODA, a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified as a candidate of PPARγ agonist. Synthesized 6-ODA and its derivative 9-octadecynoic acid (9-ODA), which both have a triple bond but in different positions, activated PPARγ in a luciferase reporter assay and increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a PPARγ-dependent manner. There is little information about the biological activity of fatty acids with a triple bond, and to our knowledge, this is the first report that 6-ODA and 9-ODA function as PPARγ agonists.

  5. Dormancy activation mechanism of tracheal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Xu, Jing-xian; Jia, Xin-Shan; Li, Wen-ya; Han, Yi-chen; Wang, En-hua; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate markers and molecular mechanisms of stem cell dormancy and activation are poorly understood. In this study, the anti-cancer drug, 5-fluorouracil, was used to selectively kill proliferating cells of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cell line. This method can enrich and purify stem cell population. The dormant versus active status of stem cells was determined by phosphorylation of RNAp II Ser2. The surviving stem cells were cultured to form stem cell spheres expressing stem cell markers and transplanted into nude mice to form a teratoma. The results demonstrated the properties of stem cells and potential for multi-directional differentiation. Bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter by 5-FU resulted in Sox2 expression in the dormant stem cells. This study shows that the dormancy and activation of HBE stem cells is closely related to epigenetic modification. PMID:27009861

  6. Dynamic mast cell-stromal cell interactions promote growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Hwang, Rosa F.; Logsdon, Craig D.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exists in a complex desmoplastic microenvironment, which includes cancer-associated fibroblasts (also known as pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) and immune cells that provide a fibrotic niche that impedes successful cancer therapy. We have found that mast cells are essential for PDAC tumorigenesis. Whether mast cells contribute to the growth of PDAC and/or PSCs is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cells contribute to the growth of PSCs and tumor cells, thus contributing to PDAC development. Tumor cells promoted mast cell migration. Both tumor cells and PSCs stimulated mast cell activation. Conversely, mast cell-derived IL-13 and tryptase stimulated PSC proliferation. Treating tumor-bearing mice with agents that block mast cell migration and function depressed PDAC growth. Our findings suggest that mast cells exacerbate the cellular and extracellular dynamics of the tumor microenvironment found in PDAC. Therefore, targeting mast cells may inhibit stromal formation and improve therapy. PMID:23633481

  7. Evaluation of new approach to ultrasound guided stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Anju; Kaushik, Teshi; Kundu, Zile Singh; Wadhera, Sarthak; Wadhera, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound imaging is an ideal tool for stellate ganglion block (SGB) due to clarity, portability, lack of radiation, and low cost. Ultrasound guided anterior approach requires the application of pressure to the anterior neck and is associated with more risk of injury to inferior thyroid artery, vertebral artery, and esophagus. The lateral approach does not interfere with nerve or vascular structures. Blockade at the C6 vertebral level results in more successful sympathetic blockade of the head and neck with less sympathetic blockade of the upper extremity compared to sympathetic blockade at C7 vertebral level, which produces successful sympathetic blockade of upper extremity. This is helpful in patients of complex regional pain syndrome of the upper limb. Hence, we conducted a study using the lateral approach at C7 level. Materials and Methods: Ultrasound guided SGBs using lateral in-plane technique at C7 level were given in 20 patients suffering from chronic pain patients of upper extremity, head, and neck using 4 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and 1 ml of 40 mg triamcinolone. The patients were assessed for a numeric pain intensity score (NPIS), the rise in axillary temperature, the range of motion of joints of upper extremity, and resolution of edema at various time intervals up to 3 months. Results: NPIS showed a statistically significant decrease from baseline at 30 min, which was sustained till 3rd month. The rise in axillary temperature after the block was statistically significant, which was sustained till 2nd week. The edema score decreased significantly at all-time intervals (P ≤ 0.001). The restriction of motion in all joints of upper limb decreased from 13 to 3 patients. Conclusion: There is a significant variation in the anatomy of stellate ganglion at the level of C6 and C7. Ultrasound guided lateral approach increases the efficacy of SGB by deposition of drug subfascially with real-time imaging. PMID:27051366

  8. Pilot evaluation of a stellate ganglion block for the treatment of hot flashes

    PubMed Central

    Pachman, Deirdre R.; Barton, Debra; Carns, Paul E.; Novotny, Paul J.; Wolf, Sherry; Linquist, Breanna; Kohli, Sadhna; Smith, DeAnne R.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Hot flashes are a significant problem in breast cancer patients, especially because the most effective therapy, estrogen, is often contraindicated. Based on recent pilot data from a single group supporting the use of a stellate ganglion block for the treatment of hot flashes, the present pilot trial was done to further evaluate the hypothesis that a stellate ganglion block may be a safe and effective therapy for hot flashes. Methods In women with breast cancer who had hot flashes, a stellate ganglion block was performed after 1 week of baseline hot flash data collection. The main efficacy measures were the changes from baseline in hot flash frequency and hot flash score during the 6th week. Results Ten patients were enrolled between 4/23/2009 and 7/10/2009; eight patients were evaluable. After the stellate ganglion block, the mean hot flash frequency and score decreased from baseline values by over 60% during some of the post-treatment weeks. The mean hot flash frequency and score at week 6 decreased from baseline values by 44% and 45%, respectively. There were no significant adverse events clearly attributed to the stellate ganglion blocks. Conclusions The results of this pilot trial support that stellate ganglion blocks may be a helpful therapy for hot flashes. A prospective placebo-controlled clinical trial should be done to more definitively determine this contention. PMID:20496155

