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Sample records for activated t-cells c1

  1. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  2. Glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c1 in the vascular smooth muscle cell response to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chow Winsion; Hou Guangpei; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2008-10-01

    The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are critical events in neointima formation during atherosclerosis and restenosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells-isoform c1 (NFATc1) is regulated by atherogenic cytokines, and has been implicated in the migratory and proliferative responses of vSMCs through the regulation of gene expression. In T-cells, calcineurin de-phosphorylates NFATc1, leading to its nuclear import, while glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK3{beta}) phosphorylates NFATc1 and promotes its nuclear export. However, the relationship between NFATc1 and GSK3{beta} has not been studied during SMC migration and proliferation. We investigated this by scrape wounding vSMCs in vitro, and studying wound repair. NFATc1 protein was transiently increased, reaching a peak at 8 h after wounding. Cell fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that NFATc1 accumulation in the nucleus was maximal at 4 h after injury, and this was coincident with a significant 9 fold increase in transcriptional activity. Silencing NFATc1 expression with siRNA or inhibition of NFAT with cyclosporin A (CsA) attenuated wound closure by vSMCs. Phospho-GSK3{beta} (inactive) increased to a peak at 30 min after injury, preceding the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3{beta} delayed the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1, caused a 50% decrease in NFAT transcriptional activity, and attenuated vSMC wound repair. We conclude that NFATc1 promotes the vSMC response to injury, and that inhibition of GSK3{beta} is required for the activation of NFAT during wound repair.

  3. Vitamin A-dependent transcriptional activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) is critical for the development and survival of B1 cells.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Mikako; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Fujimoto, Hanae; Miyajima, Michio; Kanagawa, Osami; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2011-01-11

    B1 cells represent a distinct subset of B cells that produce most of the natural serum IgM and much of the gut IgA and function as an important component of early immune responses to pathogens. The development of B1 cells depends on the nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), a transcription factor abundantly expressed by B1 cells but not by conventional B2 cells. However, the factors that regulate the expression of NFATc1 in B1 cells remain unknown. Here we show that a vitamin A-deficient diet results in reduction of NFATc1 expression in B1 cells and almost complete loss of the B1 cell compartment. As a consequence, vitamin A-deficient mice have reduced serum IgM and are unable to mount T cell-independent antibody responses against bacterial antigens. We demonstrate that injection of all-trans retinoic acid induces the expression of NFATc1, particularly from the constitutive P2 promoter, and leads to the increase of the B1 cells. Thus, the retinoic acid-dependent pathway is critical for regulating NFATc1 expression and for maintenance of the natural memory B cell compartment.

  4. Esculetin attenuates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation through c-Fos/nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong Min; Park, Sun-Hyang; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin exerts various biological effects on anti-oxidation, anti-tumors, and anti-inflammation. However, the involvement of esculetin in the bone metabolism process, particularly osteoclast differentiation has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we first confirmed the inhibitory effect of esculetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. We then revealed the relationship between esculetin and the expression of osteoclast-specific molecules to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. Esculetin interfered with the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) both at the mRNA and protein level with no involvement in osteoclast-associated early signaling pathways, suppressing the expression of various transcription factors exclusively expressed in osteoclasts such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp), cathepsin K, αvβ3 integrin, and calcitonin receptor (Ctr). Additionally, esculetin inhibited the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring-positive osteoclasts during osteoclast differentiation. However, the development of F-actin structures and subsequent bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts, which are observed in osteoclast/osteoblast co-culture systems were not affected by esculetin. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that esculetin inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via direct suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1 expression and exerts an inhibitory effect on actin ring formation during osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the effects of esculetin on osteoclast differentiation and function. • Our data demonstrate for the first time that esculetin can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • Esculetin acts as an inhibitor of c-Fos and NFATc1 activation.

  5. Chlorogenic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by down-regulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-induced nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sung Chul; Lee, Cheol; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Hyun Mee; So, Hong-Seob; Lee, Myeung Su; Rho, Mun Chual; Oh, Jaemin

    2013-01-01

    Excessive osteoclastic bone resorption plays a critical role in inflammation-induced bone loss such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal bone erosion. Therefore, identification of osteoclast targeted-agents may be a therapeutic approach to the treatment of pathological bone loss. In this study, we isolated chlorogenic acid (CGA) from fructus of Gardenia jasminoides to discover anti-bone resorptive agents. CGA is a polyphenol with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities, however, its effects on osteoclast differentiation is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effect of CGA in receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and RANKL signaling. CGA dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) without any evidence of cytotoxicity. CGA inhibited the phosphorylation of p38, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B (IκB), and IκB degradation by RANKL treatment. CGA suppressed the mRNA expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), TRAP and OSCAR in RANKL-treated bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Also, overexpression of NFATc1 in BMMs blocked the inhibitory effect of CGA on RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, to evaluate the effects of CGA in vivo, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone erosion study was carried out. CGA remarkably attenuated LPS-induced bone loss based on micro-computed tomography and histologic analysis of femurs. Taken together, our findings suggest that CGA may be a potential treatment option for osteoclast-related diseases with inflammatory bone destruction.

  6. T cell activation requires force generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering of the T cell receptor (TCR) integrates both binding kinetics and mechanical forces. To understand the contribution of the T cell cytoskeleton to these forces, we triggered T cells using a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented antigenic stimulation using the AFM cantilever while simultaneously imaging with optical microscopy and measuring forces on the cantilever. T cells respond forcefully to antigen after calcium flux. All forces and calcium responses were abrogated upon treatment with an F-actin inhibitor. When we emulated the forces of the T cell using the AFM cantilever, even these actin-inhibited T cells became activated. Purely mechanical stimulation was not sufficient; the exogenous forces had to couple through the TCR. These studies suggest a mechanical–chemical feedback loop in which TCR-triggered T cells generate forceful contacts with antigen-presenting cells to improve access to antigen. PMID:27241914

  7. Control of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by T Cells Responding to Activated T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Ansgar W.; Mor, Felix; Karin, Nathan; Cohen, Irun R.

    1989-05-01

    T cell vaccination against experimental autoimmune disease is herein shown to be mediated in part by anti-ergotypic T cells, T cells that recognize and respond to the state of activation of other T cells. The anti-ergotypic response thus combines with the previously shown anti-idiotypic T cell response to regulate autoimmunity.

  8. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  9. Choreography of MAGUKs during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Mercedes; Davis, Roger J

    2007-02-01

    T cell receptor activation requires the membrane-associated guanylate kinase CARMA1. A new study finds that a second such kinase, Dlgh1, is also required specifically for activation of the alternative p38 kinase pathway.

  10. T cell immunoregulation in active ocular toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cynthia A; Vieira, Erica L M; Castro, Vinicius M; Dutra, Walderez O; Costa, Rogerio A; Orefice, Juliana L; Campos, Wesley R; Orefice, Fernando; Young, Lucy H; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important cause of infectious ocular disease. The physiopathology of retinochoroidal lesions associated with this infection is not completely understood. The present study was undertaken to investigate cytokine production by T cells from individuals with active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis (TR) comparing with controls. Eighteen patients with active TR and 15 healthy controls (6 controls IgG(+) to Toxoplasma and 9 negative controls) were included in the study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were incubated in the presence or absence of T. gondii antigen (STAg), and stained against CD4, CD8, TNF, IL-10 and IFN-γ. Baseline expression of cytokines was higher in TR/IgG(+) patients in comparison with controls. Cytokine expression was not increased by STAg in vitro stimulation in controls. After stimulation, TR/IgG(+) patients' lymphocytes increased cytokine as compared to cultures from both controls. While T cells were the main source of IL-10, but also IFN-γ and TNF, other lymphocyte populations were relevant source of inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, it was observed a negative correlation between ocular lesion size and IL-10 expression by CD4(+) lymphocytes. This study showed that T cells are the main lymphocyte populations expressing IL-10 in patients with TR. Moreover, expression of IL-10 plays a protective role in active TR.

  11. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk.

  12. gC1qR expression in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic infection: Potential role of HCV core/gC1qR-mediated T cell suppression in the outcome of HCV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zhiqang; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Tricoche, Nancy; Shan, M.M.; Brotman, Betsy; Pfahler, Wolfram; Hahn, Young S. . E-mail: ysh5e@virginia.edu; Prince, Alfred M.

    2006-03-15

    Chimpanzee is a unique animal model for HCV infection, in which about 50% of infections resolve spontaneously. It has been reported that the magnitude of T cell responses to HCV core in recovered chimpanzees is greater than that in chronically infected ones. However, the mechanism(s) by which the chimpanzees with resolved infection overcome core-mediated immunosuppression remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of HCV core on T cell responsiveness in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic HCV infection. We found that core protein strongly inhibited T cell activation and proliferation in chimpanzees with chronic infection, while this inhibition was limited in chimpanzees with resolved infection. Notably, the level of gC1qR, as well as the binding of core protein, on the surface of T cells was lower in recovered chimpanzees when compared to chimpanzees with chronic HCV infection. Intriguingly, the observed differences in gC1qR expression levels and susceptibility to core-induced suppression amongst HCV-chronically infected and recovered chimpanzees were observed prior to HCV challenge, suggesting a possible genetic determination of the outcome of infection. These findings suggest that gC1qR expression on the surface of T cells is crucial for HCV core-mediated T cell suppression and viral clearance, and that represents a novel mechanism by which a virus usurps host machinery for persistence.

  13. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  14. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  15. PPARγ negatively regulates T cell activation to prevent follicular helper T cells and germinal center formation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Ji Yun; Senejani, Alireza G; Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Lee, Gap Ryol; Craft, Joseph; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism. Although studies of PPARγ ligands have demonstrated its regulatory functions in inflammation and adaptive immunity, its intrinsic role in T cells and autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we used CD4-PPARγKO mice to investigate PPARγ-deficient T cells, which were hyper-reactive to produce higher levels of cytokines and exhibited greater proliferation than wild type T cells with increased ERK and AKT phosphorylation. Diminished expression of IκBα, Sirt1, and Foxo1, which are inhibitors of NF-κB, was observed in PPARγ-deficient T cells that were prone to produce all the signature cytokines under Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 skewing condition. Interestingly, 1-year-old CD4-PPARγKO mice spontaneously developed moderate autoimmune phenotype by increased activated T cells, follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) and germinal center B cells with glomerular inflammation and enhanced autoantibody production. Sheep red blood cell immunization more induced TFH cells and germinal centers in CD4-PPARγKO mice and the T cells showed increased of Bcl-6 and IL-21 expression suggesting its regulatory role in germinal center reaction. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARγ has a regulatory role for TFH cells and germinal center reaction to prevent autoimmunity.

  16. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  17. SNX17 Affects T Cell Activation by Regulating T Cell Receptor and Integrin Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Douglas G.; Piotrowski, Joshua T.; Dick, Christopher J.; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    A key component in T cell activation is the endosomal recycling of receptors to the cell surface, thereby allowing continual integration of signaling and antigen recognition. One protein potentially involved in T cell receptor transport is sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). SNX proteins have been found to bind proteins involved in T cell activation, but specifically the role of SNX17 in receptor recycling and T cell activation is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, we find that SNX17 co-localizes with TCR and localizes to the immune synapse in T-APC conjugates. Significantly, knockdown of the SNX17 resulted in fewer T-APC conjugates, lower CD69, TCR, and LFA-1 surface expression, as well as lower overall TCR recycling compared to control T cells. Lastly, we identified the FERM-domain of SNX17 as being responsible in the binding and trafficking of TCR and LFA-1 to the cell surface. These data suggest that SNX17 plays a role in the maintenance of normal surface levels of activating receptors and integrins to permit optimum T cell activation at the immune synapse. PMID:25825439

  18. Visualizing how T cells collect activation signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Hélène D; Bousso, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A decade ago the first movies depicting T cell behavior in vivo with the help of two-photon microscopy were generated. These initial experiments revealed that T cells migrate rapidly and randomly in secondary lymphoid organs at steady state and profoundly alter their behavior during antigen recognition, establishing both transient and stable contacts with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Since then, in vivo imaging has continuously improved our understanding of T cell activation. In particular, recent studies uncovered how T cells may be guided in their search for the best APCs. Additionally, the development of more sophisticated fluorescent tools has permitted not only to visualize T cell-APC contacts but also to probe their functional impact on T cell activation. These recent progresses are providing new insights into how T cells sense antigen, collect activation signals during distinct types of interaction and integrate information over successive encounters.

  19. Cutting edge: inhibition of T cell activation by TIM-2.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; de Souza, Anjali J; Tosti, Richard; Narayan, Preeti; Kane, Lawrence P

    2006-10-15

    T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 2 (TIM-2) has been shown to regulate T cell activation in vitro and T cell-mediated disease in vivo. However, it is still not clear whether TIM-2 acts mainly to augment T cell function or to inhibit it. We have directly examined the function of TIM-2 in murine and human T cell lines. Our results indicate that expression of TIM-2 significantly impairs the induction of NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional reporters by not only TCR ligation but also by the pharmacological stimuli PMA and ionomycin. This does not appear to be due to a general effect on cell viability, and the block in NFAT activation can be bypassed by expression of activated alleles of Ras or calcineurin, or MEK kinase, in the case of AP-1. Thus, our data are consistent with a model whereby TIM-2 inhibits T cell activation.

  20. MERTK as negative regulator of human T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cabezón, Raquel; Carrera-Silva, E. Antonio; Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Errasti, Andrea E.; Calderón-Gómez, Elisabeth; Lozano, Juan José; España, Carolina; Ricart, Elena; Panés, Julián; Rothlin, Carla Vanina; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis whether MERTK, which is up-regulated in human DCs treated with immunosuppressive agents, is directly involved in modulating T cell activation. MERTK is a member of the TAM family and contributes to regulating innate immune response to ACs by inhibiting DC activation in animal models. However, whether MERTK interacts directly with T cells has not been addressed. Here, we show that MERTK is highly expressed on dex-induced human tol-DCs and participates in their tolerogenic effect. Neutralization of MERTK in allogenic MLR, as well as autologous DC–T cell cultures, leads to increased T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Additionally, we identify a previously unrecognized noncell-autonomous regulatory function of MERTK expressed on DCs. Mer-Fc protein, used to mimic MERTK on DCs, suppresses naïve and antigen-specific memory T cell activation. This mechanism is mediated by the neutralization of the MERTK ligand PROS1. We find that MERTK and PROS1 are expressed in human T cells upon TCR activation and drive an autocrine proproliferative mechanism. Collectively, these results suggest that MERTK on DCs controls T cell activation and expansion through the competition for PROS1 interaction with MERTK in the T cells. In conclusion, this report identified MERTK as a potent suppressor of T cell response. PMID:25624460

  1. Chaperone-mediated autophagy regulates T cell responses through targeted degradation of negative regulators of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Valdor, Rut; Mocholi, Enric; Botbol, Yair; Guerrero-Ros, Ignacio; Chandra, Dinesh; Koga, Hiroshi; Gravekamp, Claudia; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Macian, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) targets soluble proteins for lysosomal degradation. Here we found that CMA was activated in T cells in response to engagement of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), which induced expression of the CMA-related lysosomal receptor LAMP-2A. In activated T cells, CMA targeted the ubiquitin ligase Itch and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN1 for degradation to maintain activation-induced responses. Consequently, deletion of the gene encoding LAMP-2A in T cells caused deficient in vivo responses to immunization or infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Impaired CMA activity also occurred in T cells with age, which negatively affected their function. Restoration of LAMP-2A in T cells from old mice resulted in enhancement of activation-induced responses. Our findings define a role for CMA in regulating T cell activation through the targeted degradation of negative regulators of T cell activation.

  2. Nylon Wool Purification Alters the Activation of T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method. PMID:18952296

  3. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  4. Epigenomics of T cell activation, differentiation and memory

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Suresh; Barski, Artem; Zhao, Keji

    2010-01-01

    Activation of T cells is an essential step in the immunological response to infection. While activation of naïve T cells results in proliferation and slow differentiation into cytokine-producing effector cells, antigen engagement with memory cells leads to cytokine production immediately. Even though the cell surface signaling events are similar in both the cases, the outcome is different, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms may exist downstream of the activation signals. Recent advances in the understanding of global epigenetic patterns in T cells have resulted in the appreciation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in processes such as activation and differentiation. In this review we discuss recent data suggesting that naïve T cell activation, differentiation and lineage commitment results in epigenetic changes and a fine balance between different histone modifications is required. On the other hand, memory T cells are poised and do not require epigenetic changes for short-term activation. PMID:20226645

  5. A role for CD9 molecules in T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Costimulation mediated by the CD28 molecule plays an important role in optimal activation of T cells. However, CD28-deficient mice can mount effective T cell-dependent immune responses, suggesting the existence of other costimulatory systems. In a search for other costimulatory molecules on T cells, we have developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that can costimulate T cells in the absence of antigen-presenting cells (APC). The molecule recognized by this mAb, 9D3, was found to be expressed on almost all mature T cells and to be a protein of approximately 24 kD molecular mass. By expression cloning, this molecule was identified as CD9, 9D3 (anti-CD9) synergized with suboptimal doses of anti-CD3 mAb in inducing proliferation by virgin T cells. Costimulation was induced by independent ligation of CD3 and CD9, suggesting that colocalization of these two molecules is not required for T cell activation. The costimulation by anti-CD9 was as potent as that by anti-CD28. Moreover, anti-CD9 costimulated in a CD28- independent way because anti-CD9 equally costimulated T cells from the CD28-deficient as well as wild-type mice. Thus, these results indicate that CD9 serves as a molecule on T cells that can deliver a potent CD28- independent costimulatory signal. PMID:8760830

  6. The influence of tetracyclines on T cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Kloppenburg, M; Verweij, C L; Miltenburg, A M; Verhoeven, A J; Daha, M R; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C

    1995-01-01

    Minocycline has been shown to have an anti-inflammatory effect in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Since there is evidence that RA is a T cell-mediated disease, we investigated the effect of minocycline on human T cell clones derived from the synovium of an RA patient. The T cells, when activated via the T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex, were suppressed functionally by minocycline, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition of T cell proliferation and reduction in production of IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Besides an inhibition of IL-2 production, minocycline exerted its effect on T cell proliferation by induction of a decreased IL-2 responsiveness. We showed that the chelating capacity of minocycline plays a crucial role in the inhibitory effect on T cell function, since the inhibitory effect on T cell proliferation could be annulled by addition of exogenous Ca2+. However, minocycline did not markedly influence the typical TCR/CD3-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Taken together, the results clearly indicate that minocycline has immunomodulating effects on human T cells. PMID:8536384

  7. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Roddy S; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W; Kam, Lance C; Milone, Michael C

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young's Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E > 2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (nonsignificant) toward a greater proportion of CD62L(neg), effector-differentiated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Naive CD4(+) T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ-producing Th1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation, and Th differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands.

  8. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roddy S.; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W.; Kam, Lance; Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young’s Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E >2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (non-significant) towards a greater proportion of CD62Lneg, effector-differentiated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ producing TH1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation and TH differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands. PMID:22732590

  9. Activated skin γδ T-cells regulate T-cell infiltration of the wound site after burn.

    PubMed

    Rani, Meenakshi; Zhang, Qiong; Scherer, Michael R; Cap, Andrew P; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-02-01

    Burn induces an immunopathological response involving multiple immune cell types that includes γδ T-cells. Nonetheless, the role of γδ T-cells at the wound site after burn is not clearly defined. Wild type and γδ T-cell receptor deficient (δ TCR(-/-)) mice were subjected to a major burn or sham procedure. At 1-7 d thereafter, skin samples were collected and T-cell populations analyzed. The majority of T-cells in the skin of sham mice were γδ T-cells. After burn, however, an increase in the total T-cells was observed at the wound site and these cells were predominantly αβ T-cells. Their influx was γδ T-cell dependent, as it was markedly reduced in injured δ TCR(-/-) mice. Burn wound γδ T-cells were activated with increased expression of TLRs and CD69. In contrast, the infiltrating αβ T-cells TLR and CD69 expressions were attenuated after burn. Thus, burn is associated with of γδ T-cell activation at the injury site, which initiates a massive infiltration of the wound with αβ T-cells that likely facilitate the transition from the inflammatory to the proliferative phase of healing.

  10. T cells conditioned with MDSC show an increased anti-tumor activity after adoptive T cell based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Raber, Patrick L; Sierra, Rosa A; Thevenot, Paul T; Shuzhong, Zhang; Wyczechowska, Dorota D; Kumai, Takumi; Celis, Esteban; Rodriguez, Paulo C

    2016-04-05

    The success of adoptive T cell-based immunotherapy (ACT) in cancer is limited in part by the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which block several T cell functions, including T cell proliferation and the expression of various cytotoxic mediators. Paradoxically, the inhibition of CD8+ T cell differentiation into cytotoxic populations increased their efficacy after ACT into tumor-bearing hosts. Therefore, we aimed to test the impact of conditioning CD8+ T cells with MDSC on their differentiation potential and ACT efficacy. Our results indicate that MDSC impaired the progression of CD8+ T cells into effector populations, without altering their activation status, production of IL-2, or signaling through the T cell receptor. In addition, culture of CD8+ T cells with MDSC resulted in an increased ACT anti-tumor efficacy, which correlated with a higher frequency of the transferred T cells and elevated IFNγ production. Interestingly, activated CD62L+ CD8+ T cells were responsible for the enhanced anti-tumor activity showed by MDSC-exposed T cells. Additional results showed a decreased protein synthesis rate and lower activity of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in T cells conditioned with MDSC. Silencing of the negative mTOR regulator tuberous sclerosis complex-2 in T cells co-cultured with MDSC restored mTOR activity, but resulted in T cell apoptosis. These results indicate that conditioning of T cells with MDSC induces stress survival pathways mediated by a blunted mTOR signaling, which regulated T cell differentiation and ACT efficacy. Continuation of this research will enable the development of better strategies to increase ACT responses in cancer.

  11. Despite large-scale T cell activation, only a minor subset of T cells responding in vitro to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans differentiate into effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, H H; Tanavoli, S; Haines, D D; Kreutzer, D L

    2000-06-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has a potent T cell stimulatory effect, activating more than half of all T cells. However, since the fate of these activated T cells was not known, the present study sought to determine whether all of these T cells differentiate into effector cells. To that end, the intracellular expression of T cell cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10) in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans was determined by flow cytometry. Results demonstrated a time-dependent increase in the expression of the cytokines, most reaching peak levels at 24-48 h. At 48 h, the proportion of T cells expressing each of the cytokines were as follows: IL-2 (1.7%+/-0.3), IFN-gamma (1.8%+/-0.5), IL-4 (1.0%+/-0.2) and IL-10 (1.5%+/-0.5). These data indicated that only 2-5% of all T cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans expressed any T cell cytokines. The finding of large-scale T cell activation in the absence of cytokine expression suggests that the activation of T cells in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans is incomplete. To investigate this phenomenon, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 24 h followed by sorting of the activated (CD69+) cells by immunomagnetic separation and restimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. Results demonstrated that nearly 90% of the T cells were unresponsive to further restimulation. A possible explanation for this unresponsiveness is the induction of clonal anergy among the responding T cells. To determine possible preferential effects of the stimulation on specific cytokines, the expression of each cytokine among T cells responding to A. actinomycetemcomitans was compared to the maximum levels achieved by PMA + ionomycin stimulation. Results showed that number of IL-2+ and IFN-gamma+ T cells observed in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans were between 2% and 7% of those seen in

  12. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  13. Caerulomycin A Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Khatri, Neeraj; Vohra, Rakesh M.; Jolly, Ravinder S.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caerulomycin A (CaeA) is a known antifungal and antibiotic agent. Further, CaeA is reported to induce the expansion of regulatory T cell and prolongs the survival of skin allografts in mouse model of transplantation. In the current study, CaeA was purified and characterized from a novel species of actinomycetes, Actinoalloteichus spitiensis. The CaeA was identified for its novel immunosuppressive property by inhibiting in vitro and in vivo function of T cells. Methods Isolation, purification and characterization of CaeA were performed using High Performance Flash Chromatography (HPFC), NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. In vitro and in vivo T cell studies were conducted in mice using flowcytometry, ELISA and thymidine-[methyl-3H] incorporation. Results CaeA significantly suppressed T cell activation and IFN-γ secretion. Further, it inhibited the T cells function at G1 phase of cell cycle. No apoptosis was noticed by CaeA at a concentration responsible for inducing T cell retardation. Furthermore, the change in the function of B cells but not macrophages was observed. The CaeA as well exhibited substantial inhibitory activity in vivo. Conclusion This study describes for the first time novel in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive function of CaeA on T cells and B cells. CaeA has enough potential to act as a future immunosuppressive drug. PMID:25286329

  14. Macroautophagy regulates energy metabolism during effector T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Vanessa M; Valdor, Rut; Patel, Bindi; Singh, Rajat; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Macian, Fernando

    2010-12-15

    Macroautophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of lysosomal-mediated protein degradation that plays a key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by recycling amino acids, reducing the amount of damaged proteins, and regulating protein levels in response to extracellular signals. We have found that macroautophagy is induced after effector T cell activation. Engagement of the TCR and CD28 results in enhanced microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing, increased numbers of LC3-containing vesicles, and increased LC3 flux, indicating active autophagosome formation and clearance. The autophagosomes formed in stimulated T cells actively fuse with lysosomes to degrade their cargo. Using a conditional KO mouse model where Atg7, a critical gene for macroautophagy, is specifically deleted in T cells, we have found that macroautophagy-deficient effector Th cells have defective IL-2 and IFN-γ production and reduced proliferation after stimulation, with no significant increase in apoptosis. We have found that ATP generation is decreased when autophagy is blocked, and defects in activation-induced cytokine production are restored when an exogenous energy source is added to macroautophagy-deficient T cells. Furthermore, we present evidence showing that the nature of the cargo inside autophagic vesicles found in resting T cells differs from the cargo of autophagosomes in activated T cells, where mitochondria and other organelles are selectively excluded. These results suggest that macroautophagy is an actively regulated process in T cells that can be induced in response to TCR engagement to accommodate the bioenergetic requirements of activated T cells.

  15. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures.

  16. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  17. T Cell Subset and Stimulation Strength-Dependent Modulation of T Cell Activation by Kv1.3 Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Edwards, Wilson; Liu, Yi; Ngo, Karen; Angsana, Julianty; Castro, Glenda; Wu, Nancy; Liu, Xuejun; Swanson, Ronald V.; Wickenden, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Kv1.3 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed on T cells that plays an important role in T cell activation. Previous studies have shown that blocking Kv1.3 channels in human T cells during activation results in reduced calcium entry, cytokine production, and proliferation. The aim of the present study was to further explore the effects of Kv1.3 blockers on the response of different human T cell subsets under various stimulation conditions. Our studies show that, unlike the immune suppressor cyclosporine A, the inhibitory effect of Kv1.3 blockers was partial and stimulation strength dependent, with reduced inhibitory efficacy on T cells under strengthened anti-CD3/CD28 stimulations. T cell responses to allergens including house dust mites and ragweed were partially reduced by Kv1.3 blockers. The effect of Kv1.3 inhibition was dependent on T cell subsets, with stronger effects on CCR7- effector memory compared to CCR7+ central memory CD4 T cells. Calcium entry studies also revealed a population of CD4 T cells resistant to Kv1.3 blockade. Activation of CD4 T cells was accompanied with an increase in Kv1.3 currents but Kv1.3 transcripts were found to be reduced, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism in the regulation of Kv1.3 activities. In summary, Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cell activation in a manner that is highly dependent on the T cell identity and stimulation strength, These findings suggest that Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cells in a unique, conditional manner, further refining our understanding of the therapeutic potential of Kv1.3 blockers. PMID:28107393

  18. T cell transcripts and T cell activities in the gills of the teleost fish sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Nuñez Ortiz, N; Gerdol, M; Stocchi, V; Marozzi, C; Randelli, E; Bernini, C; Buonocore, F; Picchietti, S; Papeschi, C; Sood, N; Pallavicini, A; Scapigliati, G

    2014-12-01

    The gills of fish are a mucosal tissue that contains T cells involved in the recognition of non-self and pathogens, and in this work we describe some features of gill-associated T cells of European sea bass, a marine model species. A whole transcriptome was obtained by deep sequencing of RNA from unstimulated gills that has been analyzed for the presence of T cell-related transcripts. Of the putative expressed sequences identified in the transcriptome, around 30 were related to main functions related to T cells including Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cell subpopulations, thus suggesting their possible presence in the branchial epithelium. The number of T cells in the gills of sea bass, measured with the specific T cell mAb DLT15 range from 10% to 20%, and IHC analysis shows their abundance and distribution in the epithelium. Leukocytes from gills are able to proliferate in the presence of lectins ConA and PHA, as measured by flow cytometry using CFSE fluorescence incorporation, and during proliferation the number of T cells counted by immunofluorescence increased. In lectin-proliferating cells the expression of T cell-related genes TRβ, TRγ, CD4, CD8α, CD45 and IL-10 increased dramatically. Our data represent a first analysis on T cell genes and on basic T cell activities of fish gills, and suggest the presence of functionally active subpopulations of T lymphocytes in this tissue.

  19. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  20. NITRIC OXIDE, MITOCHONDRIAL HYPERPOLARIZATION AND T-CELL ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gyorgy; Koncz, Agnes; Fernandez, David; Perl, Andras

    2007-01-01

    T lymphocyte activation is associated with nitric oxide (NO) production that plays an essential role in multiple T cell functions. NO acts as a messenger, activating soluble guanyl cyclase and participating in the transduction signaling pathways involving cyclic GMP. NO modulates mitochondrial events that are involved in apoptosis and regulates mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial biogenesis in many cell types, including lymphocytes. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization (MHP), an early and reversible event during both T lymphocyte activation and apoptosis, is regulated by NO. Here, we discuss recent evidence that NO-induced MHP represents a molecular switch in multiple T cell signaling pathways. Overproduction of NO in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) induces mitochondrial biogenesis and alters Ca2+ signaling. Thus, while NO plays a physiological role in lymphocyte cell signaling, its overproduction may disturb normal T cell function, contributing to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:17462531

  1. T Cell Activation Thresholds are Affected by Gravitational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley; Gonzalez, M.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    1999-01-01

    T cells stimulated in space flight by various mitogenic signals show a dramatic reduction in proliferation and expression of early activation markers. Similar results are also obtained in a ground based model of microgravity, clinorotation, which provides a vector-averaged reduction of the apparent gravity on cells without significant shear force. Here we demonstrate that T cell inhibition is due to an increase in the required threshold for activation. Dose response curves indicate that cells activated during clinorotation require higher stimulation to achieve the same level of activation, as measured by CD69 expression. Interleukin 2 receptor expression, and DNA synthesis. The amount of stimulation necessary for 50% activation is 5 fold in the clinostat relative to static. Correlation of TCR internalization with activation also exhibit a dramatic right shift in clinorotation, demonstrating unequivocally that signal transduction mechanism independent of TCR triggering account for the increased activation threshold. Previous results from space flight experiments are consistent with the dose response curves obtained for clinorotation. Activation thresholds are important aspects of T cell memory, autoimmunity and tolerance Clinorotation is a useful, noninvasive tool for the study of cellular and biochemical event regulating T cell activation threshold and the effects of gravitation forces on these systems.

  2. Low SAMHD1 expression following T-cell activation and proliferation renders CD4+ T cells susceptible to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Brezar, Vedran; Ayinde, Diana; Lefebvre, Cécile; Wiesch, Julian Schulze Zur; van Lunzen, Jan; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Schwartz, Olivier; Hocini, Hakim; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Seddiki, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: HIV-1 replication depends on the state of cell activation and division. It is established that SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 infection of resting CD4+ T cells. The modulation of SAMHD1 expression during T-cell activation and proliferation, however, remains unclear, as well as a role for SAMHD1 during HIV-1 pathogenesis. Methods: SAMHD1 expression was assessed in CD4+ T cells after their activation and in-vitro HIV-1 infection. We performed phenotype analyzes using flow cytometry on CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood and lymph nodes from cohorts of HIV-1-infected individuals under antiretroviral treatment or not, and controls. Results: We show that SAMHD1 expression decreased during CD4+ T-cell proliferation in association with an increased susceptibility to in-vitro HIV-1 infection. Additionally, circulating memory CD4+ T cells are enriched in cells with low levels of SAMHD1. These SAMHD1low cells are highly differentiated, exhibit a large proportion of Ki67+ cycling cells and are enriched in T-helper 17 cells. Importantly, memory SAMHD1low cells were depleted from peripheral blood of HIV-infected individuals. We also found that follicular helper T cells present in secondary lymphoid organs lacked the expression of SAMHD1, which was accompanied by a higher susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. Conclusion: We demonstrate that SAMHD1 expression is decreased during CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation. Also, CD4+ T-cell subsets known to be more susceptible to HIV-1 infection, for example, T-helper 17 and follicular helper T cells, display lower levels of SAMHD1. These results pin point a role for SAMHD1 expression in HIV-1 infection and the concomitant depletion of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25715102

  3. NOD1 Cooperates with TLR2 to Enhance T Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation in CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Blandine C.; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Tomkowiak, Martine; Marvel, Jacqueline; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR), like Toll-like receptors (TLR) and NOD-like receptors (NLR), are involved in the detection of microbial infections and tissue damage by cells of the innate immune system. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that TLR2 can additionally function as a costimulatory receptor on CD8 T cells. Here, we establish that the intracytosolic receptor NOD1 is expressed and functional in CD8 T cells. We show that C12-iEDAP, a synthetic ligand for NOD1, has a direct impact on both murine and human CD8 T cells, increasing proliferation and effector functions of cells activated via their T cell receptor (TCR). This effect is dependent on the adaptor molecule RIP2 and is associated with an increased activation of the NF-κB, JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NOD1 stimulation can cooperate with TLR2 engagement on CD8 T cells to enhance TCR-mediated activation. Altogether our results indicate that NOD1 might function as an alternative costimulatory receptor in CD8 T cells. Our study provides new insights into the function of NLR in T cells and extends to NOD1 the recent concept that PRR stimulation can directly control T cell functions. PMID:22848741

  4. Computational properties of mitochondria in T cell activation and fate

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we review how mitochondrial Ca2+ transport (mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and Na+/Ca2+ exchange) is involved in T cell biology, including activation and differentiation through shaping cellular Ca2+ signals. Based on recent observations, we propose that the Ca2+ crosstalk between mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm may form a proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controller. This PID mechanism (which is well known in engineering) could be responsible for computing cellular decisions. In addition, we point out the importance of analogue and digital signal processing in T cell life and implication of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in this process. PMID:27852805

  5. Activated CD8+ T cells induce expansion of Vβ5+ regulatory T cells via TNFR2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Joedicke, Jara J; Myers, Lara; Carmody, Aaron B; Messer, Ronald J; Wajant, Harald; Lang, Karl S; Lang, Philipp A; Mak, Tak W; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Dittmer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Vβ5+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are specific for a mouse endogenous retroviral superantigen, become activated and proliferate in response to Friend retrovirus (FV) infection. We previously reported that FV-induced expansion of this Treg subset was dependent on CD8+ T cells and TNFα, but independent of IL-2. We now show that the inflammatory milieu associated with FV infection is not necessary for induction of Vβ5+ Treg expansion. Rather, it is the presence of activated CD8+ T cells that is critical for their expansion. The data indicate that the mechanism involves signaling between the membrane-bound form of TNFα (memTNFα) on activated CD8+ T cells and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) on Tregs. CD8+ T cells expressing memTNFα but no soluble TNFα (solTNFα) remained competent to induce strong Vβ5+ Treg expansion in vivo. In addition, Vβ5+ Tregs expressing only TNFR2 but no TNFR1 were still responsive to expansion. Finally, treatment of naïve mice with solTNFα did not induce Vβ5+ Treg expansion, but treatment with a TNFR2-specific agonist did. These results reveal a new mechanism of intercellular communication between activated CD8+ T cell effectors and Tregs that results in the activation and expansion of a Treg subset that subsequently suppresses CD8+ T cell functions. PMID:25098294

  6. T Cell Receptor-induced Activation and Apoptosis In Cycling Human T Cells Occur throughout the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Michael; Zaks, Tal Z.; JL, Liu; LeRoith, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have found conflicting associations between susceptibility to activation-induced cell death and the cell cycle in T cells. However, most of the studies used potentially toxic pharmacological agents for cell cycle synchronization. A panel of human melanoma tumor-reactive T cell lines, a CD8+ HER-2/neu-reactive T cell clone, and the leukemic T cell line Jurkat were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Fractions enriched for the G0–G1, S, and G2–M phases of the cell cycle were assayed for T cell receptor-mediated activation as measured by intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytolytic recognition of tumor targets, and induction of Fas ligand mRNA. Susceptibility to apoptosis induced by recombinant Fas ligand and activation-induced cell death were also studied. None of the parameters studied was specific to a certain phase of the cell cycle, leading us to conclude that in nontransformed human T cells, both activation and apoptosis through T cell receptor activation can occur in all phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10588669

  7. Blockade of T-cell activation by dithiocarbamates involves novel mechanisms of inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, S; Gómez del Arco, P; Armesilla, A L; Aramburu, J; Luo, C; Rao, A; Redondo, J M

    1997-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) have recently been reported as powerful inhibitors of NF-kappaB activation in a number of cell types. Given the role of this transcription factor in the regulation of gene expression in the inflammatory response, NF-kappaB inhibitors have been suggested as potential therapeutic drugs for inflammatory diseases. We show here that DTCs inhibited both interleukin 2 (IL-2) synthesis and membrane expression of antigens which are induced during T-cell activation. This inhibition, which occurred with a parallel activation of c-Jun transactivating functions and expression, was reflected by transfection experiments at the IL-2 promoter level, and involved not only the inhibition of NF-kappaB-driven reporter activation but also that of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Accordingly, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) indicated that pyrrolidine DTC (PDTC) prevented NF-kappaB, and NFAT DNA-binding activity in T cells stimulated with either phorbol myristate acetate plus ionophore or antibodies against the CD3-T-cell receptor complex and simultaneously activated the binding of AP-1. Furthermore, PDTC differentially targeted both NFATp and NFATc family members, inhibiting the transactivation functions of NFATp and mRNA induction of NFATc. Strikingly, Western blotting and immunocytochemical experiments indicated that PDTC promoted a transient and rapid shuttling of NFATp and NFATc, leading to their accelerated export from the nucleus of activated T cells. We propose that the activation of an NFAT kinase by PDTC could be responsible for the rapid shuttling of the NFAT, therefore transiently converting the sustained transactivation of this transcription factor that occurs during lymphocyte activation, and show that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) can act by directly phosphorylating NFATp. In addition, the combined inhibitory effects on NFAT and NF-KB support a potential use of DTCs as immunosuppressants. PMID:9343406

  8. Modulating DNA methylation in activated CD8+ T cells inhibits regulatory T cell-induced binding of Foxp3 to the CD8+ T Cell IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle M; Akaronu, Nnenna; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Hood, Sylvia F; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) activated during the course of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection suppress CD8(+) CTL function in a TGF-β-dependent fashion, inhibiting IFN-γ and IL-2 production and inducing G1 cell-cycle arrest. In this article, we describe the molecular events occurring at the IL-2 promoter leading to suppression of IL-2 production. These experiments demonstrate that Foxp3 induced by lentivirus-activated Tregs in the CD8(+) target cells binds to the IL-2 promoter, actively repressing IL-2 transcription. We further demonstrate that the chronic activation of CD8(+) T cells during FIV infection results in chromatin remodeling at the IL-2 promoter, specifically, demethylation of CpG residues. These DNA modifications occur during active transcription and translation of IL-2; however, these changes render the IL-2 promoter permissive to Foxp3-induced transcriptional repression. These data help explain, in part, the seemingly paradoxical observations that CD8(+) T cells displaying an activation phenotype exhibit altered antiviral function. Further, we demonstrate that blocking demethylation of CpG residues at the IL-2 promoter inhibits Foxp3 binding, suggesting a potential mechanism for rescue and/or reactivation of CD8(+) T cells. Using the FIV model for lentiviral persistence, these studies provide a framework for understanding how immune activation combined with Treg-mediated suppression may affect CD8(+) T cell IL-2 transcription, maturation, and antiviral function.

  9. Functional Anatomy of T Cell Activation and Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fooksman, David R.; Vardhana, Santosh; Vasiliver-Shamis, Gaia; Liese, Jan; Blair, David; Waite, Janelle; Sacristán, Catarina; Victora, Gabriel; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Dustin, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    T cell activation and function require a structured engagement of antigen-presenting cells. These cell contacts are characterized by two distinct dynamics in vivo: transient contacts resulting from promigratory junctions called immunological kinapses or prolonged contacts from stable junctions called immunological synapses. Kinapses operate in the steady state to allow referencing to self-peptide-MHC (pMHC) and searching for pathogen-derived pMHC. Synapses are induced by T cell receptor (TCR) interactions with agonist pMHC under specific conditions and correlate with robust immune responses that generate effector and memory T cells. High-resolution imaging has revealed that the synapse is highly coordinated, integrating cell adhesion, TCR recognition of pMHC complexes, and an array of activating and inhibitory ligands to promote or prevent T cell signaling. In this review, we examine the molecular components, geometry, and timing underlying kinapses and synapses. We integrate recent molecular and physiological data to provide a synthesis and suggest ways forward. PMID:19968559

  10. The Nrf2 activator tBHQ inhibits T cell activation of primary human CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Turley, Alexandra E; Zagorski, Joseph W; Rockwell, Cheryl E

    2015-02-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates a battery of antioxidant, detoxification, and cell stress genes. It is activated by oxidative stress and a number of exogenous compounds, one of which is tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a widely used food preservative. Nrf2 modulates immune responses in numerous rodent models of inflammation, but its effects on human immune cells are not well characterized. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of the Nrf2 activator tBHQ on early events of T cell activation in primary human cells. Treatment with tBHQ induced mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes HMOX-1, GCLC, and NQO1, and also increased NRF2 mRNA expression, albeit to a lesser extent than the other target genes. tBHQ decreased production of the cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ at both the protein and mRNA levels after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to an even greater extent in isolated CD4 T cells. Likewise, tBHQ decreased induction of CD25 and CD69 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and this decrease was even more marked in isolated CD4 T cells. In addition, tBHQ inhibited induction of NFκB DNA binding in anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated PBMCs. Collectively, these data suggest that tBHQ inhibits activation of primary human CD4 T cells, which correlates with activation of Nrf2 and inhibition of NFκB DNA binding. Although these studies suggest the food additive tBHQ negatively impacts T cell activation, further studies will be needed to fully elucidate the effect of tBHQ on human immune responses.

  11. HIV-1 latency in actively dividing human T cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Jeeninga, Rienk E; Westerhout, Ellen M; van Gerven, Marja L; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Background Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual cannot be achieved by current drug regimens. Viral reservoirs established early during the infection remain unaffected by anti-retroviral therapy and are able to replenish systemic infection upon interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic targeting of viral latency will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the establishment and long-term maintenance of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 T cells, the most prominent reservoir of transcriptional silent provirus. However, the molecular mechanisms that permit long-term transcriptional control of proviral gene expression in these cells are still not well understood. Exploring the molecular details of viral latency will provide new insights for eventual future therapeutics that aim at viral eradication. Results We set out to develop a new in vitro HIV-1 latency model system using the doxycycline (dox)-inducible HIV-rtTA variant. Stable cell clones were generated with a silent HIV-1 provirus, which can subsequently be activated by dox-addition. Surprisingly, only a minority of the cells was able to induce viral gene expression and a spreading infection, eventhough these experiments were performed with the actively dividing SupT1 T cell line. These latent proviruses are responsive to TNFα treatment and alteration of the DNA methylation status with 5-Azacytidine or genistein, but not responsive to the regular T cell activators PMA and IL2. Follow-up experiments in several T cell lines and with wild-type HIV-1 support these findings. Conclusion We describe the development of a new in vitro model for HIV-1 latency and discuss the advantages of this system. The data suggest that HIV-1 proviral latency is not restricted to resting T cells, but rather an intrinsic property of the virus. PMID:18439275

  12. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L− Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25− T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging. PMID:28382033

  13. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L- Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25- T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging.

  14. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  15. Hili inhibits HIV replication in activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Peterlin, B Matija; Liu, Pingyang; Wang, Xiaoyun; Cary, Daniele; Shao, Wei; Leoz, Marie; Hong, Tian; Pan, Tao; Fujinaga, Koh

    2017-03-22

    Piwil proteins restrict the replication of mobile genetic elements in the germline. They are also expressed in many transformed cell lines. In this report, we discovered that the human piwil 2 (hili) can also inhibit HIV replication, especially in activated CD4+ T cells that are the preferred target cells for this virus in the infected host. Although resting cells did not express hili, it was rapidly induced following T cell activation. In these cells and transformed cell lines, depletion of hili increased levels of viral proteins and new viral particles. Further studies revealed that hili binds to tRNA. Some of them represent rare tRNA species, whose codons are over-represented in the viral genome. Targeting tRNA(Arg)(UCU) with an antisense oligonucleotide replicated effects of hili and also inhibited HIV replication. Finally, hili also inhibited the retrotransposition of the endogenous intracysternal A particle (IAP) by a similar mechanism. Thus, hili joins a list of host proteins that inhibit the replication of HIV and other mobile genetic elements.IMPORTANCE Piwil proteins inhibit the movement of mobile genetic elements in the germline. In their absence, sperm does not form and male mice are sterile. This inhibition is thought to occur via small piRNAs. However, in some species and in human somatic cells, piwil proteins bind primarily to tRNA. In this report, we demonstrate that human piwil proteins, especially hili, not only bind to select tRNA species that include rare tRNAs, but also inhibit HIV replication. Importantly, T cell activation induces the expression of hili in CD4+ T cells. Since hili also inhibited the movement of an endogenous retrovirus (IAP), our finding shed new light on this intracellular resistance to exogenous and endogenous retroviruses as well as other mobile genetic elements.

  16. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  17. Stochasticity and spatial heterogeneity in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Nigel J; van der Merwe, P Anton

    2007-04-01

    Stochastic and spatial aspects are becoming increasingly recognized as an important factor in T-cell activation. Activation occurs in an intrinsically noisy environment, requiring only a handful of agonist peptide-major histocompatibility complex molecules, thus making consideration of signal to noise of prime importance in understanding sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, it is widely established that surface-bound ligands are more effective at activation than soluble forms, while surface patternation has highlighted the role of spatial relocation in activation. Here we consider the results of a number of models of T-cell activation, from a realistic model of kinetic segregation-induced T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering through to simple queuing theory models. These studies highlight the constraints on cell activation by a surface receptor that recruits kinases. Our analysis shows that TCR triggering based on trapping of bound TCRs in regions of close proximity that exclude large ectodomain-containing molecules, such as the phosphatases CD45 and CD148, can effectively reproduce known signaling characteristics and is a viable 'signal transduction' mechanism distinct from oligomerization and conformation-based mechanisms. A queuing theory analysis shows the interrelation between sensitivity and specificity, emphasizing that these are properties of individual cell functions and need not be, nor are likely to be, uniform across different functions. In fact, threshold-based mechanisms of detection are shown to be poor at ligand discrimination because, although they can be highly specific, that specificity is limited to a small range of peptide densities. Time integration mechanisms however are able to control noise effectively, while kinetic proofreading mechanisms endow them with good specificity properties. Thus, threshold mechanisms are likely to be important for rapidly detecting minimal signaling requirements, thus achieving efficient scanning of antigen

  18. Activation strategies for invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlgruber, Ayano C; Donado, Carlos A; LaMarche, Nelson M; Brenner, Michael B; Brennan, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialized T cell subset that plays an important role in host defense, orchestrating both innate and adaptive immune effector responses against a variety of microbes. Specific microbial lipids and mammalian self lipids displayed by the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d can activate iNKT cells through their semi-invariant αβ T cell receptors (TCRs). iNKT cells also constitutively express receptors for inflammatory cytokines typically secreted by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and they can be activated through these cytokine receptors either in combination with TCR signals, or in some cases even in the absence of TCR signaling. During infection, experimental evidence suggests that both TCR-driven and cytokine-driven mechanisms contribute to iNKT cell activation. While the relative contributions of these two signaling mechanisms can vary widely depending on the infectious context, both lipid antigens and PAMPs mediate reciprocal activation of iNKT cells and APCs, leading to downstream activation of multiple other immune cell types to promote pathogen clearance. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in iNKT cell activation during infection, focusing on the central contributions of both lipid antigens and PAMP-induced inflammatory cytokines, and highlight in vivo examples of activation during bacterial, viral, and fungal infections.

  19. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  20. Mitochondrial biogenesis and proteome remodeling promotes one carbon metabolism for T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Ron-Harel, Noga; Santos, Daniel; Ghergurovich, Jonathan M.; Sage, Peter T.; Reddy, Anita; Lovitch, Scott B.; Dephoure, Noah; Satterstrom, F. Kyle; Sheffer, Michal; Spinelli, Jessica B.; Gygi, Steven; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Naïve T cell stimulation activates anabolic metabolism to fuel the transition from quiescence to growth and proliferation. Here we show that naïve CD4+ T cell activation induces a unique program of mitochondrial biogenesis and remodeling. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified protein dynamics during T cell activation. We identified substantial remodeling of the mitochondrial proteome over the first 24 hr of T cell activation to generate mitochondria with a distinct metabolic signature, with one carbon metabolism as the most induced pathway. Salvage pathways and mitochondrial one carbon metabolism, fed by serine, contribute to purine and thymidine synthesis to enable T cell proliferation and survival. Genetic inhibition of the mitochondrial serine catabolic enzyme SHMT2 impaired T cell survival in culture, and antigen-specific T cell abundance in vivo. Thus, during T cell activation, mitochondrial proteome remodeling generates specialized mitochondria with enhanced one carbon metabolism that is critical for T cell activation and survival. PMID:27411012

  1. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  2. Growth Factor Midkine Promotes T-Cell Activation through Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Signaling and Th1 Cell Differentiation in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tomohiro; Maeda, Kayaho; Sato, Waichi; Kosugi, Tomoki; Sato, Yuka; Kojima, Hiroshi; Kato, Noritoshi; Ishimoto, Takuji; Tsuboi, Naotake; Uchimura, Kenji; Yuzawa, Yukio; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    Activated T cells play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including lupus nephritis (LN). The activation of calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and STAT4 signaling is essential for T cells to perform various effector functions. Here, we identified the growth factor midkine (MK; gene name, Mdk) as a novel regulator in the pathogenesis of 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane-induced LN via activation of NFAT and IL-12/STAT4 signaling. Wild-type (Mdk(+/+)) mice showed more severe glomerular injury than MK-deficient (Mdk(-/-)) mice, as demonstrated by mesangial hypercellularity and matrix expansion, and glomerular capillary loops with immune-complex deposition. Compared with Mdk(-/-) mice, the frequency of splenic CD69(+) T cells and T helper (Th) 1 cells, but not of regulatory T cells, was augmented in Mdk(+/+) mice in proportion to LN disease activity, and was accompanied by skewed cytokine production. MK expression was also enhanced in activated CD4(+) T cells in vivo and in vitro. MK induced activated CD4(+) T cells expressing CD69 through nuclear activation of NFAT transcription and selectively increased in vitro differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells into Th1 cells by promoting IL-12/STAT4 signaling. These results suggest that MK serves an indispensable role in the NFAT-regulated activation of CD4(+) T cells and Th1 cell differentiation, eventually leading to the exacerbation of LN.