  9. Biochemical and immunocytochemical characterization and distribution of phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated subunits of neurofilaments in squid giant axon and stellate ganglion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R S; Pant, H C; House, S; Gainer, H

    1987-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to squid neurofilament (aNFP) and intermediate filament (aIFA) proteins were used as probes for the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses of neurofilament structure and distribution in the squid giant axon and stellate ganglion. On Western blots the aNFP antibody stained exclusively the 220 kDa and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components of neurofilaments in the giant axon, whereas the aIFA antibody primarily labeled the 60 kDa protein in the giant axon and the 60 and 65 kDa proteins in the stellate ganglion. Dephosphorylation of axoplasmic proteins by alkaline phosphatase resulted in a decrease in the molecular weights of both the 220 kDa and HMW neurofilament proteins and a concomitant loss of reactivity with the aNFP antibody on Western blots. This indicated that the aNFP antibody is specific for a phosphorylated epitope in the neurofilament. Increased dephosphorylation of the 220 kDa protein led to an enhanced immunostaining of the resultant 190 kDa polypeptide by the aIFA antibody, suggesting that the phosphorylated epitope may mask the conserved epitope recognized by aIFA. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical studies show intense labeling by the aNFP antibody in the giant axon. In contrast, the aIFA antibody labeled the glial cells around the giant axon intensely, while labeling of the giant axon itself was considerably less than that with the aNFP antibody. Since the 60 kDa protein in axoplasm is intensely stained by the aIFA antibody on Western blots, the relatively low amounts of labeling seen on semithin and thin sections of the giant axon by this antibody may be due to the masking of the 60 kDa protein by in situ fixed axoplasmic proteins. However, the aIFA antibody intensely labeled glial cells within the stellate ganglion and "islands" of filaments and nuclear membranes within ganglion cells. No reactivity for either antibody was seen in synapses. The aNFP antibody specifically labeled "beadlike" portions and

  10. Antibacterial activity of human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro effects of human NK cells on viability of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was investigated. PBLs depleted of glass- adherent cells showed a significant antibacterial activity that was increased as the concentration of NK cells became higher. Leu-11- enriched cells exhibited the most efficient bactericidal activity. Stimulation of NK cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B for 16 h produced a significant increase in the antibacterial activity of all NK cells tested. The antibacterial activity of monocyte-depleted cells and Leu-11-enriched cells was also enhanced after culturing in vitro for 16- 24 h without exogenous cytokines. Dependence of the antibacterial activity on the presence of serum in the culture medium was not found. Ultrastructural studies revealed close contact between NK cell membranes and bacteria, no evidence of phagocytosis, and extracellular bacterial ghosts, after incubation at 37 degrees C. Supernatants from purified NK cells exhibited potent bactericidal activity with kinetics and target specificity similar to that of effector cells. These results document the potent antibacterial activity of purified NK cells and suggest an extracellular mechanism of killing. PMID:2642532

  11. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  12. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  13. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells.

  14. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  15. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  16. Distinct speed dependence of entorhinal island and ocean cells, including respective grid cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Kitamura, Takashi; Yamamoto, Jun; Martin, Jared; Pignatelli, Michele; Kitch, Lacey J.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Entorhinal–hippocampal circuits in the mammalian brain are crucial for an animal’s spatial and episodic experience, but the neural basis for different spatial computations remain unknown. Medial entorhinal cortex layer II contains pyramidal island and stellate ocean cells. Here, we performed cell type-specific Ca2+ imaging in freely exploring mice using cellular markers and a miniature head-mounted fluorescence microscope. We found that both oceans and islands contain grid cells in similar proportions, but island cell activity, including activity in a proportion of grid cells, is significantly more speed modulated than ocean cell activity. We speculate that this differential property reflects island cells’ and ocean cells’ contribution to different downstream functions: island cells may contribute more to spatial path integration, whereas ocean cells may facilitate contextual representation in downstream circuits. PMID:26170279

  17. Stem cell tracking with optically active nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Cui, Yan; Chan, Jerry KY; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies hold promise and potential to address many unmet clinical needs. Cell tracking with modern imaging modalities offers insight into the underlying biological process of the stem-cell-based therapies, with the goal to reveal cell survival, migration, homing, engraftment, differentiation, and functions. Adaptability, sensitivity, resolution, and non-invasiveness have contributed to the longstanding use of optical imaging for stem cell tracking and analysis. To identify transplanted stem cells from the host tissue, optically active probes are usually used to label stem cells before the administration. In comparison to the traditional fluorescent probes like fluorescent proteins and dyes, nanoparticle-based probes are advantageous in terms of the photo-stabilities and minimal changes to the cell phenotype. The main focus here is to overview the recent development of optically active nanoparticles for stem cells tracking. The related optical imaging modalities include fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging. PMID:23638335

  18. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  19. The action of cholinergic agonists on the squid stellate ganglion giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Stanley, E F

    1984-07-01

    Although the giant synapse in the squid stellate ganglion has served as a model in the understanding of the ionic and electrical changes that occur during the release of transmitter from nerve terminals, little is known about the pharmacology of this synapse or the identity of its neurotransmitter. In the present study, the suggestion that acetylcholine (ACh) is the excitatory transmitter at this synapse was tested by exploring the actions of cholinergic agents on the pre- and postsynaptic giant axons and on the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP). A novel arterial perfusion technique that circumvents the diffusion barrier from the bathing medium to the synapse has been used to demonstrate a depolarizing action of ACh and its agonist carbachol on the post- but not the presynaptic axon. The cholinergic receptors are distinct from receptors activated by amino acids, such as glutamate, have a reversal potential of about -48 mV, are anion-permeable, and desensitize without blocking the EPSP. It is concluded that these receptors are involved in an inhibitory input onto the postsynaptic giant axon and, therefore, that ACh is most probably not the transmitter at the squid giant synapse.

  20. Activity-driven fluctuations in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, É.; Guo, M.; Gov, N. S.; Visco, P.; Weitz, D. A.; van Wijland, F.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a model for the dynamics of a probe embedded in a living cell, where both thermal fluctuations and nonequilibrium activity coexist. The model is based on a confining harmonic potential describing the elastic cytoskeletal matrix, which undergoes random active hops as a result of the nonequilibrium rearrangements within the cell. We describe the probe's statistics and we bring forth quantities affected by the nonequilibrium activity. We find an excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and experimental results for tracers inside living cells. Finally, we exploit our model to arrive at quantitative predictions for the parameters characterizing nonequilibrium activity, such as the typical time scale of the activity and the amplitude of the active fluctuations.

  1. Chemical ablation of stellate ganglion for head and neck cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Ghai, A; Kaushik, T; Kumar, R; Wadhera, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of patient with orofacial cancer having pain on one side of face affecting her ability to speak, chew, swallow and sleep leading to emotional and behavioral deterioration. A diagnostic stellate ganglion block was performed followed by chemical neurolysis using phenol under ultrasound guidance, to prevent complications due to inadvertent spread of drug. Her pain scores decreased drastically, she was able to chew and swallow. Weighing the risk of permanent Horner's syndrome or motor paralysis with benefit of improvement in basic functioning of debilitated patients chemical neurolysis of stellate ganglion can be performed with advanced imaging modalities. PMID:27363209

  2. Single Cell Analysis of Transcriptional Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Joo, Lucy M.; LeRoy, Gary; Janicki, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene activation is thought to occur through a series of temporally defined regulatory steps. However, this process has not been completely evaluated in single living mammalian cells. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the timing and coordination of gene activation events, we tracked the recruitment of GCN5 (histone acetyltransferase), RNA polymerase II, Brd2 and Brd4 (acetyl-lysine binding proteins), in relation to a VP16-transcriptional activator, to a transcription site that can be visualized in single living cells. All accumulated rapidly with the VP16 activator as did the transcribed RNA. RNA was also detected at significantly more transcription sites in cells expressing the VP16-activator compared to a p53-activator. After α-amanitin pre-treatment, the VP16-activator, GCN5, and Brd2 are still recruited to the transcription site but the chromatin does not decondense. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that a strong activator can rapidly overcome the condensed chromatin structure of an inactive transcription site and supercede the expected requirement for regulatory events to proceed in a temporally defined order. Additionally, activator strength determines the number of cells in which transcription is induced as well as the extent of chromatin decondensation. As chromatin decondensation is significantly reduced after α-amanitin pre-treatment, despite the recruitment of transcriptional activation factors, this provides further evidence that transcription drives large-scale chromatin decondensation. PMID:20422051