  3. ROLE OF CHIMAERINS, A GROUP OF Rac-SPECIFIC GTPase ACTIVATING PROTEINS, IN T-CELL RECEPTOR SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Caloca, María José; Delgado, Pilar; Alarcón, Balbino; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2008-01-01

    Chimaerins are GTPase-activating proteins that inactivate the GTP-hydrolase Rac1 in a diacylglycerol-dependent manner. To date, the study of chimaerins has been done mostly in neuronal cells. Here, we show that α2- and β2-chimaerin are expressed at different levels in T-cells and that they participate in T-cell receptor signaling. In agreement with this, we have observed that α2- and β2-chimaerins translocate to the T-cell/B-cell immune synapse and, using both gain- and loss-of-function approaches, demonstrated that their catalytic activity is important for the inhibition of the T-cell receptor- and Vav1-dependent stimulation of the transcriptional factor NF-AT. Mutagenesis-based approaches have revealed the molecular determinants that contribute to the biological program of chimaerins during T-cell responses. Unexpectedly, we have found that the translocation of chimaerins to the T-cell/B-cell immune synapse does not rely on the canonical binding of diacylglycerol to the C1 region of these GTPase-activating proteins. Taken together, these results identify chimaerins as candidates for the downmodulation of Rac1 in T-lymphocytes and, in addition, uncover a novel regulatory mechanism that mediates their activation in T-cells. PMID:18249095

  4. Vav1 regulates T cell activation through a feedback mechanism and crosstalk between the T cell receptor and CD28

    PubMed Central

    Helou, Ynes A.; Petrashen, Anna P.; Salomon, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    Vavl, a Rac/Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor and a critical component of the T cell receptor (TCR) signaling cascade, is rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell activation. Vav1 has established roles in proliferation, cytokine secretion, Ca2+ responses, and actin cytoskeleton regulation, however, its function in the regulation of phosphorylation of TCR components, including the ζ chain, the CD3 δ, ε, γ chains, and the associated kinases Lck, and ZAP-70 is not well established. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the role of Vav1 in receptor proximal signaling, we performed a wide-scale characterization of Vav1-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation events using quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of Vav1-deficient T cells across a time course of TCR stimulation. Importantly, this study revealed a new function for Vav1 in the negative feedback regulation of the phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs within the ζ chains, CD3 δ, ε, γ chains, as well as activation sites on the critical T cell tyrosine kinases Itk, Lck, and ZAP-70. Our study also uncovered a previously unappreciated role for Vav1 in crosstalk between the CD28 and TCR signaling pathways. PMID:26043137

  5. The role of adapter proteins in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Koretzky, G A; Boerth, N J

    1999-12-01

    Engagement of antigen receptors on lymphocytes leads to a myriad of complex signal transduction cascades. Recently, work from several laboratories has led to the identification and characterization of novel adapter molecules, proteins with no intrinsic enzymatic activity but which integrate signal transduction pathways by mediating protein-protein interactions. Interestingly, it appears that many of these adapter proteins play as critical a role as the effector enzymes themselves in both lymphocyte development and activation. This review describes some of the biochemical and molecular features of several of these newly identified hematopoietic cell-specific adapter molecules highlighting their importance in regulating (both positively and negatively) signal transduction mediated by the T cell antigen receptor.

  6. Nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 mediates p21-activated kinase 1 activation in the modulation of chemokine-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation and injury-induced vascular wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Singh, Nikhlesh K; Kumar, Sanjay; Gadepalli, Ravisekhar; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2013-07-26

    Recent literature suggests that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) mediate cell migration. However, the mechanisms were not known. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test whether cyclin/CDKs activate Pak1, an effector of Rac1, whose involvement in the modulation of cell migration and proliferation is well established. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a delayed time-dependent manner. MCP1 also stimulated F-actin stress fiber formation in a delayed manner in HASMCs, as well as the migration and proliferation of these cells. Inhibition of Pak1 suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. MCP1 induced cyclin D1 expression as well as CDK6 and CDK4 activities, and these effects were dependent on activation of NFATc1. Depletion of NFATc1, cyclin D1, CDK6, or CDK4 levels attenuated MCP1-induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation and resulted in decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. CDK4, which appeared to be activated downstream of CDK6, formed a complex with Pak1 in response to MCP1. MCP1 also activated Rac1 in a time-dependent manner, and depletion/inhibition of its levels/activation abrogated MCP1-induced NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling and, thereby, decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 led to decreased cyclin D1 expression and CDK6, CDK4, and Pak1 activities, resulting in reduced neointima formation in response to injury. Thus, these observations reveal that Pak1 is a downstream effector of CDK4 and Rac1-dependent, NFATc1-mediated cyclin D1 expression and CDK6 activity mediate this effect. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 prevented the capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells for MCP-1-induced activation of the cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling axis, affecting

  7. CD8+CD122+CD49dlow regulatory T cells maintain T-cell homeostasis by killing activated T cells via Fas/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Akane, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Mak, Tak W; Shiku, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    The Fas/FasL (CD95/CD178) system is required for immune regulation; however, it is unclear in which cells, when, and where Fas/FasL molecules act in the immune system. We found that CD8(+)CD122(+) cells, which are mostly composed of memory T cells in comparison with naïve cells in the CD8(+)CD122(-) population, were previously shown to include cells with regulatory activity and could be separated into CD49d(low) cells and CD49d(high) cells. We established in vitro and in vivo experimental systems to evaluate the regulatory activity of CD122(+) cells. Regulatory activity was observed in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(low) but not in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(high) cells, indicating that the regulatory cells in the CD8(+)CD122(+) population could be narrowed down to CD49d(low) cells. CD8(+)CD122(-) cells taken from lymphoproliferation (lpr) mice were resistant to regulation by normal CD122(+) Tregs. CD122(+) Tregs taken from generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) mice did not regulate wild-type CD8(+)CD122(-) cells, indicating that the regulation by CD122(+) Tregs is Fas/FasL-dependent. CD122(+) Tregs taken from IL-10-deficient mice could regulate CD8(+)CD122(-) cells as equally as wild-type CD122(+) Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. MHC class I-missing T cells were not regulated by CD122(+) Tregs in vitro. CD122(+) Tregs also regulated CD4(+) cells in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest an essential role of Fas/FasL as a terminal effector of the CD122(+) Tregs that kill activated T cells to maintain immune homeostasis.

  8. NKL homeobox gene activities in hematopoietic stem cells, T-cell development and T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pommerenke, Claudia; Scherr, Michaela; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Battmer, Karin; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Drexler, Hans G.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells represent developmentally arrested T-cell progenitors, subsets of which aberrantly express homeobox genes of the NKL subclass, including TLX1, TLX3, NKX2-1, NKX2-5, NKX3-1 and MSX1. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of all 48 members of the NKL homeobox gene subclass in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and during lymphopoiesis, identifying activities of nine particular genes. Four of these were expressed in HSPCs (HHEX, HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1) and three in common lymphoid progenitors (HHEX, HLX1 and MSX1). Interestingly, our data indicated downregulation of NKL homeobox gene transcripts in late progenitors and mature T-cells, a phenomenon which might explain the oncogenic impact of this group of genes in T-ALL. Using MSX1-expressing T-ALL cell lines as models, we showed that HHEX activates while HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1 repress MSX1 transcription, demonstrating the mutual regulation and differential activities of these homeobox genes. Analysis of a public T-ALL expression profiling data set comprising 117 patient samples identified 20 aberrantly activated members of the NKL subclass, extending the number of known NKL homeobox oncogene candidates. While 7/20 genes were also active during hematopoiesis, the remaining 13 showed ectopic expression. Finally, comparative analyses of T-ALL patient and cell line profiling data of NKL-positive and NKL-negative samples indicated absence of shared target genes but instead highlighted deregulation of apoptosis as common oncogenic effect. Taken together, we present a comprehensive survey of NKL homeobox genes in early hematopoiesis, T-cell development and T-ALL, showing that these genes generate an NKL-code for the diverse stages of lymphoid development which might be fundamental for regular differentiation. PMID:28151996

  9. The antihistamine olopatadine regulates T cell activation in palladium allergy.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Naohiko; Takeda, Yuri; Sato, Naoki; Ukichi, Kenichirou; Katakura, Akira; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki; Higuchi, Shigehito; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2016-06-01

    Because of its corrosion resistance palladium (Pd) has been widely used in many consumer products ranging from fashion accessories to dental materials. Recently, however, an increase in Pd allergy cases has been reported. Metal allergy is categorized as a Type IV allergy, which is characterized as a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in which T cells are known to play an important role; however, the precise mechanism of their action remains unclear. Here we defined the relationship between histamine and the Pd allergic reaction specifically with respect to T cell responses. To verify the effects of histamine on T cells, we examined whether there is a change in IFN-γ production following stimulation of histamine or the antihistamine, olopatadine hydrochloride (OLP), in vitro. In addition, we assessed whether OLP administration affected the degree of footpad swelling or IFN-γ production during the Pd allergy response in mice. We found that histamine stimulation increased IFN-γ production in T cells, specifically enhancing IFN-γ production in CD8(+) T cells compared with CD4(+) T cells. Interestingly, OLP suppressed the production of IFN-γ in CD8(+) T cells, and this compound inhibited footpad swelling and IFN-γ production in mice with Pd allergy. These results suggest that histamine promotes the Type IV allergic reaction and thus, the histamine 1 receptor (H1R) might be useful therapeutic target for treatment of metal allergy.

  10. Expression of inhibitory receptors on intratumoral T cells modulates the activity of a T cell-bispecific antibody targeting folate receptor.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Jens; Thommen, Daniela S; Herzig, Petra; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Levitsky, Victor; Savic, Spasenija; Moersig, Wolfgang; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; von Bergwelt-Baildon, M; Lardinois, Didier; Müller, Philipp; Karanikas, Vaios; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    T-cell bispecific antibodies (TCBs) are a novel therapeutic tool designed to selectively recruit T-cells to tumor cells and simultaneously activate them. However, it is currently unknown whether the dysfunctional state of T-cells, embedded into the tumor microenvironment, imprints on the therapeutic activity of TCBs. We performed a comprehensive analysis of activation and effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs) in different tumor types, upon stimulation by a TCB targeting folate receptor 1 and CD3 (FolR1-TCB). We observed a considerable heterogeneity in T-cell activation, cytokine production and tumor cell killing upon exposure to FolR1-TCB among different FolR1-expressing tumors. Of note, tumors presenting with a high frequency of PD-1(hi) TILs displayed significantly impaired tumor cell killing and T-cell function. Further characterization of additional T-cell inhibitory receptors revealed that PD-1(hi) TILs defined a T-cell subset with particularly high levels of multiple inhibitory receptors compared with PD-1(int) and PD-1(neg) T-cells. PD-1 blockade could restore cytokine secretion but not cytotoxicity of TILs in a subset of patients with scarce PD-1(hi) expressing cells; in contrast, patients with abundance of PD-1(hi) expressing T-cells did not benefit from PD-1 blockade. Our data highlight that FolR1-TCB is a promising novel immunotherapeutic treatment option which is capable of activating intratumoral T-cells in different carcinomas. However, its therapeutic efficacy may be substantially hampered by a pre-existing dysfunctional state of T-cells, reflected by abundance of intratumoral PD-1(hi) T-cells. These findings present a rationale for combinatorial approaches of TCBs with other therapeutic strategies targeting T-cell dysfunction.

  11. A role for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Murdaca, Joseph; Sibille, Brigitte; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Squillace, Raphaëlle; Le Menn, Gwenaëlle; Rekima, Akila; Larbret, Frederic; Pelé, Juline; Verhasselt, Valérie; Grimaldi, Paul A.; Neels, Jaap G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism plays an important role in T cell biology and changes in metabolism drive T cell differentiation and fate. Most research on the role of metabolism in T lymphocytes focuses on mature T cells while only few studies have investigated the role of metabolism in T cell development. In this study, we report that activation or overexpression of the transcription factor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β (PPARβ) increases fatty acid oxidation in T cells. Furthermore, using both in vivo and in vitro models, we demonstrate that PPARβ activation/overexpression inhibits thymic T cell development by decreasing proliferation of CD4−CD8− double-negative stage 4 (DN4) thymocytes. These results support a model where PPARβ activation/overexpression favours fatty acid- instead of glucose-oxidation in developing T cells, thereby hampering the proliferative burst normally occurring at the DN4 stage of T cell development. As a consequence, the αβ T cells that are derived from DN4 thymocytes are dramatically decreased in peripheral lymphoid tissues, while the γδ T cell population remains untouched. This is the first report of a direct role for a member of the PPAR family of nuclear receptors in the development of T cells. PMID:27680392

  12. STATs Shape the Active Enhancer Landscape of T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Takahashi, Hayato; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sun, Hong-wei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Kanno, Yuka; O’Shea, John J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Signaling pathways are intimately involved in cellular differentiation, allowing cells to respond to their environment by regulating gene expression. While enhancers are recognized as key elements that regulate selective gene expression, the interplay between signaling pathways and actively used enhancer elements is not clear. Here, we use CD4+ T cells as a model of differentiation, mapping the acquisition of cell-type-specific enhancer elements in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cells. Our data establish that STAT proteins have a major impact on the acquisition of lineage-specific enhancers and the suppression of enhancers associated with alternative cell fates. Transcriptome analysis further supports a functional role for enhancers regulated by STATs. Importantly, expression of lineage-defining master regulators in STAT-deficient cells fails to fully recover the chromatin signature of STAT-dependent enhancers. Thus, these findings point to a critical role of STATs as environmental sensors in dynamically molding the specialized enhancer architecture of differentiating cells. PMID:23178119

  13. Global Analysis of O-GlcNAc Glycoproteins in Activated Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Peder J.; Elias, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    T cell activation in response to Ag is largely regulated by protein posttranslational modifications. Although phosphorylation has been extensively characterized in T cells, much less is known about the glycosylation of serine/threonine residues by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). Given that O-GlcNAc appears to regulate cell signaling pathways and protein activity similarly to phosphorylation, we performed a comprehensive analysis of O-GlcNAc during T cell activation to address the functional importance of this modification and to identify the modified proteins. Activation of T cells through the TCR resulted in a global elevation of O-GlcNAc levels and in the absence of O-GlcNAc, IL-2 production and proliferation were compromised. T cell activation also led to changes in the relative expression of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) isoforms and accumulation of OGT at the immunological synapse of murine T cells. Using a glycoproteomics approach, we identified >200 O-GlcNAc proteins in human T cells. Many of the identified proteins had a functional relationship to RNA metabolism, and consistent with a connection between O-GlcNAc and RNA, inhibition of OGT impaired nascent RNA synthesis upon T cell activation. Overall, our studies provide a global analysis of O-GlcNAc dynamics during T cell activation and the first characterization, to our knowledge, of the O-GlcNAc glycoproteome in human T cells. PMID:27655845

  14. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  15. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-04-12

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4(+) T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation.

  16. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C.; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation. PMID:27068814

  17. Cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells against autologous tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Konomi, Y; Sekine, T; Takayama, T; Fuji, M; Tanaka, T

    1995-09-01

    The 51Cr-release assay is mostly applied to detecting the cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, and little is known about the activity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the correlation between the cytotoxic activity of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells and the incubation period with autologous tumor cells was analyzed by two methods. The incubation periods were 4 and 20 h (4 h and 20 h assay) for the 51Cr-release assay. Eight pairs of tumor cells and T cells were assayed. T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by using magnetic beads and panning methods, and those cells were activated by culture with recombinant interleukin-2 and immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. In 6 out of 8 cases, no cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells was detected by the 4 h assay, whereas cytotoxic activity was detected in all cases in the 20 h assay. The cytotoxic activities in 20 h assay of CD4+ T cells were increased 67-fold in comparison with the activities in 4 h assay (range: 5-197). In the case of CD8+ T cells, cytotoxic activities were detected in 6 out of 8 cases in the 4 h assay. The lytic unit ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was calculated as 1.5 in the 20 h assay (range: 0.2- > 7.2) versus 0.4 in the 4 h assay (range: < 0.1-1.3). Cytotoxic activities in colorimetric assay using Crystal Violet with a 24 h incubation were similar to those in the 20 h 51Cr-release assay in all eight cases. These results indicate that CD4+ T cells have cytotoxic activity as strong as that of CD8+ T cells towards autologous tumor cells.

  18. CD27 Promotes Survival of Activated T Cells and Complements CD28 in Generation and Establishment of the Effector T Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Jenny; Xiao, Yanling; Borst, Jannie

    2003-01-01

    CD27, like CD28, acts in concert with the T cell receptor to support T cell expansion. Using CD27−/− mice, we have shown earlier that CD27 determines the magnitude of primary and memory T cell responses to influenza virus. Here, we have examined the relative contributions of CD27 and CD28 to generation of the virus-specific effector T cell pool and its establishment at the site of infection (the lung), using CD27−/−, CD28−/−, and CD27/CD28−/− mice. We find that primary and memory CD8+ T cell responses to influenza virus are dependent on the collective contribution of both receptors. In the primary response, CD27 and CD28 impact to a similar extent on expansion of virus-specific T cells in draining lymph nodes. CD27 is the principle determinant for accumulation of virus-specific T cells in the lung because it can sustain this response in CD28−/− mice. Unlike CD28, CD27 does not affect cell cycle activity, but promotes survival of activated T cells throughout successive rounds of division at the site of priming and may do so at the site of infection as well. CD27 was found to rescue CD28−/− T cells from death at the onset of division, explaining its capacity to support a T cell response in absence of CD28. PMID:14581610

  19. Two-photon imaging of intratumoral CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity during adoptive T cell therapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Breart, Béatrice; Lemaître, Fabrice; Celli, Susanna; Bousso, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    CTLs have the potential to attack tumors, and adoptive transfer of CTLs can lead to tumor regression in mouse models and human clinical settings. However, the dynamics of tumor cell elimination during efficient T cell therapy is unknown, and it is unclear whether CTLs act directly by destroying tumor cells or indirectly by initiating the recruitment of innate immune cells that mediate tumor damage. To address these questions, we report real-time imaging of tumor cell apoptosis in vivo using intravital 2-photon microscopy and a Förster resonance energy transfer–based (FRET-based) reporter of caspase 3 activity. In a mouse model of solid tumor, we found that tumor regression after transfer of in vitro–activated CTLs occurred primarily through the direct action of CTLs on each individual tumor cell, with a minimal bystander effect. Surprisingly, the killing of 1 target cell by an individual CTL took an extended period of time, 6 hours on average, which suggested that the slow rate of killing intrinsically limits the efficiency of antitumor T cell responses. The ability to visualize when, where, and how tumor cells are killed in vivo offers new perspectives for understanding how immune effectors survey cancer cells and how local tumor microenvironments may subvert immune responses. PMID:18357341

  20. Narcolepsy Type 1 Is Associated with a Systemic Increase and Activation of Regulatory T Cells and with a Systemic Activation of Global T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pitoiset, Fabien; Regnault, Armelle; Tran, Tu Anh; Liblau, Roland; Klatzmann, David; Rosenzwajg, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare neurologic disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. Narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) has been shown to result from a selective loss of hypothalamic hypocretin-secreting neurons with patients typically showing low CSF-hypocretin levels (<110 pg/ml). This specific loss of hypocretin and the strong association with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele led to the hypothesis that NT1 could be an immune-mediated pathology. Moreover, susceptibility to NT1 has recently been associated with several pathogens, particularly with influenza A H1N1 virus either through infection or vaccination. The goal of this study was to compare peripheral blood immune cell populations in recent onset pediatric NT1 subjects (post or non-post 2009-influenza A H1N1 vaccination) to healthy donors. We demonstrated an increased number of central memory CD4+ T cells (CD62L+ CD45RA-) associated to an activated phenotype (increase in CD69 and CD25 expression) in NT1 patients. Percentage and absolute count of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in NT1 patients were increased associated with an activated phenotype (increase in GITR and LAP expression), and of activated memory phenotype. Cytokine production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after activation was not modified in NT1 patients. In H1N1 vaccinated NT1 patients, absolute counts of CD3+, CD8+ T cells, and B cells were increased compared to non-vaccinated NT1 patients. These results support a global T cell activation in NT1 patients and thus support a T cell-mediated autoimmune origin of NT1, but do not demonstrate the pathological role of H1N1 prophylactic vaccination. They should prompt further studies of T cells, particularly of Tregs (such as suppression and proliferation antigen specific assays, and also T-cell receptor sequencing), in NT1. PMID:28107375

  1. The Us3 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Inhibits T Cell Signaling by Confining Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) Activation via TRAF6 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin; Wu, Songfang; Wang, Yu; Pan, Shuang; Lan, Bei; Liu, Yaohui; Zhang, Liming; Leng, Qianli; Chen, Da; Zhang, Cuizhu; He, Bin; Cao, Youjia

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the most prevalent human virus and causes global morbidity because the virus is able to infect multiple cell types. Remarkably, HSV infection switches between lytic and latent cycles, where T cells play a critical role. However, the precise way of virus-host interactions is incompletely understood. Here we report that HSV-1 productively infected Jurkat T-cells and inhibited antigen-induced T cell receptor activation. We discovered that HSV-1-encoded Us3 protein interrupted TCR signaling and interleukin-2 production by inactivation of the linker for activation of T cells. This study unveils a mechanism by which HSV-1 intrudes into early events of TCR-mediated cell signaling and may provide novel insights into HSV infection, during which the virus escapes from host immune surveillance. PMID:25907557

  2. Mapping the Zap-70 phosphorylation sites on LAT (linker for activation of T cells) required for recruitment and activation of signalling proteins in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Paz, P E; Wang, S; Clarke, H; Lu, X; Stokoe, D; Abo, A

    2001-01-01

    T-cell-receptor (TCR)-mediated LAT (linker for activation of T cells) phosphorylation is critical for the membrane recruitment of signalling complexes required for T-cell activation. Although tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT is required for recruitment and activation of signalling proteins, the molecular mechanism associated with this event is unclear. In the present study we reconstituted the LAT signalling pathway by demonstrating that a direct tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT with activated protein-tyrosine kinase Zap70 is necessary and sufficient for the association and activation of signalling proteins. Zap-70 efficiently phosphorylates LAT on tyrosine residues at positions 226, 191, 171, 132 and 127. By substituting these tyrosine residues in LAT with phenylalanine and by utilizing phosphorylated peptides derived from these sites, we mapped the tyrosine residues in LAT required for the direct interaction and activation of Vav, p85/p110alpha and phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1). Our results indicate that Tyr(226) and Tyr(191) are required for Vav binding, whereas Tyr(171) and Tyr(132) are necessary for association and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity and PLCgamma1 respectively. Furthermore, by expression of LAT mutants in LAT-deficient T cells, we demonstrate that Tyr(191) and Tyr(171) are required for T-cell activation and Tyr(132) is required for the activation of PLCgamma1 and Ras signalling pathways. PMID:11368773

  3. Diacylglycerol Kinases (DGKs): Novel Targets for Improving T Cell Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Matthew J.; Moon, Edmund K.; Johnson, Bryon D.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are a family of enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of DGK, DGKα, and DGKζ, specifically regulate the pool of DAG that is generated as a second messenger after stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR). Deletion of either isoform in mouse models results in T cells bearing a hyperresponsive phenotype and enhanced T cell activity against malignancy. Whereas, DGKζ appears to be the dominant isoform in T cells, rationale exists for targeting both isoforms individually or coordinately. Additional work is needed to rigorously identify the molecular changes that result from deletion of DGKs in order to understand how DAG contributes to T cell activation, the effect of DGK inhibition in human T cells, and to rationally develop combined immunotherapeutic strategies that target DGKs. PMID:27800476

  4. THE INITIAL PHASE OF AN IMMUNE RESPONSE FUNCTIONS TO ACTIVATE REGULATORY T CELLS

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, William E.; Dooms, Hans; Thorne, Steve H.; Kuswanto, Wilson F.; Simonds, Erin F.; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.; Abbas, Abul K.

    2009-01-01

    An early reaction of CD4+ T lymphocytes to antigen is the production of cytokines, notably IL-2. In order to detect cytokine dependent responses, naive antigen-specific T cells were stimulated in vivo and the presence of phosphorylated STAT5 molecules was used to identify the cell populations responding to IL-2. Within hours of T-cell priming, IL-2-dependent STAT5 phosphorylation occurred primarily in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In contrast, the antigen-specific T cells received STAT5 signals only after repeated antigen exposure or memory differentiation. Regulatory T cells receiving IL-2 signals proliferated and developed enhanced suppressive activity. These results indicate that one of the earliest events in a T cell response is the activation of endogenous regulatory cells, potentially to prevent autoimmunity. PMID:19542444

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits T-cell activation by targeting both nuclear factor of activated T-cells and NF-kappaB transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Calzado, Marco A; Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, has been shown to reveal anti-inflammatory properties. Since T-cells play a key role in the onset of several inflammatory diseases, we have evaluated the immunosuppressive activity of CAPE in human T-cells, discovering that this phenolic compound is a potent inhibitor of early and late events in T-cell receptor-mediated T-cell activation. Moreover, we found that CAPE specifically inhibited both interleukin (IL)-2 gene transcription and IL-2 synthesis in stimulated T-cells. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of CAPE at the transcriptional level, we examined the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, nuclear factor of activated cells (NFAT), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors in Jurkat cells. We found that CAPE inhibited NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity without affecting the degradation of the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB inhibitory protein, IkappaBalpha. However, both NF-kappaB binding to DNA and transcriptional activity of a Gal4-p65 hybrid protein were clearly prevented in CAPE-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, CAPE inhibited both the DNA-binding and transcriptional activity of NFAT, a result that correlated with its ability to inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin-induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of this natural compound.

  6. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  7. Molecular interactions between T cells and fibroblast-like synoviocytes: role of membrane tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cytokine-activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Chinh N; Lundy, Steven K; White, Peter T; Endres, Judith L; Motyl, Christopher D; Gupta, Raj; Wilke, Cailin M; Shelden, Eric A; Chung, Kevin C; Urquhart, Andrew G; Fox, David A

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) transformation into an inflammatory phenotype in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not fully understood. FLS interactions with invading leukocytes, particularly T cells, are thought to be a critical component of this pathological process. Resting T cells and T cells activated through the T-cell receptor have previously been shown to induce inflammatory cytokine production by FLS. More recently, a distinct population of T cells has been identified in RA synovium that phenotypically resembles cytokine-activated T (Tck) cells. Using time lapse microscopy, the interactions of resting, superantigen-activated, and cytokine-activated T cells with FLS were visualized. Rapid and robust adhesion of Tck and superantigen-activated T cells to FLS was observed that resulted in flattening of the T cells and a crawling movement on the FLS surface. Tck also readily activated FLS to produce interleukin IL-6 and IL-8 in a cell contact-dependent manner that was enhanced by exogenous IL-17. Although LFA-1 and ICAM-1 co-localized at the Tck-FLS synapse, blocking the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction did not substantially inhibit Tck effector function. However, antibody blocking of membrane tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on the Tck surface did inhibit FLS cytokine production, thus illustrating a novel mechanism for involvement of TNF-alpha in cell-cell interactions in RA synovium and for the effectiveness of TNF-alpha blockade in the treatment of RA.

  8. Mapping the polarity and stimulus density requirements for T-cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Zhang, Zhanxiang; Negulescu, Paul A.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Berns, Michael W.; Cahalan, Michael D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1998-08-01

    T-cell contact with antigen-presenting cells (APC) initiates an activation cascade which includes an increase in T-cell intracellular calcium [(Ca2+)i] and leads to T-cell proliferation and differentiation. Although T-cell/APC physical contact is required for an immune response, little is known about the patterns of cellular interaction and their relation to activation. We have combined fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging with optical manipulation to investigate the contact requirements for T-cell activation, using optical tweezers to control the orientation of T- cell/APC pairs and fluorescence microscopy to measure the subsequent (Ca2+)i response, detected as an emission shift from the combination of fura-red and oregon- green, two cytoplasmic (Ca2+) indicators. APCs or beads coated with antibodies to the T-cell receptor (TCR) are trapped with a near-infrared titanium-sapphire laser and placed at different locations along the T-cell, which has a polarized appearance defined by the shape and direction of crawling (2-5 micrometers /min). T cells contacted with antigen- presenting cells or antibody-coated beads entered a dynamic and reproducible program in the first 10 - 20 mins, including (Ca2+)i increase, changes in shape and motility, engulfment, and stable contact. T cells presented with antigen at the leading edge had a higher probability of responding (85%) and a shorter latency of response (50 secs) than those contacting APCs or beads with their trailing end (APCs: 30%, 150 secs; beads: 6%, 300 secs). Alterations in antibody density, quantified by FACS analysis, and bead size were used to determine the spatial requirements for T cell activation and the minimum number of receptors which must be engaged in order to transmit a positive signal. Preliminary data show that T cell responses [response percentage, latency and (Ca2+)i pattern] depend on both antibody density and bead size.

  9. Immune activation induces immortalization of HTLV-1 LTR-Tax transgenic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaims, Alison Y.; Khani, Francesca; Zhang, Yingyu; Roberts, Arthur I.; Devadas, Satish

    2010-01-01

    Infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) results in a variety of diseases including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Although the pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, it involves complex interactions with the host immune system. Activation of infected T cells may play an important role in disease pathogenesis through induction of the oncogenic HTLV-1 Tax transactivator protein. To test this hypothesis, we employed transgenic mice in which Tax is regulated by the HTLV-1 LTR. T-cell receptor stimulation of LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells induced Tax expression, hyper-proliferation, and immortalization in culture. The transition to cellular immortalization was accompanied by markedly increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, mcl-1, previously implicated as important in T-cell survival. Immortalized cells exhibited a CD4+CD25+CD3− phenotype commonly observed in ATL. Engraftment of activated LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγ null mice resulted in a leukemia-like phenotype with expansion and tissue infiltration of Tax+, CD4+ lymphocytes. We suggest that immune activation of infected CD4+ T cells plays an important role in the induction of Tax expression, T-cell proliferation, and pathogenesis of ATL in HTLV-1–infected individuals. PMID:20634377

  10. IL-15 promotes activation and expansion of CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Freeman, Michael L.; Mudd, Joseph C.; Shive, Carey L.; Reynaldi, Arnold; Estes, Jacob D.; Deleage, Claire; Lucero, Carissa; Anderson, Jodi; Schacker, Timothy W.; Davenport, Miles P.; McCune, Joseph M.; Hunt, Peter W.; Lee, Sulggi A.; Debernardo, Robert L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Canaday, David H.; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Sieg, Scott F.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-1–infected patients, increased numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells are linked to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Here, we identified a bystander mechanism that promotes CD8 T cell activation and expansion in untreated HIV-1–infected patients. Compared with healthy controls, untreated HIV-1–infected patients have an increased population of proliferating, granzyme B+, CD8+ T cells in circulation. Vβ expression and deep sequencing of CDR3 revealed that in untreated HIV-1 infection, cycling memory CD8 T cells possess a broad T cell repertoire that reflects the repertoire of the resting population. This suggests that cycling is driven by bystander activation, rather than specific antigen exposure. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with IL-15 induced a cycling, granzyme B+ phenotype in CD8+ T cells. Moreover, elevated IL-15 expression in the lymph nodes of untreated HIV-1–infected patients correlated with circulating CD8+ T cell counts and was normalized in these patients following antiretroviral therapy. Together, these results suggest that IL-15 drives bystander activation of CD8+ T cells, which predicts disease progression in untreated HIV-1–infected patients and suggests that elevated IL-15 may also drive CD8+ T cell expansion that is linked to increased morbidity and mortality in treated patients. PMID:27322062

  11. Ena/VASP proteins regulate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting diapedesis during transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Estin, Miriam L; Thompson, Scott B; Traxinger, Brianna; Fisher, Marlie H; Friedman, Rachel S; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2017-04-04

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and Ena-VASP-like (EVL) are cytoskeletal effector proteins implicated in regulating cell morphology, adhesion, and migration in various cell types. However, the role of these proteins in T-cell motility, adhesion, and in vivo trafficking remains poorly understood. This study identifies a specific role for EVL and VASP in T-cell diapedesis and trafficking. We demonstrate that EVL and VASP are selectively required for activated T-cell trafficking but are not required for normal T-cell development or for naïve T-cell trafficking to lymph nodes and spleen. Using a model of multiple sclerosis, we show an impairment in trafficking of EVL/VASP-deficient activated T cells to the inflamed central nervous system of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additionally, we found a defect in trafficking of EVL/VASP double-knockout (dKO) T cells to the inflamed skin and secondary lymphoid organs. Deletion of EVL and VASP resulted in the impairment in α4 integrin (CD49d) expression and function. Unexpectedly, EVL/VASP dKO T cells did not exhibit alterations in shear-resistant adhesion to, or in crawling on, primary endothelial cells under physiologic shear forces. Instead, deletion of EVL and VASP impaired T-cell diapedesis. Furthermore, T-cell diapedesis became equivalent between control and EVL/VASP dKO T cells upon α4 integrin blockade. Overall, EVL and VASP selectively mediate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting the diapedesis step of transendothelial migration in a α4 integrin-dependent manner.

  12. Interleukin-7 is required for CD4+ T cell activation and autoimmune neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Brian R.; Gonzalez-Quintial, Rosana; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Farrar, Michael A.; Miller, Stephen D.; Sauer, Karsten; McGavern, Dorian B.; Kono, Dwight H.; Baccala, Roberto; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.

    2015-01-01

    IL-7 is known to be vital for T cell homeostasis but has previously been presumed to be dispensable for TCR-induced activation. Here, we show that IL-7 is critical for the initial activation of CD4+ T cells in that it provides some of the necessary early signaling components, such as activated STAT5 and Akt. Accordingly, short-term in vivo IL-7Rα blockade inhibited the activation and expansion of autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells and, when used to treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), prevented and ameliorated disease. Our studies demonstrate that IL-7 signaling is a prerequisite for optimal CD4+ T cell activation and that IL-7R antagonism may be effective in treating CD4+ T cell-mediated neuroinflammation and other autoimmune inflammatory conditions. PMID:26319414

  13. Recombinant Ad35 adenoviral proteins as potent modulators of human T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Joanne; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André; Astier, Anne L

    2015-01-01

    The protein CD46 protects cells from complement attack by regulating cleavage of C3b and C3d. CD46 also regulates the adaptive immune response by controlling T-cell activation and differentiation. Co-engagement of the T-cell receptor and CD46 notably drives T-cell differentiation by switching production of interferon-γ to secretion of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. This regulatory pathway is altered in several chronic inflammatory diseases, highlighting its key role for immune homeostasis. The manipulation of the CD46 pathway may therefore provide a powerful means to regulate immune responses. Herein, we investigated the effect of recombinant proteins derived from the fibre knob of the adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) that uses CD46 as its entry receptor, on human T-cell activation. We compared the effects of Ad35K++, engineered to exhibit enhanced affinity to CD46, and of Ad35K−, mutated in the binding site for CD46. Ad35K++ profoundly affects T-cell activation by decreasing the levels of CD46 at the surface of primary T cells, and impairing T-cell co-activation, shown by decreased CD25 expression, reduced proliferation and lower secretion of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ. In contrast, Ad35K− acts a potent co-activator of T cells, enhancing T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. These data show that recombinant Ad35 proteins are potent modulators of human T-cell activation, and support their further development as potential drugs targeting T-cell responses. PMID:25251258

  14. Clonal Expansions of Cd8+ T Cells Dominate the T Cell Infiltrate in Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions as Shown by Micromanipulation and Single Cell Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Babbe, Holger; Roers, Axel; Waisman, Ari; Lassmann, Hans; Goebels, Norbert; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Friese, Michael; Schröder, Roland; Deckert, Martina; Schmidt, Stephan; Ravid, Rivka; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Clonal composition and T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltrating actively demyelinating multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions were determined with unprecedented resolution at the level of single cells. Individual CD4+ or CD8+ T cells were isolated from frozen sections of lesional tissue by micromanipulation and subjected to single target amplification of TCR-β gene rearrangements. This strategy allows the assignment of a TCR variable region (V region) sequence to the particular T cell from which it was amplified. Sequence analysis revealed that in both cases investigated, the majority of CD8+ T cells belonged to few clones. One of these clones accounted for 35% of CD8+ T cells in case 1. V region sequence comparison revealed signs of selection for common peptide specificities for some of the CD8+ T cells in case 1. In both cases, the CD4+ T cell population was more heterogeneous. Most CD4+ and CD8+ clones were represented in perivascular infiltrates as well as among parenchymal T cells. In case 2, two of the CD8+ clones identified in brain tissue were also detected in peripheral blood. Investigation of the antigenic specificities of expanded clones may help to elucidate their functional properties. PMID:10934227

  15. Essential role of CD11a in CD8+ T-cell accumulation and activation in adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T-cells, particularly CD8+ T-cells, are major participants in obesity-linked adipose tissue inflammation. We examined the mechanisms of CD8+ T-cell accumulation and activation in adipose tissue and the role of CD11a, a beta2 integrin. CD8+ T-cells in adipose tissue of obese mice showed activated phe...

  16. T-Cell Activation under Hypoxic Conditions Enhances IFN-γ Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Jessica; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Guo, Jia; Sugunan, Siva; Meednu, Nida; Packirisamy, Gopinath; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Golding, Amit; Semenza, Gregg; Georas, Steve N.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues are characterized by hypoxic microenvironments, both in the steady state and during inflammation. Although hypoxia regulates T-cell metabolism and survival, very little is known about whether or how hypoxia influences T-cell activation. We stimulated mouse CD4+ T cells in vitro with antibodies directed against the T-cell receptor (CD3) and CD28 under normoxic (20% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. Here we report that stimulation under hypoxic conditions augments the secretion of effector CD4+ T-cell cytokines, especially IFN-γ. The enhancing effects of hypoxia on IFN-γ secretion were independent of mouse strain, and were also unaffected using CD4+ T cells from mice lacking one copy of the gene encoding hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Using T cells from IFN-γ receptor–deficient mice and promoter reporter studies in transiently transfected Jurkat T cells, we found that the enhancing effects of hypoxia on IFN-γ expression were not due to effects on IFN-γ consumption or proximal promoter activity. In contrast, deletion of the transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45–related factor 2 attenuated the enhancing effect of hypoxia on IFN-γ secretion and other cytokines. We conclude that hypoxia is a previously underappreciated modulator of effector cytokine secretion in CD4+ T cells. PMID:19372249

  17. CD4+ T cell activation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verselis, S J; Goust, J M

    1987-02-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by CD4-enriched T cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and normal individuals stimulated with concanavalin A (conA) and/or autologous and allogeneic B lymphoid cell lines (B-LCL) was evaluated 24, 48 and 96 h after stimulation. ConA-stimulated CD4+ cells from MS patients did not produce significantly more IL-2 than normal CD4+ cells. In contrast, autologous B-LCL-induced IL-2 production by MS CD4+ cells significantly (P = 0.026) exceeded that produced by normal CD4+ cells identically stimulated after 24 h in culture. Differences in IL-2 production by CD4+ cells from MS patients reached highest significance using allogeneic B-LCL, whose stimulatory capacity was similar, whether established from normal individuals or MS patients. This increased IL-2 production in response to B-LCL may represent a supranormal response of CD4+ cells from MS patients to class II major histocompatibility (MHC)-associated stimuli. It suggests that the deficiency of suppressor T cell functions postulated to play a role in MS does not arise from a lack of IL-2 induction and might indicate that bursts of IL-2 production could play a role in MS.

  18. Enhanced Effector Responses in Activated CD8+ T Cells Deficient in Diacylglycerol Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Matthew J.; Wang, Liang-Chuan S.; Moon, Edmund K.; Joshi, Rohan P.; Ranganathan, Anjana; June, Carl H.; Koretzky, Gary A.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown promise in the use of chimeric antigen receptor(CAR)-transduced T cells; however, augmentation of their activity may broaden their clinical utility and improve their efficacy. We hypothesized that, since CAR action requires proteins essential for TCR signal transduction, deletion of negative regulators of these signaling pathways would enhance CAR signaling and effector T cell function. We tested CAR activity and function in T cells that lacked one or both isoforms of diacylglycerol kinase (dgk) expressed highly in T cells, dgkα and dgkζ, enzymes that metabolize the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) and limit Ras/ERK activation. We found that primary murine T cells transduced with CARs specific for the human tumor antigen mesothelin demonstrated greatly enhanced cytokine production and cytotoxicity when co-cultured with a murine mesothelioma line that stably expresses mesothelin. Additionally, we found that dgk-deficient CAR-transduced T cells were more effective in limiting the growth of implanted tumors, both concurrent with and after establishment of tumor. Consistent with our studies in mice, pharmacologic inhibition of dgks also augments function of primary human T cells transduced with CARs. These results suggest that deletion of negative regulators of TCR signaling enhances the activity and function of CAR-expressing T cells and identify dgks as potential targets for improving the clinical potential of CARs. PMID:23576561

  19. TCRγ4δ1-Engineered αβT Cells Exhibit Effective Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    He, Kangxia; You, Hongqin; Li, Yuxia; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    T cell engineering with T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for tumors plays an important role in adoptive T cell transfer (ATC) therapy for cancer. Here, we present a novel strategy to redirect peripheral blood-derived αβT cells against tumors via TCRγ4δ1 gene transduction. The broad-spectrum antitumor activity of TCRδ1 cells in innate immunity is dependent on CDR3δ1. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells were prepared by lentiviral transduction and characterized by analyzing in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to tumors, ability of proliferation and cytokine production, and potential role in autoimmunity. Results show that TCRγ4δ1 genes were transduced to approximately 36% of polyclonal αβT cells. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells exhibited effective in vitro TCRγδ-dependent cytotoxicity against various tumor cells via the perforin-granzyme pathway. They also showed a strong proliferative capacity and robust cytokine production. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells neither expressed mixed TCR dimers nor bound/killed normal cells in vitro. More important, adoptive transfer of TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells into nude mice bearing a human HepG2 cell line significantly suppressed tumor growth. Our results demonstrate a novel role for TCRγ4δ1 in gene therapy and ATC for cancer. PMID:27463149

  20. Altered Intracellular ATP Production by Activated CD4+ T-Cells in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Gabrielli, Liliana; Chiereghin, Angela; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Background. The neonatal immune system is not fully developed at birth; newborns have adequate lymphocytes counts but these cells lack function. Objective. To assess the activity of T-cells and the influence of the main perinatal factors in very preterm infants (birth weight < 1500 g). Design. Blood samples from 59 preterm infants (21/59 were dizygotic twins) were collected at birth and at 30 days of life to measure CD4+ T-cell activity using the ImmuKnow™ assay. Fifteen healthy adults were included as a control group. Results. CD4+ T-cell activity was lower in VLBW infants compared with adults (p < 0.001). Twins showed lower immune activity compared to singletons (p = 0.005). Infants born vaginally showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity compared to those born by C-section (p = 0.031); infants born after prolonged Premature Rupture of Membranes (pPROM) showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity at birth (p = 0.002) compared to infants born without pPROM. Low CD4+ T-cell activity at birth is associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in the first week of life (p = 0.049). Conclusions. Preterm infants show a lack in CD4+ T-cell activity at birth. Perinatal factors such as intrauterine inflammation, mode of delivery, and zygosity can influence the adaptive immune activation capacity at birth and can contribute to exposing these infants to serious complications such as NEC. PMID:28070527

  1. Urinary CD8+ T-cell counts discriminate between active and inactive lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe and frequent manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Early detection of initial renal manifestations and relapses during follow-up is pivotal to prevent loss of renal function. Apart from renal biopsies, current urinary and serological diagnostic tests fail to accurately demonstrate the presence of active LN. Previously, we demonstrated that effector memory T-cells (CD45RO+CCR7-;TEM) migrate into the urine during active LN. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of urinary T-cells in comparison with traditional markers of active LN. Methods T-cells in the urine during active LN and remission were investigated. Twenty-two, in most cases biopsy-proven, active LN patients and 24 SLE patients without active LN were enrolled and serial measurements were performed in 16 patients. Results Analysis of the urinary sediment in active renal disease showed an increased number of CD8+ T-cells and absence of these cells during remission. Enumerating T-cell counts in LN patients with a history of renal involvement was a superior marker of active LN in comparison to traditional markers, such as proteinuria and s-creatinine. Conclusions In conclusion, urinary T-cells, in particular CD8+ T cells, are a promising marker to assess renal activity in LN patients, in particular in those with prior renal involvement. PMID:23445537

  2. Multistage T cell-dendritic cell interactions control optimal CD4 T cell activation through the ADAP-SKAP55-signaling module.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jason S; Burbach, Brandon J; Srivastava, Rupa; Fife, Brian T; Shimizu, Yoji

    2013-09-01

    The Ag-specific interactions between T cells and dendritic cells progress through dynamic contact stages in vivo consisting of early long-term stable contacts and later confined, yet motile, short-lived contacts. The signaling pathways that control in vivo interaction dynamics between T cells and dendritic cells during priming remain undefined. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP) is a multifunctional adapter that regulates "inside-out" signaling from the TCR to integrins. Using two-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that, in the absence of ADAP, CD4 T cells make fewer early-stage stable contacts with Ag-laden dendritic cells, and the interactions are characterized by brief repetitive contacts. Furthermore, ADAP-deficient T cells show reduced contacts at the late motile contact phase and display less confinement around dendritic cells. The altered T cell interaction dynamics in the absence of ADAP are associated with defective early proliferation and attenuated TCR signaling in vivo. Regulation of multistage contact behaviors and optimal T cell signaling involves the interaction of ADAP with the adapter src kinase-associated phosphoprotein of 55 kDa (SKAP55). Thus, integrin activation by the ADAP-SKAP55-signaling module controls the stability and duration of T cell-dendritic cell contacts during the progressive phases necessary for optimal T cell activation.

  3. HCV coinfection does not alter the frequency of regulatory T cells or CD8+ T cell immune activation in chronically infected HIV+ Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Wei, Xiaoyan; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Jiucong; Kang, Wenzhen; Sun, Yongtao

    2012-09-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) is a subset of CD4(+) T cells that play a critical role in regulating the immune responses. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with T cell abnormalities and alters effector T cell function. There are a large number of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here, we evaluated the proportion of CD4(+) Treg cells expressing CD25 and FOXP3, and the status of immune activation of CD8(+) T cells in 60 Chinese patients chronically infected with HIV and/or HCV. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the level of Treg cells and immune activated CD8(+) T cells. We observed that the Treg level was upregulated in HIV infection and HCV infection could not enhance this kind of upregulation significantly. The level of Treg cells was negatively correlated with CD4(+) T cell counts and positively correlated with HIV viral loads. We observed considerably elevated CD38 and HLA-DR expression in CD8(+) T cells in HIV-infected subjects but not in HCV-infected patients in comparison to that in healthy controls. There is no significant difference concerning the proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing CD38 or HLA-DR between HIV-1-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. After 12-week HAART, the proportion of Treg cells dropped, but still more than the level in healthy controls. HAART could reverse the abnormal immune activation of CD8(+) T cells. The decrease of Tregs did not alter the downregulation of HIV-1-specific CTL responses in these HIV-infected patients after HAART therapy. The level of HIV virus might be the key point for the decline of CTL responses.

  4. Activated human B lymphocytes express three CTLA-4 counterreceptors that costimulate T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Boussiotis, V A; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Daley, J; Gray, G; Nadler, L M

    1993-01-01

    Signaling via the T-cell receptor complex is necessary but not sufficient to induce antigen-specific T lymphocytes to expand clonally. To proliferate, T cells must receive one or more costimulatory signals provided by antigen presenting cells (APCs). One such critical costimulatory signal is delivered by the CD28/CTLA-4 counterreceptor, B7, expressed on APCs. B7 costimulation induces CD28 signaling, resulting in interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, T-cell receptor signaling in the absence of B7 costimulation results in induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we show that activated human B lymphocytes express two additional CTLA-4 counterreceptors also capable of providing T-cell costimulation. At 24 hr postactivation, B cells express a CTLA-4 counterreceptor not recognized by anti-B7 or -BB-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which induces detectable IL-2 secretion and T-cell proliferation. At 48 and 72 hr postactivation, B cells express both B7 and a third CTLA-4 counterreceptor identified by the anti-BB-1 mAb. BB-1 appears to be a molecule distinct from B7 by its expression on B7- cells and its capacity to induce T cells to proliferate without significant accumulation of IL-2. As observed for B7, costimulatory signals mediated by these alternative CTLA-4/CD28 counterreceptors are likely to be essential for generation of an immune response and their absence may result in antigen-specific tolerance. We propose the following terminology for these CTLA-4 counterreceptors: (i) B7, B7-1; (ii) early CTLA-4 binding counterreceptor, B7-2; and (iii) BB-1, B7-3. PMID:7504293

  5. Interleukin-13 interferes with activation-induced t-cell apoptosis by repressing p53 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The etiology and the underlying mechanism of CD4+ T-cell polarization are unclear. This study sought to investigate the mechanism by which interleukin (IL)-13 prevents the activation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. Here we report that CD4+ T cells expressed IL-13 receptor α2 in the intestine of sensitized mice. IL-13 suppressed both the activation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells and the expression of p53 and FasL. Exposure to recombinant IL-13 inhibited activation-induced cell death (AICD) along with the expression of p53, caspase 3, and tumor necrosis factor-α in CD4+ T cells. Administration of an anti-IL-13 antibody enhanced the effect of specific immunotherapy on allergic inflammation in the mouse intestine, enforced the expression of p53 in intestinal CD4+ T cells, and enhanced the frequency of CD4+ T-cell apoptosis upon challenge with specific antigens. In summary, blocking IL-13 enhances the therapeutic effect of antigen-specific immunotherapy by regulating apoptosis and thereby enforcing AICD in CD4+ T cells. PMID:26189367

  6. Constitutively active Lck kinase in T cells drives antigen receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Nika, Konstantina; Soldani, Cristiana; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Paster, Wolfgang; Gray, Adrian; Etzensperger, Ruth; Fugger, Lars; Polzella, Paolo; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Dushek, Omer; Höfer, Thomas; Viola, Antonella; Acuto, Oreste

    2010-06-25

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and coreceptor ligation is thought to initiate signal transduction by inducing activation of the kinase Lck. Here we showed that catalytically active Lck was present in unstimulated naive T cells and thymocytes and was readily detectable in these cells in lymphoid organs. In naive T cells up to approximately 40% of total Lck was constitutively activated, part of which was also phosphorylated on the C-terminal inhibitory site. Formation of activated Lck was independent of TCR and coreceptors but required Lck catalytic activity and its maintenance relied on monitoring by the HSP90-CDC37 chaperone complex to avoid degradation. The amount of activated Lck did not change after TCR and coreceptor engagement; however it determined the extent of TCR-zeta phosphorylation. Our findings suggest a dynamic regulation of Lck activity that can be promptly utilized to initiate T cell activation and have implications for signaling by other immune receptors.