  3. Transition from circular to stellate forms of submarine volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.

    2001-02-01

    Large volcanic islands and guyots have stellate forms that reflect the relief of radiating volcanic rift zones, multiple volcanic centers, and embayments due to giant flank failures. Small mid-ocean ridge volcanoes, in contrast, are commonly subcircular in plan view and show only embryonic rift zones. In order to characterize the transition between these two end-members the morphology of 141 seamounts and guyots was studied using the shape of the depth contour at half the height of each edifice. Irregularity was characterized by measuring perimeter distance, elongation, and moment of inertia of the contours, assuming an "ideal" edifice is circular. The analysis reveals a general transition over 2-4 km edifice height (best transition estimate 3 km), while some large edifices 4-5 km high show no major embayments or ridges, suggesting considerable variation in the effectiveness of mechanisms that cause flank instability and growth of rift zones. The various origins of the transition are discussed, and the upper limit of magma chambers, many of which lie above the basement of the larger edifices, is proposed to affect the morphologic complexity via a number of mechanisms and is an important factor affecting the mode of growth. The origins of the truncated cone shape of mid-ocean ridge volcanoes are also discussed. Of the eruption mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their flat summits, the most likely mechanisms involve eruption from small ephemeral magma bodies lying within the low-density upper oceanic crust. The discussion includes speculations on factors affecting the depths of magma chambers beneath oceanic volcanoes. Supporting table is available via Web browser or via Anonymous FTP from ftp://kosmos.agu.org, directory "append" (Username = "anonymous", Password ="guest"); subdirectories in the ftp site are arranged by paper number. Information on searching and submitting electronic supplements is found at http://www.agu.org/pubs/csupp_about.html.

  4. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  5. Kinetic Discrimination in T-Cell Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Beeson, Craig; Lyons, Daniel S.; Davis, Mark M.; McConnell, Harden M.

    1996-02-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model.

  6. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  7. Membrane-to-nucleus signaling links insulin-like growth factor-1- and stem cell factor-activated pathways.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Asuzu, David T; Gibbons, Simon J; Aarsvold, Kirsten H; Bardsley, Michael R; Lomberk, Gwen A; Mathison, Angela J; Kendrick, Michael L; Shen, K Robert; Taguchi, Takahiro; Gupta, Anu; Rubin, Brian P; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Farrugia, Gianrico; Urrutia, Raul A; Ordog, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell factor (mouse: Kitl, human: KITLG) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), acting via KIT and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), respectively, are critical for the development and integrity of several tissues. Autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT and IGF1-IGF1R signaling are also activated in several cancers including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), the most common sarcoma. In murine gastric muscles, IGF1 promotes Kitl-dependent development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), the non-neoplastic counterpart of GIST, suggesting cooperation between these pathways. Here, we report a novel mechanism linking IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT signaling in both normal and neoplastic cells. In murine gastric muscles, the microenvironment for ICC and GIST, human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2), a model for cancer niches, and GIST cells, IGF1 stimulated Kitl/KITLG protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity by activating several signaling pathways including AKT-mediated glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibition (GSK3i). GSK3i alone also stimulated Kitl/KITLG expression without activating mitogenic pathways. Both IGF1 and GSK3i induced chromatin-level changes favoring transcriptional activation at the Kitl promoter including increased histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3 lysine (K) 4 methylation, reduced H3K9 and H3K27 methylation and reduced occupancy by the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2. By pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of chromatin modifiers we demonstrated that these changes have the predicted impact on KITLG expression. KITLG knock-down and immunoneutralization inhibited the proliferation of GIST cells expressing wild-type KIT, signifying oncogenic autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT signaling. We conclude that membrane-to-nucleus signaling involving GSK3i establishes a previously unrecognized link between the IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT pathways, which is active in both physiologic and oncogenic contexts and can be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24116170

  8. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  9. Active lithium chloride cell for spacecraft power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischmann, C. W.; Horning, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An active thionyl chloride high rate battery is under development for spacecraft operations. It is a 540kC (150 Ah) battery capable of pulses up to 75A. This paper describes the design and initial test data on a 'state-of-the-art' cell that has been selected to be the baseline for the prototype cell for that battery. Initial data indicate that the specification can be met with fresh cells. Data for stored cells and additional environmental test data are in the process of being developed.

  10. Left Stellate Ganglionectomy for the Long Q-T Interval Syndrome: Nine-Year Follow-up of a Patient

    PubMed Central

    Strickman, Neil E.; Dear, Wayne E.

    1982-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias in patients with the long Q-T interval syndrome remain difficult to treat. In 1972, the first left stellate ganglionectomy was performed successfully to alter the pattern of ventricular recovery with control of ventricular arrhythmias. To date, no long-term evaluation has been carried out in any patients who have undergone left stellate ganglion removal for control of life-threatening arrhythmias. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman previously afflicted with idiopathic prolongation of the Q-T and syncope 9 years after successful partial ablation of the left stellate ganglion for the control of ventricular tachyarrhythmia. PMID:15226961

  11. Entangled active matter: From cells to ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D. L.; Phonekeo, S.; Altshuler, E.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2016-07-01

    Both cells and ants belong to the broad field of active matter, a novel class of non-equilibrium materials composed of many interacting units that individually consume energy and collectively generate motion or mechanical stresses. However cells and ants differ from fish and birds in that they can support static loads. This is because cells and ants can be entangled, so that individual units are bound by transient links. Entanglement gives cells and ants a set of remarkable properties usually not found together, such as the ability to flow like a fluid, spring back like an elastic solid, and self-heal. In this review, we present the biology, mechanics and dynamics of both entangled cells and ants. We apply concepts from soft matter physics and wetting to characterize these systems as well as to point out their differences, which arise from their differences in size. We hope that our viewpoints will spur further investigations into cells and ants as active materials, and inspire the fabrication of synthetic active matter.