  7. Surfactant Protein A integrates activation signal strength to differentially modulate T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sambuddho; Giamberardino, Charles; Thomas, Joseph; Evans, Kathy; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ledford, Julie G; Hsia, Bethany; Pastva, Amy M; Wright, Jo Rae

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lipoproteins lower the surface tension at the alveolar:airway interface of the lung and participate in host defense. Previous studies reported that surfactant protein A (SP-A) inhibits lymphocyte proliferation. We hypothesized that SP-A mediated modulation of T cell activation depends upon the strength, duration and type of lymphocyte activating signals. Modulation of T cell signal strength imparted by different activating agents ex and in vivo in different mouse models, and in vitro with human T cells show a strong correlation between strength of signal (SoS) and functional effects of SP-A interactions. T cell proliferation is enhanced in the presence of SP-A at low SoS imparted by exogenous mitogens, specific antibodies, APCs or in homeostatic proliferation. Proliferation is inhibited at higher SoS imparted by different doses of the same T cell mitogens, or indirect stimuli such as LPS. Importantly, reconstitution with exogenous SP-A into the lungs of SP-A-/- mice stimulated with a strong signal also resulted in suppression of T cell proliferation, while elevating baseline proliferation in unstimulated T cells. These signal strength and SP-A dependent effects are mediated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels over time, involving extrinsic Ca2+ activated channels late during activation. These effects are intrinsic to the global T cell population, and are manifested in vivo in naïve as well as memory phenotype T cells. Thus, SP-A appears to integrate signal thresholds to control T cell proliferation. PMID:22219327

  8. Complementary Dendritic Cell–activating Function of CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mailliard, Robbie B.; Egawa, Shinichi; Cai, Quan; Kalinska, Anna; Bykovskaya, Svetlana N.; Lotze, Michael T.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Storkus, Walter J.; Kalinski, Pawel

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) activated by CD40L-expressing CD4+ T cells act as mediators of “T helper (Th)” signals for CD8+ T lymphocytes, inducing their cytotoxic function and supporting their long-term activity. Here, we show that the optimal activation of DCs, their ability to produce high levels of bioactive interleukin (IL)-12p70 and to induce Th1-type CD4+ T cells, is supported by the complementary DC-activating signals from both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Cord blood– or peripheral blood–isolated naive CD8+ T cells do not express CD40L, but, in contrast to naive CD4+ T cells, they are efficient producers of IFN-γ at the earliest stages of the interaction with DCs. Naive CD8+ T cells cooperate with CD40L-expressing naive CD4+ T cells in the induction of IL-12p70 in DCs, promoting the development of primary Th1-type CD4+ T cell responses. Moreover, the recognition of major histocompatibility complex class I–presented epitopes by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells results in the TNF-α– and IFN-γ–dependent increase in the activation level of DCs and in the induction of type-1 polarized mature DCs capable of producing high levels of IL-12p70 upon a subsequent CD40 ligation. The ability of class I–restricted CD8+ T cells to coactivate and polarize DCs may support the induction of Th1-type responses against class I–presented epitopes of intracellular pathogens and contact allergens, and may have therapeutical implications in cancer and chronic infections. PMID:11854360

  9. Aurora-A shines on T cell activation through the regulation of Lck.

    PubMed

    Blas-Rus, Noelia; Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    Different protein kinases control signaling emanating from the T cell receptor (TCR) during antigen-specific T cell activation. Mitotic kinases, e.g. Aurora-A, have been widely studied in the context of mitosis due to their role during microtubule (MT) nucleation, becoming critical regulators of cell cycle progression. We have recently described a specific role for Aurora-A kinase in antigenic T cell activation. Blockade of Aurora-A in T cells severely disrupts the dynamics of MTs and CD3ζ-bearing signaling vesicles during T cell activation. Furthermore, Aurora-A deletion impairs the activation of signaling molecules downstream of the TCR. Targeting Aurora-A disturbs the activation of Lck, which is one of the first signals that drive T cell activation in an antigen-dependent manner. This work describes possible models of regulation of Lck by Aurora-A during T cell activation. We also discuss possible roles for Aurora-A in other systems similar to the IS, and its putative functions in cell polarization.

  10. Rare Event Simulation for T-cell Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsmeier, Florian; Baake, Ellen

    2009-02-01

    The problem of statistical recognition is considered, as it arises in immunobiology, namely, the discrimination of foreign antigens against a background of the body's own molecules. The precise mechanism of this foreign-self-distinction, though one of the major tasks of the immune system, continues to be a fundamental puzzle. Recent progress has been made by van den Berg, Rand, and Burroughs (J. Theor. Biol. 209:465-486, 2001), who modelled the probabilistic nature of the interaction between the relevant cell types, namely, T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Here, the stochasticity is due to the random sample of antigens present on the surface of every APC, and to the random receptor type that characterises individual T-cells. It has been shown previously (van den Berg et al. in J. Theor. Biol. 209:465-486, 2001; Zint et al. in J. Math. Biol. 57:841-861, 2008) that this model, though highly idealised, is capable of reproducing important aspects of the recognition phenomenon, and of explaining them on the basis of stochastic rare events. These results were obtained with the help of a refined large deviation theorem and were thus asymptotic in nature. Simulations have, so far, been restricted to the straightforward simple sampling approach, which does not allow for sample sizes large enough to address more detailed questions. Building on the available large deviation results, we develop an importance sampling technique that allows for a convenient exploration of the relevant tail events by means of simulation. With its help, we investigate the mechanism of statistical recognition in some depth. In particular, we illustrate how a foreign antigen can stand out against the self background if it is present in sufficiently many copies, although no a priori difference between self and nonself is built into the model.

  11. Toward immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: ex vivo activation, expansion, and genetic modification of canine T cells.

    PubMed

    Mata, Melinda; Vera, Juan F; Gerken, Claudia; Rooney, Cliona M; Miller, Tasha; Pfent, Catherine; Wang, Lisa L; Wilson-Robles, Heather M; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising antitumor activity in early phase clinical studies, especially for hematological malignancies. However, most preclinical models do not reliably mimic human disease. We reasoned that developing an adoptive T-cell therapy approach for spontaneous osteosarcoma (OS) occurring in dogs would more closely reproduce the condition in human cancer. To generate CAR-expressing canine T cells, we developed expansion and transduction protocols that allow for the generation of sufficient numbers of CAR-expressing canine T cells for future clinical studies in dogs within 2 weeks of ex vivo culture. To evaluate the functionality of CAR-expressing canine T cells, we targeted HER2(+) OS. We demonstrate that canine OS is positive for HER2, and that canine T cells expressing a HER2-specific CAR with human-derived transmembrane and CD28.ζ signaling domains recognize and kill HER2(+) canine OS cell lines in an antigen-dependent manner. To reduce the potential immunogenicity of the CAR, we evaluated a CAR with canine-derived transmembrane and signaling domains, and found no functional difference between human and canine CARs. Hence, we have successfully developed a strategy to generate CAR-expressing canine T cells for future preclinical studies in dogs. Testing T-cell therapies in an immunocompetent, outbred animal model may improve our ability to predict their safety and efficacy before conducting studies in humans.

  12. Amino-acid transporters in T-cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ren, W; Liu, G; Yin, J; Tan, B; Wu, G; Bazer, F W; Peng, Y; Yin, Y

    2017-03-02

    T-cell-mediated immune responses aim to protect mammals against cancers and infections, and are also involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Cellular uptake and the utilization of nutrients is closely related to the T-cell fate decision and function. Research in this area has yielded surprising findings in the importance of amino-acid transporters for T-cell development, homeostasis, activation, differentiation and memory. In this review, we present current information on amino-acid transporters, such as LAT1 (l-leucine transporter), ASCT2 (l-glutamine transporter) and GAT-1 (γ-aminobutyric acid transporter-1), which are critically important for mediating peripheral naive T-cell homeostasis, activation and differentiation, especially for Th1 and Th17 cells, and even memory T cells. Mechanically, the influence of amino-acid transporters on T-cell fate decision may largely depend on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. These discoveries remarkably demonstrate the role of amino-acid transporters in T-cell fate determination, and strongly indicate that manipulation of the amino-acid transporter-mTORC1 axis could ameliorate many inflammatory or autoimmune diseases associated with T-cell-based immune responses.

  13. Microtubule-associated protein-4 controls nanovesicle dynamics and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Blas-Rus, Noelia; Martin-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The immune synapse (IS) is a specialized structure formed at the contact area between T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that is essential for the adaptive immune response. Proper T cell activation requires its polarization towards the APC, which is highly dependent on the tubulin cytoskeleton. Microtubule-associated protein-4 (MAP4) is a microtubule (MT)-stabilizing protein that controls MTs in physiological processes, such as cell division, migration, vesicular transport or primary cilia formation. In this study, we assessed the role of MAP4 in T cell activation. MAP4 decorates the pericentrosomal area and MTs of the T cell, and it is involved in MT detyrosination and stable assembly in response to T cell activation. In addition, MAP4 prompts the timely translocation of the MT-organizing center (MTOC) towards the IS and the dynamics of signaling nanovesicles that sustains T cell activation. However, MAP4 acts as a negative regulator of other T cell activation-related signals, including diacylglycerol (DAG) production and IL2 secretion. Our data indicate that MAP4 acts as a checkpoint molecule that balances positive and negative hallmarks of T cell activation.

  14. Knock-in Mutation of the Distal Four Tyrosines of Linker for Activation of T Cells Blocks Murine T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Menon, Rashmi K.; Grinberg, Alexander; Zhang, Weiguo; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Love, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    The integral membrane adapter protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) performs a critical function in T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signal transduction by coupling the TCR to downstream signaling pathways. After TCR engagement, LAT is tyrosine phosphorylated by ZAP-70 creating docking sites for multiple src homology 2–containing effector proteins. In the Jurkat T cell line, the distal four tyrosines of LAT bind PLCγ-1, Grb2, and Gads. Mutation of these four tyrosine residues to phenylalanine (4YF) blocked TCR-mediated calcium mobilization, Erk activation, and nuclear factor (NF)-AT activation. In this study, we examined whether these four tyrosine residues were essential for T cell development by generating LAT “knock-in” mutant mice that express the 4YF mutant protein under the control of endogenous LAT regulatory sequences. Significantly, the phenotype of 4YF knock-in mice was identical to LAT−/− (null) mice; thymocyte development was arrested at the immature CD4−CD8− stage and no mature T cells were present. Knock-in mice expressing wild-type LAT protein, generated by a similar strategy, displayed a normal T cell developmental profile. These results demonstrate that the distal four tyrosine residues of LAT are essential for preTCR signaling and T cell development in vivo. PMID:11457888

  15. T cell selection and differential activation on structurally related HLA-DR4 ligands.

    PubMed

    Gebe, J A; Novak, E J; Kwok, W W; Farr, A G; Nepom, G T; Buckner, J H

    2001-09-15

    Plasticity of TCR interactions during CD4(+) T cell activation by an MHC-peptide complex accommodates variation in the peptide or MHC contact sites in which recognition of an altered ligand by the T cell can modify the T cell response. To explore the contribution of this form of TCR cross-recognition in the context of T cell selection on disease-associated HLA molecules, we have analyzed the relationship between TCR recognition of the DRB1*0401- and DRB1*0404-encoded HLA class II molecules associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Thymic reaggregation cultures demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells selected on either DRB1*0401 or DRB1*0404 could be subsequently activated by the other MHC molecule. Using HLA tetramer technology we identify hemagglutinin residue 307-319-specific T cells restricted by DRB1*0401, but activated by hemagglutinin residues 307-319, in the context of DRB1*0404. One such clone exhibits an altered cytokine profile upon activation with the alternative MHC ligand. This altered phenotype persists when both class II molecules are present. These findings directly demonstrate that T cells selected on an MHC class II molecule carry the potential for activation on altered self ligands when encountering Ags presented on a related class II molecule. In individuals heterozygous for these alleles the possibility of TCR cross-recognition could lead to an aberrant immune response.

  16. Aplotaxene blocks T cell activation by modulation of protein kinase C-θ-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Na, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Hyun-Su; Piragyte, Indre; Choi, Eun-Ju; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Han, Weon-Cheol; Lee, Seung-Ho; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2013-12-01

    Aplotaxene, (8Z, 11Z, 14Z)-heptadeca-1, 8, 11, 14-tetraene, is one of the major components of essential oil obtained from Inula helenium root, which is used in Oriental medicine. However, the effects of aplotaxene on immunity have not been investigated. Here, we show that aplotaxene inhibits T cell activation in terms of IL-2 and CD69 expression. Aplotaxene, at a concentration that optimally inhibits IL-2 production, has little effect on apoptotic or necrotic cell death, suggesting that apoptosis is not a mechanism for aplotaxene-mediated inhibition of T cell activation. Aplotaxene affects neither superantigeninduced conjugate formation between Jurkat T cells and Raji B cells nor clustering of CD3 and LFA-1 at the immunological synapse. Aplotaxene significantly inhibits PKC-θ phosphorylation and translocation to the immunological synapse, and blocks PMA-induced T-cell receptor internalization. Furthermore, aplotaxene leads to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK, ERK and p38) phosphorylation and NF-κB, NF-AT, and AP-1 promoter activities in Jurkat T cells. Taken together, our findings provide evidence for the immunosuppressive effect of aplotaxene on activated T cells through the modulation of the PKC-θ and MAPK pathways, suggesting that aplotaxene may be a novel immunotherapeutic agent for immunological diseases related to the overactivation of T cells.

  17. T-cell death following immune activation is mediated by mitochondria-localized SARM.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, P; Singh, L P; Selvarajan, V; Chng, W J; Ng, S B; Tan, N S; Ho, B; Chen, J; Ding, J L

    2013-03-01

    Following acute-phase infection, activated T cells are terminated to achieve immune homeostasis, failure of which results in lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases. We report that sterile α- and heat armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM), the most conserved Toll-like receptors adaptor, is proapoptotic during T-cell immune response. SARM expression is significantly reduced in natural killer (NK)/T lymphoma patients compared with healthy individuals, suggesting that decreased SARM supports NK/T-cell proliferation. T cells knocked down of SARM survived and proliferated more significantly compared with wild-type T cells following influenza infection in vivo. During activation of cytotoxic T cells, the SARM level fell before rising, correlating inversely with cell proliferation and subsequent T-cell clearance. SARM knockdown rescued T cells from both activation- and neglect-induced cell deaths. The mitochondria-localized SARM triggers intrinsic apoptosis by generating reactive oxygen species and depolarizing the mitochondrial potential. The proapoptotic function is attributable to the C-terminal sterile alpha motif and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domains. Mechanistically, SARM mediates intrinsic apoptosis via B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members. SARM suppresses B cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and downregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, which are cell survival effectors. Overexpression of Bcl-xL and double knockout of Bcl-2 associated X protein and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer substantially reduced SARM-induced apoptosis. Collectively, we have shown how T-cell death following infection is mediated by SARM-induced intrinsic apoptosis, which is crucial for T-cell homeostasis.

  18. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  19. Adoptively transferred TRAIL+ T cells suppress GVHD and augment antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Dogan, Yildirim; Moroz, Maxim; Holland, Amanda M.; Yim, Nury L.; Rao, Uttam K.; Young, Lauren F.; Tannenbaum, Daniel; Masih, Durva; Velardi, Enrico; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Jenq, Robert R.; Penack, Olaf; Hanash, Alan M.; Smith, Odette M.; Piersanti, Kelly; Lezcano, Cecilia; Murphy, George F.; Liu, Chen; Palomba, M. Lia; Sauer, Martin G.; Sadelain, Michel; Ponomarev, Vladimir; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies to suppress graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) also compromise graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Furthermore, most experimental strategies to separate GVHD and GVT responses merely spare GVT function without actually enhancing it. We have previously shown that endogenously expressed TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is required for optimal GVT activity against certain malignancies in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In order to model a donor-derived cellular therapy, we genetically engineered T cells to overexpress TRAIL and adoptively transferred donor-type unsorted TRAIL+ T cells into mouse models of allo-HSCT. We found that murine TRAIL+ T cells induced apoptosis of alloreactive T cells, thereby reducing GVHD in a DR5-dependent manner. Furthermore, murine TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro and in vivo antilymphoma GVT response. Moreover, human TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity against both human leukemia cell lines and against freshly isolated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Finally, as a model of off-the-shelf, donor-unrestricted antitumor cellular therapy, in vitro–generated TRAIL+ precursor T cells from third-party donors also mediated enhanced GVT response in the absence of GVHD. These data indicate that TRAIL-overexpressing donor T cells could potentially enhance the curative potential of allo-HSCT by increasing GVT response and suppressing GVHD. PMID:23676461

  20. T cell receptor-dependent activation of mTOR signaling in T cells is mediated by Carma1 and MALT1, but not Bcl10.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristia S; Phong, Binh; Corey, Catherine; Cheng, Jing; Gorentla, Balachandra; Zhong, Xiaoping; Shiva, Sruti; Kane, Lawrence P

    2014-06-10

    Signaling to the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates diverse cellular processes, including protein translation, cellular proliferation, metabolism, and autophagy. Most models place Akt upstream of the mTOR complex, mTORC1; however, in T cells, Akt may not be necessary for mTORC1 activation. We found that the adaptor protein Carma1 [caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing membrane-associated protein 1] and at least one of its associated proteins, the paracaspase MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), were required for optimal activation of mTOR in T cells in response to stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR) and the co-receptor CD28. However, Bcl10, which binds to Carma1 and MALT1 to form a complex that mediates signals from the TCR to the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), was not required. The catalytic activity of MALT1 was required for the proliferation of stimulated CD4+ T cells, but not for early TCR-dependent activation events. Consistent with an effect on mTOR, MALT1 activity was required for the increased metabolic flux in activated CD4+ T cells. Together, our data suggest that Carma1 and MALT1 play previously unappreciated roles in the activation of mTOR signaling in T cells after engagement of the TCR.

  1. Expression of T-cell-activating protein in peripheral lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, E T; Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    T-cell-activating protein (TAP) is an allelic 12-kDa membrane protein that participates in T-cell activation. Soluble anti-TAP monoclonal antibodies can trigger antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybridomas to produce interleukin 2 and are mitogenic for normal T cells and thymocytes. TAP is expressed on 10% of thymocytes, which are mainly cortisone-resistant and mature. In the periphery, TAP is expressed on 70% of resting T cells but not on resting B cells. In this report, we analyze in detail the nature of TAP expression on peripheral lymphocyte subsets by immunofluorescence techniques. We show that all inducer (L3T4+) T cells are TAP+. In contrast, only 50% of Lyt-2+ T cells express detectable TAP. Functional studies demonstrated that at least part of the heterogeneity of TAP expression is present in the Lyt-2+ cytolytic T-cell (CTL) subset. Unstimulated CTL precursors are TAP- but are induced to express TAP in the effector state. Furthermore, this reflects actual synthesis of TAP, as TAP is detectable on activated Lyt-2+ CTLs passaged in vitro under conditions where passive acquisition can be ruled out. To extend this observation, we have studied the expression of TAP on activated T and B cells. Upon activation, all T and B cells became TAP+. Furthermore, the TAP molecules on B and T cells are indistinguishable by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This suggests that TAP expression defines further heterogeneity of lymphocytes, with activation being one parameter influencing its expression. Images PMID:3020545

  2. Role of monocyte fucose-receptors in T-cell fibronectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Donson, J; Mandy, K; Feng, Z H; Mandy, S; Brown, E J; Godfrey, H P

    1991-01-01

    T-cell fibronectin (FN) is a lymphokine produced by antigen- and mitogen-activated T cells that agglutinates human monocytes at femtomolar concentrations. This extreme degree of activity derives from co-operative interactions between multiple FN domains and multiple monocyte integrin protein receptors. T-cell FN, like other FN, is a glycoprotein. The role interactions between T-cell FN carbohydrate and lectin-like monocyte surface receptors play in mediating T-cell FN activity was studied by determining the ability of monosaccharides to inhibit T-cell FN activity. L-Fucose and L-rhamnose significantly inhibited T-cell FN-mediated monocyte agglutination at concentrations as low as 0.01 mM; D-glucose, D- or L-galactose, D- or L-mannose and D-fucose were not inhibitory at 10-100 mM. This inhibition appeared to be due to interference with the binding of T-cell FN fucose residues to monocyte fucose receptors since: (i) treatment of T-cell FN with alpha-L-fucosidase abolished its agglutinating activity for human monocytes, while treatment with beta-D-galactosidase or with alpha-L-fucosidase in the presence of L-fucose had no effect; (ii) treatment of monocytes with alpha-L-fucosidase did not affect their response to T-cell FN; and (iii) L-fucose or L-rhamnose did not alter the expression of monocyte integrin FN receptors under conditions where T-cell FN-mediated monocyte agglutination was completely inhibited. In vivo, 1 mumol intracutaneous L-fucose inhibited expression of delayed hypersensitivity by 30% (P much less than 0.001); similar doses of L-rhamnose inhibited responses by 10% (P less than 0.02). These data implicate a fucose receptor in monocyte response to T-cell FN, and suggest that T-cell FN is only one of the mediators involved in initiating delayed hypersensitivity reactions in vivo. PMID:1769694

  3. IFNγ Regulates Activated Vδ2+ T Cells through a Feedback Mechanism Mediated by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fechter, Karoline; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Jakobsson, Emma; Ferrin, Izaskun; Lang, Valérie; Sepulveda, Pilar; Pennington, Daniel J.; Trigueros, César

    2017-01-01

    γδ T cells play a role in a wide range of diseases such as autoimmunity and cancer. The majority of circulating human γδ T lymphocytes express a Vγ9Vδ2+ (Vδ2+) T cell receptor (TCR) and following activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we show that IFNγ, produced by Vδ2+ cells, activates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated immunosupression, which in turn exerts a negative feedback mechanism on γδ T cell function ranging from cytokine production to proliferation. Importantly, this modulatory effect is limited to a short period of time (<24 hours) post-T cell activation, after which MSCs can no longer exert their immunoregulatory capacity. Using genetically modified MSCs with the IFNγ receptor 1 constitutively silenced, we demonstrate that IFNγ is essential to this process. Activated γδ T cells induce expression of several factors by MSCs that participate in the depletion of amino acids. In particular, we show that indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme involved in L-tryptophan degradation, is responsible for MSC-mediated immunosuppression of Vδ2+ T cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that γδ T cell responses can be immuno-modulated by different signals derived from MSC. PMID:28076364

  4. T Cell Receptor Activation of NF-κB in Effector T Cells: Visualizing Signaling Events Within and Beyond the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Traver, Maria K; Paul, Suman; Schaefer, Brian C

    2017-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) to NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation and effector T cell differentiation and function. In naïve T cells, data suggest that most or all key cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling occurs in a TCR-proximal manner at the immunological synapse (IS). However, the subcellular organization of cytoplasmic NF-κB-activating complexes in effector T cells is more complex, involving signaling molecules and regulatory mechanisms beyond those operative in naïve cells. Additionally, in effector T cells, much signaling occurs at cytoplasmic locations distant from the IS. Visualization of these cytoplasmic signaling complexes has provided key insights into the complex and dynamic regulation of NF-κB signal transduction in effector T cells. In this chapter, we provide in-depth protocols for activating and preparing effector T cells for fluorescence imaging, as well as a discussion of the effective application of distinct imaging methodologies, including confocal and super-resolution microscopy and imaging flow cytometry.

  5. Selective impairment of T lymphocyte activation through the T cell receptor/CD3 complex after cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Timón, M; Arnaiz-Villena, A; Ruiz-Contreras, J; Ramos-Amador, J T; Pacheco, A; Regueiro, J R

    1993-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is reported to cause transient immunosuppression in man. In this study we have analysed the effect of CMV on T lymphocyte function in 29 children diagnosed for acute CMV infection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from the patients showed a significant specific impairment in their proliferative response to enterotoxins A and C1, to concanavalin A and to the anti-CD3 MoAb OKT3. The impaired responses were corrected with exogenous IL-2. In contrast, stimulation using phytohaemagglutinin, as well as activation signals delivered through the surface molecules CD26 or CD28, elicited normal proliferative responses in CMV PBMC. The results indicate that the T cell anergy associated with CMV infection is restricted to the T cell receptor/CD3 activation pathway. PMID:8403514

  6. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  7. Activated V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells trigger granulocyte functions via MCP-2 release.

    PubMed

    Agrati, Chiara; Cimini, Eleonora; Sacchi, Alessandra; Bordoni, Veronica; Gioia, Cristiana; Casetti, Rita; Turchi, Federica; Tripodi, Marco; Martini, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells display a broad antimicrobial activity by directly killing infected cells and by inducing an effective adaptive immune response. The activation of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells by aminobisphosphonate drugs such as zoledronic acid (ZOL) results in a massive release of cytokines and chemokines that may induce a bystander activation of other immune cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of soluble factors released by ZOL-activated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells to induce granulocyte activation. We showed that soluble factors released by ZOL-stimulated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells activate granulocytes by inducing their chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and alpha-defensins release. Proteomic analysis allowed us to identify a number of cytokines and chemokines specifically released by activated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells. Moreover, MCP-2 depletion by neutralizing Ab revealed a critical role of this chemokine in induction of granulocyte alpha-defensins release. Altogether, these data show a Vgamma9Vdelta2-mediated activation of granulocytes through a bystander mechanism, and confirm the wide ability of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T-lymphocytes in orchestrating the immune response. In conclusion, an immune modulating strategy targeting Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells may represent a key switch to induce an effective and well-coordinated immune response, and can be proposed as a way to strengthen the immune competence during infectious diseases.

  8. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  9. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Katayama, Akiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki; Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Ohmori, Naoya; Aki, Tsunehiro; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Goto, Shigeru; Chen, Chao-Long; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  10. Chloroquine inhibits human CD4+ T-cell activation by AP-1 signaling modulation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ralf L. J.; Jutz, Sabrina; Goldhahn, Katrin; Witzeneder, Nadine; Gerner, Marlene C.; Trapin, Doris; Greiner, Georg; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Guenter; Pickl, Winfried F.; Burgmann, Heinz; Steinberger, Peter; Ratzinger, Franz; Schmetterer, Klaus G.

    2017-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic for rheumatic diseases. Although its modes of action on the innate immune system are well described, there is still insufficient knowledge about its direct effects on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we evaluated the influence of CQ on activation parameters of human CD4+ T-cells. CQ directly suppressed proliferation, metabolic activity and cytokine secretion of T-cells following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activation. In contrast, CQ showed no effect on up-regulation of T-cell activation markers. CQ inhibited activation of all T helper cell subsets, although IL-4 and IL-13 secretion by Th2 cells were less influenced compared to other Th-specific cytokines. Up to 10 μM, CQ did not reduce cell viability, suggesting specific suppressive effects on T-cells. These properties of CQ were fully reversible in re-stimulation experiments. Analyses of intracellular signaling showed that CQ specifically inhibited autophagic flux and additionally activation of AP-1 by reducing phosphorylation of c-JUN. This effect was mediated by inhibition of JNK catalytic activity. In summary, we characterized selective and reversible immunomodulatory effects of CQ on human CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide new insights into the biological actions of JNK/AP-1 signaling in T-cells and may help to expand the therapeutic spectrum of CQ. PMID:28169350

  11. CD4+ T Cells Are as Protective as CD8+ T Cells against Rickettsia typhi Infection by Activating Macrophage Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Moderzynski, Kristin; Papp, Stefanie; Rauch, Jessica; Heine, Liza; Kuehl, Svenja; Richardt, Ulricke; Fleischer, Bernhard; Osterloh, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi is an intracellular bacterium that causes endemic typhus, a febrile disease that can be fatal due to complications including pneumonia, hepatitis and meningoencephalitis, the latter being a regular outcome in T and B cell-deficient C57BL/6 RAG1-/- mice upon Rickettsia typhi infection. Here, we show that CD4+ TH1 cells that are generated in C57BL/6 mice upon R. typhi infection are as protective as cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. CD4+- as well as CD8+-deficient C57BL/6 survived the infection without showing symptoms of disease at any point in time. Moreover, adoptively transferred CD8+ and CD4+ immune T cells entered the CNS of C57BL/6 RAG1-/- mice with advanced infection and both eradicated the bacteria. However, immune CD4+ T cells protected only approximately 60% of the animals from death. They induced the expression of iNOS in infiltrating macrophages as well as in resident microglia in the CNS which can contribute to bacterial killing but also accelerate pathology. In vitro immune CD4+ T cells inhibited bacterial growth in infected macrophages which was in part mediated by the release of IFNγ. Collectively, our data demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are as protective as CD8+ T cells against R. typhi, provided that CD4+ TH1 effector cells are present in time to support bactericidal activity of phagocytes via the release of IFNγ and other factors. With regard to vaccination against TG Rickettsiae, our findings suggest that the induction of CD4+ TH1 effector cells is sufficient for protection. PMID:27875529

  12. T-Cell Receptor (TCR) Clonotype-Specific Differences in Inhibitory Activity of HIV-1 Cytotoxic T-Cell Clones Is Not Mediated by TCR Alone.

    PubMed

    Flerin, Nina C; Chen, Huabiao; Glover, Tynisha D; Lamothe, Pedro A; Zheng, Jian Hua; Fang, Justin W; Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Newell, Evan W; Davis, Mark M; Walker, Bruce D; Goldstein, Harris

    2017-03-15

    Functional analysis of T-cell responses in HIV-infected individuals has indicated that virus-specific CD8(+) T cells with superior antiviral efficacy are well represented in HIV-1 controllers but are rare or absent in HIV-1 progressors. To define the role of individual T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes in differential antiviral CD8(+) T-cell function, we performed detailed functional and mass cytometric cluster analysis of multiple CD8(+) T-cell clones recognizing the identical HLA-B*2705-restricted HIV-1 epitope KK10 (KRWIILGLNK). Effective and ineffective CD8(+) T-cell clones segregated based on responses to HIV-1-infected and peptide-loaded target cells. Following cognate peptide stimulation, effective HIV-specific clones displayed significantly more rapid TCR signal propagation, more efficient initial lytic granule release, and more sustained nonlytic cytokine and chemokine secretion than ineffective clones. To evaluate the TCR clonotype contribution to CD8(+) T-cell function, we cloned the TCR α and β chain genes from one effective and two ineffective CD8(+) T-cell clones from an elite controller into TCR-expressing lentivectors. We show that Jurkat/MA cells and primary CD8(+) T cells transduced with lentivirus expressing TCR from one of the ineffective clones exhibited a level of activation by cognate peptide and inhibition of in vitro HIV-1 infection, respectively, that were comparable to those of the effective clonotype. Taken together, these data suggest that the potent antiviral capacity of some HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells is a consequence of factors in addition to TCR sequence that modulate functionality and contribute to the increased antiviral capacity of HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in elite controllers to inhibit HIV infection.IMPORTANCE The greater ex vivo antiviral inhibitory activity of CD8(+) T cells from elite controllers than from HIV-1 progressors supports the crucial role of effective HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in controlling HIV-1

  13. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor.

    PubMed

    Gornalusse, German G; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-08-25

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG -41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG -41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm(3)) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes.

  14. Reduced frequency of memory T cells and increased Th17 responses in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marín, Nancy D; París, Sara C; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4(+) CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and an increased frequency of CD4(+) CD45RO(-) CD27(+) T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response.

  15. Reduced Frequency of Memory T Cells and Increased Th17 Responses in Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nancy D.; París, Sara C.; Rojas, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4+ CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and an increased frequency of CD4+ CD45RO− CD27+ T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response. PMID:22914361

  16. Asparagine deprivation mediated by Salmonella asparaginase causes suppression of activation-induced T cell metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Torres, AnnMarie; Luke, Joanna D; Kullas, Amy L; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Botbol, Yair; Koller, Antonius; Tonge, Peter J; Chen, Emily I; Macian, Fernando; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2016-02-01

    Salmonellae are pathogenic bacteria that induce immunosuppression by mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Previously, we showed that a putative type II l-asparaginase produced by Salmonella Typhimurium inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence in a murine model of infection. Here, we report that this putative L-asparaginase exhibits L-asparagine hydrolase activity required for Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cells. We show that L-asparagine is a nutrient important for T cell activation and that L-asparagine deprivation, such as that mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase, causes suppression of activation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, autophagy, Myc expression, and L-lactate secretion. We also show that L-asparagine deprivation mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase causes suppression of cellular processes and pathways involved in protein synthesis, metabolism, and immune response. Our results advance knowledge of a mechanism used by Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cell responses and mediate virulence, and provide new insights into the prerequisites of T cell activation. We propose a model in which l-asparagine deprivation inhibits T cell exit from quiescence by causing suppression of activation-induced metabolic reprogramming.

  17. Ectonucleotidase activity and immunosuppression in astrocyte-CD4 T cell bidirectional signaling

    PubMed Central

    Filipello, Fabia; Romagnani, Andrea; Mazzitelli, Sonia; Matteoli, Michela; Verderio, Claudia; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play a crucial role in neuroinflammation as part of the glia limitans, which regulates infiltration of the brain parenchyma by leukocytes. The signaling pathways and molecular events, which result from the interaction of activated T cells with astrocytes are poorly defined. Here we show that astrocytes promote the expression and enzymatic activity of CD39 and CD73 ectonucleotidases in recently activated CD4 cells by a contact dependent mechanism that is independent of T cell receptor interaction with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is robustly upregulated and sufficient to promote ectonucleotidases expression. T cell adhesion to astrocyte results in differentiation to an immunosuppressive phenotype defined by expression of the transcription factor Rorγt, which characterizes the CD4 T helper 17 subset. CD39 activity in T cells in turn inhibits spontaneous calcium oscillations in astrocytes that correlated with enhanced and reduced transcription of CCL2 chemokine and Sonic hedgehog (Shh), respectively. We hypothesize this TCR-independent interaction promote an immunosuppressive program in T cells to control possible brain injury by deregulated T cell activation during neuroinflammation. On the other hand, the increased secretion of CCL2 with concomitant reduction of Shh might promote leukocytes extravasation into the brain parenchyma. PMID:26784253

  18. The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for Ly-6A/E- mediated T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Ly-6E, a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored murine alloantigen that can activate T cells upon antibody cross-linking, has been converted into an integral membrane protein by gene fusion. This fusion product, designated Ly-6EDb, was characterized in transiently transfected COS cells and demonstrated to be an integral cell surface membrane protein. Furthermore, the fusion antigen can be expressed on the surface of the BW5147 class "E" mutant cell line, which only expresses integral membrane proteins but not GPI-anchored proteins. The capability of this fusion antigen to activate T cells was examined by gene transfer studies in D10G4.1, a type 2 T cell helper clones. When transfected into D10 cells, the GPI-anchored Ly-6E antigen, as well as the endogenous GPI-anchored Ly-6A antigen, can initiate T cell activation upon antibody cross-linking. In contrast, the transmembrane anchored Ly-6EDb antigen was unable to mediate T cell activation. Our results demonstrate that the GPI-anchor is critical to Ly-6A/E-mediated T cell activation. PMID:1825084

  19. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  20. Lower Affinity T Cells are Critical Components and Active Participants of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and biophysical parameters of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide:MHC (pMHC) interaction define intrinsic factors required for T cell activation and differentiation. Although receptor ligand kinetics are somewhat cumbersome to assess experimentally, TCR:pMHC affinity has been shown to predict peripheral T cell functionality and potential for forming memory. Multimeric forms of pMHC monomers have often been used to provide an indirect readout of higher affinity T cells due to their availability and ease of use while allowing simultaneous definition of other functional and phenotypic characteristics. However, multimeric pMHC reagents have introduced a bias that underestimates the lower affinity components contained in the highly diverse TCR repertoires of all polyclonal T cell responses. Advances in the identification of lower affinity cells have led to the examination of these cells and their contribution to the immune response. In this review, we discuss the identification of high- vs. low-affinity T cells as well as their attributed signaling and functional differences. Lastly, mechanisms are discussed that maintain a diverse range of low- and high-affinity T cells. PMID:26441973

  1. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    PubMed

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-03-31

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells.

  2. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  3. Signalling pathways induced by protease-activated receptors and integrins in T cells.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Miriam; Yongjun, Yin; Groysman, Maya; Dekel, Idit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2002-01-01

    Recent characterization of the thrombin receptor indicates that it plays a role in T-cell signalling pathways. However, little is known regarding the signalling events following stimulation of additional members of the protease-activated receptor (PAR) family, i.e. PAR2 and PAR3. Most of the postligand cascades are largely unknown. Here, we illustrate that in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells, activation of PAR1, PAR2 and PAR3 induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav1. This response was impaired in Jurkat T cells deficient in p56lck (JCaM1.6). Activation of PARs also led to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and SLP-76, two key proteins in T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling. We also demonstrated that p56lck is meaningful for integrin signalling. Thus, JCaM1.6 cells exhibited a marked reduction in their adherence to fibronectin-coated plates, as compared to the level of adherence of Jurkat T cells. While the phosphorylation of Vav1 in T cells is augmented following adhesion, no additional increase was noted following treatment of the adhered cells with PARs. Altogether, we have identified key components in the postligand-signalling cascade of PARs and integrins. Furthermore, we have identified Lck as a critical and possibly upstream component of PAR-induced Vav1 phosphorylation, as well as integrin activation, in Jurkat T cells.

  4. Tissue signatures influence the activation of intrahepatic CD8+ T cells against malaria sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Morrot, Alexandre; Rodrigues, Maurício M.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites and liver stages express antigens that are targeted to the MHC-Class I antigen-processing pathway. After the introduction of Plasmodium sporozoites by Anopheles mosquitoes, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in skin-draining lymph nodes are the first cells to cross-present parasite antigens and elicit specific CD8+ T cells. One of these antigens is the immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP). The CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immune response against CSP is dependent on the interleukin loop involving IL-4 receptor expression on CD8+ cells and IL-4 secretion by CD4+ T cell helpers. In a few days, these CD8+ T cells re-circulate to secondary lymphoid organs and the liver. In the liver, the hepatic sinusoids are enriched with cells, such as dendritic, sinusoidal endothelial and Kupffer cells, that are able to cross-present MHC class I antigens to intrahepatic CD8+ T cells. Specific CD8+ T cells actively find infected hepatocytes and target intra-cellular parasites through mechanisms that are both interferon-γ-dependent and -independent. Immunity is mediated by CD8+ T effector or effector-memory cells and, when present in high numbers, these cells can provide sterilizing immunity. Human vaccination trials with recombinant formulations or attenuated sporozoites have yet to achieve the high numbers of specific effector T cells that are required for sterilizing immunity. In spite of the limited number of specific CD8+ T cells, attenuated sporozoites provided multiple times by the endovenous route provided a high degree of protective immunity. These observations highlight that CD8+ T cells may be useful for improving antibody-mediated protective immunity to pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria parasites. PMID:25202304

  5. Protection from type 1 diabetes by invariant NK T cells requires the activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Dalam; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Hussain, Shabbir; Delovitch, Terry L

    2006-09-15

    Invariant NK T (iNKT) cells regulate immune responses, express NK cell markers and an invariant TCR, and recognize lipid Ags in a CD1d-restricted manner. Previously, we reported that activation of iNKT cells by alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) protects against type 1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice via an IL-4-dependent mechanism. To further investigate how iNKT cells protect from T1D, we analyzed whether iNKT cells require the presence of another subset(s) of regulatory T cells (Treg), such as CD4+ CD25+ Treg, for this protection. We found that CD4+ CD25+ T cells from NOD.CD1d(-/-) mice deficient in iNKT cell function similarly in vitro to CD4+ CD25+ T cells from wild-type NOD mice and suppress the proliferation of NOD T responder cells upon alpha-GalCer stimulation. Cotransfer of NOD diabetogenic T cells with CD4+ CD25+ Tregs from NOD mice pretreated with alpha-GalCer demonstrated that activated iNKT cells do not influence the ability of T(regs) to inhibit the transfer of T1D. In contrast, protection from T1D mediated by transfer of activated iNKT cells requires the activity of CD4+ CD25+ T cells, because splenocytes pretreated with alpha-GalCer and then inactivated by anti-CD25 of CD25+ cells did not protect from T1D. Similarly, mice inactivated of CD4+ CD25+ T cells before alpha-GalCer treatment were also not protected from T1D. Our data suggest that CD4+ CD25+ T cells retain their function during iNKT cell activation, and that the activity of CD4+ CD25+ Tregs is required for iNKT cells to transfer protection from T1D.

  6. Angiopoietin 2 stimulates TIE2-expressing monocytes to suppress T cell activation and to promote regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Chen, Yung-Yi; Muthana, Munitta; Welford, Abigail F; Tal, Andrea O; Scholz, Alexander; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Murdoch, Craig; De Palma, Michele; Lewis, Claire E

    2011-04-01

    Angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) is a proangiogenic cytokine whose expression is often upregulated by endothelial cells in tumors. Expression of its receptor, TIE2, defines a highly proangiogenic subpopulation of myeloid cells in circulation and tumors called TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs). Genetic depletion of TEMs markedly reduces tumor angiogenesis in various tumor models, emphasizing their essential role in driving tumor progression. Previously, we demonstrated that ANGPT2 augments the expression of various proangiogenic genes, the potent immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10, and a chemokine for regulatory T cells (Tregs), CCL17 by TEMs in vitro. We now show that TEMs also express higher levels of IL-10 than TIE2(-) macrophages in tumors and that ANGPT2-stimulated release of IL-10 by TEMs suppresses T cell proliferation, increases the ratio of CD4(+) T cells to CD8(+) T cells, and promotes the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+) Tregs. Furthermore, syngeneic murine tumors expressing high levels of ANGPT2 contained not only high numbers of TEMs but also increased numbers of Tregs, whereas genetic depletion of tumor TEMs resulted in a marked reduction in the frequency of Tregs in tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that ANGPT2-stimulated TEMs represent a novel, potent immunosuppressive force in tumors.

  7. T-cell accumulation and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted upregulation in adipose tissue in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation, which includes increased macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue (AT) and upregulation of chemokines and cytokines. T cells also play important roles in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis but have not been well studied in obesity....

  8. BAP31 is involved in T cell activation through TCR signal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kunwei; Xu, Jialin; Cao, Yuhua; Hou, Yue; Shan, Mu; Wang, Yanqing; Xu, Yang; Sun, Mingyi; Wang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    BAP31 is a ubiquitously expressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein. The functions of BAP31 in the immune system have not been investigated due to the lack of animal models. Therefore we created a BAP31 conditional knockdown mouse by performing a knockdown of BAP31 in the thymus. In doing so, we demonstrate that the maturation of T cells is normal but the number of T cells is less in the thymus of the knockout mouse. In addition, the spleen and lymph nodes of peripheral immune organs contained a lesser proportion of the mature T cells in the thymus specific BAP31 knockout mice. The BAP31 knockout T cells decreased the proliferation activated by TCR signal pathways. Further studies clarified that BAP31 affects the phosphorylation levels of both Zap70/Lck/Lat of the upstream members and Akt/GSK/Jnk/Erk of the downstream members of TCR signal pathways. Furthermore, BAP31 can regulate the expression of some markers such as CD3/TCRα/TCRβ and some cytokines like IL-2/IFN-γ/IL-6/TNF-α which are important for T cell activation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that BAP31 may play an important role in T cell activation by regulating TCR signaling. PMID:28333124

  9. Frequency of IFNγ-producing T cells correlates with seroreactivity and activated T cells during canine Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans or animals are not available, and in many settings, dogs are an important source of domestic infection for the insect vector. Identification of infected canines is crucial for evaluating peridomestic transmission dynamics and parasite control strategies. As immune control of T. cruzi infection is dependent on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, we aimed to define a serodiagnostic assay and T cell phenotypic markers for identifying infected dogs and studying the canine T. cruzi-specific immune response. Plasma samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from forty-two dogs living in a T. cruzi-endemic region. Twenty dogs were known to be seropositive and nine seronegative by conventional serologic tests two years prior to our study. To determine canine seroreactivity, we tested sera or plasma samples in a multiplex bead array against eleven recombinant T. cruzi proteins. Ninety-four percent (17/18) of dogs positive by multiplex serology were initially positive by conventional serology. The frequency of IFNγ-producing cells in PBMCs responding to T. cruzi correlated to serological status, identifying 95% of multiplex seropositive dogs. Intracellular staining identified CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations as the sources of T. cruzi lysate-induced IFNγ. Low expression of CCR7 and CD62L on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells suggested a predominance of effector/effector memory T cells in seropositive canines. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to correlate T. cruzi-specific antibody responses with T cell responses in naturally infected dogs and validate these methods for identifying dogs exposed to T. cruzi. PMID:24456537

  10. K33-linked polyubiquitination of Zap70 by Nrdp1 controls CD8(+) T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingjin; Chen, Taoyong; Li, Xuelian; Yu, Zhou; Tang, Songqing; Wang, Chen; Gu, Yan; Liu, Yanfang; Xu, Sheng; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Jianli; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-12-01

    The key molecular mechanisms that control signaling via T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) remain to be fully elucidated. Here we found that Nrdp1, a ring finger-type E3 ligase, mediated Lys33 (K33)-linked polyubiquitination of the signaling kinase Zap70 and promoted the dephosphorylation of Zap70 by the acidic phosphatase-like proteins Sts1 and Sts2 and thereby terminated early TCR signaling in CD8(+) T cells. Nrdp1 deficiency significantly promoted the activation of naive CD8(+) T cells but not that of naive CD4(+) T cells after engagement of the TCR. Nrdp1 interacted with Zap70 and with Sts1 and Sts2 and connected K33 linkage of Zap70 to Sts1- and Sts2-mediated dephosphorylation. Our study suggests that Nrdp1 terminates early TCR signaling by inactivating Zap70 and provides new mechanistic insights into the non-proteolytic regulation of TCR signaling by E3 ligases.

  11. B7x: A widely expressed B7 family member that inhibits T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Xingxing; Loke, P'ng; Kim, Jayon; Murphy, Kenneth; Waitz, Rebecca; Allison, James P.

    2003-01-01

    B7 family proteins provide costimulatory signals that regulate T cell responses. Here we report the third set of B7 family-related T cell inhibitory molecules with the identification of a homolog of the B7 family, B7x. It is expressed in immune cells, nonlymphoid tissues, and some tumor cell lines. B7x inhibits cell-cycle progression, proliferation, and cytokine production of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. B7x binds a receptor that is expressed on activated, but not resting T cells that is distinct from known CD28 family members. Its receptor may be a recently identified inhibitory molecule, B and T lymphocyte attenuator. These studies identify a costimulatory pathway that may have a unique function in downregulation of tissue-specific autoimmunity and antitumor responses. PMID:12920180

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat responds to T-cell activation signals

    SciTech Connect

    Tong-Starksen, S.E.; Luciw, P.A.; Peterlin, B.M.

    1987-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS, infects and kills lymphoid cells bearing the CD4 antigen. In an infected cell, a number of cellular as well as HIV-encoded gene products determine the levels of viral gene expression and HIV replication. Efficient HIV replication occurs in activated T cells. Utilizing transient expression assays, the authors show that gene expression directed by the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) increases in response to T-cell activation signals. The effects of T-cell activation and of the HIV-encoded trans-activator (TAT) are multiplicative. Analysis of mutations and deletions in the HIV LTR reveals that the region responding to T-cell activation signals is located at positions -105 to -80. These sequences are composed of two direct repeats, which are homologous to the core transcriptional enhancer elements in the simian virus 40 genome. The studies reveal that these elements function as the HIV enhancer. By acting directly on the HIV LTR, T-cell activation may play an important role in HIV gene expression and in the activation of latent HIV.

  13. Patterns of Expression of Vaginal T-Cell Activation Markers during Estrogen-Maintained Vaginal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Al-Sadeq, Ameera; Hamad, Mawieh; Abu-Elteen, Khaled

    2008-12-15

    : The immunosuppressive activity of estrogen was further investigated by assessing the pattern of expression of CD25, CD28, CD69, and CD152 on vaginal T cells during estrogen-maintained vaginal candidiasis. A precipitous and significant decrease in vaginal fungal burden toward the end of week 3 postinfection was concurrent with a significant increase in vaginal lymphocyte numbers. During this period, the percentage of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD152+, and CD28+ vaginal T cells gradually and significantly increased. The percentage of CD3+ and CD3+CD4+ cells increased from 43% and 15% at day 0 to 77% and 40% at day 28 postinfection. Compared with 29% CD152+ vaginal T cells in naive mice, > 70% of vaginal T cells were CD152+ at day 28 postinfection. In conclusion, estrogen-maintained vaginal candidiasis results in postinfection time-dependent changes in the pattern of expression of CD152, CD28, and other T-cell markers, suggesting that T cells are subject to mixed suppression and activation signals.

  14. Patterns of Expression of Vaginal T-Cell Activation Markers during Estrogen-Maintained Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The immunosuppressive activity of estrogen was further investigated by assessing the pattern of expression of CD25, CD28, CD69, and CD152 on vaginal T cells during estrogen-maintained vaginal candidiasis. A precipitous and significant decrease in vaginal fungal burden toward the end of week 3 postinfection was concurrent with a significant increase in vaginal lymphocyte numbers. During this period, the percentage of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD152+, and CD28+ vaginal T cells gradually and significantly increased. The percentage of CD3+ and CD3+CD4+ cells increased from 43% and 15% at day 0 to 77% and 40% at day 28 postinfection. Compared with 29% CD152+ vaginal T cells in naive mice, > 70% of vaginal T cells were CD152+ at day 28 postinfection. In conclusion, estrogen-maintained vaginal candidiasis results in postinfection time-dependent changes in the pattern of expression of CD152, CD28, and other T-cell markers, suggesting that T cells are subject to mixed suppression and activation signals. PMID:20525139

  15. LYSOPHOSPHATIDIC ACID INHIBITS CD8 T CELL ACTIVATION AND CONTROL OF TUMOR PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Shannon K.; Strauch, Pamela; Fujiwara, Yuko; Al-Shami, Amin; Oravecz, Tamas; Tigyi, Gabor; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2013-01-01

    CD8 T lymphocytes are able to eliminate nascent tumor cells through a process referred to as immune surveillance. However, multiple inhibitory mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment have been described that impede tumor rejection by CD8 T cells, including increased signaling by inhibitory receptors. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that has been shown repeatedly to promote diverse cellular processes benefiting tumorigenesis. Accordingly, the increased expression of LPA and LPA receptors is a common feature of diverse tumor cell lineages and can result in elevated systemic LPA levels. LPA is recognized by at least 6 distinct G-protein-coupled receptors and several of which are expressed by T cells, although the precise role of LPA signaling in CD8 T cell activation and function has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that LPA signaling via the LPA5 receptor expressed by CD8 T cells suppresses antigen receptor signaling, cell activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in a mouse melanoma model tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are LPA5-deficient are able to control tumor growth significantly better than wild-type tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Together, these data suggest that the production of LPA by tumors serves not only in an autocrine manner to promote tumorigenesis but also as a mechanism to suppress adaptive immunity and highlights a potential novel target for cancer treatment. PMID:24455753

  16. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  17. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens.