  12. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  13. Hippo Pathway Activity Influences Liver Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Yimlamai, Dean; Christodoulou, Constantina; Galli, Giorgio G.; Yanger, Kilangsungla; Pepe-Mooney, Brian; Gurung, Basanta; Shrestha, Kriti; Cahan, Patrick; Stanger, Ben Z.; Camargo, Fernando D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is an important regulator of cellular proliferation and organ size. However, little is known about the role of this cascade in the control of cell fate. Employing a combination of lineage tracing, clonal analysis, and organoid culture approaches, we demonstrate that Hippo-pathway activity is essential for the maintenance of the differentiated hepatocyte state. Remarkably, acute inactivation of Hippo-pathway signaling in vivo is sufficient to de-differentiate, at very high efficiencies, adult hepatocytes into cells bearing progenitor characteristics. These hepatocyte-derived progenitor cells demonstrate self-renewal and engraftment capacity at the single cell level. We also identify the NOTCH signaling pathway as a functional important effector downstream of the Hippo transducer YAP. Our findings uncover a potent role for Hippo/YAP signaling in controlling liver cell fate, and reveal an unprecedented level of phenotypic plasticity in mature hepatocytes, which has implications for the understanding and manipulation of liver regeneration. PMID:24906150

  14. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  15. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  16. Intracellular mechanisms of lymphoid cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fresa, K; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Activation of lymphocytes for proliferation is associated with the appearance of an intracellular factor (ADR) that can induce DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. ADR plays a role in the sequence of intracellular events leading to activation for IL-2-mediated proliferation. Because of the nature of the defining assay, the locus of ADR action appears to be near the terminal end of the transduction pathway. Interestingly, although lymphocytes from aged individuals respond poorly to proliferative stimuli, they appear to produce normal to above-normal levels of ADR. In contrast, their nuclei are only poorly responsive to stimulation by ADR. Preparations rich in ADR activity have proteolytic activity as well. In addition, aprotinin, as well as a variety of other protease inhibitors, suppresses ADR-induced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. ADR activity can be removed from active extracts by absorption with aprotinin-conjugated agarose beads, and can be removed from the beads by elution at pH 5.0. This latter suggests that ADR itself is a protease. However, its endogenous substrate is not yet known. We have also detected an inhibitor of ADR activity in the cytoplasm of resting lymphocytes. This is a heat-stable protein of approximately 60,000 Da. In addition to suppressing the interaction of ADR with quiescent nuclei, the inhibitor can suppress DNA synthetic activity of replicative nuclei isolated from mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Interestingly, these preparations had little or no activity on replicative nuclei derived from several neoplastic cell lines. The resistance of tumor cell nuclei to spontaneously occurring cytoplasmic inhibitory factors such as the one described here may provide one explanation for the loss of growth control in neoplastic cells. PMID:2642767

  17. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  18. Place cell activation predicts subsequent memory.

    PubMed

    Robitsek, R Jonathan; White, John A; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-10-01

    A major quandary in memory research is how hippocampal place cells, widely recognized as elements of a spatial map, contribute to episodic memory, our capacity to remember unique experiences that depends on hippocampal function. Here we recorded from hippocampal neurons as rats performed a T-maze alternation task in which they were required to remember a preceding experience over a delay in order to make a subsequent spatial choice. As it has been reported previously in other variations of this task, we observed differential firing that predicted correct subsequent choices, even as the animal traversed identical locations prior to the choice. Here we also observed that most place cells also fired differently on correct as compared to error trials. Among these cells, a large majority fired strongly before the delay or during the retrieval phase but were less active or failed to activate when the animal subsequently made an error. These findings join the place cell phenomenon with episodic memory performance dependent on the hippocampus, revealing that memory accuracy can be predicted by the activation of single place cells in the hippocampus.