  18. Potentiation of T Cell Stimulatory Activity by Chemical Fixation of a Weak Peptide-MHC Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inkyu; Kim, Kwangmi; Choi, Sojin; Lomunova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The stability of peptide-MHC complex (pMHC) is an important factor to shape the fate of peptide-specific T cell immune response, but how it influences on T cell activation process is poorly understood. To better understand that, we investigated various T cell activation events driven by Ld MHCI loaded with graded concentrations of P2Ca and QL9 peptides, respectively, with 2C TCR Tg T cells; the binding strength of P2Ca for Ld is measurably weaker than that of QL9, but either peptides in the context of Ld interact with 2C TCR with a similar strength. When their concentrations required for early T cell activation events, which occur within several minutes to an hour, were concerned, EC50s of QL9 were about 100 folds lower than those of P2Ca, which was expected from their association constants for Ld. When EC50s for late activation events, which takes over several hours to occur, were concerned, the differences grew even larger (> 300 folds), suggesting that, due to weak binding, Ld/P2Ca dissociate from each other more easily to lose its antigenicity in a short time. Accordingly, fixation of Ld/P2Ca with paraformaldehyde resulted in a significant improvement in its immunogenicity. These results imply that binding strength of a peptide for a MHC is a critical factor to determine the duration of pMHC-mediated T cell activation and thus the attainment of productive T cell activation. It is also suggested that paraformaldehyde fixation should be an effective tool to ameliorate the immunogenicity of pMHC with a poor stability. PMID:28152301

  19. T cell activation induces proteasomal degradation of Argonaute and rapid remodeling of the microRNA repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Bronevetsky, Yelena; Villarino, Alejandro V.; Eisley, Christopher J.; Barbeau, Rebecca; Barczak, Andrea J.; Heinz, Gitta A.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Heissmeyer, Vigo; McManus, Michael T.; Erle, David J.; Rao, Anjana

    2013-01-01

    Activation induces extensive changes in the gene expression program of naive CD4+ T cells, promoting their differentiation into helper T cells that coordinate immune responses. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in this process, and miRNA expression also changes dramatically during T cell differentiation. Quantitative analyses revealed that T cell activation induces global posttranscriptional miRNA down-regulation in vitro and in vivo. Argonaute (Ago) proteins, the core effector proteins of the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC), were also posttranscriptionally down-regulated during T cell activation. Ago2 was inducibly ubiquitinated in activated T cells and its down-regulation was inhibited by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Therefore, activation-induced miRNA down-regulation likely occurs at the level of miRISC turnover. Measurements of miRNA-processing intermediates uncovered an additional layer of activation-induced, miRNA-specific transcriptional regulation. Thus, transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms cooperate to rapidly reprogram the miRNA repertoire in differentiating T cells. Altering Ago2 expression in T cells revealed that Ago proteins are limiting factors that determine miRNA abundance. Naive T cells with reduced Ago2 and miRNA expression differentiated more readily into cytokine-producing helper T cells, suggesting that activation-induced miRNA down-regulation promotes acquisition of helper T cell effector functions by relaxing the repression of genes that direct T cell differentiation. PMID:23382546

  20. Activating and propagating polyclonal gamma delta T cells with broad specificity for malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Mi, Tiejuan; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Hurton, Lenka V.; Ang, Sonny; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian A.; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Bast, Robert C.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To activate and propagate populations of γδT cells expressing polyclonal repertoire of γ and δ TCR chains for adoptive immunotherapy for cancer, which has yet to be achieved. Experimental Design Clinical-grade artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) derived from K562 tumor cells were used as irradiated feeders to activate and expand human γδT cells to clinical scale. These cells were tested for proliferation, TCR expression, memory phenotype, cytokine secretion, and tumor killing. Results γδT cell proliferation was dependent upon CD137L expression on aAPC and addition of exogenous IL-2 and IL-21. Propagated γδT cells were polyclonal as they expressed Vδ1, Vδ2, Vδ3, Vδ5, Vδ7, and Vδ8 with Vγ2, Vγ3, Vγ7, Vγ8, Vγ9, Vγ10, and Vγ11 TCR chains. Interferon-γ production by Vδ1, Vδ2, and Vδ1negVδ2neg subsets was inhibited by pan-TCRγδantibody when added to co-cultures of polyclonal γδT cells and tumor cell lines. Polyclonal γδT cells killed acute and chronic leukemia, colon, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer cell lines, but not healthy autologous or allogeneic normal B cells. Blocking antibodies demonstrated that polyclonal γδT cells mediated tumor cell lysis through combination of DNAM1, NKG2D, and TCRγδ. The adoptive transfer of activated and propagated γδT cells expressing polyclonal versus defined Vδ TCR chains imparted a hierarchy (polyclonal>Vδ1>Vδ1negVδ2neg>Vδ2) of survival of mice with ovarian cancer xenografts. Conclusions Polyclonal γδT cells can be activated and propagated with clinical-grade aAPC and demonstrate broad anti-tumor activities, which will facilitate the implementation of γδT cell cancer immunotherapies in humans. PMID:24833662

  1. Intracellular complement activation sustains T cell homeostasis and mediates effector differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G; Fara, Antonella F; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-12

    Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While "tonic" intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance.

  2. Mechanisms of T Cell Activation and Pathways of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abais-Battad, Justine M.; Rudemiller, Nathan P.; Mattson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Significant advancements have been made in the search for antigens and pathways responsible for activation of the adaptive immune response, furthering our understanding of the factors contributing to hypertension and potentially leading to the development of new and more effective therapies. PMID:26125645

  3. Transient global T cell activation after vaccination of rhesus macaques with a DNA-poxvirus vaccine regimen for HIV.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andreia; Müller, Tracey L; Chege, Gerald K; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Burgers, Wendy A

    2015-07-09

    Persistent T cell activation following immunization with HIV vaccines may increase HIV acquisition risk. We investigated the magnitude and kinetics of T cell activation following vaccination of rhesus macaques with a candidate HIV vaccine consisting of a recombinant DNA and MVA vaccination regimen. We show that global CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation, as measured by the expression of Ki67 and Bcl-2, peaked one week after boosting with MVA, but then waned rapidly to pre-vaccination levels. Furthermore, increased frequencies of CD4+ CCR5+ T cells, which represent potential HIV target cells, were short-lived and decreased to baseline levels within two months. Activated CD4+ T cells were predominantly of a central memory phenotype, and activated CD8+ T cells were distributed between central and effector memory phenotypes. Thus, only transient changes in T cell activation occurred following poxvirus vaccination, indicating a lack of persistent immune activation.

  4. Interleukin-21 Receptor Gene Induction in Human T Cells Is Mediated by T-Cell Receptor-Induced Sp1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zheng; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo; Xue, Hai-Hui; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Keji; Leonard, Warren J.

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) plays important roles in regulating the immune response. IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) mRNA is expressed at a low level in human resting T cells but is rapidly induced by mitogenic stimulation. We now investigate the basis for IL21R gene regulation in T cells. We found that the −80 to −20 region critically regulates IL-21R promoter activity and corresponds to a major DNase I-hypersensitive site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, DNA affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Sp1 binds to this region in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, mutation of the Sp1 motif markedly reduced IL-21R promoter activity, and Sp1 small interfering RNAs effectively diminished IL-21R expression in activated T cells. Interestingly, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation, T cells increased IL-21R expression and Sp1 protein levels while decreasing Sp1 phosphorylation. Moreover, phosphatase inhibitors that increased phosphorylation of Sp1 diminished IL-21R transcription. These data indicate that TCR-induced IL-21R expression is driven by TCR-mediated augmentation of Sp1 protein levels and may partly depend on the dephosphorylation of Sp1. PMID:16260592

  5. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  6. Bromelain treatment reduces CD25 expression on activated CD4+ T cells in vitro✩

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda A.; McNamara, Jeff T.; Zhan, Lijun; Maulik, Nilanjana; Thrall, Roger S.

    2009-01-01

    Bromelain (Br), an extract from pineapple stem with cysteine protease activity, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a number of inflammatory models. We have previously shown that Br treatment decreased activated CD4+ T cells and has a therapeutic role in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease. The current study was designed to determine the effect of Br on CD4+ T cell activation, specifically the expression of CD25 in vitro. CD25 is up regulated upon T cell activation, found as a soluble fraction (sCD25) and is a therapeutic target in inflammation, autoimmunity and allergy. Br treatment of anti-CD3 stimulated CD4+ T cells reduced CD25 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. This reduction of CD25 was dependent on the proteolytic action of Br as the addition of E64 (a cysteine protease inhibitor) abrogated this response. The concentration of sCD25 was increased in supernatants of Br treated activated CD4+ T cells as compared to control cells, suggesting that Br proteolytically cleaved cell-surface CD25. This novel mechanism of action identifies how Br may exert its therapeutic benefits in inflammatory conditions. PMID:19162239

  7. Nuclear Envelope Lamin-A Couples Actin Dynamics with Immunological Synapse Architecture and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    González-Granado, José María; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando Garcia; Freije, José María Pérez; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins have been implicated in structural and functional activities, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction. However, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we showed that the abundance of A-type lamins is almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but that it is substantially increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR), and is an early event that accelerates formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. We found that lamin-A enhanced the polymerization of F-actin in T cells, a critical step for immunological synapse formation, by physically connecting the nucleus to the plasma membrane through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We also showed that lamin-A played a key role in other membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear events related to TCR activation, including receptor-clustering, downstream signaling, and target gene expression. Notably, the presence of lamin-A was associated with enhanced extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 signaling, and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway reduced the extent of lamin-A–dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice deficient in lamin-A exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation, and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response. PMID:24757177

  8. Controlling T-Cell Activation with Synthetic Dendritic Cells Using the Multivalency Effect

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have recently gained a lot of attention. They efficiently activate T cells and serve as powerful replacements for dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy. Focusing on a specific class of polymer-based aAPCs, so-called synthetic dendritic cells (sDCs), we have investigated the importance of multivalent binding on T-cell activation. Using antibody-functionalized sDCs, we have tested the influence of polymer length and antibody density. Increasing the multivalent character of the antibody-functionalized polymer lowered the effective concentration required for T-cell activation. This was evidenced for both early and late stages of activation. The most important effect observed was the significantly prolonged activation of the stimulated T cells, indicating that multivalent sDCs sustain T-cell signaling. Our results highlight the importance of multivalency for the design of aAPCs and will ultimately allow for better mimics of natural dendritic cells that can be used as vaccines in cancer treatment. PMID:28393131

  9. T-cell growth transformation by herpesvirus saimiri is independent of STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Heck, Elke; Lengenfelder, Doris; Schmidt, Monika; Müller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Biesinger, Brigitte; Ensser, Armin

    2005-05-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (saimirine herpesvirus 2) (HVS), a T-lymphotropic tumor virus, induces lymphoproliferative disease in several species of New World primates. In addition, strains of HVS subgroup C are able to transform T cells of Old World primates, including humans, to permanently growing T-cell lines. In concert with the Stp oncoprotein, the tyrosine kinase-interacting protein (Tip) of HVS C488 is required for T-cell transformation in vitro and lymphoma induction in vivo. Tip was previously shown to interact with the protein tyrosine kinase Lck. Constitutive activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) has been associated with oncogenesis and has also been detected in HVS-transformed T-cell lines. Furthermore, Tip contains a putative consensus YXPQ binding motif for the SH2 (src homology 2) domains of STAT1 and STAT3. Tip tyrosine phosphorylation at this site was required for binding of STATs and induction of STAT-dependent transcription. Here we sought to address the relevance of STAT activation for transformation of human T cells by introducing a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation in the YXPQ motif of Tip of HVS C488. Unexpectedly, the recombinant virus was still able to transform human T lymphocytes, but it had lost its capability to activate STAT3 as well as STAT1. This demonstrates that growth transformation by HVS is independent of STAT3 activation.

  10. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-04

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis EsxH inhibits ESCRT-dependent CD4(+) T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Tufariello, JoAnn M; Srivastava, Smita; Zahra, Aleena; Klevorn, Thais; Grace, Patricia S; Mehra, Alka; Park, Heidi S; Ernst, Joel D; Jacobs, William R; Philips, Jennifer A

    2016-12-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) establishes a persistent infection, despite inducing antigen-specific T-cell responses. Although T cells arrive at the site of infection, they do not provide sterilizing immunity. The molecular basis of how Mtb impairs T-cell function is not clear. Mtb has been reported to block major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation; however, no bacterial effector or host-cell target mediating this effect has been identified. We recently found that Mtb EsxH, which is secreted by the Esx-3 type VII secretion system, directly inhibits the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Here, we showed that ESCRT is required for optimal antigen processing; correspondingly, overexpression and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that EsxH inhibited the ability of macrophages and dendritic cells to activate Mtb antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. Compared with the wild-type strain, the esxH-deficient strain induced fivefold more antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell proliferation in the mediastinal lymph nodes of mice. We also found that EsxH undermined the ability of effector CD4(+) T cells to recognize infected macrophages and clear Mtb. These results provide a molecular explanation for how Mtb impairs the adaptive immune response.

  12. Donor CD19 CAR T cells exert potent graft-versus-lymphoma activity with diminished graft-versus-host activity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Smith, Melody; James, Scott E; Davila, Marco L; Velardi, Enrico; Argyropoulos, Kimon V; Gunset, Gertrude; Perna, Fabiana; Kreines, Fabiana M; Levy, Emily R; Lieberman, Sophie; Jay, Hillary V; Tuckett, Andrea Z; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Tan, Lisa; Young, Lauren F; Takvorian, Kate; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Jenq, Robert R; Hanash, Alan M; Motta, Ana Carolina F; Murphy, George F; Liu, Chen; Schietinger, Andrea; Sadelain, Michel; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2017-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a potentially curative therapy for hematological malignancies. However, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and relapse after allo-HSCT remain major impediments to the success of allo-HSCT. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) direct tumor cell recognition of adoptively transferred T cells. CD19 is an attractive CAR target, which is expressed in most B cell malignancies, as well as in healthy B cells. Clinical trials using autologous CD19-targeted T cells have shown remarkable promise in various B cell malignancies. However, the use of allogeneic CAR T cells poses a concern in that it may increase risk of the occurrence of GVHD, although this has not been reported in selected patients infused with donor-derived CD19 CAR T cells after allo-HSCT. To understand the mechanism whereby allogeneic CD19 CAR T cells may mediate anti-lymphoma activity without causing a significant increase in the incidence of GVHD, we studied donor-derived CD19 CAR T cells in allo-HSCT and lymphoma models in mice. We demonstrate that alloreactive T cells expressing CD28-costimulated CD19 CARs experience enhanced stimulation, resulting in the progressive loss of both their effector function and proliferative potential, clonal deletion, and significantly decreased occurrence of GVHD. Concurrently, the other CAR T cells that were present in bulk donor T cell populations retained their anti-lymphoma activity in accordance with the requirement that both the T cell receptor (TCR) and CAR be engaged to accelerate T cell exhaustion. In contrast, first-generation and 4-1BB-costimulated CAR T cells increased the occurrence of GVHD. These findings could explain the reduced risk of GVHD occurring with cumulative TCR and CAR signaling.

  13. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, P.F.; Siebenlist, U. ); Irving, S.G.; Kelly, K. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

  14. 3'uridylation controls mature microRNA turnover during CD4 T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Vazquez, Cristina; Enright, Anton J; Rodríguez-Galán, Ana; Perez-García, Arantxa; Collier, Paul; Jones, Matthew R; Benes, Vladimir; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Mittelbrunn, María; Ramiro, Almudena R; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-03-28

    Activation of T lymphocytes requires a tight regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) expression. Terminal uridyltransferases (TUTases) catalyze 3' non-templated nucleotide addition (3'NTA) to miRNAs which may influence miRNA stability and function. Here, we investigated 3'NTA to mature miRNA in CD4 T lymphocytes by deep sequencing. Upon T cell activation, miRNA sequences bearing terminal uridines are specifically decreased, concomitantly with downregulation of TUT4 and TUT7 enzymes. Analyzing TUT4 deficient T lymphocytes, we proved that this terminal uridyltransferase is essential for the maintenance of miRNA uridylation in steady state of T lymphocytes. Analysis of synthetic uridylated miRNAs shows that 3' addition of uridine promotes degradation of these uridylated miRNAs after T cell activation. Our data underline post-transcriptional uridylation as a mechanism to fine tune miRNA levels during T cell activation.

  15. Otud7b facilitates T cell activation and inflammatory responses by regulating Zap70 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Yichuan; Jin, Jin; Chang, Jae-Hoon; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Cheng, Xuhong; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-03-07

    Signal transduction from the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for T cell-mediated immune responses and, when deregulated, also contributes to the development of autoimmunity. How TCR signaling is regulated is incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism in which the deubiquitinase Otud7b has a crucial role in facilitating TCR signaling. Upon TCR ligation, Otud7b is rapidly recruited to the tyrosine kinase Zap70, a central mediator of TCR-proximal signaling. Otud7b deficiency attenuates the activation of Zap70 and its downstream pathways and impairs T cell activation and differentiation, rendering mice refractory to T cell-mediated autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Otud7b facilitated Zap70 activation by deubiquitinating Zap70, thus preventing the association of Zap70 with the negative-regulatory phosphatases Sts1 and Sts2. These findings establish Otud7b as a positive regulator of TCR-proximal signaling and T cell activation, highlighting the importance of deubiquitination in regulating Zap70 function.

  16. Leptin deficiency in vivo enhances the ability of splenic dendritic cells to activate T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic adipokine that is critical for regulating food intake and energy expenditure and also participates in functions of the immune system, including those of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we assess the effect of leptin deficiency on the function splenic dendritic cells (sDC). sDC from leptin-deficient mice (Lepob) were evaluated ex vivo for phenotype, ability to respond to inflammatory stimuli, to acquire and process antigens and to activate T cells. The data show that Lepob sDC express activation markers similar to controls and respond similarly to LPS activation or anti-CD40 cross-linking. In addition, antigen acquisition and processing by Lepob sDC was similar to controls. However, Lepob sDC elicited higher production of IFN-γ in mixed lymphocyte reactions and increased production of IL-2 by antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma relative to controls. To assess Lepob sDC activation of T cells in vivo, Lepob and control mice were infected systemically with Mycobacterium avium. Lepob mice were significantly better at neutralizing the infection as measured by splenic bacterial load over time. This was mirrored with an increased percentage of activated T cells in M. avium-infected Lepob mice. Thus, although no changes were detected in sDC phenotype, activation, antigen processing or presentation, these DC surprisingly presented an enhanced ability to activate T cells ex vivo and in vivo. These data demonstrate that leptin can modulate DC function and suggest that leptin may dampen T-cell responsiveness in the physiological setting. PMID:24966213

  17. Asynchronous combinatorial action of four regulatory factors activates Bcl11b for T cell commitment

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Yui, Mary A.; Ng, Kenneth K.H.; Pease, Shirley S.; Zhang, Jingli A.; Damle, Sagar S.; Freedman, George; Siu, Sharmayne; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Elowitz, Michael B.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2016-01-01

    During T cell development, multipotent progenitors relinquish competence for other fates and commit to the T cell lineage by turning on the transcription factor Bcl11b. To clarify lineage commitment mechanisms, we followed developing T cells at single-cell level using Bcl11b knock-in fluorescent reporter mice. Notch signaling and Notch-activated transcription factors collaborate to activate Bcl11b expression, irrespective of Notch-dependent proliferation. These inputs work via three distinct, asynchronous mechanisms: an early locus poising function dependent on TCF-1 and GATA-3; a stochastic permissivity function dependent on Notch signaling; and a separate amplitude-control function dependent on Runx1, a factor already present in multipotent progenitors. Despite all being necessary for Bcl11b activation, these inputs act in a stage specific manner, providing a multi-tiered mechanism for developmental gene regulation. PMID:27376470

  18. BTLA exhibits immune memory for αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for αβ T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-γ and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLAhigh αβ T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection. PMID:25360214

  19. Transgenic Ly-49A inhibits antigen-driven T cell activation and delays diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sherry S; Patterson, Tricia; Pauza, Mary E

    2005-04-01

    Activation of islet-specific T cells plays a significant role in the development of type 1 diabetes. In an effort to control T cell activation, we expressed the inhibitory receptor, Ly-49A, on islet-specific mouse CD4 cells. Ag-mediated activation of Ly-49A T cells was inhibited in vitro when the Ly-49A ligand, H-2D(d), was present on APCs. Ag-driven T cell proliferation, cytokine production, and changes in surface receptor expression were significantly reduced. Inhibition was also evident during secondary antigenic challenge. Addition of exogenous IL-2 did not rescue cells from inhibition, suggesting that Ly-49A engagement does not lead to T cell anergy. Importantly, in an adoptive transfer model, Ly-49A significantly delays the onset of diabetes. Together these results demonstrate that the inhibitory receptor Ly-49A effectively limits Ag-specific CD4 cell responses even in the presence of sustained autoantigen expression in vivo.

  20. Nuclear envelope lamin-A couples actin dynamics with immunological synapse architecture and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    González-Granado, José M; Silvestre-Roig, Carlos; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando G; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-04-22

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins regulate multiple cellular functions, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction; however, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. We showed that the abundance of A-type lamins was almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but was increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). The increase in lamin-A was an early event that accelerated formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. Polymerization of F-actin in T cells is a critical step for immunological synapse formation, and lamin-A interacted with the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex to promote F-actin polymerization. We also showed that lamin-A expression accelerated TCR clustering and led to enhanced downstream signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling, as well as increased target gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway reduced lamin-A-dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice lacking lamin-A in immune cells exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response.

  1. Early Gag Immunodominance of the HIV-Specific T-Cell Response during Acute/Early Infection Is Associated with Higher CD8+ T-Cell Antiviral Activity and Correlates with Preservation of the CD4+ T-Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Yanina; Falivene, Juliana; Socias, María Eugenia; Laufer, Natalia; Coloccini, Romina Soledad; Rodriguez, Ana María; Ruiz, María Julia; Pando, María Ángeles; Giavedoni, Luis David; Cahn, Pedro; Sued, Omar; Salomon, Horacio; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The important role of the CD8+ T-cell response on HIV control is well established. Moreover, the acute phase of infection represents a proper scenario to delineate the antiviral cellular functions that best correlate with control. Here, multiple functional aspects (specificity, ex vivo viral inhibitory activity [VIA] and polyfunctionality) of the HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell subset arising early after infection, and their association with disease progression markers, were examined. Blood samples from 44 subjects recruited within 6 months from infection (primary HIV infection [PHI] group), 16 chronically infected subjects, 11 elite controllers (EC), and 10 healthy donors were obtained. Results indicated that, although Nef dominated the anti-HIV response during acute/early infection, a higher proportion of early anti-Gag T cells correlated with delayed progression. Polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T cells were detected at early time points but did not associate with virus control. Conversely, higher CD4+ T-cell set points were observed in PHI subjects with higher HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell VIA at baseline. Importantly, VIA levels correlated with the magnitude of the anti-Gag cellular response. The advantage of Gag-specific cells may result from their enhanced ability to mediate lysis of infected cells (evidenced by a higher capacity to degranulate and to mediate VIA) and to simultaneously produce IFN-γ. Finally, Gag immunodominance was associated with elevated plasma levels of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β). All together, this study underscores the importance of CD8+ T-cell specificity in the improved control of disease progression, which was related to the capacity of Gag-specific cells to mediate both lytic and nonlytic antiviral mechanisms at early time points postinfection. PMID:23616666

  2. Micro RNA-155 participates in re-activation of encephalitogenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Jevtić, Bojan; Timotijević, Gordana; Stanisavljević, Suzana; Momčilović, Miljana; Mostarica Stojković, Marija; Miljković, Djordje

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miR) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the immune response regulation. miR-155 has been attributed a major pro-inflammatory role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here, a role of miR-155 in re-activation of encephalitogenic CD4(+) T cells was investigated. Dark Agouti rats were immunized with myelin basic protein (MBP) emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant. CD4(+) T cells were purified from draining lymph node cells (DLNC) obtained in the inductive phase and from spinal cord immune cells (SCIC) isolated at the peak of EAE. CD4(+) T cells obtained from SCIC (i.e., in vivo re-activated cells) had markedly higher expression of miR-155 in comparison to those purified from DLNC (not re-activated). Likewise, in vitro re-activation of DLNC with MBP led to increase in miR-155 expression. Further, DLNC and DLNC CD4(+) T cells were transfected with an inhibitor of miR-155 during in vitro re-activation. As a result, expression of important CD4(+) T cell effector cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17, but not of regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β, was reduced. These results imply that miR-155 supports re-activation of encephalitogenic CD4(+) T cells. Our results contribute to a view that miR-155 might be a valuable target in multiple sclerosis therapy.

  3. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells and Cytokines Gene Expression of the T Cells in AIDS Patients with Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome during Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heling; Xie, Yirui; Su, Junwei; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Yin, Michael; Zhou, Qihui

    2017-01-01

    Background. The etiology of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in AIDS patients after the initiation of HAART remains unknown. Several researches indicated that the development of IRIS is associated with the production and variation of cytokines, whose gene expression are closely related to the Ca2+/CN-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. Methods. We studied the expression of NFAT isoforms and their major target cytokines genes in peripheral blood CD3+ T cells of subjects through fluorescence quantitative PCR and explored the expression changes of these genes before and after HAART. Results. After the initiation of HARRT, NFAT1, IL-6, and IL-8 gene expression showed a reversal trend in the CD3+ T cells of the IRIS group and changed from low expression before HARRT to high expression after HARRT. In particular, the relative gene expression of NFAT1 was markedly higher compared with the other three isoforms. The IRIS group also showed higher NFAT4, NFAT2, NFAT1, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-2, IL-18, and TNF-α gene expression than the non-IRIS group. Conclusion. This study suggested that high expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18 can predict the risk of IRIS. The increased expression of NFAT1 and NFAT4 may promote the expression of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, which may promote the occurrence of IRIS. PMID:28316373

  4. Lymphocyte Display: A Novel Antibody Selection Platform Based on T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Laura Sanz, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Since their onset, display technologies have proven useful for the selection of antibodies against a variety of targets; however, most of the antibodies selected with the currently available platforms need to be further modified for their use in humans, and are restricted to accessible antigens. Furthermore, these platforms are not well suited for in vivo selections. We present here a novel cell based antibody display platform, which takes advantage of the functional capabilities of T lymphocytes. The display of antibodies on the surface of T lymphocytes, as a part of a chimeric-immune receptor (CIR) mediating signaling, may ideally link the antigen-antibody interaction to a demonstrable change in T cell phenotype, due to subsequent expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69. In this proof-of-concept, an in vitro selection was carried out using a human T cell line lentiviral-transduced to express a tumor-specific CIR on the surface, against a human tumor cell line expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen. Based on an effective interaction between the CIR and the tumor antigen, we demonstrated that combining CIR-mediated activation with FACS sorting of CD69+ T cells, it is possible to isolate binders to tumor specific cell surface antigen, with an enrichment factor of at least 103-fold after two rounds, resulting in a homogeneous population of T cells expressing tumor-specific CIRs. PMID:19777065

  5. Antiproliferative Activity of T. welwitschii Extract on Jurkat T Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Batanai; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Triumfetta welwitschii is a plant used traditionally for the treatment of fever and diarrhoea. Previous work has shown that T. welwitschii has antibacterial activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate T. welwitschii extract for anticancer activity against Jurkat T cells. The Jurkat T cell line is used to study acute T cell leukaemia. An antiproliferation assay, determination of induction of apoptosis, the determination of the effect of the combination of the extract and GSH, and effects of the extract on DNA leakage were conducted. T. welwitschii was found to decrease cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. T. welwitschii caused apoptosis in the Jurkat T cells as shown by DNA fragmentation. When T. welwitschii was combined with reduced GSH, it was found that the growth of the Jurkat T cells was significantly reduced compared to untreated cells after 72 h of treatment. This was unexpected, as cancer cells have elevated levels of GSH compared to normal cells. The results of this study show that T. welwitschii is a potential source of compounds that may serve as leads for anticancer compounds. PMID:26557698

  6. Treponemal infection specifically enhances node T-cell regulation of macrophage activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, D R; Bagasra, O; Jacobs, R F

    1986-01-01

    Hamsters experimentally inoculated in the inguinal region with Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum develop considerable pathology at that site. We examined the cell populations from these inguinal lymph nodes to determine their intercellular responses to infection. In vitro, syphilitic-node T cells markedly suppressed C3b receptor-mediated ingestion (C3bMI) in syphilitic macrophages derived from sites both proximal and distal to the inoculation. This activity was more pronounced when node T cells rather than peritoneal T cells were used. When treponemal preparations or live treponemes were added to the coculture system, the suppression was specifically enhanced, whereas the addition of heterologous agents did not promote this effect. Syphilitic macrophages from either compartment cultured alone showed no significant inhibition of C3bMI. In parallel studies on syphilitic macrophages, we observed that the expression of Ia quickly became elevated and was sustained throughout the infection. Moreover, in vitro culturing of the syphilitic-node T cells with these macrophages did not alter this function. These observations suggest that the syphilitic node contains a subpopulation of T cells that can selectively suppress macrophage C3bMI activity and concurrently regulate their cellular response to treponemal infection. PMID:3531014

  7. Gene encoding T-cell-activating protein TAP maps to the Ly-6 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Yeh, E T; Gramm, C F; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    Recently we described two murine T-cell membrane proteins, TAP (T-cell-activating protein) and TAPa (TAP-associated protein). Previous experiments suggested that TAP is involved in physiologic T-cell activation. The subject of this report is a genetic analysis of these molecules. TAP and TAPa map to the Ly-6 locus. The relationship of these molecules to other antigens encoded in this locus is examined. Based on tissue distribution, molecular structure, and functional properties, TAP is distinct from any previously described Ly-6 antigen, whereas TAPa is probably identical to the 34-11-3 antigen. TAP and TAPa are coexpressed on all cell types examined so far. Moreover, comparative studies demonstrate a complex developmentally regulated pattern in the expression of molecules encoded in this locus. Images PMID:3010324

  8. PKCθ-Mediated PDK1 Phosphorylation Enhances T Cell Activation by Increasing PDK1 Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ah; Choi, Hyunwoo; Yang, Taewoo; Cho, Steve K.; Park, Zee-Yong; Park, Sung-Gyoo

    2017-01-01

    PDK1 is essential for T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of NF-κB, and PDK1-induced phosphorylation of PKCθ is important for TCR-induced NF-κB activation. However, inverse regulation of PDK1 by PKCθ during T cell activation has not been investigated. In this study, we found that PKCθ is involved in human PDK1 phosphorylation and that its kinase activity is crucial for human PDK1 phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry analysis of wild-type PKCθ or of kinase-inactive form of PKCθ revealed that PKCθ induced phosphorylation of human PDK1 at Ser-64. This PKCθ-induced PDK1 phosphorylation positively regulated T cell activation and TCR-induced NF-κB activation. Moreover, phosphorylation of human PDK1 at Ser-64 increased the stability of human PDK1 protein. These results suggest that Ser-64 is an important phosphorylation site that is part of a positive feedback loop for human PDK1-PKCθ-mediated T cell activation. PMID:28152304

  9. Circulating gamma delta T cells are activated and depleted during progression of high-grade gliomas: Implications for gamma delta T cell therapy of GBM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains frustratingly impervious to any existing therapy. We have previously shown that GBM is sensitive to recognition and lysis by ex vivo activated gamma delta T cells, a minor subset of lymphocytes that innately recognize autologous stress-associated target antigens...

  10. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  11. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of ‘exhaustion’ or ‘immune checkpoint’ markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  12. Nickel differentially regulates NFAT and NF-{kappa}B activation in T cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Rumiko; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Ohara, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Makoto; Yamazaki, Tomomi; Nishii, Shigeaki; Aiba, Setsuya

    2011-08-01

    Nickel is a potent hapten that induces contact hypersensitivity in human skin. While nickel induces the maturation of dendritic cells via NF-{kappa}B and p38 MAPK activation, it also exerts immunosuppressive effects on T cells through an unknown mechanism. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of its effects on T cells, we examined the effects of NiCl{sub 2} on mRNA expression in human CD3+ T cells stimulated with CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Using a DNA microarray and Gene Ontology, we identified 70 up-regulated (including IL-1{beta}, IL-6 and IL-8) and 61 down-regulated (including IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-{gamma}) immune responsive genes in NiCl{sub 2}-treated T cells. The DNA microarray results were verified using real-time PCR and a Bio-Plex{sup TM} suspension protein array. Suppression of IL-2 and IFN-{gamma} gene transcription by NiCl{sub 2} was also confirmed using Jurkat T cells transfected with IL-2 or IFN-{gamma} luciferase reporter genes. To explore the NiCl{sub 2}-regulated signaling pathway, we examined the binding activity of nuclear proteins to NFAT, AP-1, and NF-{kappa}B consensus sequences. NiCl{sub 2} significantly and dose-dependently suppressed NFAT- and AP-1-binding activity, but augmented NF-{kappa}B-binding activity. Moreover, NiCl{sub 2} decreased nuclear NFAT expression in stimulated T cells. Using Jurkat T cells stimulated with PMA/ionomycin, we demonstrated that NiCl{sub 2} significantly suppressed stimulation-evoked cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} increases, suggesting that NiCl{sub 2} regulates NFAT signals by acting as a blocker of Ca{sup 2+} release-activated Ca{sup 2+} (CRAC) channels. These data showed that NiCl{sub 2} decreases NFAT and increases NF-{kappa}B signaling in T cells. These results shed light on the effects of nickel on the molecular regulation of T cell signaling. - Graphical Abstract: Nickel suppresses stimulation-evoked cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} increase, which results in the suppression of NFAT signals. On the other hand, Ni rather

  13. RIAM Regulates the Cytoskeletal Distribution and Activation of PLC-γ1 in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Lafuente, Esther M.; Meraner, Paul; Kim, Jin sub; Dombkowski, David; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.

    2010-01-01

    Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM), an adaptor molecule of the Mig-10/RIAM/Lamellipodin (MRL) family, plays a critical role in actin reorganization and inside-out activation of integrins in lymphocytes and platelets. We investigated the role of RIAM in T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling. Elimination of endogenous RIAM by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in impaired generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, whereas phosphorylation of ζ chain–associated protein kinase of 70 kD (ZAP-70) and formation of the linker of activated T cells (LAT) signalosome were unaffected. Knockdown of RIAM also resulted in defective nuclear translocation of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and activation of Ras guanine nucleotide-releasing protein 1 (RasGRP)1, which led to the diminished transcription of Il2. These events were associated with the impaired translocation of phosphorylated phospholipase C γ1 (PLC-γ1) to the actin cytoskeleton, which was required for the recruitment of PLC-γ1 to the immediate proximity of its substrate phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], and were reversed by reconstitution of cells with RIAM. Thus, by regulating the activation of PLC-γ1, RIAM has a central role in the activation of T cells and the transcription of target genes. PMID:19952372

  14. JEG-3 Trophoblast Cells Producing Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Promote Conversion of Human CD4+FOXP3- T Cells into CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells and Foster T Cell Suppressive Activity.

    PubMed

    Poloski, Eileen; Oettel, Anika; Ehrentraut, Stefanie; Luley, Lydia; Costa, Serban Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2016-03-09

    The pregnancy hormone human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) reportedly modulates innate and adaptive immune responses and contributes thereby to fetal survival. More precisely, hCG has been shown to support human Treg cell homing into the fetal-maternal interface and enhance number and function of Treg cells in murine pregnancy. Here, we aimed to study whether hCG and hCG-producing human trophoblast cell lines induce Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells and promote T cell suppressive activity. CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of normal pregnant women and cultured in the presence of hCG-producing (JEG-3, HTR-8) and non-producing (SWAN-71) cell lines. To confirm the participation of hCG in Treg cell conversion, the experiments were performed in the presence of anti-hCG and additional experiments were run with recombinant or urine-purified hCG. After culture the number of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells as well as the suppressive capacity of total T cells was assessed. hCG-producing JEG-3 cells as well as recombinant and urine-purified hCG induced CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells. Blockage of hCG impaired Treg cell induction. Moreover, hCG-producing JEG-3 cells increased suppressive activity of CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells through an antigen-independent pathway. Our results propose another mechanism through which hCG modulates the female immune system during pregnancy in favor of the fetus.

  15. T cell-mediated activation and regulation of anti-chromatin B cells.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Ramón, Hilda E; Hondowicz, Brian D; Erikson, Jan

    2006-07-01

    We have taken an immunoglobulin transgenic approach to study how self-reactive B cells are held in check in healthy mice and what parameters contribute to their activation in autoimmunity. Using this strategy, we have documented that a population of anti-chromatin B cells migrate to the periphery. In a healthy background, these cells have a reduced lifespan, appear developmentally arrested, and localize primarily to the T/B cell interface in the spleen. Importantly, they are capable of differentiating into antibody-forming cells when provided with T cell help. T(H)1 and T(H)2 cells induce IgG2a and IgG1 autoantibodies, respectively. In the context of the autoimmune-prone lpr/lpr or gld/gld mutations, these autoreactive B cells populate the B cell follicle, and this is dependent upon CD4 T cells. However, after 10 weeks of age serum autoantibodies are produced. We hypothesize that control of autoantibody production in young autoimmune-prone mice is regulated by the counterbalancing influence of regulatory T cells. We show that while autoantibody production is blocked in the context of regulatory T cells, early events characterizing a productive T cell-B cell interaction are not disturbed, with the notable exceptions of T(H) ICOS levels and IFN-gamma and IL-10 production.

  16. On-chip activation and subsequent detection of individual antigen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing; Han, Qing; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Kent, Sally C.; Raddassi, Khadir; Nilsson, Björn; Nepom, Gerald T.; Hafler, David A.; Love, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in samples of human tissue has been difficult to determine accurately ex vivo, particularly for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis or Type 1 diabetes. Conventional approaches involve the expansion of primary T cells in vitro to increase the numbers of cells, and a subsequent assessment of the frequencies of antigen-specific T cells in the expanded population by limiting dilution or by using fluorescently labeled tetramers of peptide-loaded major histocompatibility complex (MHC) receptors. Here we describe an alternative approach that uses arrays of subnanoliter wells coated with recombinant peptide-loaded MHC Class II monomers to isolate and stimulate individual CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. In these experiments, activation was monitored using microengraving to capture two cytokines (IFNγ and IL-17) released from single cells. This new method should enable direct enumeration of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo from clinical samples. PMID:20000848

  17. Murine T cell activation is regulated by surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide)

    SciTech Connect

    Warford, Jordan; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Hoskin, David W.; Easton, Alexander S.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Surfen is the first inhibitor of glycosaminoglycan function to be studied in murine T cells. •Surfen reduces T cell proliferation stimulated in vitro and in vivo. •Surfen reduces CD25 expression in T cells activated in vivo but not in vitro. •Surfen increases T cell proliferation when T cell receptor activation is bypassed. •Surfen’s effects are blocked by co-administration of heparin sulfate. -- Abstract: Surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide) binds to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and has been shown to influence their function, and the function of proteoglycans (complexes of GAGs linked to a core protein). T cells synthesize, secrete and express GAGs and proteoglycans which are involved in several aspects of T cell function. However, there are as yet no studies on the effect of GAG-binding agents such as surfen on T cell function. In this study, surfen was found to influence murine T cell activation. Doses between 2.5 and 20 μM produced a graduated reduction in the proliferation of T cells activated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibody-coated T cell expander beads. Surfen (20 mg/kg) was also administered to mice treated with anti-CD3 antibody to activate T cells in vivo. Lymphocytes from surfen-treated mice also showed reduced proliferation and lymph node cell counts were reduced. Surfen reduced labeling with a cell viability marker (7-ADD) but to a much lower extent than its effect on proliferation. Surfen also reduced CD25 (the α-subunit of the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor) expression with no effect on CD69 expression in T cells treated in vivo but not in vitro. When receptor activation was bypassed by treating T cells in vitro with phorbyl myristate acetate (10 ng/ml) and ionomycin (100 ng/ml), surfen treatment either increased proliferation (10 μM) or had no effect (2.5, 5 and 20 μM). In vitro treatment of T cells with surfen had no effect on IL-2 or interferon-γ synthesis and did not alter proliferation of the IL-2 dependent cell

  18. Effect of antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C on the frequency of regulatory T cells, T-cell activation, and serum levels of TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Pavel; Davidová, Alžběta; Beran, Ondřej; Arientová, Simona; Boštík, Pavel; Kapla, Jaroslav; Kondělková, Kateřina; Plíšek, Stanislav; Holub, Michal

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to analyze T-regulatory cells (Tregs), activated CD8(+) T cells, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF)-β in hepatitis C patients. We enrolled 31 patients with chronic genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 30 seropositive persons with spontaneous HCV elimination, and 23 healthy volunteers. The patients were examined at the beginning of the interferon-alpha (IFN-α)-based therapy (baseline) and at weeks 4 (W4) and 12 (W12) of the therapy. The percentage of Tregs and the expression of activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR on CD8(+) T cells were analyzed in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry. Serum levels of TGF-β were measured in a multiplex assay using flow cytometry. The percentage of Tregs in patients was higher than in controls and seropositive persons. Similarly, the percentage of CD8(+) T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR was higher in patients compared with controls and seropositive persons. Chronic HCV infection is associated with elevated circulating Tregs and activated CD8(+) T cells. During IFN-α-based therapy these cells gradually increase, whereas TGF-β serum levels decrease.

  19. Regulation of NFAT by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in T cells.

    PubMed

    Valdor, Rut; Schreiber, Valérie; Saenz, Luis; Martínez, Teresa; Muñoz-Suano, Alba; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Ramírez, Pablo; Parrilla, Pascual; Aguado, Enrique; García-Cózar, Francisco; Yélamos, José

    2008-04-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors is pivotal for T lymphocyte functionality. All relevant NFAT activation events upon T cells stimulation such as nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activity have been shown to be dictated by its phosphorylation state. Here, we provide evidence for a novel post-translational modification that regulates NFAT. Indeed, NFATc1 and NFATc2 are poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated by poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Moreover, we have also found a physical interaction between PARP-1 and both NFATc1 and NFATc2. Interestingly, PARP is activated during T cell stimulation in the absence of DNA damage, leading to ADP-ribose polymers formation and transfer to nuclear acceptor proteins. Our data suggest that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation modulates the activation of NFAT in T cells, as PARP inhibition causes an increase in NFAT-dependent transactivation and a delay in NFAT nuclear export. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation will expedited NFAT export from the nucleus directly or by priming/facilitating NFAT phosphorylation. Altogether, these data point to PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation as a novel regulatory mechanism of NFAT at nuclear level, suggesting a potential use of PARP as a new therapeutic target in the modulation of NFAT.

  20. Regulatory Activity of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in T-Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wooki; Khan, Naim A.; McMurray, David N.; Prior, Ian A.; Wang, Naisyin; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are considered to be authentic immunosuppressors and appear to exert beneficial effects with respect to certain immune-mediated diseases. In addition to promoting T-helper 1 (Th1) cell to T-helper 2 (Th2) cell effector T-cell differentiation, n-3 PUFA may also exert anti-inflammatory actions by inducing apoptosis in Th1 cells. With respect to mechanisms of action, effects range from the modulation of membrane receptors to gene transcription via perturbation of a number of second messenger cascades. In this review, the putative targets of anti-inflammatory n-3 PUFA, activated during early and late events of T-cell activation will be discussed. Studies have demonstrated that these fatty acids alter plasma membrane micro-organization (lipid rafts) at the immunological synapse, the site where T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APC) form a physical contact for antigen initiated T-cell signaling. In addition, the production of diacylglycerol and the activation of different isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), calcium signaling, and nuclear translocation/activation of transcriptional factors, can be modulated by n-3 PUFA. Advantages and limitations of diverse methodologies to study the membrane lipid raft hypothesis, as well as apparent contradictions regarding the effect of n-3 PUFA on lipid rafts will be critically presented. PMID:20176053

  1. CD8+ T Cell-Independent Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Pennell, Christopher A.; Olin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of preclinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Cancer immunotherapy seeks to recruit an effective immune response to eliminate tumor cells. To date, cancer vaccines have shown only limited effectiveness because of our incomplete understanding of the necessary effector cells and mechanisms that yield efficient tumor clearance. CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity has long been proposed as the primary effector function necessary for tumor regression. However, there is increasing evidence that indicates that components of the immune system other than CD8+ T cells play important roles in tumor eradication and control. The following review should provide an understanding of the mechanisms involved in an effective antitumor response to guide future therapeutic designs. The information provided suggests an alternate means of effective tumor clearance in malignant glioma to the canonical CD8+ cytotoxic T cell mechanism. PMID:26351148

  2. Visualizing Chemokine-Dependent T Cell Activation and Migration in Response to Central Nervous System Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Monica J.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2014-01-01

    In response to central nervous system (CNS) injury and infection, astrocytes, neurons, and CNS vasculature express several chemokines, including CCL21. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), western blot, and immunohistochemical methods can quantify mRNA and protein expression. However, these methods do not quantify chemokine bioavailability and bioactivity, variables modified by many environ mental factors including composition of extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we illustrate how two-photon microscopy and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE or CFDA SE) labeling of T cells coupled with flow cytometry can be used as tools to assess chemokine-mediated regulation of T cell proliferation, activation, and migration. PMID:23625499

  3. Prolonged impairment of very late activating antigen-mediated T cell proliferation via the CD3 pathway after T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, K; Nojima, Y; Tachibana, K; Soiffer, R J; Murray, C; Schlossman, S F; Ritz, J; Morimoto, C

    1994-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) is prolonged T cell dysfunction resulting in a variety of infectious complications in the months to years after hematologic engraftment. We previously showed that immobilized extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as fibronectin (FN), the CS-1 domain of FN, or collagen (CO) acted synergistically with immobilized anti-CD3 to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, the comitogenic effect of ECMs could be mimicked by immobilized mAb reactive with a common beta 1 chain (CD29) of very late activating (VLA) antigens which include ECM receptors. Since the interaction of T cells with ECMs appears to play an important role in the process of T cell reconstitution following allo-BMT, we examined the expression of VLA antigens (alpha 1-alpha 6, beta 1) and their functional roles in CD3-mediated T cell proliferation at various times after T cell depleted allo-BMT. VLA beta 1 as well as VLA alpha 4, alpha 5, and alpha 6 expression was lower than normal controls during the first 3 mo after allo-BMT and auto-BMT, whereas these expressions returned to normal levels by 4 mo after allo-BMT and auto-BMT. Although alpha 1 and alpha 2 were not expressed on lymphocytes from normal controls, these antigens were expressed on lymphocytes at the detectable levels (5-15%) from patients after allo-BMT and auto-BMT. Both CD29 and CD3 were expressed at normal levels on lymphocytes from patients > 3 mo after allo-BMT, whereas T cell interaction with ECM through VLA proteins or crosslinking of VLA beta 1 expressed by T cells with anti-CD29 mAb results in poor induction of CD3-mediated T cell proliferation for a prolonged period (> 1 yr) after allo-BMT. In contrast, T cell proliferation induced by crosslinking of anti-CD2 or anti-CD26 with anti-CD3 was almost fully recovered by 1 yr post-allo-BMT. After autologous BMT, impaired VLA-mediated T cell proliferation via the CD3 pathway after auto-BMT returned to normal

  4. Zinc differentially regulates mitogen-activated protein kinases in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Hönscheid, Andrea; Dubben, Svenja; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient with remarkable importance for immunity, in particular for T-cell function. This is, at least in part, based on an involvement of zinc ions in immune cell signal transduction; dynamic changes of the intracellular free zinc concentration have recently been recognized as signaling events. Because the molecular targets of zinc signals remain incompletely understood, we investigated the impact of elevated intracellular free zinc on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and MAPK-dependent cytokine production in human T-cells. p38 was activated by treatment with zinc and the ionophore pyrithione, whereas ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases were unaffected. In contrast, after T-cell receptor stimulation with antibodies against CD3, ERK1/2-phosphorylation was selectively suppressed by intracellular zinc. Mechanisms that had been shown to mediate zinc-effects in other cells, such as activation of the Src kinase Lck, inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 or MAPK phosphatases and cyclic nucleotide/protein kinase A signaling were not involved. This indicates that the differential impact of zinc on the MAPK families in T-cells is mediated by mechanisms that differ from the ones observed in other cell types. Further investigation of the activation of p38 by zinc demonstrated that this MAPK is responsible for the zinc-mediated activation of CREB and mRNA expression of the Th1 cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-2. In conclusion, regulation of MAPK activity contributes to the impact of zinc on T-cell function.

  5. Epigenetic Alterations May Regulate Temporary Reversal of CD4+ T Cell Activation Caused by Trichloroethylene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Ashley R.; Cooney, Craig A.; Reisfeld, Brad; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that short-term (4 weeks) or chronic (32 weeks) exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) in drinking water of female MRL+/+ mice generated CD4+ T cells that secreted increased levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and expressed an activated (CD44hiCD62Llo) phenotype. In contrast, the current study of subchronic TCE exposure showed that midway in the disease process both of these parameters of CD4+ T cell activation were reversed. This phase of the disease process may represent an attempt by the body to counteract the inflammatory effects of TCE. The decrease in CD4+ T cell production of IFN-γ following subchronic TCE exposure could not be attributed to skewing toward a Th2 or Th17 phenotype or to an increase in Treg cells. Instead, the suppression corresponded to alterations in markers used to assess DNA methylation, namely increased expression of retrotransposons Iap (intracisternal A particle) and Muerv (murine endogenous retrovirus). Also observed was an increase in the expression of Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase-1) and decreased expression of several genes known to be downregulated by DNA methylation, namely Ifng, Il2, and Cdkn1a. CD4+ T cells from a second study in which MRL+/+ mice were treated for 17 weeks with TCE showed a similar increase in Iap and decrease in Cdkn1a. In addition, DNA collected from the CD4+ T cells in the second study showed TCE-decreased global DNA methylation. Thus, these results described the biphasic nature of TCE-induced alterations in CD4+ T cell function and suggested that these changes represented potentially reversible alterations in epigenetic processes. PMID:22407948

  6. A CB2-Selective Cannabinoid Suppresses T-Cell Activities and Increases Tregs and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Rebecca H; Meissler, Joseph J; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Daohai; Adler, Martin W; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2015-06-01

    We have previously shown that agonists selective for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), including O-1966, inhibit the Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR), an in vitro correlate of organ graft rejection, predominantly through effects on T-cells. Current studies explored the mechanism of this immunosuppression by O-1966 using mouse spleen cells. Treatment with O-1966 dose-relatedly decreased levels of the active nuclear forms of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT in wild-type T-cells, but not T-cells from CB2 knockout (CB2R k/o) mice. Additionally, a gene expression profile of purified T-cells from MLR cultures generated using a PCR T-cell activation array showed that O-1966 decreased mRNA expression of CD40 ligand and CyclinD3, and increased mRNA expression of Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2), Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 5 (SOCS5), and IL-10. The increase in IL-10 was confirmed by measuring IL-10 protein levels in MLR culture supernatants. Further, an increase in the percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) was observed in MLR cultures. Pretreatment with anti-IL-10 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibition of proliferation and blocked the increase of Tregs. Additionally, O-1966 treatment caused a dose-related decrease in the expression of CD4 in MLR cultures from wild-type, but not CB2R k/o, mice. These data support the potential of CB2-selective agonists as useful therapeutic agents to prolong graft survival in transplant patients, and strengthens their potential as a new class of immunosuppressive agents with broader applicability.

  7. Fatty acid metabolic reprogramming via mTOR-mediated inductions of PPARγ directs early activation of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Angela, Mulki; Endo, Yusuke; Asou, Hikari K.; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tumes, Damon J.; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Yokote, Koutaro; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    To fulfil the bioenergetic requirements for increased cell size and clonal expansion, activated T cells reprogramme their metabolic signatures from energetically quiescent to activated. However, the molecular mechanisms and essential components controlling metabolic reprogramming in T cells are not well understood. Here, we show that the mTORC1–PPARγ pathway is crucial for the fatty acid uptake programme in activated CD4+ T cells. This pathway is required for full activation and rapid proliferation of naive and memory CD4+ T cells. PPARγ directly binds and induces genes associated with fatty acid uptake in CD4+ T cells in both mice and humans. The PPARγ-dependent fatty acid uptake programme is critical for metabolic reprogramming. Thus, we provide important mechanistic insights into the metabolic reprogramming mechanisms that govern the expression of key enzymes, fatty acid metabolism and the acquisition of an activated phenotype during CD4+ T cell activation. PMID:27901044

  8. Cigarette Smoke inhibits ROCK2 activation in T cells and modulates IL-22 production

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chien-Huan; Gupta, Sanjay; Geraghty, Patrick; Foronjy, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions are known to play a key role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is one of the strongest environmental risk factors associated with RA and has been shown to mediate a range of complex immunomodulatory effects from decreased T and B cell activation to depressed phagocytic function. The effects of CS on the function of TH17 cells, one of the key TH effector subsets implicated in RA pathogenesis, are not fully understood. IRF4 is one of the crucial transcription factors involved in TH-17 differentiation and is absolutely required for the production of IL-17 and IL-21 but, interestingly, inhibits the synthesis of IL-22. The production of IL-17 and IL-21 by IRF4 can be augmented by its phosphorylation by the serine-threonine kinase ROCK2. Given that CS has been reported to increase ROCK activity in endothelial cells, here we investigated the effects of CS on the ROCK2-IRF4 axis in T cells. Surprisingly, we found that CS leads to decreased ROCK2 activation and IRF4 phosphorylation in T cells. This effect was associated with increased IL-22 production. Using a GEF pull-down assay we furthermore identify ARHGEF1 as a key upstream regulator of ROCK2 whose activity in T cells is inhibited by CS. Thus CS can inhibit the ROCK2-IRF4 axis and modulate T cell production of IL-22. PMID:26882474

  9. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion Delays T Cell Activation and Effector Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Margoles, Lindsay M.; Mittal, Rohit; Klingensmith, Nathan J.; Lyons, John D.; Liang, Zhe; Serbanescu, Mara A.; Wagener, Maylene E.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in intensive care units in the US, and it is known that chronic alcohol use is associated with higher incidence of sepsis, longer ICU stays, and higher mortality from sepsis. Both sepsis and chronic alcohol use are associated with immune deficits such as decreased lymphocyte numbers, impaired innate immunity, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, and susceptibility to infections; however, understanding of specific pathways of interaction or synergy between these two states of immune dysregulation is lacking. This study therefore sought to elucidate mechanisms underlying the immune dysregulation observed during sepsis in the setting of chronic alcohol exposure. Using a murine model of chronic ethanol ingestion followed by sepsis induction via cecal ligation and puncture, we determined that while CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from alcohol fed mice eventually expressed the same cellular activation markers (CD44, CD69, and CD43) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, TNF) as their water fed counterparts, there was an overall delay in the acquisition of these phenotypes. This early lag in T cell activation was associated with significantly reduced IL-2 production at a later timepoint in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments in alcohol sepsis, as well as with a reduced accumulation of CD8dim activated effectors. Taken together, these data suggest that delayed T cell activation may result in qualitative differences in the immune response to sepsis in the setting of chronic alcohol ingestion. PMID:27861506

  10. Roles of calpain-calpastatin system (CCS) in human T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Mikosik, Anna; Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Daca, Agnieszka; Henc, Izabella; Frąckowiak, Joanna E.; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Foerster, Jerzy; Page, Aurelie Le; Bryl, Ewa; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M.

    2016-01-01

    The immune response is determined by the speed of the T cell reaction to antigens assured by a state of readiness for proliferation and cytokine secretion. Proliferation, apoptosis and motion of many cell types are controlled by cytoplasmic proteases - μ- and m-calpain - and their inhibitor calpastatin, together forming the “calpain-calpastatin system” (CCS), assumed to modify their targets only upon activation-dependent cytoplasmic Ca2+ increase. Contrastingly to this notion, using quantitative real time PCR and semiquantitative flow cytometry respectively, we show here that the CCS genes are constitutively expressed, and that both calpains are constitutively active in resting, circulating human CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that calpain inhibition in the resting T cells prevents them from proliferation in vitro and greatly reduces secretion of multiple cytokines. The mechanistic reason for these effects of calpain inhibition on T cell functions might be the demonstrated significant reduction of the expression of active (phosphorylated) upstream signalling molecules, including the phospholipase C gamma, p56Lck and NFκB, in the inhibitor-treated cells. Thus, we propose that the constitutive, self-regulatory calpain-calpastatin system activity in resting human T cells is a necessary, controlling element of their readiness for complex and effective response to antigenic challenge. PMID:27835610

  11. Malt1 ubiquitination triggers NF-kappaB signaling upon T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Wegener, Elmar; Welteke, Verena; Ferch, Uta; Arslan, Seda Cöl; Ruland, Jürgen; Scheidereit, Claus; Krappmann, Daniel

    2007-11-14

    Triggering of antigen receptors on lymphocytes is critical for initiating adaptive immune response against pathogens. T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement induces the formation of the Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 (CBM) complex that is essential for activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK)/NF-kappaB pathway. However, the molecular mechanisms that link CBM complex formation to IKK activation remain unclear. Here we report that Malt1 is polyubiquitinated upon T-cell activation. Ubiquitin chains on Malt1 provide a docking surface for the recruitment of the IKK regulatory subunit NEMO/IKKgamma. TRAF6 associates with Malt1 in response to T-cell activation and can function as an E3 ligase for Malt1 in vitro and in vivo, mediating lysine 63-linked ubiquitination of Malt1. Multiple lysine residues in the C-terminus of Malt1 serve as acceptor sites for the assembly of polyubiquitin chains. Malt1 mutants that lack C-terminal ubiquitin acceptor lysines are impaired in rescuing NF-kappaB signaling and IL-2 production in Malt1-/- T cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that induced Malt1 ubiquitination is critical for the engagement of CBM and IKK complexes, thereby directing TCR signals to the canonical NF-kappaB pathway.

  12. In vivo activity of a nonspecific T cell-replacing factor.

    PubMed

    Kindred, B; Bösing-Schneider, R; Corley, R B

    1979-01-01

    Nonspecific T cell-replacing factors prepared as supernatants from mixed lymphocyte cultures or concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells are active in vivo iv injected into nude mice at least 3 days before antigen. The supernatants appear to act by enhancing the week IgM responses that occur in untreated nudes. Secondary responses and IgG antibody were not found.

  13. Targeting dendritic cells to accelerate T-cell activation overcomes a bottleneck in tuberculosis vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kristin L.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Das, Shibali; Gopal, Radha; Horne, William; Connell, Terry D.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Kolls, Jay K.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine that induces sterilizing immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been elusive. Absence of sterilizing immunity induced by TB vaccines may be due to delayed activation of mucosal dendritic cells (DCs), and subsequent delay in antigen presentation and activation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. Here we show that pulmonary delivery of activated M. tuberculosis antigen-primed DCs into vaccinated mice, at the time of M. tuberculosis exposure, can overcome the delay in accumulation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. In addition, activating endogenous host CD103+ DCs and the CD40–CD40L pathway can similarly induce rapid accumulation of vaccine-induced lung CD4+ T-cell responses and limit early M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, our study provides proof of concept that targeting mucosal DCs can accelerate vaccine-induced T-cell responses on M. tuberculosis infection, and provide insights to overcome bottlenecks in TB vaccine efficacy. PMID:28004802

  14. Transcriptional regulation by Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Luis; Lozano, Juan J; Valdor, Rut; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Ramirez, Pablo; Parrilla, Pascual; Aparicio, Pedro; Sumoy, Lauro; Yélamos, José

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as an integral part of the gene expression regulatory machinery during development and in response to specific cellular signals. PARP-1 might modulate gene expression through its catalytic activity leading to poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of nuclear proteins or by its physical association with relevant proteins. Recently, we have shown that PARP-1 is activated during T cell activation. However, the proposed role of PARP-1 in reprogramming T cell gene expression upon activation remains largely unexplored. Results In the present study we use oligonucleotide microarray analysis to gain more insight into the role played by PARP-1 during the gene expression reprogramming that takes place in T cells upon activation with anti-CD3 stimulation alone, or in combination with anti-CD28 co-stimulation. We have identified several groups of genes with expression modulated by PARP-1. The expression of 129 early-response genes to anti-CD3 seems to be regulated by PARP-1 either in a positive (45 genes) or in a negative manner (84 genes). Likewise, in the presence of co-stimulation (anti-CD3 + anti-CD28 stimulation), the expression of 203 genes is also regulated by PARP-1 either up (173 genes) or down (30 genes). Interestingly, PARP-1 deficiency significantly alters expression of genes associated with the immune response such as chemokines and genes involved in the Th1/Th2 balance. Conclusion This study provides new insights into changes in gene expression mediated by PARP-1 upon T cell activation. Pathway analysis of PARP-1 as a nuclear signalling molecule in T cells would be of relevance for the future development of new therapeutic approaches targeting PARP-1 in the acquired immune response. PMID:18412984

  15. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  16. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  17. Positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation through kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Mustelin, Tomas; Taskén, Kjetil

    2003-01-01

    The sequence of events in T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling leading to T-cell activation involves regulation of a number of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and the phosphorylation status of many of their substrates. Proximal signalling pathways involve PTKs of the Src, Syk, Csk and Tec families, adapter proteins and effector enzymes in a highly organized tyrosine-phosphorylation cascade. In intact cells, tyrosine phosphorylation is rapidly reversible and generally of a very low stoichiometry even under induced conditions due to the fact that the enzymes removing phosphate from tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), have a capacity that is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the PTKs. It follows that a relatively minor change in the PTK/PTPase balance can have a major impact on net tyrosine phosphorylation and thereby on activation and proliferation of T-cells. This review focuses on the involvement of PTKs and PTPases in positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation, the emerging theme of reciprocal regulation of each type of enzyme by the other, as well as regulation of phosphotyrosine turnover by Ser/Thr phosphorylation and regulation of localization of signal components. PMID:12485116

  18. TLR3-induced activation of mast cells modulates CD8+ T-cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Orinska, Zane; Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-08-01

    Mast cells play an important role in host defense against various pathogens, but their role in viral infection has not been clarified in detail. dsRNA, synthesized by various types of viruses and mimicked by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) is recognized by Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). In this study, we demonstrate that poly(I:C) injection in vivo potently stimulates peritoneal mast cells to up-regulate a number of different costimulatory molecules. Therefore, we examined the expression and the functional significance of TLR3 activation in mast cells. Mast cells express TLR3 on the cell surface and intracellularly. After stimulation of mast cells with poly(I:C) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), TLR3 is phosphorylated and the expression of key antiviral response cytokines (interferon beta, ISG15) and chemokines (IP10, RANTES) is upregulated. Interestingly, mast cells activated via TLR3-poly(I:C) potently stimulate CD8+ T-cell recruitment. Indeed, mast-cell-deficient mice (KitW/KitW-v) given an intraperitoneal injection of poly(I:C) show a decreased CD8+ T-cell recruitment, whereas granulocytes normally migrate to the peritoneal cavity. Mast-cell reconstitution of KitW/KitW-v mice normalizes the CD8+ T-cell influx. Thus, mast cells stimulated through engagement of TLR3 are potent regulators of CD8+ T-cell activities in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Proteolytic degradation of intestinal mucosal extracellular matrix after lamina propria T cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Pender, S L; Lionetti, P; Murch, S H; Wathan, N; MacDonald, T T

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteoglycans, consisting of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains covalently linked to a protein core, are a major component of the extracellular matrix of the intestinal lamina propria. AIMS: This study investigated the effects of lamina propria T cell activation on the proteoglycan component of the matrix. METHODS: The high degree of sulphation of GAGs means that they are polyanionic and thus can be visualised in tissue sections by means of colloidal-gold labelled cationic probes. RESULTS: In human fetal small intestine there is a dense meshwork of anionic residues in the lamina propria and basement membrane. When explants of human fetal small intestine are cultured ex vivo, and resident lamina propria T cells are activated with pokeweed mitogen, mucosal destruction occurs within three days. This is associated with the rapid loss of anionic sites from the lamina propria. Dermatan sulphate proteoglycan is lost from the tissue and is present at increased concentrations in the organ culture supernatants, indicating that T cell activation has led to solubilisation of lamina propria proteoglycans. Tissue destruction and loss of anionic residues are inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by dexamethasone, and by the protease inhibitor, alpha 2 macroglobulin. CONCLUSIONS: Proteolytic degradation of the lamina propria may therefore be a mechanism by which T cell hypersensitivity injures the intestinal mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8977345

  20. Epipolymorphisms associated with the clinical outcome of autoimmune arthritis affect CD4+ T cell activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Roberto; Rossetti, Maura; Whitaker, John W; Wang, Wei; Lovell, Daniel J; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-11-29

    Multifactorial diseases, including autoimmune juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), result from a complex interplay between genetics and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to integrate such gene-environment interactions, fine-tuning gene expression, and possibly contributing to immune system dysregulation. Although anti-TNF therapy has strongly increased JIA remission rates, it is not curative and up to 80% of patients flare upon treatment withdrawal. Thus, a crucial unmet medical and scientific need is to understand the immunological mechanisms associated with remission or flare to inform clinical decisions. Here, we explored the CD4(+) T-cell DNA methylome of 68 poly-articular and extended oligo-articular JIA patients, before and after anti-TNF therapy withdrawal, to identify features associated with maintenance of inactive disease. Individual CpG sites were clustered in coherent modules without a priori knowledge of their function through network analysis. The methylation level of several CpG modules, specifically those enriched in CpG sites belonging to genes that mediate T-cell activation, uniquely correlated with clinical activity. Differences in DNA methylation were already detectable at the time of therapy discontinuation, suggesting epigenetic predisposition. RNA profiling also detected differences in T-cell activation markers (including HLA-DR) but, overall, its sensitivity was lower than epigenetic profiling. Changes to the T-cell activation signature at the protein level were detectable by flow cytometry, confirming the biological relevance of the observed alterations in methylation. Our work proposes epigenetic discrimination between clinical activity states, and reveals T-cell-related biological functions tied to, and possibly predicting or causing, clinical outcome.

  1. Simvastatin requires activation in accessory cells to modulate T-cell responses in asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Yakin, Yakup; Körber, Sandra; Grensemann, Barbara; Bendella, Zeynep; Boyaci, Niyazi; Gallert, Willem-Jakob; Yanik, Sarah Derya; Jungck, David; Koch, Andrea

    2016-10-05

    T-cell-dependent airway and systemic inflammation triggers the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Retrospective studies suggest that simvastatin has anti-inflammatory effects in both diseases but it is unclear, which cell types are targeted. We hypothesized that simvastatin modulates T-cell activity. Circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, either pure, co-cultured with monocytes or alveolar macrophages (AM) or in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), were ex vivo activated towards Th1/Tc1 or Th2/Tc2 and incubated with simvastatin. Markers for Th1/Tc1 (IFNγ) and Th2/Tc2 (IL-5, IL-13) were measured by ELISA; with PBMCs this was done comparative between 11 healthy never-smokers, 11 current smokers without airflow limitation, 14 smokers with COPD and 11 never-smokers with atopic asthma. T-cell activation induced IFNγ, IL-5 and IL-13 in the presence and absence of accessory cells. Simvastatin did not modulate cytokine expression in pure T-cell fractions. β-hydroxy-simvastatin acid (activated simvastatin) suppressed IL-5 and IL-13 in pure Th2- and Tc2-cells. Simvastatin suppressed IL-5 and IL-13 in Th2-cells co-cultivated with monocytes or AM, which was partially reversed by the carboxylesterase inhibitor benzil. Simvastatin suppressed IL-5 production of Th2/Tc2-cells in PBMCs without differences between cohorts and IL-13 stronger in never-smokers and asthma compared to COPD. Simvastatin induced IFNγ in Th1/Tc1-cells in PBMCs of all cohorts except asthmatics. Simvastatin requires activation in accessory cells likely by carboxylesterase to suppress IL-5 and IL-13 in Th2/Tc2-cells. The effects on Il-13 are partially reduced in COPD. Asthma pathogenesis prevents simvastatin-induced IFNγ up-regulation. Simvastatin has anti-inflammatory effects that could be of interest for asthma therapy.

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of the Apoptosis Function in Human Activated T Cells.

    PubMed

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The apoptosis function can be monitored on human lymphocytes by quantifying the induced-death upon apoptotic stimuli involving either the extrinsic or the intrinsic pathway on in vitro activated T cells. Her, we describe an in vitro assay allowing the monitoring of three different apoptosis pathways: (1) the FAS-induced pathway, (2) the activation-induced cell death (AICD), and (3) the death induced by starvation of the cells, called activated-cell autonomous death (ACAD).

  3. In vitro activation and differentiation of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into HCV core- and NS3-specific armed effector cells: a new role for CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnadas, Deepa K; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyrrell, Lorne J; Agrawal, Babita

    2009-01-01

    Viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been correlated with strong, multi-specific and sustained T cell responses. The number of functionally active effector T cells determines the outcome of infection. Only a small number of antigen-specific naïve T cells are originally present. Upon infection, they undergo activation, clonal expansion and differentiation to become effector cells. In this study, we determined the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to prime T cells in vitro to become effector cells upon stimulation with various TLR ligands or IFNalpha. T cell priming and activation was determined by proliferation and production of effector molecules, IFN-gamma and Granzyme B (GrB). HCV Core-specific T cells showed significant increase in proliferation, and the number of HCV Core-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-gamma and GrB was higher than control or NS3-specific T cells. These in vitro-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells exhibit the phenotype of just-activated and/or armed effector lymphocytes confirming the transition of naïve T cells to effector cells. This is the first study demonstrating the activation of GrB+CD4+ T cells against antigen(s) derived from HCV. Our study suggests a novel role of CD4+ T cells in immunity against HCV.

  4. Aurora A drives early signalling and vesicle dynamics during T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Blas-Rus, Noelia; Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Borroto, Aldo; Camafeita, Emilio; Jorge, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jesús; Alarcón, Balbino; Malumbres, Marcos; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-04-19

    Aurora A is a serine/threonine kinase that contributes to the progression of mitosis by inducing microtubule nucleation. Here we have identified an unexpected role for Aurora A kinase in antigen-driven T-cell activation. We find that Aurora A is phosphorylated at the immunological synapse (IS) during TCR-driven cell contact. Inhibition of Aurora A with pharmacological agents or genetic deletion in human or mouse T cells severely disrupts the dynamics of microtubules and CD3ζ-bearing vesicles at the IS. The absence of Aurora A activity also impairs the activation of early signalling molecules downstream of the TCR and the expression of IL-2, CD25 and CD69. Aurora A inhibition causes delocalized clustering of Lck at the IS and decreases phosphorylation levels of tyrosine kinase Lck, thus indicating Aurora A is required for maintaining Lck active. These findings implicate Aurora A in the propagation of the TCR activation signal.

  5. Aurora A drives early signalling and vesicle dynamics during T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Blas-Rus, Noelia; Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Borroto, Aldo; Camafeita, Emilio; Jorge, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jesús; Alarcón, Balbino; Malumbres, Marcos; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Aurora A is a serine/threonine kinase that contributes to the progression of mitosis by inducing microtubule nucleation. Here we have identified an unexpected role for Aurora A kinase in antigen-driven T-cell activation. We find that Aurora A is phosphorylated at the immunological synapse (IS) during TCR-driven cell contact. Inhibition of Aurora A with pharmacological agents or genetic deletion in human or mouse T cells severely disrupts the dynamics of microtubules and CD3ζ-bearing vesicles at the IS. The absence of Aurora A activity also impairs the activation of early signalling molecules downstream of the TCR and the expression of IL-2, CD25 and CD69. Aurora A inhibition causes delocalized clustering of Lck at the IS and decreases phosphorylation levels of tyrosine kinase Lck, thus indicating Aurora A is required for maintaining Lck active. These findings implicate Aurora A in the propagation of the TCR activation signal. PMID:27091106

  6. Whole Blood Activation Results in Altered T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production Profiles by Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry, a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a whole-blood activation culture has been described. In this study, whole blood activation was compared to traditional PBMC activation and the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells, T cell subsets and monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: For T cell cytokine assessment (IFNg/IL-10 and IL-21/L-4) following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a Significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture and (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. Four-color analysiS was used to allow assessment of cytokine production by specific T cell subsets. It was found that IFNgamma production was significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were Significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines (IL-1a/IL-12 and TNFa/IL-10) in conjunction with CD14. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFa. equally well in both culture systems, however monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated in whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and TNFa producing

  7. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Reuterswärd, Philippa; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge; Kiessling, Rolf; Kogner, Per

    2016-01-01

    Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor.

  8. Activation of the STAT6 transcription factor in Jurkat T-cells by the herpesvirus saimiri Tip protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, In-Gyu; Choi, Myung-Sik; Kim, Ik-Sang; Choi, Joong-Kook; Jung, Jae Ung

    2012-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS), a T-lymphotropic monkey herpesvirus, induces fulminant T-cell lymphoma in non-natural primate hosts. In addition, it can immortalize human T-cells in vitro. HVS tyrosine kinase-interacting protein (Tip) is an essential viral gene required for T-cell transformation both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that Tip interacts with the STAT6 transcription factor and induces phosphorylation of STAT6 in T-cells. The interaction with STAT6 requires the Tyr127 residue and Lck-binding domain of Tip, which are indispensable for interleukin (IL)-2-independent T-cell transformation by HVS. It was also demonstrated that Tip induces nuclear translocation of STAT6, as well as activation of STAT6-dependent transcription in Jurkat T-cells. Interestingly, the phosphorylated STAT6 mainly colocalized with vesicles containing Tip within T-cells, but was barely detectable in the nucleus. However, nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT6 and transcriptional activation of STAT6 by IL-4 stimulation were not affected significantly in T-cells expressing Tip. Collectively, these findings suggest that the constitutive activation of STAT6 by Tip in T-cells may contribute to IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by HVS. PMID:22012462

  9. Murine allogeneic CD19 CAR T cells harbor potent antileukemic activity but have the potential to mediate lethal GVHD.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Elad; Yang, Yinmeng; Qin, Haiying; Chien, Christopher D; Kochenderfer, James N; Fry, Terry J

    2016-03-10

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) persisting or relapsing following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has a dismal prognosis. Success with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells offers an opportunity to treat these patients with leukemia-redirected donor-derived T cells, which may be more functional than T cells derived from patients with leukemia but have the potential to mediate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We, together with others, have previously demonstrated tumor-specific T-cell dysfunction in the allogeneic environment. Here, we studied CAR T-cell function following BMT using an immunocompetent murine model of minor mismatched allogeneic transplantation followed by donor-derived CD19-CAR T cells. Allogeneic donor-derived CD19-CAR T cells eliminated residual ALL with equal potency to those administered after syngeneic BMT. Surprisingly, allogeneic CAR T cells mediated lethal acute GVHD with early mortality, which is atypical for this minor mismatch model. We demonstrated that both allogeneic and syngeneic CAR T cells show initial expansion as effector T cells, with a higher peak but rapid deletion of allogeneic CAR T cells. Interestingly, CAR-mediated acute GVHD was only seen in the presence of leukemia, suggesting CAR-target interactions induced GVHD. Indeed, serum interleukin (IL)-6 was elevated only in the presence of both leukemia and CAR T cells, and IL-6 neutralization ameliorated the severity of GVHD in a delayed donor lymphocyte infusion model. Finally, allogeneic CD4(+) CAR T cells were responsible for GVHD, which correlated with their ability to produce IL-6 upon CAR stimulation. Altogether, we demonstrate that donor-derived allogeneic CAR T cells are active but have the capacity to drive GVHD.

  10. Reconstitution of CD4 T Cells in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid after Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Kenneth S.; Vinton, Carol; Hage, Chadi A.; Kohli, Lisa M.; Twigg, Homer L.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Zwickl, Beth; Waltz, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Douek, Daniel C.; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The massive depletion of gastrointestinal-tract CD4 T cells is a hallmark of the acute phase of HIV infection. In contrast, the depletion of the lower-respiratory-tract mucosal CD4 T cells as measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is more moderate and similar to the depletion of CD4 T cells observed in peripheral blood (PB). To understand better the dynamics of disease pathogenesis and the potential for the reconstitution of CD4 T cells in the lung and PB following the administration of effective antiretroviral therapy, we studied cell-associated viral loads, CD4 T-cell frequencies, and phenotypic and functional profiles of antigen-specific CD4 T cells from BAL fluid and blood before and after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The major findings to emerge were the following: (i) BAL CD4 T cells are not massively depleted or preferentially infected by HIV compared to levels for PB; (ii) BAL CD4 T cells reconstitute after the initiation of HAART, and their infection frequencies decrease; (iii) BAL CD4 T-cell reconstitution appears to occur via the local proliferation of resident BAL CD4 T cells rather than redistribution; and (iv) BAL CD4 T cells are more polyfunctional than CD4 T cells in blood, and their functional profile is relatively unchanged after the initiation of HAART. Taken together, these data suggest mechanisms for mucosal CD4 T-cell depletion and interventions that might aid in the reconstitution of mucosal CD4 T cells. PMID:20610726

  11. Gamma Delta T-Cells Regulate Wound Myeloid Cell Activity After Burn

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    GAMMA DELTA T CELLS REGULATE WOUND MYELOID CELL ACTIVITY AFTER BURN Meenakshi Rani ,* Qiong Zhang,* and Martin G. Schwacha*† *Department of Surgery...Cell Activity After Burn 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Rani M., Zhang Q., Schwacha M. G., 5d...WT mice. 138 SHOCK VOL. 42, NO. 2 RANI ET AL. Copyright © 2014 by the Shock Society. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. systemic

  12. Hyaluronan synthesis is necessary for autoreactive T-cell trafficking, activation, and Th1 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Hedwich F.; Rieck, Mary; Gurevich, Irina; Nagy, Nadine; Negrin, Robert S.; Wight, Thomas N.; Steinman, Lawrence; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) accumulates at sites of autoimmune inflammation, including white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS), but its functional importance in pathogenesis is unclear. We have evaluated the impact of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an oral inhibitor of HA synthesis, on disease progression in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS. Treatment with 4-MU decreases the incidence of EAE, delays its onset, and reduces the severity of established disease. 4-MU inhibits the activation of autoreactive T cells and prevents their polarization toward a Th1 phenotype. Instead, 4-MU promotes polarization toward a Th2 phenotpye and induction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Further, 4-MU hastens trafficking of T cells through secondary lymphoid organs, impairs the infiltration of T cells into the CNS parenchyma, and limits astrogliosis. Together, these data suggest that HA synthesis is necessary for disease progression in EAE and that treatment with 4-MU may be a potential therapeutic strategy in CNS autoimmunity. Considering that 4-MU is already a therapeutic, called hymecromone, that is approved to treat biliary spasm in humans, we propose that it could be repurposed to treat MS. PMID:26787861

  13. Hyaluronan synthesis is necessary for autoreactive T-cell trafficking, activation, and Th1 polarization.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Hedwich F; Rieck, Mary; Gurevich, Irina; Nagy, Nadine; Butte, Manish J; Negrin, Robert S; Wight, Thomas N; Steinman, Lawrence; Bollyky, Paul L

    2016-02-02

    The extracellular matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) accumulates at sites of autoimmune inflammation, including white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS), but its functional importance in pathogenesis is unclear. We have evaluated the impact of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an oral inhibitor of HA synthesis, on disease progression in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS. Treatment with 4-MU decreases the incidence of EAE, delays its onset, and reduces the severity of established disease. 4-MU inhibits the activation of autoreactive T cells and prevents their polarization toward a Th1 phenotype. Instead, 4-MU promotes polarization toward a Th2 phenotpye and induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Further, 4-MU hastens trafficking of T cells through secondary lymphoid organs, impairs the infiltration of T cells into the CNS parenchyma, and limits astrogliosis. Together, these data suggest that HA synthesis is necessary for disease progression in EAE and that treatment with 4-MU may be a potential therapeutic strategy in CNS autoimmunity. Considering that 4-MU is already a therapeutic, called hymecromone, that is approved to treat biliary spasm in humans, we propose that it could be repurposed to treat MS.

  14. Removal of regulatory T cell activity reverses hyporesponsiveness and leads to filarial parasite clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew D; LeGoff, Laetitia; Harris, Anjanette; Malone, Eva; Allen, Judith E; Maizels, Rick M

    2005-04-15

    Human filarial parasites cause chronic infection associated with long-term down-regulation of the host's immune response. We show here that CD4+ T cell regulation is the main determinant of parasite survival. In a laboratory model of infection, using Litomosoides sigmodontis in BALB/c mice, parasites establish for >60 days in the thoracic cavity. During infection, CD4+ T cells at this site express increasing levels of CD25, CTLA-4, and glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor family-related gene (GITR), and by day 60, up to 70% are CTLA-4(+)GITR(high), with a lesser fraction coexpressing CD25. Upon Ag stimulation, CD4(+)CTLA-4(+)GITR(high) cells are hyporesponsive for proliferation and cytokine production. To test the hypothesis that regulatory T cell activity maintains hyporesponsiveness and prolongs infection, we treated mice with Abs to CD25 and GITR. Combined Ab treatment was able to overcome an established infection, resulting in a 73% reduction in parasite numbers (p < 0.01). Parasite killing was accompanied by increased Ag-specific immune responses and markedly reduced levels of CTLA-4 expression. The action of the CD25(+)GITR+ cells was IL-10 independent as in vivo neutralization of IL-10R did not restore the ability of the immune system to kill parasites. These data suggest that regulatory T cells act, in an IL-10-independent manner, to suppress host immunity to filariasis.

  15. Microbial antigen mimics activate diabetogenic CD8 T cells in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ningwen; Peng, Jian; Liu, Fuqiang; Hu, Youjia; Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Both animal model and human studies indicate that commensal bacteria may modify type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, the underlying mechanisms by which gut microbes could trigger or protect from diabetes are not fully understood, especially the interaction of commensal bacteria with pathogenic CD8 T cells. In this study, using islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit–related protein (IGRP)–reactive CD8 T cell receptor NY8.3 transgenic nonobese diabetic mice, we demonstrated that MyD88 strongly modulates CD8+ T cell–mediated T1D development via the gut microbiota. Some microbial protein peptides share significant homology with IGRP. Both the microbial peptide mimic of Fusobacteria and the bacteria directly activate IGRP-specific NY8.3 T cells and promote diabetes development. Thus, we provide evidence of molecular mimicry between microbial antigens and an islet autoantigen and a novel mechanism by which the diabetogenicity of CD8+ T cells can be regulated by innate immunity and the gut microbiota. PMID:27621416

  16. Cross-dressed dendritic cells drive memory CD8+ T-cell activation after viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wakim, Linda M; Bevan, Michael J

    2011-03-31

    After an infection, cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors proliferate and become effector cells by recognizing foreign peptides in the groove of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules expressed by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Professional APCs specialized for T-cell activation acquire viral antigen either by becoming infected themselves (direct presentation) or by phagocytosis of infected cells, followed by transfer of antigen to the cytosol, processing and MHC class I loading in a process referred to as cross-presentation. An alternative way, referred to as 'cross-dressing', by which an uninfected APC could present antigen was postulated to be by the transfer of preformed peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of an infected cell to the APC without the need of further processing. Here we show that this mechanism exists and boosts the antiviral response of mouse memory CD8(+) T cells. A number of publications have demonstrated sharing of peptide-loaded MHC molecules in vitro. Our in vitro experiments demonstrate that cross-dressing APCs do not acquire peptide-MHC complexes in the form of exosomes released by donor cells. Rather, the APCs and donor cells have to contact each other for the transfer to occur. After a viral infection, we could isolate cross-dressed APCs able to present viral antigen in vitro. Furthermore, using the diphtheria toxin system to selectively eliminate APCs that could only acquire viral peptide-MHC complexes by cross-dressing, we show that such presentation can promote the expansion of resting memory T cells. Notably, naive T cells were excluded from taking part in the response. Cross-dressing is a mechanism of antigen presentation used by dendritic cells that may have a significant role in activating previously primed CD8(+) T cells.

  17. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  18. Cell cycle progression following naive T cell activation is independent of Jak3/common gamma-chain cytokine signals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Lin, Tsung H; Appell, Kenneth C; Berg, Leslie J

    2009-10-01

    T cell proliferation following activation is an essential aspect of the adaptive immune response. Multiple factors, such as TCR signaling, costimulation, and signals from cytokines, each contribute to determine the magnitude of T cell expansion. In this report, we examine in detail the role of Jak3/common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines in promoting cell cycle progression and proliferation of naive T cells. Using naive CD4+ T cells from Jak3-deficient mice and wild-type CD4+ T cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of Jak3, we find that these cytokine signals are not required for proliferation; instead, they are important for the survival of activated T cells. In addition, we show that the percentage of cells entering the cell cycle and the percentage of cells in each round of cell division are comparable between Jak3-deficent and wild-type T cells. Furthermore, cell cycle progression and the regulated expression of key cell cycle proteins are independent of Jak3/common gamma-chain cytokine signals. These findings hold true over a wide range of TCR signal strengths. However, when CD28 costimulatory signals, but not TCR signals, are limiting, Jak3-dependent cytokine signals become necessary for the proliferation of naive T cells. Because CD28 signaling has been found to be dispensable for autoreactive T cell responses, these data suggest the potential for interfering with autoimmune T cell responses by inhibition of Jak3 signaling.

  19. Idelalisib and caffeine reduce suppression of T cell responses mediated by activated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Barry D.; MacPherson, Sean A.; McKenzie, Judith L.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with T cell dysfunction. Activated CLL cells are found within the lymphoid tumor micro-environment and overcoming immuno-suppression induced by these cells may improve anti-CLL immune responses. However, the mechanisms by which activated CLL cells inhibit T cell responses, and reagents targeting such mechanisms have not been identified. Here we demonstrate that the ability of in vitro activated CLL cells to suppress T cell proliferation is not reversed by the presence of ecto-nuclease inhibitors or blockade of IL-10, PD-1 and CTLA-4 pathways. Caffeine is both an adenosine receptor antagonist and a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, p110δ (PI3Kδ) inhibitor and, at physiologically relevant levels, significantly reversed suppression. Significant reversal of suppression was also observed with the PI3Kδ specific inhibitor Idelalisib but not with adenosine receptor specific antagonists. Furthermore, addition of caffeine or Idelalisib to activated CLL cells significantly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream kinase of PI3K, but did not affect CLL viability. These results suggest that caffeine, in common with Idelalisib, reduces the immuno-suppressive activity of activated CLL cells by inhibiting PI3Kδ. These findings raise the possibility that these compounds may provide a useful therapeutic adjunct by reducing immuno-suppression within the tumor micro-environment of CLL. PMID:28257435

  20. Balancing speed and accuracy of polyclonal T cell activation: a role for extracellular feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extracellular feedback is an abundant module of intercellular communication networks, yet a detailed understanding of its role is still lacking. Here, we study interactions between polyclonal activated T cells that are mediated by IL-2 extracellular feedback as a model system. Results Using mathematical modeling we show that extracellular feedback can give rise to opposite outcomes: competition or cooperation between interacting T cells, depending on their relative levels of activation. Furthermore, the outcome of the interaction also depends on the relative timing of activation of the cells. A critical time window exists after which a cell that has been more strongly activated nevertheless cannot exclude an inferior competitor. Conclusions In a number of experimental studies of polyclonal T-cell systems, outcomes ranging from cooperation to competition as well as time dependent competition were observed. Our model suggests that extracellular feedback can contribute to these observed behaviors as it translates quantitative differences in T cells’ activation strength and in their relative activation time into qualitatively different outcomes. We propose extracellular feedback as a general mechanism that can balance speed and accuracy – choosing the most suitable responders out of a polyclonal population under the clock of an escalating threat. PMID:22925037

  1. Novel APC-like properties of human NK cells directly regulate T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Jacob; Gonen-Gross, Tsufit; Fitchett, Jonathan; Rowe, Tony; Daniels, Mark; Arnon, Tal I.; Gazit, Roi; Joseph, Aviva; Schjetne, Karoline W.; Steinle, Alexander; Porgador, Angel; Mevorach, Dror; Goldman-Wohl, Debra; Yagel, Simcha; LaBarre, Michael J.; Buckner, Jane H.; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2004-01-01

    Initiation of the adaptive immune response is dependent on the priming of naive T cells by APCs. Proteomic analysis of unactivated and activated human NK cell membrane–enriched fractions demonstrated that activated NK cells can efficiently stimulate T cells, since they upregulate MHC class II molecules and multiple ligands for TCR costimulatory molecules. Furthermore, by manipulating antigen administration, we show that NK cells possess multiple independent unique pathways for antigen uptake. These results highlight NK cell–mediated cytotoxicity and specific ligand recognition by cell surface–activating receptors on NK cells as unique mechanisms for antigen capturing and presentation. In addition, we analyzed the T cell–activating potential of human NK cells derived from different clinical conditions, such as inflamed tonsils and noninfected and CMV-infected uterine decidual samples, and from transporter-associated processing antigen 2–deficient patients. This in vivo analysis revealed that proinflammatory, but not immune-suppressive, microenvironmental requirements can selectively dictate upregulation of T cell–activating molecules on NK cells. Taken together, these observations offer new and unexpected insights into the direct interactions between NK and T cells and suggest novel APC-like activating functions for human NK cells. PMID:15578093

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment responsiveness depends on the degree of CD8+ T cell activation in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Gong, Fang-Qi; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Hu, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) has become the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children and is also a risk factor for ischemic heart disease in adults. However, Kawasaki disease lacks specific laboratory diagnostic indices. Thus, this study analyzed the T cell activation profiles of Kawasaki disease and assessed their value in the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease and the prediction of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) sensitivity. We analyzed human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR), CD69 and CD25 expression on peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the acute phase of KD. We compared the percentages of HLA-DR+/CD69+/CD25+ T cells in the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations of IVIG-effective and IVIG-resistant groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess the diagnostic value of the above parameters. The median percentage of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells and the median ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD25+ T cells were significantly elevated in the patient group compared with those in the control group during the acute phase of KD. Regarding the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease, the area under the ROC curve was 0.939 for the percentage of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells. There was a significant difference in the ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD69+ T cells between IVIG-resistant patients and IVIG-sensitive patients. Regarding IVIG sensitivity, the area under the ROC curve was 0.795 for it. Excessive CD8+ T cell activation, as well as an imbalance between CD8+ T cell activation and inhibition, underlies the pathogenesis of Kawasaki disease. The percentage of CD8+ HLA-DR+ T cells may be used as an index to diagnose Kawasaki disease. IVIG inhibits CD8+ T cell activation, but excessive CD8+ T cell activation may cause IVIG resistance. The ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD69+ T cells may be used as a predictor of IVIG sensitivity.

  3. Prostaglandin synthesis in human T cells: its partial inhibition by lectins and anti-CD3 antibodies as a possible step in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Aussel, C; Mary, D; Fehlmann, M

    1987-05-15

    The human leukemic T cell line Jurkat was used to study arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. We demonstrated that Jurkat cells are able to convert AA into prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxanes. The presence of tritiated 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2, PGA2 (B2), and thromboxane B2 in the culture medium was shown either by thin-layer chromatography after a 4-hr incubation period of [3H]AA-prelabeled Jurkat cells or by using specific radioimmuno assays. PG synthesis was inhibited by both indomethacin and niflumic acid, two cyclooxygenase inhibitors. AA metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway was followed during T cell activation. T cells were activated by lectins or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to trigger the T3-Ti complex and by 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) to mimic IL 1-dependent pathways. Our results show that lectins and anti-CD3 mAb both reduce the amount of PG released by the cells, whereas TPA did not. We confirmed that a combination of TPA and lectins or TPA and anti-CD3 mAb is necessary to obtain full activation of Jurkat cells if this event is monitored by using measurement of IL 2 synthesis. In addition, lectins and anti-CD3 mAb can be replaced by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or niflumic acid. Indeed, a combination of TPA and one of these two drugs induced maximal IL 2 synthesis. These results thus suggest that a reduction in PG synthesis might be a prerequisite to allow the cascade of events involved in T cell activation.

  4. T cells produce an antigen-binding factor with in vivo activity analogous to IgE antibody

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    T cell-dependent activation of resident tissue mast cells is required for the elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions in mice. A T cell-derived antigen-binding factor that transfers the ability to elicit an immediate hypersensitivity-like skin reaction is described and compared with a hybridoma IgE antibody. Both the T cell factor and IgE mediate reactions with increased vascular permeability and both are mast cell dependent, as they are inactive in two different types of mast cell deficient mice (W/Wv and Sl/Sld). The T cell factor was distinguished from IgE by affinity chromatography using specific anti-IgE and anti-factor antibodies and by a shorter duration of passive sensitization. The T cell factor is a suitable candidate for participation in the mechanism by which T cells activate mast cells in delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:6187880

  5. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals a Role for Serine and Threonine Kinases in the Cytoskeletal Reorganization in Early T Cell Receptor Activation in Human Primary T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ruperez, Patricia; Gago-Martinez, Ana; Burlingame, A. L.; Oses-Prieto, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events play a primary role in regulation of almost all aspects of cell function including signal transduction, cell cycle, or apoptosis. Thus far, T cell phosphoproteomics have focused on analysis of phosphotyrosine residues, and little is known about the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in early activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). Therefore, we performed a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis of the global phosphoproteome of human primary T cells in response to 5 min of TCR activation with anti-CD3 antibody. Combining immunoprecipitation with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody, titanium dioxide phosphopeptide enrichment, isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation methodology, and strong cation exchange separation, we were able to identify 2814 phosphopeptides. These unique sites were employed to investigate the site-specific phosphorylation dynamics. Five hundred and seventeen phosphorylation sites showed TCR-responsive changes. We found that upon 5 min of stimulation of the TCR, specific serine and threonine kinase motifs are overrepresented in the set of responsive phosphorylation sites. These phosphorylation events targeted proteins with many different activities and are present in different subcellular locations. Many of these proteins are involved in intracellular signaling cascades related mainly to cytoskeletal reorganization and regulation of small GTPase-mediated signal transduction, probably involved in the formation of the immune synapse. PMID:22499768

  6. In vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine inhibits T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production and significantly increases the frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thueson, Lindsay E; Emmons, Tiffany R; Browning, Dianna L; Kreitinger, Joanna M; Shepherd, David M; Wetzel, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    The herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-[ethylamino]-6-[isopropylamino]-s-triazine) is the most common water contaminant in the United States. Atrazine is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and is classified as an estrogen disrupting compound because it elevates estrogen levels via induction of the enzyme aromatase. Previous studies have shown that atrazine exposure alters the function of innate immune cells such as NK cells, DC, mast cells, and macrophages. In this study we have examined the impact of in vitro atrazine exposure on the activation, proliferation, and effector cytokine production by primary murine CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We found that atrazine exposure significantly inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and accumulation as well as the expression of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the effects were more pronounced in cells from male animals. These effects were partially mimicked by pharmacological reagents that elevate intracellular cAMP levels and addition of exogenous rmIL-2 further inhibited proliferation and CD25 expression. Consistent with these findings, atrazine exposure during T cell activation resulted in a 2- to 5-fold increase in the frequency of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells.

  7. IL-32γ induces chemotaxis of activated T cells via dendritic cell-derived CCL5.

    PubMed

    Son, Mi Hye; Jung, Mi Young; Choi, Seulah; Cho, Daeho; Kim, Tae Sung

    2014-07-18

    Interleukin (IL)-32 has been associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis and Crohn's disease. We have previously reported that IL-32γ, the IL-32 isoform with the highest biological activity, could act as an immune modulator through regulation of dendritic cell (DC) functions in immune responses. Cell locomotion is crucial for induction of an effective immune response. In this study, we investigated the effect and underlying mechanisms of IL-32γ on recruitment of T cells. IL-32γ upregulated the expression of several chemokines including CCL2, CCL4, and CCL5 in the DCs. In particular, IL-32γ significantly increased CCL5 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with JNK and NF-κB inhibitors suppressed IL-32γ-induced CCL5 expression in DCs, indicating that IL-32γ induced CCL5 production through the JNK and NF-κB pathways. Furthermore, supernatants from IL-32γ-treated DCs showed chemotactic activities controlling migration of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and these activities were suppressed by addition of neutralizing anti-CCL5 antibody. These results show that IL-32γ effectively promotes migration of activated T cells via CCL5 production in DCs. The chemotactic potential of IL-32γ may explain the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-32 and the pathologic role of IL-32 in immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Activation of cytokine genes in T cells during primary and secondary murine influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Carding, S R; Allan, W; McMickle, A; Doherty, P C

    1993-02-01

    The patterns of cytokine mRNA expression in mice with primary or secondary influenza pneumonia have been assessed by in situ hybridization analysis of cells from both the mediastinal lymph node (MLN) and the virus-infected lung. Evidence of substantial transcriptional activity was found in all lymphocyte subsets recovered from both anatomical sites. The kinetics of cytokine mRNA expression after primary infection with an H3N2 virus were in accord with the idea that the initial response occurs in regional lymphoid tissue, with the effector T cells later moving to the lung. This temporal separation was much less apparent for the more rapid secondary response resulting from challenge of H3N2-primed mice with an H1N1 virus. Among the T cell receptor alpha/beta+ subsets, transcripts for interferon (IFN) gamma and tumor necrosis factor beta were most commonly found in the CD8+ population whereas mRNA for interleukin (IL) 4 and IL-10 was much more prevalent in CD4+ T cells. The gamma/delta T cells expressed mRNA for all cytokines tested, with IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-gamma predominating among those recovered from the inflammatory exudate. At particular time points, especially early in the MLN and late in the infected lung, the frequency of mRNA+ lymphocytes was much higher than would be expected from current understanding of the prevalence of virus-specific precursors and effectors. If this response is typical, induction of cytokine gene expression for T cells that are not responding directly to the invading pathogen may be a prominent feature of acute virus infections.

  9. Lenalidomide enhances antigen-specific activity and decreases CD45RA expression of T cells from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Neuber, Brigitte; Herth, Isabelle; Tolliver, Claudia; Schoenland, Stefan; Hegenbart, Ute; Hose, Dirk; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Ho, Anthony D; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Hundemer, Michael

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the specific T cell response against the multiple myeloma Ag HM1.24 is enhanced by the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide (Revlimid). Ag-specific CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells against the HM1.24 Ag were expanded in vitro by dendritic cells in 29 healthy donors and 26 patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. Ag-specific activation was analyzed by IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin secretion using ELISA, ELISPOT assay, and intracellular staining, and generation of Ag-specific T cells was analyzed by tetramer staining. Expression of T cell maturation markers (CD45RA, CD45R0, CCR7, and CD28) was investigated by flow cytometry. We found that activation of HM1.24-specific T cells from healthy donors and patients with plasma cell dyscrasias was enhanced significantly by lenalidomide and furthermore that the impact of lenalidomide on T cells depends on the duration of the exposure. Notably, lenalidomide supports the downregulation of CD45RA on T cells upon activation, observed in healthy donors and in patients in vitro and also in patients during lenalidomide therapy in vivo. We showed for the first time, to our knowledge, that lenalidomide enhances the Ag-specific activation of T cells and the subsequent downregulation of CD45RA expression of T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Epipolymorphisms associated with the clinical outcome of autoimmune arthritis affect CD4+ T cell activation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spreafico, Roberto; Rossetti, Maura; Whitaker, John W.; Wang, Wei; Lovell, Daniel J.; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial diseases, including autoimmune juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), result from a complex interplay between genetics and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to integrate such gene–environment interactions, fine-tuning gene expression, and possibly contributing to immune system dysregulation. Although anti-TNF therapy has strongly increased JIA remission rates, it is not curative and up to 80% of patients flare upon treatment withdrawal. Thus, a crucial unmet medical and scientific need is to understand the immunological mechanisms associated with remission or flare to inform clinical decisions. Here, we explored the CD4+ T-cell DNA methylome of 68 poly-articular and extended oligo-articular JIA patients, before and after anti-TNF therapy withdrawal, to identify features associated with maintenance of inactive disease. Individual CpG sites were clustered in coherent modules without a priori knowledge of their function through network analysis. The methylation level of several CpG modules, specifically those enriched in CpG sites belonging to genes that mediate T-cell activation, uniquely correlated with clinical activity. Differences in DNA methylation were already detectable at the time of therapy discontinuation, suggesting epigenetic predisposition. RNA profiling also detected differences in T-cell activation markers (including HLA-DR) but, overall, its sensitivity was lower than epigenetic profiling. Changes to the T-cell activation signature at the protein level were detectable by flow cytometry, confirming the biological relevance of the observed alterations in methylation. Our work proposes epigenetic discrimination between clinical activity states, and reveals T-cell–related biological functions tied to, and possibly predicting or causing, clinical outcome. PMID:27849614

  11. T-cell activation by soluble MHC oligomers can be described by a two-parameter binding model.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, J D; Cochran, J R; Stern, L J

    2001-01-01

    T-cell activation is essential for initiation and control of immune system function. T cells are activated by interaction of cell-surface antigen receptors with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins on the surface of other cells. Studies using soluble oligomers of MHC-peptide complexes and other types of receptor cross-linking agents have supported an activation mechanism that involves T cell receptor clustering. Receptor clustering induced by incubation of T cells with MHC-peptide oligomers leads to the induction of T-cell activation processes, including downregulation of engaged receptors and upregulation of the cell-surface proteins CD69 and CD25. Dose-response curves for these T-cell activation markers are bell-shaped, with different maxima and midpoints, depending on the valency of the soluble oligomer used. In this study, we have analyzed the activation behavior using a mathematical model that describes the binding of multivalent ligands to cell-surface receptors. We show that a simple equilibrium binding model accurately describes the activation data for CD4(+) T cells treated with MHC-peptide oligomers of varying valency. The model can be used to predict activation and binding behavior for T cells and MHC oligomers with different properties. PMID:11606269

  12. Human T cell microparticles circulate in blood of hepatitis patients and induce fibrolytic activation of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Kornek, Miroslaw; Popov, Yury; Libermann, Towia A.; Afdhal, Nezam H.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Microparticles (MP) are small cell membrane vesicles which are released from cells during apoptosis or activation. While circulating platelet MP have been studied in some detail, the existence and functional role of T cell MP remain elusive. We show that blood from patients with active hepatitis C (ALT>100 IU/ml) contains elevated numbers of T cell MP compared to patients with mild hepatitis C (ALT<40 IU/ml) and healthy controls. T cell MP fuse with cell membranes of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the major effector cells for excess matrix deposition in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. MP uptake is partly ICAM-1 dependent and leads to activation of NFkB and ERK1/2 and subsequent upregulation of fibrolytic genes in HSC, to downregulation of procollagen α1(I) mRNA, and blunting of profibrogenic activities of TGFβ1. Ex vivo the induced fibrolytic activity is evident in MP derived from activated CD4+ T cells, and highest with MP from activated and apoptotic CD8+ T cells. Mass spectrometry, FACS analysis and function blocking antibodies revealed CD147/Emmprin as candidate transmembrane molecule in HSC fibrolytic activation by CD8+ T cell MP. We conclude that 1) circulating T cell MP are a novel diagnostic marker for inflammatory liver diseases, and 2) in vivo induction of T cell MP may be a novel strategy to induce regression of liver fibrosis. PMID:20979056

  13. Positive Regulation of Interleukin-2 Expression by a Pseudokinase, Tribbles 1, in Activated T Cells.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Chiharu; Itoh, Yuka; Inoue, Yasumichi; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Tribbles 1 (TRB1), a member of the Tribbles family, is a pseudokinase that is conserved among species and implicated in various human diseases including leukemia, cardiovascular diseases, and metabolic disorders. However, the role of TRB1 in the immune response is not understood. To evaluate this role, we examined regulation of TRB1 expression and the function of TRB1 in interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction in Jurkat cells, a human acute T cell leukemia cell line. We found that TRB1 was strongly induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin in these cells. IL-2 expression was induced in Jurkat cells activated by PMA and ionomycin; however, knockdown of TRB1 resulted in decreased induction of IL-2. TRB1 null Jurkat cells established using the CRISPR/Cas9 system also showed reduction of IL-2 expression on PMA/ionomycin stimulation. TRB1 knockdown also markedly inhibited IL-2 promoter activation. To determine the mechanism of the stimulatory effect on IL-2 induction, we focused on histone deacetylases (HDACs), and found that HDAC1 preferentially interacts with TRB1. TRB1 suppressed the interaction of HDAC1 with nuclear factor of activated T cells 2 (NFAT2), which is a crucial transcription factor for IL-2 induction. These results indicate that TRB1 is a positive regulator of IL-2 induction in activated T cells.