  19. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  20. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  1. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  2. Phenotypic models of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lever, Melissa; Maini, Philip K; van der Merwe, P Anton; Dushek, Omer

    2014-09-01

    T cell activation is a crucial checkpoint in adaptive immunity, and this activation depends on the binding parameters that govern the interactions between T cell receptors (TCRs) and peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC complexes). Despite extensive experimental studies, the relationship between the TCR-pMHC binding parameters and T cell activation remains controversial. To make sense of conflicting experimental data, a variety of verbal and mathematical models have been proposed. However, it is currently unclear which model or models are consistent or inconsistent with experimental data. A key problem is that a direct comparison between the models has not been carried out, in part because they have been formulated in different frameworks. For this Analysis article, we reformulated published models of T cell activation into phenotypic models, which allowed us to directly compare them. We find that a kinetic proofreading model that is modified to include limited signalling is consistent with the majority of published data. This model makes the intriguing prediction that the stimulation hierarchy of two different pMHC complexes (or two different TCRs that are specific for the same pMHC complex) may reverse at different pMHC concentrations.

  3. Region based stellate features combined with variable selection using AdaBoost learning in mammographic computer-aided detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hoe; Choi, Jae Young; Ro, Yong Man

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a new method is developed for extracting so-called region-based stellate features to correctly differentiate spiculated malignant masses from normal tissues on mammograms. In the proposed method, a given region of interest (ROI) for feature extraction is divided into three individual subregions, namely core, inner, and outer parts. The proposed region-based stellate features are then extracted to encode the different and complementary stellate pattern information by computing the statistical characteristics for each of the three different subregions. To further maximize classification performance, a novel variable selection algorithm based on AdaBoost learning is incorporated for choosing an optimal subset of variables of region-based stellate features. In particular, we develop a new variable selection metric (criteria) that effectively determines variable importance (ranking) within the conventional AdaBoost framework. Extensive and comparative experiments have been performed on the popular benchmark mammogram database (DB). Results show that our region-based stellate features (extracted from automatically segmented ROIs) considerably outperform other state-of-the-art features developed for mammographic spiculated mass detection or classification. Our results also indicate that combining region-based stellate features with the proposed variable selection strategy has an impressive effect on improving spiculated mass classification and detection.

  4. Shape memory polymers for active cell culture.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kevin A; Luo, Xiaofan; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2011-07-04

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of "smart" materials that have the ability to change from a fixed, temporary shape to a pre-determined permanent shape upon the application of a stimulus such as heat(1-5). In a typical shape memory cycle, the SMP is first deformed at an elevated temperature that is higher than its transition temperature, T(trans;) [either the melting temperature (T(m;)) or the glass transition temperature (T(g;))]. The deformation is elastic in nature and mainly leads to a reduction in conformational entropy of the constituent network chains (following the rubber elasticity theory). The deformed SMP is then cooled to a temperature below its T(trans;) while maintaining the external strain or stress constant. During cooling, the material transitions to a more rigid state (semi-crystalline or glassy), which kinetically traps or "freezes" the material in this low-entropy state leading to macroscopic shape fixing. Shape recovery is triggered by continuously heating the material through T(trans;) under a stress-free (unconstrained) condition. By allowing the network chains (with regained mobility) to relax to their thermodynamically favored, maximal-entropy state, the material changes from the temporary shape to the permanent shape. Cells are capable of surveying the mechanical properties of their surrounding environment(6). The mechanisms through which mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment control cell behavior are areas of active research. Substrates of defined topography have emerged as powerful tools in the investigation of these mechanisms. Mesoscale, microscale, and nanoscale patterns of substrate topography have been shown to direct cell alignment, cell adhesion, and cell traction forces(7-14). These findings have underscored the potential for substrate topography to control and assay the mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment during cell culture, but the substrates used to date

  5. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells.

    PubMed

    Peña, Karina A; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-08-15

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  6. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  7. Identification of 6-octadecynoic acid from a methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Nakai, Naomi; Kawachi, Atsushi; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Neffati, Mohamed; Akita, Toru; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Mori, Naoki; Irie, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Masaya

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •6-ODA, a rare fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified from Marrubium vulgare. •6-ODA was synthesized from petroselinic acid as a starting material. •6-ODA stimulated lipid accumulation in HSC-T6 and 3T3-L1 cells. •The first report of a fatty acid with a triple bond functioning as a PPARγ agonist. •This study sheds light on novel functions of a fatty acid with a triple bond. -- Abstract: 6-Octadecynoic acid (6-ODA), a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified in the methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Fibrogenesis caused by hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by PPARγ whose ligands are clinically used for the treatment of diabetes. Plant extracts of Marrubium vulgare L., were screened for activity to inhibit fibrosis in the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6 using Oil Red-O staining, which detects lipids that typically accumulate in quiescent hepatic stellate cells. A methanol extract with activity to stimulate accumulation of lipids was obtained. This extract was found to have PPARγ agonist activity using a luciferase reporter assay. After purification using several chromatographic methods, 6-ODA, a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified as a candidate of PPARγ agonist. Synthesized 6-ODA and its derivative 9-octadecynoic acid (9-ODA), which both have a triple bond but in different positions, activated PPARγ in a luciferase reporter assay and increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a PPARγ-dependent manner. There is little information about the biological activity of fatty acids with a triple bond, and to our knowledge, this is the first report that 6-ODA and 9-ODA function as PPARγ agonists.

  8. Fluorescence activated cell sorting of plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, cell type-specific analysis of gene expression greatly enhances understanding of developmental regulation and responses to environmental stimuli in any multicellular organism. In situ hybridization and reporter gene visualization can to a limited extent be used to this end but for high resolution quantitative RT-PCR or high-throughput transcriptome-wide analysis the isolation of RNA from particular cell types is requisite. Cellular dissociation of tissue expressing a fluorescent protein marker in a specific cell type and subsequent Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) makes it possible to collect sufficient amounts of material for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis/amplification and microarray analysis. An extensive set of cell type-specific fluorescent reporter lines is available to the plant research community. In this case, two marker lines of the Arabidopsis thaliana root are used: P(SCR;)::GFP (endodermis and quiescent center) and P(WOX5;)::GFP (quiescent center). Large numbers (thousands) of seedlings are grown hydroponically or on agar plates and harvested to obtain enough root material for further analysis. Cellular dissociation of plant material is achieved by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This procedure makes use of high osmolarity-induced plasmolysis and commercially available cellulases, pectinases and hemicellulases to release protoplasts into solution. FACS of GFP-positive cells makes use of the visualization of the green versus the red emission spectra of protoplasts excited by a 488 nm laser. GFP-positive protoplasts can be distinguished by their increased ratio of green to red emission. Protoplasts are typically sorted directly into RNA extraction buffer and stored for further processing at a later time. This technique is revealed to be straightforward and practicable. Furthermore, it is shown that it can be used without difficulty to isolate sufficient numbers of cells for transcriptome analysis, even for very scarce

  9. Fluorescence activated cell sorting of plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2010-02-18

    High-resolution, cell type-specific analysis of gene expression greatly enhances understanding of developmental regulation and responses to environmental stimuli in any multicellular organism. In situ hybridization and reporter gene visualization can to a limited extent be used to this end but for high resolution quantitative RT-PCR or high-throughput transcriptome-wide analysis the isolation of RNA from particular cell types is requisite. Cellular dissociation of tissue expressing a fluorescent protein marker in a specific cell type and subsequent Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) makes it possible to collect sufficient amounts of material for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis/amplification and microarray analysis. An extensive set of cell type-specific fluorescent reporter lines is available to the plant research community. In this case, two marker lines of the Arabidopsis thaliana root are used: P(SCR;)::GFP (endodermis and quiescent center) and P(WOX5;)::GFP (quiescent center). Large numbers (thousands) of seedlings are grown hydroponically or on agar plates and harvested to obtain enough root material for further analysis. Cellular dissociation of plant material is achieved by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This procedure makes use of high osmolarity-induced plasmolysis and commercially available cellulases, pectinases and hemicellulases to release protoplasts into solution. FACS of GFP-positive cells makes use of the visualization of the green versus the red emission spectra of protoplasts excited by a 488 nm laser. GFP-positive protoplasts can be distinguished by their increased ratio of green to red emission. Protoplasts are typically sorted directly into RNA extraction buffer and stored for further processing at a later time. This technique is revealed to be straightforward and practicable. Furthermore, it is shown that it can be used without difficulty to isolate sufficient numbers of cells for transcriptome analysis, even for very scarce

  10. Differential Expression of CX3CL1 in Hepatitis B Virus-Replicating Hepatoma Cells Can Affect the Migration Activity of CX3CR1+ Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Osamu; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ninomiya, Masashi; Iwata, Tomoaki; Kogure, Takayuki; Inoue, Jun; Sugiyama, Masaya; Morosawa, Tatsuki; Fujisaka, Yasuyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to stellate cells and immune cells, inflamed hepatocytes and hepatoma cells express various kinds of chemokines that attract various kinds of immune cells. Previously, we reported that hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication can induce physiological stress. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of chemokines produced by HBV-infected hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. A real-time PCR array targeting genes related to chemokines and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were carried out to detect the specific chemokines produced by Huh7 cells and HepG2 cells infected with various HBV genotypes. A migration assay, flow cytometry analysis, and immunohistochemistry were carried out to analyze the candidate immune cells that can affect the immunopathogenesis of HBV infection. The expressions of CX3CL1 mRNA and protein were significantly different among HBV genotypes A, B, and C and control cells (mock) (P < 0.05). CD56+ NK cells and CD8+ T cells migrated to the hepatoma cells with HBV replication. Moreover, the migration activity of both immune cells was partially cancelled after the treatment of CX3CL1 neutralizing antibody. The expression level of NKG2D on CX3CR1+ NK cells in HCC with HBV infection was significantly lower than that in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with HCV infection and chronic hepatitis B and C patients (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the frequency of PD-1high CX3CR1+ CD8+ T cells in HCC with HBV infection was significantly higher than that in HCC with HCV infection and chronic hepatitis B and C (P < 0.05). The expression of CX3CL1 in HBV-replicating hepatocytes and hepatoma cells could contribute to the immunopathogenesis of HBV infection. IMPORTANCE The progressions of the disease are significantly different among HBV genotypes. However, it has not been clear that how different HBV genotypes could induce different inflammatory responses. Here, we first report that the levels of expression of CX3CL1 mRNA and protein were