  14. Otud7b facilitates T cell activation and inflammatory responses by regulating Zap70 ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Yichuan; Jin, Jin; Chang, Jae-Hoon; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Cheng, Xuhong

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction from the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for T cell–mediated immune responses and, when deregulated, also contributes to the development of autoimmunity. How TCR signaling is regulated is incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism in which the deubiquitinase Otud7b has a crucial role in facilitating TCR signaling. Upon TCR ligation, Otud7b is rapidly recruited to the tyrosine kinase Zap70, a central mediator of TCR-proximal signaling. Otud7b deficiency attenuates the activation of Zap70 and its downstream pathways and impairs T cell activation and differentiation, rendering mice refractory to T cell–mediated autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Otud7b facilitated Zap70 activation by deubiquitinating Zap70, thus preventing the association of Zap70 with the negative-regulatory phosphatases Sts1 and Sts2. These findings establish Otud7b as a positive regulator of TCR-proximal signaling and T cell activation, highlighting the importance of deubiquitination in regulating Zap70 function. PMID:26903241

  15. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  16. TAP, a novel T cell-activating protein involved in the stimulation of MHC-restricted T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Five mAbs have been generated and used to characterize TAP (T cell activating protein) a novel, functional murine T cell membrane antigen. The TAP molecule is a 12-kD protein that is synthesized by T cells. By antibody crossblocking, it appears to be closely associated with a 16- kD protein on the T cell membrane also identified with a novel mAb. These molecules are clearly distinct from the major well-characterized murine T cell antigens previously described. Antibody binding to TAP can result in the activation of MHC-restricted, antigen-specific inducer T cell hybridomas that is equivalent in magnitude to maximal antigen or lectin stimulation. This is a direct effect of soluble antibody and does not require accessory cells or other factors. The activating anti-TAP mAbs are also mitogenic for normal heterogeneous T lymphocytes in the presence of accessory cells or IL-1. In addition, these antibodies are observed to modulate specific immune stimulation. Thus, the activating anti-TAP mAbs synergise with antigen-specific stimulation of T cells, while a nonactivating anti-TAP mAb inhibits antigen driven activation. These observations suggest that the TAP molecule may participate in physiologic T cell activation. The possible relationship of TAP to known physiologic triggering structures, the T3- T cell receptor complex, is considered. TAP is expressed on 70% of peripheral T cells and therefore defines a major T cell subset, making it perhaps the first example of a murine subset-specific activating protein. PMID:2418146

  17. Spaceflight alters expression of microRNA during T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Chang, Tammy T.; Martinez, Emily M.; Li, Chai-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Altered immune function has been demonstrated in astronauts during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab; this could be a major barrier to long-term space exploration. We tested the hypothesis that spaceflight causes changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression. Human leukocytes were stimulated with mitogens on board the International Space Station using an onboard normal gravity control. Bioinformatics showed that miR-21 was significantly up-regulated 2-fold during early T-cell activation in normal gravity, and gene expression was suppressed under microgravity. This was confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR (n = 4). This is the first report that spaceflight regulates miRNA expression. Global microarray analysis showed significant (P < 0.05) suppression of 85 genes under microgravity conditions compared to normal gravity samples. EGR3, FASLG, BTG2, SPRY2, and TAGAP are biologically confirmed targets and are co-up-regulated with miR-21. These genes share common promoter regions with pre-mir-21; as the miR-21 matures and accumulates, it most likely will inhibit translation of its target genes and limit the immune response. These data suggest that gravity regulates T-cell activation not only by transcription promotion but also by blocking translation via noncoding RNA mechanisms. Moreover, this study suggests that T-cell activation itself may induce a sequence of gene expressions that is self-limited by miR-21.—Hughes-Fulford, M., Chang, T. T., Martinez, E. M., Li, C.-F. Spaceflight alters expression of microRNA during T-cell activation. PMID:26276131

  18. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27679638

  19. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  20. Affinity and dose of TCR engagement yield proportional enhancer and gene activity in CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Karmel A; Sajti, Eniko; Collier, Jana G; Gosselin, David; Troutman, Ty Dale; Stone, Erica L; Hedrick, Stephen M; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Affinity and dose of T cell receptor (TCR) interaction with antigens govern the magnitude of CD4+ T cell responses, but questions remain regarding the quantitative translation of TCR engagement into downstream signals. We find that while the response of mouse CD4+ T cells to antigenic stimulation is bimodal, activated cells exhibit analog responses proportional to signal strength. Gene expression output reflects TCR signal strength, providing a signature of T cell activation. Expression changes rely on a pre-established enhancer landscape and quantitative acetylation at AP-1 binding sites. Finally, we show that graded expression of activation genes depends on ERK pathway activation, suggesting that an ERK-AP-1 axis plays an important role in translating TCR signal strength into proportional activation of enhancers and genes essential for T cell function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10134.001 PMID:27376549

  1. Human secondary lymphoid organs typically contain polyclonally-activated proliferating regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jorieke H; Koenen, Hans J P M; Fasse, Esther; Tijssen, Henk J; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Joosten, Irma

    2013-09-26

    Immunomodulating regulatory T-cell (Treg) therapy is a promising strategy in autoimmunity and transplantation. However, to achieve full clinical efficacy, better understanding of in vivo human Treg biology is warranted. Here, we demonstrate that in contrast to blood and bone marrow Tregs, which showed a resting phenotype, the majority of CD4(pos)CD25(pos)CD127(neg)FoxP3(pos) Tregs in secondary lymphoid organs were proliferating activated CD69(pos)CD45RA(neg) cells with a hyperdemethylated FOXP3 gene and a broad T-cell receptor-Vβ repertoire, implying polyclonal activation. Activated CD69(pos) Tregs were distributed over both T-cell and B-cell areas, distant from Aire(pos) and CD11c(pos) cells. In contrast to the anergic peripheral blood Tregs, lymphoid organ Tregs had significant ex vivo proliferative capacity and produced cytokines like interleukin-2, while revealing similar suppressive potential. Also, next to Treg-expressing chemokine receptors important for a prolonged stay in lymphoid organs, a significant part of the cells expressed peripheral tissue-associated, functional homing markers. In conclusion, our data suggest that human secondary lymphoid organs aid in the maintenance and regulation of Treg function and homeostasis. This knowledge may be exploited for further optimization of Treg immunotherapy, for example, by ex vivo selection of Tregs with capacity to migrate to lymphoid organs providing an in vivo platform for further Treg expansion.

  2. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Regulates Development and Activation of CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuczma, Michal; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors belonging to the TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) superfamily. BMPs were found to regulate multiple cell processes such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. They were originally described to play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites but were found to play a significant role in embryogenesis and development of multiple tissues and organs. Activities of BMPs are regulated by a number of secreted proteins, which modulate their availability to bind cellular receptors. The functions of individual BMPs are highly redundant due to binding the same receptors and inducing overlapping signal transduction pathways. Recently, BMPs were found to regulate cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. BMPs are involved in thymic development of T cells at the early, double negative, as well as later, double positive, stages of thymopoesis. They specifically modulate thymic development of regulatory T cells (T(reg)). In the periphery, BMPs affect T cell activation, promoting generation of T(reg) cells. We found that mice deficient for one of the receptors activated by BMPs demonstrated slower growth of transplantable melanoma tumors.

  3. F-actin polymerization and retrograde flow drive sustained PLCγ1 signaling during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Alexander; Li, Shuixing; O'Connor, Roddy S.; Milone, Michael C.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of T cells by antigen-presenting cells involves assembly of signaling molecules into dynamic microclusters (MCs) within a specialized membrane domain termed the immunological synapse (IS). Actin and myosin IIA localize to the IS, and depletion of F-actin abrogates MC movement and T cell activation. However, the mechanisms that coordinate actomyosin dynamics and T cell receptor signaling are poorly understood. Using pharmacological inhibitors that perturb individual aspects of actomyosin dynamics without disassembling the network, we demonstrate that F-actin polymerization is the primary driver of actin retrograde flow, whereas myosin IIA promotes long-term integrity of the IS. Disruption of F-actin retrograde flow, but not myosin IIA contraction, arrested MC centralization and inhibited sustained Ca2+ signaling at the level of endoplasmic reticulum store release. Furthermore, perturbation of retrograde flow inhibited PLCγ1 phosphorylation within MCs but left Zap70 activity intact. These studies highlight the importance of ongoing actin polymerization as a central driver of actomyosin retrograde flow, MC centralization, and sustained Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22665519

  4. Vitamin E reverses impaired linker for activation of T cells activation in T cells from aged C57BL/6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplemental vitamin E restores age-related defects in IL-2 production, T cell proliferation, and immune synapse formation. Here, we evaluated the effect of vitamin E on TCR-proximal signaling events. In aged murine CD4+ T cells stimulated via CD3 and CD28, tyrosine 191 of the adaptor protein LAT wa...

  5. Short natural sleep is associated with higher T cell and lower NK cell activities.

    PubMed

    Fondell, Elinor; Axelsson, John; Franck, Kristina; Ploner, Alexander; Lekander, Mats; Bälter, Katarina; Gaines, Hans

    2011-10-01

    Short sleep duration increases the risk of several diseases, possibly involving compromised immune function. However, most previous studies are based on experimentally induced sleep deprivation, and only a few have studied natural variations in sleep duration. Thus our aim was to study how natural variations in sleep duration affect immune function. In total, 36 healthy men and women, aged 20-54, donated blood; 29 on three consecutive mornings, and seven on one morning. Each morning, participants self-reported sleep duration the night prior to blood draw. General sleep patterns, physical activity and stress were also assessed. A flow-cytometric assay was used to measure natural killer cell activity (NKCA), T cell function (in response to PHA, influenza, and SEA+B), and B cell function (in response to PWM) per volume whole blood. Short sleep duration prior to blood draw (<7 h) was associated with 49% higher PHA-induced T cell function (95% CI 7/109%) and 30% lower NKCA compared with normal prior sleep (7-9 h) (95% CI -46/-8%). In addition, high perceived stress was associated with 39% higher PHA-induced T cell function (95% CI 0/94%). High general physical activity was associated with 47% increased numbers of B cells and 28% increased numbers of T cells, but not with immune function. Our results suggest strong relationships between short sleep duration and T- and NK-cell functions. The stability of the findings as well as the clinical consequences of the link between short sleep and immune function should be explored in future studies.

  6. Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton promotes CD4(+) T cell activation and drives Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wu, Jie; Miao, Miao; Dou, Heng; Nan, Ning; Shi, Mingsheng; Yu, Guang; Shan, Fengping

    2017-03-15

    Several lines of evidences have shown that Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton (Nr-CWS) has immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. However, there is no information about the effect of Nr-CWS on CD4(+) T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Nr-CWS on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) T cells. Our results of in vitro experiments showed that Nr-CWS could significantly up-regulate the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, increase the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in the supernatants, but has no significant effect on the apoptosis and death of CD4(+) T cells. Results of in vivo experiments showed that Nr-CWS could promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, and increase the production of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α (Th1 type cytokines). These data suggest that Nr-CWS can enhance the activation of CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells to Th1 cells.

  7. Non-random pairing of CD46 isoforms with skewing towards BC2 and C2 in activated and memory/effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Aida S.; Bundgaard, Bettina B.; Møller, Bjarne K.; Höllsberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    CD46 is a glycoprotein with important functions in innate and adaptive immune responses. Functionally different isoforms are generated by alternative splicing at exons 7–9 (BC and C isoforms) and exon 13 (CYT-1 and CYT-2 isoforms) giving rise to BC1, BC2, C1 and C2. We developed a novel real-time PCR assay that allows quantitative comparisons between these isoforms. Their relative frequency in CD4+ T cells from 100 donors revealed a distribution with high interpersonally variability. Importantly, the distribution between the isoforms was not random and although splicing favoured inclusion of exon 8 (BC isoforms), exclusion of exon 8 (C isoforms) was significantly linked to exclusion of exon 13 (CYT-2 isoforms). Despite inter-individual differences, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes expressed similar isoform profiles intra-individually. However, memory/effector CD4+ T cells had a significantly higher frequency of CYT-2 when compared with naïve CD4+ T cells. Likewise, in vitro activation of naïve and total CD4+ T cells increased the expression of CYT-2. This indicates that although splicing factors determine a certain expression profile in an individual, the profile can be modulated by external stimuli. This suggests a mechanism by which alterations in CD46 isoforms may temporarily regulate the immune response. PMID:27739531

  8. Uncoupling complement C1s activation from C1q binding in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and immunosuppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Parry, Graham C; Panicker, Sandip; Elkon, Keith B

    2016-02-01

    Complement activation contributes to inflammation in many diseases, yet it also supports physiologic apoptotic cells (AC) clearance and its downstream immunosuppressive effects. The roles of individual complement components in AC phagocytosis have been difficult to dissect with artificially depleted sera. Using human in vitro systems and the novel antibody complement C1s inhibitor TNT003, we uncoupled the role of the enzymatic activation of the classical pathway from the opsonizing role of C1q in mediating a) the phagocytosis of early and late AC, and b) the immunosuppressive capacity of early AC. We found that C1s inhibition had a small impact on the physiologic clearance of early AC, leaving their immunosuppressive properties entirely unaffected, while mainly inhibiting the phagocytosis of late apoptotic/secondary necrotic cells. Our data suggest that C1s inhibition may represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to control classical pathway activation without causing significant AC accumulation in diseases without defects in AC phagocytosis.

  9. T cell activation responses are differentially regulated during clinorotation and in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi, B. B.; Penkala, J. E.; Vens, C.; Huls, H.; Cubbage, M.; Sams, C. F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocyte activation with mitogenic lectins during spaceflight have shown a dramatic inhibition of activation as measured by DNA synthesis at 72 h, but the mechanism of this inhibition is unknown. We have investigated the progression of cellular events during the first 24 h of activation using both spaceflight microgravity culture and a ground-based model system that relies on the low shear culture environment of a rotating clinostat (clinorotation). Stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with soluble anti-CD3 (Leu4) in clinorotation and in microgravity culture shows a dramatic reduction in surface expression of the receptor for IL-2 (CD25) and CD69. An absence of bulk RNA synthesis in clinorotation indicates that stimulation with soluble Leu4 does not induce transition of T cells from G0 to the G1 stage of the cell cycle. However, internalization of the TCR by T cells and normal levels of IL-1 synthesis by monocytes indicate that intercellular interactions that are required for activation occur during clinorotation. Complementation of TCR-mediated signaling by phorbol ester restores the ability of PBMCs to express CD25 in clinorotation, indicating that a PKC-associated pathway may be compromised under these conditions. Bypassing the TCR by direct activation of intracellular pathways with a combination of phorbol ester and calcium ionophore in clinorotation resulted in full expression of CD25; however, only partial expression of CD25 occurred in microgravity culture. Though stimulation of purified T cells with Bead-Leu4 in microgravity culture resulted in the engagement and internalization of the TCR, the cells still failed to express CD25. When T cells were stimulated with Bead-Leu4 in microgravity culture, they were able to partially express CD69, a receptor that is constitutively stored in intracellular pools and can be expressed in the absence of new gene expression. Our results suggest that the inhibition of T cell

  10. Deletion of mTORC1 Activity in CD4+ T Cells Is Associated with Lung Fibrosis and Increased γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vigeland, Christine L.; Collins, Samuel L.; Chan-Li, Yee; Hughes, Andrew H.; Oh, Min-Hee; Powell, Jonathan D.; Horton, Maureen R.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating, incurable disease in which chronic inflammation and dysregulated, excessive wound healing lead to progressive fibrosis, lung dysfunction, and ultimately death. Prior studies have implicated the cytokine IL-17A and Th17 cells in promoting the development of fibrosis. We hypothesized that loss of Th17 cells via CD4-specific deletion of mTORC1 activity would abrogate the development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. However, in actuality loss of Th17 cells led to increased mortality and fibrosis in response to bleomycin. We found that in the absence of Th17 cells, there was continued production of IL-17A by γδ T cells. These IL-17A+ γδ T cells were associated with increased lung neutrophils and M2 macrophages, accelerated development of fibrosis, and increased mortality. These data elucidate the critical role of IL-17A+ γδ T cells in promoting chronic inflammation and fibrosis, and reveal a novel therapeutic target for treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27649073

  11. Lentivirally Engineered DC activate AFP-specific T cells which Inhibit Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the antitumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered DC in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and antitumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DC. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DC vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DC-based vaccines. PMID:21491085

  12. Lentivirally engineered dendritic cells activate AFP-specific T cells which inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2011-07-01

    α-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the anti-tumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered Dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and anti-tumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DCs. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DCs vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DCs-based vaccines.

  13. The effect of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppressor cells on T-cell activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, S E

    1987-01-01

    The suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) after a single exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation provides an excellent model system with which to study both the activation and the mode of action of suppressor T cells. Suppression of CHS after UV radiation is mediated by hapten-specific suppressor T cells (UVTs). These cells have a broad range of activity: CHS and antibody production in vivo and the generation of cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) and T-cell proliferative responses in vitro are suppressed by UVTs. The present study is concerned with determining the target of UVTs. The UVTs could suppress the response to hapten-modified T-dependent antigens, such as trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified sheep erythrocytes (TNP-SRBC) or TNP-conjugated bovine serum albumin (TNP-BSA), but had no suppressive effect on the response to a T-independent antigen, TNP-conjugated lipopolysaccharide (TNP-LPS). The UVTs also suppressed the generation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in vitro. The suppression of CTL generation in vitro and CHS in vivo could be overcome by the addition of exogenous IL-2. These data suggest that UVTs suppress the immune response by affecting T-helper cell function. PMID:2952584

  14. Activated CD4+ T cells preferentially take up lipid microspheres, but resting cells do not.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K

    1995-01-01

    Lipid microspheres (LM) used as drug carriers increase the effectiveness and reduce the toxicity of incorporated drugs. The present study is designed to determine whether or not activated T lymphocytes, which were the cells chosen first from the 'inflammatory cells', can take up LM in vitro. LM were labelled with a fluorescent probe, DiI (DiI-LM), to examine the kinetics. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes principally took up DiI-LM, while lymphocytes and granulocytes did not. When PBMC were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 MoAb and IL-2, cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD16 incorporated DiI-LM. Purified CD4+ T cells, obtained by positive panning selection, were stimulated with this system. They were CD25, CD71, LFA-1-positive, and also showed an ability to take up DiI-LM, which resting cells did not. The findings were confirmed by flow cytometry and quantitative analysis of DiI. Confocal micrographs showed fluorescent granules from the probe in the cytoplasm of stimulated CD4+ T cells after incubation with DiI-LM. These results suggest that immunomodulatory agents incorporated into LM might selectively regulate the function of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells when these are activated. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7882572

  15. Trichloroethylene activates CD4+ T cells: potential role in an autoimmune response.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, K M; Griffin, J M; Pumford, N R

    1999-11-01

    Trichloroethylene is an industrial solvent and has become a major environmental contaminant. Autoimmune-prone MRL +/+ mice were treated for up to 22 weeks with trichloroethylene in the drinking water (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/mL) in order to study the immunoregulatory effects of this environmental toxicant. After only 4 weeks of treatment, trichloroethylene was shown to promote the expansion of CD4+ T cells that expressed a memory/activation phenotype (i.e., CD44hi CD45RBlo) and secreted high levels of IFN-gamma, but not IL-4. In addition, trichloroethylene treatment accelerated the development of an autoimmune response in the MRL +/+ mice as evidenced by an earlier appearance of antinuclear antibodies and increased levels of total IgG2a. MRL +/+ mice treated with trichloroethylene for 22 weeks also contained antibodies specific for trichloroethylene adducts, suggesting the activation of trichloroethylene-specific T cells. The results suggest that trichloroethylene can stimulate antigen nonspecific as well as specific T cells that are capable of promoting autoimmunity in genetically predisposed individuals.

  16. Recruitment of calcineurin to the TCR positively regulates T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debjani; Barr, Valarie A; Akpan, Itoro; Mittelstadt, Paul R; Singha, Laishram I; Samelson, Lawrence E; Ashwell, Jonathan D

    2017-02-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphatase whose primary targets in T cells are NFAT transcription factors, and inhibition of calcineurin activity by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 is a cornerstone of immunosuppressive therapies. Here we found that calcineurin was recruited to the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling complex, where it reversed inhibitory phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase Lck on Ser59 (Lck(S59)). Loss of calcineurin activity impaired phosphorylation of Tyr493 of the tyrosine kinase ZAP-70 (ZAP-70(Y493)), as well as some downstream pathways in a manner consistent with signaling in cells expressing Lck(S59A) (Lck that cannot be phosphorylated) or Lck(S59E) (a phosphomimetic mutant). Notably, CsA inhibited integrin-LFA-1-dependent and NFAT-independent adhesion of T cells to the intercellular adhesion molecule ICAM-1, with little effect on cells expressing mutant Lck. These results provide new understanding of how widely used immunosuppressive drugs interfere with essential processes in the immune response.

  17. Premalignant Oral Lesion Cells Elicit Increased Cytokine Production and Activation of T-cells

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, SARA D.; LEVINGSTON, CORINNE; YOUNG, M. RITA I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are known to evade the host immune response. How premalignant oral lesions modulate the immune response, however, has yet to be elucidated. Materials and Methods A mouse model of oral carcinogenesis was used to determine how mediators from premalignant oral lesion cells vs. HNSCC cells impact on immune cytokine production and activation. Results Media conditioned by premalignant lesion cells elicited an increased production of T cell-associated cytokines and proinflammatory mediators from cervical lymph node cells compared to media conditioned by HNSCC cells or media alone. In the presence of premalignant lesion cell-conditioned media, CD4+ T cell expression of the IL-2 receptor CD25 and CD8+ T cell expression of the activation marker CD69 was greater, compared to what was induced in HNSCC cell-conditioned media or media alone. Conclusion Premalignant lesion cells promote a proinflammatory environment and induce immune changes before HNSCC tumors are established. PMID:27354582

  18. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor. PMID:28123870

  19. CD4+ T cell recovery beyond the first year of complete suppression of viral replication during highly active antiretroviral therapy is not influenced by CD8+ T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Benito, Jose M; Lopez, Mariola; Lozano, Sara; Ballesteros, Celia; Capa, Laura; Martinez, Pilar; Gonzalez-Lahoz, Juan; Soriano, Vincent

    2005-12-15

    CD38 expression on CD8(+) T cells was longitudinally assessed in 31 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons with undetectable plasma viremia who had undergone highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for 12 months and were followed for a mean of 30 months thereafter. Overall, CD4(+)T cell counts increased during follow-up, whereas CD38 expression remained stable. However, a subset of patients showed declines in CD38 expression, and, conversely, another subset showed increases in CD38 expression. No association could be found between long-term gains in CD4(+) T cells and evolution of CD38 expression. Thus, activation of CD8(+) T cells does not seem to be associated with the extent of CD4(+) T cell recovery beyond the first year of successful HAART.

  20. Association of T Cell and Macrophage Activation with Arterial Vascular Health in HIV.

    PubMed

    Grome, Heather N; Barnett, Louise; Hagar, Cindy C; Harrison, David G; Kalams, Spyros A; Koethe, John R

    2017-02-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the arterial vascular functions affected by persistent innate and cellular immune activation are not well described. We assessed the relationship between immunologic and vascular parameters in 70 HIV-infected adults on efavirenz, tenofovir, and emtricitabine with more than 2 years of virologic suppression and no history of CVD. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using ultrasound and circulating intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) by multiple immunoassay. We also measured circulating naive (CD45RO(-)CCR7(+)CD27(+)), activated (CD38(+) and CD38(+)DR(+)), exhausted (PD1(+)), senescent (CD57(+)), and memory (CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets by flow cytometry, and macrophage activation markers by ELISA and multiple immunoassay. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART), and body mass index. Median age was 45 years (IQR 39, 50), median CD4(+) count 701 cells/μl (IQR 540, 954), and 43% were female. Lower brachial FMD was associated with a higher percentage of activated CD8(+) T cells (p < .01), but not associated with macrophage activation. In contrast, higher ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were associated with sCD163 (p < = .01 for both), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (p < = .02 for both), and sCD14 (p = .01 for ICAM-1 only). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that circulating CD8(+) T cell activation may impair arterial smooth muscle relaxation, while macrophage activation has a role in the expression of endothelial cell proteins involved in immune cell translocation. Both innate and cellular immune activation appear to promote arterial vascular disease in HIV-infected persons on ART using differing mechanisms.

  1. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors establish CD8(+) T cell identity through intrinsic HDAC activity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shaojun; Li, Fengyin; Zeng, Zhouhao; Zhao, Yunjie; Yu, Shuyang; Shan, Qiang; Li, Yalan; Phillips, Farrah C; Maina, Peterson K; Qi, Hank H; Liu, Chengyu; Zhu, Jun; Pope, R Marshall; Musselman, Catherine A; Zeng, Chen; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell dichotomy is essential for effective cellular immunity. How individual T cell identity is established remains poorly understood. Here we show that the high-mobility group (HMG) transcription factors Tcf1 and Lef1 are essential for repressing CD4(+) lineage-associated genes including Cd4, Foxp3 and Rorc in CD8(+) T cells. Tcf1- and Lef1-deficient CD8(+) T cells exhibit histone hyperacetylation, which can be ascribed to intrinsic histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in Tcf1 and Lef1. Mutation of five conserved amino acids in the Tcf1 HDAC domain diminishes HDAC activity and the ability to suppress CD4(+) lineage genes in CD8(+) T cells. These findings reveal that sequence-specific transcription factors can utilize intrinsic HDAC activity to guard cell identity by repressing lineage-inappropriate genes.

  2. Messenger RNA encoding constitutively active Toll-like receptor 4 enhances effector functions of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pato, A; Eisenberg, G; Machlenkin, A; Margalit, A; Cafri, G; Frankenburg, S; Merims, S; Peretz, T; Lotem, M; Gross, G

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy of cancer employs a large number of ex-vivo-propagated T cells which recognize their targets either by virtue of their endogenous T cell receptor (TCR) or via genetic reprogramming. However, both cell-extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms often diminish the in-vivo potency of these therapeutic T cells, limiting their clinical efficacy and broader use. Direct activation of human T cells by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands induces T cell survival and proliferation, boosts the production of proinflammatory cytokines and augments resistance to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Removal of the TLR ligand-binding region results in constitutive signalling triggered by the remaining cytosolic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The use of such TIR domains therefore offers an ideal means for equipping anti-tumour T cells with the arsenal of functional attributes required for improving current clinical protocols. Here we show that constitutively active (ca)TLR-4 can be expressed efficiently in human T cells using mRNA electroporation. The mere expression of caTLR-4 mRNA in polyclonal CD8 and CD4 T cells induced the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, triggered the surface expression of CD25, CD69 and 4-1BB and up-regulated a panel of cytokines and chemokines. In tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes prepared from melanoma patients, caTLR-4 induced robust IFN-γ secretion in all samples tested. Furthermore, caTLR-4 enhanced the anti-melanoma cytolytic activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and augmented the secretion of IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for at least 4 days post-transfection. Our results demonstrate that caTLR-4 is capable of exerting multiple T cell-enhancing effects and can potentially be used as a genetic adjuvant in adoptive cell therapy. PMID:26212048

  3. Dynamic Regulation of TCR-Microclusters and the Microsynapse for T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Saito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell is the initiating event in T cell-mediated adaptive immunity. The Immunological Synapse (IS) is formed at the interface between these two cell types, and is the site where antigen (Ag)-specific recognition and activation are induced through the T cell receptor (TCR). This occurs at the center of the IS, and cell adhesion is supported through integrins in the area surrounding the TCR. Recently, this model has been revised based on data indicating that the initial Ag-specific activation signal is triggered prior to IS formation at TCR-microclusters (MCs), sites where TCR, kinases and adaptors of TCR proximal downstream signaling molecules accumulate as an activation signaling cluster. TCR-MCs then move into the center of the cell-cell interface to generate the cSMAC. This translocation of TCR-MCs is mediated initially by the actin cytoskeleton and then by dynein-induced movement along microtubules. The translocation of TCR-MCs and cSMAC formation is induced upon strong TCR stimulation through the assembly of a TCR-dynein super complex with microtubules. The Ag-specific activation signal is induced at TCR-MCs, but the adhesion signal is now shown to be induced by generating a "microsynapse," which is composed of a core of TCR-MCs and the surrounding adhesion ring of integrin and focal adhesion molecules. Since the microsynapse is critical for activation, particularly under weak TCR stimulation, this structure supports a weak TCR signal through a cell-cell adhesion signal. The microsynapse has a structure similar to the IS but on a micro-scale and regulates Ag-specific activation as well as cell-cell adhesion. We describe here the dynamic regulation of TCR-MCs, responsible for inducing Ag-specific activation signals, and the microsynapse, responsible for adhesion signals critical for cell-cell interactions, and their interrelationship.

  4. T-Cell Receptor/CD28 Engagement When Combined with Prostaglandin E2 Treatment Leads to Potent Activation of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Ève; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J.; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2003-01-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE2-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE2 treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56lck and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE2-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus. PMID:14512564

  5. T-cell receptor/CD28 engagement when combined with prostaglandin E2 treatment leads to potent activation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J

    2003-10-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE(2) treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56(lck) and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus.

  6. CARMA1 is required for Akt-mediated NF-kappaB activation in T cells.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Preeti; Holt, Brittany; Tosti, Richard; Kane, Lawrence P

    2006-03-01

    Many details of the generic pathway for induction of NF-kappaB have been delineated, but it is still not clear how multiple, diverse receptor systems are able to converge on this evolutionarily conserved family of transcription factors. Recent studies have shown that the CARMA1, Bcl10, and MALT1 proteins are critical for coupling the common elements of the NF-kappaB pathway to the T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28. We previously demonstrated a role for the serine/threonine kinase Akt in CD28-mediated NF-kappaB induction. Using a CARMA1-deficient T-cell line, we have now found that the CARMA complex is required for induction of NF-kappaB by Akt, in cooperation with protein kinase C activation. Furthermore, using a novel selective inhibitor of Akt, we confirm that Akt plays a modulatory role in NF-kappaB induction by the TCR and CD28. Finally, we provide evidence for a physical and functional interaction between Akt and CARMA and for Akt-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl10. Therefore, in T cells, Akt impinges upon NF-kappaB signaling through at least two separate mechanisms.

  7. T-cell activation is accompanied by an ubiquitination process occurring at the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Aurelie; Müller, Sabina; Favier, Benoit; Penna, Doris; Guiraud, Martine; Delmas, Christelle; Champagne, Eric; Valitutti, Salvatore

    2005-04-15

    The immunological synapse (IS) is a specialized signaling area formed at the contact site between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), where sustained engagement and signaling of TCR and accessory molecules occur. A key feature of T-cell antigen recognition is that the process of TCR/peptide-MHC interaction is self-limited by the internalization and degradation of triggered TCR and recruited signaling components. The mechanism of signaling component degradation involves their ubiquitination and targeting for degradation. Yet, the relationship between the ubiquitination process and TCR signaling as well as the cellular localization of TCR-induced ubiquitination are still elusive. In the present work, we visualize for the first time ubiquitination at the TCR signaling area. We show an enrichment of ubiquitin staining in TCR/CD3 caps in T-lymphocytes stimulated by anti-CD3 antibodies. Remarkably, we also show the recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b and a significant ubiquitination at the immunological synapse in antigen-stimulated T-cells. Our results identify the immunological synapse as the cellular area where TCR-induced protein ubiquitination occurs. They imply that the synapse is a specialized site where the activation process is not only triggered, but also controlled via ubiquitination of signaling actors.

  8. Pentacyclic Triterpenes in Euphorbia microsciadia with Their T-cell Proliferation Activity.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Abdul Majid; Ghanadian, Mustafa; Afsharypour, Suleiman; Abdella, Omer Mohamed; Mirzai, Mehdi; Askari, Gholamreza

    2011-01-01

    The ethyl acetate partition of dried methanolic extract of aerial parts of Euphorbia microsciadia (Euphorbiaceae) afforded three pentacyclic triterpenes, betulinic acid (1) from lupane type, oleanolic acid (2) from oleane type and ursolic acid (3) from ursane type triterpenes that are reported for the first time in this plant. These three compounds were structurally compared through their mass fragmentation pattern, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data and their biologic immunomodulatory effects. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by (13)C- and (1)H-NMR as well as 2D-NMR, IR and by the aid of mass fragmentation pattern and comparing with the literature. After running T-Cell proliferation assay, oleanolic acid stimulated proliferation of T-Cells at lower concentration 0.5 µg/mL, while betulinic acid and ursolic acid showed inhibitory activity against T-Cell proliferation with IC50- value > 50 µg/mL and 3.01 ± 0.47 µg/mL, respectively.

  9. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  10. Induction of the POU domain transcription factor Oct-2 during T-cell activation by cognate antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, S M; Tsang, W; Doll, S; Scherle, P; Ko, H S; Tran, A C; Lenardo, M J; Staudt, L M

    1992-01-01

    Oct-2 is a transcription factor that binds specifically to octamer DNA motifs in the promoters of immunoglobulin and interleukin-2 genes. All tumor cell lines from the B-cell lineage and a few from the T-cell lineage express Oct-2. To address the role of Oct-2 in the T-cell lineage, we studied the expression of Oct-2 mRNA and protein in nontransformed human and mouse T cells. Oct-2 was found in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells prepared from human peripheral blood and in mouse lymph node T cells. In a T-cell clone specific for pigeon cytochrome c in the context of I-Ek, Oct-2 was induced by antigen stimulation, with the increase in Oct-2 protein seen first at 3 h after activation and continuing for at least 24 h. Oct-2 mRNA induction during antigen-driven T-cell activation was blocked by cyclosporin A, as well as by protein synthesis inhibitors. These results suggest that Oct-2 participates in transcriptional regulation during T-cell activation. The relatively delayed kinetics of Oct-2 induction suggests that Oct-2 mediates the changes in gene expression which occur many hours or days following antigen stimulation of T lymphocytes. Images PMID:1620122

  11. Low Double-Negative CD3+CD4−CD8− T Cells Are Associated with Incomplete Restoration of CD4+ T Cells and Higher Immune Activation in HIV-1 Immunological Non-Responders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Su, Bin; Xia, Huan; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhiying; Ji, Yunxia; Yang, Zixuan; Dai, Lili; Mayr, Luzia M.; Moog, Christiane; Wu, Hao; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Failure of immune reconstitution increases the risk of AIDS or non-AIDS related morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. CD3+CD4−CD8− T cells, which are usually described as double-negative (DN) T cells, display CD4-like helper and immunoregulatory functions. Here, we have measured the percentage of DN T cells in the immune reconstituted vs. non-immune reconstituted HIV-1-infected individuals. We observed that immunological non-responders (INRs) had a low number of DN T cells after long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the number of these cells positively correlated with the CD4+ T cell count. The ART did not result in complete suppression of immune activation recorded by the percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+CD8+ T cells in INRs, and a strong inverse correlation was observed between DN T cells and immune activation. A low proportion of TGF-β1+DN T cells was found in INRs. Further mechanism study demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1-producing DN T cells and immune activation had a negative correlation after ART. Taken together, our study suggests that DN T cells control the immunological response in HIV-1-infected patients. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanism of immune reconstitution and could develop specific treatments to return the immune system to homeostasis following initiation of HIV-1 therapy. PMID:28018346

  12. Low Double-Negative CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T Cells Are Associated with Incomplete Restoration of CD4(+) T Cells and Higher Immune Activation in HIV-1 Immunological Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofan; Su, Bin; Xia, Huan; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhiying; Ji, Yunxia; Yang, Zixuan; Dai, Lili; Mayr, Luzia M; Moog, Christiane; Wu, Hao; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Failure of immune reconstitution increases the risk of AIDS or non-AIDS related morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, which are usually described as double-negative (DN) T cells, display CD4-like helper and immunoregulatory functions. Here, we have measured the percentage of DN T cells in the immune reconstituted vs. non-immune reconstituted HIV-1-infected individuals. We observed that immunological non-responders (INRs) had a low number of DN T cells after long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the number of these cells positively correlated with the CD4(+) T cell count. The ART did not result in complete suppression of immune activation recorded by the percentage of CD38(+)HLA-DR(+)CD8(+) T cells in INRs, and a strong inverse correlation was observed between DN T cells and immune activation. A low proportion of TGF-β1(+)DN T cells was found in INRs. Further mechanism study demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1-producing DN T cells and immune activation had a negative correlation after ART. Taken together, our study suggests that DN T cells control the immunological response in HIV-1-infected patients. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanism of immune reconstitution and could develop specific treatments to return the immune system to homeostasis following initiation of HIV-1 therapy.

  13. Aberrant activation of the interleukin-2 autocrine loop through the nuclear factor of activated T cells by nonleukemogenic human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 but not by leukemogenic type 1 virus.

    PubMed

    Niinuma, Akiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Oie, Masayasu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Gejyo, Fumitake; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Xie, Li; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2005-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) but not HTLV-2 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia. We found that HTLV-2 Tax2 protein stimulated reporter gene expression regulated by the interleukin (IL)-2 promoter through the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in a human T-cell line (Jurkat). However, the activity of HTLV-1 Tax1 was minimal in this system. T-cell lines immortalized by HTLV-2 but not HTLV-1 constitutively exhibited activated NFAT in the nucleus and constitutively expressed IL-2 mRNA. Cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of NFAT activation, abrogated the induction of IL-2 mRNA in HTLV-2-immortalized T-cell lines and concomitantly inhibited cell growth. This growth inhibition was rescued by the addition of IL-2 to the culture. Furthermore, anti-IL-2 receptor antibodies significantly reduced the proliferation of HTLV-2-infected T-cell lines but not that of HTLV-1-infected cells. Our results suggest that Tax2 activates an IL-2 autocrine loop mediated through NFAT that supports the growth of HTLV-2-infected cells under low-IL-2 conditions. This mechanism would be especially important in vivo, where this autocrine mechanism establishes a nonleukemogenic life-long HTLV-2 infection. The results also suggest that differences in long-term cytokine production between HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection are another factor for the differences in pathogenesis.

  14. Vaccines combined with immune checkpoint antibodies promote cytotoxic T cell activity and tumor eradication

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar A.; Lewin, Sarah A.; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) cancer vaccine can be used in combination with immune checkpoint antibodies, anti–CTLA-4 or anti–PD-1, to enhance cytotoxic T cell (CTL) activity and induce the regression of solid B16 tumors in mice. Combination therapy obviated the need for vaccine boosting and significantly skewed intratumoral reactions toward CTL activity, resulting in the regression of B16 tumors up to 50mm2 in size and 75% survival rates. These data suggests that combining material-based cancer vaccines with checkpoint antibodies has the potential to mediate tumor regression in humans. PMID:26669718

  15. Virion encapsidated HIV-1 Vpr induces NFAT to prime non-activated T cells for productive infection

    PubMed Central

    Höhne, Kristin; Businger, Ramona; van Nuffel, Anouk; Bolduan, Sebastian; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Baeyens, Ann; Vermeire, Jolien; Malatinkova, Eva; Verhasselt, Bruno; Schindler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells encountered by HIV-1 are non-activated and do not readily allow productive infection. HIV-1 Vpr is highly abundant in progeny virions, and induces signalling and HIV-1 LTR transcription. We hence hypothesized that Vpr might be a determinant of non-activated T-cell infection. Virion-delivered Vpr activated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) through Ca2+ influx and interference with the NFAT export kinase GSK3β. This leads to NFAT translocation and accumulation within the nucleus and was required for productive infection of unstimulated primary CD4+ T cells. A mutagenesis approach revealed correlation of Vpr-mediated NFAT activation with its ability to enhance LTR transcription and mediate cell cycle arrest. Upon NFAT inhibition, Vpr did not augment resting T-cell infection, and showed reduced G2/M arrest and LTR transactivation. Altogether, Vpr renders unstimulated T cells more permissive for productive HIV-1 infection and stimulates activation of productively infected as well as virus-exposed T cells. Therefore, it could be involved in the establishment and reactivation of HIV-1 from viral reservoirs and might have an impact on the levels of immune activation, which are determinants of HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:27383627

  16. T-cell receptor-induced JNK activation requires proteolytic inactivation of CYLD by MALT1.

    PubMed

    Staal, Jens; Driege, Yasmine; Bekaert, Tine; Demeyer, Annelies; Muyllaert, David; Van Damme, Petra; Gevaert, Kris; Beyaert, Rudi

    2011-05-04

    The paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) is central to lymphocyte activation and lymphomagenesis. MALT1 mediates antigen receptor signalling to NF-κB by acting as a scaffold protein. Furthermore, MALT1 has proteolytic activity that contributes to optimal NF-κB activation by cleaving the NF-κB inhibitor A20. Whether MALT1 protease activity is involved in other signalling pathways, and the identity of the relevant substrates, is unknown. Here, we show that T-cell receptors (TCR) activation, as well as overexpression of the oncogenic API2-MALT1 fusion protein, results in proteolytic inactivation of CYLD by MALT1, which is specifically required for c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and the inducible expression of a subset of genes. These results indicate a novel role for MALT1 proteolytic activity in TCR-induced JNK activation and reveal CYLD cleavage as the underlying mechanism.

  17. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Activation of Notch1 promotes development of human CD8(+) single positive T cells in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Haji, Yoichi; Suzuki, Makiko; Moriya, Kunihiko; So, Takanori; Hozumi, Katsuto; Mizuma, Masamichi; Unno, Michiaki; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-05-02

    Notch1 mutations are found in more than 50% of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. However, the functions of Notch1 for human T cell development and leukemogenesis are not well understood. To examine the role of Notch1, human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which had been transduced with a constitutively active form of Notch1 (ICN1), were transplanted into severely immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid-IL2rγ(null) (NOG) mice. We found that the great majority of the ICN1-expressing hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow expressed surface markers for T cells, such as CD3, CD4, and CD8, and that this T cell development was independent of the thymus. Accordingly, phenotypically mature CD8(+) single positive (SP) T cells were observed in the spleen. Furthermore, T-ALL developed in one NOG recipient mouse out of 26 that had been secondary transferred with the T cells developed in the first NOG mice. These results indicate that Notch1 signaling in HSCs promotes CD8(+) SP T cell development, and that T cell leukemogenesis may require additional oncogenic factors other than Notch1 activation.

  19. TLR activation excludes circulating naive CD8+ T cells from gut-associated lymphoid organs in mice.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Kirchner, Sophie-Kathrin; Stephan, Nicolas; Bohn, Bernadette; Suhartha, Nina; Hotz, Christian; Anz, David; Sandholzer, Nadja; Stecher, Bärbel; Rüssmann, Holger; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole

    2013-05-15

    The trafficking of effector T cells is tightly regulated by the expression of site-specific sets of homing molecules. In contrast, naive T cells are generally assumed to express a uniform pattern of homing molecules and to follow a random distribution within the blood and secondary lymphoid organs. In this study, we demonstrate that systemic infection fundamentally modifies the trafficking of circulating naive CD8(+) T cells. We show that on naive CD8(+) T cells, the constitutive expression of the integrin α4β7 that effects their entry into GALT is downregulated following infection of mice with Salmonella typhimurium. We further show that this downregulation is dependent on TLR signaling, and that the TLR-activated naive CD8(+) T cells are blocked from entering GALT. This contrasts strongly with Ag-experienced effector T cells, for which TLR costimulation in the GALT potently upregulates α4β7 and enhances trafficking to intestinal tissues. Thus, TLR activation leads to opposite effects on migration of naive and effector CD8(+) T cells. Our data identify a mechanism that excludes noncognate CD8(+) T cells from selected immune compartments during TLR-induced systemic inflammation.

  20. Common γ-chain cytokine signaling is required for macroautophagy induction during CD4+ T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Botbol, Yair; Patel, Bindi; Macian, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular process that mediates degradation in the lysosome of cytoplasmic components including proteins and organelles. Previous studies have shown that macroautophagy is induced in activated T cells to regulate organelle homeostasis and the cell's energy metabolism. However, the signaling pathways that initiate and regulate activation-induced macroautophagy in T cells have not been identified. Here, we show that activation-induced macroautophagy in T cells depends on signaling from common γ-chain cytokines. Consequently, inhibition of signaling through JAK3, induced downstream of cytokine receptors containing the common γ-chain, prevents full induction of macroautophagy in activated T cells. Moreover, we found that common γ-chain cytokines are not only required for macroautophagy upregulation during T cell activation but can themselves induce macroautophagy. Our data also show that macroautophagy induction in T cells is associated with an increase of LC3 expression that is mediated by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Overall, our findings unveiled a new role for common γ-chain cytokines as a molecular link between autophagy induction and T-cell activation. PMID:26391567

  1. The Microbiota Contributes to CD8+ T Cell Activation and Nutrient Malabsorption following Intestinal Infection with Giardia duodenalis

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Aleksander; Li, Erqiu; Maloney, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a noninvasive luminal pathogen that impairs digestive function in its host in part by reducing intestinal disaccharidase activity. This enzyme deficiency has been shown in mice to require CD8+ T cells. We recently showed that both host immune responses and parasite strain affected disaccharidase levels during murine giardiasis. However, high doses of antibiotics were used to facilitate infections in that study, and we therefore decided to systematically examine the effects of antibiotic use on pathogenesis and immune responses in the mouse model of giardiasis. We found that antibiotic treatment did not overtly increase the parasite burden but significantly limited the disaccharidase deficiency observed in infected mice. Moreover, while infected mice had more activated CD8+ αβ T cells in the small intestinal lamina propria, this increase was absent in antibiotic-treated mice. Infection also led to increased numbers of CD4+ αβ T cells in the lamina propria and activation of T cell receptor γδ-expressing intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), but these changes were not affected by antibiotics. Finally, we show that activated CD8+ T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzymes but that granzymes are not required for sucrase deficiency. We conclude that CD8+ T cells become activated in giardiasis through an antibiotic-sensitive process and contribute to reduced sucrase activity. These are the first data directly demonstrating activation of CD8+ T cells and γδ T cells during Giardia infections. These data also demonstrate that disruption of the intestinal microbiota by antibiotic treatment prevents pathological CD8+ T cell activation in giardiasis. PMID:27456829

  2. Akt Pathway Activation by Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax Oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Mathew A; Baydoun, Hicham H; Al-Saleem, Jacob; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Green, Patrick; Ratner, Lee

    2015-10-23

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type 1, the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, expresses the viral oncoprotein Tax1. In contrast, HTLV-2, which expresses Tax2, is non-leukemogenic. One difference between these homologous proteins is the presence of a C-terminal PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) in Tax1, previously reported to be important for non-canonical NFκB activation. In contrast, this study finds no defect in non-canonical NFκB activity by deletion of the Tax1 PBM. Instead, Tax1 PBM was found to be important for Akt activation. Tax1 attenuates the effects of negative regulators of the PI3K-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), and PHLPP. Tax1 competes with PTEN for binding to DLG-1, unlike a PBM deletion mutant of Tax1. Forced membrane expression of PTEN or PHLPP overcame the effects of Tax1, as measured by levels of Akt phosphorylation, and rates of Akt dephosphorylation. The current findings suggest that Akt activation may explain the differences in transforming activity of HTLV-1 and -2.

  3. CD43 REGULATES THE THRESHOLD FOR T CELL ACTIVATION BY TARGETING CBL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Lilia, B. Mérida; del Rio, Roxana; Nora, A. Fierro; Cruz-Muñoz, Mario E.; Olivares, Norma; Melchy, Erika; Igras, Vivian; Georg, A. Holländer; Steven, J. Burakoff; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell (TC) activation requires the coordinated signaling of the T cell receptor (TCR) and co-receptor molecules, allowing TCs to respond to lower degrees of TCR occupancy. Co-receptor molecules set the threshold for TC activation by controlling different regulatory signaling loops. The Cbl family members prevent undesired activation of TCs by regulating TCR signals. In this report we show that TC pre-stimulation by the CD43 co-receptor molecule before TCR engagement inhibits TCR-dependent c-Cbl tyrosine phosphorylation, c-Cbl interaction with the adapter molecule Crk-L and promotes Cbl-b degradation in a PKCθ–dependent manner. Consequently, the prolonged tyrosine phosphorylation and delayed degradation of ZAP-70 and of the ζ chain lead to enhanced MAPK activation and robust TC response. These data indicates that CD43-mediated signals lower the threshold for TC activation by restricting the c-Cbl and Cbl-b inhibitory effects on TCR signaling. In addition to the strength and duration of intracellular signals, our data underscore temporality with which certain molecules are engaged as yet another mechanism to fine tune TC signal quality, and ultimately immune function. PMID:21905200

  4. The impact of Nucleofection® on the activation state of primary human CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingce; Ma, Zhengyu; Selliah, Nithianandan; Weiss, Greta; Genin, Anna; Finkel, Terri H.; Cron, Randy Q.

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer into primary human CD4 T lymphocytes is a critical tool in studying the mechanism of T cell-dependent immune responses and human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection. Nucleofection® is an electroporation technique that allows efficient gene transfer into primary human CD4 T cells that are notoriously resistant to traditional electroporation. Despite its popularity in immunological research, careful characterization of its impact on the physiology of CD4 T cells has not been documented. Herein, using freshly-isolated primary human CD4 T cells, we examine the effects of Nucleofection® on CD4 T cell morphology, intracellular calcium levels, cell surface activation markers, and transcriptional activity. We find that immediately after Nucleofection®, CD4 T cells undergo dramatic morphological changes characterized by wrinkled and dilated plasma membranes before recovering 1 hour later. The intracellular calcium level also increases after Nucleofection®, peaking after 1 hour before recovering 8 hours post transfection. Moreover, Nucleofection® leads to increased expression of T cell activation markers, CD154 and CD69, for more than 24 hours, and enhances the activation effects of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. In addition, transcriptional activity is increased in the first 24 hours after Nucleofection®, even in the absence of exogenous stimuli. Therefore, Nucleofection® significantly alters the activation state of primary human CD4 T cells. The effect of transferred gene products on CD4 T cell function by Nucleofection® should be assessed after sufficient resting time post transfection or analyzed in light of the activation caveats mentioned above. PMID:24910411

  5. Induction of apoptosis in bacillus Calmette-Guérin-activated T cells by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, P; Hernández-Garay, M; García-Martínez, E

    2000-06-15

    In view of the critical role played by bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in the development and functional activation of protective T cells against tuberculosis, it has become important to understand the mechanisms by which cytokines regulate BCG-mediated immune responses. There is evidence that cytokine-mediated suppression of T cell function by mechanisms, including apoptosis, may reduce host resistance in tuberculosis. However, it is unclear whether cytokine-mediated suppression of antigen-responsive T cells through apoptotic mechanisms may be operating during human cellular activation induced by BCG. Here we present evidence, for the first time, that treatment of BCG-activated T cells with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induces cellular apoptosis. These results were further supported by the fact that treatment of cells with a blocking mAb directed to TGF-beta significantly inhibited the percentage of apoptosis induced by TGF-beta. Interestingly, TGF-beta-mediated death of BCG-activated T cells in cultures containing interleukin (IL)-12 was observed. Moreover, our results demonstrated the induction of apoptosis by TGF-beta in BCG-activated T cells cultured in the presence of exogenous IL-12. In addition, our data indicated that TGF-beta significantly inhibited both BCG-induced cell growth determined by thymidine uptake and BCG-induced IFN-gamma secretion. Finally, TGF-beta-induced apoptosis in BCG-activated T cells correlated inversely with BCG-induced IFN-gamma secretion. Taken together, these findings indicate that TGF-beta induces apoptosis in human T cells activated with BCG and at the same time suggest that loss of BCG-reactive T cells through apoptotic mechanisms could contribute to an increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

  6. Graded Foxo1 Activity in Regulatory T Cells Differentiates Tumor Immunity from Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chong T.; Liao, Will; Dadi, Saida; Toure, Ahmed; Li, Ming O.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 have a pivotal role in maintaining immunological self-tolerance1-5; yet, excessive Treg cell activities suppress anti-tumor immune responses6-8. Compared to resting phenotype Treg (rTreg) cells in the secondary lymphoid organs, Treg cells in non-lymphoid tissues including solid tumors exhibit an activated Treg (aTreg) cell phenotype9-11. However, aTreg cell function and whether its generation can be manipulated to promote tumor immunity without evoking autoimmunity are largely unexplored. Here we show that the transcription factor Foxo1, previously demonstrated to promote Treg cell suppression of lymphoproliferative diseases12,13, has an unexpected function in inhibiting aTreg cell-mediated immune tolerance. We found that aTreg cells turned over at a slower rate than rTreg cells, but were not locally maintained in tissues. Transcriptome analysis revealed that aTreg cell differentiation was associated with repression of Foxo1-dependent gene transcription, concomitant with reduced Foxo1 expression and enhanced Foxo1 phosphorylation at sites of the Akt kinase. Treg cell-specific expression of an Akt-insensitive Foxo1 mutant prevented downregulation of lymphoid organ homing molecules, and depleted aTreg cells, causing CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Compared to Treg cells from healthy tissues, tumor-infiltrating Treg cells downregulated Foxo1 target genes more substantially. Expression of the Foxo1 mutant at a lower dose was sufficient to deplete tumor-associated Treg cells, activate effector CD8+ T cells, and inhibit tumor growth without inflicting autoimmunity. Thus, Foxo1 inactivation is essential for the generation of aTreg cells that have a crucial function in suppressing CD8+ T cell responses; and the Foxo signaling pathway in Treg cells can be titrated to preferentially break tumor immune tolerance. PMID:26789248

  7. Dual functions for the endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensors STIM1 and STIM2 in T cell activation and tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Oh-hora, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Megumi; Hogan, Patrick G; Sharma, Sonia; Lamperti, Ed; Chung, Woo; Prakriya, Murali; Feske, Stefan; Rao, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry through calcium release–activated calcium channels is the chief mechanism for increasing intracellular Ca2+ in immune cells. Here we show that mouse T cells and fibroblasts lacking the calcium sensor STIM1 had severely impaired store-operated Ca2+ influx, whereas deficiency in the calcium sensor STIM2 had a smaller effect. However, T cells lacking either STIM1 or STIM2 had much less cytokine production and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFAT. T cell–specific ablation of both STIM1 and STIM2 resulted in a notable lymphoproliferative phenotype and a selective decrease in regulatory T cell numbers. We conclude that both STIM1 and STIM2 promote store-operated Ca2+ entry into T cells and fibroblasts and that STIM proteins are required for the development and function of regulatory T cells. PMID:18327260

  8. Role of Ly-6 in lymphocyte activation. II. Induction of T cell activation by monoclonal anti-Ly-6 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The Ly-6 locus controls the expression and/or encodes for alloantigenic specificities found primarily on subpopulations of murine T and B lymphocytes. We have recently identified and characterized a new rat mAb, D7, that recognizes a nonpolymorphic Ly-6 specificity. After crosslinking by anti-Ig reagents or by Fc receptor-bearing accessory cells, mAb D7 could induce IL-2 production from T cell hybridomas, and in the presence of PMA could trigger a vigorous proliferative response in resting peripheral T cells. The addition of mAb D7 to cultures of antigen- and alloantigen-, but not mitogen-stimulated T cells resulted in a marked augmentation of the proliferative response. A number of other well-characterized mAbs to Ly-6 locus products could also stimulate a T cell proliferative response after crosslinking by anti-Ig and in the presence of PMA. These results strongly suggest that Ly-6 molecules may play a critical role in the T cell activation cascade, either as receptors for an unidentified soluble or cell-associated ligand or as transducing molecules that modulate signals initiated by antigen stimulation of the T3-Ti complex. PMID:3489060

  9. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurton, Lenka V.; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M.; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR+ T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19+ leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45ROnegCCR7+CD95+, phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR+ T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:27849617

  10. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Hurton, Lenka V; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M; Switzer, Kirsten C; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-11-29

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR(+) T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19(+) leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45RO(neg)CCR7(+)CD95(+), phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR(+) T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials.

  11. The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 modulates the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Tessy; Sankarshanan, Mohan; Mauldin, Ileana S.; Mullins, David W.; Lorenz, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The importance of regulatory T cells (Treg) for immune tolerance is well recognized, yet the signaling molecules influencing their suppressive activity are relatively poorly understood. Here, through in vivo studies and complementary ex vivo studies, we make several important observations. First, we identify the cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 as a novel ‘endogenous brake’ and modifier of the suppressive ability of Treg cells; consistent with this notion, loss of SHP-1 expression strongly augments the ability of Treg cells to suppress inflammation in a mouse model. Second, specific pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 enzymatic activity via the cancer drug sodium stibogluconate (SSG) potently augmented Treg cell suppressor activity both in vivo and ex vivo. Finally, through a quantitative imaging approach, we directly demonstrate that Treg cells prevent the activation of conventional T cells, and that SHP-1-deficient Treg cells are more efficient suppressors. Collectively, our data reveal SHP-1 as a critical modifier of Treg cell function, and a potential therapeutic target for augmenting Treg cell-mediated suppression in certain disease states. PMID:20952680

  12. Preclinical evaluation of ex vivo expanded/activated γδ T cells for immunotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Nichole L; Gillespie, G Yancey; Lopez, Richard D; Markert, James M; Cloud, Gretchen A; Langford, Catherine P; Arnouk, Hilal; Su, Yun; Haines, Hilary L; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Lamb, Lawrence S

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that expanded/activated γδ T cells from healthy donors are cytotoxic to GBM cell lines and primary GBM explants. In this report, we examined the therapeutic effect of intracranial infusion of expanded/activated γδ T cells on human minimal and established U251 tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the presence of NKG2D ligands on cell lines and tumors, and blocking studies were used to determine the effect of these ligands on γδ T cell recognition. Expanded/activated γδ T cells were prepared by 18-day culture in RPMI, human serum (HS), anti-CD2, IL-12, IFN-γ, and OKT-3. Anti-GBM activity of the cell product was assessed using in vitro cytotoxicity assays against the GBM cell line U251MG in suspension and in adherent culture. Ex vivo expanded/activated γδ T cells were of the effector/memory phenotype, expressed Th1 cytokines, and effectively killed U251 cells in vitro. Xenografts were prepared using a U251 cell line following transfection with a firefly luciferase gene to monitor tumor progression. Mice treated with γδ T cells showed slower progression of both new and established GBM xenografts versus mice that received vehicle only as determined by photon emission over time. Median survival was improved in all γδ T cell treated groups between 32 and 50 days by Kaplan-Meier analysis. U251 cells expressed ULBP-2 and ULBP-3, although blocking of these reduced in vitro cytotoxicity of γδ T cells to U251MG by only 33 and 25%, respectively. These studies show that expanded/activated γδ T cells can mediate killing of new or established GBM xenografts, reduce tumor progression, and constitute a potentially effective novel immunotherapeutic strategy against GBM.

  13. Modulation of enzymatic activity of Src-family kinases in bovine T cells transformed by Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Fich, C; Klauenberg, U; Fleischer, B; Bröker, B M

    1998-08-01

    After infection with sporozoites of the protozoon Theileria parva (Tp) bovine T cells are readily transformed to permanent growth in vivo and in vitro. Their transformed state depends on the constant presence of the parasite but membrane signals remain important. Non-receptor tyrosine kinases play a critical role in the transduction of membrane signals in haematopoietic cells. We have investigated Src-family kinases in bovine T cells transformed by Tp. The T cell receptor-associated tyrosine kinase p60fyn had high activity in all cell lines tested. In addition, weak phosphorylation of 2 novel bands was observed associated with Fyn. In contrast to Fyn, enzymatic activity of p56lck, which in T cells has an essential role in signalling, was low. Furthermore, 1 of 3 Tp transformed cell lines was completely devoid of p56lck indicating that the enzyme is not necessary for the Tp dependent growth of the T cells. In addition to p60fyn and p56lck weak enzymatic activity of 1 splice variant of p53/56lyn was observed after infection of T cells with Tp. These data show that growth transformation by Tp influences kinase activity in bovine T cells. However, they also prove that p56lck does not play an essential role in the transformation mechanism.

  14. In vitro activation of hTERT-specific T cell responses in lung cancer patients following chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Staudinger, Matthias; Woester, Katrin; Wellnitz, Dominique; Boettcher, Sebastian; Gramatzki, Martin; Kneba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine chemotherapy concomitant in vitro activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-specific T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods PBMCs depleted of regulatory T cells were stimulated by peptide loaded dendritic cells (DC) matured either by application of cytokines (cDC) or a Toll-like receptor 7/8-agonist combined with a soluble CD40-ligand (ligDC). The hTERT peptide-specific T cell responses were assessed using flow cytometry for intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Results After cDC activation, T cells producing IFN-γ in response to hTERT were found in PBMC samples of 4 patients. In 2 of these patients the hTERT-specific T cell responses were further increased after ligDC application. However, PBMC of 3 other patients showed little or no induction of hTERT-specific T cell responses as a result of the methods applied during this study. Conclusions These results indicate, that concomitant to chemotherapy hTERT-specific T cell responses can be activated in PBMC of NSCLC patients in vitro. This activation can be further increased by ligDC though the number of responding patients is still limited. PMID:23825754

  15. Deficiency of N-myristoylation reveals calcineurin activity as regulator of IFN-γ-producing γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Rampoldi, Francesca; Brunk, Fabian; Bonrouhi, Mahnaz; Federico, Giuseppina; Krunic, Damir; Porubsky, Stefan; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Popovic, Zoran V

    2017-04-01

    γδ T cell subsets can be characterized, in part, by their secretion of select proinflammatory cytokines. The molecular mechanisms driving the diverse fates of γδ T cells have not been elucidated. We have previously shown that the attachment of myristic acid to the N-terminal glycine of proteins, termed N-myristoylation, is essential for αβ T cell development and activation. Here, we explore the potential role of this lipid modification on the activation of γδ T cells. In the absence of N-myristoylation, the CD27(+) γδ T cell subset was dominantly affected. The cells produced high levels of IFN-γ upon stimulation. In addition, they were more sensitive to inhibition of the CaN-Nfat pathway than were γδ T cells with myristoylated CaN. N-Myristoylation was found to modulate activity of phosphatase CaN, a regulator of Nfat. In summary, the CaN-Nfat pathway regulates development and function of IFN-γ-producing γδ T cells, and its balanced activity is strongly dependent on CaN N-myristoylation.

  16. Coordinated integrin activation by actin-dependent force during T-cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Elliott, Hunter L; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-10-10

    For a cell to move forward it must convert chemical energy into mechanical propulsion. Force produced by actin polymerization can generate traction across the plasma membrane by transmission through integrins to their ligands. However, the role this force plays in integrin activation is unknown. Here we show that integrin activity and cytoskeletal dynamics are reciprocally linked, where actin-dependent force itself appears to regulate integrin activity. We generated fluorescent tension-sensing constructs of integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) to visualize intramolecular tension during cell migration. Using quantitative imaging of migrating T cells, we correlate tension in the αL or β2 subunit with cell and actin dynamics. We find that actin engagement produces tension within the β2 subunit to induce and stabilize an active integrin conformational state and that this requires intact talin and kindlin motifs. This supports a general mechanism where localized actin polymerization can coordinate activation of the complex machinery required for cell migration.

  17. Investigation of biochemical property changes in activation-induced CD 8 + T cell apoptosis using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ju; Ahn, Hyung Joon; Lee, Gi-Ja; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Dohyun; Shin, Jae-Ho; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-07-01

    The study was to investigate the changes in biochemical properties of activated mature CD8+ T cells related to apoptosis at a molecular level. We confirmed the activation and apoptosis of CD8+ T cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and atomic force microscopy and then performed Raman spectral measurements on activated mature CD8+ T cells and cellular deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). In the activated mature CD8+ T cells, there were increases in protein spectra at 1002 and 1234 cm-1. In particular, to assess the apoptosis-related DNA spectral signatures, we investigated the spectra of the cellular DNA isolated from resting and activated mature CD8+ T cells. Raman spectra at 765 to 786 cm-1 and 1053 to 1087 cm-1 were decreased in activated mature DNA. In addition, we analyzed Raman spectrum using the multivariate statistical method including principal component analysis. Raman spectra of activated mature DNA are especially well-discriminated from those of resting DNA. Our findings regarding the biochemical and structural changes associated with apoptosis in activated mature T cells and cellular DNA according to Raman spectroscopy provide important insights into allospecific immune responses generated after organ transplantation, and may be useful for therapeutic manipulation of the immune response.

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity is required for allogeneic T-cell responses after hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Eid, Saada; Ganguly, Sudipto; Tyler, Megan; Huang, Alex Y.; Letterio, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular intermediates in T-cell activation pathways are crucial targets for the therapy and prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). We recently identified an essential role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in T-cell activation and effector function, but the contribution of Cdk5 activity to the development of GVHD has not been explored. Using an established, preclinical, murine, GVHD model, we reveal that Cdk5 activity is increased in key target organs early after allo-HCT. We then generated chimeric mice (Cdk5+/+C or Cdk5−/−C) using hematopoietic progenitors from either embryonic day 16.5 Cdk5+/+ or Cdk5−/− embryos to enable analyses of the role of Cdk5 in GVHD, as germ line Cdk5 gene deletion is embryonically lethal. The immunophenotype of adult Cdk5−/−C mice is identical to control Cdk5+/+C mice. However, transplantation of donor Cdk5−/−C bone marrow and T cells dramatically reduced the severity of systemic and target organ GVHD. This phenotype is attributed to decreased T-cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), reduced in vivo proliferation within these organs, and fewer cytokine-producing donor T cells during GVHD development. Moreover, these defects in Cdk5−/− T-cell function are associated with altered CCR7 signaling following ligation by CCL19, a receptor:ligand interaction critical for T-cell migration into SLOs. Although Cdk5 activity in donor T cells contributed to graft-versus-tumor effects, pharmacologic inhibition of Cdk5 preserved leukemia-free survival. Collectively, our data implicate Cdk5 in allogeneic T-cell responses after HCT and as an important new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28064242

  19. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Larisa M.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical “activate-and-kill” strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV–GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime. PMID:26138068

  20. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells.

    PubMed

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wong, Victor C; Chavali, Arvind K; Gearhart, Larisa M; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical "activate-and-kill" strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV-GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime.

  1. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Palmer, E; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell-activating protein TAP is a murine phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein whose expression is controlled by the Ly-6 locus. Previous studies have suggested an important role for this protein in physiological T-cell activation. Using oligonucleotide probes, we have now isolated a cDNA clone whose predicted sequence would encode a protein with an NH2-terminal sequence identical to that of the TAP molecule. Further analysis of the predicted protein sequence revealed a cysteine-rich protein with a hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus and without N-linked glycosylation sites--all features consistent with our previous analysis of the TAP protein. In Southern blot analysis, the Ly-6.2 cDNA clone detects a multigene family and a restriction fragment length polymorphism that maps precisely to the Ly-6 locus. Expression of the cDNA clone in COS cells demonstrates that it codes for TAP and clarifies the relationship between the epitopes recognized by various alpha Ly-6 monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we have studied the expression of Ly-6 mRNA in a variety of cell lineages. Ly-6 transcripts were detected in all organs examined, including spleen, kidney, lung, brain, and heart. This demonstrates that the Ly-6 locus is transcriptionally active in a wide range of organs and suggests that the role of TAP or TAP-like proteins might extend to other tissues. Images PMID:2895473

  2. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  3. Dermal γδ T-Cells Can Be Activated by Mitochondrial Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schwacha, Martin G.; Rani, Meenakshi; Nicholson, Susannah E.; Lewis, Aaron M.; Holloway, Travis L.; Sordo, Salvador; Cap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gamma delta T-cells have been shown to be important to the early immunoinflammatory response to injury, independent of infection. This unique T-cell population acts to regulate cell trafficking and the release of cytokines and growth factors. We propose this sterile inflammatory response is in part associated with damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated by major injury, such as burn, and mediated via toll-like receptors (TLRs). It is unknown whether DAMPs can activate resident γδ T-cells that reside in skin. Methods Gamma delta T-cells were isolated from the skin of male C57BL/6 mice by enzymatic digestion. Mitochondrial DAMPs (MTDs) were generated from mitochondria isolated from mouse livers by sonication and centrifugation. Dermal γδ T-cells were incubated with MTDs (0–500 μg/ml) for 24 hr and cells and supernatants were collected for analysis. Results MTDs activated dermal γδ T-cells, as evidenced by increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression following in vitro exposure. MTDs also induced the production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6), and growth factors (PDGF and VEGF) by γδ T-cells. Conclusions These findings herein support the concept that MTDs released after tissue/cellular injury are capable of activating dermal γδ T-cells. We propose that the activation of this unique T-cell population is central in the initiation of sterile inflammation and also contributes to the subsequent healing processes. PMID:27403524

  4. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays a role in SV40 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, Kate; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent evidence highlighted a role for the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), in the transcription of the human polyomavirus JCV. Here we show that NFAT is also important in the transcriptional control of the related polyomavirus, Simian Virus 40 (SV40). Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced SV40 infection of Vero, 293A, and HeLa cells, and this block occurred at the stage of viral transcription. Both NFAT3 and NFAT4 bound to the SV40 promoter through {kappa}B sites located within the 72 bp repeated enhancer region. In Vero cells, NFAT was involved in late transcription, but in HeLa and 293A cells both early and late viral transcription required NFAT activity. SV40 large T-Ag was found to increase NFAT activity and provided a positive feedback loop to transactivate the SV40 promoter.

  5. Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations and T cell activation by prickly pear polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Aires, Virginie; Adote, Sylvie; Hichami, Aziz; Moutairou, Kabirou; Boustani, Es-Saddik E; Khan, Naim A

    2004-05-01

    Opuntia ficus indica (prickly pear) polyphenolic compounds (OFPC) triggered an increase in [Ca2+]i in human Jurkat T-cell lines. Furthermore, OFPC-induced rise in [Ca2+]i was significantly curtailed in calcium-free buffer (0% Ca2+) as compared to that in 100% Ca2+ medium. Preincubation of cells with tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels, significantly diminished the OFPC-induced sustained response on the increases in [Ca2+]i. Lanthanum and nifedipine, the respective inhibitors of voltage-dependent and L-type calcium channels, failed to curtail significantly the OFPC-induced calcium response. As OFPC still stimulated increases in [Ca2+]i in 0% Ca2+ medium, the role of intracellular calcium was investigated. Hence, addition of thapsigargin (TG), an inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), during the OFPC-induced peak response exerted an additive effect, indicating that the mechanism of action of these two agents are different. Furthermore, U73122, an inhibitor of IP3 production, completely abolished increases in [Ca2+]i, induced by OFPC, suggesting that these polyphenols induce the production of IP3 that recruits calcium from ER pool. Polyphenolic compounds do act extracellularly as addition of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (BSA) significantly diminished the rise in [Ca2+]i evoked by the formers. OFPC also induced plasma membrane hyperpolarisation which was reversed by addition of BSA. OFPC were found to curtail the expression of IL-2 mRNA and T-cell blastogenesis. Together these results suggest that OFPC induce increases in [Ca2+]i via ER pool and opening of CRAC channels, and exert immunosuppressive effects in Jurkat T-cells.

  6. Virome analysis of antiretroviral-treated HIV patients shows no correlation between T-cell activation and anelloviruses levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Bruhn, Roberta; Deeks, Steven G.; Delwart, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormally high levels of T-cell activation can persist in HIV-infected subjects despite effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and has been associated with negative health outcomes. The nature of the antigenic drivers or other causes of this residual T-cell activation remain uncertain. Anelloviruses are universally acquired soon after birth, resulting in persistent viremia, and considered part of the commensal human virome. Reduced immunocompetence results in increased anellovirus levels. Objectives To test whether increased levels of anelloviruses or other viruses in plasma are associated with higher levels of persistent T-cell activation during ART. Study design Two amplification methods combined with next generation sequencing were used to detect all viruses and estimate relative anellovirus levels in plasma from 19 adults on effective ART who exhibited a wide range of T-cell activation levels. Results Nucleic acids from HBV and HCV were detected in one patient each while pegivirus A (GBV-C) was found in three patients. Anellovirus DNA was detected in all patients with some individuals carrying up to eight different genotypes. Specific anellovirus genotypes or higher level of co-infections were not detected in subjects with higher levels of T-cell activation. No association was detected between relative plasma anellovirus DNA levels and the percentage of activated CD4 or CD8 T cells. Conclusions Human anelloviruses were detected in all HIV suppressed subjects, exhibited a wide range of viremia levels, and were genetically highly diverse. The level of persistent T-cell activation was not correlated with the level of viremia or genotypes present indicating that anellovirus antigens are unlikely to be a dominant source of antigens driving chronic T-cell activation. PMID:26479202

  7. T-cell activation: A queuing theory analysis at low agonist density.

    PubMed

    Wedagedera, J R; Burroughs, N J

    2006-09-01

    We analyze a simple linear triggering model of the T-cell receptor (TCR) within the framework of queuing theory, in which TCRs enter the queue upon full activation and exit by downregulation. We fit our model to four experimentally characterized threshold activation criteria and analyze their specificity and sensitivity: the initial calcium spike, cytotoxicity, immunological synapse formation, and cytokine secretion. Specificity characteristics improve as the time window for detection increases, saturating for time periods on the timescale of downregulation; thus, the calcium spike (30 s) has low specificity but a sensitivity to single-peptide MHC ligands, while the cytokine threshold (1 h) can distinguish ligands with a 30% variation in the complex lifetime. However, a robustness analysis shows that these properties are degraded when the queue parameters are subject to variation-for example, under stochasticity in the ligand number in the cell-cell interface and population variation in the cellular threshold. A time integration of the queue over a period of hours is shown to be able to control parameter noise efficiently for realistic parameter values when integrated over sufficiently long time periods (hours), the discrimination characteristics being determined by the TCR signal cascade kinetics (a kinetic proofreading scheme). Therefore, through a combination of thresholds and signal integration, a T cell can be responsive to low ligand density and specific to agonist quality. We suggest that multiple threshold mechanisms are employed to establish the conditions for efficient signal integration, i.e., coordinate the formation of a stable contact interface.

  8. Decreased Gaq expression in T cells correlates with enhanced cytokine production and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiao; Yu, Bing; Qian, Hongyan; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant T cell immune responses appear central to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We previously reported that Gαq, the alpha subunit of Gq, regulates T and B cell immune responses, promoting autoimmunity. To address whether Gαq contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE, Gαq mRNA expression was studied using real time-PCR in PBMCs and T cells from SLE patients as well as age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Our results showed that Gαq mRNA expression was decreased in PBMCs and T cells from SLE patients compared to healthy individuals. Correlation analyses showed that Gαq expression in T cells from SLE patients was associated with disease severity (as per SLE Disease Activity Index), the presence of lupus nephritis, and expression of Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines. In keeping with clinical results, T-helper cell subsets (Th1, Th2 and Th17) were over-represented in Gαq knockout mice. In addition, Gαq expression in SLE T cells was negatively correlated with the expression of Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic gene, and positively correlated with the expression of Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene. These data suggest that reduced Gαq levels in T cells may promote enhanced and prolonged T cell activation, contributing to the clinical manifestations of SLE. PMID:27965465

  9. Targeted suppression of autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation using blocking anti-CD8 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Mathew; Pearson, James A.; Gras, Stephanie; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Lissina, Anya; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Willis, Mark D.; Dockree, Tamsin; McLaren, James E.; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Gostick, Emma; Robertson, Neil P.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Wong, F. Susan; Peakman, Mark; Skowera, Ania; Wooldridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T-cells play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. However, drugs that target the entire CD8+ T-cell population are not desirable because the associated lack of specificity can lead to unwanted consequences, most notably an enhanced susceptibility to infection. Here, we show that autoreactive CD8+ T-cells are highly dependent on CD8 for ligand-induced activation via the T-cell receptor (TCR). In contrast, pathogen-specific CD8+ T-cells are relatively CD8-independent. These generic differences relate to an intrinsic dichotomy that segregates self-derived and exogenous antigen-specific TCRs according to the monomeric interaction affinity with cognate peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI). As a consequence, “blocking” anti-CD8 antibodies can suppress autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation in a relatively selective manner. These findings provide a rational basis for the development and in vivo assessment of novel therapeutic strategies that preferentially target disease-relevant autoimmune responses within the CD8+ T-cell compartment. PMID:27748447

  10. Characterization of a subset of bone marrow-derived natural killer cells that regulates T cell activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Taba; Trivedi, Prachi P; Wolf, Norbert A; Roberts, Paul C; Swanborg, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    We report that bone marrow-derived natural killer (BMNK) cells from DA or F344 rats inhibit PMA/ionomycin-induced T cell proliferation. These NK-regulatory cells are NKR-P1A(dim), whereas a minor subpopulation is NKR-P1A(bright). Only the NKR-P1A(dim) BMNK cells inhibit T cell proliferation. If activated with rat Con A supernatant, the NKR-P1A(dim) cells become NKR-P1A(bright) and lose the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast to BMNK cells, all DA and F344 rat NK cells isolated from the blood, spleen, cervical, or mesenteric lymph nodes or Peyer's patches are NKR-P1A(bright) and lack the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. Inhibition of T cell proliferation correlates with significant down-regulation of CD3, suggesting that this may be the mechanism through which the NKR-P1A(dim) cells mediate suppression. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-arginine acetate-abrogated NKR-P1A(dim) cell inhibition of T cell proliferation. We conclude that rat bone marrow NKR-P1A(dim) cells represent a unique population that may play a role in maintaining immune homeostasis by regulating the clonal expansion of activated T cells.

  11. Dysregulated miR34a/diacylglycerol kinase ζ interaction enhances T-cell activation in acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan-xin; Li, Hui; Feng, Qi; Li, Xin; Yu, Ying-yi; Zhou, Li-wei; Gao, Yan; Li, Guo-sheng; Ren, Juan; Ma, Chun-hong; Gao, Cheng-jiang; Peng, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an idiopathic paradigm of human bone marrow failure syndrome, which involves active destruction of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors by cytotoxic T cells in the bone marrow. Aberrant expression of microRNAs in T cells has been shown to lead to development of certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we performed a microarray analysis of miRNA expression in bone marrow CD3+ T cells from patients with aplastic anemia and healthy controls. Overexpression of miR34a and underexpression of its target gene diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) ζ in bone marrow mononuclear cells were validated in 41 patients and associated with the severity of aplastic anemia. Further, the level of miR34a was higher in naïve T cells from patients than from controls. The role of miR34a and DGKζ in aplastic anemia was investigated in a murine model of immune-mediated bone marrow failure using miR34a−/− mice. After T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro, lymph node T cells from miR34a−/− mice demonstrated reduced activation and proliferation accompanied with a less profound down-regulation of DGKζ expression and decreased ERK phosphorylation compared to those from wild-type C57BL6 control mice. Infusion of 5 × 106 miR34a−/− lymph node T cells into sublethally irradiated CB6F1 recipients led to increased Lin-Sca1+CD117+ cells and less vigorous expansion of CD8+ T cells than injection of same number of wild-type lymph node cells. Our study demonstrates that the miR34a/DGKζ dysregulation enhances T-cell activation in aplastic anemia and targeting miR34a may represent a novel molecular therapeutic approach for patients with aplastic anemia. PMID:28008152

  12. Dysregulated miR34a/diacylglycerol kinase ζ interaction enhances T-cell activation in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Xin; Li, Hui; Feng, Qi; Li, Xin; Yu, Ying-Yi; Zhou, Li-Wei; Gao, Yan; Li, Guo-Sheng; Ren, Juan; Ma, Chun-Hong; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Peng, Jun

    2017-01-24

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an idiopathic paradigm of human bone marrow failure syndrome, which involves active destruction of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors by cytotoxic T cells in the bone marrow. Aberrant expression of microRNAs in T cells has been shown to lead to development of certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we performed a microarray analysis of miRNA expression in bone marrow CD3+ T cells from patients with aplastic anemia and healthy controls. Overexpression of miR34a and underexpression of its target gene diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) ζ in bone marrow mononuclear cells were validated in 41 patients and associated with the severity of aplastic anemia. Further, the level of miR34a was higher in naïve T cells from patients than from controls. The role of miR34a and DGKζ in aplastic anemia was investigated in a murine model of immune-mediated bone marrow failure using miR34a-/- mice. After T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro, lymph node T cells from miR34a-/- mice demonstrated reduced activation and proliferation accompanied with a less profound down-regulation of DGKζ expression and decreased ERK phosphorylation compared to those from wild-type C57BL6 control mice. Infusion of 5 × 106 miR34a-/- lymph node T cells into sublethally irradiated CB6F1 recipients led to increased Lin-Sca1+CD117+ cells and less vigorous expansion of CD8+ T cells than injection of same number of wild-type lymph node cells. Our study demonstrates that the miR34a/DGKζ dysregulation enhances T-cell activation in aplastic anemia and targeting miR34a may represent a novel molecular therapeutic approach for patients with aplastic anemia.

  13. Dynamic Regulation of TCR–Microclusters and the Microsynapse for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Saito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell is the initiating event in T cell-mediated adaptive immunity. The Immunological Synapse (IS) is formed at the interface between these two cell types, and is the site where antigen (Ag)-specific recognition and activation are induced through the T cell receptor (TCR). This occurs at the center of the IS, and cell adhesion is supported through integrins in the area surrounding the TCR. Recently, this model has been revised based on data indicating that the initial Ag-specific activation signal is triggered prior to IS formation at TCR–microclusters (MCs), sites where TCR, kinases and adaptors of TCR proximal downstream signaling molecules accumulate as an activation signaling cluster. TCR–MCs then move into the center of the cell–cell interface to generate the cSMAC. This translocation of TCR–MCs is mediated initially by the actin cytoskeleton and then by dynein-induced movement along microtubules. The translocation of TCR–MCs and cSMAC formation is induced upon strong TCR stimulation through the assembly of a TCR–dynein super complex with microtubules. The Ag-specific activation signal is induced at TCR–MCs, but the adhesion signal is now shown to be induced by generating a “microsynapse,” which is composed of a core of TCR–MCs and the surrounding adhesion ring of integrin and focal adhesion molecules. Since the microsynapse is critical for activation, particularly under weak TCR stimulation, this structure supports a weak TCR signal through a cell–cell adhesion signal. The microsynapse has a structure similar to the IS but on a micro-scale and regulates Ag-specific activation as well as cell–cell adhesion. We describe here the dynamic regulation of TCR–MCs, responsible for inducing Ag-specific activation signals, and the microsynapse, responsible for adhesion signals critical for cell–cell interactions, and their interrelationship. PMID:27446085

  14. Direct activation of antigen-presenting cells is required for CD8+ T-cell priming and tumor vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kratky, Wolfgang; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Oxenius, Annette; Spörri, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Successful priming of adaptive immune responses is crucially dependent on innate activation signals that convert resting antigen-presenting cells (APCs) into immunogenic ones. APCs expressing the relevant innate pattern recognition receptors can be directly activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to become competent to prime T-cell responses. Alternatively, it has been suggested that APCs could be activated indirectly by proinflammatory mediators synthesized by PAMP-exposed cells. However, data obtained with CD4+ T cells suggest that inflammatory signals often cannot substitute for direct pattern recognition in APC activation for the priming of T helper responses. To test whether the same is true for CD8+ T cells, we studied cytotoxic T lymphocyte development in vitro and in mixed chimeric mice in which coexisting APCs can either present a preprocessed model antigen or directly recognize a given PAMP, but not both. We show that indirectly activated APCs promote antigen-specific proliferation of naïve CD8+ T cells but fail to support their survival and cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation. Furthermore, CD8+ T cells primed by indirectly activated APCs are unable to reject tumors. Thus, inflammation cannot substitute for direct recognition of single PAMPs in CD8+ T-cell priming. These findings have important practical implications for vaccine design, indicating that adjuvants must be judiciously chosen to trigger the relevant pattern recognition receptors in APCs. PMID:21987815

  15. Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) modulates antioxidant activity and human T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) also known as Jujube, is a deciduous shrub which belongs to Rhamnaceae family. This plant is used in Algerian traditional medicine for its anti-diabetic, sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic activities. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of different vitamins (vitamin A, C and E) and fatty acids in root, stem, leaves, fruit pulp and seed of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) and assessed the effects of their aqueous extracts on antioxidant status and human T-cell proliferation. Methods Aqueous filtrates from different parts, i.e, root, leaf, stem, fruit pulp and seed, of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) were prepared. Vitamin C levels were determined by precipitating with 10% trichloroacetic acid and vitamin A and E were assessed by HPLC. Lipid composition of these extracts was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Anti-oxidant capacity was evaluated by using anti-radical resistance kit [Kit Radicaux Libres (KRL@; Kirial International SA, Couternon, France)]. T-cell blastogenesis was assessed by the incorporation of 3H-thymidine. IL-2 gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Results Our results show that fruit pulp contained higher vitamin A and C contents than other parts of the plant. Furthermore, the fruit pulp was the richest source of linoleic acid (18:2n-6), a precursor of n-6 fatty acids. Fruit seeds possessed higher vitamin C levels than leaves, roots and stem. The leaves were the richest source of vitamin E and linolenic acid (18:3n-3), a precursor of n-3 fatty acids. The antioxidant capacity of the different extracts, measured by KRL@ test, was as follows: pulp < seedT-cell proliferation is concerned, we observed that the different extracts of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) exerted immunosuppressive effects. Conclusion Seed extracts exerted the most potent immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation and IL-2 mRNA expression. The results of the present study are

  16. Contact dependent suppression of CD4 T cell activation and proliferation by B cells activated through IgD cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Preciado-Llanes, Lorena; Wing, James B; Foster, Rachel A; Carlring, Jennifer; Lees, Andrew; Read, Robert C; Heath, Andrew W

    2014-09-20

    Although the co-stimulatory interaction between B and T cells is well defined, recent evidence suggests that B cells also have a regulatory role. Here, we show that B cells activated using anti-IgD conjugated to dextran (α-δ-dex) directly inhibit TCR-induced CD4 T cell activation, proliferation and cytokine production. This effect was observed in CD4 T cells activated both with and without CD28 co-stimulation. T cell viability was unaffected, and the T cell suppressive effect was mediated by contact with IgD activated purified B cells and not by IL-10 or other soluble factors. This is the first evidence of IgD activated B cells mediating inhibition of activation and proliferation of CD4 T cells in humans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Interrogating the signaling dynamics of T cell activation with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnement, Michael R.; Faley, Shannon L.; Wikswo, John P.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2006-02-01

    We report the use of antibody-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) to monitor the expression dynamics of the membrane bound cytokine receptor interleukin-2 receptor-α (IL-2Rα) throughout the course of Jurkat T cell activation. Maximal receptor expression is observed 32-48 hours after activation, followed by a sharp decrease subsequent to 48 hours consistent with IL-2R internalization. Fluorescence microscopy, ELISA, and FACS analyses were used to verify controlled activation and specificity of QD labeling. Additionally, confocal microscopy demonstrated receptor internalization subsequent to expression and QD labeling. Antibody-conjugated QDs provide a convenient means to rapidly determine cell state and interrogate end products of cell signaling pathways. Interrogation of other signaling pathways can eventually be carried out in a similar manner upon identification of relevant membrane associated receptors. Ultimately, the multiplexing capabilities of QDs will allow the examination of several signaling pathways simultaneously and aid in toxin detection and discrimination.

  18. Quantitative and Temporal Requirements Revealed for Zap-70 Catalytic Activity During T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Melichar, Heather J.; Ross, Jenny O.; Cheng, Debra A.; Zikherman, Julie; Shokat, Kevan M.; Robey, Ellen A.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Zap-70 is crucial for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, but the quantitative and temporal requirements for its function in thymocyte development are not known. Using a chemical-genetic system to selectively and reversibly inhibit Zap-70 catalytic activity in a model of synchronized thymic selection, we showed that CD4+CD8+ thymocytes integrate multiple, transient, Zap-70-dependent signals over more than 36 h to reach a cumulative threshold for positive selection, whereas one hour of signaling was sufficient for negative selection. Titration of Zap-70 activity resulted in graded reductions in positive and negative selection but did not decrease the cumulative TCR signals integrated by positively selected OT-I cells, revealing heterogeneity, even among CD4+CD8+ thymocytes expressing identical TCRs undergoing positive selection. PMID:24908390

  19. Monoclonal cryoimmunoglobulin with anti-cytomegalovirus activity associated with T cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Seigneurin, J M; Renversez, J C; Baccard, M; Seigneurin, D; Micouin, C

    1980-01-01

    A patient with chronic T cell lymphocytic leukaemia developed a monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG3 kappa = 14 g/l) which was in part cryoprecipitable. At the same time, a subclinical CMV infection occurred which was associated with a neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, and which led to a rise in anti-CMV antibodies. The F(ab')2 fragment of IgG3 kappa, obtained by enzymatic cleavage, was examined for several antiviral activities and it was found to have a strong anti-CMV activity using the immunofluorescence test with anti-kappa conjugate. This is one of the few examples of a cryoglobulin with specific antiviral activity. The leukaemia, possibly together with immunosuppressive therapy, may have been responsible for the uncontrolled proliferation of the clone producing the cryoimmunoglobulin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6254708

  20. T-cell activation by transitory neo-antigens derived from distinct microbial pathways.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Alexandra J; Eckle, Sidonia B G; Birkinshaw, Richard W; Liu, Ligong; Patel, Onisha; Mahony, Jennifer; Chen, Zhenjun; Reantragoon, Rangsima; Meehan, Bronwyn; Cao, Hanwei; Williamson, Nicholas A; Strugnell, Richard A; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Mak, Jeffrey Y W; Fairlie, David P; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James

    2014-05-15

    T cells discriminate between foreign and host molecules by recognizing distinct microbial molecules, predominantly peptides and lipids. Riboflavin precursors found in many bacteria and yeast also selectively activate mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, an abundant population of innate-like T cells in humans. However, the genesis of these small organic molecules and their mode of presentation to MAIT cells by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-related protein MR1 (ref. 8) are not well understood. Here we show that MAIT-cell activation requires key genes encoding enzymes that form 5-amino-6-d-ribitylaminouracil (5-A-RU), an early intermediate in bacterial riboflavin synthesis. Although 5-A-RU does not bind MR1 or activate MAIT cells directly, it does form potent MAIT-activating antigens via non-enzymatic reactions with small molecules, such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal, which are derived from other metabolic pathways. The MAIT antigens formed by the reactions between 5-A-RU and glyoxal/methylglyoxal were simple adducts, 5-(2-oxoethylideneamino)-6-D-ribitylaminouracil (5-OE-RU) and 5-(2-oxopropylideneamino)-6-D-ribitylaminouracil (5-OP-RU), respectively, which bound to MR1 as shown by crystal structures of MAIT TCR ternary complexes. Although 5-OP-RU and 5-OE-RU are unstable intermediates, they became trapped by MR1 as reversible covalent Schiff base complexes. Mass spectra supported the capture by MR1 of 5-OP-RU and 5-OE-RU from bacterial cultures that activate MAIT cells, but not from non-activating bacteria, indicating that these MAIT antigens are present in a range of microbes. Thus, MR1 is able to capture, stabilize and present chemically unstable pyrimidine intermediates, which otherwise convert to lumazines, as potent antigens to MAIT cells. These pyrimidine adducts are microbial signatures for MAIT-cell immunosurveillance.

  1. Hepatic CD206-positive macrophages express amphiregulin to promote the immunosuppressive activity of regulatory T cells in HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kai; Huang, Ling; Sun, Xiaomei; Yang, Lihua; Gong, Zuojiong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a major cause of chronic liver inflammation worldwide. Innate and adaptive immune responses work together to restrain or eliminate hepatitis B virus in the liver. Compromised or failed adaptive immune response results in persistent virus replication and spread. How to promote antiviral immunity is a research focus for hepatitis B virus prevention and therapy. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in the regulation of antiviral immunity. We found that F4/80(+)CD206(+)CD80(lo/+) macrophages were a particular hepatic macrophage subset that expressed amphiregulin in our mouse hepatitis B virus infection model. CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin promoted the immunosuppressive activity of intrahepatic regulatory T cells, demonstrated by higher expression of CTLA-4, ICOS, and CD39, as well as stronger inhibition of antiviral function of CD8(+) T cells. Amphiregulin-neutralizing antibody diminished the effect of CD206(+) macrophages on regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin activated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in regulatory T cells, and this mammalian target of rapamycin activation was essential for promotion of regulatory T cell activity by CD206(+) macrophages. Adoptive transfer of CD206(+) macrophages into hepatitis B virus-infected mice increased cytoplasmic hepatitis B virus DNA in hepatocytes and also increased serum hepatitis B surface antigen. The antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells was decreased after macrophage transfer. Therefore, our research indicated that amphiregulin produced by CD206(+) macrophages plays an important role in modulating regulatory T cell function and subsequently restrains the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells. Our study offers new insights into the immunomodulation in hepatitis B virus infection.

  2. Elevated PD-1 expression and decreased telomerase activity in memory T cells of patients with symptomatic Herpes Zoster infection.

    PubMed

    Zangeneh, Z; Golmoghaddam, H; Emad, M; Erfani, N; Doroudchi, M

    2014-11-16

    We investigated PD-1 levels on VZV-specific CD8+ T-cells of patients with zoster and the effect of PD-1 on the telomerase activity. CD3, CD8, CD137 and PD-1 expressions were analyzed on PBMCs from 9 symptomatic and 5 asymptomatic individuals. The effect of PD-1 blockade at the time of stimulation on the telomerase activity of non-senescent CD57-CD45RO+CD8+CD3+ memory T-cells was evaluated. PD-1 was elevated on CD8+ T-cells in patients. The frequency of PD-1+ and CD137- cells in total CD3+CD8+ T cells of patients was elevated compared to controls. Telomerase activity of non-senescent memory T-cells was lower than that of controls. Blockade of PD-1 at the time of stimulation increased telomerase activity of non-senescent memory T-cells, accompanied by increased CD137 expression. Low telomerase activity of the patients with reactivated zoster could be partially overcome by blocking PD-1 pathway.

  3. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  4. Inhibition of NAMPT pathway by FK866 activates the function of p53 in HEK293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Basant Kumar; Dittrich, Tino; Chandra, Prakash; Becker, Annette; Lippka, Yannick; Selvakumar, Divakarvel; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Welte, Karl

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In 293T cells, p53 is considered to be inactive due to its interaction with the large T-antigen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation of p53 at lysine 382 is important for its functional activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First evidence to document the presence of a functional p53 in 293T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NAMPT/SIRT pathway by FK866 in 293T cells increases the functional activity of p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This activation of p53 involves reversible acetylation of p53 at lysine 382. -- Abstract: Inactivation of p53 protein by endogenous and exogenous carcinogens is involved in the pathogenesis of different human malignancies. In cancer associated with SV-40 DNA tumor virus, p53 is considered to be non-functional mainly due to its interaction with the large T-antigen. Using the 293T cell line (HEK293 cells transformed with large T antigen) as a model, we provide evidence that p53 is one of the critical downstream targets involved in FK866-mediated killing of 293T cells. A reduced rate of apoptosis and an increased number of cells in S-phase was accompanied after knockdown of p53 in these cells. Inhibition of NAMPT by FK866, or inhibition of SIRT by nicotinamide decreased proliferation and triggered death of 293T cells involving the p53 acetylation pathway. Additionally, knockdown of p53 attenuated the effect of FK866 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The data presented here shed light on two important facts: (1) that p53 in 293T cells is active in the presence of FK866, an inhibitor of NAMPT pathway; (2) the apoptosis induced by FK866 in 293T cells is associated with increased acetylation of p53 at Lys382, which is required for the functional activity of p53.

  5. Active and suppressor T cells: diminution in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita and in first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Fudenberg, H H; Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Salinas, C F

    1979-01-01

    Active, total and nonspecific suppressor T cells were studied in a 15-year-old black male with dyskeratosis congenita syndrome, a precancerous mucosal disease, and in 7 siblings and several other relatives in three generations. The propositus and 1 elder sister, products of a second-cousin marriage, died with dyskeratosis congenita. The mother had dermatomyositis, and the maternal grandmother and her sister reportedly had rheumatoid arthritis. Studies of available siblings, father, and grandparents revealed a high incidence of deficiency in number of active and/or suppressor T cells, sometimes severe enough to result in a decrease in total T cells. The patient had many stigmata of precocious aging, as did the sibling who died with the same syndrome. The laboratory data suggest that a defect in cell-mediated immunity, involving mainly or exclusively suppressor T cells, is associated with, and is presumably the cause of, precocious aging; perhaps an abiotrophy in this cell subpopulation results in physiologic aging.

  6. CD4 T-Cell Responses in Primary HIV Infection: Interrelationship with Immune Activation and Virus Burden

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Mathieu F.; Didier, Céline; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Manea, Maria E.; Campa, Pauline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Weiss, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Early events during primary HIV infection (PHI) are thought to influence disease outcome. Although a growing body of evidence suggests a beneficial role of HIV-specific CD4 help in HIV infection, it is unclear how early viral replication, systemic immune activation, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may shape CD4 T-cell responses during PHI, and whether HIV-specific CD4 responses contribute to the high immune activation observed in PHI. Twenty-seven patients with early PHI were included in a prospective longitudinal study and 12 of them received ART after enrollment. Fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for measurement of ex vivo T-cell activation and of cytokine-producing CD4 T-cells following stimulation with PMA/ionomycin or HIV-1-gag-p24 antigen. Patients were segregated based on CD8 T-cell activation level (i.e., % HLA-DR+CD38+ CD8 T-cells) at baseline (BL). Patients with lower immune activation exhibited higher frequency of bulk CD4 T-cells producing IFN-γ or IL-17 and higher effector-to-regulatory cell ratios. No differences were found in HIV-specific CD4 T-cell frequencies. In contrast, segregation of patients based on plasma viral load (pVL) revealed that patients with higher pVL showed higher cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD4 responses. Of note, the frequency of IFN-γ+ HIV-specific CD4 T cells significantly diminished between BL and month 6 only in ART-treated patients. However, early treatment initiation was associated with better maintenance of HIV-specific IFN-γ+ CD4 T-cells. These data suggest that HIV-specific CD4 responses do not fuel systemic T-cell activation and are driven by viral replication but not able to contribute to its control in the early phase of infection. Moreover, our data also suggest a benefit of early treatment for the maintenance of HIV-specific CD4 T-cell help. PMID:27746782

  7. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  8. The human IL-2 gene promoter can assemble a positioned nucleosome that becomes remodeled upon T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Attema, Joanne L; Reeves, Raymond; Murray, Vincent; Levichkin, Ilya; Temple, Mark D; Tremethick, David J; Shannon, M Frances

    2002-09-01

    Controlled production of the cytokine IL-2 plays a key role in the mammalian immune system. Expression from the gene is tightly regulated with no detectable expression in resting T cells and a strong induction following T cell activation. The IL-2 proximal promoter (+1 to -300) contains many well-defined transcriptional activation elements that respond to T cell stimulation. To determine the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of interleukin-2 gene transcription, nucleosome assembly across the IL-2 promoter region was examined using in vitro chromatin reconstitution assays. The IL-2 promoter assembles a nucleosome that is both translationally and rotationally positioned, spanning some of the major functional control elements. The binding of transcription factors to these elements, with the exception of the architectural protein HMGA1, was occluded by the presence of the nucleosome. Analysis of the chromatin architecture of the IL-2 gene in Jurkat T cells provided evidence for the presence of a similarly positioned nucleosome in vivo. The region encompassed by this nucleosome becomes remodeled following activation of Jurkat T cells. These observations suggest that the presence of a positioned nucleosome across the IL-2 proximal promoter may play an important role in maintaining an inactive gene in resting T cells and that remodeling of this nucleosome is important for gene activation.

  9. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  10. IL-7 modulates B cells survival and activation by inducing BAFF and CD70 expression in T cells.

    PubMed

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Ruffin, Nicolas; Lantto, Rebecka; Vivar, Nancy; Chiodi, Francesca; Rethi, Bence

    2012-06-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) promotes the maintenance and activation of peripheral T cells, whereas it does not act directly on mature B cells due to the lack of IL-7Rα expression on these. We report here that, in spite of the insensitivity of B cells to IL-7, high concentration of IL-7 can lead to increased B cell survival and antibody production in the presence of T cells, without the use of any further B cell stimulatory signal. IL-7 promoted B cell activation through inducing CD70 expression on resting T cells, particularly on CD4+ memory cells. The interaction of CD70 molecules with the B cell costimulatory receptor CD27 led to B cell proliferation, the accumulation of CD38 + CD20- plasmablasts and antibody production. In addition, IL-7 treatment induced BAFF secretion from resting peripheral T cells thereby promoting B cell survival. IL-7 levels can increase in lymphopenic conditions, in autoimmune diseases or in patients receiving T cell regenerative IL-7 therapy. Based on our findings high IL-7 levels can lead to increased B cell activation by inducing the B cell regulatory proteins CD70 and BAFF in resting T cells. Such activity might be beneficial in short term immune-stimulatory IL-7 therapies; permanently increased IL-7 levels, on the other hand, can contribute to impaired B cell tolerance.

  11. Soluble CD80 restores T cell activation and overcomes tumor cell programmed death ligand 1-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Haile, Samuel T; Dalal, Sonia P; Clements, Virginia; Tamada, Koji; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    Many tumor cells escape anti-tumor immunity through their expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL1 or B7-H1), which interacts with T cell-expressed PD1 and results in T cell apoptosis. We previously reported that transfection of human tumor cells with a membrane-bound form of the human costimulatory molecule CD80 prevented PD1 binding and restored T cell activation. We now report that a membrane-bound form of murine CD80 similarly reduces PDL1-PD1-mediated suppression by mouse tumor cells and that a soluble protein consisting of the extracellular domains of human or mouse CD80 fused to the Fc domain of IgG1 (CD80-Fc) overcomes PDL1-mediated suppression by human and mouse tumor cells, respectively. T cell activation experiments with human and mouse tumor cells indicate that CD80-Fc facilitates T cell activation by binding to PDL1 to inhibit PDL1-PD1 interactions and by costimulating through CD28. CD80-Fc is more effective in preventing PD1-PDL1-mediated suppression and restoring T cell activation compared with treatment with mAb to either PD1 or PDL1. These studies identify CD80-Fc as an alternative and potentially more efficacious therapeutic agent for overcoming PDL1-induced immune suppression and facilitating tumor-specific immunity.

  12. Retinoic Acid Can Exacerbate T Cell Intrinsic TLR2 Activation to Promote Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vivien; Pearson, Kandyce; Kim, Jee-Hyun; Kamdar, Karishma; DePaolo, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of vitamin A to immune health has been well established. However, recent evidence indicates that its active metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), has the ability to promote both tolerogenic and inflammatory responses. While the outcome of RA-mediated immunity is dependent upon the immunological status of the tissue, the contribution of specific innate signals influencing this response have yet to be delineated. Here, we found that treatment with RA can dampen inflammation during intestinal injury. Importantly, we report a novel and unexpected requirement for TLR2 in RA-mediated suppression. Our data demonstrate that RA treatment enhances TLR2-dependent IL-10 production from T cells and this, in turn, potentiates T regulatory cell (TREG) generation without the need for activation of antigen presenting cells. These data also suggest that combinatorial therapy using RA and TLR2 ligands may be advantageous in the design of therapies to treat autoimmune or inflammatory disease. PMID:25826367

  13. Allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA binding activity, and inhibit phosphorylated NF-κB p65 nuclear localization in CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Ryuichi; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Obata, Fumiya; Kubo, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    CD8+ T-cells of asymptomatic HIV-1 carriers (AC) suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I)-restricted and -unrestricted manner. In order to investigate the mechanism of MHC-I-unrestricted CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 suppression, we previously established allo-antigen stimulated CD8+T-cells from HIV-1-uninfected donors. These allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppressed HIV-1 replication in acutely infected autologous CD4+ T-cells when directly co-cultured. To elucidate the mechanism of HIV-1 replication suppression, we analyzed DNA-binding activity and phosphorylation of transcriptional factors associated with HIV-1 replication by electrophoresis mobility shift assay and Western blotting. When CD4+ T-cells were cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells, the reduction of NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA-binding activity was observed. Nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 was suppressed in CD4+ T-cells. Although NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 are known to be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA), no difference was observed in the expression and phosphorylation of the PKA catalytic subunit in CD4+ T-cells cultured with PHA-treated CD8+ T-cells or allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Cyclic AMP is also known to enter through gap junctions, but the suppression of HIV-1 replication mediated by allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells was not affected by the gap junction inhibitor. The nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276) was inhibited only in CD4+ T-cells cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Our results indicate that allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress the transcriptional activity of NF-κB p65 or Ets-1 in an antigen-nonspecific manner, and inhibit the nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276).

  14. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 tax mutants that selectively abrogate NFkappaB or CREB/ATF activation fail to transform primary human T cells.

    PubMed

    Ross, T M; Narayan, M; Fang, Z Y; Minella, A C; Green, P L

    2000-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) Tax protein has been implicated in the HTLV oncogenic process, primarily due to its pleiotropic effects on cellular genes involved in growth regulation and cell cycle control. To date, several approaches attempting to correlate Tax activation of the CREB/activating transcription factor (ATF) or NFkappaB/Rel transcriptional activation pathway to cellular transformation have yielded conflicting results. In this study, we use a unique HTLV-2 provirus (HTLV(c-enh)) that replicates by a Tax-independent mechanism to directly assess the role of Tax transactivation in HTLV-mediated T-lymphocyte transformation. A panel of well-characterized tax-2 mutations is utilized to correlate the respective roles of the CREB/ATF or NFkappaB/Rel signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that viruses expressing tax-2 mutations that selectively abrogate NFkappaB/Rel or CREB/ATF activation display distinct phenotypes but ultimately fail to transform primary human T lymphocytes. One conclusion consistent with our results is that the activation of NFkappaB/Rel provides a critical proliferative signal early in the cellular transformation process, whereas CREB/ATF activation is required to promote the fully transformed state. However, complete understanding will require correlation of Tax domains important in cellular transformation to those Tax domains important in the modulation of gene transcription, cell cycle control, induction of DNA damage, and other undefined activities.

  15. Nuclear factor-κB activity in T cells from patients with rheumatic diseases: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Collantes, E.; Blazquez, M; Mazorra, V.; Macho, A.; Aranda, E.; Munoz, E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The NF-κB/Rel family of transcription factors regulates the expression of many genes involved in the immune or inflammatory response at the transcriptional level. The aim of this study was to determine whether distinctive patterns of NF-kB activation are seen in different forms of joint disease.
METHODS—The DNA binding activity of these nucleoproteins was examined in purified synovial and peripheral T cells from patients with various chronic rheumatic diseases (12: four with rheumatoid arthritis; five with spondyloarthropathies; and three with osteoarthritis).
RESULTS—Electrophoretic mobility shift assays disclosed two specific complexes bound to a NF-κB specific 32P-labelled oligonucleotide in nucleoproteins extracted from purified T cells isolated from synovial fluid and peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The complexes consisted of p50/p50 homodimers and p50/p65 heterodimers. Increased NF-kB binding to DNA in synovial T cells was observed relative to peripheral T cells. In non-rheumatoid arthritis, binding of NF-κB in synovial T cells was exclusively mediated by p50/p50 homodimers.
CONCLUSION—Overall, the results suggest that NF-κB may play a central part in the activation of infiltrating T cells in chronic rheumatoid arthritis. The activation of this nuclear factor is qualitatively different in rheumatoid synovial T cells to that in other forms of non-rheumatoid arthritis (for example, osteoarthritis, spondyloarthropathies).

 Keywords: NF-κB; synovial T cells; rheumatoid arthritis; spondyloarthropathy; osteoarthritis PMID:10070274

  16. Preserved Activity of CD20-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T Cells in the Presence of Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Rufener, Gregory A; Press, Oliver W; Olsen, Philip; Lee, Sang Yun; Jensen, Michael C; Gopal, Ajay K; Pender, Barbara; Budde, Lihua E; Rossow, Jeffrey K; Green, Damian J; Maloney, David G; Riddell, Stanley R; Till, Brian G

    2016-06-01

    CD20 is an attractive immunotherapy target for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD20 is a promising strategy. A theoretical limitation is that residual serum rituximab might block CAR binding to CD20 and thereby impede T cell-mediated anti-lymphoma responses. The activity of CD20 CAR-modified T cells in the presence of various concentrations of rituximab was tested in vitro and in vivo CAR-binding sites on CD20(+) tumor cells were blocked by rituximab in a dose-dependent fashion, although at 37°C blockade was incomplete at concentrations up to 200 μg/mL. T cells with CD20 CARs also exhibited modest dose-dependent reductions in cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity, but not proliferation, against lymphoma cell lines. At rituximab concentrations of 100 μg/mL, CAR T cells retained ≥50% of baseline activity against targets with high CD20 expression, but were more strongly inhibited when target cells expressed low CD20. In a murine xenograft model using a rituximab-refractory lymphoma cell line, rituximab did not impair CAR T-cell activity, and tumors were eradicated in >85% of mice. Clinical residual rituximab serum concentrations were measured in 103 lymphoma patients after rituximab therapy, with the median level found to be only 38 μg/mL (interquartile range, 19-72 μg/mL). Thus, despite modest functional impairment in vitro, the in vivo activity of CD20-targeted CAR T cells remains intact at clinically relevant levels of rituximab, making use of these T cells clinically feasible. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 509-19. ©2016 AACR

  17. Cytoskeletal polarization of T cells is regulated by an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lowin-Kropf, B; Shapiro, V S; Weiss, A

    1998-02-23

    Binding of a T cell to an appropriate antigen-presenting cell (APC) induces the rapid reorientation of the T cell cytoskeleton and secretory apparatus towards the cell-cell contact site in a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and peptide/major histocompatibility complex-dependent process. Such T cell polarization directs the delivery of cytokines and cytotoxic mediators towards the APC and contributes to the highly selective and specific action of effector T cells. To study the signaling pathways that regulate cytoskeletal rearrangements in T lymphocytes, we set up a conjugate formation assay using Jurkat T cells as effectors and cell-sized latex beads coated with various antibodies as artificial APCs. Here, we report that beads coated with antibodies specific for the TCR-CD3 complex were sufficient to induce T cell polarization towards the bead attachment site, as judged by reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and localized actin polymerization. Thus, these cytoskeletal changes did not depend on activation of additional coreceptors. Moreover, single subunits of the TCR complex, namely TCR-zeta and CD3epsilon, were equally effective in inducing cytoskeletal polarization. However, mutagenesis of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs), present three times in TCR-zeta and once in CD3epsilon, revealed that the induction of cytoskeletal rearrangements required the presence of at least one intact ITAM. In agreement with this result, lack of functional Lck, the protein tyrosine kinase responsible for ITAM phosphorylation, abolished both MTOC reorientation and polarized actin polymerization. Both inhibitor and transient overexpression studies demonstrated that MTOC reorientation could occur in the absence of Ras activation. Our results suggest that APC-induced T cell polarization is a TCR-mediated event that is coupled to the TCR by the same signaling motif as TCR-induced gene activation, but diverges in its distal signaling

  18. Cytokine-mediated induction of endothelial adhesion molecule and histocompatibility leukocyte antigen expression by cytomegalovirus-activated T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, W. J.; Knight, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been associated with allograft rejection and transplantation-associated arteriosclerosis. CMV infects endothelium, the interface between allograft tissue and the host immune system; however, mechanisms by which such interaction might exacerbate the rejection process remain unresolved. Here we test the hypothesis that host immune activity, triggered by CMV-infected graft endothelial cells (ECs), can result in the production of cytokines capable of enhancing the alloimmunogenicity of nearby uninfected endothelia. To model these phenomena in vitro, confluent monolayers of ECs derived from human umbilical vein or adult gonadal vein were incubated 5 days beneath trans-well culture inserts containing CMV-seropositive or CMV-seronegative donor-derived CD3+ or CD4+ T cells alone or in combination with CMV-infected or uninfected allogeneic ECs. The extent of T cell proliferation was determined by [3H]thymidine labeling of trans-well contents after transfer to microtiter plates. Endothelial responses to soluble factors elaborated by CMV-activated T cells were determined by immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence flow cytometric analysis of underlying EC monolayers. Results of experiments with CMV-seropositive donor-derived CD4+ T cells demonstrated enhancement of ICAM-1 and histocompatibility leukocyte antigen class I, as well as induction of histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR on ECs incubated beneath T cell/EC/CMV trans-well co-cultures. Total (CD3+) T cells co-cultured with EC/CMV induced VCAM-1 as well. Furthermore, [3H]thymidine incorporation by these T cells indicated a strong proliferative response. Endothelial responses to T cells alone or in combination with uninfected ECs were minimal, and T cells cultured under these conditions showed little proliferative activity. Similarly, little or no endothelial responses were apparent in monolayers beneath trans-wells containing T cells isolated from CMV-seronegative individuals

  19. Autoreactive helper T cells alleviate the need for intrinsic TLR signaling in autoreactive B cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Josephine R.; Neves, Adriana Turqueti; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    T cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus; however, there is relatively little information on the nature and specificity of autoreactive T cells. Identifying such cells has been technically difficult because they are likely to be rare and low affinity. Here, we report a method for identifying autoreactive T cell clones that recognize proteins contained in autoantibody immune complexes, providing direct evidence that functional autoreactive helper T cells exist in the periphery of normal mice. These T cells significantly enhanced autoreactive B cell proliferation and altered B cell differentiation in vivo. Most importantly, these autoreactive T cells were able to rescue many aspects of the TLR-deficient AM14 (anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor) B cell response, suggesting that TLR requirements can be bypassed. This result has implications for the efficacy of TLR-targeted therapy in the treatment of ongoing disease. PMID:28239656

  20. Dopamine receptors D3 and D5 regulate CD4(+)T-cell activation and differentiation by modulating ERK activation and cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Franz, Dafne; Contreras, Francisco; González, Hugo; Prado, Carolina; Elgueta, Daniela; Figueroa, Claudio; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine receptors have been described in T-cells, however their signalling pathways coupled remain unknown. Since cAMP and ERKs play key roles regulating T-cell physiology, we aim to determine whether cAMP and ERK1/2-phosphorylation are modulated by dopamine receptor 3 (D3R) and D5R, and how this modulation affects CD4(+) T-cell activation and differentiation. Our pharmacologic and genetic evidence shows that D3R-stimulation reduced cAMP levels and ERK2-phosphorylation, consequently increasing CD4(+) T-cell activation and Th1-differentiation, respectively. Moreover, D5R expression reinforced TCR-triggered ERK1/2-phosphorylation and T-cell activation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate how D3R and D5R modulate key signalling pathways affecting CD4(+) T-cell activation and Th1-differentiation.

  1. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ Agonists Prevent In Vivo Remodeling of Human Artery Induced by Alloreactive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tobiasova, Zuzana; Zhang, Lufeng; Yi, Tai; Qin, Linfeng; Manes, Thomas D.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Lorber, Marc I.; Rodriguez, Frederick C.; Choi, Je-Min; Tellides, George; Pober, Jordan S.; Kawikova, Ivana; Bothwell, Alfred L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ligands activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) have antiinflammatory effects. Vascular rejection induced by allogeneic T cells can be responsible for acute and chronic graft loss. Studies in rodents suggest that PPARγ agonists may inhibit graft vascular rejection, but human T-cell responses to allogeneic vascular cells differ from those in rodents, and the effects of PPARγ in human transplantation are unknown. Methods and Results We tested the effects of PPARγ agonists on human vascular graft rejection using a model in which human artery is interposed into the abdominal aorta of immunodeficient mice, followed by adoptive transfer of allogeneic (to the artery donor) human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Interferon-γ–dependent rejection ensues within 4 weeks, characterized by intimal thickening, T-cell infiltrates, and vascular cell activation, a response resembling clinical intimal arteritis. The PPARγ agonists 15-deoxy-prostaglandin-J2, ciglitazone, and pioglitazone reduced intimal expansion, intimal infiltration of CD45RO+ memory T cells, and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines. The PPARγ antagonist GW9662 reversed the protective effects of PPARγ agonists, confirming the involvement of PPARγ-mediated pathways. In vitro, pioglitazone inhibited both alloantigen-induced proliferation and superantigen-induced transendothelial migration of memory T cells, indicating the potential mechanisms of PPARγ effects. Conclusion Our results suggest that PPARγ agonists inhibit allogeneic human memory T cell responses and may be useful for the treatment of vascular graft rejection. PMID:21690493

  3. The virulence polysaccharide Vi released by Salmonella Typhi targets membrane prohibitin to inhibit T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Srikanth K; Dutta, Debjani; Parween, Farhat; Qadri, Ayub

    2014-07-01

    T cells are critical to immunity against pathogenic Salmonella including Salmonella Typhi which causes systemic infection, typhoid, in humans. The strategies that this pathogen employs to keep T-cell mediated immune responses in check during establishment of systemic infection are not completely understood. Here, we show that the virulence polysaccharide Vi, which distinguishes S. Typhi from localized gastroenteritis-producing nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars, is a potent inhibitor of T-cell activation. Vi released by S. Typhi interacts with the membrane prohibitin complex and inhibits IL-2 secretion from T cells stimulated through the T-cell receptor (TCR) but does not affect PMA-activated interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion. Treatment with Vi suppresses early activation events including TCR down-regulation, actin polymerization, and phosphorylation of ERK. Coadministration of Vi with anti-CD3 Ab reduces secretion of IL-2 and interferon γ in mice. Our findings reveal a mechanism by which S. Typhi may target T-cell immunity during establishment of typhoid.

  4. Calcium mobilization is both required and sufficient for initiating chromatin decondensation during activation of peripheral T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Megan D.; Bingham, Kellie N.; Mitchell, Taylor Y.; Meredith, Jenna L.; Rawlings, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen engagement of the T-cell receptor (TCR) induces a rapid and dramatic decondensation of chromatin that is necessary for T-cell activation. This decondensation makes T-cells competent to respond to Interleukin-2 providing a mechanism to ensure clonotypic proliferation during an immune response. Using murine T-cells, we investigated the mechanism by which TCR signaling can initiate chromatin decondensation, focusing on the role of calcium mobilization. During T-cell activation, calcium is first released from intracellular stores, followed by influx of extracellular calcium via store operated calcium entry. We show that mobilization of intracellular calcium is required for TCR-induced chromatin decondensation. However, the decondensation is not dependent on the activity of the downstream transcription factor NFAT. Furthermore, we show that the influx of extracellular calcium is dispensable for initiating chromatin decondensation. Finally, we show that mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores is sufficient to induce decondensation, independent of TCR engagement. Collectively, our data suggest that chromatin decondensation in peripheral T-cells is controlled by modulating intracellular calcium levels. PMID:25453467

  5. Interleukin-37 Enhances the Suppressive Activity of Naturally Occurring CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Wei; Dong, Ning; Wu, Yao; Zhu, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Chun-Ting; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for the suppression of autoimmunity and can control the immune-mediated pathology during the early phase of sepsis. Our previous data showed that silencing interleukin-37 (IL-37) in human CD4+CD25+ Tregs obviously reduced the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Here, we found that rhIL-37 stimulation markedly enhanced the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs isolated from naive C57BL/6 J mice in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Treatment with rhIL-37 could significantly upregulate the expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (CTLA)-4 and forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3) on CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Also, rhIL-37 stimulation promoted the production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) but not IL-10 in the supernatants of cultured CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Pretreated CD4+CD25+ Tregs with rhIL-37 in the presence or absence of LPS were cocultured with CD4+CD25− T cells, ratio of IL-4/interferon-γ in the supernatants obviously increased in IL-37-stimulated groups. In addition, early administration of IL-37 significantly improved the survival rate of septic mice induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Taken together, we concluded that rhIL-37 enhances the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs and might be a potential immunomodulator for the treatment of septic complications. PMID:27941849

  6. Itk Signals Promote Neuroinflammation by Regulating CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun K.; Kim, Do-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (Itk) signaling in cluster of differentiation 4-positive (CD4+) T cells promotes experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We show that Itk−/− mice exhibit reduced disease severity, and transfer of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into T cell-deficient recipients results in lower disease severity. We observed a significant reduction of CD4+ T cells in the CNS of Itk−/− mice or recipients of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells during EAE, which is consistent with attenuated disease. Itk−/− CD4+ T cells exhibit defective response to myelin antigen stimulation attributable to displacement of filamentous actin from the CD4+ coreceptor. This results in inadequate transmigration of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into the CNS and across brain endothelial barriers in vitro. Finally, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells show significant reduction in production of T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines and exhibit skewed T effector/T regulatory cell ratios. These results indicate that signaling by Itk promotes autoimmunity and CNS inflammation, suggesting that it may be a viable target for treatment of MS. PMID:25568116

  7. Constitutively Active Lck Kinase in T Cells Drives Antigen Receptor Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Konstantina; Soldani, Cristiana; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Paster, Wolfgang; Gray, Adrian; Etzensperger, Ruth; Fugger, Lars; Polzella, Paolo; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Dushek, Omer; Höfer, Thomas; Viola, Antonella; Acuto, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    Summary T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and coreceptor ligation is thought to initiate signal transduction by inducing activation of the kinase Lck. Here we showed that catalytically active Lck was present in unstimulated naive T cells and thymocytes and was readily detectable in these cells in lymphoid organs. In naive T cells up to ∼40% of total Lck was constitutively activated, part of which was also phosphorylated on the C-terminal inhibitory site. Formation of activated Lck was independent of TCR and coreceptors but required Lck catalytic activity and its maintenance relied on monitoring by the HSP90-CDC37 chaperone complex to avoid degradation. The amount of activated Lck did not change after TCR and coreceptor engagement; however it determined the extent of TCR-ζ phosphorylation. Our findings suggest a dynamic regulation of Lck activity that can be promptly utilized to initiate T cell activation and have implications for signaling by other immune receptors. PMID:20541955

  8. The Transmembrane Domain of HIV-1 gp41 Inhibits T-Cell Activation by Targeting Multiple T-Cell Receptor Complex Components through Its GxxxG Motif.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Etai; Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Klug, Yoel A; Shai, Yechiel

    2016-02-23

    To successfully infect and persist within its host, HIV-1 utilizes several immunosuppressive motifs within its gp41 envelope glycoprotein to manipulate and evade the immune system. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 downregulates T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling through a hitherto unknown mechanism. Interactions between TMDs within the membrane milieu have been shown to be typically mediated by particular amino acids, such as interactions between basic and acidic residues and dimerization motifs as GxxxG. The HIV-1 TMD exhibits both a polar arginine (Arg(696)) residue and a GxxxG motif, making them ideal candidates for mediators of TMD-TCR interaction. Using a primary T-cell activation assay and biochemical and biophysical methods, we demonstrate that the gp41 TMD directly interacts with TMDs of the TCR and the CD3 coreceptors (δ, γ, and ε) within the membrane, presumably leading to impairment of complex assembly. Additionally, we reveal that although Arg(696) does not affect TMD immunosuppression, the GxxxG motif is crucial in mediating gp41's TMD interaction with the CD3 coreceptors of the TCR. These findings suggest that compared with other gp41 immunosuppressive motifs, the gp41 TMD has multiple targets within the TCR complex, suggesting less susceptibility to evolutionary pressure and consequently being advantageous for the virus over the host immune response. Furthermore, as the GxxxG motif mediates interactions of the gp41 TMD with multiple receptors, it emerges as an attractive drug target. This multitarget inhibitory mechanism might be a strategy utilized by HIV to interfere with the function of additional host receptors.

  9. Monosomy 1p36 uncovers a role for OX40 in survival of activated CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Suhoski, M M; Perez, E E; Heltzer, M L; Laney, A; Shaffer, L G; Saitta, S; Nachman, S; Spinner, N B; June, C H; Orange, J S

    2008-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is a subtelomeric deletion syndrome associated with congenital anomalies presumably due to haploinsufficiency of multiple genes. Although immunodeficiency has not been reported, genes encoding costimulatory molecules of the TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) are within 1p36 and may be affected. In one patient with monosomy 1p36, comparative genome hybridization and fluorescence in- situ hybridization confirmed that TNFRSF member OX40 was included within the subtelomeric deletion. T cells from this patient had decreased OX40 expression after stimulation. Specific, ex vivo T cell activation through OX40 revealed enhanced proliferation, and reduced viability of patient CD4+ T cells, providing evidence for the association of monosomy 1p36 with reduced OX40 expression, and decreased OX40-induced T cell survival. These results support a role for OX40 in human immunity, and calls attention to the potential for haploinsufficiency deletions of TNFRSF costimulatory molecules in monosomy 1p36.

  10. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein is a negative regulator of the CD8 T cell response in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Tai, Albert K; Lin, Miao; Chang, Francesca; Terhorst, Cox; Huber, Brigitte T

    2005-08-15

    The primary manifestation of X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, caused by a dysfunctional adapter protein, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein (SAP), is an excessive T cell response upon EBV infection. Using the SAP-/- mouse as a model system for the human disease, we compared the response of CD8+ T cells from wild-type (wt) and mutant mice to various stimuli. First, we observed that CD8+ T cells from SAP-/- mice proliferate more vigorously than those from wt mice upon CD3/CD28 cross-linking in vitro. Second, we analyzed the consequence of SAP deficiency on CTL effector function and homeostasis. For this purpose, SAP-/- and wt mice were infected with the murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). At 2 wk postinfection, the level of viral-specific CTL was much higher in mutant than in wt mice, measured both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, we established that throughout 45 days of MHV-68 infection the frequency of virus-specific CD8+ T cells producing IFN-gamma was significantly higher in SAP-/- mice. Consequently, the level of latent infection by MHV-68 was considerably lower in SAP-/- mice, which indicates that SAP-/- CTL control this infection more efficiently than wt CTL. Finally, we found that the Vbeta4-specific CD8+ T cell expansion triggered by MHV-68 infection is also enhanced and prolonged in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, our data indicate that SAP functions as a negative regulator of CD8+ T cell activation.

  11. Neurocognitive decline in HIV patients is associated with ongoing T-cell activation in the cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Grauer, Oliver M; Reichelt, Doris; Grüneberg, Ute; Lohmann, Hubertus; Schneider-Hohendorf, Tilman; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Gross, Catharina C; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz; Husstedt, Ingo W

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain a challenge despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Immune cell activation has been implicated to play a major role in the development of HAND. Methods In this study, we used multicolor flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples to determine the expression of HLA-DR and programmed death-1 (PD-1) on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in patients with chronic HIV infection. Expression levels were correlated with HI virus load in PB and CSF, classification of HAND and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal abnormalities. Results In a cohort of 86 HIV patients we found that the grade of neurocognitive impairment and the severity of MRI signal abnormalities correlated with decreasing CD4/CD8-ratios and increased frequencies of HLA-DR expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells reaching the highest values in the CSF samples. Importantly, HLA-DR upregulation was still detectable in virologically suppressed HIV patients. Further, T-cell subpopulation analysis of 40 HIV patients showed a significant shift from naïve to effector memory (EM) T cells that was negatively correlated with the grade of neurocognitive impairment in the PB samples. Moreover, PD-1 was significantly increased on CD4+ memory T cells with highest levels on EM T cells in HIV patients with mild or severe neurocognitive alterations. Interpretation The CD4/CD8 ratio, the proportion of EM to naïve T cells and the immune activation profile of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in PB and CSF might be useful parameters to monitor the efficacy of cART and to identify HIV patients at risk of further neurocognitive deterioration. PMID:26401512

  12. The chemokine CCL5 regulates glucose uptake and AMP kinase signaling in activated T cells to facilitate chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Olivia; Burke, J Daniel; Gao, Darrin F; Fish, Eleanor N

    2012-08-24

    Recruitment of effector T cells to sites of infection or inflammation is essential for an effective adaptive immune response. The chemokine CCL5 (RANTES) activates its cognate receptor, CCR5, to initiate cellular functions, including chemotaxis. In earlier studies, we reported that CCL5-induced CCR5 signaling activates the mTOR/4E-BP1 pathway to directly modulate mRNA translation. Specifically, CCL5-mediated mTOR activation contributes to T cell chemotaxis by initiating the synthesis of chemotaxis-related proteins. Up-regulation of chemotaxis-related proteins may prime T cells for efficient migration. It is now clear that mTOR is also a central regulator of nutrient sensing and glycolysis. Herein we describe a role for CCL5-mediated glucose uptake and ATP accumulation to meet the energy demands of chemotaxis in activated T cells. We provide evidence that CCL5 is able to induce glucose uptake in an mTOR-dependent manner. CCL5 treatment of ex vivo activated human CD3(+) T cells also induced the activation of the nutrient-sensing kinase AMPK and downstream substrates ACC-1, PFKFB-2, and GSK-3β. Using 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glucose uptake, and compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, experimental data are presented that demonstrate that CCL5-mediated T cell chemotaxis is dependent on glucose, as these inhibitors inhibit CCL5-mediated chemotaxis in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, these findings suggest that both glycolysis and AMPK signaling are required for efficient T cell migration in response to CCL5. These studies extend the role of CCL5 mediated CCR5 signaling beyond lymphocyte chemotaxis and demonstrate a role for chemokines in promoting glucose uptake and ATP production to match energy demands of migration.

  13. GD2-specific CAR T Cells Undergo Potent Activation and Deletion Following Antigen Encounter but can be Protected From Activation-induced Cell Death by PD-1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Christo, Susan N; Hayball, John D; Lewis, Ian D; Brenner, Malcolm K; Brown, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown great promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies but more variable results in the treatment of solid tumors and the persistence and expansion of CAR T cells within patients has been identified as a key correlate of antitumor efficacy. Lack of immunological "space", functional exhaustion, and deletion have all been proposed as mechanisms that hamper CAR T-cell persistence. Here we describe the events following activation of third-generation CAR T cells specific for GD2. CAR T cells had highly potent immediate effector functions without evidence of functional exhaustion in vitro, although reduced cytokine production reversible by PD-1 blockade was observed after longer-term culture. Significant activation-induced cell death (AICD) of CAR T cells was observed after repeated antigen stimulation, and PD-1 blockade enhanced both CAR T-cell survival and promoted killing of PD-L1(+) tumor cell lines. Finally, we assessed CAR T-cell persistence in patients enrolled in the CARPETS phase 1 clinical trial of GD2-specific CAR T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Together, these data suggest that deletion also occurs in vivo and that PD-1-targeted combination therapy approaches may be useful to augment CAR T-cell efficacy and persistence in patients.

  14. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A internal deletion mutants: serological activity and induction of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T O; Hufnagle, W O; Betley, M J

    1993-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the N-terminal region of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) is required for its ability to induce T-cell proliferation. To better localize internal peptides of SEA that are important for induction of murine T-cell proliferation, SEA mutants that had internal deletions in their N-terminal third were constructed. A series of unique restriction enzyme sites were first engineered into sea; only one of these changes resulted in an amino acid substitution (the aspartic acid residue at position 60 of mature SEA was changed to a glycine [D60G]). Because the D60G substitution had no discernible effect on serological or biological activity, the sea allele encoding this mutant SEA was used to construct a panel of mutant SEAs lacking residues 3 to 17, 19 to 23, 24 to 28, 29 to 49, 50 to 55, 56 to 59, 61 to 73, 68 to 74, or 74 to 85. Recombinant plasmids with the desired mutations were constructed in Escherichia coli and transferred to Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcal culture supernatants containing the mutant SEAs were examined. Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-SEA antiserum revealed that each of the recombinant S. aureus strains produced a mutant SEA of the predicted size. All the mutant SEAs exhibited increased sensitivity to monkey stomach lavage fluid in vitro, which is consistent with these mutants having conformations unlike that of wild-type SEA or the SEA D60G mutant. In general, deletion of internal peptides had a deleterious effect on the ability to induce T-cell proliferation; only SEA mutants lacking either residues 3 to 17 or 56 to 59 consistently produced a statistically significant increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine. In the course of this work, two monoclonal antibodies that had different requirements for binding to SEA in Western blots were identified. The epitope for one monoclonal antibody was contained within residues 108 to 230 of mature SEA. Binding of the other monoclonal antibody to

  15. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Definition of MS Myelin Immune-Mediated Disease T Cells d What Causes MS? Disproved Theories Viruses Clusters d Who Gets MS? Pediatric MS ... the progression of MS, without harming any immune cells that are not involved in the process of myelin destruction. Share Smaller ... More Immune-Mediated Disease Learn More Myelin ...

  16. Frontrunners of T cell activation: Initial, localized Ca2+ signals mediated by NAADP and the type 1 ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Insa M A; Diercks, Björn-Philipp; Gattkowski, Ellen; Czarniak, Frederik; Kempski, Jan; Werner, René; Schetelig, Daniel; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Schumacher, Valéa; von Osten, Manuel; Lodygin, Dimitri; Flügel, Alexander; Fliegert, Ralf; Guse, Andreas H

    2015-10-13

    The activation of T cells is the fundamental on switch for the adaptive immune system. Ca(2+) signaling is essential for T cell activation and starts as initial, short-lived, localized Ca(2+) signals. The second messenger nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) forms rapidly upon T cell activation and stimulates early Ca(2+) signaling. We developed a high-resolution imaging technique using multiple fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes to characterize these early signaling events and investigate the channels involved in NAADP-dependent Ca(2+) signals. In the first seconds of activation of either primary murine T cells or human Jurkat cells with beads coated with an antibody against CD3, we detected Ca(2+) signals with diameters close to the limit of detection and that were close to the activation site at the plasma membrane. In Jurkat cells in which the ryanodine receptor (RyR) was knocked down or in primary T cells from RyR1(-/-) mice, either these early Ca(2+) signals were not detected or the number of signals was markedly reduced. Local Ca(2+) signals observed within 20 ms upon microinjection of Jurkat cells with NAADP were also sensitive to RyR knockdown. In contrast, TRPM2 (transient receptor potential channel, subtype melastatin 2), a potential NAADP target channel, was not required for the formation of initial Ca(2+) signals in primary T cells. Thus, through our high-resolution imaging method, we characterized early Ca(2+) release events in T cells and obtained evidence for the involvement of RyR and NAADP in such signals.

  17. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A.; Víctor, Víctor M.; Esplugues, Juan V.; Rojas, José M.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys118, suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys118 contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  18. Glutathione peroxidase 1 deficiency attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury by modulation of T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D H; Son, D J; Park, M H; Yoon, D Y; Han, S B; Hong, J T

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model is well-established experimental T cell-mediated liver disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with T-cell activation and proliferation, but continued ROS exposure induces T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Because glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) is an antioxidant enzyme and is involved in T-cell development, we investigated the role of Gpx1 during Con A-induced liver injury in Gpx1 knockout (KO) mice. Male wild-type (WT) mice and Gpx1 KO mice were intravenously injected with Con A (10 mg/kg), and then killed after 8 h after Con A injection. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were measured to assess hepatic injury. To identify that Gpx1 affects T cell-mediated inflammation, we pretreated Gpx1 inhibitor to Human Jurkat T cells then treated Con A. Con A-induced massive liver damage in WT mice but its damage was attenuated in Gpx1 KO mice. Con A-induced Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 were also decreased in the liver and spleen of Gpx1 KO mice compared with WT mice. In Jurkat T cells, Con A-induced mRNA levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α were downregulated by pretreatment of Gpx inhibitor, mercaptosuccinic acid. We also observed that Gpx1 KO mice showed increasing oxidative stress in the liver and spleen compared with WT mice. These results suggest that Gpx1 deficiency attenuates Con A-induced liver injury by induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness through chronic ROS exposure. PMID:27124582

  19. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling regulates PTEN expression and intestinal cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingding; Zhou, Yuning; Jackson, Lindsey N.; Johnson, Sara M.; Chow, Chi-Wing; Evers, B. Mark

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) proteins are a family of transcription factors (NFATc1–c4) involved in the regulation of cell differentiation and adaptation. Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or overexpression of PTEN enhanced intestinal cell differentiation. Here we show that treatment of intestinal-derived cells with the differentiating agent sodium butyrate (NaBT) increased PTEN expression, NFAT binding activity, and NFAT mRNA expression, whereas pretreatment with the NFAT signaling inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) blocked NaBT-mediated PTEN induction. Moreover, knockdown of NFATc1 or NFATc4, but not NFATc2 or NFATc3, attenuated NaBT-induced PTEN expression. Knockdown of NFATc1 decreased PTEN expression and increased the phosphorylation levels of Akt and downstream targets Foxo1 and GSK-3α/β. Furthermore, overexpression of NFATc1 or the NFATc4 active mutant increased PTEN and p27kip1 expression and decreased Akt phosphorylation. In addition, pretreatment with CsA blocked NaBT-mediated induction of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity and villin and p27kip1 expression; knockdown of either NFATc1 or NFATc4 attenuated NaBT-induced IAP activity. We provide evidence showing that NFATc1 and NFATc4 are regulators of PTEN expression. Importantly, our results suggest that NFATc1 and NFATc4 regulation of intestinal cell differentiation may be through PTEN regulation. PMID:21148296

  20. Coordinated integrin activation by actin-dependent force during T-cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Elliott, Hunter L.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    For a cell to move forward it must convert chemical energy into mechanical propulsion. Force produced by actin polymerization can generate traction across the plasma membrane by transmission through integrins to their ligands. However, the role this force plays in integrin activation is unknown. Here we show that integrin activity and cytoskeletal dynamics are reciprocally linked, where actin-dependent force itself appears to regulate integrin activity. We generated fluorescent tension-sensing constructs of integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) to visualize intramolecular tension during cell migration. Using quantitative imaging of migrating T cells, we correlate tension in the αL or β2 subunit with cell and actin dynamics. We find that actin engagement produces tension within the β2 subunit to induce and stabilize an active integrin conformational state and that this requires intact talin and kindlin motifs. This supports a general mechanism where localized actin polymerization can coordinate activation of the complex machinery required for cell migration. PMID:27721490

  1. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  2. The catalytic activity of the kinase ZAP-70 mediates basal signaling and negative feedback of the T cell receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Debra A; Kadlecek, Theresa A.; Cantor, Aaron J.; Kuriyan, John

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation must be properly regulated to ensure normal T cell development and effective immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells while avoiding autoimmunity. The mechanisms controlling the fine-tuning of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell activation are unclear. The Syk family kinase ζ chain–associated protein kinase of 70 kD (ZAP-70) is a critical component of the TCR signaling machinery that leads to T cell activation. To elucidate potential feedback targets that are dependent on the kinase activity of ZAP-70, we performed a mass spectrometry–based, phosphoproteomic study to quantify temporal changes in phosphorylation patterns after inhibition of ZAP-70 catalytic activity. Our results provide insights into the fine-tuning of the T cell signaling network before and after TCR engagement. The data indicate that the kinase activity of ZAP-70 stimulates negative feedback pathways that target the Src family kinase Lck and modulate the phosphorylation patterns of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) of the CD3 and ζ-chain components of the TCR, and of downstream signaling molecules, including ZAP-70. We developed a computational model that provides a unified mechanistic explanation for the experimental findings on ITAM phosphorylation in wild-type cells, ZAP-70–deficient cells, and cells with inhibited ZAP-70 catalytic activity. This model incorporates negative feedback regulation of Lck activity by the kinase activity of ZAP-70 and makes unanticipated specific predictions for the order in which tyrosines in the ITAMs of TCR ζ-chains must be phosphorylated to be consistent with the experimental data. PMID:25990959

  3. IL10 and PD-1 Cooperate to Limit the Activity of Tumor-Specific CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaojun; Fourcade, Julien; Pagliano, Ornella; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M; Zarour, Hassane M

    2015-04-15

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors show great promise as therapy for advanced melanoma, heightening the need to determine the most effective use of these agents. Here, we report that programmed death-1(high) (PD-1(high)) tumor antigen (TA)-specific CD8(+) T cells present at periphery and at tumor sites in patients with advanced melanoma upregulate IL10 receptor (IL10R) expression. Multiple subsets of peripheral blood mononucleocytes from melanoma patients produce IL10, which acts directly on IL10R(+) TA-specific CD8(+) T cells to limit their proliferation and survival. PD-1 blockade augments expression of IL10R by TA-specific CD8(+) T cells, thereby increasing their sensitivity to the immunosuppressive effects of endogenous IL10. Conversely, IL10 blockade strengthened the effects of PD-1 blockade in expanding TA-specific CD8(+) T cells and reinforcing their function. Collectively, our findings offer a rationale to block both IL10 and PD-1 to strengthen the counteraction of T-cell immunosuppression and to enhance the activity of TA-specific CD8(+) T cell in advanced melanoma patients.

  4. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  5. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  6. Natural OX40L expressed on human T cell leukemia virus type-I-immortalized T cell lines interferes with infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by CCR5-utilizing human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OX40 ligand (OX40L) co-stimulates and differentiates T cells via ligation of OX40 that is transiently induced on T cells upon activation, resulting in prolonged T cell survival and enhanced cytokine production by T cells. This view has led to the targeting of OX40 as a strategy to boost antigen specific T cells in the context of vaccination. In addition, the ligation of OX40 has also been shown to inhibit infection by CCR5-utilizing (R5) but not CXCR4-utilizing (X4) human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) via enhancement of production of CCR5-binding β-chemokines. It was reasoned that human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) immortalized T cell lines that express high levels of OX40L could serve as an unique source of physiologically functional OX40L. The fact that HTLV-1+ T cell lines simultaneously also express high levels of OX40 suggested a potential limitation. Results Results of our studies showed that HTLV-1+ T cell lines bound exogenous OX40 but not OX40L, indicating that HTLV-1+ T cell lines express an active form of OX40L but an inactive form of OX40. Anti-OX40 non-blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not blocking mAb, stained HTLV-1+ T cell lines, suggesting that the OX40 might be saturated with endogenous OX40L. Functionality of the OX40L was confirmed by the fact that a paraformaldehyde (PFA)-fixed HTLV-1+ T cell lines inhibited the infection of autologous activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with R5 HIV-1 which was reversed by either anti-OX40L blocking mAb or a mixture of neutralizing mAbs against CCR5-binding β-chemokines. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrated that autologous T cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1 can be utilized as a conventional source of physiologically functional OX40L. PMID:24238037

  7. Microglia activity modulated by T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-wei; Zhu, Xin-li; Qin, Li-ming; Qian, Hai-jun; Wang, Yiner

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the main innate immune cells in the central nervous system that are actively involved in maintaining brain homeostasis and diseases. T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) plays critical roles in both the adaptive and the innate immune system and is an emerging therapeutic target for treatment of various disorders. In the brain Tim-3 is specifically expressed on microglia but its functional role is unclear. Here, we showed that Tim-3 was up-regulated on microglia by ATP or LPS stimulation. Tim-3 activation with antibodies increased microglia expression of TGF-β, TNF-α and IL-1β. Blocking of Tim-3 with antibodies decreased the microglial phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons. Tim-3 blocking alleviated the detrimental effect of microglia on neurons and promoted NG2 cell differentiation in co-cultures. Finally, MAPKs namely ERK1/2 and JNK proteins were phosphorylated upon Tim-3 activation in microglia. Data indicated that Tim-3 modulates microglia activity and regulates the interaction of microglia-neural cells.

  8. Synthetic glycolipid activators of natural killer T cells as immunotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Leandro J; Saavedra-Ávila, Noemí A; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Certain types of glycolipids have been found to have remarkable immunomodulatory properties as a result of their ability to activate specific T lymphocyte populations with an extremely wide range of immune effector properties. The most extensively studied glycolipid reactive T cells are known as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. The antigen receptors of these cells specifically recognize certain glycolipids, most notably glycosphingolipids with α-anomeric monosaccharides, presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule CD1d. Once activated, iNKT cells can secrete a very diverse array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, glycolipid-mediated activation of iNKT cells has been explored for immunotherapy in a variety of disease states, including cancer and a range of infections. In this review, we discuss the design of synthetic glycolipid activators for iNKT cells, their impact on adaptive immune responses and their use to modulate iNKT cell responses to improve immunity against infections and cancer. Current challenges in translating results from preclinical animal studies to humans are also discussed.

  9. Proteasome inhibition reduces superantigen-mediated T cell activation and the severity of psoriasis in a SCID-hu model.

    PubMed

    Zollner, Thomas M; Podda, Maurizio; Pien, Christine; Elliott, Peter J; Kaufmann, Roland; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2002-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that bacterial superantigens contribute to inflammation and T cell responses in psoriasis. Psoriatic inflammation entails a complex series of inductive and effector processes that require the regulated expression of various proinflammatory genes, many of which require NF-kappa B for maximal trans-activation. PS-519 is a potent and selective proteasome inhibitor based upon the naturally occurring compound lactacystin, which inhibits NF-kappa B activation by blocking the degradation of its inhibitory protein I kappa B. We report that proteasome inhibition by PS-519 reduces superantigen-mediated T cell-activation in vitro and in vivo. Proliferation was inhibited along with the expression of very early (CD69), early (CD25), and late T cell (HLA-DR) activation molecules. Moreover, expression of E-selectin ligands relevant to dermal T cell homing was reduced, as was E-selectin binding in vitro. Finally, PS-519 proved to be therapeutically effective in a SCID-hu xenogeneic psoriasis transplantation model. We conclude that inhibition of the proteasome, e.g., by PS-519, is a promising means to treat T cell-mediated disorders such as psoriasis.

  10. Specific T-cell tolerance may reflect selective activation of lymphokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vidard, L; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B

    1995-01-01

    Selective T-cell unresponsiveness, as measured by interleukin 2 (IL-2) synthesis upon challenge with antigen, was induced in SJL mice by ovalbumin (OVA) in incomplete or complete Freund's adjuvant administered i.p. or s.c. Ten days later, the mice were given booster injections of 100 micrograms of OVA/complete Freund's adjuvant. On day 20, lymph node and spleen cells were challenged in vitro with serial dilutions of OVA. There was an antigen-specific dose-dependent down regulation of IL-2 production and T-cell proliferation in lymph node T cells. Concomitantly, 100 micrograms of OVA up regulated IL-4 and, to a lesser extent, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production, particularly by spleen T cells. Altogether, these data indicate that the drop of IL-2 production and T-cell proliferation, as well as the up regulation of IL-4 and IFN-gamma production, are complex manifestations of an evolving T-cell response. The maturation of the T-cell response leads to the production of different patterns of lymphokines, which may be significantly affected, as desired, by dosage, timing, and route of immunization, as well as by the choice of adjuvants. PMID:7892258

  11. T cell tolerance and activation to a transgene-encoded tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, A; McCormick, D; Scott, D; Yeoman, H; Chandler, P; Mellor, A; Dyson, J

    1996-05-01

    Much has been learned in recent years concerning the nature of tumor antigens recognized by T cells. To apply this knowledge clinically, the nature of the host response to individual and multiple tumor antigens has to be characterized. This will help to define the efficacy of immune surveillance and the immune status of the host following exposure to tumor antigens expressed on pre-neoplastic tissue. To approach these questions, we have developed a transgenic mouse which expresses the tumor-specific antigen P91A. The single amino acid substitution in P91A results in the expression of a new MHC class I (H-2Ld)-binding peptide. In transgenic tissue, the H-2Ld/P91A complex is expressed in isolation from other tumor-associated antigens, allowing definition of the immune response to a single defined tumor antigen, a situation closely analogous to events during tumorigenesis. We show that CD8+ T cell immune surveillance of P91A is ineffective without the introduction of a helper determinant operating through stimulation of CD4+ T cells. Recognition of the isolated P91A tumor antigen on normal tissue by CD8+ T cells is a tolerogenic process. Induction of T cell tolerance suggests tumor antigen-T cell interactions occurring during tumorigenesis may elicit T cell tolerance and hence confound some immunotherapeutic approaches.

  12. Alloreactive T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Fitch, F W

    1984-01-01

    T cell clones are useful models for studying lymphocyte function both at the level of the individual cell and in interacting systems. Murine cytolytic and non- cytolyic T cell clones have been obtained with relative ease, and the particular procedure used to derive and maintain T cell clones may influence profoundly the characteristics of the resulting cells. The method of choice depends on the specific question to be asked. Although some clones have characteristics that would have been expected on the basis of results observed with bulk cell populations, other clones have rather unexpected properties. Although most T cell clones appear to be either cytolytic or non-cytolytic, this distinction is not always absolute. A high proportion of both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cell clones have dual reactivity. This is true for cells which by other criteria appear to be true clones. The frequency of such cells is high enough to suggest that most if not all T cells may have reactivity for more than one antigenic determinant or that antigenic determinants recognized by T cells are shared widely and unexpectedly. It is not clear whether one or two different antigen receptors account for such dual reactivity. The nature of the T cell receptor for antigen remains obscure. T cell clones, because of their homogeneous nature, should make it easier to answer these important immunological questions. Although it remains to be determined how many distinct molecules account for the numerous biological activities found in the culture supernatants from antigen-stimulated T cell clones, it is clear that these factors influence several different types of cells that are involved directly and indirectly in immune responses. IL-2 stimulates both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cells to proliferate. BCSF causes polyclonal activation of B cells, and there may be other factors which influence B cell responses to antigenic stimulation. IL-3 apparently stimulates maturation of immature T cells

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immunosuppression: selective triggering of CD4+ T-cell death by the T-cell receptor-CD3 pathway and not by the CD69 or Ly-6 activation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, M F; DosReis, G A

    1996-01-01

    In a model of experimental Chagas' disease induced with metacyclic forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells undergo T-cell receptor (TCR)-CD3-mediated activation-induced cell death (AICD) in vitro. CD4+ T cells from T. cruzi-infected mice also developed unresponsiveness in proliferative responses to TCR-CD3-mediated stimulation. A linear correlation was found between extent of proliferative unresponsiveness and loss of CD4+ T-cell viability. CD4+ T-cell activation through the CD69 or Ly-6 A/E pathway, on the other hand, did not result in proliferative unresponsiveness compared with controls. Lack of suppression in proliferation assays correlated with lack of AICD by cells stimulated through the CD69 or Ly-6 A/E pathway. Concomitant stimulation through CD69, however, did not rescue CD4+ T cells from CD3-induced death. Flow cytometry study of cells stimulated in vitro showed no defect in interleukin-2 receptor expression by CD4+ T cells from infected donors, which escaped TCR-mediated AICD. In vivo injection of anti-CD3 into acutely infected mice, but not into control mice, led to splenocyte DNA fragmentation and failed to increase splenic CD4+ T-cell numbers. These results show that TCR-CD3-mediated AICD is involved in CD4+ T-cell unresponsiveness in vitro following infection with T. cruzi. In addition, successful activation of these cells through the CD69 and Ly-6 pathways is due to differences in the inability of these stimuli to trigger AICD. Since TCR-CD3-mediated AICD can be induced in vivo in infected mice, these findings may be relevant for the onset of immunological disturbances in the host. PMID:8613360

  14. Jun NH2-terminal kinase is constitutively activated in T cells transformed by the intracellular parasite Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Galley, Y; Hagens, G; Glaser, I; Davis, W; Eichhorn, M; Dobbelaere, D

    1997-05-13

    When T cells become infected by the parasite Theileria parva, they acquire a transformed phenotype and no longer require antigen-specific stimulation or exogenous growth factors. This is accompanied by constitutive interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor expression. Transformation can be reversed entirely by elimination of the parasites using the specific drug BW720c. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase and jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family, which play a central role in the regulation of cellular differentiation and proliferation and also participate in the regulation of IL-2 and IL-2 receptor gene expression. T. parva was found to induce an unorthodox pattern of mitogen-activated protein kinase expression in infected T cells. JNK-1 and JNK-2 are constitutively active in a parasite-dependent manner, but have altered properties. In contrast, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 is not activated even though its activation pathway is functionally intact. Different components of the T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent signal transduction pathways also were examined. The TCRzeta or CD3epsilon chains were found not to be phosphorylated and T. parva-transformed T cells were resistant to inhibitors that block the early steps of T cell activation. Compounds that inhibit the progression of T cells to proliferation, however, were inhibitory. Our data provide the first example, to our knowledge, for parasite-mediated JNK activation, and our findings strongly suggest that T. parva not only lifts the requirement for antigenic stimulation but also entirely bypasses early TCR-dependent signal transduction pathways to induce continuous proliferation.

  15. CD107a as a marker of activation in chicken cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Wattrang, Eva; Dalgaard, Tina S; Norup, Liselotte R; Kjærup, Rikke B; Lundén, Anna; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2015-04-01

    The study aimed to evaluate cell surface mobilisation of CD107a as a general activation marker on chicken cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Experiments comprised establishment of an in vitro model for activation-induced CD107a mobilisation and design of a marker panel for the detection of CD107a mobilisation on chicken CTL isolated from different tissues. Moreover, CD107a mobilisation was analysed on CTL isolated from airways of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV)-infected birds direct ex vivo and upon in vitro stimulation. Results showed that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in combination with ionomycin was a consistent inducer of CD107a cell surface mobilisation on chicken CTL in a 4h cell culture model. In chickens experimentally infected with IBV, higher frequencies of CTL isolated from respiratory tissues were positive for CD107a on the cell surface compared to those from uninfected control chickens indicating in vivo activation. Moreover, upon in vitro PMA+ ionomycin stimulation, higher proportions of CTL isolated from the airways of IBV-infected chickens showed CD107a mobilisation compared to those from uninfected control chickens. Monitoring of CD107a cell surface mobilisation may thus be a useful tool for studies of chicken CTL cytolytic potential both in vivo and in vitro.

  16. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Are Essential for CD8+ T Cell Activation and Antitumor Responses After Local Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Sabine; Yang, Jianping; Ronchese, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Tumors harbor several populations of dendritic cells (DCs) with the ability to prime tumor-specific T cells. However, these T cells mostly fail to differentiate into armed effectors and are unable to control tumor growth. We have previously shown that treatment with immunostimulatory agents at the tumor site can activate antitumor immune responses and is associated with the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) in the tumor and tumor-draining lymph node (dLN). Here, we use depletion of DCs or monocytes and monocyte transfer to show that these moDCs are critical to the activation of antitumor immune responses. Treatment with the immunostimulatory agents monosodium urate crystals and Mycobacterium smegmatis induced the accumulation of monocytes in the dLN, their upregulation of CD11c and MHCII, and expression of iNOS, TNFα, and IL12p40. Blocking monocyte entry into the lymph node and tumor through neutralization of the chemokine CCL2 or inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling prevented the generation of moDCs, the infiltration of tumor-specific T cells into the tumor, and antitumor responses. In a reciprocal fashion, monocytes transferred into mice depleted of CD11c+ cells were sufficient to rescue CD8+ T cell priming in lymph node and delay tumor growth. Thus, monocytes exposed to the appropriate conditions become powerful activators of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells and antitumor immunity. PMID:26635798

  17. The NFAT-1 DNA binding complex in activated T cells contains Fra-1 and JunB.

    PubMed Central

    Boise, L H; Petryniak, B; Mao, X; June, C H; Wang, C Y; Lindsten, T; Bravo, R; Kovary, K; Leiden, J M; Thompson, C B

    1993-01-01

    Activation of T cells induces transcription of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene. IL-2 expression is regulated through the binding of transcription factors to multiple sites within the IL-2 enhancer. One such cis-acting element within the IL-2 enhancer is the NFAT-1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells) binding site. NFAT-1 binding activity is absent in resting cells but is induced upon T-cell activation. The induction of NFAT-1 binding activity can be inhibited by cyclosporin A, potentially accounting