  11. Insect cells respiratory activity in bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Soraia Athie Calil; Santos, Mariza Gerdulo; Yokomizo, Adriana Yurie; Pereira, Carlos Augusto; Tonso, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Specific respiration rate ( \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} }} $$\\end{document}) is a key parameter to understand cell metabolism and physiological state, providing useful information for process supervision and control. In this work, we cultivated different insect cells in a very controlled environment, being able to measure \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} }} $$\\end{document}. Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells have been used through virus infection as host for foreign protein expression and bioinsecticide production. Transfected Drosophila melanogaster (S2) cells can be used to produce different proteins. The objective of this work is to investigate respiratory activity and oxygen transfer during the growth of different insect cells lines as Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), Drosophila melanogaster (S2) wild and transfected for the expression of GPV and EGFP. All experiments were performed in a well-controlled 1-L bioreactor, with SF900II serum free medium. Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells reached 10.7 × 106 cells/mL and maximum specific respiration rate (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} \\max }} $$\\end{document}) of 7.3 × 10−17 molO2/cell s. Drosophila melanogaster (S2) cells achieved 51.2 × 106 cells/mL and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage

  12. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis1,2. While incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known crosstalk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic–adrenal–medullary axis, which controls stress–induced catecholamine release in support of the fight–or–flight reflex3,4. It remains unknown however if chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease–promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Sympathetic nerve fibers release surplus noradrenaline, which uses the β3 adrenergic receptor to signal bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels. Consequently, elevated hematopoietic stem cell proliferation increases output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis–prone ApoE−/− mice encounter chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promotes plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  13. Noninvasive low-frequency electromagnetic stimulation of the left stellate ganglion reduces myocardial infarction-induced ventricular arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Songyun; Zhou, Xiaoya; Huang, Bing; Wang, Zhuo; Zhou, Liping; Wang, Menglong; Yu, Lilei; Jiang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic stimulation has been widely used in autonomic disorders in the past few decades, but few studies has been done in cardiac diseases. Recently, studies showed that low-frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) might suppress atrial fibrillation by mediating the cardiac autonomic nervous system. In the present study, the effect of LF-EMF stimulation of left stellate ganglion (LSG) on LSG neural activity and ventricular arrhythmia has been studied in an acute myocardium infarction canine model. It is shown that LF-EMF stimulation leads to a reduction both in the neural activity of LSG and in the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. The obtained results suggested that inhibition of the LSG neural activity might be the causal of the reduction of ventricular arrhythmia since previous studies have shown that LSG hyperactivity may facilitate the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. LF-EMF stimulation might be a novel noninvasive substitute for the existing implant device-based electrical stimulation or sympathectomy in the treatment of cardiac disorders. PMID:27470078

  14. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  15. Cell Micromanipulation with an Active Handheld Micromanipulator

    PubMed Central

    Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Ettensohn, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the use of an active handheld micromanipulator, known as Micron, for micromanipulation of cells. The device enables users to manipulate objects on the order of tens of microns in size, with the natural ease of use of a fully handheld tool. Micron senses its own position using a purpose-built microscale optical tracker, estimates the erroneous or undesired component of hand motion, and actively corrects it by deflecting its own tool tip using piezoelectric actuators. Benchtop experiments in tip positioning show that active compensation can reduce positioning error by up to 51% compared to unaided performance. Preliminary experiments in bisection of sea urchin embryos exhibit an increased success rate when performed with the help of Micron. PMID:21096452

  16. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  17. Active stochastic stress fluctuations in the cell cytoskeleton stir the cell and activate primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christoph F.; Fakhri, Nikta; Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Wessel, Alok D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mackintosh, Frederick C.

    2015-03-01

    Cells are active systems with molecular force generation that drives complex dynamics at the supramolecular scale. Much of cellular dynamics is driven by myosin motors interacting with the actin cytoskeleton. We discovered active random ``stirring'' driven by cytoplasmic myosin as an intermediate mode of transport, different from both thermal diffusion and directed motor activity. We found a further manifestation of cytoskeletal dynamics in the active motion patterns of primary cilia generated by epithelial cells. These cilia were thought to be immotile due to the absence of dynein motors, but it turns out that their anchoring deeper inside the cell in combination with the strongly fluctuating cortex results in clearly measurable non-equilibrium fluctuations.

  18. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemi