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Sample records for activated temperature dependence

  1. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, George J.; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R.; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-06-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T <= 35 °C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy Eeff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole-1. Eeff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole-1. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  2. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  3. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  4. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes. PMID:27627349

  5. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  6. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  7. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-09-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature-dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T < 270 K and T < 260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high-temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  8. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T<270 K and T<260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  9. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~275 to ~400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures with the introduction of a new temperature dependence parameterisation. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multicomponent system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~190 to ~440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 25% in comparison to

  10. Temperature dependence of oxygen evolution through catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović-Bijelić, A.; Bijelić, G.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.; Vukojević, V.

    2007-09-01

    By experimental investigations of the temperature dependence of catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase in the temperature range 278 328 K, different kinetic profiles for oxygen evolution were found below and above 298 K. Extension of the model is proposed to account for these observations. By numeric simulations of the reaction kinetics at different temperatures, it was found that enhanced evaporation of molecular oxygen from the reaction solution is the main root through which oxygen is lost at elevated temperatures in laboratory conditions.

  11. Temperature dependence of the photoinduced anisotropy in chalcogenide glasses: Activation energies and their interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, V. K.; Adriaenssens, G. J.; Elliott, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Three distinct regions have been observed in the measured temperature dependence of photoinduced anisotropy in chalcogenide glasses (Se and AsSe). At high temperatures the relaxation of the induced anisotropy is governed by an Arrhenius law with a change of activation energy at the glass-transition temperature Tg (thus suggesting a method for detection of Tg in glasses). Conversely, the low-temperature relaxation is not thermally activated. These observations are explained by introducing a triple-well configurational diagram for the valence-alternation pairs (VAP's) and their environments, which are believed to be responsible. A transient neutral state connects two (initial and final) charged states of the VAP's. A symmetry reversal of the pyramid centered at an overcoordinated chalcogen atom is suggested as a microscopic mechanism for the photoinduced anisotropy.

  12. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  13. Temperature dependence of the activity of polyphenol peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases in modern and buried soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Blagodatskaya, E. V.; Blagodatsky, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Under conditions of the global climate warming, the changes in the reserves of soil humus depend on the temperature sensitivities of polyphenol peroxidases (PPPOs) and polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). They play an important role in lignin decomposition, mineralization, and humus formation. The temperature dependence of the potential enzyme activity in modern and buried soils has been studied during incubation at 10 or 20°C. The experimental results indicate that it depends on the availability of the substrate and the presence of oxygen. The activity of PPOs during incubation in the absence of oxygen for two months decreases by 2-2.5 times, which is balanced by an increase in the activity of PPPOs by 2-3 times. The increase in the incubation temperature to 20°C and the addition of glucose accelerates this transition due to the more abrupt decrease in the activity of PPOs. The preincubation of the soil with glucose doubles the activity of PPPOs but has no significant effect on the activity of PPOs. The different effects of temperature on two groups of the studied oxidases and the possibility of substituting enzymes by those of another type under changing aeration conditions should be taken into consideration in predicting the effect of the climate warming on the mineralization of the soil organic matter. The absence of statistically significant differences in the enzymatic activity between the buried and modern soil horizons indicates the retention by the buried soil of some of its properties (soil memory) and the rapid restoration of high enzymatic activity during the preincubation.

  14. Temperature dependence of bromine activation due to reaction with ozone in a proxy for organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edebeli, Jacinta; Ammann, Markus; Gilgen, Anina; Eichler, Anja; Schneebeli, Martin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of boundary layer ozone depletion events in the Polar Regions [1] and in the mid-latitudes [2], two areas of very different temperature regimes, begs the question of temperature dependence of reactions responsible for these observations [3]. These ODEs have been attributed to ozone reacting with halides leading to reactive halogens (halogen activation) of which bromide is extensively studied, R1 - R3 [4, 5] (R1 is a multiphase reaction). O3 + Br-→ O2 + OBr- (R1) OBr- + H+ ↔ HOBr (R2) HOBr + H+ + Br-→ Br2 + H2O (R3) Despite extensive studies of ozone-bromide interactions, the temperature dependence of bromine activation is not clear [3]. This limits parameterization of the involved reactions and factors in atmospheric models [3, 6]. Viscosity changes in the matrix (such as organic aerosols) due to temperature have been shown to influence heterogeneous reaction rates and products beyond pure temperature effect [7]. With the application of coated wall flow-tubes, the aim of this study is therefore to investigate the temperature dependence of bromine activation by ozone interaction while attempting to characterize the contributions of the bulk and surface reactions to observed ozone uptake. Citric acid is used in this study as a hygroscopically characterized matrix whose viscosity changes with temperature and humidity. Here, we present reactive ozone uptake measured between 258 and 289 K. The data show high reproducibility. Comparison of measured uptake with modelled bulk uptake at different matrix compositions (and viscosities) indicate that bulk reactive uptake dominates, but there are other factors which still need further consideration in the model. References 1. Barrie, L.A., et al., Nature, 1988. 334: p. 138 - 141. 2. Hebestreit, K., et al., Science, 1999. 283: p. 55-57. 3. Simpson, W.R., et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2007. 7: p. 4375 - 4418. 4. Haag, R.W. and J. Hoigné, Environ Sci Technol, 1983. 17: p. 261-267. 5. Oum, K.W., et

  15. Temperature dependence of bromine activation due to reaction with ozone in a proxy for organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edebeli, Jacinta; Ammann, Markus; Gilgen, Anina; Eichler, Anja; Schneebeli, Martin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of boundary layer ozone depletion events in the Polar Regions [1] and in the mid-latitudes [2], two areas of very different temperature regimes, begs the question of temperature dependence of reactions responsible for these observations [3]. These ODEs have been attributed to ozone reacting with halides leading to reactive halogens (halogen activation) of which bromide is extensively studied, R1 - R3 [4, 5] (R1 is a multiphase reaction). O3 + Br‑→ O2 + OBr‑ (R1) OBr‑ + H+ ↔ HOBr (R2) HOBr + H+ + Br‑→ Br2 + H2O (R3) Despite extensive studies of ozone-bromide interactions, the temperature dependence of bromine activation is not clear [3]. This limits parameterization of the involved reactions and factors in atmospheric models [3, 6]. Viscosity changes in the matrix (such as organic aerosols) due to temperature have been shown to influence heterogeneous reaction rates and products beyond pure temperature effect [7]. With the application of coated wall flow-tubes, the aim of this study is therefore to investigate the temperature dependence of bromine activation by ozone interaction while attempting to characterize the contributions of the bulk and surface reactions to observed ozone uptake. Citric acid is used in this study as a hygroscopically characterized matrix whose viscosity changes with temperature and humidity. Here, we present reactive ozone uptake measured between 258 and 289 K. The data show high reproducibility. Comparison of measured uptake with modelled bulk uptake at different matrix compositions (and viscosities) indicate that bulk reactive uptake dominates, but there are other factors which still need further consideration in the model. References 1. Barrie, L.A., et al., Nature, 1988. 334: p. 138 - 141. 2. Hebestreit, K., et al., Science, 1999. 283: p. 55-57. 3. Simpson, W.R., et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2007. 7: p. 4375 - 4418. 4. Haag, R.W. and J. Hoigné, Environ Sci Technol, 1983. 17: p. 261-267. 5. Oum

  16. Temperature and time dependence of the electro-mechanical properties of flexible active fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Atitallah, H.; Ounaies, Z.; Muliana, A.

    2016-04-01

    Active fiber composites (AFCs) are comprised of piezoelectric fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix. AFCs use interdigitated electrodes, which produce electric field lines parallel to the fiber direction, thus taking advantage of the larger d 33 piezoelectric coefficient. The polymer volume content of the AFCs is generally more than 50%; since polymers tend to have behaviors affected by their viscoelastic characteristics especially at elevated temperatures, it is necessary to understand the thermo-electro-mechanical behavior of AFCs at different loading rates. In this study, mechanical, electrical and electromechanical properties of AFCs were measured at different isothermal temperatures, namely 25 °C, 50 °C and 75 °C and at different loading rates. The measurements of all the properties of AFCs were done along the fiber direction. It was found that at higher temperatures, the modulus and tensile strength decreased for all strain rates and the strain at failure increased. The remnant polarization increased with decrease in frequency and increase in temperature; however, the coercive field decreased with temperature and was not affected by the frequency. Due to the viscoelastic behavior of the epoxy, the piezoelectric coefficient d 33 increased at higher temperature and lower frequency. It was also noted that this coefficient is dependent on the magnitude of the electric field.

  17. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence properties in a thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, Akitsugu; Kobayashi, Takashi Nagase, Takashi; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Goushi, Kenichi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-05-26

    Using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we have investigated the temperature dependence of PL properties of 1,2,3,5-tetrakis(carbazol-9-yl)-4,6-dicyano-benzene (4CzIPN), which have a small energy gap between its singlet and triplet excited states and thus exhibits efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence [H. Uoyama et al., Nature 492, 235 (2012)]. Below around 100 K, PL quantum efficiency of 4CzIPN thin films is largely suppressed and strong photoexcitation intensity dependence appears. These features can be explained by using rate equations for the densities of singlet and triplet excited states considering a triplet-triplet annihilation process.

  18. Patterns of sarcomere activation, temperature dependence, and effect of ryanodine in chemically skinned cardiac fibers

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Functionally skinned and electrochemically shunted myocytes were prepared by perfusing rat hearts with collagenase in order to obtain a technically improved measurement of sarcomere dynamics and to evaluate the role of sarcoplasmic reticulum in situ with respect to contractile activation. In the presence of micromolar calcium, the myocytes exhibited phasic and propagated contraction waves beginning at one end and proceeding along the myocyte. Beating rates, the propagation velocity of the activation wave, and single sarcomere shortening and relaxation velocities were obtained by manual or automated analysis of 16-mm film recorded at 170 frames/s from a camera attached to a microscope that was equipped with a temperature-controlled stage. In parallel experiments, calcium accumulation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the myocytes in situ was measured by direct isotopic tracer methods. The frequency (10-38 min-1) of spontaneous contractions, the velocity (1.9-7.4 microns . s-1) of sarcomere shortening, and the velocity (1.7-6.8 microns . s-1) of sarcomere relaxation displayed identical temperature dependences (Q10 = 2.2), which are similar to that of the calcium pump of sarcoplasmic reticulum and are consistent with a rate limit imposed by enzyme-catalyzed mechanisms on all these parameters. On the other hand, the velocity (77- 159 microns . s-1) of sequential sarcomere activation displayed a lower temperature dependence (Q10 = 1.5), which is consistent with a diffusion-limited and self-propagating release of calcium from one sarcomere to the other. The phasic contractile activity of the dissociated myocytes was inhibited by 10(-8)-10(6) M ryanodine (and not by myolemmal calcium blockers) under conditions in which calcium accumulation by sarcoplasmic reticulum in situ was demonstrated to proceed optimally. The effect of ryanodine is attributed to an interaction of this drug with sarcotubular structures, producing inhibition of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic

  19. Temperature Dependence of Magnetically Active Charge Excitations in Magnetite across the Verwey Transition.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, M; Chainani, A; Ueda, S; Matsunami, M; Ishida, Y; Eguchi, R; Tsuda, S; Takata, Y; Yabashi, M; Tamasaku, K; Nishino, Y; Ishikawa, T; Daimon, H; Todo, S; Tanaka, H; Oura, M; Senba, Y; Ohashi, H; Shin, S

    2015-12-18

    We study the electronic structure of bulk single crystals and epitaxial films of Fe_{3}O_{4}. Fe 2p core level spectra show clear differences between hard x-ray (HAX) and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (PES). The bulk-sensitive spectra exhibit temperature (T) dependence across the Verwey transition, which is missing in the surface-sensitive spectra. By using an extended impurity Anderson full-multiplet model-and in contrast to an earlier peak assignment-we show that the two distinct Fe species (A and B site) and the charge modulation at the B site are responsible for the newly found double peaks in the main peak above T_{V} and its T-dependent evolution. The Fe 2p HAXPES spectra show a clear magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) in the metallic phase of magnetized 100-nm-thick films. The model calculations also reproduce the MCD and identify the contributions from magnetically distinct A and B sites. Valence band HAXPES shows a finite density of states at E_{F} for the polaronic half metal with a remnant order above T_{V} and a clear gap formation below T_{V}. The results indicate that the Verwey transition is driven by changes in the strongly correlated and magnetically active B-site electronic states, consistent with resistivity and optical spectra. PMID:26722935

  20. Temperature-dependent hyper-activation of monoglucosyldiacylglycerol synthase is post-translationally regulated in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Mie; Tsuchiya, Mami; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2009-07-21

    The mechanism of monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (MGlcDG) increase following heat shock in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was examined by measuring MGlcDG synthase (Sll1377) activity. Temperature-dependent activation of Sll1377 was observed in the membrane fraction of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, whereas the Sll1377 protein level remained unchanged, suggesting that the activity is post-translationally regulated without covalent modification of Sll1377 by soluble enzymes. Four individual mutations introduced into recombinant Sll1377 (D147, D200, R329, and R331) significantly reduced the activity and blocked temperature-dependent activation, suggesting that these amino acid residues are essential for Sll1377 activity at both normal growth temperature and the higher temperature.

  1. Extraction of activation energies from temperature dependence of dark currents of SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, E.; Vinogradov, S.; Popova, E.; Wiest, F.; Iskra, P.; Gebauer, W.; Loebner, S.; Ganka, T.; Dietzinger, C.; Fojt, R.; Hansch, W.

    2016-02-01

    Despite several advantages of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) over Photomultiplier Tubes (PMT) like the increased photon detection efficiency (PDE), the compact design and the insensitivity to magnetic fields, the dark count rate (DCR) of SiPM is still a large drawback. Decreasing of the SiPM dark count rate has become a modern task, which could lead to an enormous enhancement of the application range of this promising photo-detector. The main goal of this work is to gain initial information on the dark generation and identify the dominating contributions to dark currents. The chosen approach to fulfill this task is to extract characteristic activation energies of the contributing mechanisms from temperature dependent investigations of dark currents and DCR. Since conventional methods are not suited for a precise analysis of activation energies, a new method has to be developed. In this paper, first steps towards the development of a reliable method for the analysis of dark currents and dark events are presented.

  2. Temperature-dependent fumigant activity of essential oils against twospotted spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Lim, Eu Gene; Roh, Hyun Sik; Coudron, Thomas A; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2011-04-01

    Fumigant activity of 34 commercial essential oils was assessed on female adults and eggs of twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) at three temperatures (5, 15, and 25 degrees C). Common thyme, cinnamon, and lemongrass oils were equally effective on twospotted spider mite adults showing 85.8-100% mortality at 5 and 10 microl/liter air at 25 degrees C. At a lower temperature of 15 degrees C, lemongrass and peppermint resulted in > or =90% mortality of adults at 10 microl/liter air. Only lemongrass was relatively active at 5 microl/liter air, at 15 degrees C. At 5 degrees C, lemongrass and peppermint caused significantly higher adult mortality than controls but only at 10 microl/liter air. Common thyme oil showed the highest ovicidal activity at 5 microl/liter air at 25 degrees C. Among the main components of common thyme and lemongrass oils, citral was lethal to twospotted spider mite adults at all tested temperatures. Carvacrol, thymol, and citral caused the same inhibitory effects on the hatch of twospotted spider mite eggs at 25 degrees C. However, citral was more active than other compounds to twospotted spider mite eggs at 15 degrees C. Therefore, we conclude that citral has the best potential for development as a fumigant against twospotted spider mite on agricultural products harvested late in the growing season.

  3. Temperature-Dependent Halogen-Exchange Activity Studies of Zeolite-Derived Aluminum Trifluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Hajime,E.; Delattre, J.; Stacy, A.

    2007-01-01

    A high-surface-area (190 m{sup 2}/g) amorphous aluminum trifluoride material ('plasma-AlF{sub 3}') was synthesized by plasma decomposition of zeolite, and its structural and reactivity properties were investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of plasma-AlF{sub 3} indicates morphological features on the nanometer-scale, whereas temperature-programmed X-ray diffraction is used to determine the phase-transition temperatures of plasma-AlF{sub 3} to {beta}- and {alpha}-AlF{sub 3}. Halogen-exchange reactivity is studied by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) techniques using the dismutation of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} as a model reaction. Plasma-AlF{sub 3} is found to possess an unexpected low-temperature (>315 C) activity not observed with the well-known halogen-exchange catalyst {beta}-AlF{sub 3}. Supporting TPR studies on aluminum trifluoride hydrates are performed to correlate this new activity with an amorphous AlF{sub 3} structure, and a simple Lewis acid model is presented to explain the reactivity data.

  4. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators.

  5. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators. PMID:27016583

  6. Cyclophilin40 isomerase activity is regulated by a temperature-dependent allosteric interaction with Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Wear, Martin A.; Landré, Vivian; Narayan, Vikram; Ning, Jia; Erman, Burak; Ball, Kathryn L.; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilin 40 (Cyp40) comprises an N-terminal cyclophilin domain with peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain that binds to the C-terminal–EEVD sequence common to both heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Hsp90. We show in the present study that binding of peptides containing the MEEVD motif reduces the PPIase activity by ∼30%. CD and fluorescence assays show that the TPR domain is less stable than the cyclophilin domain and is stabilized by peptide binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) shows that the affinity for the–MEEVD peptide is temperature sensitive in the physiological temperature range. Results from these biophysical studies fit with the MD simulations of the apo and holo (peptide-bound) structures which show a significant reduction in root mean square (RMS) fluctuation in both TPR and cyclophilin domains when–MEEVD is bound. The MD simulations of the apo-protein also highlight strong anti-correlated motions between residues around the PPIase-active site and a band of residues running across four of the seven helices in the TPR domain. Peptide binding leads to a distortion in the shape of the active site and a significant reduction in these strongly anti-correlated motions, providing an explanation for the allosteric effect of ligand binding and loss of PPIase activity. Together the experimental and MD results suggest that on heat shock, dissociation of Cyp40 from complexes mediated by the TPR domain leads to an increased pool of free Cyp40 capable of acting as an isomerase/chaperone in conditions of cellular stress. PMID:26330616

  7. Temperature dependence of decay time and intensity of alpha pulses in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Martinez, P.; Alekna, V.P.

    1962-01-01

    The intensity and decay time of Po210 ?? particle scintillations produced in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide have been measured with a fast electronic system as a function of temperature down to 77??K. Three modes of decay due to alpha excitation have been observed for CsI(Tl), and two for CsI. Other than the 7- and 0.55-??sec modes (at room temperature) reported in the literature for CsI(Tl), an additional temperature-independent mode of about 1.3 ??sec has been detected between 77 and 150??K. In CsI a fast temperature-dependent mode of decay (???100 nsec) was observed between 100-200??K in addition to the known principal mode. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. Temperature dependence of dc electrical conductivity of activated carbon-metal oxide nanocomposites. Some insight into conduction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso-Bogeat, Adrián; Alexandre-Franco, María; Fernández-González, Carmen; Sánchez-González, José; Gómez-Serrano, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    From a commercial activated carbon (AC) and six metal oxide (Al2O3, Fe2O3, SnO2, TiO2, WO3 and ZnO) precursors, two series of AC-metal oxide nanocomposites are prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 °C, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 or 850 °C in inert atmosphere. The temperature-dependent dc electrical conductivity of AC and the as-prepared nanocomposites is measured from room temperature up to ca. 200 °C in air atmosphere by the four-probe method. The decrease in conductivity for the hybrid materials as compared to AC is the result of a complex interplay between several factors, including not only the intrinsic conductivity, crystallite size, content and chemical nature of the supported nanoparticles, which ultimately depend on the precursor and heat treatment temperature, but also the adsorption of oxygen and water from the surrounding atmosphere. The conductivity data are discussed in terms of a thermally activated process. In this regard, both AC and the prepared nanocomposites behave as semiconductors, and the temperature-dependent conductivity data have been interpreted on the basis of the classical model proposed by Mott and Davis. Because of its high content of heteroatoms, AC may be considered as a heavily doped semiconductor, so that conduction of thermally excited carriers via acceptor or donor levels is expected to be the dominant mechanism. The activation energies for the hybrid materials suggest that the supported metal oxide nanoparticles strongly modify the electronic band structure of AC by introducing new trap levels in different positions along its band gap. Furthermore, the thermally activated conduction process satisfies the Meyer-Neldel rule, which is likely connected with the shift of the Fermi level due to the introduction of the different metal oxide nanoparticles in the AC matrix.

  9. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, “The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations,” J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of “solvated ionic radius” assumed by earlier studies.

  10. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, "The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations," J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of "solvated ionic radius" assumed by earlier studies.

  11. Temperature dependent BRDF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airola, Marc B.; Brown, Andrea M.; Hahn, Daniel V.; Thomas, Michael E.; Congdon, Elizabeth A.; Mehoke, Douglas S.

    2014-09-01

    Applications involving space based instrumentation and aerodynamically heated surfaces often require knowledge of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an exposed surface at high temperature. Addressing this need, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) developed a BRDF facility that features a multiple-port vacuum chamber, multiple laser sources covering the spectral range from the longwave infrared to the ultraviolet, imaging pyrometry and laser heated samples. Laser heating eliminates stray light that would otherwise be seen from a furnace and requires minimal sample support structure, allowing low thermal conduction loss to be obtained, which is especially important at high temperatures. The goal is to measure the BRDF of ceramic-coated surfaces at temperatures in excess of 1000°C in a low background environment. Most ceramic samples are near blackbody in the longwave infrared, thus pyrometry using a LWIR camera can be very effective and accurate.

  12. Low temperature dependence of triboelectric effect for energy harvesting and self-powered active sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanjie; Chen, Jun; Wu, Zhiming; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) has been proved as a simple, reliable, cost-effective, and efficient means to harvest ambient mechanical energy in a normal environment, although its performance evaluation under the room temperature is still lacking. Here, we systematically looked into the reliance of triboelectric nanogenerators output on the ambient temperature spanning from 77 K to 320 K. Employed the most commonly used Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and aluminum as two contact materials, both the output voltage and current show a tendency of increase with decreasing temperature. Applicability of triboelectric nanogenerator over a wide range of temperature was confirmed from 77 K to 320 K. And, an output enhancement of 79.3% was experimentally obtained at the temperature of 77 K compared to that at a temperature of 300 K. However, a reverse tendency was observed for the TiO2 nanotubes/PTFE and Al coated TiO2 nanotubes/PTFE based triboelectric nanogenerators. This work can contribute not only to the design and packaging of triboelectric devices to operate at extreme environmental temperatures but also to the fundamental understanding of the mechanism of triboelectric effect.

  13. Multiscale Modeling Indicates That Temperature Dependent [Ca2+]i Spiking in Astrocytes Is Quantitatively Consistent with Modulated SERCA Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komin, Niko; Moein, Mahsa; Ellisman, Mark H.; Skupin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) are the most predominant active signaling mechanism in astrocytes that can modulate neuronal activity and is assumed to influence neuronal plasticity. Although Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes has been intensively studied in the past, our understanding of the signaling mechanism and its impact on tissue level is still incomplete. Here we revisit our previously published data on the strong temperature dependence of Ca2+ signals in both cultured primary astrocytes and astrocytes in acute brain slices of mice. We apply multiscale modeling to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependent [Ca2+]i spiking is mainly caused by the increased activity of the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum ATPases (SERCAs) that remove Ca2+ from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum. Quantitative comparison of experimental data with multiscale simulations supports the SERCA activity hypothesis. Further analysis of multiscale modeling and traditional rate equations indicates that the experimental observations are a spatial phenomenon where increasing pump strength leads to a decoupling of Ca2+ release sites and subsequently to vanishing [Ca2+]i spikes. PMID:26347125

  14. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  15. Shape-Dependent Activity of Ceria for Hydrogen Electro-Oxidation in Reduced-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ting; Meng, Xie; Wu, Hao; Li, Junliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ji, Xiaona; Wang, Jianqiang; Chen, Chusheng; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2015-11-01

    Single crystalline ceria nanooctahedra, nanocubes, and nanorods are hydrothermally synthesized, colloidally impregnated into the porous La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) scaffolds, and electrochemically evaluated as the anode catalysts for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Well-defined surface terminations are confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy--(111) for nanooctahedra, (100) for nanocubes, and both (110) and (100) for nanorods. Temperature-programmed reduction in H2 shows the highest reducibility for nanorods, followed sequentially by nanocubes and nanooctahedra. Measurements of the anode polarization resistances and the fuel cell power densities reveal different orders of activity of ceria nanocrystals at high and low temperatures for hydrogen electro-oxidation, i.e., nanorods > nanocubes > nanooctahedra at T ≤ 450 °C and nanooctahedra > nanorods > nanocubes at T ≥ 500 °C. Such shape-dependent activities of these ceria nanocrystals have been correlated to their difference in the local structure distortions and thus in the reducibility. These findings will open up a new strategy for design of advanced catalysts for reduced-temperature SOFCs by elaborately engineering the shape of nanocrystals and thus selectively exposing the crystal facets.

  16. Size-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Palladium Nanoparticles Fabricated in Porous Organic Polymers for Alkene Hydrogenation at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Mondal, John; Trinh, Quang Thang; Jana, Avijit; Ng, Wilson Kwok Hung; Borah, Parijat; Hirao, Hajime; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-06-22

    Ultrafine palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) with 8 and 3 nm sizes were effectively fabricated in triazine functionalized porous organic polymer (POP) TRIA that was developed by nonaqueous polymerization of 2,4,6-triallyoxy-1,3,5-triazine. The Pd NPs encapsulated POP (Pd-POP) was fully characterized using several techniques. Further studies revealed an excellent capability of Pd-POP for catalytic transfer hydrogenation of alkenes at room temperature with superior catalytic performance and high selectivity of desired products. Highly flammable H2 gas balloon at high pressure and temperature used in conventional hydrogenation reactions was not needed in the present synthetic system. Catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the size of encapsulated Pd NPs in the POP. The Pd-POP catalyst with Pd NPs of 8 nm in diameter exhibited higher catalytic activity for alkene hydrogenation as compared with the Pd-POP catalyst encapsulating 3 nm Pd NPs. Computational studies were undertaken to gain insights into different catalytic activities of these two Pd-POP catalysts. High reusability and stability as well as no Pd leaching of these Pd-POP catalysts make them highly applicable for hydrogenation reactions at room temperature. PMID:27258184

  17. Temperature dependence of emission measure in solar X-ray plasmas. I - Nonflaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Previous determinations of the form of the emission-measure distribution function for solar active regions are examined. It is found that two analyses in particular are affected by low quality of either observational or atomic data. An alternative method of analysis is discussed.

  18. Temperature dependence of the rate and activation parameters for tert-butyl chloride solvolysis: Monte Carlo simulation of confidence intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Dae Dong; Kim, Jong-Youl; Lee, Ikchoon; Chung, Sung Sik; Park, Kwon Ha

    2004-07-01

    The solvolysis rate constants ( kobs) of tert-butyl chloride are measured in 20%(v/v) 2-PrOH-H 2O mixture at 15 temperatures ranging from 0 to 39 °C. Examination of the temperature dependence of the rate constants by the weighted least squares fitting to two to four terms equations has led to the three-term form, ln kobs= a1+ a2T-1+ a3ln T, as the best expression. The activation parameters, ΔH ‡ and ΔS ‡, calculated by using three constants a1, a2 and a3 revealed the steady decrease of ≈1 kJ mol -1 per degree and 3.5 J K -1 mol -1 per degree, respectively, as the temperature rises. The sign change of ΔS ‡ at ≈20.0 °C and the large negative heat capacity of activation, ΔC p‡=-1020 J K -1 mol -1, derived are interpreted to indicate an S N1 mechanism and a net change from water structure breaking to electrostrictive solvation due to the partially ionic transition state. Confidence intervals estimated by the Monte Carlo method are far more precise than those by the conventional method.

  19. Upper Thermosphere Winds and Temperatures in the Geomagnetic Polar Cap: Solar Cycle, Geomagnetic Activity, and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Won, Y.-I.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Burns, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers located at Thule, Greenland (76.5 deg. N, 69.0 deg. W, lambda = 86 deg.) and at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland (67.0 deg. N, 50.9 deg. W, lambda = 74 deg.) have monitored the upper thermospheric (approx. 240-km altitude) neutral wind and temperature over the northern hemisphere geomagnetic polar cap since 1983 and 1985, respectively. The thermospheric observations are obtained by determining the Doppler characteristics of the (OI) 15,867-K (630.0-nm) emission of atomic oxygen. The instruments operate on a routine, automatic, (mostly) untended basis during the winter observing seasons, with data coverage limited only by cloud cover and (occasional) instrument failures. This unique database of geomagnetic polar cap measurements now extends over the complete range of solar activity. We present an analysis of the measurements made between 1985 (near solar minimum) and 1991 (near solar maximum), as part of a long-term study of geomagnetic polar cap thermospheric climatology. The measurements from a total of 902 nights of observations are compared with the predictions of two semiempirical models: the Vector Spherical Harmonic (VSH) model of Killeen et al. (1987) and the Horizontal Wind Model (HWM) of Hedin et al. (1991). The results are also analyzed using calculations of thermospheric momentum forcing terms from the Thermosphere-ionosphere General Circulation Model TGCM) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The experimental results show that upper thermospheric winds in the geomagnetic polar cap have a fundamental diurnal character, with typical wind speeds of about 200 m/s at solar minimum, rising to up to about 800 m/s at solar maximum, depending on geomagnetic activity level. These winds generally blow in the antisunward direction, but are interrupted by episodes of modified wind velocity and altered direction often associated with changes in the orientation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The

  20. Recombination activity of light-activated copper defects in p-type silicon studied by injection- and temperature-dependent lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglese, Alessandro; Lindroos, Jeanette; Vahlman, Henri; Savin, Hele

    2016-09-01

    The presence of copper contamination is known to cause strong light-induced degradation (Cu-LID) in silicon. In this paper, we parametrize the recombination activity of light-activated copper defects in terms of Shockley—Read—Hall recombination statistics through injection- and temperature dependent lifetime spectroscopy (TDLS) performed on deliberately contaminated float zone silicon wafers. We obtain an accurate fit of the experimental data via two non-interacting energy levels, i.e., a deep recombination center featuring an energy level at Ec-Et=0.48 -0.62 eV with a moderate donor-like capture asymmetry ( k =1.7 -2.6 ) and an additional shallow energy state located at Ec-Et=0.1 -0.2 eV , which mostly affects the carrier lifetime only at high-injection conditions. Besides confirming these defect parameters, TDLS measurements also indicate a power-law temperature dependence of the capture cross sections associated with the deep energy state. Eventually, we compare these results with the available literature data, and we find that the formation of copper precipitates is the probable root cause behind Cu-LID.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Cesium Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, John David

    The gamma-ray excited, temperature dependent scintillation characteristics of CsI(T1) are reported over the temperature range of -100 to +50^circ C. The modified Bollinger-Thomas and shaped square wave methods were used to measure the rise and decay times. Emission spectra were measured using a monochromator and corrected for monochromator and photocathode spectral efficiencies. The shaped square wave method was also used to determine the scintillation yield as was a current mode method. The thermoluminescence emission of CsI(T1) were measured using the same current mode method. At room temperature, CsI(T1) was found to have two primary decay components with decay time constants of tau_1 = 679 +/- 9 ns (63.7%) and tau_2 = 3.34 +/- 0.10 mus (36.1%), an absolute scintillation yield of 65,500 +/- 4,100 photons/MeV, and emission bands at about 400 and 560 nm. The tau_1 luminescent state was observed to be populated by an exponential process with a resulting rise time constant of 19.6 +/- 1.9 ns at room temperature. An ultra-fast decay component with a <0.5 ns decay time was found to emit about 0.2% of the total scintillation light (about 100 photons/MeV). Except for the ultra-fast decay time, the rise and decay time constants were observed to increase exponentially with inverse temperature. At -80 ^circC, tau_1 and tau_2 were determined to be 2.22 +/- 0.31 mu s and 18.0 +/- 1.44 mus, respectively, while the 400 nm emission band was not observed below -50 ^circC. At +50^circ C, the decay constants were found to be 628 +/- 3 ns (70.5%) and 2.63 +/- 0.03 mus (29.3%) and both emission bands are present. The scintillation yield of CsI(T1) was observed to be only slightly temperature dependent between -40 and +50^circ C, peaking at about -30 ^circC (about 6% above the room temperature yield). Four different commercially-available CsI(T1) crystals were used. Minimal variations in the measured scintillation characteristics were observed among these four crystals

  2. Regulation of the temperature-dependent activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by phospholipids in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-02-20

    TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) proteins are heat-activated nonselective cation channels. TRPV1 channels are polymodal in their function and exhibit multifaceted regulation with various molecular compounds. In this regard, phosphoinositides, particularly phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, are important channel regulators. However, their effects on TRPV1 channel activity have not been conclusively determined. To characterize temperature-induced activation of TRPV1 in the presence of different phospholipids, we purified the TRPV1 protein from HEK-293 cells and incorporated it into planar lipid bilayers. In the presence of 2.5 μm phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, TRPV1 channels demonstrated rapid activation at 33-39 °C and achieved full channel opening at 42 °C. At this temperature range, TRPV1 heat activation exhibited steep temperature dependence (temperature coefficient (Q10) of 18), and the channel openings were accompanied by large changes in entropy and enthalpy, suggesting a substantial conformation change. At a similar temperature range, another phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, also potentiated heat activation of TRPV1, but with much lower efficiency. Negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol could also induce heat activation of TRPV1 channels, although with a small-conductance state. Our data demonstrate that phospholipids, specifically phosphoinositides, are important regulators of TRPV1 and are required for heat-induced channel activity.

  3. Electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms of nitroxyl radicals in ionic liquids and conventional organic liquids: temperature dependence of a thermally activated process.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Krishnendu; Kattnig, Daniel R; Mladenova, Boryana Y; Grampp, Günter; Das, Ranjan

    2015-03-26

    During the past two decades, several studies have established a significant role played by a thermally activated process in the electron spin relaxation of nitroxyl free radicals in liquid solutions. Its role has been used to explain the spin relaxation behavior of these radicals in a wide range of viscosities and microwave frequencies. However, no temperature dependence of this process has been reported. In this work, our main aim was to investigate the temperature dependence of this process in neat solvents. Electron spin-lattice relaxation times of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), in X-band microwave frequency, were measured by the pulse saturation recovery technique in three room-temperature ionic liquids ([bmim][BF4], [emim][BF4], and [bmim][PF6]), di-isononyl phthalate, and sec-butyl benzene. The ionic liquids provided a wide range of viscosity in a modest range of temperature. An auxiliary aim was to examine whether the dynamics of a probe molecule dissolved in ionic liquids was different from that in conventional molecular liquids, as claimed in several reports on fluorescence dynamics in ionic liquids. This was the reason for the inclusion of di-isononyl phthalate, whose viscosities are similar to that of the ionic liquids in similar temperatures, and sec-butyl benzene. Rotational correlation times of the nitroxyl radicals were determined from the hyperfine dependence of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line widths. Observation of highly well-resolved proton hyperfine lines, riding over the nitrogen hyperfine lines, in the low viscosity regime in all the solvents, gave more accurate values of the rotational correlation times than the values generally measured in the absence of these hyperfine lines and reported in the literature. The measured rotational correlation times obeyed a modified Stokes-Einstein-Debye relation of temperature dependence in all solvents. By separating the contributions of g

  4. Electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms of nitroxyl radicals in ionic liquids and conventional organic liquids: temperature dependence of a thermally activated process.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Krishnendu; Kattnig, Daniel R; Mladenova, Boryana Y; Grampp, Günter; Das, Ranjan

    2015-03-26

    During the past two decades, several studies have established a significant role played by a thermally activated process in the electron spin relaxation of nitroxyl free radicals in liquid solutions. Its role has been used to explain the spin relaxation behavior of these radicals in a wide range of viscosities and microwave frequencies. However, no temperature dependence of this process has been reported. In this work, our main aim was to investigate the temperature dependence of this process in neat solvents. Electron spin-lattice relaxation times of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), in X-band microwave frequency, were measured by the pulse saturation recovery technique in three room-temperature ionic liquids ([bmim][BF4], [emim][BF4], and [bmim][PF6]), di-isononyl phthalate, and sec-butyl benzene. The ionic liquids provided a wide range of viscosity in a modest range of temperature. An auxiliary aim was to examine whether the dynamics of a probe molecule dissolved in ionic liquids was different from that in conventional molecular liquids, as claimed in several reports on fluorescence dynamics in ionic liquids. This was the reason for the inclusion of di-isononyl phthalate, whose viscosities are similar to that of the ionic liquids in similar temperatures, and sec-butyl benzene. Rotational correlation times of the nitroxyl radicals were determined from the hyperfine dependence of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line widths. Observation of highly well-resolved proton hyperfine lines, riding over the nitrogen hyperfine lines, in the low viscosity regime in all the solvents, gave more accurate values of the rotational correlation times than the values generally measured in the absence of these hyperfine lines and reported in the literature. The measured rotational correlation times obeyed a modified Stokes-Einstein-Debye relation of temperature dependence in all solvents. By separating the contributions of g

  5. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  6. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  7. Temperature-dependent solubilities and mean ionic activity coefficients of alkali halides in water from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-07-01

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous KCl, NaF, NaI, and NaCl solutions of varying concentrations have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations following a recently developed methodology based on gradual insertions of salt molecules [Z. Mester and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 044507 (2015)]. The non-polarizable ion models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)], Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)], Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)], and Joung and Cheatham [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 9020 (2008)] were used along with the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] in the simulations. In addition to the chemical potentials in solution used to obtain the activity coefficients, we also calculated the chemical potentials of salt crystals and used them to obtain the solubility of these alkali halide models in SPC/E water. The models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)] and Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)] provide excellent predictions of the mean ionic activity coefficients at 298.15 K and 1 bar, but significantly underpredict or overpredict the solubilities. The other two models generally predicted the mean ionic activity coefficients only qualitatively. With the exception of NaF for which the solubility is significantly overpredicted, the model of Joung and Cheatham predicts salt solubilities that are approximately 40%-60% of the experimental values. The models of Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)] make good predictions for the NaCl and NaI solubilities, but significantly underpredict the solubilities for KCl and NaF. We also tested the transferability of the models to temperatures much higher than were used to parametrize them by performing simulations for NaCl at 373.15 K and 1 bar, and at 473.15 K and 15.5 bar. All models overpredict the drop in the values of mean ionic

  8. The Wilson-Bappu effect of the MgII K line - dependence on stellar temperature, activity and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgarøy, Øystein; Engvold, Oddbjørn; Lund, Niels

    1999-03-01

    The Wilson-Bappu effect is investigated using accurate absolute magnitudes of 65 stars obtained through early release of data from the Hipparcos satellite together with MgII k line widths determined from high resolution spectra observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observatory. Stars of spectral classes F, G, K and M and luminosity classes I-V are represented in the sample. Wilson-Bappu relations for the Mg II k line for stars of different temperatures i.e. spectral classes are determined. The relation varies with spectral class and there is a significant scatter of the line widths around the regression lines. The sample contains slowly rotating stars of different activity levels and is suitable for investigations of a possible relation between line width and stellar activity. A difference in behavior between dwarfs and giants (and supergiants) of spectral class K seems to be present. Magnetic activity affects the width of the Mg II k line in dwarfs. Metallicity is found to influence the Mg II k line width in giants and supergiants. Possible interpretations of the new results are briefly discussed.

  9. Temperature dependence of emission measure in solar X-ray plasmas. 1: Non-flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    1974-01-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet line emission from hot, optically thin material forming coronal active regions on the sun may be described in terms of an emission measure distribution function, Phi (T). A relationship is developed between line flux and Phi (T), a theory which assumes that the electron density is a single-valued function of temperature. The sources of error involved in deriving Phi (T) from a set of line fluxes are examined in some detail. These include errors in atomic data (collisional excitation rates, assessment of other mechanisms for populating excited states of transitions, element abundances, ion concentrations, oscillator strengths) and errors in observed line fluxes arising from poorly - known instrumental responses. Two previous analyses are discussed in which Phi (T) for a non-flaring active region is derived. A least squares method of Batstone uses X-ray data of low statistical significance, a fact which appears to influence the results considerably. Two methods for finding Phi (T) ab initio are developed. The coefficients are evaluated by least squares. These two methods should have application not only to active-region plasmas, but also to hot, flare-produced plasmas.

  10. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lytvynenko, Anton S.; Kiskin, Mikhail A.; Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V.; Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M.

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  11. Time- and temperature-dependent changes in cytochrome c oxidase activity and cyanide concentration in excised mice organs and mice cadavers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Rao, Pooja; Yadav, Shiv K; Gujar, Niranjan L; Satpute, Ravindra M; Bhattacharya, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Postmortem stability of cyanide biomarkers is often disputed. We assessed the time and temperature-dependent changes in cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activity and cyanide concentration in various organs of mice succumbing to cyanide. Immediately after death, excised mice organs and mice cadavers were stored at room temperature (35°C ± 5°C) or in frozen storage (-20°C ± 2°C). At various times after death, CCO activity and cyanide concentrations were measured in excised mice organs or organs removed from mice cadavers. The study revealed that (i) measuring both the biomarkers in mice cadavers was more reliable compared to excised mice organs, (ii) measuring temporal CCO activity and cyanide concentration in vital organs from mice cadavers (room temperature) was reliable up to 24 h, and (iii) CCO activity in the brain and lungs and cyanide concentration in organs from mice cadavers (frozen) were measurable beyond 21 days. This study will be helpful in postmortem determination of cyanide poisoning.

  12. Temperature-dependent ion beam mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Rehn, L.E.; Alexander, D.E.

    1993-08-01

    Recent work on enhanced interdiffusion rates during ion-beam mixing at elevated temperatures is reviewed. As discussed previously, expected increase in ion-beam mixing rates due to `radiation-enhanced diffusion` (RED), i.e. the free migration of isolated vacancy and interstitial defects, is well documented in single-crystal specimens in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 of absolute melting temperature. In contrast, the increase often observed at somewhat lower temperatures during ion-beam mixing of polycrystalline specimens is not well understood. However, sufficient evidence is available to show that this increase reflects intracascade enhancement of a thermally-activated process that also occurs without irradiation. Recent evidence is presented which suggests that this process is Diffusion-induced Grain-Boundary Migration (DIGM). An important complementary conclusion is that because ion-beam mixing in single-crystal specimens exhibits no significant temperature dependence below that of RED, models that invoke only irradiation-specific phenomena, e.g., cascade-overlap, thermal-spikes, or liquid-diffusion, and hence which predict no difference in mixing behavior between single- or poly-crystalline specimens, cannot account for the existing results.

  13. Low and moderate photosynthetically active radiation affects the flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) dependent on two low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Neugart, Susanne; Fiol, Michaela; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Zrenner, Rita; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2013-11-01

    Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) contains a large number of naturally occurring structurally different non-acylated and acylated flavonol glycosides as well as hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of low and moderate photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and how these levels interact with low temperature in these phenolic compounds. Juvenile kale plants were treated with PAR levels from 200 to 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at 5 and 10 °C under defined conditions in climate chambers. Of the investigated 20 compounds, 11 and 17 compounds were influenced by PAR and temperature, respectively. In addition, an interaction between PAR and temperature was found for eight compounds. The response of the phenolic compounds to PAR was structure-dependent. While quercetin triglycosides increased with higher PAR at 5 and 10 °C, the kaempferol triglycosides exhibited the highest concentrations at 400 μmol m(-2) s(-1). In contrast, kaempferol diglycosides exhibited the highest concentrations at increased PAR levels of 600 and 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at 10 °C. However, key genes of flavonol biosynthesis were influenced by temperature but remained unaffected by PAR. Furthermore, there was no interaction between the PAR level and the low temperature in the response of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale with the exception of caffeoylquinic acid, which decreased with higher PAR levels of 600 and 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and at a lower temperature. In conclusion, PAR and its interaction with temperature could be a suitable tool for modifying the profile of phenolic compounds.

  14. The universality of enzymatic rate-temperature dependency.

    PubMed

    Elias, Mikael; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Rosenne, Shaked; Tawfik, Dan S

    2014-01-01

    Organismal adaptation to extreme temperatures yields enzymes with distinct configurational stabilities, including thermophilic and psychrophilic enzymes, which are adapted to high and low temperatures, respectively. These enzymes are widely assumed to also have unique rate-temperature dependencies. Thermophilic enzymes, for example, are considered optimal at high temperatures and effectively inactive at low temperatures due to excess rigidity. Surveying published data, we find that thermophilic, mesophilic, and psychrophilic enzymes exhibit indistinguishable rate-temperature dependencies. Furthermore, given the nonenzymatic rate-temperature dependency, all enzymes, regardless of their operation temperatures, become >10-fold less powerful catalysts per 25 °C temperature increase. Among other factors, this loss of rate acceleration may be ascribed to thermally induced vibrations compromising the active-site catalytic configuration, suggesting that many enzymes are in fact insufficiently rigid.

  15. A facile and rapid room-temperature route to hierarchical bismuth oxyhalide solid solutions with composition-dependent photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Han, Qiaofeng; Zhu, Junwu; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    The unique nanosheet-based flower-like BiOCl1-xBrx (x=0-1) hierarchical solid solutions have been prepared by the reaction of Bi2O3 and KCl/KBr in mixed solution of glacial acetic acid (HAc) and H2O in dozens of minutes under ambient conditions. During the preparation process, the intermediate bismuth oxide acetate (CH3COOBiO) plays a key role in the formation of BiOCl1-xBrx solid solutions in such a short time. The as-prepared hierarchical BiOCl1-xBrx solid solutions possess high specific surface areas and modified band structures, which exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity for Rhodamine B (RhB) degradation in comparison with pure BiOCl and BiOBr under visible light irradiation, with the activity reaching the maximum at x=0.5. The photodegradation efficiency of the BiOCl0.5Br0.5 solid solution is twice and 12times higher than P25 TiO2 under UV and visible light irradiation, respectively.

  16. Cage assembly of DegP protease is not required for substrate-dependent regulation of proteolytic activity or high-temperature cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seokhee; Sauer, Robert T

    2012-05-01

    DegP, a member of the highly conserved HtrA family, performs quality-control degradation of misfolded proteins in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria and is required for high-temperature survival of Escherichia coli. Substrate binding transforms DegP from an inactive oligomer containing two trimers into active polyhedral cages, typically containing four or eight trimers. Although these observations suggest a causal connection, we show that cage assembly and proteolytic activation can be uncoupled. Indeed, DegP variants that remain trimeric, hexameric, or dodecameric in the presence or absence of substrate still display robust and positively cooperative substrate degradation in vitro and, most importantly, sustain high-temperature bacterial growth as well as the wild-type enzyme. Our results support a model in which substrate binding converts inactive trimers into proteolytically active trimers, and simultaneously leads to cage assembly by enhancing binding of PDZ1 domains in one trimer to PDZ2' domains in neighboring trimers. Thus, both processes depend on substrate binding, but they can be uncoupled without loss of biological function. We discuss potential coupling mechanisms and why cage formation may have evolved if it is not required for DegP proteolysis. PMID:22529381

  17. Temperature dependence of methyl-coenzyme M reductase activity and of the formation of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase red2 state induced by coenzyme B.

    PubMed

    Goenrich, Meike; Duin, Evert C; Mahlert, Felix; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2005-06-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyses the formation of methane from methyl-coenzyme M (CH(3)-S-CoM) and coenzyme B (HS-CoB) in methanogenic archaea. The enzyme has an alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2) subunit structure forming two structurally interlinked active sites each with a molecule F(430) as a prosthetic group. The nickel porphinoid must be in the Ni(I) oxidation state for the enzyme to be active. The active enzyme exhibits an axial Ni(I)-based electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal and a UV-vis spectrum with an absorption maximum at 385 nm. This state is called the MCR-red1 state. In the presence of coenzyme M (HS-CoM) and coenzyme B the MCR-red1 state is in part converted reversibly into the MCR-red2 state, which shows a rhombic Ni(I)-based EPR signal and a UV-vis spectrum with an absorption maximum at 420 nm. We report here for MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis that the MCR-red2 state is also induced by several coenzyme B analogues and that the degree of induction by coenzyme B is temperature-dependent. When the temperature was lowered below 20 degrees C the percentage of MCR in the red2 state decreased and that in the red1 state increased. These changes with temperature were fully reversible. It was found that at most 50% of the enzyme was converted to the MCR-red2 state under all experimental conditions. These findings indicate that in the presence of both coenzyme M and coenzyme B only one of the two active sites of MCR can be in the red2 state (half-of-the-sites reactivity). On the basis of this interpretation a two-stroke engine mechanism for MCR is proposed.

  18. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  19. Temperature dependence of sapphire fiber Raman scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Tian, Zhipeng; Homa, Daniel; Hill, Cary; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-04-27

    Anti-Stokes Raman scattering in sapphire fiber has been observed for the first time. Temperature dependence of Raman peaks’ intensity, frequency shift, and linewidth were also measured. Three anti-Stokes Raman peaks were observed at temperatures higher than 300°C in a 0.72-m-long sapphire fiber excited by a second-harmonic Nd YAG laser. The intensity of anti-Stokes peaks are comparable to that of Stokes peaks when the temperature increases to 1033°C. We foresee the combination of sapphire fiber Stokes and anti-Stokes measurement in use as a mechanism for ultrahigh temperature sensing.

  20. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  1. Temperature dependence of polymer photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Yuko

    One of many steps to develop a sustainable society is to reduce the use of fossil fuels by replacing them with renewable energy sources, such as solar energy. This dissertation concerns one of the most contemporary methods to harvest solar radiation and covert it to electricity, using thin polymer films. The photovoltaic devices in this study consisted of a thin layer of p-phenylenevinylene (PPV) based semiconducting polymer sandwiched between two metals (semi-transparent ITO and evaporated metal electrode). Two modified device structures were studied, an interfacial heterojunction device, which includes an additional layer of inorganic n-type semiconductor (Ti-oxides) and a bulk heterojunction device, which is formed by blending electron-attracting materials. Both modifications resulted in higher device performances under ambient conditions due to an increased number of dissociation sites. From studies of inorganic solar cells, it is well known that temperature has a large effect on device performance. However, there are only a few studies on organic Solar cells, concerning the temperature dependence. This thesis focuses on understanding the temperature dependent behaviors of polymer photovoltaic devices. Temperature dependence study allows us to examine how the device parameters such as short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) are affected by the material properties and the device architectures. The current-voltage relationships were measured in a temperature controlled OXFORD cryostat operating between 150K and 404K. From the dark current-voltage measurements, the field-independent hole mobility (mu0) was extracted, using a space charge limited current analysis. From the photocurrent-voltage measurements, the temperature dependence on Isc, Voc, and fill factor were studied. The temperature characteristics of Isc (T) were compared to that of mu0(T), and two different dependencies were obtained for different device architectures. The temperature

  2. Temperature dependence of BCF plastic scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    We examined temperature dependence in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) made of BCF-60 or BCF-12 scintillating fiber coupled to optical fiber with cyanoacrylate. PSDs were subjected to a range of temperatures using a temperature-controlled water bath and irradiated at each temperature while either the dose was measured using a CCD camera or the spectral output was measured using a spectrometer. The spectrometer was used to examine the intensity and spectral distribution of scintillation light emitted by the PSDs, Cerenkov light generated within the PSD, and light transmitted through an isolated optical coupling. BCF-60 PSDs exhibited a 0.50% decrease and BCF-12 PSDs a 0.09% decrease in measured dose per °C increase, relative to dose measured at 22°C. Spectrometry revealed that the total intensity of the light generated by BCF-60 and BCF-12 PSDs decreased by 0.32% and 0.13%, respectively, per °C increase. The spectral distribution of the light changed slightly with temperature for both PSDs, accounting for the disparity between the change in measured dose and total light output. The generation of Cerenkov light was temperature independent. However, light transmitted through optical coupling between the scintillator and the optical fiber also exhibited temperature dependence. PMID:23574889

  3. Calibration and validation of an activated sludge model for greenhouse gases no. 1 (ASMG1): prediction of temperature-dependent N₂O emission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lisha; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    An activated sludge model for greenhouse gases no. 1 was calibrated with data from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) without control systems and validated with data from three similar plants equipped with control systems. Special about the calibration/validation approach adopted in this paper is that the data are obtained from simulations with a mathematical model that is widely accepted to describe effluent quality and operating costs of actual WWTPs, the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2). The calibration also aimed at fitting the model to typical observed nitrous oxide (N₂O) emission data, i.e., a yearly average of 0.5% of the influent total nitrogen load emitted as N₂O-N. Model validation was performed by challenging the model in configurations with different control strategies. The kinetic term describing the dissolved oxygen effect on the denitrification by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was modified into a Haldane term. Both original and Haldane-modified models passed calibration and validation. Even though their yearly averaged values were similar, the two models presented different dynamic N₂O emissions under cold temperature conditions and control. Therefore, data collected in such situations can potentially permit model discrimination. Observed seasonal trends in N₂O emissions are simulated well with both original and Haldane-modified models. A mechanistic explanation based on the temperature-dependent interaction between heterotrophic and autotrophic N₂O pathways was provided. Finally, while adding the AOB denitrification pathway to a model with only heterotrophic N₂O production showed little impact on effluent quality and operating cost criteria, it clearly affected N2O emission productions. PMID:23728837

  4. Calibration and validation of an activated sludge model for greenhouse gases no. 1 (ASMG1): prediction of temperature-dependent N₂O emission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lisha; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    An activated sludge model for greenhouse gases no. 1 was calibrated with data from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) without control systems and validated with data from three similar plants equipped with control systems. Special about the calibration/validation approach adopted in this paper is that the data are obtained from simulations with a mathematical model that is widely accepted to describe effluent quality and operating costs of actual WWTPs, the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2). The calibration also aimed at fitting the model to typical observed nitrous oxide (N₂O) emission data, i.e., a yearly average of 0.5% of the influent total nitrogen load emitted as N₂O-N. Model validation was performed by challenging the model in configurations with different control strategies. The kinetic term describing the dissolved oxygen effect on the denitrification by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was modified into a Haldane term. Both original and Haldane-modified models passed calibration and validation. Even though their yearly averaged values were similar, the two models presented different dynamic N₂O emissions under cold temperature conditions and control. Therefore, data collected in such situations can potentially permit model discrimination. Observed seasonal trends in N₂O emissions are simulated well with both original and Haldane-modified models. A mechanistic explanation based on the temperature-dependent interaction between heterotrophic and autotrophic N₂O pathways was provided. Finally, while adding the AOB denitrification pathway to a model with only heterotrophic N₂O production showed little impact on effluent quality and operating cost criteria, it clearly affected N2O emission productions.

  5. Temperature dependence of the hyperfine interaction at

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Garcia, Alberto; de la Presa, Patricia; Ayala, Alejandro

    2001-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the quadrupole hyperfine parameters covering the temperature range from 293 to 1173 K was measured at {sup 181}Ta probes in SrHfO{sub 3} by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy. A fluctuating distribution of quadrupole interactions model was applied to interpret the data. At low temperatures above {approximately}300 K a static, asymmetric, and distributed electric quadrupole interaction was detected. At intermediate temperatures ({approx}600 K) a different quadrupole interaction appears, characterized by a fluctuating distribution of axially symmetric electric field gradient tensors. Above 873 K, the unique presence of a nuclear spin relaxation mechanism shows a second change in the perturbation acting on probes. These changes in the hyperfine interaction are consistent with the structural phase transitions detected by diffraction techniques. The probe effects were also analyzed, comparing {sup 181}Ta with {sup 111}Cd experiments.

  6. Coupled temperature dependences of volume and compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, A. C.; Ledbetter, H.

    2011-04-01

    We present a new method for understanding the changes with temperature of the volume and compressibility of solids. These changes depend on five parameters: V 0, B 0, Θ, γ G and δ T. V 0 and B 0 are the atomic volume and bulk modulus at T = 0 K, Θ is the Debye temperature, γ G is the Grüneisen parameter, and δ T is the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter. Equations for the temperature-dependent volume, bulk modulus and thermal expansion are given, and examples of the use of these equations are provided, with particular emphasis on the light actinides. For the elements, we examine the relationship between experimental values of γ G and δ T, and find no clear correlation. In particular, Swenson's rule, which states that the bulk modulus does not change with temperature if the volume is held constant, is a poor approximation to the data. We reveal a new useful approximate relationship between dB/dP and γ G. We find that the thermodynamic quantity q, which describes the variation in γ G with volume, distributes around 2, not around 1, as often assumed. We show that the thermal- expansion behavior of Si and Ge (including negative thermal expansion at low temperatures) are well described with the use of a two-level invar model.

  7. Origins of the temperature dependence of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Peracchi, A

    1999-01-01

    The difficulties in interpreting the temperature dependence of protein enzyme reactions are well recognized. Here, the hammerhead ribozyme cleavage was investigated under single-turnover conditions between 0 and 60 degrees C as a model for RNA-catalyzed reactions. Under the adopted conditions, the chemical step appears to be rate-limiting. However, the observed rate of cleavage is affected by pre-catalytic equilibria involving deprotonation of an essential group and binding of at least one low-affinity Mg2+ion. Thus, the apparent entropy and enthalpy of activation include contributions from the temperature dependence of these equilibria, precluding a simple physical interpretation of the observed activation parameters. Similar pre-catalytic equilibria likely contribute to the observed activation parameters for ribozyme reactions in general. The Arrhenius plot for the hammerhead reaction is substantially curved over the temperature range considered, which suggests the occurrence of a conformational change of the ribozyme ground state around physiological temperatures. PMID:10390528

  8. Temperature dependence of the water retention curve for dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Goss, K.-U.

    2011-03-01

    Water retention curves (WRCs) are equivalent to water adsorption isotherms that display the soil water content as a function of water activity in the pore space. The use of water activity implies that pure (unbound) water at the given temperature is considered to be a reference state. In this study we measured the temperature dependence of WRCs for nine European soils under dry conditions (i.e., water activity < 90% relative humidity (RH), matrix tension <-1.5 MPa). The results show a significant temperature dependence of the WRCs. The absolute value of the adsorption enthalpy of water, ?, which reflects this temperature dependence, increased with decreasing water content and thus deviated from the condensation enthalpy of a pure (unbound) water phase, ?. These results are explained by the following facts: under increasingly drier conditions the interactions between water molecules and the mineral surfaces become more and more dominant because the sorbed water film becomes very thin. These interactions between water and minerals are stronger than those between pure water molecules. The observed temperature dependence of WRCs varied only a little between the studied soils. Therefore, the average equation, ?, derived from our experimental data may serve as a good approximation of ? for soils in general and thus allow the temperature extrapolation of WRCs (in the dry region down to 30% RH) between 5°C and 40°C without the need for additional experimental information.

  9. Temperature dependent light transmission in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Mahendran, V.; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the influence of temperature on the magnetic field induced light transmission in a kerosene based ferrofluid containing oleic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. At a fixed temperature the transmitted light intensity is found to monotonically increase with incident wavelength due to reduced extinction efficiency at higher wavelength. The transmitted intensity decreases with external magnetic field due to enhanced scattering from the field induced linear chain like structures along the direction of the external magnetic field and due to the build-up of standing waves inside the scattering medium. The extinction of the field induced transmitted light intensity is found to occur at a lower external field as the sample temperature is lowered. The rate of extinction of normalized transmitted light intensity decreased linearly with increasing sample temperature due to slower field induced aggregation kinetics because of an increased Brownian motion of the suspended nanoparticles and a reduced coupling constant. The observed temperature dependent magneto-optical properties of magnetic nanofluids can be exploited for applications in optical devices.

  10. Investigating temperature degradation in THz quantum cascade lasers by examination of temperature dependence of output power

    SciTech Connect

    Albo, Asaf Hu, Qing

    2015-03-30

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to investigate the temperature degradation of THz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based on analyzing the dependence of lasing output power on temperature. The output power is suggested to decrease exponentially with some characteristic activation energy indicative of the degradation mechanism. As a proof of concept, Arrhenius plots of power versus temperature are used to extract the activation energy in vertical transition THz QCLs. The extracted energies are consistent with thermally activated longitudinal optical-phonon scattering being the dominant degradation mechanism, as is generally accepted. The extracted activation energy values are shown to be in good agreement with the values predicted from laser spectra.

  11. Substrate-dependent temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myachina, Olga; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Activity of extracellular enzymes responsible for decomposition of organics is substrate dependent. Quantity of the substrate is the main limiting factor for enzymatic or microbial heterotrophic activity in soils. Different mechanisms of enzymes response to temperature suggested for low and high substrate availability were never proved for real soil conditions. We compared the temperature responses of enzymes-catalyzed reactions in soils. Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation.

  12. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  13. Quasipermanent magnets of high temperature superconductor - Temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jianxiong; Ren, Yanru; Weinstein, Roy; Kozlowski, Gregory; Oberly, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in quasi-permanent magnets of high temperature superconductors. Magnets composed of irradiated Y(1+)Ba2Cu3O7 trapped field Bt = 1.52 T at 77 K and 1.9 T at lower temperature. However, the activation magnet limited Bt at lower temperature. We present data on Jc(H,T) for unirradiated materials, and calculate Bt at various T. Based upon data at 65 K, we calculate Bt in unirradiated single grains at 20 K and find that 5.2 T will be trapped for grain diameter d about 1.2 cm, and 7.9 T for d = 2.3 cm. Irradiated grains will trap four times these values.

  14. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  15. Neutralization of radical toxicity by temperature-dependent modulation of extracellular SOD activity in coral bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi and its role as a virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Murali, Malliga Raman; Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Devaraj, Sivasitambaram Niranjali

    2010-08-01

    Vibrio shiloi is the first and well-documented bacterium which causes coral bleaching, particularly, during summer, when seawater temperature is between 26 and 31 degrees C. Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiotic association between coral hosts and their photosynthetic microalgae zooxanthellae. This is either due to lowered resistance in corals to infection or increased virulence of the bacterium at the higher sea surface temperature. The concentration of the oxygen and resulting oxygen radicals produced by the zooxanthellae during photosynthesis are highly toxic to bacteria, which also assist corals in resisting the infection. Hence, in this study we examined the effect of different temperatures on the activity of a novel extracellular SOD in V. shiloi. We also partially characterized the SOD and clearly confirmed that the extracellular SOD produced by V. shiloi is Mn-SOD type, as it was not inhibited by H2O2 or KCN. Performing chemical susceptibility killing assay, we confirmed that extracellular SOD may act as first line of defense for the bacteria against the reactive oxygen species. Since, increased activity of novel Mn-SOD at higher temperature, leads to the neutralization of radical toxicity and facilitates the survival of V. shiloi. Hence, the extracellular Mn-SOD may be considered as a virulence factor.

  16. Temperature dependence of denitrification in phototrophic river biofilms.

    PubMed

    Boulêtreau, S; Salvo, E; Lyautey, E; Mastrorillo, S; Garabetian, F

    2012-02-01

    Denitrification is an ecosystem service of nitrogen load regulation along the terrestrial-freshwater-marine continuum. The present study documents the short-term temperature sensitivity of denitrification enzyme activity in phototrophic river biofilms as a typical microbial assemblage of this continuum. Denitrification measurements were performed using the acetylene inhibition method at four incubation temperatures: 1.1, 12.1, 21.2 and 30.9°C. For this range of temperature, N(2)O production could be fitted to an exponential function of incubation temperature, yielding mean (±standard error) activation energy of 1.42 (±0.24) eV and Q(10) of 7.0 (±1.4). This first quantification of denitrification enzyme activity temperature dependence in phototrophic river biofilms compares with previous studies performed in soils and sediments. This demonstrates the high temperature dependence of denitrification as compared to other community-level metabolisms such as respiration or photosynthesis. This result suggests that global warming can unbalance natural community metabolisms in phototrophic river biofilms and affect their biogeochemical budget.

  17. Swim stress activates serotonergic and nonserotonergic neurons in specific subdivisions of the rat dorsal raphe nucleus in a temperature-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Donner, N C; Hale, M W; Lowry, C A

    2011-12-01

    Physical (exteroceptive) stimuli and emotional (interoceptive) stimuli are thought to influence stress-related physiologic and behavioral responses through different neural mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that stress-induced activation of brainstem serotonergic systems is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature. In order to further investigate the effects of environmental influences on stress-induced activation of serotonergic systems, we exposed adult male Wistar rats to either home cage control conditions or a 15-min swim in water maintained at 19 °C, 25 °C, or 35 °C and conducted dual immunohistochemical staining for c-Fos, a marker of immediate-early nuclear activation, and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), a marker of serotonergic neurons. Changes in core body temperature were documented using biotelemetry. As expected, exposure to cold (19 °C) swim, relative to warm (35 °C) swim, increased c-Fos expression in the external lateral part of the parabrachial nucleus (LPBel), an important part of the spinoparabrachial pathway involved in sensation of cold, cutaneous stimuli, and in serotonergic neurons in the raphe pallidus nucleus (RPa), an important part of the efferent mechanisms controlling thermoregulatory warming responses. In addition, exposure to cold (19 °C) swim, relative to 35 °C swim, increased c-Fos expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventrolateral part/periaqueductal gray (DRVL/VLPAG) and dorsal raphe nucleus, interfascicular part (DRI). Both of these subregions of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) have previously been implicated in thermoregulatory responses. Altogether, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that midbrain serotonergic neurons, possibly via activation of afferents to the DR by thermosensitive spinoparabrachial pathways, play a role in integration of physiologic and behavioral responses to interoceptive stress-related cues involved in forced swimming and exteroceptive cues related to cold

  18. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-07-01

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  19. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. J.; Buesking, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  20. Temperature dependence of the properties of vapor-deposited polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, F. Y.; Blanton, T. N.; Harding, D. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2003-04-01

    The Young's modulus and helium gas permeability of vapor-deposited poly(4,4'-oxydiphenylenepyromellitimide) were measured at cryogenic and elevated temperatures (10-573 K). The Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature from 5.5 GPa at 10 K to 1.8 GPa at 573 K. The temperature dependency of the permeability followed the Arrhenius' relationship, with different activation energy for permeation for samples imidized under different conditions. The effect of the imidization conditions on the permeation properties could be explained in terms of morphology/crystallinity as determined by x-ray diffraction techniques. Imidizing in air instead of nitrogen increased the permeability while lowering the activation energy for permeation and crystallinity. Imidizing at higher heating rates (in nitrogen) resulted in higher permeability, lower activation energy for permeation, and larger and fewer crystallites with better-aligned lattice planes.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Photosynthesis in Agropyron smithii Rydb. 1

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Russell K.; Stidham, Mark A.; Williams, George J.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Uribe, Ernest G.

    1982-01-01

    As part of an extensive analysis of the factors regulating photosynthesis in Agropyron smithii Rydb., a C3 grass, we have examined the response of leaf gas exchange and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase activity to temperature. Emphasis was placed on elucidating the specific processes which regulate the temperature response pattern. The inhibitory effects of above-optimal temperatures on net CO2 uptake were fully reversible up to 40°C. Below 40°C, temperature inhibition was primarily due to O2 inhibition of photosynthesis, which reached a maximum of 65% at 45°C. The response of stomatal conductance to temperature did not appear to have a significant role in determining the overall temperature response of photosynthesis. The intracellular conductance to CO2 increased over the entire experimental temperature range, having a Q10 of 1.2 to 1.4. Increases in the apparent Michaelis constant (Kc) for RuBP carboxylase were observed in both in vitro and in vivo assays. The Q10 values for the maximum velocity (Vmax) of CO2 fixation by RuBP carboxylase in vivo was lower (1.3-1.6) than those calculated from in vitro assays (1.8-2.2). The results suggest that temperature-dependent changes in enzyme capacity may have a role in above-optimum temperature limitations below 40°C. At leaf temperatures above 40°C, decreases in photosynthetic capacity were partially dependent on temperature-induced irreversible reductions in the quantum yield for CO2 uptake. PMID:16662320

  2. Temperature dependent phonon shifts in few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Late, Dattatray J

    2015-03-18

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) sheets of black phosphorus have attracted much attention due to their potential for future nanoelectronic and photonics device applications. Present investigations deal with the temperature dependent phonon shifts in a few-layer black phosphorus nanosheet sample prepared using micromechanical exfoliation on a 300 nm SiO2/Si substrate. The temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy experiments were carried out on a few-layer black phosphorus sample, which depicts softening of Ag(1), B2g, and Ag(2) modes as temperature increases from 77 to 673 K. The calculated temperature coefficients for Ag(1), B2g, and Ag(2) modes of the few-layer black phosphorus nanosheet sample were observed to be -0.01, -0.013, and -0.014 cm(-1) K(-1), respectively. The temperature dependent softening modes of black phosphorus results were explained on the basis of a double resonance process which is more active in an atomically thin sample. This process can also be fundamentally pertinent in other promising and emerging 2D ultrathin layer and heterostructured materials.

  3. Lidar and CTIPe model studies of the fast amplitude growth with altitude of the diurnal temperature "tides" in the Antarctic winter lower thermosphere and dependence on geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Weichun; Chu, Xinzhao; Lu, Xian; Chen, Cao; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Richmond, Arthur D.

    2015-02-01

    Four years of lidar observations at McMurdo reveal that the fast amplitude growth with altitude of diurnal temperature tides from 100 to 110 km during Antarctic winters, exceeding that of the freely propagating tides from the lower atmosphere, increases in strength with the Kp magnetic activity index. Simulations with the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics (CTIPe) model reproduce the lidar observations and exhibit concentric ring structures of diurnal amplitudes encircling the south geomagnetic pole and overlapping the auroral zone. These findings point to a magnetospheric source origin. Mechanistic studies using CTIPe show that the adiabatic cooling/heating associated with Hall ion drag is the dominant source of this feature, while Joule heating is a minor contributor due to the counteraction by Joule-heating-induced adiabatic cooling. The sum of total dynamical effects and Joule heating explains ~80% of the diurnal amplitudes. Auroral particle heating, lower atmosphere tides, and direct solar heating have minor contributions.

  4. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; Emery, Keith A.; Williams, Rafell

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  5. Water temperature dependence of single bubble sonoluminescence threshold.

    PubMed

    Germano, M; Alippi, A; Bettucci, A; Brizi, F; Passeri, D

    2010-01-01

    Water temperature dependence of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) threshold has been experimentally measured to perform measurements at different temperatures on the very same bubble. Results show lower thresholds, i.e. an easier prime of mechanism, of sonoluminescence at lower water temperatures. Dependence is almost linear at lower temperatures while between 14 degrees C and about 20 degrees C the curve changes its slope reaching soon a virtual independence from water temperature above about 20 degrees C.

  6. Modeling temperature dependence of trace element concentrations in groundwater using temperature dependent distribution coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Saito, T.; Hamamoto, S.; Komatsu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In our previous study, we have observed trace element concentrations in groundwater increased when groundwater temperature was increased with constant thermal loading using a 50-m long vertical heat exchanger installed at Saitama University, Japan. During the field experiment, 38 degree C fluid was circulated in the heat exchanger resulting 2.8 kW thermal loading over 295 days. Groundwater samples were collected regularly from 17-m and 40-m deep aquifers at four observation wells located 1, 2, 5, and 10 m, respectively, from the heat exchange well and were analyzed with ICP-MS. As a result, concentrations of some trace elements such as boron increased with temperature especially at the 17-m deep aquifer that is known as marine sediment. It has been also observed that the increased concentrations have decreased after the thermal loading was terminated indicating that this phenomenon may be reversible. Although the mechanism is not fully understood, changes in the liquid phase concentration should be associated with dissolution and/or desorption from the solid phase. We therefore attempt to model this phenomenon by introducing temperature dependence in equilibrium linear adsorption isotherms. We assumed that distribution coefficients decrease with temperature so that the liquid phase concentration of a given element becomes higher as the temperature increases under the condition that the total mass stays constant. A shape function was developed to model the temperature dependence of the distribution coefficient. By solving the mass balance equation between the liquid phase and the solid phase for a given element, a new term describing changes in the concentration was implemented in a source/sink term of a standard convection dispersion equation (CDE). The CDE was then solved under a constant ground water flow using FlexPDE. By calibrating parameters in the newly developed shape function, the changes in element concentrations observed were quite well predicted. The

  7. Temperature Dependence of Phonons in Pyrolitic Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, B. N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4°K and 1500°C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes.

  8. Temperature dependence of interaction-induced entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Khasin, Michael; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2005-11-15

    Both direct and indirect weak nonresonant interactions are shown to produce entanglement between two initially disentangled systems prepared as a tensor product of thermal states, provided the initial temperature is sufficiently low. Entanglement is determined by the Peres-Horodecki criterion, which establishes that a composite state is entangled if its partial transpose is not positive. If the initial temperature of the thermal states is higher than an upper critical value T{sub uc} the minimal eigenvalue of the partially transposed density matrix of the composite state remains positive in the course of the evolution. If the initial temperature of the thermal states is lower than a lower critical value T{sub lc}{<=}T{sub uc} the minimal eigenvalue of the partially transposed density matrix of the composite state becomes negative, which means that entanglement develops. We calculate the lower bound T{sub lb} for T{sub lc} and show that the negativity of the composite state is negligibly small in the interval T{sub lb}temperature T{sub lb} can be considered as the critical temperature for the generation of entanglement. It is conjectured that above this critical temperature a composite quantum system could be simulated using classical computers.

  9. Temperature dependence of electrical conductivity and lunar temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olhoeft, G. R.; Strangway, D. W.; Sharpe, H.; Frisillo, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Metallic conduction mechanicsms are probably not important in lunar materials because of the small amounts of free metal and metallic oxides present. This is confirmed by the extremely low conductivities measured to date and the fact that the conductivity increases with temperature. The major conduction mechanicsm appears to be ionic. This conduction mechanism is very strongly controlled by temperature, by deviations from stoichiometry, by electric field strengths, and by oxygen fugacity.

  10. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity of liquid Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Patel, H. P.; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper deals with the effect of temperature variation on the electrical resistivity (ρ) of liquid Sn(Tin). We have used a new parameter free pseudopotential along with screening Taylor et al and Farid et al local field correction functions. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere (PYHS) reference system is used to describe structural information. Zeeman formula has been used for finding resistivity with the variation of temperature. The balanced harmonies between present data and experimental data have been achieved with a minimal deviation. So, we concluded that our newly constructed model potential is an effective one to produce the data of electrical resistivity of liquid Sn(Tin) as a function of temperature.

  11. Temperature Dependent Electrical Properties of PZT Wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, T.; Sen, S.; Seal, A.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The electrical and electromechanical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) wafers were investigated and compared with PZT bulk. PZT wafers were prepared by tape casting technique. The transition temperature of both the PZT forms remained the same. The transition from an asymmetric to a symmetric shape was observed for PZT wafers at higher temperature. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33) values obtained were 560 pc/N and 234 pc/N, and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (k p) values were 0.68 and 0.49 for bulk and wafer, respectively. The reduction in polarization after fatigue was only ~3% in case of PZT bulk and ~7% for PZT wafer.

  12. Temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen titanate nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Diego C. B.; Brandão, Frederico D.; Krambrock, Klaus; Ferlauto, Andre S.; Fonseca, Fabio C.

    2014-11-14

    The temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen-rich titanate nanotubes (H-TNTs) in the 90–270 °C range was investigated by impedance spectroscopy. Three types of dominant conduction were found which depend on the previous thermal treatment of the samples. For untreated samples, at low temperatures (T < 100 °C), electrical conductivity is relatively high (>10{sup −4} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and is dominated by protonic transport within structural water molecules. For thermal annealing in inert atmosphere up to 150 °C, water molecules are released from the nanotube structure resulting in a dehydrated H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} phase. Such phase has a low, thermally-dependent, electrical conductivity (10{sup −8} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) with activation energy of 0.68 eV. For samples annealed up to 260 °C, loss of OH groups, and consequent generation of oxygen vacancies, occurs that result in the non-stoichiometric H{sub 2(1−z)}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7−z} phase. This phase has much higher conductivity (10{sup −5} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and lower associated activation energy (0.40 eV). The generation of oxygen vacancies is confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements at room temperature, which revealed the presence of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies. The activation energy value found is consistent with the thermal ionization energy of the oxygen vacancies. Such defect formation represents the initial stage of the phase transformation from titanate to TiO{sub 2} (B). X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements also support such interpretation.

  13. ACTIVE MEDIA: Nature of the temperature dependence of the lasing efficiency of erbium laser glasses and the mechanism of the influence of sensitisers on this efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galagan, B. I.; Danileiko, Yu K.; Denker, B. I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Sverchkov, S. E.

    1998-04-01

    A study was made of the influence of an elevated temperature on the lasing efficiency of ytterbium—erbium phosphate glasses, including the influence of additional sensitisation with neodymium or chromium ions. Temperatures below 200°C had practically no influence on chromium-free glasses. In the case of glasses containing chromium the deterioration of the parameters with increase in temperature was the result of a fall of the quantum efficiency of energy transfer in the chromium—ytterbium pair and also of an increase in nonradiative losses associated with the presence of the divalent chromium impurity.

  14. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Temperature dependence of gramicidin channel conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyundeok; Beck, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The gramicidin channel is the smallest known biological ion channel, and it exhibits cation selectivity. Recently, Dr. John Cuppoletti's group at the University of Cincinnati has shown that the gramicidin channel can function at high temperatures with significant currents. This finding may have implications for fuel cell technologies. In order to explore the effect of temperature on channel conductance, we examined the gramicidin system at 300K, 330K, and 360K by computer simulation. Two forms of gramicidin, the head-to-head helical dimer and the intertwined double helix, were examined. Both the decrease of the free energy barrier and the increase of the diffusion of potassium ions inside the gramicidin channel at high temperatures imply an increase of current. We found that higher temperatures also affect the lifetime of hydrogen bonds, the distribution of the bending angle, the distribution of the distance between dimers, and the size of the pore radius for the helical dimer structure. These finding may be related to the gating of the gramicidin channel.

  16. Structural evaluations and temperature dependent photoluminescence characterizations of Eu3+-activated SrZrO3 hollow spheres for luminescence thermometry applications

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subrata; Som, Sudipta; Yang, Che-Yuan; Chavhan, Sudam; Lu, Chung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    This research is focused on the temperature sensing ability of perovskite SrZrO3:Eu3+ hollow spheres synthesized via the sol-gel method followed by heating. The Rietveld refinement indicated that the precursors annealed at 1100 °C were crystallized to form orthorhombic SrZrO3. SrZrO3 particles exhibited non-agglomerated hollow spherical morphology with an average particle size of 300 nm. The UV-excited photoluminescence spectrum of SrZrO3:Eu3+ consisted of two regions. One region was associated with SrZrO3 trap emission, and the other one was related to the emission of Eu3+ ions. The intensity ratio of the emission of Eu3+ ions to the host emission (FIR) and the emission lifetime of Eu3+ ions were measured in the temperature range of 300–550 K. The sensitivity obtained via the lifetime method was 7.3× lower than that measured via the FIR. Within the optimum temperature range of 300–460 K, the as-estimated sensor sensitivity was increased from 0.0013 to 0.028 K−1. With a further increase in temperatures, the sensitivity started to decline. A maximum relative sensitivity was estimated to be 2.22%K−1 at 460 K. The resolutions in both methods were below 1K in the above temperature range. The results indicated the suitability of SrZrO3:Eu3+ for the distinct high temperature sensing applications. PMID:27189117

  17. Structural evaluations and temperature dependent photoluminescence characterizations of Eu3+-activated SrZrO3 hollow spheres for luminescence thermometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subrata; Som, Sudipta; Yang, Che-Yuan; Chavhan, Sudam; Lu, Chung-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    This research is focused on the temperature sensing ability of perovskite SrZrO3:Eu3+ hollow spheres synthesized via the sol-gel method followed by heating. The Rietveld refinement indicated that the precursors annealed at 1100 °C were crystallized to form orthorhombic SrZrO3. SrZrO3 particles exhibited non-agglomerated hollow spherical morphology with an average particle size of 300 nm. The UV-excited photoluminescence spectrum of SrZrO3:Eu3+ consisted of two regions. One region was associated with SrZrO3 trap emission, and the other one was related to the emission of Eu3+ ions. The intensity ratio of the emission of Eu3+ ions to the host emission (FIR) and the emission lifetime of Eu3+ ions were measured in the temperature range of 300–550 K. The sensitivity obtained via the lifetime method was 7.3× lower than that measured via the FIR. Within the optimum temperature range of 300–460 K, the as-estimated sensor sensitivity was increased from 0.0013 to 0.028 K‑1. With a further increase in temperatures, the sensitivity started to decline. A maximum relative sensitivity was estimated to be 2.22%K‑1 at 460 K. The resolutions in both methods were below 1K in the above temperature range. The results indicated the suitability of SrZrO3:Eu3+ for the distinct high temperature sensing applications.

  18. Temperature dependence of the internal friction of polycrystalline indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, K. V.; Golyandin, S. N.; Kustov, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    The temperature dependences of the internal friction and the elastic modulus of polycrystalline indium have been investigated in the temperature range 7-320 K at oscillatory loading frequencies of approximately 100 kHz. The effect of temperature on the amplitude dependence and the effect of high-amplitude loading at 7 K on the temperature and amplitude dependences of the internal friction of indium have been analyzed. It has been demonstrated that the thermocycling leads to microplastic deformation of indium due to the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the appearance of a "recrystallization" maximum in the spectrum of the amplitude-dependent internal friction. The conclusion has been drawn that the bulk diffusion of vacancies and impurities begins at temperatures of approximately 90 K and that, at lower temperatures, the diffusion occurs in the vicinity of dislocations. It has been revealed that the high-temperature internal friction background becomes noticeable after the dissolution of Cottrell atmospheres.

  19. Temperature dependence of diffusivities, preliminary definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, R. Michael; Nadarajah, Arunan

    1993-01-01

    During the six months definition phase of the instrument development program, research personnel at the Center for Microgravity and Materials Research of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) were to furnish all of the necessary labor, services, materials, and facilities necessary to provide science requirement definition, initiate hardware development activities, requirements and timetable for integration and experimental accommodation of the GAS payload into the Shuttle cargo bay and an updated ground-based research flight program proposal consistent with the NRA selection letter. These activities were to be accomplished in parallel and consistent with the necessary research and development work toward the accomplishment of the overall objectives of the selected proposal.

  20. Temperature dependence of heterogeneous nucleation: Extension of the Fletcher model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Robert; Winkler, Paul; Wagner, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Recently there have been several cases reported where the critical saturation ratio for onset of heterogeneous nucleation increases with nucleation temperature (positive slope dependence). This behavior contrasts with the behavior observed in homogeneous nucleation, where a decreasing critical saturation ratio with increasing nucleation temperature (negative slope dependence) seems universal. For this reason the positive slope dependence is referred to as anomalous. Negative slope dependence is found in heterogeneous nucleation as well, but because so few temperature-dependent measurements have been reported, it is not presently clear which slope condition (positive or negative) will become more frequent. Especially interesting is the case of water vapor condensation on silver nanoparticles [Kupc et al., AS&T 47: i-iv, 2013] where the critical saturation ratio for heterogeneous nucleation onset passes through a maximum, at about 278K, with higher (lower) temperatures showing the usual (anomalous) temperature dependence. In the present study we develop an extension of Fletcher's classical, capillarity-based, model of heterogeneous nucleation that explicitly resolves the roles of surface energy and surface entropy in determining temperature dependence. Application of the second nucleation theorem, which relates temperature dependence of nucleation rate to cluster energy, yields both necessary and sufficient conditions for anomalous temperature behavior in the extended Fletcher model. In particular it is found that an increasing contact angle with temperature is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for anomalous temperature dependence to occur. Methods for inferring microscopic contact angle and its temperature dependence from heterogeneous nucleation probability measurements are discussed in light of the new theory.

  1. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed. PMID:26854767

  2. DNAzyme catalytic beacon sensors that resist temperature-dependent variations.

    PubMed

    Nagraj, Nandini; Liu, Juewen; Sterling, Stephanie; Wu, Jenny; Lu, Yi

    2009-07-21

    The temperature-dependent variability of a Pb2+-specific 8-17E DNAzyme catalytic beacon sensor has been addressed through the introduction of mismatches in the DNAzyme, and the resulting sensors resist temperature-dependent variations from 4 to 30 degrees C.

  3. Strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanjgaokar, Nikhil J.

    Nanocrystalline metal films are candidate materials for microelectronics and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). The long term mechanical stability of metal films requires quantitative understanding of their thermo-mechanical behavior in the large range of operating strain rates and temperatures. This dissertation research studied (a) the role of thermally activated processes based on the strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films, and (b) deformation processes at nominally elastic loads that lead to creep strain over a moderate temperature range that is relevant to MEMS applications. The rate dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films was first investigated at room temperature ~ 25 °C and at strain rates between 10-6 to 20 s-1. The use of digital image correlation (DIC) facilitated repeatable and accurate measurements of fullfield strain from free-standing nanocrystalline Au thin films. The experimental stress-strain curves were used to calculate activation volumes for two film thicknesses (0.85 mum, and 1.75 mum), which were 4.5b3 and 8.1b3, at strain rates smaller than 10-4 s-1 and 12.5b3 and 14.6b3 at strain rates higher than 10-4 s-1. The reduced activation volume and increased strain rate sensitivity at slow strain rates were attributed to grain boundary (GB) diffusional processes that result in creep strain. The room temperature strain rate results were augmented with microscale strain rate experiments at temperatures up to 110 °C. Two methods for heating free-standing microscale thin film specimens, namely uniform heating using a custom-built microheater and resistive (Joule) heating, were evaluated using a combination of full-field strain measurements by optical microscopy and full-field temperature measurements by infrared (IR) thermal imaging. It was shown for the first time that the Joule specimen heating method results in large underestimation of the inelastic material properties

  4. Temperature dependent LH1→RC energy transfer in purple bacteria Tch. tepidum with shiftable LH1-Qy band: A natural system to investigate thermally activated energy transfer in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-04-01

    The native LH1-RC complex of the purple bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum has an ultra-red LH1-Qy absorption at 915nm, which can shift to 893 and 882nm by means of chemical modifications. These unique complexes are a good natural system to investigate the thermally activated energy transfer process, with the donor energies different while the other factors (such as the acceptor energy, special pair at 890nm, and the distance/relative orientation between the donor and acceptor) remain the same. The native B915-RC, B893-RC and B882-RC complexes, as well as the LH1-RC complex of Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides were studied by temperature-dependent time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The energy transfer time constants, kET(-1), are 65, 45, 46 and 45ps at room temperature while 225, 58, 85, 33ps at 77K for the B915-RC, B893-RC, B882-RC and Rba. sphaeroides LH1-RC, respectively. The dependences of kET on temperature have different trends. The reorganization energies are determined to be 70, 290, 200 and 45cm(-1), respectively, by fitting kET vs temperature using Marcus equation. The activation energies are 200, 60, 115 and 20cm(-1), respectively. The influences of the structure (the arrangement of the 32 BChl a molecules) on kET are discussed based on these results, to reveal how the B915-RC complex accomplishes its energy transfer function with a large uphill energy of 290cm(-1).

  5. Temperature dependence of the excited state absorption of alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Jenssen, H.P.

    1983-03-01

    The temperature dependence from 28 to 290/sup 0/C of the excited-state absorption cross section sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) in the gain wavelength region of alexandrite has been determined from the temperature dependence of the single pass gain (SPG) and of the fluorescence. sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) and the emission cross section increase with temperature at approximately the same rate.

  6. Temperature dependence of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of two soils.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the soil water matric potential, surface tension, and diffuse double-layer thickness are discussed in terms of their possible interaction with the unsaturated conductivity values obtained. A case is presented for further study to isolate these temperature-sensitive parameters as well as additional parameters related to fluid flow path changes with temperature.-from Author

  7. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Leandro; Duran, Jesus; Isah, Anne; Albers, Patrick; McDougall, Michael; Wang, Weining

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer-based solar cells are the newest generation solar cells. While research on this area has been progressing, the efficiency is still low because certain important parameters of the solar cell are still not well understood. It is of interest to study the temperature dependence of the solar cell parameters, such as conductivity of the polymer, open circuit voltage, and reverse saturation current to gain a better understanding on the solar cells. In this work, we report our temperature dependence of conductivity measurement using our in-house temperature-varying apparatus. In this project, we designed and built a temperature varying apparatus using a thermoelectric cooler module which gives enough temperature range as we need and costs much less than a cryostat. The set-up of the apparatus will be discussed. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurements for PEDOT:PSS films with different room-temperature conductivity will be compared and discussed. NJSGC-NASA Fellowship grant

  8. Temperature dependence of DNA condensation at high ionic concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Yanhui; Fan, Yangtao; Hu, Lin; Xu, Houqiang

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments pointed out that compact states of DNA condensed by multivalent cation prefer higher temperature. The condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in temperature. At the same time, a recent experimental work carried out in buffer solution without multivalent cation points out that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the temperature. DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. It is necessary to revolve the effects of temperature dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, and a model including the temperature dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the temperature dependence of toroid conformations. With an increase in temperature, the first periodic oscillation in the autocorrelation function shifts left and the number of segments containing the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments mentioned above, the long-axis length is defined to estimate the temperature dependence of condensation process further. At the temperatures defined in experiments mentioned above, the relation between long-axis length and temperature matches the experimental results.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients from ab initio Computations: Hydrogen in Nickel

    SciTech Connect

    E Wimmer; W Wolf; J Sticht; P Saxe; C Geller; R Najafabadi; G Young

    2006-03-16

    The temperature-dependent mass diffusion coefficient is computed using transition state theory. Ab initio supercell phonon calculations of the entire system provide the attempt frequency, the activation enthalpy, and the activation entropy as a function of temperature. Effects due to thermal lattice expansion are included and found to be significant. Numerical results for the case of hydrogen in nickel demonstrate a strong temperature dependence of the migration enthalpy and entropy. Trapping in local minima along the diffusion path has a pronounced effect especially at low temperatures. The computed diffusion coefficients with and without trapping bracket the available experimental values over the entire temperature range between 0 and 1400 K.

  10. Stability of CdTe solar cells at elevated temperatures: Bias, temperature, and Cu dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltner, Jason F.; Sites, James R.

    1999-03-01

    A systematic study of the stability of CdTe solar cells fabricated by SCI and NREL has been made. Cells were stressed at elevated temperatures under various bias conditions, both with illumination (˜2 suns) and in the dark. An activation energy of approximately 1 eV is implied from cells stressed at various elevated temperatures. The stability of CdTe solar cells was found to be bias dependent and device-specific. Cells made with thick CdTe and no back-contact copper as well as by at least one SCI recipe were very stable. Extrapolation of effects assuming Arrhenius behavior yields estimated lifetime expectations for the cells stressed at elevated temperatures.

  11. Model of local temperature changes in brain upon functional activation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christopher M; Smith, Michael B; Turner, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Experimental results for changes in brain temperature during functional activation show large variations. It is, therefore, desirable to develop a careful numerical model for such changes. Here, a three-dimensional model of temperature in the human head using the bioheat equation, which includes effects of metabolism, perfusion, and thermal conduction, is employed to examine potential temperature changes due to functional activation in brain. It is found that, depending on location in brain and corresponding baseline temperature relative to blood temperature, temperature may increase or decrease on activation and concomitant increases in perfusion and rate of metabolism. Changes in perfusion are generally seen to have a greater effect on temperature than are changes in metabolism, and hence active brain is predicted to approach blood temperature from its initial temperature. All calculated changes in temperature for reasonable physiological parameters have magnitudes <0.12 degrees C and are well within the range reported in recent experimental studies involving human subjects.

  12. Temperature dependent vibrational modes of glycosidic bond in disaccharide sugars.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2008-03-17

    We studied the temperature dependent vibrational modes of the glycosidic bond in trehalose, sucrose, and maltose at wavenumbers ranging from 1000 to 1200 cm(-1). We found that the slope of temperature dependent Raman shifts of the glycosidic bond in trehalose and sucrose changed at temperatures around 120 degrees C, indicating a bond length or a bond angle (dihedral and torsional angles) change. However, we did not observe any slope change in maltose because the melting temperature of maltose is very close to 120 degrees C. We also found, at temperatures below 120 degrees C, that Raman shifts of the vibrational modes of the glycosidic bond in trehalose showed the strongest temperature dependence among the three disaccharides.

  13. Climate change and temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles.

    PubMed Central

    Janzen, F J

    1994-01-01

    Despite increasing concern over the possible impact of global temperature change, there is little empirical evidence of direct temperature effects on biotic interactions in natural systems. Clear assessment of the ecological and evolutionary impact of changing climatic temperature requires a natural system in which populations exhibit a direct unambiguous fitness response to thermal fluctuation. I monitored nests of a population of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) with temperature-dependent sex determination to investigate the causal relationship between local climatic variation in temperature and offspring sex ratio. Consistent with theoretical predictions, annual offspring sex ratio was highly correlated with mean July air temperature, validating concerns about the effect of climate change on population demography. This correlation implies that even modest increases in mean temperature (< 2 degrees C) may drastically skew the sex ratio. Statistical evaluation of the variance in climate change indicates that an increase in mean temperature of 4 degrees C would effectively eliminate production of male offspring. Quantitative genetic analyses and behavioral data suggest that populations with temperature-dependent sex determination may be unable to evolve rapidly enough to counteract the negative fitness consequences of rapid global temperature change. Populations of species with temperature-dependent sex determination may serve as ideal indicators of the biological impact of global temperature change. PMID:8052608

  14. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  15. Temperature dependent electrical transport of disordered reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Narayanan, T. N.; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-06-01

    We report on the simple route for the synthesis of chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using ascorbic acid (a green chemical) as a reducing agent. Temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of rGO thin films have been studied in a wide range (50 K T 400 K) of temperature. Electrical conduction in rGO thin films was displayed in two different temperature regimes. At higher temperatures, Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of resistance was observed indicating a band gap dominating transport behavior. At lower temperatures, the rGO sample showed a conduction mechanism consistent with Mott's two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH). An unsaturated negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed up to 3 T field. A decrease in negative MR at high temperatures is attributed to the phonon scattering of charge carriers.

  16. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-07-01

    A modified Levenberg-Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Multiorbital Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekino, M; Okamoto, Satoshi; Koshibae, W; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature dependence of thermopower in the multiorbital Hubbard model is studied by using the dynamical mean-field theory with the non-crossing approximation impurity solver. It is found that the Coulomb interaction, the Hund coupling, and the crystal filed splitting bring about nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the hermopower, including its sign reversal. The implication of our theoretical results to some materials is discussed.

  18. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Radiative and Nonradiative Rates from Time-Dependent Correlation Function Methods.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants in radiative and nonradiative decays from excited electronic states has been studied using a time-dependent correlation function approach in the framework of the adiabatic representation and the harmonic oscillator approximation. The present work analyzes the vibrational aspect of the processes, which gives rise to the temperature dependence, with the inclusion of mode-mixing, as well as of frequency change effects. The temperature dependence of the rate constants shows a contrasting nature, depending on whether the process has been addressed within the Franck-Condon approximation or beyond it. The calculation of the Duschinsky matrix and the shift vector between the normal modes of the two states can be done in Cartesian and/or internal coordinates, depending on the flexibility of the investigated molecule. A new computational code has been developed to calculate the rates of intersystem crossing, internal conversion, and fluorescence for selected molecules as functions of temperature. PMID:26683207

  20. The temperature dependence of electrical excitability in fish hearts.

    PubMed

    Vornanen, Matti

    2016-07-01

    Environmental temperature has pervasive effects on the rate of life processes in ectothermic animals. Animal performance is affected by temperature, but there are finite thermal limits for vital body functions, including contraction of the heart. This Review discusses the electrical excitation that initiates and controls the rate and rhythm of fish cardiac contraction and is therefore a central factor in the temperature-dependent modulation of fish cardiac function. The control of cardiac electrical excitability should be sensitive enough to respond to temperature changes but simultaneously robust enough to protect against cardiac arrhythmia; therefore, the thermal resilience and plasticity of electrical excitation are physiological qualities that may affect the ability of fishes to adjust to climate change. Acute changes in temperature alter the frequency of the heartbeat and the duration of atrial and ventricular action potentials (APs). Prolonged exposure to new thermal conditions induces compensatory changes in ion channel expression and function, which usually partially alleviate the direct effects of temperature on cardiac APs and heart rate. The most heat-sensitive molecular components contributing to the electrical excitation of the fish heart seem to be Na(+) channels, which may set the upper thermal limit for the cardiac excitability by compromising the initiation of the cardiac AP at high temperatures. In cardiac and other excitable cells, the different temperature dependencies of the outward K(+) current and inward Na(+) current may compromise electrical excitability at temperature extremes, a hypothesis termed the temperature-dependent depression of electrical excitation. PMID:27385752

  1. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y.

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  2. Temperature dependence of helium diffusion through common epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovinger, D. J.; Hallock, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Helium gas at room temperature is known to diffuse through the epoxies commonly used in various low temperature applications, which can complicate leak detection. The helium flux typically decreases with decreasing temperature. We have measured the flux of helium that passes though thin sections of as-cast clear Stycast 1266, Stycast 2850FT (black) and TRA-BOND 2151 (blue) epoxies as a function of temperature in the range 130K < T < 300K. We analyze the data to create normalized (to constant sample thickness and pressure differential) data for comparison. We report the preliminary temperature-dependent fluxes we have measured, which show significant differences among the epoxies studied.

  3. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  4. A temperature dependent SPICE macro-model for power MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The power MOSFET SPICE Macro-Model has been developed suitable for use over the temperature range {minus}55 to 125 {degrees}C. The model is comprised of a single parameter set with temperature dependence accessed through the SPICE .TEMP card. SPICE parameter extraction techniques for the model and model predictive accuracy are discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric properties of chicken meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperatures ranging from -20 degree C to +25 degree C. At a given temperature, the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant reveals two relaxations while those of th...

  6. Temperature-dependant study of phosphorus ion implantation in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, M. A.; Smith, A. J.; Jeynes, C.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental results on shallow junction formation in germanium by phosphorus ion implantation and standard rapid thermal processing. An attempt is made to improve phosphorus activation by implanting phosphorus at high and low temperature. The focus is on studying the germanium damage and phosphorus activation as a function of implant temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with channelling and Hall Effect measurements are employed for characterisation of germanium damage and phosphorus activation, respectively. High and low temperature implants were found to be better compared to room temperature implant.

  7. Temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Dubtsov, S. N.; Baklanov, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles in gases has been experimentally studied. It is established that this dependence significantly differs from that predicted by various correlations, in particular, by the Cunningham-Millikan-Davies correlation that is used as an instrumental basis for virtually all methods of measurement of the diffusion coefficient in aerosols.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Viscosities of Common Carrier Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Trent S.; Nahir, Tal M.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for the dependence of viscosities of the real gases on temperature is described, suggesting that this dependence is greater than that predicted by the kinetic theory of gases. The experimental results were obtained using common modern instrumentation and could be reproduced by students in analytical or…

  9. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump-probe experiments.

  10. Effect of temperature change on anammox activity.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic nitrogen removal appears as a prerequisite for the implementation of energy autarchic municipal wastewater treatment plants. Whilst the application of anammox-related technologies in the side-stream is at present state of the art, the feasibility of this energy-efficient process in main-stream conditions is still under investigation. Lower operating temperatures and ammonium concentrations, together with a demand for high and stable nitrogen removal efficiency, represent the main challenges to overcome for this appealing new frontier of the wastewater treatment field. In this study, we report the short-term effect of temperature on the maximum biomass specific activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria as evaluated by means of batch tests. The experiments were performed on anammox biomass sampled from two full-scale reactors and two lab-scale reactors, all characterized by different reactor configurations and operating conditions. The results indicate that for the anammox conversion, the temperature dependency cannot be accurately modeled by one single Arrhenius coefficient (i.e., θ) as typically applied for other biological processes. The temperature effect is increasing at lower temperatures. Adaptation of anammox bacteria after long-term cultivation at 20 and 10°C was observed. Implications for modeling and process design are finally discussed.

  11. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THERMAL NEUTRONS FROM THE MOON

    SciTech Connect

    R.C. LITTLE; W. FELDMAN; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    Planetary thermal neutron fluxes provide a sensitive proxy for mafic and feldspathic terranes, and are also necessary for translating measured gamma-ray line strengths to elemental abundances. Both functions require a model for near surface temperatures and a knowledge of the dependence of thermal neutron flux on temperature. We have explored this dependence for a representative sample of lunar soil compositions and surface temperatures using MCNP{trademark}. For all soil samples, the neutron density is found to be independent of temperature, in accord with neutron moderation theory. The thermal neutron flux, however, does vary with temperature in a way that depends on {Delta}, the ratio of macroscopic absorption to energy-loss cross sections of soil compositions. The weakest dependence is for the largest {Delta} (which corresponds to the Apollo 17 high Ti basalt in our soil selection), and the largest dependence is for the lowest {Delta} (which corresponds to ferroan anorthosite, [FAN] in our selection). For the lunar model simulated, the depth at which the thermal neutron population is most sensitive to temperature is {approx}30 g/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Passion and dependency in online shopping activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Chien; Yang, Hui-Wen

    2007-04-01

    This study examines the influence of harmonious passion (HP) and obsessive passion (OP) to online shopping dependency. The results show that both HP and OP might lead to online shopping dependency and online shoppers with OP are more dependent on online shopping activities. In addition, this study also found out that HP and OP could be denoted as a sequence of different intensities of passion, where HP might be a necessity of OP. PMID:17474850

  13. Temperature dependence of acoustic impedance for specific fluorocarbon liquids.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Jon N; Hall, Christopher S; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2002-12-01

    Recent studies by our group have demonstrated the efficacy of perfluorocarbon liquid nanoparticles for enhancing the reflectivity of tissuelike surfaces to which they are bound. The magnitude of this enhancement depends in large part on the difference in impedances of the perfluorocarbon, the bound substrate, and the propagating medium. The impedance varies directly with temperature because both the speed of sound and the mass density of perfluorocarbon liquids are highly temperature dependent. However, there are relatively little data in the literature pertaining to the temperature dependence of the acoustic impedance of these compounds. In this study, the speed of sound and density of seven different fluorocarbon liquids were measured at specific temperatures between 20 degrees C and 45 degrees C. All of the samples demonstrated negative, linear dependencies on temperature for both speed of sound and density and, consequently, for the acoustic impedance. The slope of sound speed was greatest for perfluorohexane (-278 +/- 1.5 cm/s-degrees C) and lowest for perfluorodichlorooctane (-222 +/- 0.9 cm/s-degrees C). Of the compounds measured, perfluorohexane exhibited the lowest acoustic impedance at all temperatures, and perfluorodecalin the highest at all temperatures. Computations from a simple transmission-line model used to predict reflectivity enhancement from surface-bound nanoparticles are discussed in light of these results.

  14. Simulation of Temperature-Dependent Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors with Various Degrees of Disorder.

    PubMed

    Heck, Alexander; Kranz, Julian J; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-07-12

    Different trends in the temperature dependence of the mobility can be observed in organic semiconductors, which constitutes a serious challenge for theoretical approaches. In this work, we apply an atomistic bottom-up simulation for the calculation of temperature-dependent mobilities of a broad selection of materials, ranging from single crystal to amorphous solid. We evaluate how well the method is able to distinguish temperature dependences of different materials and how the findings relate to experimental observations. The applied method is able to cover the full range of temperature dependencies from activated transport in amorphous materials to band-like transport in crystals. In well-characterized materials, we find good agreement with the experiment and a band-like temperature dependence. In less-ordered materials, we find discrepancies from the experiment that indicated that experimentally studied materials possess a higher degree of disorder than do the simulated defect-free morphologies. PMID:27224054

  15. Model for temperature-dependent magnetization of nanocrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2015-01-07

    A magnetization model of nanocrystalline materials incorporating intragrain anisotropies, intergrain interactions, and texture effects has been extended to include the thermal fluctuations. The method relies on the stochastic Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert theory of magnetization dynamics and permits to study the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline materials at arbitrary temperature below the Currie temperature. The model has been used to determine the intergrain exchange constant and grain boundary anisotropy constant of nanocrystalline Ni at 100 K and 298 K. It is found that the thermal fluctuations suppress the strength of the intergrain exchange coupling and also reduce the grain boundary anisotropy. In comparison with its value at 2 K, the interparticle exchange constant decreases by 16% and 42% and the grain boundary anisotropy constant decreases by 28% and 40% at 100 K and 298 K, respectively. An application of the model to study the grain size-dependent magnetization indicates that when the thermal activation energy is comparable to the free energy of grains, the decrease in the grain size leads to the decrease in the magnetic permeability and saturation magnetization. The mechanism by which the grain size influences the magnetic properties of nc–Ni is discussed.

  16. Model for temperature-dependent magnetization of nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2015-01-01

    A magnetization model of nanocrystalline materials incorporating intragrain anisotropies, intergrain interactions, and texture effects has been extended to include the thermal fluctuations. The method relies on the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert theory of magnetization dynamics and permits to study the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline materials at arbitrary temperature below the Currie temperature. The model has been used to determine the intergrain exchange constant and grain boundary anisotropy constant of nanocrystalline Ni at 100 K and 298 K. It is found that the thermal fluctuations suppress the strength of the intergrain exchange coupling and also reduce the grain boundary anisotropy. In comparison with its value at 2 K, the interparticle exchange constant decreases by 16% and 42% and the grain boundary anisotropy constant decreases by 28% and 40% at 100 K and 298 K, respectively. An application of the model to study the grain size-dependent magnetization indicates that when the thermal activation energy is comparable to the free energy of grains, the decrease in the grain size leads to the decrease in the magnetic permeability and saturation magnetization. The mechanism by which the grain size influences the magnetic properties of nc-Ni is discussed.

  17. AlN bandgap temperature dependence from its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, E.; Freitas, J. A.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.

    2008-08-01

    In the present work we report on the AlN gap energy temperature dependence studied through the optical properties of high-quality large bulk AlN single crystals grown by a sublimation-recondensation technique. The cathodoluminescence, transmission/absorption as well as optical reflectance measurements at low temperature show a clear feature at about 6.03 eV, which could be attributed to the free exciton A. Even using a rather thick sample it was possible to observe the absorption due to the free exciton A in this energy range due to its large binding energy. We followed the temperature evolution of these features up to room temperature and inferred the gap energy temperature dependence using the exciton binding energy obtained by our group in the past.

  18. Temperature-dependent μ-Raman investigation of struvite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Kasprowicz, D.; Runka, T.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the vibrational properties of struvite crystals grown from silica gels was systematically studied by μ-Raman spectroscopy. The time-dependent Raman spectra recorded in the process of long time annealing of struvite crystal at 353 K do not indicate structural changes in the struvite crystal with the time of annealing. The temperature-dependent Raman spectra recorded in the range 298-423 K reveal a phase transition in struvite at about 368 K. Above this characteristic temperature, some of bands assigned to vibrations of the PO4 and NH4 tetrahedra and water molecules observed in the Raman spectra in low temperatures (orthorhombic phase) change their spectral parameters or disappear, which indicates a transition to a higher symmetry structure of struvite in the range of high temperatures.

  19. Activity dependent CAM cleavage and neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Katherine; Allen, Megan; Lim, Seung T.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially localized proteolysis represents an elegant means by which neuronal activity dependent changes in synaptic structure, and thus experience dependent learning and memory, can be achieved. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that matrix metalloproteinase and adamalysin activity is concentrated at the cell surface, and emerging evidence suggests that increased peri-synaptic expression, release and/or activation of these proteinases occurs with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission. Synaptically expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) could therefore represent important targets for neuronal activity-dependent proteolysis. Several CAM subtypes are expressed at the synapse, and their cleavage can influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission through a variety of non-mutually exclusive mechanisms. In the following review, we discuss mechanisms that regulate neuronal activity-dependent synaptic CAM shedding, including those that may be calcium dependent. We also highlight CAM targets of activity-dependent proteolysis including neuroligin and intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5). We include discussion focused on potential consequences of synaptic CAM shedding, with an emphasis on interactions between soluble CAM cleavage products and specific pre- and post-synaptic receptors. PMID:26321910

  20. Temperature Dependence of Surface Layering in a Dielectric Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Mo,H.; Kewalramani, S.; Evmenenko, G.; Kim, K.; Ehrlich, S.; Dutta, P.

    2007-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density oscillations (layers) at the free surface of tetrakis(2-ethylhexoxy)silane, a nonmetallic molecular liquid, was investigated using x-ray reflectivity. Below {approx}215K , the layer parameters weakly vary with temperature, if at all. Above this temperature, the layer spacings and intrinsic layer widths increase continuously, until there is no identifiable layering above 230K . This transition occurs at T/{Tc}{approx}0.23 , a temperature region that is usually accessible in metallic liquids but is preempted by freezing in many dielectric liquids.

  1. Temperature dependence of proton relaxation times in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T R; Tung, S M

    1987-01-01

    Accurate measurement of tissue relaxation characteristics is dependent on many factors, including field strength and temperature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sample temperature, viscosity and proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2). A review of two basic models of relaxation the simple molecular motion model and the fast exchange two state model is given with reference to their thermal dependencies. The temperature dependence for both T1 and T2 was studied on a 0.15 Tesla whole body magnetic resonance imager. Thirteen samples comprising both simple and complex materials were investigated by using a standard spin-echo (SE) technique and a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multi-echo sequence. A simple linear relationship between T1 and temperature was observed for all samples over the range of 20 degrees C to 50 degrees C. There is an inverse relationship between viscosity and T1 and T2. A quantity called the temperature dependence coefficient (TDC) is introduced and defined as the percent rate of change of the proton relaxation time referenced to a specific temperature. The large TDC found for T1 values, e.g. 2.37%/degrees C for CuSO4 solutions and 3.59%/degrees C for light vegetable oils at 22 degrees C, indicates that a temperature correction should be made when comparing in-vivo and in-vitro T1 times. The T2 temperature dependence is relatively small. PMID:3041151

  2. Temperature Dependent Constitutive Modeling for Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, June K.; Kim, Hyung S.; Kim, Heon Y.

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloys have been increasingly used in automotive and electronic industries because of their excellent strength to weight ratio and EMI shielding properties. However, magnesium alloys have low formability at room temperature due to their unique mechanical behavior (twinning and untwining), prompting for forming at an elevated temperature. In this study, a temperature dependent constitutive model for magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheet is developed. A hardening law based on non linear kinematic hardening model is used to consider Bauschinger effect properly. Material parameters are determined from a series of uni-axial cyclic experiments (T-C-T or C-T-C) with the temperature ranging 150-250 deg. C. The influence of temperature on the constitutive equation is introduced by the material parameters assumed to be functions of temperature. Fitting process of the assumed model to measured data is presented and the results are compared.

  3. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  4. On the detection of precipitation dependence on temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Luo, Ming; Leung, Yee

    2016-05-01

    Employing their newly proposed interannual difference method (IADM), Liu et al. (2009) and Shiu et al. (2012) reported a shocking increase of around 100% K-1 in heavy precipitation with warming global temperature in 1979-2007. Such increase is alarming and prompts us to probe into the IADM. In this study, both analytical derivations and numerical analyses demonstrate that IADM provides no additional information to that of the conventional linear regression, and also, it may give a false indication of dependence. For clarity and simplicity, we therefore recommend linear regression analysis over the IADM for the detection of dependence. We also find that heavy precipitation decreased during the global warming hiatus, and the precipitation dependence on temperature drops by almost 50% when the study period is extended to 1979-2014 and it may keep dropping in the near future. The risk of having heavy precipitation under warming global temperature may have been overestimated.

  5. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  6. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  7. Temperature dependence of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Daniel V; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees

    2015-06-12

    In order to gain a better physical understanding of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores, we study the temperature dependence of λ-DNA translocations through 10 nm diameter silicon nitride nanopores, both experimentally and theoretically. The measured ionic conductance G, the DNA-induced ionic-conductance blockades [Formula: see text] and the event frequency Γ all increase with increasing temperature while the DNA translocation time τ decreases. G and [Formula: see text] are accurately described when bulk and surface conductances of the nanopore are considered and access resistance is incorporated appropriately. Viscous drag on the untranslocated part of the DNA coil is found to dominate the temperature dependence of the translocation times and the event rate is well described by a balance between diffusion and electrophoretic motion. The good fit between modeled and measured properties of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores in this first comprehensive temperature study, suggest that our model captures the relevant physics of the process.

  8. Temperature and Depth Dependence of Order in Liquid Crystal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Miranda,L.; Hu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the depth dependence and temperature behavior of the ordering of smectic-A films close to the smectic A-nematic transition, deposited on grated glass. X-ray grazing incidence geometry in reflection mode through the glass substrate was used to characterize the samples. Our results indicate the presence of a structure similar to the helical twist grain boundary phase. The structure has two maxima, one close to the glass-liquid crystal interface and another about 8 {mu}m above the surface. The structure at 8 {mu}m is the one that dominates at higher temperatures. In addition, we find that order is preserved to temperatures close to the nematic-isotropic transition temperature for the deeper gratings. We find also a dependence of the orientation of the structure with the depth of the grating and the elastic constant of the liquid crystal.

  9. Temperature dependent sensor response caused by polymer-solvent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M A

    1992-01-01

    Absorption of organic solvents by a range of polymers has been used as the chemical transduction mechanism for a variety of sensors. This paper examines the effect of the polymer-solvent interaction on the temperature dependence of the sensor response. Optical interferometric cavities are formed on the end of an optical fiber by plasma-deposition of a fluorocarbon polymer. Swelling of the polymer when exposed to various solvent vapors produces changes in the reflectivity of the fiber tip. The temperature dependence of the sensor response is related to the strength of the polymer-solvent interaction and the heat of vaporization of the solvent.

  10. Anomalous temperature dependence of the IR spectrum of polyalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helenius, V.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Kotila, S.; Nieminen, J.; Lohikoski, R.; Timonen, J.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the infrared spectra of acetanilide (ACN), tryptophan-(alanine) 15, and tyrosine-(alanine) 15. No sidebands of the amide-I vibration were observed in the polypeptides, but two anomalous sidebands of the NH stretch with a similar temperature dependence as that of the anomalous amide-I vibrational mode at 1650 cm -1 of crystalline ACN were detected. Fermi resonance combined with the appearance of a red-shifted sideband of NH stretch through coupling to lattice modes seems to explain this band structure. Observations are indicative of excitons that may occur in polypeptides as well as in single crystals of ACN.

  11. Temperature dependence of VUV transmission of synthetic fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, St.; Lange, H.; Schoepp, H.; Witzke, H.-D.

    2006-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the VUV transmission of synthetic fused silica is of interest for commercial applications as well as for fundamental research. In this work the transmission properties of Suprasil 2 from Heraeus with an absorption edge at very low wavelengths is investigated. The absorption edge of this quartz glass shifts from 170 to 180 nm between 789 and 1129 K. The Urbach rule is discussed for the characterization of the temperature dependent transmission curves. The results are applied to the diagnostics of the Hg 185 nm line from a high pressure mercury discharge lamp.

  12. The temperature dependence of ponded infiltration under isothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Murphy, F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple temperature-sensitive modification to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is described; this assumes that the temperature dependence of the hydraulic conductivity is reciprocally equal to the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water, and that both the transmission zone saturation and the wetting front matric potential gradient are independent of temperature. This modified Green and Ampt equation is compared with ponded, isothermal infiltration experiments run on repacked columns of Olympic Sand and Aiken Loam at 5, 25, and 60??C. Experimental results showed increases in infiltration rates of at least 300% between 5 and 60??C for both soil materials, with subsequent increases in cumulative infiltration of even greater magnitudes for the loam. There is good agreement between measured and predicted initial infiltration rates at 25??C for both soil materials, yet at 60??C, the predicted results overestimate initial infiltration rates for the sand and underestimate initial rates for the loam. Measurements of the wetting depth vs. cumulative infiltration indicate that the transmission zone saturation increased with increasing temperature for both soil materials. In spite of this increased saturation with temperature, the final infiltration rates at both 25 and 60??C were predicted accurately using the modified Green and Ampt equation. This suggests that increased saturation occurred primarily in dead-end pore spaces, so that transmission zone hydraulic conductivities were unaffected by these temperature-induced changes in saturation. In conclusion, except for initial infiltration rates at 60??C, the measured influence of temperature on infiltration rates was fully accounted for by the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water. ?? 1991.

  13. Electrostatic control over temperature-dependent tunnelling across a single-molecule junction

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Wang, Lejia; del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potentials. The results show the temperature dependence of the current to vary strongly as a function of the gate voltage. Specifically, the current across the molecule exponentially increases in the Coulomb blockade regime and decreases at the charge degeneracy points, while remaining temperature-independent at resonance. Our observations can be well accounted for by a formal single-level tunnelling model where the temperature dependence relies on the thermal broadening of the Fermi distributions of the electrons in the leads. PMID:27211787

  14. Electrostatic control over temperature-dependent tunnelling across a single-molecule junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Wang, Lejia; Del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potentials. The results show the temperature dependence of the current to vary strongly as a function of the gate voltage. Specifically, the current across the molecule exponentially increases in the Coulomb blockade regime and decreases at the charge degeneracy points, while remaining temperature-independent at resonance. Our observations can be well accounted for by a formal single-level tunnelling model where the temperature dependence relies on the thermal broadening of the Fermi distributions of the electrons in the leads.

  15. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  16. Temperature dependence of nucleation rate in a binary solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Philippe, T.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of regression (partial dissolution) effects on the temperature dependence of nucleation rate in a binary solid solution has been studied theoretically. The results of the analysis are compared with the predictions of the simplest Volmer-Weber theory. Regression effects are shown to have a strong influence on the shape of the curve of nucleation rate versus temperature. The temperature TM at which the maximum rate of nucleation occurs is found to be lowered, particularly for low interfacial energy (coherent precipitation) and high-mobility species (e.g. interstitial atoms).

  17. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures. PMID:27046573

  18. NICMOS Flats and temperature dependence of the DQE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeker, Torsten

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this proposal is to obtain initial estimates of the detective quantum efficiency {DQE} of the NICMOS detectors and its temperature dependence in the previously uncharted temperature regime expected for operation under the NICMOS Cooling System {NCS}. The observations will measure the relative {via flat field morphology} and absolute DQE variation at three temperature setpoints. In addition, they will provide a monitor for particulate contamination {"Grot"} and detector lateral position {from the coronagraphic spot and FDA vignetting}. When stars are present in the field of view, they will enable a preliminary focus determination.

  19. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures.

  20. Active structural vibration control: Robust to temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vivek; Sharma, Manu; Thakur, Nagesh

    2012-11-01

    d-form augmented piezoelectric constitutive equations which take into account temperature dependence of piezoelectric strain coefficient (d31) and permittivity (∈33), are converted into e-form. Using e-form constitutive equations, a finite element model of a smart two dimensional plate instrumented with piezoelectric patches is derived. Equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's variational principle. Coupled equations of motion are uncoupled using modal analysis. Modal state vectors are estimated using the Kalman observer. The first mode of smart cantilevered plate is actively controlled using negative first modal velocity feedback at various temperatures. Total control effort required to do so is calculated using the electro-mechanical impedance method. The temperature dependence of sensor voltage, control voltage, control effort and Kalman observer equations is shown analytically. Simulation results are presented using MATLAB. Variations in (i) peak sensor voltage, (ii) actual and estimated first modal velocities, (iii) peak control voltage, (iv) total control effort and (v) settling time with respect to temperature are presented. Active vibration control performance is not maintained at temperature away from reference temperature when the temperature dependence of piezoelectric stress coefficient ‘e31' and permittivity ‘∈33' is not included in piezoelectric constitutive equations. Active control of vibrations becomes robust to temperature variations when the temperature dependence of ‘e31' and ‘∈33' is included in piezoelectric constitutive equations.

  1. The Temperature Dependence of Biological Rates from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcus, V. L.; Schipper, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Can enzymology and thermodynamics shed light on the response of the biosphere to a changing climate? We have recently developed a theory describing the temperature dependence of biological rates. We have called this MacroMolecular Rate Theory (MMRT) to reflect some fundamental thermodynamic properties peculiar to biological macromolecules. This theory scales well from enzymes to ecosystems and explains the curved temperature dependence of ecosystem processes such as respiration, as described by Lloyd and Taylor 20 years ago. MMRT also accounts for temperature optima which are a feature of all biological processes including respiration, photosynthsis and net ecosystem exchange. MMRT begins with enzymes. Enzymes drive metabolism and enable life by catalysing a myraid of chemical reactions with phenomenal rate enhancements. According to the classical thermodynamics description, enzymes achieve catalysis by binding to the transition state for the reaction and thus, lowering the reaction barrier. The dissociation constant, Kd, for the enzyme-transition state complex, commensurate with the observed rate enhancements, is extreme (Kd ~ 10-22 M). Such tight binding of the transition state influences the thermodynamic parameter, Cp, the heat capacity of the molecule. The difference in heat capacity, ∆C‡P, between the enzyme-substrate complex (Kd ~ 10-5 M) and the enzyme-transition state complex (Kd ~ 10-22 M) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme catalyzed rates. ∆C‡P is close to zero for reactions that involve small molecules, but is generally large and negative for reactions that involve macromolecules such as enzymes. The result is a curved temperature dependence of enzyme catalyzed rates and a temperature optimum above which, the rate decreases. This ∆C‡P signature is pervasive and scales from enzymes, to microbial growth rates, to microbial metabolism and ecosystem fluxes. It also has important implications for the temperature

  2. High temperature dependence of thermal transport in graphene foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Sun, Yi; Xiao, Huying; Hu, Xuejiao; Yue, Yanan

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the decreased thermal property of carbon materials with temperature according to the Umklapp phonon scattering theory, highly porous free-standing graphene foam (GF) exhibits an abnormal characteristic that its thermal property increases with temperature above room temperature. In this work, the temperature dependence of thermal properties of free-standing GF is investigated by using the transient electro-thermal technique. Significant increase for thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity from ˜0.3 to 1.5 W m-1 K-1 and ˜4 × 10-5 to ˜2 × 10-4 m2 s-1 respectively is observed with temperature from 310 K to 440 K for three GF samples. The quantitative analysis based on a physical model for porous media of Schuetz confirms that the thermal conductance across graphene contacts rather than the heat conductance inside graphene dominates thermal transport of our GFs. The thermal expansion effect at an elevated temperature makes the highly porous structure much tighter is responsible for the reduction in thermal contact resistance. Besides, the radiation heat exchange inside the pores of GFs improves the thermal transport at high temperatures. Since free-standing GF has great potential for being used as supercapacitor and battery electrode where the working temperature is always above room temperature, this finding is beneficial for thermal design of GF-based energy applications.

  3. High temperature dependence of thermal transport in graphene foam.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Sun, Yi; Xiao, Huying; Hu, Xuejiao; Yue, Yanan

    2015-03-13

    In contrast to the decreased thermal property of carbon materials with temperature according to the Umklapp phonon scattering theory, highly porous free-standing graphene foam (GF) exhibits an abnormal characteristic that its thermal property increases with temperature above room temperature. In this work, the temperature dependence of thermal properties of free-standing GF is investigated by using the transient electro-thermal technique. Significant increase for thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity from ∼0.3 to 1.5 W m(-1) K(-1) and ∼4 × 10(-5) to ∼2 × 10(-4) m(2) s(-1) respectively is observed with temperature from 310 K to 440 K for three GF samples. The quantitative analysis based on a physical model for porous media of Schuetz confirms that the thermal conductance across graphene contacts rather than the heat conductance inside graphene dominates thermal transport of our GFs. The thermal expansion effect at an elevated temperature makes the highly porous structure much tighter is responsible for the reduction in thermal contact resistance. Besides, the radiation heat exchange inside the pores of GFs improves the thermal transport at high temperatures. Since free-standing GF has great potential for being used as supercapacitor and battery electrode where the working temperature is always above room temperature, this finding is beneficial for thermal design of GF-based energy applications.

  4. Efficiencies of thermodynamics when temperature-dependent energy levels exist.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Takuya

    2016-03-14

    Based on a generalized form of the second law of thermodynamics, in which the temperature-dependent energy levels of a system are appropriately included in entropy generation, we show that the effect reasonably appears in efficiencies of thermodynamic processes. PMID:26890276

  5. Temperature dependence of soliton diffusion in trans-polyacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.; Norris, J.R.; Isoya, J.

    1997-07-01

    The temperature dependence of 1-D diffusion rate of solitons in transpolyacetylene is determined by time-domain analysis of ESR measurements. The diffusion rate appears to obey a simple power law. Monte Carlo simulation of 1-D diffusion process in impure chains indicates that overall diffusion can be much slower than that without traps.

  6. Anomalous temperature dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of phycobiliproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, E. G.; Schmitt, F.-J.; Hätti, P.; Klementiev, K. E.; Paschenko, V. Z.; Renger, G.; Rubin, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Using a single photon counting technique we have investigated fluorescence decay spectra of phycobiliproteins with picosecond time resolution. The studies were performed in a wide range of temperatures—from 4 to 300 K. Comparing the fluorescence decay kinetics of samples rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen with samples that were frozen slowly revealed that the temperature-dependent changes of phycobiliproteins fluorescence lifetime reflect the presence of three different stages, with a phase transition between 273 and 263 K that strongly depends on the rate of freezing. When the temperature decreases from 300 to 273 K, the fluorescence lifetime increases from 1.6 to 1.8 ns. In the region from 273 to 263 K we observed a decrease of the fluorescence lifetime, which strongly depends on the freezing rate: a slight decrease at high freezing rate and a drop down to 200 ps lifetime at slow freezing rate. In the low-temperature regime from 263 to 4 K a linear increase in the fluorescence lifetime was observed for all samples. It was found that the strong temperature dependence of the phycobiliprotein fluorescence, especially in the range between 263 and 273 K, is due to the interaction of the solvent with the chromophore bound to the protein. This feature is explained by a photoisomerization of the phycobiliproteins into a quenching form which is naturally prevented by the protein environment. The formation of ice microcrystals at low freezing rate eliminates this ‘protective’ effect of the protein environment.

  7. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    SciTech Connect

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W.

    1997-07-01

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  8. Temperature dependence of liquid crystals electrical response by impedance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. C.; Gaona, N.; Pérez, I.; Urruchi, V.; Pena, J. M. S.

    2007-05-01

    Liquid crystals are a growing technology bringing solutions for a number of applications in high performance displays featuring video-rate, color and high resolution images, and in prototypes of photonic devices. Electrooptic response of antiferroelectric liquid crystals (AFLC) might be superior to nematic liquid crystals that are been customarily employed nowadays. AFLC show reduced time response being promising candidates for portable multimedia devices, optical routing applications, among others. In this work, temperature and frequency dependence of impedance measurements, in passive devices of commercial antiferroelectric liquid crystals, has been studied. Measurements of the temperature dependence of optical transmission have been obtained. 1Hz triangular waveforms with different amplitude have been applied to the devices to carry out such characterization. Simultaneous measurements of optical transmission and electrical impedance have been performed. Specific addressing schemes have been tested in order to obtain the optimum electrooptical performance. Display blanking takes place when a saturation pulse is applied. Results achieved show that increasing temperature shifts the dynamic range of the analogue grayscale towards lower voltages. Impedance analysis of these devices upon switching has been performed as well. Temperature and frequency dependence of the impedance measurements have been characterized. Negative phase responses show there is a combined capacitive and resistive behavior. As the frequency increases the capacitive effect grows. Magnitude shows a linear decrease on a log-log frequency scale. As temperature increases, phase profile becomes slight more complex. New capacitive effects are suggested in a model of the electric response of AFLC cells at low frequencies.

  9. Study of the PTW microLion chamber temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; González-Castaño, D; Díaz-Botana, P; Pardo-Montero, J

    2014-06-01

    The use of liquid ionization chambers in radiotherapy has grown during the past few years. While for air ionization chambers the k(TP) correction for air mass density due to pressure and temperature variations is well known, less work has been done on the case of liquid ionization chambers, where there is still the need to take into account the influence of temperature in the free ion yield. We have measured the PTW microLion isooctane-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence in a ~ ±10 °C interval around the standard 20 °C room temperature for three operation voltages, including the manufacturer recommended voltage, and two beam qualities, (60)Co and 50 kV x-rays. Within the measured temperature range, the microLion signal exhibits a positive linear dependence, which is around 0.24% K(-1) at 800 V with (60)Co irradiation. This effect is of the same order of magnitude as the T dependence found in air ionization chambers, but its nature is completely different and its sign opposite to that of an air chamber. Onsager theory has been used to model the results and is consistent with this linear behaviour. However, some inconsistencies in the modelling of the 50 kV x-ray results have been found that are attributed to the failure of Onsager's isolated pair assumption for such radiation quality.

  10. Unconventional temperature dependence of the cuprate excitation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, William; Mauger, Alain; Noat, Yves

    2016-08-01

    Key properties of the cuprates, such as the pseudogap observed above the critical temperature Tc, remain highly debated. Given their importance, we recently proposed a novel mechanism based on the Bose-like condensation of mutually interacting Cooper pairs [W. Sacks, A. Mauger, Y. Noat, Supercond. Sci. Technol. 28, 105014 (2015)]. In this work, we calculate the temperature dependent DOS using this model for different doping levels from underdoped to overdoped. In all situations, due to the presence of excited pairs, a pseudogap is found above Tc while the normal DOS is recovered at T∗, the pair formation temperature. A similar behavior is found as a function of magnetic field, crossing a vortex, where a pseudogap exists in the vortex core. We show that the precise DOS shape depends on combined pair (boson) and quasiparticle (fermion) excitations, allowing for a deeper understanding of the SC to the PG transition.

  11. Temperature dependence of penetration depth in thin film niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, N.; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique is presented which should allow precise determination of the temperature dependence of the inductance, and hence of the penetration depth, of superconducting niobium thin-film structures. Four niobium thin-film stripline inductors are arranged in a bridge configuration, and inductance differences are measured using a potentiometric technique with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the null detector. Numerical simulations of the stripline inductances are presented which allow the performance of the measurement technique to be evaluated. The prediction of the two-fluid model for the penetration-depth temperature dependence is given for reduced temperatures of 0.3 to 0.9. The experimental apparatus and its resolution and accuracy are discussed.

  12. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  13. Sensitive Dependence of Gibbs Measures at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel, Daniel; Rivera-Letelier, Juan

    2015-09-01

    The Gibbs measures of an interaction can behave chaotically as the temperature drops to zero. We observe that for some classical lattice systems there are interactions exhibiting a related phenomenon of sensitive dependence of Gibbs measures: An arbitrarily small perturbation of the interaction can produce significant changes in the low-temperature behavior of its Gibbs measures. For some one-dimensional XY models we exhibit sensitive dependence of Gibbs measures for a (nearest-neighbor) interaction given by a smooth function, and for perturbations that are small in the smooth category. We also exhibit sensitive dependence of Gibbs measures for an interaction on a classical lattice system with finite-state space. This interaction decreases exponentially as a function of the distance between sites; it is given by a Lipschitz continuous potential in the configuration space. The perturbations are small in the Lipschitz topology. As a by-product we solve some problems stated by Chazottes and Hochman.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Carbon Isotope Fractionation in CAM Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Deleens, Eliane; Treichel, Isabel; O'Leary, Marion H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17°C nights, 23°C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is −4‰ (that is, malate is enriched in 13C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0‰ at 27°C/33°C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. PMID:16664371

  15. TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT INFRARED OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF OLIVINE AND ENSTATITE

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidler, S.; Mutschke, H.; Posch, Th. E-mail: harald.mutschke@uni-jena.de

    2015-01-10

    Since the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) mission, it has become clear that dust in circumstellar disks and outflows consists partly of crystalline silicates of pyroxene and olivine type. An exact mineralogical analysis of the dust infrared emission spectra relies on laboratory spectra, which, however, have been mostly measured at room temperature so far. Given that infrared spectral features depend on the thermal excitation of the crystal's vibrational modes, laboratory spectra measured at various (low and high) temperatures, corresponding to the thermal conditions at different distances from the star, can improve the accuracy of such analyses considerably. We have measured the complex refractive index in a temperature range of 10-973 K for one mineral of each of those types of silicate, i.e., for an olivine and an enstatite of typical (terrestrial) composition. Thus, our data extend the temperature range of previous data to higher values and the compositional range to higher iron contents. We analyze the temperature dependence of oscillator frequencies and damping parameters governing the spectral characteristics of the bands and calculate absorption cross-sectional spectra that can be compared with astronomical emission spectra. We demonstrate the usefulness of our new data by comparing spectra calculated for a 100 K dust temperature with the ISO SWS spectrum of IRAS 09425-6040.

  16. Temperature dependence of single-axis acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2003-03-01

    The temperature-dependent physical conditions for single-axis acoustic levitation are theoretically analyzed with consideration of the deviation of the actual acoustic field from the plane standing wave approximation. The effects of temperature variation on the resonant conditions, levitation force and threshold pressures pm (the minimum entrapping pressure) and pM (the maximum pressure to keep the integration of a liquid drop) are discussed by assuming a quasi-static heating and cooling process. The first resonant spacing H1 between the reflector and emitter is larger than that predicted for plane standing waves, and its temperature dependence comes mainly from the variation of wavelength, which is proportional to T1/2. The maximum levitation force FM has a drastic decreasing tendency with temperature rise due to its sensitivity to the ratios of the geometric parameters to wavelength. For the containerless processing of water and the Pb-Sn eutectic alloy, pm decreases whereas pM increases with the enhancement of temperature, which narrows the allowed pressure range for the safe and stable levitation of the processed drops at higher temperatures. As an experimental application of these analyses, the acoustically levitated water and the Pb-Sn eutectic alloy melt are highly undercooled by up to 24 and 38 K, respectively.

  17. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    PubMed

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems. PMID:26881922

  18. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    PubMed

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  19. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  20. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  1. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-01-01

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy–entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy–entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  2. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.

    2012-12-10

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  3. Temperature dependent Raman and DFT study of creatine.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Sharma, Poornima; Singh, Ranjan K

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent Raman spectra of creatine powder have been recorded in the temperature range 420-100K at regular intervals and different clusters of creatine have been optimized using density functional theory (DFT) in order to determine the effect of temperature on the hydrogen bonded network in the crystal structure of creatine. Vibrational assignments of all the 48 normal modes of the zwitterionic form of creatine have been done in terms of potential energy distribution obtained from DFT calculations. Precise analysis gives information about thermal motion and intermolecular interactions with respect to temperature in the crystal lattice. Formation of higher hydrogen bonded aggregates on cooling can be visualized from the spectra through clear signature of phase transition between 200K and 180K. PMID:26010702

  4. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced.

  5. Temperature dependent relativistic mean field for highly excited hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Y. K.; Maharana, J. P.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Panos, C. P.; Ring, P.

    2000-11-01

    The temperature dependent relativistic mean field (RMF-T) results obtained by using nonlinear Lagrangian parameter set NL3 are presented for a few selected representative spherical and deformed nuclei. The calculated total binding energy (entropy) decrease (increase) as temperature (T) increases. The depths of the potentials and the single particle (sp) energies change very little with temperature. The density slightly spreads out; as a result the radius increases as temperature rises. For well deformed nuclei the shell effects disappear at around T~3 MeV. This value of T is relatively higher as compared to the corresponding value of T (~1.8 MeV) obtained in the Strutinsky-type calculations. This difference in the value of T is shown to be due to the use of the effective nucleon mass (< the bare mass) appearing in the Skyrme III interaction or emerging from the RMF Lagrangian.

  6. Multiaxial Temperature- and Time-Dependent Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David; McLennan, Michael; Anderson, Gregory; Macon, David; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    A temperature- and time-dependent mathematical model predicts the conditions for failure of a material subjected to multiaxial stress. The model was initially applied to a filled epoxy below its glass-transition temperature, and is expected to be applicable to other materials, at least below their glass-transition temperatures. The model is justified simply by the fact that it closely approximates the experimentally observed failure behavior of this material: The multiaxiality of the model has been confirmed (see figure) and the model has been shown to be applicable at temperatures from -20 to 115 F (-29 to 46 C) and to predict tensile failures of constant-load and constant-load-rate specimens with failure times ranging from minutes to months..

  7. Does N2 fixation amplify the temperature dependence of ecosystem metabolism?

    PubMed

    Welter, Jill R; Benstead, Jonathan P; Cross, Wyatt F; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Williamson, Tanner J

    2015-03-01

    Variation in resource supply can cause variation in temperature dependences of metabolic processes (e.g., photosynthesis and respiration). Understanding such divergence is particularly important when using metabolic theory to predict ecosystem responses to climate warming. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of temperature-resource interactions on metabolic processes, particularly in cases where the supply of limiting resources exhibits temperature dependence. We investigated the responses of biomass accrual, gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and N2 fixation to warming during biofilm development in a streamside channel experiment. Areal rates of GPP, CR, biomass accrual, and N2 fixation scaled positively with temperature, showing a 32- to 71-fold range across the temperature gradient (approximately 7 degrees-24 degrees C). Areal N2-fixation rates exhibited apparent activation energies (1.5-2.0 eV; 1 eV = approximately 1.6 x 10(-19) J) approximating the activation energy of the nitrogenase reaction. In contrast, mean apparent activation energies for areal rates of GPP (2.1-2.2 eV) and CR (1.6-1.9 eV) were 6.5- and 2.7-fold higher than estimates based on metabolic theory predictions (i.e., 0.32 and 0.65 eV, respectively) and did not significantly differ from the apparent activation energy observed for N2 fixation. Mass-specific activation energies for N2 fixation (1.4-1.6 eV), GPP (0.3-0.5 eV), and CR (no observed temperature relationship) were near or lower than theoretical predictions. We attribute the divergence of areal activation energies from those predicted by metabolic theory to increases in N2 fixation with temperature, leading to amplified temperature dependences of biomass accrual and areal rates of GPP and R. Such interactions between temperature dependences must be incorporated into metabolic models to improve predictions of ecosystem responses to climate change.

  8. Does N2 fixation amplify the temperature dependence of ecosystem metabolism?

    PubMed

    Welter, Jill R; Benstead, Jonathan P; Cross, Wyatt F; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Williamson, Tanner J

    2015-03-01

    Variation in resource supply can cause variation in temperature dependences of metabolic processes (e.g., photosynthesis and respiration). Understanding such divergence is particularly important when using metabolic theory to predict ecosystem responses to climate warming. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of temperature-resource interactions on metabolic processes, particularly in cases where the supply of limiting resources exhibits temperature dependence. We investigated the responses of biomass accrual, gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and N2 fixation to warming during biofilm development in a streamside channel experiment. Areal rates of GPP, CR, biomass accrual, and N2 fixation scaled positively with temperature, showing a 32- to 71-fold range across the temperature gradient (approximately 7 degrees-24 degrees C). Areal N2-fixation rates exhibited apparent activation energies (1.5-2.0 eV; 1 eV = approximately 1.6 x 10(-19) J) approximating the activation energy of the nitrogenase reaction. In contrast, mean apparent activation energies for areal rates of GPP (2.1-2.2 eV) and CR (1.6-1.9 eV) were 6.5- and 2.7-fold higher than estimates based on metabolic theory predictions (i.e., 0.32 and 0.65 eV, respectively) and did not significantly differ from the apparent activation energy observed for N2 fixation. Mass-specific activation energies for N2 fixation (1.4-1.6 eV), GPP (0.3-0.5 eV), and CR (no observed temperature relationship) were near or lower than theoretical predictions. We attribute the divergence of areal activation energies from those predicted by metabolic theory to increases in N2 fixation with temperature, leading to amplified temperature dependences of biomass accrual and areal rates of GPP and R. Such interactions between temperature dependences must be incorporated into metabolic models to improve predictions of ecosystem responses to climate change. PMID:26236857

  9. Multi-Relaxation Temperature-Dependent Dielectric Model of the Arctic Soil at Positive Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I. V.; Mironov, V. L.

    2014-11-01

    Frequency spectra of the dielectric permittivity of the Arctic soil of Alaska are investigated with allowance for the dipole and ionic relaxation of molecules of the soil moisture at frequencies from 40 MHz to 16 GHz and temperatures from -5 to +25°С. A generalized temperature-dependent multi-relaxation refraction dielectric model of the humid Arctic soil is suggested.

  10. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  11. Temperature-dependent internal photoemission probe for band parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yan-Feng; Perera, A. G. Unil

    2012-11-01

    The temperature-dependent characteristic of band offsets at the heterojunction interface was studied by an internal photoemission (IPE) method. In contrast to the traditional Fowler method independent of the temperature (T), this method takes into account carrier thermalization and carrier/dopant-induced band-renormalization and band-tailing effects, and thus measures the band-offset parameter at different temperatures. Despite intensive studies in the past few decades, the T dependence of this key band parameter is still not well understood. Re-examining a p-type doped GaAs emitter/undoped AlxGa1-xAs barrier heterojunction system disclosed its previously ignored T dependency in the valence-band offset, with a variation up to ˜-10-4 eV/K in order to accommodate the difference in the T-dependent band gaps between GaAs and AlGaAs. Through determining the Fermi energy level (Ef), IPE is able to distinguish the impurity (IB) and valence bands (VB) of extrinsic semiconductors. One important example is to determine Ef of dilute magnetic semiconductors such as GaMnAs, and to understand whether it is in the IB or VB.

  12. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihn, Sangwook

    This dissertation summarizes my study of time- and temperature-dependent behavior of a tubular lap bonded joint to provide a design methodology for windmill blade structures. The bonded joint is between a cast-iron rod and a GFRP composite pipe. The adhesive material is an epoxy containing chopped glass fibers. We proposed a new fabrication method to make concentric and void-less specimens of the tubular joint with a thick adhesive bondline to stimulate the root bond of a blade. The thick bondline facilitates the joint assembly of actual blades. For a better understanding of the behavior of the bonded joint, we studied viscoelastic behavior of the adhesive materials by measuring creep compliance at several temperatures during loading period. We observed that the creep compliance depends highly on the period of loading and the temperature. We applied time-temperature equivalence to the creep compliance of the adhesive material to obtain time-temperature shift factors. We also performed constant-rate of monotonically increased uniaxial tensile tests to measure static strength of the tubular lap joint at several temperatures and different strain-rates. We observed two failure modes from load-deflection curves and failed specimens. One is the brittle mode, which was caused by weakness of the interfacial strength occurring at low temperature and short period of loading. The other is the ductile mode, which was caused by weakness of the adhesive material at high temperature and long period of loading. Transition from the brittle to the ductile mode appeared as the temperature or the loading period increased. We also performed tests under uniaxial tensile-tensile cyclic loadings to measure fatigue strength of the bonded joint at several temperatures, frequencies and stress ratios. The fatigue data are analyzed statistically by applying the residual strength degradation model to calculate statistical distribution of the fatigue life. Combining the time-temperature

  13. Temperature-Dependent Giant Magnetoimpedance Effect in Amorphous Soft Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, M.; Roy, R. K.; Panda, A. K.; Greve, D. W.; Ohodnicki, P.; McHenry, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance (GMI)-based devices offer potential as next-generation low-cost, flexible, ultrasensitive sensors. They can be used in applications that include current sensors, field sensors, stress sensors, and others. Challenging applications involve operation at high temperatures, and therefore studies of GMI temperature dependence and performance of soft magnetic materials are needed. We present a high-temperature GMI study on an amorphous soft magnetic microwire from room temperature to 560°C. The GMI ratio was observed to be nearly constant at ˜86% at low temperatures and to decrease rapidly at ˜290°C, finally reaching a near-zero value at 500°C. The rapid drop in GMI ratio at 290°C is associated with a reduction in the long-range ferromagnetic order as measured by the spontaneous magnetization ( M) at the Curie temperature ( T c). We also correlated the impedance with the magnetic properties of the material. From room temperature to 290°C, the impedance was found to be proportional to the square root of the magnetization to magnetic anisotropy ratio. Lastly, M( T) has been fit using a Handrich-Kobe model, which describes the system with a modified Brillouin function and an asymmetrical distribution of exchange interactions. We infer that the structural fluctuations of the amorphous phase result in a relatively small asymmetry in the fluctuation parameters.

  14. Temperature-dependent solvation modulates the dimensions of disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, René; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B.; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    For disordered proteins, the dimensions of the chain are an important property that is sensitive to environmental conditions. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the temperature-induced chain collapse of five unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins. Because this behavior is sensitive to the details of intrachain and chain–solvent interactions, the collapse allows us to probe the physical interactions governing the dimensions of disordered proteins. We find that each of the proteins undergoes a collapse with increasing temperature, with the most hydrophobic one, λ-repressor, undergoing a reexpansion at the highest temperatures. Although such a collapse might be expected due to the temperature dependence of the classical “hydrophobic effect,” remarkably we find that the largest collapse occurs for the most hydrophilic, charged sequences. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that this result can be rationalized in terms of the temperature-dependent solvation free energies of the constituent amino acids, with the solvation properties of the most hydrophilic residues playing a large part in determining the collapse. PMID:24706910

  15. Temperature-dependent solvation modulates the dimensions of disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, René; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    For disordered proteins, the dimensions of the chain are an important property that is sensitive to environmental conditions. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the temperature-induced chain collapse of five unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins. Because this behavior is sensitive to the details of intrachain and chain-solvent interactions, the collapse allows us to probe the physical interactions governing the dimensions of disordered proteins. We find that each of the proteins undergoes a collapse with increasing temperature, with the most hydrophobic one, λ-repressor, undergoing a reexpansion at the highest temperatures. Although such a collapse might be expected due to the temperature dependence of the classical "hydrophobic effect," remarkably we find that the largest collapse occurs for the most hydrophilic, charged sequences. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that this result can be rationalized in terms of the temperature-dependent solvation free energies of the constituent amino acids, with the solvation properties of the most hydrophilic residues playing a large part in determining the collapse.

  16. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  17. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  18. A temperature dependent SPICE macro-model for power MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.G.

    1992-05-01

    A power MOSFET macro-model for use with the circuit simulator SPICE has been developed suitable for use over the temperature range of {minus}55 to 125{degrees}C. The model is comprised of a single parameter set with the temperature dependence accessed through the SPICE TEMP card. This report describes in detail the development of the model and the extraction algorithms used to obtain model parameters. The extraction algorithms are described in sufficient detail to allow for automated measurements which in turn allows for rapid and cost effective development of an accurate SPICE model for any power MOSFET. 22 refs.

  19. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties of a thermoplastic gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Neitzert, Heinz C.; Sorrentino, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The frequency and the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of a thermoplastic gelatin based bio-material have been investigated. At lower frequencies the dielectric response is strongly affected by charge carrier accumulation at the electrodes which modifies the dominating hopping conduction mechanism. The variation of the ac conductivity with frequency obeys a Jonscher type power law except for a small deviation in the low frequency range due to the electrode polarization effect. The master curve of the ac conductivity data shows that the conductivity relaxation of the gelatin is temperature independent.

  20. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of thin silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Davide; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-10

    We compute the lattice thermal conductivity (kappa) of silicon nanowires as a function of temperature by molecular dynamics simulations. In wires with amorphous surfaces kappa may reach values close to that of amorphous silicon and is nearly constant between 200 and 600 K; this behavior is determined by the presence of a majority of nonpropagating vibrational modes. We develop a parameter-free model that accounts for the temperature dependence observed in our simulations and provides a qualitative explanation of recent experiments. PMID:20163124

  1. Temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Leys, Jan; Wübbenhorst, Michael; Preethy Menon, Chirukandath; Rajesh, Ravindran; Thoen, Jan; Glorieux, Christ; Nockemann, Peter; Thijs, Ben; Binnemans, Koen; Longuemart, Stéphane

    2008-02-14

    The electrical conductivities of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquids and of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids with different anions were determined in the temperature range between 123 and 393 K on the basis of dielectric measurements in the frequency range from 1 to 10(7) Hz. Most of the ionic liquids form a glass and the conductivity values obey the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. The glass transition temperatures are increasing with increasing length of the alkyl chain. The fragility is weakly dependent on the alkyl chain length but is highly sensitive to the structure of the anion.

  2. Temperature-dependent efficiency droop of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Pengfei; McKendry, Jonathan J. D.; Herrnsdorf, Johannes; Ferreira, Ricardo; Watson, Ian M.; Gu, Erdan Dawson, Martin D.; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Anthony E.

    2014-10-27

    Temperature-dependent trends in radiative and Auger recombination coefficients have been determined at different injection carrier concentrations using InGaN micro-light emitting diodes 40 μm in diameter. The differential lifetime was obtained first from the measured modulation bandwidth and was then employed to calculate the carrier concentration in the quantum well active region. When the temperature increases, the carrier concentration increases, but both the radiative and Auger recombination coefficients decrease. In addition, the temperature dependence of radiative and Auger recombination coefficients is weaker at a higher injection carrier concentration, which is strongly related to phase space filling.

  3. Temperature dependence of predation depends on the relative performance of predators and prey.

    PubMed

    Öhlund, Gunnar; Hedström, Per; Norman, Sven; Hein, Catherine L; Englund, Göran

    2015-01-22

    The temperature dependence of predation rates is a key issue for understanding and predicting the responses of ecosystems to climate change. Using a simple mechanistic model, we demonstrate that differences in the relative performances of predator and prey can cause strong threshold effects in the temperature dependence of attack rates. Empirical data on the attack rate of northern pike (Esox lucius) feeding on brown trout (Salmo trutta) confirm this result. Attack rates fell sharply below a threshold temperature of +11°C, which corresponded to a shift in relative performance of pike and brown trout with respect to maximum attack and escape swimming speeds. The average attack speed of pike was an order of magnitude lower than the escape speed of brown trout at 5°C, but approximately equal at temperatures above 11°C. Thresholds in the temperature dependence of ecological rates can create tipping points in the responses of ecosystems to increasing temperatures. Thus, identifying thresholds is crucial when predicting future effects of climate warming.

  4. The importance of temperature dependent energy gap in the understanding of high temperature thermoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Saurabh; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we show the importance of temperature dependent energy band gap, E g (T), in understanding the high temperature thermoelectric (TE) properties of material by considering LaCoO3 (LCO) and ZnV2O4 (ZVO) compounds as a case study. For the fix value of band gap, E g , deviation in the values of α has been observed above 360 K and 400 K for LCO and ZVO compounds, respectively. These deviation can be overcomed by consideration of temperature dependent band gap. The change in used value of E g with respect to temperature is ∼4 times larger than that of In As. This large temperature dependence variation in E g can be attributed to decrement in the effective on-site Coulomb interaction due to lattice expansion. At 600 K, the value of ZT for n and p-doped, LCO is ∼0.35 which suggest that it can be used as a potential material for TE device. This work clearly suggest that one should consider the temperature dependent band gap in predicting the high temperature TE properties of insulating materials.

  5. Temperature dependence of carrier capture by defects in gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, William R.; Modine, Normand A.

    2015-08-01

    This report examines the temperature dependence of the capture rate of carriers by defects in gallium arsenide and compares two previously published theoretical treatments of this based on multi phonon emission (MPE). The objective is to reduce uncertainty in atomistic simulations of gain degradation in III-V HBTs from neutron irradiation. A major source of uncertainty in those simulations is poor knowledge of carrier capture rates, whose values can differ by several orders of magnitude between various defect types. Most of this variation is due to different dependence on temperature, which is closely related to the relaxation of the defect structure that occurs as a result of the change in charge state of the defect. The uncertainty in capture rate can therefore be greatly reduced by better knowledge of the defect relaxation.

  6. Temperature Dependence of Internal Deformation Field in Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Wonsuk; Song, Sanghoon; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Pham, Tung; Harder, Ross; Xiong, Gang; Yoon, Kyung Byung; Robinson, Ian K.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2011-03-01

    We studied temperature dependent internal deformation field distributions in zeolite microcrystals using coherent x-ray diffraction. We measured the coherent x-ray diffraction patterns around (200) and (020) Bragg peaks of the crystals. The three-dimensional real space images were obtained by phasing and inverting the oversampled diffraction patterns using the phase retrieval algorithm combined with error reduction and hybrid input-output method. The internal deformation fields show unusual temperature dependent behaviors which might be originated from the synthesis and calcination process. This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea (Nos. 2010-0000112 and R15-2008-006-01001-0), Seoul Research and Business Development Program (10816), and Sogang University Research Grant (2010).

  7. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, S.; Ruiter, R.; Zomer, P. J.; Wojtaszek, M.; van Wees, B. J.; Banerjee, T.

    2014-12-01

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and chemically stable in all environments, unlike standard metal/semiconductor interfaces. We fabricate such interfaces with n-type Si at ambient conditions and find their electrical characteristics to be highly rectifying, with minimal reverse leakage current (<10-10 A) and rectification of more than 106. We extract Schottky barrier height of 0.69 eV for the exfoliated graphene and 0.83 eV for the CVD graphene devices at room temperature. The temperature dependent electrical characteristics suggest the influence of inhomogeneities at the graphene/n-Si interface. A quantitative analysis of the inhomogeneity in Schottky barrier heights is presented using the potential fluctuation model proposed by Werner and Güttler.

  8. Time temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Flexural stress relaxation (FSR) and flexural internal friction (FIF) techniques were employed to measure the time-dependent deformation of boron fibers from -190 to 800 C. The principal specimens were 203 micrometers diameter fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13 micrometer tungsten substrate. The observation of complete creep strain recovery with time and temperature indicated that CVD boron fibers deform flexurally as anelastic solids with no plastic component.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  10. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinyu; Korbsrisate, Sunee; Withatanung, Patoo; Adler, Natalie Lazar; Clokie, Martha R. J.; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages) influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology, and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model B. thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C), the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C), the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial biology, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria. PMID:25452746

  11. Temperature dependence of the reconstruction of zigzag edges in graphene.

    PubMed

    He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Fan, Ye; Allen, Christopher S; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-05-26

    We examine the temperature dependence of graphene edge terminations at the atomic scale using an in situ heating holder within an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The relative ratios of armchair, zigzag, and reconstructed zigzag edges from over 350 frames at each temperature are measured. Below 400 °C, the edges are dominated by zigzag terminations, but above 600 °C, this changes dramatically, with edges dominated by armchair and reconstructed zigzag edges. We show that at low temperature chemical etching effects dominate and cause deviation to the thermodynamics of the system. At high temperatures (600 and 800 °C), adsorbates are evaporated from the surface of graphene and chemical etching effects are significantly reduced, enabling the thermodynamic distribution of edge types to be observed. The growth rate of holes at high temperature is also shown to be slower than at room temperature, indicative of the reduced chemical etching process. These results provide important insights into the role of chemical etching effects in the hole formation, edge sputtering, and edge reconstruction in graphene.

  12. Temperature dependence of proton permeation through a voltage-gated proton channel

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Miyuki; Ando, Hiroyuki; Morihata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiromu; Mori, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are found in many different types of cells, where they facilitate proton movement through the membrane. The mechanism of proton permeation through the channel is an issue of long-term interest, but it remains an open question. To address this issue, we examined the temperature dependence of proton permeation. Under whole cell recordings, rapid temperature changes within a few milliseconds were imposed. This method allowed for the measurement of current amplitudes immediately before and after a temperature jump, from which the ratios of these currents (Iratio) were determined. The use of Iratio for evaluating the temperature dependence minimized the contributions of factors other than permeation. Temperature jumps of various degrees (ΔT, −15 to 15°C) were applied over a wide temperature range (4–49°C), and the Q10s for the proton currents were evaluated from the Iratios. Q10 exhibited a high temperature dependence, varying from 2.2 at 10°C to 1.3 at 40°C. This implies that processes with different temperature dependencies underlie the observed Q10. A novel resistivity pulse method revealed that the access resistance with its low temperature dependence predominated in high temperature ranges. The measured temperature dependence of Q10 was decomposed into Q10 of the channel and of the access resistances. Finally, the Q10 for proton permeation through the voltage-gated proton channel itself was calculated and found to vary from 2.8 at 5°C to 2.2 at 45°C, as expected for an activation enthalpy of 64 kJ/mol. The thermodynamic features for proton permeation through proton-selective channels were discussed for the underlying mechanism. PMID:19720960

  13. Temperature dependence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesen, Y.; Stuckelberger, M.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.; Wyrsch, N.

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar (a-Si:H) cells are known to have better temperature coefficients than crystalline silicon cells. To investigate whether a-Si:H cells that are optimized for standard conditions (STC) also have the highest energy yield, we measured the temperature and irradiance dependence of the maximum power output (Pmpp), the fill factor (FF), the short-circuit current density (Jsc), and the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for four series of cells fabricated with different deposition conditions. The parameters varied during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) were the power and frequency of the PE-CVD generator, the hydrogen-to-silane dilution during deposition of the intrinsic absorber layer (i-layer), and the thicknesses of the a-Si:H i-layer and p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide layer. The results show that the temperature coefficient of the Voc generally varies linearly with the Voc value. The Jsc increases linearly with temperature mainly due to temperature-induced bandgap reduction and reduced recombination. The FF temperature dependence is not linear and reaches a maximum at temperatures between 15 °C and 80 °C. Numerical simulations show that this behavior is due to a more positive space-charge induced by the photogenerated holes in the p-layer and to a recombination decrease with temperature. Due to the FF(T) behavior, the Pmpp (T) curves also have a maximum, but at a lower temperature. Moreover, for most series, the cells with the highest power output at STC also have the best energy yield. However, the Pmpp (T) curves of two cells with different i-layer thicknesses cross each other in the operating cell temperature range, indicating that the cell with the highest power output could, for instance, have a lower energy yield than the other cell. A simple energy-yield simulation for the light-soaked and annealed states shows that for Neuchâtel (Switzerland) the best cell at STC also has the best energy

  14. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids.

    PubMed

    Sehnem, A L; Figueiredo Neto, A M; Aquino, R; Campos, A F C; Tourinho, F A; Depeyrot, J

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient S(T)(T) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence. PMID:26565244

  15. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-05-15

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy.

  16. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data.

  17. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  18. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. PMID:26026294

  19. Temperature dependence of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, Daniel V.; Jonsson, Magnus P.; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    In order to gain a better physical understanding of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores, we study the temperature dependence of λ-DNA translocations through 10 nm-in-diameter silicon-nitride nanopores, both experimentally and theoretically. The measured ionic conductance G, the DNA-induced ionic-conductance blockades ΔG and the event frequency Γ all increase with increasing temperature while the DNA translocation time τ decreases. G and ΔG are accurately described when bulk and surface conductances of the nanopore are considered and access resistance is incorporated appropriately. Viscous drag on the untranslocated part of the DNA coil is found to dominate the temperature dependence of the translocation times and the event rate is well described by a balance between diffusion and electrophoretic motion. The good fit between modeled and measured properties of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores in this first comprehensive temperature study, suggest that our model captures the relevant physics of the process. PMID:25994084

  20. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  1. [Temperature dependence of parameters of plant photosynthesis models: a review].

    PubMed

    Borjigidai, Almaz; Yu, Gui-Rui

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviewed the progress on the temperature response models of plant photosynthesis. Mechanisms involved in changes in the photosynthesis-temperature curve were discussed based on four parameters, intercellular CO2 concentration, activation energy of the maximum rate of RuBP (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate) carboxylation (V (c max)), activation energy of the rate of RuBP regeneration (J(max)), and the ratio of J(max) to V(c max) All species increased the activation energy of V(c max) with increasing growth temperature, while other parameters changed but differed among species, suggesting the activation energy of V(c max) might be the most important parameter for the temperature response of plant photosynthesis. In addition, research problems and prospects were proposed. It's necessary to combine the photosynthesis models at foliage and community levels, and to investigate the mechanism of plants in response to global change from aspects of leaf area, solar radiation, canopy structure, canopy microclimate and photosynthetic capacity. It would benefit the understanding and quantitative assessment of plant growth, carbon balance of communities and primary productivity of ecosystems.

  2. Temperature dependence of Brewer UV measurements at Rome station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, Anna M.; Benevento, Giuseppe; Casale, Giuseppe R.

    2003-11-01

    Decreasing trends of total ozone affect mainly solar ultraviolet (UV) levels at ground level with adverse effects on the biosphere. Highly accurate measurements of solar UV irradiance have become an important issue to assess UV trends. To detect these trends stations with well calibrated instruments, with long-term stability and Quality Assurance (QA)/ Quality Control (QC) carefully followed procedures, are necessary. The Solar Radiometry Observatory of Rome, University "La Sapienza" (city center) is one of the stations regularly measuring UV irradiance in Italy. Measurements of UV spectral (290-325 nm) irradiance started in 1992, using Brewer MKIV 067. Measurements of total irradiance contained in the 280 - 320 nm waveband begun in 2000 with the YES UVB-1 broad-band radiometer. An investigation of the internal temperature dependence of the spectral responsivity to improve the quality of the Brewer UV data was carried out. The study was based on the analysis of responsivity files recorded during the years 2000-2002. Responsivities are provided by specific tests through a set of five 50 W quartz tungsten-halogen lamps, traceable to the standards of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The lamp tests allow to measure any changes in the instrument response over time. It was observed that a decrease in the instrument's responsivity resulted from an increase of the internal temperature. A methodology based on a family of responsivity files at different temperature intervals is proposed to allow correction of UV irradiances using the responsivity file at the corresponding temperatures. The mean percentage differnce between temperature corrected and non-corrected Brewer data varies from 0.8% to 1.5% over an internal temperature of 8°C-42°C. In addition the results of a field evaluation in Rome between Brewer 067 and two temperature stabilized instruments, a broad-band radiometer (YES UVB-1) and a moderate bandwidth multichannel radiometer

  3. Temperature dependence of looping rates in a short peptide.

    PubMed

    Roccatano, Danilo; Sahoo, Harekrushna; Zacharias, Martin; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-15

    Knowledge of the influence of chain length and amino acid sequence on the structural and dynamic properties of small peptides in solution provides essential information on protein folding pathways. The combination of time-resolved optical spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods has become a powerful tool to investigate the kinetics of end-to-end collisions (looping rates) in short peptides, which are relevant in early protein folding events. We applied the combination of both techniques to study temperature-dependent (280-340 K) looping rates of the Dbo-AlaGlyGln-Trp-NH2 peptide, where Dbo represents a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine, which served as a fluorescent probe in the time-resolved spectroscopic experiments. The experimental looping rates increased from 4.8 x 10(7) s(-1) at 283 K to 2.0 x 10(8) s(-1) at 338 K in H2O. The corresponding Arrhenius plot provided as activation parameters Ea = 21.5 +/- 1.0 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A/s-1) = 26.8 +/- 0.2 in H2O. The results in D2O were consistent with a slight solvent viscosity effect, i.e., the looping rates were 10-20% slower. MD simulations were performed with the GROMOS96 force field in a water solvent model, which required first a parametrization of the synthetic amino acid Dbo. After corrections for solvent viscosity effects, the calculated looping rates varied from 1.5 x 10(8) s(-1) at 280 K to 8.2 x 10(8) s(-1) at 340 K in H2O, which was about four times larger than the experimental data. The calculated activation parameters were Ea = 24.7 +/- 1.5 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A/s(-1)) = 29.4 +/- 0.1 in H2O.

  4. Special aspects of the temperature dependence of EPR absorption of chemically carbonized polyvinylidene fluoride derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivulin, V. E.; Pesin, L. A.; Ivanov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The temperature dependences of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption of two samples of chemically carbonized derivatives of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) synthesized under different conditions have been measured in the range of 100-300 K. It has been found that the temperature dependence of the integrated intensity of the EPR signal of both samples is nonmonotonic and does not obey the classical Curie dependence characteristic of free radicals. An analytical expression that is consistent with experimental data and suggests the presence of an activation component of paramagnetism in the test samples has been obtained. The presence of a term independent of temperature in this equation also indicates the paramagnetic contribution of free electrons. The magnitude of the activation energy of the singlet-triplet transitions has been evaluated: δ = 0.067 eV. The HYSCORE spectra of chemically carbonized PVDF derivatives have been obtained for the first time.

  5. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  6. Temperature dependent vibration analysis of functionally graded rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Wann

    2005-06-01

    A theoretical method is developed to investigate vibration characteristics of initially stressed functionally graded rectangular plates made up of metal and ceramic in thermal environment. The temperature is assumed to be constant in the plane of the plate and to vary in the thickness direction only. Two types of thermal condition are considered. The first type is that one value of the temperature is imposed on the upper surface and the other (or same) value on the lower surface. The second is that the heat flows from the upper surface to the lower one held at a prescribed temperature. Material properties are assumed to be temperature dependent, and vary continuously through the thickness according to a power law distribution in terms of the volume fraction of the constituents. The third-order shear deformation plate theory to account for rotary inertia and transverse shear strains is adopted to formulate the theoretical model. The Rayleigh-Ritz procedure is applied to obtain the frequency equation. The analysis is based on an expansion of the displacements in the double Fourier series that satisfy the boundary conditions. The effect of material compositions, plate geometry, and temperature fields on the vibration characteristics is examined. The present theoretical results are verified by comparing with those in literature.

  7. Temperature dependence of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R L

    1986-01-01

    Accurate calorimetric data for the thermodynamics of transfer of six liquid hydrocarbons to water have been combined with solubility data to provide a model for the temperature dependence of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. The model applies at temperatures for which the change in heat capacity (delta Cp) is constant. The extrapolated value of the temperature (Ts) at which the entropy of transfer (delta S degrees) reaches zero is strikingly similar (Ts = 112.8 degrees C +/- 2.2 degrees C) for the six hydrocarbons. This finding provides an interpretation for the empirical relation discovered by Sturtevant: the ratio delta S degrees/delta Cp measured at 25 degrees C is constant for the transfer of nonpolar substances from nonaqueous media to water. Constancy of this ratio is equivalent to Ts = constant. When applied to protein folding, the hydrocarbon model gives estimates of the contributions of the hydrophobic interaction to the entropy and enthalpy changes on unfolding and, by difference, estimates of the residual contributions from other sources. The major share of the large enthalpy change observed on unfolding at high temperatures comes from the hydrophobic interaction. The hydrophobic interaction changes from being entropy-driven at 22 degrees C to being enthalpy-driven at 113 degrees C. Finally, the hydrocarbon model predicts that plots of the specific entropy change on unfolding versus temperature should nearly intersect close to 113 degrees C, as observed by Privalov. PMID:3464944

  8. Optimization to Low Temperature Activity in Psychrophilic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Struvay, Caroline; Feller, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Psychrophiles, i.e., organisms thriving permanently at near-zero temperatures, synthesize cold-active enzymes to sustain their cell cycle. These enzymes are already used in many biotechnological applications requiring high activity at mild temperatures or fast heat-inactivation rate. Most psychrophilic enzymes optimize a high activity at low temperature at the expense of substrate affinity, therefore reducing the free energy barrier of the transition state. Furthermore, a weak temperature dependence of activity ensures moderate reduction of the catalytic activity in the cold. In these naturally evolved enzymes, the optimization to low temperature activity is reached via destabilization of the structures bearing the active site or by destabilization of the whole molecule. This involves a reduction in the number and strength of all types of weak interactions or the disappearance of stability factors, resulting in improved dynamics of active site residues in the cold. Considering the subtle structural adjustments required for low temperature activity, directed evolution appears to be the most suitable methodology to engineer cold activity in biological catalysts. PMID:23109875

  9. Temperature-dependent Refractive Index of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon and germanium are perhaps the two most well-understood semiconductor materials in the context of solid state device technologies and more recently micromachining and nanotechnology. Meanwhile, these two materials are also important in the field of infrared lens design. Optical instruments designed for the wavelength range where these two materials are transmissive achieve best performance when cooled to cryogenic temperatures to enhance signal from the scene over instrument background radiation. In order to enable high quality lens designs using silicon and germanium at cryogenic temperatures, we have measured the absolute refractive index of multiple prisms of these two materials using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, as a function of both wavelength and temperature. For silicon, we report absolute refractive index and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K at wavelengths from 1.1 to 5.6 pin, while for germanium, we cover temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K and wavelengths from 1.9 to 5.5 microns. We compare our measurements with others in the literature and provide temperature-dependent Sellmeier coefficients based on our data to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. Citing the wide variety of values for the refractive indices of these two materials found in the literature, we reiterate the importance of measuring the refractive index of a sample from the same batch of raw material from which final optical components are cut when absolute accuracy greater than k5 x 10" is desired.

  10. Concentration and temperature effects on ovostatin activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarity, Debra M.

    1994-01-01

    Light scattering experiments performed at Mississippi State University using MSFC ovostatin preparations indicated that at low ovostatin concentrations, below 0.2 mg/ml, the protein was dissociating from a tetramer into dimers. Since the proposed mechanism of action involved the tetrameric form of the protein, we hypothesized that perhaps under the conditions of our assays at various O/T ratios the ovostatin was becoming dissociated into an inactive dimer. To examine this possibility we assayed the ovostatin activity as a function of ovostatin concentration and of temperature of the assay. Data are presented that show the results of these assays at 23 C, 30 C, 37 C and 42 C respectively. The data are highly suggestive that there is a decrease in ovostatin activity as the concentration of the protein falls below 0.06 mg/ml. This may not be of any physiological importance, however, since the concentration of ovostatin in the egg is about 0.5 mg/ml. Curiously, the dissociation of the tetramer into dimers does not show a significant temperature dependence as would be expected for an equilibrium reaction. Whether this is in fact the case, or whether the differences are so small as to not be discerned from the current data remains to be seen. Another aspect to consider is that in the egg the primary role of the ovostatin may or may not be as a protease inhibitor. Although the inhibition of collagenase by ovostatin may be an important aspect of embryogenesis, it is also possible that it functions as a binding protein for some substance. In this regard, all ovostatin preparations from MSFC have shown an approximately 88,000 MW protein associated with the ovostatin. The identity of this protein is not currently known and may be the subject of future studies.

  11. Temperature dependence of the energy gap of semiconductors in the low-temperature limit.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Manuel; Meyer, T A; Thewalt, M L W

    2004-05-14

    The temperature dependence of the electronic states and energy gaps of semiconductors is an old but still important experimental and theoretical topic. Remarkably, extant results do not clarify the asymptotic T-->0 behavior. Recent breakthroughs in the spectroscopy of enriched 28Si allow us to measure changes in the band gap over the liquid 4He temperature range with an astounding precision of one part in 10(8), revealing a T4.0+/-0.2 decrease with increasing T. This is in excellent agreement with a theoretical argument predicting an exponent of 4. This power law should apply, in the low temperature limit, to the temperature dependence of the energies of all electronic states in semiconductors and insulators.

  12. Temperature dependence and shape effect in high-temperature microwave heating of nickel oxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, H.; Kashimura, K.; Hayashi, M.; Matsumuro, T.; Watanabe, T.; Mitani, T.; Shinohara, N.

    2015-02-01

    The temperature dependence of microwave absorption was investigated for Ni1-yO particles over the frequency range 2.0-13.5 GHz and temperature range 25-1000 °C. Using a coaxial transmission line method with a network analyzer, both the real and imaginary parts of the relative permittivity (ε‧r and ε″r, respectively) and permeability (μ‧r and μ″r, respectively) were measured; finding that both are largely dependent on the temperature at all frequencies. Furthermore, permeability loss factors related to shape effects were observed at high frequencies, indicating an increase in the microwave-absorption properties. A modified form of Mie's theory was applied to discuss these effects, wherein a spherical model demonstrating a close fit to the shape effect data suggests a more complex microwave-absorption behavior at increased temperature.

  13. Temperature-dependent phagotrophy and phototrophy in a mixotrophic chrysophyte.

    PubMed

    Princiotta, Sarah DeVaul; Smith, Brian T; Sanders, Robert W

    2016-06-01

    The roles of temperature and light on grazing and photosynthesis were examined for Dinobryon sociale, a common freshwater mixotrophic alga. Photosynthetic rate was determined for D. sociale adapted to temperatures of 8, 12, 16, and 20°C under photosynthetically active radiation light irradiances of 25, 66, and 130 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) , with concurrent measurement of bacterial ingestion at all temperatures under medium and high light (66 and 130 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) ). Rates of ingestion and photosynthesis increased with temperature to a maximum at 16°C under the two higher light regimes, and declined at 20°C. Although both light and temperature had a marked effect on photosynthesis, there was no significant difference in bacterivory at medium and high irradiances at any given temperature. At the lowest light condition (25 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) ), photosynthesis remained low and relatively stable at all temperatures. D. sociale acquired the majority of carbon from photosynthesis, although the low photosynthetic rate without a concurrent decline in feeding rate at 8°C suggested 20%-30% of the carbon budget could be attributed to bacterivory at low temperatures. Grazing experiments in nutrient-modified media revealed that this mixotroph had increased ingestion rates when either dissolved nitrogen or phosphorus was decreased. This work increases our understanding of environmental effects on mixotrophic nutrition. Although the influence of abiotic factors on phagotrophy and phototrophy in pure heterotrophs and phototrophs has been well studied, much less is known for mixotrophic organisms. PMID:27273535

  14. Temperature dependent photoluminescence from lead sulfide nanosheets and nanocubes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdong; Kim, Seung Gi; Oh, Eunsoon; Kim, Sang Hyuk; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-01-29

    We studied temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectra in the mid-infrared range from lead sulfide (PbS) nanosheets with an average thickness of 25 nm and nanocubes grown by solvothermal and hydrothermal methods. Distinct bandedge PL emission was observed in the whole temperature range between 10 and 300 K, indicating the high optical quality of these nanostructures. The PL peak of the nanosheets was found at 0.326 eV at 10 K, about 40 meV higher than that of bulk PbS due to the quantum confinement effect, whereas no confinement effect was observed for the nanocubes. We also demonstrate that the absorption edges of the nanocubes and nanosheets in the transmission spectra agree very well with their fundamental bandgap.

  15. Simulations of the temperature dependence of amide I vibration.

    PubMed

    Kaminský, Jakub; Bouř, Petr; Kubelka, Jan

    2011-01-13

    For spectroscopic studies of peptide and protein thermal denaturation it is important to single out the contribution of the solvent to the spectral changes from those originated in the molecular structure. To obtain insights into the origin and size of the temperature solvent effects on the amide I spectra, combined molecular dynamics and density functional simulations were performed with the model N-methylacetamide molecule (NMA). The computations well reproduced frequency and intensity changes previously observed in aqueous NMA solutions. An empirical correction of vacuum frequencies in single NMA molecule based on the electrostatic potential of the water molecules provided superior results to a direct density functional average obtained for a limited number of solute-solvent clusters. The results thus confirm that the all-atom quantum and molecular mechanics approach captures the overall influence of the temperature dependent solvent properties on the amide I spectra and can improve the accuracy and reliability of molecular structural studies.

  16. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-08-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  17. Temperature dependence of bulk viscosity in water using acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. J.; Parker, N. G.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its fundamental role in the dynamics of compressible fluids, bulk viscosity has received little experimental attention and there remains a paucity of measured data. Acoustic spectroscopy provides a robust and accurate approach to measuring this parameter. Working from the Navier-Stokes model of a compressible fluid one can show that the bulk viscosity makes a significant and measurable contribution to the frequency-squared acoustic attenuation. Here we employ this methodology to determine the bulk viscosity of Millipore water over a temperature range of 7 to 50°C. The measured attenuation spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions, while the bulk viscosity of water is found to be approximately three times larger than its shear counterpart, reinforcing its significance in acoustic propagation. Moreover, our results demonstrate that this technique can be readily and generally applied to fluids to accurately determine their temperature dependent bulk viscosities.

  18. Localized subcritical convective cells in temperature-dependent viscosity fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomatov, V. S.

    2012-06-01

    Numerical simulations of infinite Prandtl number convection in the stagnant lid regime of temperature-dependent viscosity convection demonstrate the existence of spatially localized, stable convective cells below the critical Rayleigh number (subcritical convection). These solutions are in stark contrast to the usual, supercritical, convective planforms, where convective cells form in the entire layer. The isolated cell has a shape of an axisymmetric dome with an upwelling at the center and thus appears as a very weak plume. Formation of these structures requires subcritical conditions and a localized initial temperature perturbation but does not require any spatial heterogeneity in the material properties or the heat flux. When several localized plumes form, they tend to attract to each other and form stable clusters. This type of subcritical convection may play a role in the formation and longevity of localized features on planetary bodies, including the crustal dichotomy and Tharsis region on Mars and the asymmetric pattern of volcanism on Mercury.

  19. On the temperature dependence of oceanic export efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cael, B. B.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the fraction of primary production exported from the euphotic layer (termed the export efficiency ef) is a complicated matter. Studies have suggested empirical relationships with temperature which offer attractive potential for parameterization. Here we develop what is arguably the simplest mechanistic model relating the two, using established thermodynamic dependencies for primary production and respiration. It results in a single-parameter curve that constrains the envelope of possible efficiencies, capturing the upper bounds of several ef-T data sets. The approach provides a useful theoretical constraint on this relationship and extracts the variability in ef due to temperature but does not idealize out the remaining variability which evinces the substantial complexity of the system in question.

  20. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants for different plant sesquiterpenes.

    PubMed

    Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-11-01

    Sesquiterpenes are plant-produced hydrocarbons with important ecological functions in plant-to-plant and plant-to-insect communication, but due to their high reactivity they can also play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. So far, there is little information of gas/liquid phase partition coefficients (Henry's law constants) and their temperature dependencies for sesquiterpenes, but this information is needed for quantitative simulation of the release of sesquiterpenes from plants and modeling atmospheric reactions in different phases. In this study, we estimated Henry's law constants (Hpc) and their temperature responses for 12 key plant sesquiterpenes with varying structure (aliphatic, mono-, bi- and tricyclic sesquiterpenes). At 25 °C, Henry's law constants varied 1.4-fold among different sesquiterpenes, and the values were within the range previously observed for monocyclic monoterpenes. Hpc of sesquiterpenes exhibited a high rate of increase, on average ca. 1.5-fold with a 10 °C increase in temperature (Q10). The values of Q10 varied 1.2-fold among different sesquiterpenes. Overall, these data demonstrate moderately high variation in Hpc values and Hpc temperature responses among different sesquiterpenes. We argue that these variations can importantly alter the emission kinetics of sesquiterpenes from plants. PMID:26291755

  1. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  2. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  3. Temperature dependent optical properties of pentacene films on zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Helzel, J.; Jankowski, S.; El Helou, M.; Witte, G.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2011-11-21

    The optical transitions of pentacene films deposited on ZnO have been studied by absorption spectroscopy as a function of temperature in the range of room temperature down to 10 K. The pentacene films were prepared with thicknesses of 10 nm, 20 nm, and 100 nm on the ZnO-O(000-1) surface by molecular beam deposition. A unique temperature dependence has been observed for the two Davydov components of the excitons for different film thicknesses. At room temperature, the energetic positions of the respective absorption bands are the same for all films, whereas the positions differ more than 20 meV at 10 K caused by the very different expansion coefficients of pentacene and ZnO. Although the pentacene is just bonded via van der Waals interaction to the ZnO substrate, the very first pentacene monolayer (adlayer) is forced to keep the initial position on the ZnO surface and suffering, therefore, a substantial tensile strain. For all the subsequent pentacene monolayers, the strain is reduced step by step resulting electronically in a strong potential gradient at the interface.

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  5. Calibration of Gyros with Temperature Dependent Scale Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belur, Sheela V.; Harman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The general problem of gyro calibration can be stated as the estimation of the scale factors, misalignments, and drift-rate biases of the gyro using the on-orbit sensor measurements. These gyro parameters have been traditionally treated as temperature-independent in the operational flight dynamics ground systems at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a scenario which has been successfully applied in the gyro calibration of a large number of missions. A significant departure from this is the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission where, due to the high thermal variations expected during the mission phase, it is necessary to model the scale factors as functions of temperature. This paper addresses the issue of gyro calibration for the MAP gyro model using a manufacturer-supplied model of the variation of scale factors with temperature. The problem is formulated as a least squares problem and solved using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in the MATLAB(R) library function NLSQ. The algorithm was tested on simulated data with Gaussian noise for the quaternions as well as the gyro rates and was found to consistently converge close to the true values. Significant improvement in accuracy was noticed due to the estimation of the temperature-dependent scale factors as against constant scale factors.

  6. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  7. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15-300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system. PMID:27296771

  8. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15–300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system. PMID:27296771

  9. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  10. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  11. Temperature-dependent conformational changes in the bacteriopheophytins of Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, J M; Violette, C A; Frank, H A; Bocian, D F

    1990-05-22

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. The spectra were obtained with a variety of excitation wavelengths, spanning the UV, violet, and yellow-green regions of the absorption spectrum, and at a number of temperatures ranging from 30 to 270 K. The RR data indicate that the frequencies of certain vibrational modes of the bacteriochlorin pigments in the RC shift with temperature. These shifts are reversible and do not depend on external factors such as solvent or detergent. The acetyl carbonyl bands exhibit the largest shifts with temperature. These shifts are attributed to thermal effects involving the torsional vibrations of the acetyl groups of several (or all) of the bacteriochlorins rather than to specific pigment-protein interactions. The frequency of the structure-sensitive skeletal mode near 1610 cm-1 of one of the two bacteriopheophytins (BPhs) in the RC is also sensitive to temperature. In contrast, no temperature sensitivity is observed for the analogous modes of the bacteriochlorophylls or other BPhs. Over the range 160-100 K, the skeletal mode of the BPh upshifts by approximately 4 cm-1. This upshift is attributed to a flattening of the macrocycle at low temperatures. It is suggested that the BPh active in the electron-transfer process is the pigment whose structure is temperature dependent. It is further suggested that such structural changes could be responsible in part for the temperature dependence of the electron-transfer rates in photosynthetic RCs.

  12. Activation of Phosphorylase Kinase by Physiological Temperature.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Julio E; Thompson, Jackie A; Rimmer, Mary Ashley; Nadeau, Owen W; Carlson, Gerald M

    2015-12-29

    In the six decades since its discovery, phosphorylase kinase (PhK) from rabbit skeletal muscle has usually been studied at 30 °C; in fact, not a single study has examined functions of PhK at a rabbit's body temperature, which is nearly 10 °C greater. Thus, we have examined aspects of the activity, regulation, and structure of PhK at temperatures between 0 and 40 °C. Between 0 and 30 °C, the activity at pH 6.8 of nonphosphorylated PhK predictably increased; however, between 30 and 40 °C, there was a dramatic jump in its activity, resulting in the nonactivated enzyme having a far greater activity at body temperature than was previously realized. This anomalous change in properties between 30 and 40 °C was observed for multiple functions, and both stimulation (by ADP and phosphorylation) and inhibition (by orthophosphate) were considerably less pronounced at 40 °C than at 30 °C. In general, the allosteric control of PhK's activity is definitely more subtle at body temperature. Changes in behavior related to activity at 40 °C and its control can be explained by the near disappearance of hysteresis at physiological temperature. In important ways, the picture of PhK that has emerged from six decades of study at temperatures of ≤30 °C does not coincide with that of the enzyme studied at physiological temperature. The probable underlying mechanism for the dramatic increase in PhK's activity between 30 and 40 °C is an abrupt change in the conformations of the regulatory β and catalytic γ subunits between these two temperatures.

  13. Prominence oscillations: Effect of a time-dependent background temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, J. L.; Carbonell, M.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Small amplitude oscillations in prominences have been known about for a long time, and from a theoretical point of view, these oscillations have been interpreted in terms of standing or propagating linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In general, these oscillations were studied by producing small perturbations in a background equilibrium with stationary physical properties. Aims: Taking into account that prominences are dynamic plasma structures, the assumption of a stationary equilibrium is not realistic. Therefore, our main aim is to study the effects produced by a non-stationary background on slow MHD waves, which could be responsible for prominence oscillations. Methods: Assuming that the radiation term is proportional to temperature and constant external heating, we have derived an expression for the temporal variation of the background temperature, which depends on the imbalance between heating and cooling processes. Furthermore, radiative losses, together with parallel thermal conduction, have also been included as damping mechanisms for the waves. Results: As temperature increases with time, the period of slow waves decreases and the amplitude of the velocity perturbations is damped. The inclusion of radiative losses enhances the damping. As temperature decreases with time, the period of slow waves increases and the amplitude of velocity perturbations grows while, as expected, the inclusion of radiative losses contributes to the damping of oscillations. Conclusions: There is observational evidence that, in different locations of the same prominence, oscillations are damped or amplified with time. This temporal damping or amplification can be obtained by a proper combination of a variable background temperature, together with radiative damping. Furthermore, decayless oscillations can also be obtained with an appropriate choice of the characteristic radiation time.

  14. Temperature dependence of the two photon absorption in indium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors have long been a source of interesting physics. Two photon absorption (TPA) is one such process, in which two photons provide the energy for the creation of an electron-hole pair. Researchers at other FEL centers have studied room temperature TPA in InSb, InAs, and HgCdTe. Working at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center, we have extended and refined this work by measuring the temperature dependence of the TPA coefficient in InAs over the range from 80 to 350 K at four wavelengths: 4.5, 5.06, 6.01, and 6.3 microns. The measurements validate the functional dependence of recent band structure calculations with enough precision to discriminate parabolic from non-parabolic models, and to begin to observe smaller effects, such as contributions due to the split-off band. These experiments therefore serve as a strong independent test of the Kane band theory, as well as providing a starting point for detailed observations of other nonlinear absorption mechanisms.

  15. Optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy for spatially, temperature, and wavelength dependent refractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, Joel D.

    A microfluidic refractometer was designed based on previous optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy (OFIS) chips utilized to distinguish healthy and cancerous cells. The optofluidic cavity is realized by adding high reflectivity dielectric mirrors to the top and bottom of a microfluidic channel. This creates a plane-plane Fabry-Perot optical cavity in which the resonant wavelengths are highly dependent on the optical path length inside the cavity. Refractometry is a useful method to determine the nature of fluids, including the concentration of a solute in a solvent as well as the temperature of the fluid. Advantages of microfluidic systems are the easy integration with lab-on-chip devices and the need for only small volumes of fluid. The unique abilities of the microfluidic refractometer in this thesis include its spatial, temperature, and wavelength dependence. Spatial dependence of the transmission spectrum is inherent through a spatial filtering process implemented with an optical fiber and microscope objective. A sequence of experimental observations guided the change from using the OFIS chip as a cell discrimination device to a complimentary refractometer. First, it was noted the electrode structure within the microfluidic channel, designed to trap and manipulate biological cells with dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces, caused the resonant wavelengths to blue-shift when the electrodes were energized. This phenomenon is consistent with the negative dn/dT property of water and water-based solutions. Next, it was necessary to develop a method to separate the optical path length into physical path length and refractive index. Air holes were placed near the microfluidic channel to exclusively measure the cavity length with the known refractive index of air. The cavity length was then interpolated across the microfluidic channel, allowing any mechanical changes to be taken into account. After the separation of physical path length and refractive index, it was of interest

  16. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Band Gap in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Cesar E P; Rocha, A R; Marini, Andrea

    2016-08-10

    Black phosphorus (BP) has gained renewed attention due to its singular anisotropic electronic and optical properties that might be exploited for a wide range of technological applications. In this respect, the thermal properties are particularly important both to predict its room temperature operation and to determine its thermoelectric potential. From this point of view, one of the most spectacular and poorly understood phenomena is indeed the BP temperature-induced band gap opening; when temperature is increased, the fundamental band gap increases instead of decreases. This anomalous thermal dependence has also been observed recently in its monolayer counterpart. In this work, based on ab initio calculations, we present an explanation for this long known and yet not fully explained effect. We show that it arises from a combination of harmonic and lattice thermal expansion contributions, which are in fact highly interwined. We clearly narrow down the mechanisms that cause this gap opening by identifying the peculiar atomic vibrations that drive the anomaly. The final picture we give explains both the BP anomalous band gap opening and the frequency increase with increasing volume (tension effect). PMID:27428304

  17. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Geiss, Roy H.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  18. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E. Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  19. Effects of a temperature-dependent rheology on large scale continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonder, Leslie J.; England, Philip C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a temperature-dependent rheology on large-scale continental extension are investigated using a thin viscous sheet model. A vertically-averaged rheology is used that is consistent with laboratory experiments on power-law creep of olivine and that depends exponentially on temperature. Results of the calculations depend principally on two parameters: the Peclet number, which describes the relative rates of advection and diffusion of heat, and a dimensionless activation energy, which controls the temperature dependence of the rheology. At short times following the beginning of extension, deformation occurs with negligible change in temperature, so that only small changes in lithospheric strength occur due to attenuation of the lithosphere. However, after a certain critical time interval, thermal diffusion lowers temperatures in the lithosphere, strongly increasing lithospheric strength and slowing the rate of extension. This critical time depends principally on the Peclet number and is short compared with the thermal time constant of the lithosphere. The strength changes cause the locus of high extensional strain rates to shift with time from regions of high strain to regions of low strain. Results of the calculations are compared with observations from the Aegean, where maximum extensional strains are found in the south, near Crete, but maximum present-day strain rates are largest about 300 km further north.

  20. Effects of a temperature-dependent rheology on large-scale continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonder, Leslie J.; England, Philip C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a temperature-dependent rheology on large-scale continental extension are investigated using a thin viscous sheet model. A vertically-averaged rheology is used that is consistent with laboratory experiments on power-law creep of olivine and that depends exponentially on temperature. Results of the calculations depend principally on two parameters: the Peclet number, which describes the relative rates of advection and diffusion of heat, and a dimensionless activation energy, which controls the temperature dependence of the rheology. At short times following the beginning of extension, deformation occurs with negligible change in temperature, so that only small changes in lithospheric strength occur due to attenuation of the lithosphere. However, after a certain critical time interval, thermal diffusion lowers temperatures in the lithosphere, strongly increasing lithospheric strength and slowing the rate of extension. This critical time depends principally on the Peclet number and is short compared with the thermal time constant of the lithosphere. The strength changes cause the locus of high extensional strain rates to shift with time from regions of high strain to regions of low strain. Results of the calculations are compared with observations from the Aegean, where maximum extensional strains are found in the south, near Crete, but maximum present-day strain rates are largest about 300 km further north.

  1. Intensity and temperature-dependent photoluminescence of tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films

    SciTech Connect

    Ajward, A. M.; Wang, X.; Wagner, H. P.

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the recombination of excitons in tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films by intensity and temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). At low temperature (15 K) and elevated excitation intensity the radiative emission is quenched by singlet-singlet annihilation processes. With rising temperature the PL quenching is strongly reduced resulting in a PL efficiency maximum at ∼170 K. The reduced exciton annihilation is attributed to thermally activated occupation of non-quenchable trapped exciton states. Above 170 K the PL efficiency decreases due to thermal de-trapping of radiative states and subsequent migration to non-radiative centers.

  2. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y W; Bian, X L; Wu, S W; Hussain, I; Jia, Y D; Yi, J; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10(-6) s(-1) to 10(-2) s(-1) are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  3. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. W.; Bian, X. L.; Wu, S. W.; Hussain, I.; Jia, Y. D.; Yi, J.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10−6 s−1 to 10−2 s−1 are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  4. Temperature-dependent transient creep and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, Boris I.

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale mantle convection forms the upper boundary layer (lithosphere) where the vertical temperature drop is about 1300 K. Theoretical rheology and laboratory experiments with rock samples show that transient creep occurs while creep strains are sufficiently small. The transient creep is described by the temperature-dependent Andrade rheological model. Since plate tectonics allows only small deformations in lithospheric plates, creep of the lithosphere plates is transient whereas steady-state creep, described by non-Newtonian power-law rheological model, takes place in the underlying mantle. The solution of stability problem shows that the lithosphere is stable but small-scale convective oscillations are attenuated very weakly in regions of thickened lithosphere beneath continental cratons (subcratonic roots) where the thickness of the lithosphere is about 200 km. These oscillations create small-scale convective cells (the horizontal dimensions of the cells are of the order of the subcratonic lithosphere thickness). Direction of motion within the cells periodically changes (the period of convective oscillations is of the order of 3 × 108 yr). In this study, the oscillations of cratonic lithosphere caused by initial relief perturbation are considered. This relief perturbation is assumed to be created by overthrusting in orogenic belts surrounding cratons. The perturbation of the Earth's surface relief leads to a fast isothermal process of isostatic recovery. In the presence of vertical temperature gradient, vertical displacements, associated with the recovery process in the lithosphere interior, instantly produce the initial temperature perturbations exciting thermoconvective oscillations in the cratonic lithosphere. These small-amplitude convective oscillations cause oscillatory crustal movements which form sedimentary basins on cratons.

  5. The Temperature Dependence of Water's Latent Heat of Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szedlak, A.; Blanchard, A. V.; Kostinski, A. B.; Cantrell, W. H.

    2009-12-01

    Freezing of water in Earth's atmosphere affects cloud dynamics through the release of the latent heat. The latent heat released is a function of how deeply the cloud water is supercooled before freezing begins - the deeper the supercooling, the less heat is released to the atmosphere. We present new measurements of the temperature dependent latent heat of freezing of water, measured using a Perkin Elmer DSC 7 and a Mettler Toledo Polymer DSC. Both instruments have been calibrated against melting transitions of water, dodecane, undecane,and tetradecane, and both agree within the error of the measurements with values in the literature. However, the two measurements show dramatic differences for the latent heat of freezing of water, which we attribute to the different methods used to extract a heat flux. At higher temperatures our measurements with the Perkin Elmer, which is a power compensation type calorimeter, are comparable to those of Bertolini et al. (1985). At lower temperatures, our measurements diverge from those of Bertolini et al. (1985), which we again attribute to the different principle of operation of the calorimeters. We conclude that temperature gradients within the freezing water play a critical role in the quantity of heat eventually exchanged with the surroundings. Finally, we reconcile the measurements with Kirchhoff's relation, which can be written (∂ΔH/∂T)p = Δcp where ΔH is the enthalpy difference between product and reactant (supercooled water and ice in this case) and Δcp is the difference in their heat capacities. [Bertolini, D., M. Cassettari, and G. Salvetti, Anomalies in the latent-heat of solidification of supercooled water. Chem. Phys. Lett., 119, 553-555, 1985.

  6. Temperature-dependent shear band dynamics in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Klaumuenzer, David; Maass, Robert; Dalla Torre, Florian H.; Loeffler, Joerg F.

    2010-02-08

    Flow serrations recorded during inhomogeneous deformation of Zr{sub 52.5}Ti{sub 5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10} (Vit105) were studied during compression testing at temperatures between -40 and 60 deg. C. The shear band velocities determined exhibit a pronounced temperature dependence covering nearly two orders of magnitude. The velocities follow an Arrhenius-type behavior with an associated activation energy of 0.3+-0.05 eV. The results demonstrate a thermally activated mechanism of shear band propagation, which is similar to the behavior of other, nonmetallic amorphous materials.

  7. Activity-Dependent Model for Neuronal Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, L.

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of modern biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behavior of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behavior is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. This fundamental problem in neurobiology has recently shown a number of features in common to other complex systems. These features mainly concern the morphology of the network, namely the spatial organization of the established connections, and a novel kind of neuronal activity. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. Both features have been found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behavior. In this contribution, we apply a statistical mechanical model to describe the complex activity in a neuronal network. The network is chosen to have a number of connections in long range, as found for neurons in vitro. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. The numerical power spectra for electrical activity reproduces also the power law behavior measured in an EEG of man resting with the eyes closed.

  8. Temperature dependence of the transient photoconductive response in stretched trans-polyacetylene films with below-gap excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walser, A. D.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R. R.; Tubino, R.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the picosecond photocurrent with below-gap excitation (1.06 microns) has been measured for a highly oriented form of transpolyacetylene. The one-dimensional picosecond photocurrent is independent of temperature. The three-dimensional picosecond photocurrent is temperature dependent with an activation energy of 63 meV. These results demonstrate the photoproduction of nonlinear charged carriers (solitons and polarons) at energies that are below the principal interband absorption edge.

  9. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Poncé, S. Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X.; Marini, A.; Verstraete, M.

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  10. Boundary formulations for shape sensitivity of temperature dependent conductivity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, James H.; Wang, Hua

    1992-01-01

    Used in concert with the Kirchhoff transformation, implicit differentiation of the discretized boundary integral equations governing the conduction of heat in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity is shown to generate an accurate and economical approach for computation of shape sensitivities. For problems with specified temperature and heat flux boundary conditions, a linear problem results for both the analysis and sensitivity analysis. In problems with either convection or radiation boundary conditions, a nonlinear problem is generated. Several iterative strategies are presented for the solution of the resulting sets of nonlinear equations and the computational performances examined in detail. Multizone analysis and zone condensation strategies are demonstrated to provide substantive computational economies in this process for models with either localized nonlinear boundary conditions or regions of geometric insensitivity to design variables. A series of nonlinear example problems is presented that have closed form solutions. Exact analytical expressions for the shape sensitivities associated with these problems are developed and these are compared with the sensitivities computed using the boundary element formulation.

  11. Time-temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The time-dependent deformation of boron fibers over the temperature range from -190 to 800 C is studied by flexural stress relaxation and flexural internal friction techniques on 203-micron diam specimen fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13-micron tungsten substrate. It is shown that up to at least 800 C all nonelastic behavior observed during axial deformation of CVD boron fibers can be explained solely by anelastic mechanisms and that although creep strains are small, boron fiber anelasticity can produce significant mechanical effects which would otherwise be neglected under the elastic approximation. Relations are obtained to demonstrate the considerable effects of anelasticity on such fiber/composite properties as modulus, creep, creep recovery, stress relaxation, and damping capacity. For an elastic-core/anelastic-sheath model, boron fibers on tungsten substrates are shown to have predictable fracture stresses for time-temperature conditions ranging from impact to long-time stress rupture. Possible techniques for altering these stresses are discussed.

  12. The Temperature Dependent Enthalpy of Vaporization of Pure Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jianxiang

    Recently the universal behavior of the temperature dependent enthalpy of vaporization along with the whole liquid-vapor coexistence curve at equilibrium is described and explained by Roman et al.5 The work (called RWVM relation) succeeds in the combination of the linear relation near the triple point and the renormalization group theory result near the critical point. For the convenience of chemical designs and engineering applications, we report its b values yielding the minimum average absolute deviation (AAD) for 74 pure substances from the NIST web-book and compare the results with other correlations. We find that with an adapted b value, the RWVM relation predicts the data of 47 pure substances with an AAD less than 0.0093, with six more than 0.02 and all less than 0.03 except quantum fluid hydrogen, that is clearly better than other correlations. For most pure substances, b covers the range from 0 to 1. Only one negative value stands for the quantum fluid helium because of its enthalpy of vaporization being experimentally not a monotonic function of the temperature in the range near the triple point.

  13. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  14. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in nonaqueous electrolyte solutions: Temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Tuhin; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Biswas, Ranjit

    2009-08-01

    Temperature dependence of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in ethyl acetate (EA), acetonitrile (ACN), and ethanol at several concentrations of lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) has been investigated by using the steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The temperature range considered is 267-343 K. The temperature dependent spectral peak shifts and reaction driving force (-ΔGr) in electrolyte solutions of these solvents can be explained qualitatively in terms of interaction between the reactant molecule and ion-atmosphere. Time resolved studies indicate that the decay kinetics of P4C is biexponential, regardless of solvents, LiClO4 concentrations, and temperatures considered. Except at higher electrolyte concentrations in EA, reaction rates in solutions follow the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence where the estimated activation energy exhibits substantial electrolyte concentration dependence. The average of the experimentally measured activation energies in these three neat solvents is found to be in very good agreement with the predicted value based on data in room temperature solvents. While the rate constant in EA shows a electrolyte concentration induced parabolic dependence on reaction driving force (-ΔGr), the former in ethanol and ACN increases only linearly with the increase in driving force (-ΔGr). The data presented here also indicate that the step-wise increase in solvent reorganization energy via sequential addition of electrolyte induces the ICT reaction in weakly polar solvents to crossover from the Marcus inverted region to the normal region.

  15. Fish introductions reveal the temperature dependence of species interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Catherine L.; Öhlund, Gunnar; Englund, Göran

    2014-01-01

    A major area of current research is to understand how climate change will impact species interactions and ultimately biodiversity. A variety of environmental conditions are rapidly changing owing to climate warming, and these conditions often affect both the strength and outcome of species interactions. We used fish distributions and replicated fish introductions to investigate environmental conditions influencing the coexistence of two fishes in Swedish lakes: brown trout (Salmo trutta) and pike (Esox lucius). A logistic regression model of brown trout and pike coexistence showed that these species coexist in large lakes (more than 4.5 km2), but not in small, warm lakes (annual air temperature more than 0.9–1.5°C). We then explored how climate change will alter coexistence by substituting climate scenarios for 2091–2100 into our model. The model predicts that brown trout will be extirpated from approximately half of the lakes where they presently coexist with pike and from nearly all 9100 lakes where pike are predicted to invade. Context dependency was critical for understanding pike–brown trout interactions, and, given the widespread occurrence of context-dependent species interactions, this aspect will probably be critical for accurately predicting climate impacts on biodiversity. PMID:24307673

  16. Temperature Dependence in Femtosecond Desorption at Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misewich, James

    1998-03-01

    Femtosecond laser induced desorption at metal surfaces is distinguished by two salient observations: the high yield of the reaction and the short correlation time in pump-probe measurements. This has led to the proposal of a model for desorption induced by multiple electronic transitions (DIMET). (J.A. Misewich, T.F. Heinz, and D.M. Newns, Phys. Rev. Lett. v.68 (1992) 3737.) The effect of the adsorbate temperature in DIMET has been studied using stochastic trajectory calculations with initial adsorbate vibrational quantum state occupation. We find that initial vibrational excitation substantially increases the desorption yield. These findings are related to two experimental observations. The long time-scale wings found in femtosecond time-resolved correlation measurements are thought to reflect the residual vibrational excitation left in the undesorbed adlayer following the first laser pulse. (J.A. Misewich, A. Kalamarides, T.F. Heinz, U. Hoefer, and M.M.T. Loy, J. Chem. Phys. v.100 (1994) 736.) Also, the wavelength dependence of femtosecond desorption experiments (S. Deliwala, R.J. Finlay, J.R. Goldman, T.H. Her, W.D. Mieher, and E. Mazur, Chem. Phys. Lett. v.242 (1995) 617 and D.G. Busch and W. Ho, Phys. Rev. Lett. v.77 (1996) 1338.) suggests a role for nonthermalized electrons which is interpreted in terms of the vibrational excitation left in the adlayer from unsuccessful DIET (single excitation) events as a result of the wavelength dependent nonthermalized electron distribution.

  17. The role of actin in the temperature-dependent gelation and contraction of extracts of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The temperature-dependent assembly and the interaction of Acanthamoeba contractile proteins have been studied in a crude extract. A cold extract of soluble proteins from Acanthamoeba castellanii is prepared by homogenizing the cells in a sucrose-ATP-ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta- aminoethyl ether) N,N'-tetraacetic acid buffer and centrifuging at 136,000 g for 1 h. When this supernate of soluble proteins is warmed to room temperature, it forms a solid gel. Upon standing at room temperature, the gel slowly contracts and squeezes out soluble components. The rates of gelation and contraction are both highly temperature dependent, with activation energies of about 20 kcal per mol. Gel formation is dependent upon the presence of ATP and Mg++. Low concentrations of Ca++ accelerate the contractile phase of this phenomenon. The major protein component of the gel is actin. It is associated with myosin, cofactor, a high molecular weight protein tentatively identfied as actin-binding protein, and several other unidentified proteins. Actin has been purified from these gels and was found to be capable of forming a solid gel when polymerized in the presence of ATP, MgCl3, and KCL. The rate of purified actin polymerication is very temperature dependent and is accelerated by the addition of fragments of muscle actin filaments. These data suggest that Acanthamoeba contractile proteins have a dual role in the cell; they may generate the forces for cellular movements and also act as cytoskeletal elements by controlling the consistency of the cytoplasm. PMID:1030705

  18. Temperature dependence of polyhedral cage volumes in clathrate hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.; Jones, C.Y.; Toby, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The polyhedral cage volumes of structure I (sI) (carbon dioxide, methane, trimethylene oxide) and structure II (sII) (methane-ethane, propane, tetrahydrofuran, trimethylene oxide) hydrates are computed from atomic positions determined from neutron powder-diffraction data. The ideal structural formulas for sI and sII are, respectively, S2L6 ?? 46H2O and S16L???8 ?? 136H2O, where S denotes a polyhedral cage with 20 vertices, L a 24-cage, and L??? a 28-cage. The space-filling polyhedral cages are defined by the oxygen atoms of the hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Collectively, the mean cage volume ratio is 1.91 : 1.43 : 1 for the 28-cage : 24-cage : 20-cage, which correspond to equivalent sphere radii of 4.18, 3.79, and 3.37 A??, respectively. At 100 K, mean polyhedral volumes are 303.8, 227.8, and 158.8 A??3 for the 28-cage, 24-cage, and 20-cage, respectively. In general, the 20-cage volume for a sII is larger than that of a sI, although trimethylene oxide is an exception. The temperature dependence of the cage volumes reveals differences between apparently similar cages with similar occupants. In the case of trimethylene oxide hydrate, which forms both sI and sII, the 20-cages common to both structures contract quite differently. From 220 K, the sII 20-cage exhibits a smooth monotonic reduction in size, whereas the sI 20-cage initially expands upon cooling to 160 K, then contracts more rapidly to 10 K, and overall the sI 20-cage is larger than the sII 20-cage. The volumes of the large cages in both structures contract monotonically with decreasing temperature. These differences reflect reoriented motion of the trimethyelene oxide molecule in the 24-cage of sI, consistent with previous spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. For the 20-cages in methane hydrate (sI) and a mixed methane-ethane hydrate (sII), both containing methane as the guest molecule, the temperature dependence of the 20-cage volume in sII is much less than that in sI, but sII is overall

  19. Temperature adaptations in psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic chloride-dependent alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Alexandre; Delbrassine, François; Da Lage, Jean-Luc; Feller, Georges

    2012-09-01

    The functional and structural adaptations to temperature have been addressed in homologous chloride-dependent α-amylases from a psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium, the ectothermic fruit fly, the homeothermic pig and from a thermophilic actinomycete. This series covers nearly all temperatures encountered by living organisms. We report a striking continuum in the functional properties of these enzymes coupled to their structural stability and related to the thermal regime of the source organism. In particular, thermal stability recorded by intrinsic fluorescence, circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry appears to be a compromise between the requirement for a stable native state and the proper structural dynamics to sustain the function at the environmental/physiological temperatures. The thermodependence of activity, the kinetic parameters, the activations parameters and fluorescence quenching support these activity-stability relationships in the investigated α-amylases.

  20. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  1. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the European edible frog (Rana esculenta): spectral details and temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, P; Wit, H P; Segenhout, J M

    1989-11-01

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions were recorded in 41 ears of 29 European edible frogs (Rana esculenta). Emission frequencies ranged from 450 to 1350 Hz. The distribution of frequencies shows two distinct populations: one above and one below 1 kHz. With one exception, a maximum number of two emissions were recorded per ear, each in a different population. An amplitude distribution of a frog emission was sampled, from which it was concluded that the emission is generated by an active oscillator. The spectral width of an emission ranged from 1 to 200 Hz (average 38 Hz). There was negative correlation between sound pressure level of an emission and spectral width. In 4 frogs the dependence of emission power and frequency on temperature was investigated. An emission could be 'switched on and off' within a few degrees centigrade. At temperatures below the switching interval no emission was recorded; for higher temperatures emission power showed no dependence on temperature. Frequency increased with temperature (Q10 = 1.1 to 1.3). This yields a mismatch with temperature dependence of best frequencies of auditory fibers. The consequences of this mismatch are discussed. PMID:2691473

  2. Temperature dependence of enthalpies and entropies of formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Entropies and enthalpies of vacancy formation and diffusion in BCC iron are calculated for each temperature directly from free-energies using phase-space trajectories obtained from spin-lattice dynamics simulations. Magnon contributions are found to be particularly substantial in the temperature regime near the α-β (ferro/para-magnetic) transition. Strong temperature dependence and singular behavior can be seen in this temperature regime, reflecting magnon softening effects. Temperature dependence of the lattice component in this regime is also much more significant compared to previous estimations based on Arrhenius-type fitting. Similar effects on activation processes involving other irradiation-produced defects in magnetic materials are expected.

  3. High pressure and anesthesia: pressure stimulates or inhibits bacterial bioluminescence depending upon temperature.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, S; Kamaya, H; Ueda, I

    1988-10-01

    Although high pressure is often viewed as a nonspecific stimulus counteracting anesthesia, pressure can either excite or inhibit biological activity depending on the temperature at application. Temperature and pressure are two independent variables that determine equilibrium quantity, e.g., the state of organisms in terms of activity and anesthesia depth. We used the light intensity of luminous bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) as an activity parameter, and studied the effects of pressure and anesthetics on the bacteria's light intensity at various temperatures. The light intensity was greatest at about 30 degrees C at ambient pressure. When the system was pressurized up to 204 atm, the temperature for maximum light intensity was shifted to higher temperatures. Above the optimal temperature for the maximal light intensity, high pressure increased the light intensity. Below the optimal temperature, pressure decreased light intensity. Pressure only shifts the reaction equilibrium to the lower volume state (Le Chatelier's principle). When the volume of the excited state is larger than the resting state, high pressure inhibits excitation, and vice versa. Halothane 0.008 atm and isoflurane 0.021 atm inhibited the light intensity both above and below the optimal temperature. When pressurized, the light intensity increased in the high temperature range but decreased in the low temperature range, as in the control. Thus, high pressure seemingly potentiated the anesthetic action at low temperatures. When the ratio of the light intensity in bacteria exposed to anesthesia and those not exposed to anesthesia was plotted against the pressure, however, the value approached unity in proportion to the pressure increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3421502

  4. Temperature-dependence of planktonic metabolism in the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Corral, L. S.; Barber, E.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; Sal, S.; Holding, J.; Agustí, S.; Navarro, N.; Serret, P.; Mozetič, P.; Duarte, C. M.

    2014-02-01

    The temperature dependence of planktonic metabolism in the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean was assessed on the basis of measurements of gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR) and net community production (NCP), as well as experimental assessments of the response of CR to temperature manipulations. Metabolic rates were measured at 68 stations along three consecutive longitudinal transects completed during the Malaspina 2010 Expedition, in three different seasons. Temperatures gradients were observed in depth and at basin and seasonal scale. The results showed seasonal variability in the metabolic rates, being the highest rates observed during the spring transect. The overall mean integrated GPP/CR ratio was of 1.39 ± 0.27 decreasing from winter to summer and the NCP for the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean during this cruises, was net autotrophy (NCP > 0) in about two-thirds of the total sampled communities (68.2%). Here, we reported the activation energies describing the temperature-dependence of planktonic community metabolism, which generally was higher for CR than for GPP in the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean, as the metabolic theory of ecology predicts. Also, we performed an assessment of the activation energies describing the responses to in situ temperature at field (EaCR = 1.64 ± 0.36 eV) and those derive experimentally by temperature manipulations (EaCR = 1.45 ± 0.6 eV), which showed a great consistency.

  5. Temperature-dependent charge injection and transport in pentacene thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Hyunji; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, Jaehoon; Choi, Jong Sun

    2015-11-01

    The electrical characteristics of p-channel pentacene thin-film transistors (TFTs) were analyzed at different operating temperatures ranging from 253 to 353 K. An improvement in the drain current and field-effect mobility of the pentacene TFTs is observed with increasing temperature. From the Arrhenius plots of field-effect mobility extracted at various temperatures, a lower activation energy of 99.34 meV was obtained when the device is operating in the saturation region. Such observation is ascribed to the thermally activated hole transport through the pentacene grain boundaries. On the other hand, it was found that the Au/pentacene contact significantly affects the TFTs electrical characteristics in the linear region, which resulted in a higher activation energy. The activation energy based on the linear field-effect mobility, which increased from 344.61 to 444.70 meV with decreasing temperature, implies the charge-injection-limited electrical behavior of pentacene TFTs at low temperatures. The thermally induced electrical characteristic variations in pentacene TFTs can thus be studied through the temperature dependence of the charge injection and transport processes.

  6. Engineering a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon for Temperature-Dependent Product Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Sun, JS; Adams, MWW

    2012-02-24

    Microorganisms growing near the boiling point have enormous biotechnological potential but only recently have molecular engineering tools become available for them. We have engineered the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100 degrees C, to switch its end products of fermentation in a temperature-controlled fashion without the need for chemical inducers. The recombinant strain (LAC) expresses a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase from the moderately thermophilic Caldicellulosiruptor bescii (optimal growth temperature [T-opt] of 78 degrees C) controlled by a "cold shock" promoter that is upregulated when cells are transferred from 98 degrees C to 72 degrees C. At 98 degrees C, the LAC strain fermented sugar to produce acetate and hydrogen as end products, and lactate was not detected. When the LAC strain was grown at 72 degrees C, up to 3 mM lactate was produced instead. Expression of a gene from a moderately thermophilic bacterium in a hyperthermophilic archaeon at temperatures at which the hyperthermophile has low metabolic activity provides a new perspective to engineering microorganisms for bioproduct and biofuel formation. IMPORTANCE Extremely thermostable enzymes from microorganisms that grow near or above the boiling point of water are already used in biotechnology. However, the use of hyperthermophilic microorganisms themselves for biotechnological applications has been limited by the lack of their genetic accessibility. Recently, a genetic system for Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 degrees C, was developed in our laboratory. In this study, we present the first heterologous protein expression system for a microorganism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C, a first step towards the potential expression of genes involved in biomass degradation or biofuel production in hyperthermophiles. Moreover, we developed the first system for specific gene induction in P. furiosus. As the cold shock promoter

  7. Temperature, Pulse, and Respiration. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runge, Lillian

    This learning activity package on temperature, pulse, and respiration is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  8. Temperature Dependence of Diffusivities in Liquid Elements (LMD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    This research was to advance the understanding of diffusion mechanisms in liquid metals and alloys through accurate diffusivity measurements over a wide range of temperatures, including the proximity of the materials melting points. Specifically, it was driven towards developing a methodology (and subsequent flight hardware) to enable several diffusion coefficient measurements (i.e., at several different temperatures) to be performed using a single sample. The Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD) was funded as a Flight Definition Project in February 1993 in response to NRA 91-OSSA-20 (Microgravity Science and Applications Division). The Science Concept Review for LAID was held during April 1994. In January 1995 we were informed that we had failed this review and the project was change to ground-based activities only. A new proposal was submitted for the next NRA addressing the panels concerns. As part of NASA's Risk Mitigation program, a scaled-down version of the hardware was funded in July of 1995 for a flight opportunity utilizing experiment on the Microgravity Isolation Mount. This experiment was to determine the self-diffusivity of indium at 185 C. The LMD was transferred to the Mir Space Station in STS-81 and returned on STS-84 (January - May 1997). Three, out of five, self-diffusion data sets were returned. A description of this experiment/hardware is included below. This summary is only intended to give the reader an overview of the results obtained for the tasks outlined in the original proposal. Research that was not published is explained in more detail. At the end of this report is a list of refereed publications and invited talks that were given as a result of this work. The reader is directed to these for further details. Attachment: Real-time diffusivity measurements in liquids at several temperatures with one sample, On the insensitivity of liquid diffusivity measurements to deviations from 1D transport, and Numerical simulations of the convective

  9. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Čaja, Alexander E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Nemec, Patrik E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Malcho, Milan E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk

    2014-08-06

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  10. Radiation influence on the temperature-dependent parameters of fluids.

    PubMed

    Bulavin, L A; Cherevko, K V; Gavryushenko, D A; Sysoev, V M; Vlasenko, T S

    2016-03-01

    Based on the fundamental Bogolyubov chain of equations, a model relating the structural and thermophysical properties of the nonequilibrium liquid systems under irradiation in stationary state is introduced. The obtained results suggest that the thermophysical properties of the liquid systems under irradiation are defined by the "effective temperature" that can be calculated from the perturbed momentum distribution functions of the systems. It is shown that the structural changes in the liquid systems under irradiation are caused by the changes in the coefficients of the Maxwell distribution function due to the momentum exchange between the active particles and the particles forming the liquid. To confirm the theoretical predictions, a qualitative comparison of the model with the existing experimental data on irradiation influence on the surface tension coefficients of liquids is performed. PMID:27078318

  11. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-06-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  12. Temperature Dependence on The Synthesis of Jatropha Biolubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunam Resul, Muhammad Faiz M.; Idaty Mohd Ghazi, Tinia; Idris, Azni

    2011-02-01

    Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha biolubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH3) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120°C and 200°C with pressure kept at 10mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha biolubricant was found to be the highest (47%) at 200°C. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150°C due to insignificant improvement in biolubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 × 10-1 (%wt/wt.min.°C)-1. The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha biolubricant was at -3°C and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha biolubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based biolubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based biolubricant.

  13. Binding sequences for RdgB, a DNA damage-responsive transcriptional activator, and temperature-dependent expression of bacteriocin and pectin lyase genes in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuteru; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2008-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum strain Er simultaneously produces the phage tail-like bacteriocin carotovoricin (Ctv) and pectin lyase (Pnl) in response to DNA-damaging agents. The regulatory protein RdgB of the Mor/C family of proteins activates transcription of pnl through binding to the promoter. However, the optimal temperature for the synthesis of Ctv (23 degrees C) differs from that for synthesis of Pnl (30 degrees C), raising the question of whether RdgB directly activates ctv transcription. Here we report that RdgB directly regulates Ctv synthesis. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated RdgB binding to the P(0), P(1), and P(2) promoters of the ctv operons, and DNase I footprinting determined RdgB-binding sequences (RdgB boxes) on these and on the pnl promoters. The RdgB box of the pnl promoter included a perfect 7-bp inverted repeat with high binding affinity to the regulator (K(d) [dissociation constant] = 150 nM). In contrast, RdgB boxes of the ctv promoters contained an imperfect inverted repeat with two or three mismatches that consequently reduced binding affinity (K(d) = 250 to 350 nM). Transcription of the rdgB and ctv genes was about doubled at 23 degrees C compared with that at 30 degrees C. In contrast, the amount of pnl transcription tripled at 30 degrees C. Thus, the inverse synthesis of Ctv and Pnl as a function of temperature is apparently controlled at the transcriptional level, and reduced rdgB expression at 30 degrees C obviously affected transcription from the ctv promoters with low-affinity RdgB boxes. Pathogenicity toward potato tubers was reduced in an rdgB knockout mutant, suggesting that the RdgAB system contributes to the pathogenicity of this bacterium, probably by activating pnl expression.

  14. Infralimbic cortex controls core body temperature in a histamine dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Riveros, M E; Perdomo, G; Torrealba, F

    2014-04-10

    An increase in body temperature accelerates biochemical reactions and behavioral and physiological responses. A mechanism to actively increase body temperature would be beneficial during motivated behaviors. The prefrontal cortex is implicated in organizing motivated behavior; the infralimbic cortex, a subregion of the medial prefrontal cortex, has the necessary connectivity to serve the role of initiating such thermogenic mechanism at the beginning of the appetitive phase of motivated behavior; further, this cortex is active during motivated behavior and its disinhibition produces a marked behavioral and vegetative arousal increase, together with increases in histamine levels. We wanted to explore if this arousal was related to histaminergic activation after pharmacological infralimbic disinhibition and during the appetitive phase of motivated behavior. We measured core temperature and motor activity in response to picrotoxin injection in the infralimbic cortex, as well as during food-related appetitive behavior, evoked by enticing hungry rats with food. Pretreatment with the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine decreased thermal response to picrotoxin and enticement and completely blunted motor response to enticement. Motor and temperature responses to enticement were also completely abolished by infralimbic cortex inhibition with muscimol. To assess if this histamine dependent temperature increase was produced by an active sympathetic mediated thermogenic mechanism or was just a consequence of increased locomotor activity, we injected propranolol (i.p.), a β adrenergic receptor blocker, before picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex. Propranolol reduced the temperature increase without affecting locomotor activity. Altogether, these results suggest that infralimbic activation is necessary for appetitive behavior by inducing a motor and a vegetative arousal increase mediated by central histamine.

  15. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  16. Stress and temperature dependence of screw dislocation mobility in {alpha}-Fe by molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, M. R.

    2011-11-01

    The low-temperature plastic yield of {alpha}-Fe single crystals is known to display a strong temperature dependence and to be controlled by the thermally activated motion of screw dislocations. In this paper, we present molecular dynamics simulations of (1/2)<111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} screw dislocation motion as a function of temperature and stress in order to extract mobility relations that describe the general dynamic behavior of screw dislocations in pure {alpha}-Fe. We find two dynamic regimes in the stress-velocity space governed by different mechanisms of motion. Consistent with experimental evidence, at low stresses and temperatures, the dislocations move by thermally activated nucleation and propagation of kink pairs. Then, at a critical stress, a temperature-dependent transition to a viscous linear regime is observed. Critical output from the simulations, such as threshold stresses and the stress dependence of the kink activation energy, are compared to experimental data and other atomistic works with generally very good agreement. Contrary to some experimental interpretations, we find that glide on {l_brace}112{r_brace} planes is only apparent, as slip always occurs by elementary kink-pair nucleation/propagation events on {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes. Additionally, a dislocation core transformation from compact to dissociated has been identified above room temperature, although its impact on the general mobility is seen to be limited. This and other observations expose the limitations of inferring or presuming dynamic behavior on the basis of only static calculations. We discuss the relevance and applicability of our results and provide a closed-form functional mobility law suitable for mesoscale computational techniques.

  17. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Material Nonlinearities on the Response of Piezoelectric Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1997-01-01

    Previously developed analytical formulations for piezoelectric composite plates are extended to account for the nonlinear effects of temperature on material properties. The temperature dependence of the composite and piezoelectric properties are represented at the material level through the thermopiezoelectric constitutive equations. In addition to capturing thermal effects from temperature dependent material properties, this formulation also accounts for thermal effects arising from: (1) coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the various composite and piezoelectric plies and (2) pyroelectric effects on the piezoelectric material. The constitutive equations are incorporated into a layerwise laminate theory to provide a unified representation of the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal behavior of smart structures. Corresponding finite element equations are derived and implemented for a bilinear plate element with the inherent capability to model both the active and sensory response of piezoelectric composite laminates. Numerical studies are conducted on a simply supported composite plate with attached piezoceramic patches under thermal gradients to investigate the nonlinear effects of material property temperature dependence on the displacements, sensory voltages, active voltages required to minimize thermal deflections, and the resultant stress states.

  18. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  19. Temperature dependent dynamics of DegP-trimer: A molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Nivedita; Ramaswamy, Amutha

    2015-01-01

    DegP is a heat shock protein from high temperature requirement protease A family, which reacts to the environmental stress conditions in an ATP independent way. The objective of the present analysis emerged from the temperature dependent functional diversity of DegP between chaperonic and protease activities at temperatures below and above 28 °C, respectively. DegP is a multimeric protein and the minimal functional unit, DegP-trimer, is of great importance in understanding the DegP pathway. The structural aspects of DegP-trimer with respect to temperature variation have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations (for 100 ns) and principal component analysis to highlight the temperature dependent dynamics facilitating its functional diversity. The DegP-trimer revealed a pronounced dynamics at both 280 and 320 K, when compared to the dynamics observed at 300 K. The LA loop is identified as the highly flexible region during dynamics and at extreme temperatures, the residues 46–80 of LA loop express a flip towards right (at 280) and left ( at 320 K) with respect to the fixed β-sheet connecting the LA loop of protease for which Phe46 acts as one of the key residues. Such dynamics of LA loop facilitates inter-monomeric interaction with the PDZ1 domain of the neighbouring monomer and explains its active participation when DegP exists as trimer. Hence, the LA loop mediated dynamics of DegP-trimer is expected to provide further insight into the temperature dependent dynamics of DegP towards the understanding of its assembly and functional diversity in the presence of substrate. PMID:25987966

  20. Are reptiles predisposed to temperature-dependent sex determination?

    PubMed

    Georges, A; Ezaz, T; Quinn, A E; Sarre, S D

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrates show an astonishing array of sex determining mechanisms, including male and female heterogamety, multiple sex chromosome systems, environmental sex determination, parthenogenesis and hermaphroditism. Sex determination in mammals and birds is extraordinarily conservative compared to that of reptiles, amphibians and fish. In this paper, we explore possible explanations for the diversity of sex determining modes in reptiles, and in particular, address the prevalence of reptilian temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and its almost haphazard distribution across the reptile phylogeny. We suggest that reptiles are predisposed to evolving TSD from genotypic sex determination (GSD) by virtue of the uniquely variable thermal environment experienced by their embryos during the critical period in which sex is determined. Explicit mechanisms for canalization of sexual phenotype in the face of high thermal variation during development provide a context for thermolability in sex determination at extremes and the raw material for natural selection to move this thermolability into the developmental mainstream when there is a selective advantage to do so. Release of cryptic variation when canalization is challenged and fails at extremes may accelerate evolutionary transitions between GSD and TSD.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Lateral Charge Transport in Silicon Nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Scott, Shelley; Jacobson, Rb; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Savage, Donald; Eriksson, Mark; Lagally, Max

    2014-03-01

    Thin sheets of single-crystal silicon (nanomembranes), electrically isolated from a bulk substrate by a dielectric layer, are an exceptional tool for studying the electronic transport properties of surfaces in the absence of an extended bulk. Under UHV, we measure the conductivity, and a back gate allows us to look into the depletion region, where we can determine the minimum conductance. For hydrogen-terminated Si(001) NMs, for which the surface has no conductivity, the minimum conductance decreases with decreasing NM thickness (220-42nm), demonstrating the reduction in carriers for thinner NMs. For the clean Si(2 ×1)surface, mobile charge exists in the π* surface band. For thicknesses below 200nm surface conduction dominates, rendering the thickness independence of the minimum. We determine a surface charge mobility of ~50cm2V-1s-1. We have measured the temperature dependence of the conductance of a 42nm thick HF treated SiNM. The results show that the Fermi level is pinned 0.21 +/- 0 . 01 eV below the conduction band minimum, in agreement with XPS results. Supported by DOE.

  2. Temperature dependence of electronic eigenenergies in the adiabatic harmonic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncé, S.; Antonius, G.; Gillet, Y.; Boulanger, P.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Marini, A.; Côté, M.; Gonze, X.

    2014-12-01

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon interactions (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is important in many materials. We address it in the adiabatic harmonic approximation, based on first principles (e.g., density-functional theory), from different points of view: directly from atomic position fluctuations or, alternatively, from Janak's theorem generalized to the case where the Helmholtz free energy, including the vibrational entropy, is used. We prove their equivalence, based on the usual form of Janak's theorem and on the dynamical equation. We then also place the Allen-Heine-Cardona (AHC) theory of the renormalization in a first-principles context. The AHC theory relies on the rigid-ion approximation, and naturally leads to a self-energy (Fan) contribution and a Debye-Waller contribution. Such a splitting can also be done for the complete harmonic adiabatic expression, in which the rigid-ion approximation is not required. A numerical study within the density-functional perturbation theory framework allows us to compare the AHC theory with frozen-phonon calculations, with or without the rigid-ion approximation. For the two different numerical approaches without non-rigid-ion terms, the agreement is better than 7 μ eV in the case of diamond, which represent an agreement to five significant digits. The magnitude of the non-rigid-ion terms in this case is also presented, distinguishing specific phonon modes contributions to different electronic eigenenergies.

  3. Soft self-assembled nanoparticles with temperature-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Capone, Barbara; Likos, Christos N.

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of versatile building blocks that reliably self-assemble into desired ordered and disordered phases is amongst the hottest topics in contemporary materials science. To this end, microscopic units of varying complexity, aimed at assembling the target phases, have been thought, designed, investigated and built. Such a path usually requires laborious fabrication techniques, especially when specific functionalisation of the building blocks is required. Telechelic star polymers, i.e., star polymers made of a number of f di-block copolymers consisting of solvophobic and solvophilic monomers grafted on a central anchoring point, spontaneously self-assemble into soft patchy particles featuring attractive spots (patches) on the surface. Here we show that the tunability of such a system can be widely extended by controlling the physical and chemical parameters of the solution. Indeed, under fixed external conditions the self-assembly behaviour depends only on the number of arms and on the ratio of solvophobic to solvophilic monomers. However, changes in temperature and/or solvent quality make it possible to reliably change the number and size of the attractive patches. This allows the steering of the mesoscopic self-assembly behaviour without modifying the microscopic constituents. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that diverse combinations of the parameters can generate stars with the same number of patches but different radial and angular stiffness. This mechanism could provide a neat way of further fine-tuning the elastic properties of the supramolecular network without changing its topology.

  4. Temperature, activity, and lizard life histories

    SciTech Connect

    Adolph, S.C.; Porter, W.P. )

    1993-08-01

    Lizard life-history characteristics vary widely among species and populations. Most authors seek adaptive or phylogenetic explanations for life-history patterns, which are usually presumed to reflect genetic differences. However, lizard life histories are often phenotypically plastic, varying in response to temperature, food availability, and other environmental factors. Despite the importance of temperature to lizard ecology and physiology, its effects on life histories have received relatively little attention. The authors present a theoretical model predicting the proximate consequences of the thermal environment for lizard life histories. Temperature, by affecting activity times, can cause variation in annual survival rate and fecundity, leading to a negative correlation between survival rate and fecundity among populations in different thermal environments. Thus, physiological and evolutionary models predict the same qualitative pattern of life-history variation in lizards. They tested their model with published life-history data from field studies of the lizard Sceloporus undulatus, using climate and geographical data to reconstruct estimated annual activity seasons. Among populations, annual activity times were negatively correlated with annual survival rate and positively correlated with annual fecundity. Proximate effects of temperature may confound comparative analyses of lizard life-history variation and should be included in future evolutionary models. 125 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Temperature Dependent Photoluminescence Measurements of Single InP Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischle, Matthias; Beirne, Gareth J.; Rossbach, Robert; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we have investigated single InP quantum dots by way of photoluminescence measurements. The lower energy dots show emission from excited states at moderate excitation powers while those emitting at higher energies do not even at high power densities. Temperature dependent measurements were carried out with the objective of understanding this difference and to develop a better understanding of the carrier escape from the dots at elevated temperatures. We observed a strong correlation between the electronic level spacings and the activation energies obtained using an arrhenius model, which thereby indicates that the carriers escape via higher lying levels.

  6. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Frequency Factor on the Evaluated Trapping Parameters of TSL Glow Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, A. N.; Öztürk, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temperature dependency on frequency factor and its relationship to trapping parameters is discussed by using the peak shape method. The coefficients appearing in the peak shape formula for the calculation of the activation energy have been determined and tabulated for the symmetry factor mg(X) for x=0.50 and 0.75 of the peak intensity. It is found that significant errors occur in the value of the trapping parameters if the temperature dependecy of the frequency factor is not consider.

  7. Temperature dependency of the emission properties from positioned In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, T.; Schneider, C.; Maier, S.; Forchel, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Igusa, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-15

    In this letter we study the influence of temperature and excitation power on the emission linewidth from site-controlled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on nanoholes defined by electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching. We identify thermal electron activation as well as direct exciton loss as the dominant intensity quenching channels. Additionally, we carefully analyze the effects of optical and acoustic phonons as well as close-by defects on the emission linewidth by means of temperature and power dependent micro-photoluminescence on single quantum dots with large pitches.

  8. Temperature dependent charge transport in organic field-effect transistors with the variation of both carrier concentration and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mamatimin; Pivrikas, Almantas; Arici, Elif; Tekin, Nalan; Ullah, Mujeeb; Sitter, Helmut; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2013-12-01

    We present experimental evidence of combined effects of temperature, carrier concentration, electric field as well as disorder on charge transport in an organic field-effect transistor (OFET). Transfer characteristics of an OFET based on sexithiophene active layer were measured from 80 to 300 K. Thermally activated carrier mobility followed Arrhenius law with two activation energies. Carrier density variation led to finite extrapolated Meyer-Neldel (MN) temperature (780 K) at low fields. Negative electric field-dependent mobility was observed in available field range. MN temperature shifted towards higher temperature when the electric field increased, and did not retain its finite character above the field of 4 × 103 V cm-1.

  9. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of lattice defects in some neutron-irradiated oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Moritami; Atobe, Kozo; Nakagawa, Masuo

    2004-11-01

    Temperature dependence of production efficiency of irradiation-induced defects in neutron-irradiated oxides has been investigated. Some oxide single crystals, MgO, α-Al2O3 (sapphire) and TiO2 (rutile), were irradiated at several controlled temperatures, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 K, using the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL), and at ambient temperature (∼370 K) in the same facility. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of a 1 μm band in TiO2 differs greatly from that of anion vacancy (F-type centers) in MgO and α-Al2O3. Results for MgO and α-Al2O3 show steep negative gradients from 10 to 370 K, whereas that for TiO2 includes a valley between 40 and 60 K and a hump at about 130 K, and then disappear at about 200 K. In MgO and α-Al2O3, this behavior can be explained by the recombination of Frenkel pairs, which is activated at higher temperature. In TiO2, in addition to the recombination mechanism, a covalent bonding property is thought to be exerted strong influence, and it is suggested that a disappearance of the 1 μm band at above 200 K is due to the recombination process of Frenkel pairs which is caused by the irradiation-induced crystallization.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of temperature-dependent sex determination in the context of ecological developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuiko; Crews, David

    2012-05-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is a prime example of phenotypic plasticity in that gonadal sex is determined by the temperature of the incubating egg. In the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta), the effect of temperature can be overridden by exogenous ligands, i.e., sex steroid hormones and steroid metabolism enzyme inhibitors, during the temperature-sensitive period (TSP) of development. Precisely how the physical signal of temperature is transduced into a biological signal that ultimately results in sex determination remains unknown. In this review, we discuss the sex determining pathway underlying TSD by focusing on two candidate sex determining genes, Forkhead box protein L2 (FoxL2) and Doublesex mab3- related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1). They appear to be involved in transducing the environmental temperature signal into a biological signal that subsequently determines gonadal sex. FoxL2 and Dmrt1 exhibit gonad-typical patterns of expression in response to temperature during the TSP in the red-eared slider turtle. Further, the biologically active ligands regulate the expression of FoxL2 and Dmrt1 during development to modify gonad trajectory. The precise regulatory mechanisms of expression of these genes by temperature or exogenous ligands are not clear. However, the environment often influences developmental gene expression by altering the epigenetic status in regulatory regions. Here, we will discuss if the regulation of FoxL2 and Dmrt1 expression by environment is mediated through epigenetic mechanisms during development in species with TSD.

  11. Temperature-Dependent Kinetic Model for Nitrogen-Limited Wine Fermentations▿

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Matthew C.; Fish, Russell; Block, David E.

    2007-01-01

    A physical and mathematical model for wine fermentation kinetics was adapted to include the influence of temperature, perhaps the most critical factor influencing fermentation kinetics. The model was based on flask-scale white wine fermentations at different temperatures (11 to 35°C) and different initial concentrations of sugar (265 to 300 g/liter) and nitrogen (70 to 350 mg N/liter). The results show that fermentation temperature and inadequate levels of nitrogen will cause stuck or sluggish fermentations. Model parameters representing cell growth rate, sugar utilization rate, and the inactivation rate of cells in the presence of ethanol are highly temperature dependent. All other variables (yield coefficient of cell mass to utilized nitrogen, yield coefficient of ethanol to utilized sugar, Monod constant for nitrogen-limited growth, and Michaelis-Menten-type constant for sugar transport) were determined to vary insignificantly with temperature. The resulting mathematical model accurately predicts the observed wine fermentation kinetics with respect to different temperatures and different initial conditions, including data from fermentations not used for model development. This is the first wine fermentation model that accurately predicts a transition from sluggish to normal to stuck fermentations as temperature increases from 11 to 35°C. Furthermore, this comprehensive model provides insight into combined effects of time, temperature, and ethanol concentration on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activity and physiology. PMID:17616615

  12. Temperature dependency of the Ga/In distribution in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorbers in high temperature processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, B. J.; Demes, T.; Lill, P. C.; Haug, V.; Hergert, F.; Zweigart, S.; Herr, U.

    2016-05-01

    The current article reports about the influence of temperature and glass substrate on Ga/In interdiffusion and chalcopyrite phase formation in the stacked elemental layer process. According to the Shockley-Queisser limit the optimum for single junction devices is near 1.4 eV, which is strongly coupled on the Ga/(Ga+In) ratio of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells. To increase the Ga content in the active region of the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 a 70:30 CuGa alloy target is used. An increase of the selenization temperature leads to a more homogeneous Ga/In distribution and a less pronounced Ga agglomeration at the back contact. The Ga/In interdiffusion rates for different selenization temperatures and substrates were estimated with the model of a two layer system. At the highest selenization temperature used an absorber band gap of 1.12 eV was realized, which is similar to typical values of absorbers produced during the co-evaporation process. The Na diffusion into the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 is weakly temperature dependent but strongly influenced by the choice of the glass substrate composition.

  13. [Temperature dependence of the structurized state of water].

    PubMed

    Savostikova, O N; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V; Kochetkova, M G

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides the results of studies of the impact of temperature on the structural and energetic state of drinking water and shows that the altered temperature conditions of water causes a change in its supramolecular structure and biological value.

  14. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  15. Effect of temperature-dependent organic carbon decay on atmospheric pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Katsumi; Hashioka, Taketo; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2007-06-01

    Extendingy an almost universal observation that the rate of microbial activity increases with temperature, we propose that marine microbial activity was suppressed during previous glacial periods and allowed proportionally more organic carbon to be exported out of the surface ocean. A stronger organic carbon pump and therefore lower rain ratios of CaCO3 to organic carbon may have contributed to the low atmospheric CO2 content during the Last Glacial Maximum. Previous study of temperature-dependent export production (Laws et al., 2000) and our map of data-based, global distribution of the rain ratios lend support to today's rain ratios being controlled at least partly by temperature. A close examination with a high-resolution regional ocean ecosystem model indicates that the correlation between rain ratio and temperature is caused indeed by preferential remineralization of organic matter, but a part of the correlation is also driven by temperature-dependent community composition. An extrapolation of these results to the globe using a global carbon cycle box model with a module for sediments indicates that the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 by the proposed mechanism is approximately 30 ppm. While this estimate is subject to uncertainty, the fact that it represents nearly one third of the glacial-interglacial variation in atmosphere pCO2 suggests the potential importance of the new mechanism. Given the historical difficulty in explaining the full CO2 amplitude with a single cause, we suggest that a set of multiple mechanisms were responsible and that the temperature-dependent POC degradation rate is one of them. We discuss two possible difficulties with our proposal that have to do with the potentially important role that ballasts play in organic carbon export and the possibility that enhanced biological pump is self limiting.

  16. High Precision Measurements of Temperature Dependence of Creep Rate of Polycrystalline Forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakakoji, T.; Hiraga, T.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining temperature dependence of creep rate, that is, activation energy for the creep is critical in geophysics, since its value can indicate deformation mechanism and also allows to extrapolate the creep rate measured in the room experiments to geological conditions when the creep mechanism is identical in both cases. Although numerous experimental results have been obtained so far, the obtained activation energy often contains error range of >50 kJ/mol, which often causes large uncertainties in strain rate at applied geological conditions. To minimize this error, it is important to collect strain rates at many different temperatures with high accuracy. We conducted high temperature compression experiments on synthetic forsterite (90%vol) and enstatite (10vol %) aggregates under increasing and decreasing temperatures. We applied a constant load of ~20 MPa using uniaxial testing machine (Shimadzu AG-X 50kN). The temperature was changed from 1360°C to 1240°C by furnace attached to the machine. Prior to the applying the load to the samples the grain size was saturated at 1360°C for 24 hours to minimize grain growth during the test. Decreasing-rate of temperature was 0.11min/°C and 0.02min/°C at temperature ranges of 1360 to 1300 and 1300 to 1240 respectively. The increasing-rate of the temperature was the same as the decreasing-rate. Strain rates from every 1 degree were obtained successfully. After the experiment, we analyzed the microstructure of the sample with scanning electron microscopy to measure the grain diameter. Arrhenius plots of strain rate demonstrate very linear distribution at > 1300 °C giving an activation energy of 649 ± 14 kJ/mol, whereas weak transition to lower activation energy 550 ± 23 kJ/mol below 1300°C was observed. Tasaka et al. (2013) obtained the activation energy of 370 ± 50 kJ/mol from similar temperature ranges used in our study but finer-grained samples. Combining these results, we interpret our results of high activation

  17. Temperature dependence of the Cl atom reaction with deuterated methanes.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Frank; Portmann, Robert W; Ravishankara, A R; Burkholder, James B

    2015-05-14

    Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) and reaction rate coefficients, k1-k4, for the gas-phase reaction of Cl atoms with (12)CH3D (k1), (12)CH2D2 (k2), (12)CHD3 (k3), and (12)CD4 (k4) over the temperature range 223-343 K in 630 Torr of synthetic air are reported. Rate coefficients were measured using a relative rate technique with (12)CH4 as the primary reference compound. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the methane isotopologue loss. The obtained KIE values were (12)CH3D: KIE1(T) = (1.227 ± 0.004) exp((43 ± 5)/T); (12)CH2D2: KIE2(T) = (1.14 ± 0.20) exp((191 ± 60)/T); (12)CHD3: KIE3(T) = (1.73 ± 0.34) exp((229 ± 60)/T); and (12)CD4: KIE4(T) = (1.01 ± 0.3) exp((724 ± 19)/T), where KIEx(T) = kCl+(12)CH4(T)/kx(T). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ (95% confidence) level and represent the precision of our data. The following Arrhenius expressions and 295 K rate coefficient values (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) were derived from the above KIE using a rate coefficient of 7.3 × 10(-12) exp(-1280/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of Cl with (12)CH4: k1(T) = (5.95 ± 0.70) × 10(-12) exp(-(1323 ± 50)/T), k1(295 K) = (6.7 ± 0.8) × 10(-14); k2(T) = (6.4 ± 1.3) × 10(-12) exp(-(1471 ± 60)/T), k2(295 K) = (4.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-14); k3(T) = (4.2 ± 1.0) × 10(-12) exp(-(1509 ± 60)/T), k3(295 K) = (2.53 ± 0.6) × 10(-14); and k4(T) = (7.13 ± 2.3) × 10(-12) exp(-(2000 ± 120)/T), k4(295 K) = (0.81 ± 0.26) × 10(-14). The reported uncertainties in the pre-exponential factors are 2σ and include estimated systematic errors in our measurements and the uncertainty in the reference reaction rate coefficient. The results from this study are compared with previously reported room-temperature rate coefficients for each of the deuterated methanes as well as the available temperature dependent data for the Cl atom reactions with CH3D and CD4. A two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model was used to examine the implications of the

  18. Temperature dependence of the Cl atom reaction with deuterated methanes.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Frank; Portmann, Robert W; Ravishankara, A R; Burkholder, James B

    2015-05-14

    Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) and reaction rate coefficients, k1-k4, for the gas-phase reaction of Cl atoms with (12)CH3D (k1), (12)CH2D2 (k2), (12)CHD3 (k3), and (12)CD4 (k4) over the temperature range 223-343 K in 630 Torr of synthetic air are reported. Rate coefficients were measured using a relative rate technique with (12)CH4 as the primary reference compound. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the methane isotopologue loss. The obtained KIE values were (12)CH3D: KIE1(T) = (1.227 ± 0.004) exp((43 ± 5)/T); (12)CH2D2: KIE2(T) = (1.14 ± 0.20) exp((191 ± 60)/T); (12)CHD3: KIE3(T) = (1.73 ± 0.34) exp((229 ± 60)/T); and (12)CD4: KIE4(T) = (1.01 ± 0.3) exp((724 ± 19)/T), where KIEx(T) = kCl+(12)CH4(T)/kx(T). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ (95% confidence) level and represent the precision of our data. The following Arrhenius expressions and 295 K rate coefficient values (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) were derived from the above KIE using a rate coefficient of 7.3 × 10(-12) exp(-1280/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of Cl with (12)CH4: k1(T) = (5.95 ± 0.70) × 10(-12) exp(-(1323 ± 50)/T), k1(295 K) = (6.7 ± 0.8) × 10(-14); k2(T) = (6.4 ± 1.3) × 10(-12) exp(-(1471 ± 60)/T), k2(295 K) = (4.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-14); k3(T) = (4.2 ± 1.0) × 10(-12) exp(-(1509 ± 60)/T), k3(295 K) = (2.53 ± 0.6) × 10(-14); and k4(T) = (7.13 ± 2.3) × 10(-12) exp(-(2000 ± 120)/T), k4(295 K) = (0.81 ± 0.26) × 10(-14). The reported uncertainties in the pre-exponential factors are 2σ and include estimated systematic errors in our measurements and the uncertainty in the reference reaction rate coefficient. The results from this study are compared with previously reported room-temperature rate coefficients for each of the deuterated methanes as well as the available temperature dependent data for the Cl atom reactions with CH3D and CD4. A two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model was used to examine the implications of the

  19. AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration for low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration technology for low temperature applications that is a novel cooling method to expand the temperature span of magnetic refrigerator. The key component of the AMR system is a porous magnetic regenerator which allows a heat transfer medium (typically helium gas) to flow through it and therefore obviate intermittently operating an external heat switch. The AMR system alternatingly heats and cools the heat transfer medium by convection when the magneto-caloric effect is created under varying magnetic field. AMR may extend the temperature span for wider range than ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) at higher temperatures above 10 K because magneto-caloric effects are typically concentrated in a small temperature range in usual magnetic refrigerants. The regenerative concept theoretically enables each magnetic refrigerant to experience a pseudo-Carnot magnetic refrigeration cycle in a wide temperature span if it is properly designed, although adequate thermodynamic matching of strongly temperature-dependent MCE (magneto-caloric effect) of the regenerator material and the heat capacity of fluid flow is often tricky due to inherent characteristics of magnetic materials. This paper covers historical developments, fundamental concepts, key components, applications, and recent research trends of AMR refrigerators for liquid helium or liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  20. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Weik, Martin Colletier, Jacques-Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography.

  1. Temperature and frequency dependence of ultrasonic attenuation in selected tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Croissette, D. H. L.; Heyser, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation over the frequency range of 1.5-10 MHz has been measured as a function of temperature for porcine liver, backfat, kidney and spleen as well as for a single specimen of human liver. The attenuation in these excised specimens increases nearly linearly with frequency. Over the temperature range of approximately 4-37 C the attenuation decreases with increasing temperature for most soft tissue studied.

  2. Features of the temperature dependence of pressure of solid helium at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisunov, A. A.; Maidanov, V. A.; Rubanskii, V. Y.; Rubets, S. P.; Rudavskii, E. Y.; Rybalko, A. S.; Syrkin, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to investigate the conditions of formation of a disordered (glass-like) state in crystals of 3He. With the help of precise measurements of pressure at constant volume it has been established that a glass phase is formed easily in rapidly cooled crystals grown under homogeneous temperature conditions in the presence of large numbers of nucleation centers. This phase can be removed only by careful annealing. This result has been found in both 3He and 4He, and is independent of type of quantum statistics and determined mainly by crystal growth conditions. An analysis of similar measurements has been performed using a different cell where during the crystal growth a directed temperature gradient was created. In this case, additional defects created as a result of deformation of the crystal were necessary to form a glass-like phase. The degree of deformation of a crystal, achievable in the experiment, was sufficient to form a glass-like phase in solid 4He, but not in a crystal of 3He where the atoms have a large amplitude of zero-point oscillations. Analyzing a temperature dependence of pressure, a study of the features of a phonon contribution to the pressure was also carried out. It was found that in both crystals 3He and 4He at different thicknesses of samples the phonon pressure differs by several times. This effect is qualitatively explained by that that in thin samples an interaction among layers of atoms becomes stronger. This leads to decreasing the phonon contribution to the thermodynamic properties of the helium crystal at low temperatures.

  3. Temperature dependent x-ray diffraction and dielectric studies of multiferroic GaFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mall, Ashish Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Polycrystalline GaFeO3 (GFO) samples were synthesized by sol-gel method. The structural and dielectric properties of GaFeO3 ceramic have been investigated by a combination of XRD and permittivity measurement. The X-ray diffraction spectra shows single phase orthorhombically distorted perovskite structure with Pc21n symmetry over a wide range of temperature 300K to 600K, with no evidence of any phase transition. Refined lattice parameters (a, b, c and V) increases with increasing temperature. Temperature dependent dielectric properties were investigated in the frequency range from 100Hz-5MHz. Impedance spectroscopy study on the sample showed that the dielectric constant and ac conductivity with frequency increases on increasing the temperature. Cole-Cole plots suggest that the response from grain is dominant at low temperature whereas grain boundary response overcomes as temperature increases. The relaxation activation energy (calculated from Cole-Cole plots) value is found to be 0.32 eV for the grain boundary. We believe that the oxygen ion vacancies play an important role in conduction processes at higher temperatures.

  4. Temperature-dependent fecundity associates with latitude in Caenorhabditis briggsae.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Anisha; Croydon-Sugarman, Melanie J F; Murray, Rosalind L; Cutter, Asher D

    2011-01-01

    Populations of organisms separated by latitude provide striking examples of local adaptation, by virtue of ecological gradients that correlate with latitudinal position on the globe. Ambient temperature forms one key ecological variable that varies with latitude, and here we investigate its effects on the fecundity of self-fertilizing nematodes of the species Caenorhabditis briggsae that exhibits strong genetically based differentiation in association with latitude. We find that isogenic strains from a Tropical phylogeographic clade have greater lifetime fecundity when reared at extreme high temperatures and lower lifetime fecundity at extreme low temperatures than do strains from a Temperate phylogeographic clade, consistent with adaptation to local temperature regimes. Further, we determine experimentally that the mechanism underlying reduced fecundity at extreme temperatures differs for low versus high temperature extremes, but that the total number of sperm produced by the gonad is unaffected by rearing temperature. Low rearing temperatures result in facultatively reduced oocyte production by hermaphrodites, whereas extreme high temperatures experienced during development induce permanent defects in sperm fertility. Available and emerging genetic tools for this organism will permit the characterization of the evolutionary genetic basis to this putative example of adaptation in latitudinally separated populations. PMID:20731713

  5. Temperature dependence of the electrode kinetics of oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface - A microelectrode investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramanian; Appleby, A. J.; Martin, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of the temperature dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics at the Pt/Nafion interface are presented. This study was carried out in the temperature range of 30-80 C and at 5 atm of oxygen pressure. The results showed a linear increase of the Tafel slope with temperature in the low current density region, but the Tafel slope was found to be independent of temperature in the high current density region. The values of the activation energy for oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface are nearly the same as those obtained at the platinum/trifluoromethane sulfonic acid interface but less than values obtained at the Pt/H3PO4 and Pt/HClO4 interfaces. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in Nafion increases with temperature while its solubility decreases with temperature. These temperatures also depend on the water content of the membrane.

  6. Force-velocity properties of human skeletal muscle fibres: myosin heavy chain isoform and temperature dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Bottinelli, R; Canepari, M; Pellegrino, M A; Reggiani, C

    1996-01-01

    1. A large population (n = 151) of human skinned skeletal muscle fibres has been studied. Force-velocity curves of sixty-seven fibres were obtained by load-clamp manoeuvres at 12 degrees C. In each fibre maximum shortening velocity (Vmax), maximum power output (Wmax), optimal velocity (velocity at which Wmax is developed, Vopt), optimal force (force at which Wmax is developed, Popt), specific tension (Po/CSA, isometric tension/cross-sectional area) were assessed. Unloaded shortening velocity (Vo) was also determined at 12 degrees C in a different group (n = 57) of fibres by slack-test procedure. 2. All fibres used for mechanical experiments were characterized on the basis of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and divided into five types: type I (or slow), types IIA and IIB (or fast), and types I-IIA and IIA-IIB (or mixed types). 3. Vmax, Wmax, Vopt, Popt, Vopt/Vmax ratio, Po/CSA and Vo were found to depend on MHC isoform composition. All parameters were significantly lower in type I than in the fast (type IIA and IIB) fibres. Among fast fibres, Vmax, Wmax, Vopt and Vo were significantly lower in type IIA and than in IIB fibres, whereas Popt, Po/CSA and Vopt/Vmax were similar. 4. The temperature dependence of Vo and Po/CSA was assessed in a group of twenty-one fibres in the range 12-22 degrees C. In a set of six fibres temperature dependence of Vmax was also studied. The Q10 (5.88) and activation energy E (125 kJ mol-1) values for maximum shortening velocity calculated from Arrhenius plots pointed to a very high temperature sensitivity. Po/CSA was very temperature dependent in the 12-17 degrees C range, but less dependent between 17 and 22 degrees C. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8887767

  7. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Weik, Martin; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography. PMID:20382997

  8. Temperature-dependence of wetting properties of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Gholamian Moghaddam, Melika

    2016-07-01

    We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations to study the spontaneous imbibition of water into a single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) at various temperatures, ranging from 270 K to 370 K. The simulations indicate that by increasing the temperature, the rate of mass uptake improves as well. Considering the end-loss friction as the main source of energy dissipation and ignoring the inertial effect on the nano-scale transport, we derive a simple expression that relates the CNT's wettability to the fluid viscosity and the rate of imbibition over the temperature range that we study. Our results also indicate that the increase in the wettability of the CNT, and the reduction in the viscosity of water at higher temperatures cause enhancement of water uptake into the nanotube. They also enable us to estimate the wetting transition temperature for TIP3P model of water in the CNTs.

  9. Geomagnetic activity: Dependence on solar wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    1977-01-01

    Current ideas about the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. The solar wind dynamic pressure as well as the influx of interplanetary magnetic field lines are both important for the generation of geomagnetic activity. The influence of the geometry of the situation as well as the variability of the interplanetary magnetic field are both found to be important factors. Semi-annual and universal time variations are discussed as well as the 22-year cycle in geomagnetic activity. All three are found to be explainable by the varying geometry of the interaction. Long term changes in geomagnetic activity are examined.

  10. Dependence of effective desorption kinetic parameters on surface coverage and adsorption temperature: CO on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingcai; Yates, John T., Jr.

    1989-06-01

    The effective desorption kinetic parameters of CO on the Pd(111) surface have been studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy. The zero coverage effective desorption activation energy and the preexponential factor were found to be 35.5 kcal/mol and 1013.5 s-1, respectively. As a function of CO coverage, a four-stage correlation between Ed(θ) and the development of stable low-energy electron desorption (LEED) structures was observed for the first time at Tads= 200 K. Ed and ν1 showed a strong compensation effect with Tc=519 K. The adsorption temperature dependence of Ed from Tads=87 to 200 K was observed and interpreted qualitatively by a model involving the production of different domain structures at various adsorption temperatures and the preservation of domain structures at higher coverages during temperature programmed desorption.

  11. Temperature-Dependent Exciton Hopping in an Array of Inhomogeneously Broadened Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Jun; Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2012-07-01

    The dynamics of exciton hopping in an array of inhomogeneously broadened CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) ensembles is examined by measuring time- and spectrally resolved fluorescence intensities. We have found a decrease in the fluorescence decay time as well as a dynamic redshift of the fluorescence spectrum originating from exciton transfer. Both show the characteristic temperature dependence reflecting the peculiar exciton dynamics in the QD ensemble. We propose a model of coupled QD arrays where inhomogeneous distribution and dark QDs that are related to a long-lasting off-state of blinking QDs are taken into account. Experimental results together with numerical calculations based on this model suggest that at low temperatures, an exciton transfers to a local low-energy site and tends to be trapped, whereas at high temperatures, thermally activated hopping of the exciton occurs repeatedly. Furthermore, we show that the decay time decrease of the QD array is attributable to exciton hopping to dark QDs.

  12. Temperature dependent measurement of absorption and emission cross sections for various Yb3+ doped laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körner, J.; Hein, J.; Kahle, M.; Liebetrau, H.; Lenski, M.; Kaluza, M.; Loeser, M.; Siebold, M.

    2011-06-01

    For laser performance simulations, optical properties of applied active materials have to be exactly known. Here we report on temperature dependent emission and absorption cross section measurements for Yb:YAG, Yb:CaF2 and Yb:FP15-glass. The temperature of the samples was aligned in steps of 20 K between 100 K and room temperature with a liquid nitrogen driven cryostat. Absorption spectra were obtained with a fiber coupled white light source and fluorescence spectra by excitation with a fiber coupled 10W laser diode at 970 nm. All spectral measurements were performed with a scanning spectrum analyzer, providing a spectral resolution down to 0.05 nm. By applying the McCumber relation in combination with the Fuchtbauer-Ladenburg method, we were able to obtain a valid emission cross section over the whole range of interest from the measured data.

  13. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  14. Temperature dependence of bistability in squid giant axons with alkaline intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Clay, J R; Shrier, A

    2002-06-01

    Raising the intracellular pH (pHi) above 7.7 in intracellularly perfused squid giant axons causes spontaneous firing of action potentials. The firing frequency ranged from 20 Hz at 0 degrees C to 200 Hz at 23 degrees C. Above 23 degrees C, the axons were quiescent. They were bistable for 13 temperature on the underlying ionic currents were on gating of the delayed rectifier potassium channel IK, and the sodium ion channel INa. The kinetics of IK had a Q10 of 3.63. The effect of T on INa was more complicated in that the peak INa amplitude increased with T, as demonstrated in earlier reports. This effect, as well as the changes in INa kinetics produced by changes in T, were mimicked in the context of a model of INa gating in which activation and inactivations are coupled. Electrical activity was simulated in a model of the action potential with appropriate temperature-dependent modifications for INa and IK. The model predicts a change from monostability (spontaneous firing) at relatively low temperatures to bistability (quiescence and spontaneous firing) as the temperature is raised, followed by change back to monostability (quiescence) as the temperature is further increased, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  15. Temperature Regulator for Actively Cooled Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max (Inventor); Kelly, H. Neale (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In active cooling of a structure it is beneficial to use a plurality of passages for conducting coolant to various portions of the structure. Since most structures do not undergo isotropic thermal loads it is desirable to allow for variation in coolant flow to each area of the structure. The present invention allows for variable flow by a variation of the area of a portion of each of the coolant passages. Shape memory alloys and bi-material springs are used to produce passages that change flow area as a function of temperature.

  16. [Temperature dependence of courtship in male guppies, Poecilia reticulata Peters (Pisces, Cyprinidae)].

    PubMed

    Laudien, H; Fechner, W; Schumann, W

    1980-01-01

    In poikilothermal animals, modes of behaviour as well as other physiological functions are dependent on the environmental temperature. Individual adaptation can decrease or cancel out this dependency. In experiments involving abrupt and slow temperature changes, we were able to prove temperature compensations and stress effects in the courting behaviour of the male Poecilia reticulata.

  17. Active temperature and velocity correlations produced by a swimmer suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2013-05-01

    The agitation produced in a fluid by a suspension of microswimmers in the low Reynolds number limit is studied. In this limit, swimmers are modeled as force dipoles all with equal strength. The agitation is characterized by the active temperature defined, as in kinetic theory, as the mean square velocity, and by the equal-time spatial correlations. Considering the phase in which the swimmers are homogeneously and isotropically distributed in the fluid, it is shown that the active temperature and velocity correlations depend on a single scalar correlation function of the dipole-dipole correlation function. By making a simple medium-range order model, in which the dipole-dipole correlation function is characterized by a single correlation length k0-1 it is possible to make quantitative predictions. It is found that the active temperature depends on the system size, scaling as L4-d at large correlation lengths L≪k0-1, while in the opposite limit it saturates in three dimensions and diverges logarithmically with the system size in two dimensions. In three dimensions the velocity correlations decay as 1/r for small correlation lengths, while at large correlation lengths the transverse correlation function becomes negative at maximum separation r˜L/2, an effect that disappears as the system increases in size.

  18. Temperature dependent surface electrochemistry on Pt singlecrystals in alkaline electrolyte: Part 3: The oxygen reductionreaction

    SciTech Connect

    tom.schmidt@psi.ch

    2002-08-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was studied in alkaline electrolyte at 293-333K on Pt(hkl) surfaces by means of the rotating ring-disk electrode technique with solution phase peroxide detected at the ring electrode. The ORR on Pt(hkl) was found to be highly structure sensitive with activities increasing in the sequence (111) > (100) > (110)(1x2). Very similar apparent activation energies (37-45 {+-} 5 kJmol-1, {eta} = 0.35 V) were found on all three surfaces. Furthermore, at elevated temperature, significantly smaller amounts of peroxide are formed in agreement with enhanced peroxide reduction rates by increasing temperature. We found that the Tafel slopes on all three single crystal surfaces decrease with increasing temperature, indicating that the logi-E relationship is not represented by a classical Butler-Volmer expression. Based on the kinetic analysis of the polarization curves and from simulations of logi-E curves, we propose that the rate of the ORR on Pt(hkl) in alkaline solution is mainly determined by the potential/temperature dependent surface coverage by OH{sub ad}. We propose two modes of action of the OH{sub ad}: (i) OH{sub ad} blocks the adsorption of O{sub 2} on active platinum sites; and (ii) OH{sub ad} alters the adsorption energy of intermediates which are formed during the ORR on Pt sites.

  19. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G

    2015-10-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6ºC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μ at the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) and generally covaried with μ but, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μ and K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. PMID:26362925

  20. Size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Ye; Huang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-21

    Nanomaterials possess a high surface/volume ratio and surfaces play an essential role in size-dependent material properties. In the present study, nanometer-thick thin films were taken as an ideal system to investigate the surface-induced size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. The surface eigenstress model was further developed with the consideration of thermal expansion, leading to analytic formulas of size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus, and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on face-centered cubic (fcc) Ag, Cu, and Ni(001) thin films were conducted at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 600 K. The MD simulation results are perfectly consistent with the theoretical predictions, thereby verifying the theoretical approach. The newly developed surface eigenstress model will be able to attack similar problems in other types of nanomaterials. PMID:27426852

  1. Temperature dependence of structural quantum effects in liquid methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomberli, B.; Benmore, C. J.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Neuefeind, J.; Honkimäki, V.

    2001-08-01

    High-energy electromagnetic radiation scattering techniques have been used to measure the structural differences between liquids composed of four different isotopes of methanol (CH3OH,CD3OD,CH3OD and CD3OH) at temperatures of 24.5 °C and - 80 °C. We measured the magnitude of the isotopic effect, which increases with decreasing temperature and comprises of both intramolecular and intermolecular effects. Intramolecularly, the C-O, O-H, and to a lesser extent the C-H bond lengths, shorten upon deuteration. Intermolecularly, the winding hydrogen bonded chain structure is affected significantly. The results show that hydrogenated simple alcohols are more disordered liquids than deuterated alcohols at the same temperature. Substitution at the methyl site is compared to substitution at the hydroxyl site and the effect is shown to increase more rapidly as temperature is decreased.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Isotope Ratios in Tree Rings

    PubMed Central

    Libby, L. M.; Pandolfi, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stable isotope ratios of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen have been measured for a German oak in wood samples of roughly three years each, for the years 1712-1954 A.D., and correlated with the existing weather records from England, Basel, and Geneva to evaluate the empirical temperature coefficients. Isotope ratios in a second official oak, measured for the years 1530-1800 A.D., show the cold temperatures of the Little Ice Age interspersed with warm intervals. PMID:16592163

  3. Temperature-dependent sorption of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene to low organic carbon aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatt, J.J.; Backhus, D.A.; Capel, P.D.; Eisenreich, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    Sorption experiments were conducted with naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene on low organic carbon sediments at 4 and 26 ??C using batch and column techniques. Experimental controls ensured the absence of biologic and photolytic activity and colloid-free solution supernatants. Equilibrium distribution coefficients (K(d)) increased 1.1-1.6 times with a decrease in temperature of 22 ??C. Fraction instantaneous sorption (F) values did not change significantly with a decrease in temperature of 22 ??C. Desorption rate constants (k2) decreased 1.2-2.6 times with a decrease in temperature of 22 ??C. Times to equilibrium were at least 40 h. The magnitude of observed K(d) and k2 values and the effect of temperature on K(d) (e.g., low enthalpy of sorption) are consistent with sorbate partitioning between the aqueous phase and small amounts of organic matter (f(oc) = 0.02%) on the sediments. The temperature dependence of K(d) and k2 may be small as compared to the effects of heterogeneities in field-scale aquifer systems. Thus, thermal gradients may not be of major importance in most saturated subsurface regimes when predicting solute transport. However, aquifer remediation pump-and- treat times could be decreased because increased temperature decreases both retardation and tailing.

  4. Dependence of Precipitation Extremes on Temperature over United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, V.; Singh, J.; Karmakar, S.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrologic disturbances are commonly associated with the phenomenal occurrence of extreme events. The human kind has always been facing problem with hydrologic extremes in terms of deaths and economic loss. Hence, a complete analysis of observed extreme events will have a substantial role in planning, designing and management of the water resource systems. Over the United States, precipitation extremes, temperature and streamflow, have increased during the twentieth century and has been attributed to many natural and anthropogenic influences. The present study examines the association of precipitation extremes on temperature over US for the period of 1950-2000. The annual maxima (AM) precipitation has been extracted for hot and cold years. The spatial mean of surface temperature/ sea surface temperature from 1950 to 2000, so obtained is arranged in ascending order. The corresponding years, with lowest temperature of 25 years are defined as cold years and highest temperature of 25 years are defined as hot years respectively. The spatio-temporal variability of 50 year return level (RL) for the AM is determined considering generalized extreme value (GEV) and non-parametric kernel distributions. To identify the significant changes in the derived RL from cold to hot years, a bootstrap-based approach is implemented. The results exhibited no significant changes in the 50 year RL of AM precipitation between hot and cold years, with 70% of total grids showing no significant changes with respect to both land surface and sea surface temperature at 20% significance level. The scatter plot between the spatial mean of AM precipitation and both land surface and sea surface temperature over US showed no association. Further the comparison with the CMIP5 models revealed that the models are showed significant association between both land surface and sea surface temperature with the AM of precipitation. The major decision making and planning rely on the model predictions, which

  5. Time Dependence of the freezing temperature for thin film spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, Raymond

    There have been many measurements of the dependence of the ``freezing temperature'', Tf, on the thickness o of thin film spin glasses. Tf decreases with decreasing o, but never vanishes. This contribution suggests that the dependence of Tf on o is a time dependent relationship. Because the lower critical dimension of a spin glass, dl ~ 2 . 5 , when the spin glass correlation length ξ (t , T) grows to o, the spin glass dimensionality crosses over from d = 3 to d = 2 . What remains are spin glass correlations for length scales <= o . The time dependence of the magnetization dynamics are then activated, with activation energy equal to a largest barrier Δmax (o) , and an associated activation time τ. For measurements at time scales such that ξ (t , T) < o , the effective dimension d = 3 , and the characteristic cusp and knee of a spin glass is observed. For experimental time scales greater than τ, with ξ (t , T) ~ o , the zero-field cooled magnetization has grown to the field-cooled value of the magnetization, leading to the identification of Tf. Quantitative agreement with experiment is exhibited. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering under Award DE-SC0013599.

  6. Temperature-dependent optical properties of Cd(1-x),Zn(x),Te substitute material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Russell, Anne Marie; Hill, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we report cryogenic optical properties of Cd(l-x), Zn(x), Te wafers that are used as substrate seed layers in the manufacturing of HgCdTe focal-plane array detectors. These studies are motivated by the fact that the substrate optical properties influence the overall detector performance. The studies consist of measuring the substrate frequency dependent transmittance T(W) and reflectance R(W) above and below the optical band-gap in the UV/Visible and infrared frequency ranges, and with temperature variation of the sample from 5 to 300 K. Determination of the optical absorption from these measurements show that the optical absorption energy gap near 1.6 eV shows a substantial increase as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 5 K. Furthermore, we observe the presence of infrared-active optical phonons whose peak frequency shifts as the temperature of the sample is varied over the measured temperature range. The theoretical frequency dependent optical conductivity, with allowance for redistribution of spectral weight among the interband transition charge carriers, will be discussed.

  7. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  8. Temperature dependent electrical transport characteristics of BaTiO{sub 3} modified lithium borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Vanita; Singh, Anupinder; Singh, Lakhwant; Awasthi, A. M.

    2015-08-15

    The glass samples with composition (70B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-29Li{sub 2}O-1Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3})-xBT; x = 0, 10 and 20 weight percent, have been prepared by conventional melt quench technique. The dielectric measurements as a function of temperature have been carried out on these samples in the frequency range 1 Hz-10 MHz. The dielectric relaxation characteristics of these samples have been studied by analyzing dielectric spectroscopy, dielectric loss, electric modulus formulation and electrical conductivity spectroscopy. It is found that the dielectric permittivity of the samples increases with an increase in the temperature and BT content. The frequency dependent ac conductivity has been analyzed using Jonscher’s universal power law whereas non exponential KWW function has been invoked to fit the experimental data of the imaginary part of the electric modulus. The values of the activation energy determined from the electric modulus and that from dc conductivity have been found to be quite close to each other suggesting that the same type of charge barriers are involved in the relaxation and the conduction mechanisms. The stretched exponent (β) and the power exponent (n) have been found to be temperature and composition dependent. The decrease in n with an increase in temperature further suggested that the ac conduction mechanism of the studied samples follows the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Regulation of Vocal Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W.

    2008-01-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms. PMID:18829853

  10. Temperature-dependent regulation of vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W

    2008-12-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms. PMID:18829853

  11. A protein thermometer controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Heather D; Higgins, Darren E

    2011-08-01

    Facultative bacterial pathogens must adapt to multiple stimuli to persist in the environment or establish infection within a host. Temperature is often utilized as a signal to control expression of virulence genes necessary for infection or genes required for persistence in the environment. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to adapt and respond to temperature fluctuations. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne, facultative intracellular pathogen that uses flagellar motility to survive in the extracellular environment and to enhance initial invasion of host cells during infection. Upon entering the host, Lm represses transcription of flagellar motility genes in response to mammalian physiological temperature (37°C) with a concomitant temperature-dependent up-regulation of virulence genes. We previously determined that down-regulation of flagellar motility is required for virulence and is governed by the reciprocal activities of the MogR transcriptional repressor and the bifunctional flagellar anti-repressor/glycosyltransferase, GmaR. In this study, we determined that GmaR is also a protein thermometer that controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes. Two-hybrid and gel mobility shift analyses indicated that the interaction between MogR and GmaR is temperature sensitive. Using circular dichroism and limited proteolysis, we determined that GmaR undergoes a temperature-dependent conformational change as temperature is elevated. Quantitative analysis of GmaR in Lm revealed that GmaR is degraded in the absence of MogR and at 37°C (when the MogR:GmaR complex is less stable). Since MogR represses transcription of all flagellar motility genes, including transcription of gmaR, changes in the stability of the MogR:GmaR anti-repression complex, due to conformational changes in GmaR, mediates repression or de-repression of flagellar motility genes in Lm. Thus, GmaR functions as a thermo

  12. Temperature dependence of Schottky diode characteristics prepared with photolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korucu, Demet; Turut, Abdulmecit

    2014-11-01

    A Richardson constant (RC) of 8.92 Acm-2K-2 from the conventional Richardson plot has been obtained because the current-voltage data of the device quite well obey the thermionic emission (TE) model in 190-320 K range. The experimental nT versus T plot of the device has given a value of T0 = 7.40 K in temperature range of 160-320 K. The deviations from the TE current mechanism at temperatures below 190 K have been ascribed to the patches introduced by lateral inhomogeneity of the barrier heights. Therefore, an experimental RC value of 7.49 A(cmK)-2 has been obtained by considering Tung's patch model in the temperature range of 80-190 K. This value is in very close agreement with the known value of 8.16 Acm-2K-2 for n-type GaAs.

  13. Parallel temperature-dependent microrheological measurements in a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Lilian Lam; Galush, William J; Furst, Eric M

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic stickers are used as a sample environment to measure the microrheology of monoclonal antibody (mAb) protein solutions. A Peltier-based microscope stage is implemented and validated, and is capable of controlling the sample temperature over the range 0.9-40 °C. The design accounts for heat transfer to and from the objective, controls the sample environment humidity to mitigate condensation, and provides adequate damping to reduce vibration from the cooling system. A concentrated sucrose solution is used as a standard sample to provide an in situ temperature measurement by the Stokes-Einstein-Sutherland relation. By combining microfluidic stickers and microrheology, 72 temperature-concentration viscosity measurements of mAb solutions can be made in 1 day, a significant increase in throughput over conventional rheometry. PMID:27375825

  14. TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

    2012-03-01

    The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

  15. Temperature dependence of impact ionization coefficients in InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kenko; Torikai, Toshitaka; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Makita, Kikuo; Ishihara, Hisahiro

    1986-01-01

    Impact ionization coefficients for electrons and holes in InP were measured experimentally at 25-175 °C in the 400-600 kV/cm electric field range with planar avalanche photodiodes, in which the n-InP avalanche region was separated from the light absorbing InGaAs and/or InGaAsP layers. α and β monotonically decreased with elevated temperatures; β/α slightly decreased with increasing temperature. Comparison of the experimental results with Okuto-Crowell formula on the impact ionization coefficient gave the phonon energy ERO=46 meV and the phonon scattering mean free path λ0=41.7 Å for electron impact ionization and ERO=36 meV and λ0=41.3 Å for hole impact ionization, respectively. Curves calculated by using these parameters agree with the experimental results quite satisfactorily at each temperature.

  16. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Brown, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of “reactant” concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q10 values of ≈7–50, compared with typical Q10 values of 1.5–3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly. PMID:18156366

  17. Achieving a Strongly Temperature-Dependent Casimir Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Woolf, David; Capasso, Federico; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-06

    We propose a method of achieving large temperature T sensitivity in the Casimir force that involves measuring the stable separation between dielectric objects immersed in a fluid. We study the Casimir force between slabs and spheres using realistic material models, and find large >2 nm/K variations in their stable separations (hundreds of nanometers) near room temperature. In addition, we analyze the effects of Brownian motion on suspended objects, and show that the average separation is also sensitive to changes in T. Finally, this approach also leads to rich qualitative phenomena, such as irreversible transitions, from suspension to stiction, as T is varied.

  18. Measurement of temperature-dependent specific heat of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Schutt, David J; dos Santos, Icaro; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2005-02-01

    We measured specific heat directly by heating a sample uniformly between two electrodes by an electric generator. We minimized heat loss by styrofoam insulation. We measured temperature from multiple thermocouples at temperatures from 25 degrees C to 80 degrees C while heating the sample, and corrected for heat loss. We confirm method accuracy with a 2.5% agar-0.4% saline physical model and obtain specific heat of 4121+/-89 J (kg K)(-1), with an average error of 3.1%.

  19. A thermally stable, durable and temperature-dependent oleophobic surface of a polymethylsilsesquioxane film.

    PubMed

    Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Cheng, Dalton F; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2013-04-25

    Polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ) films prepared by a simple sol-gel reaction of methyltriethoxysilane were found to possess thermally stable, durable, and temperature-dependent oleophobic properties under high temperature (~350 °C) conditions. PMID:23493793

  20. A thermally stable, durable and temperature-dependent oleophobic surface of a polymethylsilsesquioxane film.

    PubMed

    Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Cheng, Dalton F; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2013-04-25

    Polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ) films prepared by a simple sol-gel reaction of methyltriethoxysilane were found to possess thermally stable, durable, and temperature-dependent oleophobic properties under high temperature (~350 °C) conditions.

  1. Temperature-dependent indentation behavior of transformation-toughened zirconia-based ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikare, Veena; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    Indentation behavior of Ce-TZP, Y-TZP, and Mg-PSZ between room temperature and 1300 C was investigated. Hardness decreased with increasing temperature for all three materials, but indentation cracking increased with increasing temperature. The opposing temperature dependences are discussed in terms of dislocation and transformation plasticity.

  2. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  3. Temperature Dependences on Various Types of Photovoltaic (PV) Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audwinto, I. A.; Leong, C. S.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, S. H.

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is one of the key roles in PV technology performance, since with the increases of temperature the open-circuit voltage will drop accordingly so do the electrical efficiency and power output generation. Different types of Photovoltaic (PV) panels- silicon solar panels and thin film solar panels; mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline, CIS, CIGS, CdTe, back-contact, and bi-facial solar panel under 40°C to 70°C approximately with 5°C interval have been comparatively analyzed their actual performances with uniformly distribution of light illumination from tungsten halogen light source, ±500W/m2. DC-Electronic Load and Data Logger devices with “Lab View” data program interface were used to collect all the necessary parameters in this study. Time needed to achieve a certain degree of temperature was recorded. Generally, each of the panels needed 15 minutes to 20 minutes to reach 70°C. Halogen based light source is not compatible in short wave-length in response to thin-film solar cell. Within this period of times, all the panels are facing a performance loss up to 15%. Other parameters; Pmax, Vmax, Imax, Voc, Isc, Rserries, Rshunt, Fillfactor were collected as study cases. Our study is important in determining Photovoltaic type selection and system design as for study or industrial needed under different temperature condition.

  4. Le Chatelier's Principle Applied to the Temperature Dependence of Solubility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1984-01-01

    One effect of temperature is its influence on solubility, and that effect is used as a common example when teaching Le Chatelier's principle. Attempts to clarify the question of whether the principle holds in the case of the solubility of ionic compounds in water by investigating the literature data in detail. (JN)

  5. Temperature-dependent bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Muijs, Barry; Jonker, Michiel T O

    2009-06-15

    Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) play a key role in risk assessment of chemicals in sediments and soils. For hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), BAFs are, however, difficult to determine and values are mostly obtained by modeling. Apart from a lack of reliable data, the applicability of lab-derived values in the field situation is unknown, as exposure conditions (e.g., temperature, pH, salinity, test species, number of chemicals) are standardized in the lab, whereas they may vary in the field. In this study, the effect of temperature on the bioaccumulation of a series of moderate to very hydrophobic PAHs in aquatic worms was studied by using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. The results indicated that bioaccumulation of nonmetabolizable HOCs is an exothermic, enthalpy-driven process, thus decreasing with increasing temperature. As such, biotic concentrations may be several times higher in winter than in summertime, which could have ecotoxicological consequences. A two-parameter linear free energy relationship was derived with which PAH bioaccumulation can be predicted from temperature and the chemicals' hydrophobicities. Comparing the determined (thermodynamics of) PAH partitioning into organisms and PDMS indicated that the latter phase cannot be used as a surrogate phase for animal lipids. Still, SPME provides an appropriate analytical tool for the measurement of aqueous concentrations, from which bioaccumulation can subsequently be estimated by using BAFs. PMID:19603671

  6. Temperature-dependent bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Muijs, Barry; Jonker, Michiel T O

    2009-06-15

    Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) play a key role in risk assessment of chemicals in sediments and soils. For hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), BAFs are, however, difficult to determine and values are mostly obtained by modeling. Apart from a lack of reliable data, the applicability of lab-derived values in the field situation is unknown, as exposure conditions (e.g., temperature, pH, salinity, test species, number of chemicals) are standardized in the lab, whereas they may vary in the field. In this study, the effect of temperature on the bioaccumulation of a series of moderate to very hydrophobic PAHs in aquatic worms was studied by using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. The results indicated that bioaccumulation of nonmetabolizable HOCs is an exothermic, enthalpy-driven process, thus decreasing with increasing temperature. As such, biotic concentrations may be several times higher in winter than in summertime, which could have ecotoxicological consequences. A two-parameter linear free energy relationship was derived with which PAH bioaccumulation can be predicted from temperature and the chemicals' hydrophobicities. Comparing the determined (thermodynamics of) PAH partitioning into organisms and PDMS indicated that the latter phase cannot be used as a surrogate phase for animal lipids. Still, SPME provides an appropriate analytical tool for the measurement of aqueous concentrations, from which bioaccumulation can subsequently be estimated by using BAFs.

  7. Temperature Dependence in Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, T. F.; Misewich, J. A.

    1996-03-01

    The process of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) is a subject of great theoretical and experimental interest. We have extended the classic MGR model for DIET to include initial thermal excitation of the adsorbate. In the MGR model, an electronic transition causes the adsorbate to move on excited potential energy surface. Desorption ensues whenever the adsorbate stays in the excited state long enough to acquire the necessary energy to escape from the surface. At finite temperatures, the initial transition occurs from a distribution of ground-state vibrational energies and momenta. Compared with the zero temperature desorption yield some components of the finite-temperature distribution will have enhanced yields while others will have suppressed yields. Averaging over the initial distribution, we find that the desorption yield increases substantially with temperature, particularly for short excited-state lifetimes. These findings and their extension to the multiple excitation regime are relevant to understanding the long-time scale response observed in femtosecond two-pulse correlation measurements of O_2/Pd(111). J. A. Misewich et al., J. Chem. Phys. 100, 736 (1994)

  8. Finite-element technique applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre-Ramirez, G.; Oden, J. T.

    1969-01-01

    Finite element method applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, using nonlinear constitutive equation for heat ABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGH

  9. Lava flow dynamics driven by temperature-dependent viscosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniega, S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Anderson, S. W.; Stofan, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    As lava viscosity can change 1-2 orders of magnitude due to small changes in temperature, several studies have predicted the formation of low-viscosity/high-temperature "fingers" (similar to a Saffman-Taylor type instability) within an initially near-uniform flow. We examine the onset and evolution of such fingers within a uniform lava sheet flow due to an influx of lava with slightly-variable temperature. We assume Hele-shaw-type geometry (depth << other dimensions), Newtonian and laminar fluid flow, a simple Nahme's exponential law relating temperature and viscosity, and radiative heat-loss through the flow's upper surface. Through the use of numerical simulation and steady-state analysis of model equations, we identify solutions that provide pahoehoe lava flows with a natural mechanism for the formation of lava channels/tubes within a sheet flow. Preliminary results indicate that flow-focusing occurs rapidly due to the thermo-viscosity relation, but zones of hotter flow commonly settle into a new steady-state and it is difficult to create perpetually-lengthening hot-fingers of lava (which seem more physically similar to developing lava tubes). This suggests that additional and/or discontinuous physical processes (such as decreasing radiative rates due to thickening of the surface crust or crystallization abruptly retarding flow within lower-temperature regions) may play important roles in the continued growth of preferred flow zones. We also derive qualitative and quantitative estimates of environmental controls on finger size, spacing, and location. This work has application to Earth and planetary volcanology studies as pahoehoe flows dominate terrestrial basaltic lavas and the eruption/emplacement mechanics that yield long lava flows on the Earth and Mars are not yet well understood.

  10. A method to correct for temperature dependence and measure simultaneously dose and temperature using a plastic scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) work well for radiation dosimetry. However, they show some temperature dependence, and a priori knowledge of the temperature surrounding the PSD is required to correct for this dependence. We present a novel approach to correct PSD response values for temperature changes instantaneously and without the need for prior knowledge of the temperature value. In addition to rendering the detector temperature-independent, this approach allows for actual temperature measurement using solely the PSD apparatus. With a temperature-controlled water tank, the temperature was varied from room temperature to more than 40°C and the PSD was used to measure the dose delivered from a cobalt-60 photon beam unit to within an average of 0.72% from the expected value. The temperature was measured during each acquisition with the PSD and a thermocouple and values were within 1°C of each other. The depth-dose curve of a 6-MV photon beam was also measured under warm non-stable conditions and this curve agreed to within an average of −0.98% from the curve obtained at room temperature. The feasibility of rendering PSDs temperature-independent was demonstrated with our approach, which also enabled simultaneous measurement of both dose and temperature. This novel approach improves both the robustness and versatility of PSDs. PMID:26407188

  11. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Ma, Qingxin

    2008-04-01

    The experimental determination of rate constants for atmospheric reactions and how these rate constants vary with temperature remain a crucially important part of atmosphere science. In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (COS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) has been investigated using a Knudsen cell reactor and a temperature-programmed reaction apparatus. We found that the adsorption and the heterogeneous reaction are sensitive to temperature. The initial uptake coefficients (gammat(Ini)) of COS on MgO decrease from 1.07 +/- 0.71 x 10-6 to 4.84 +/- 0.60 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 228 to 300 K, and the steady state uptake coefficients (gammat(SS)) increase from 5.31 +/- 0.06 x 10-8 to 1.68 +/- 0.41 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 240 to 300 K. The desorption rate constants (kdes) were also found to increase slightly with the enhancement of temperature. The empirical formula between the uptake coefficients, desorption rate constants and temperature described in the form of Arrhenius expression were obtained. The activation energies for the heterogeneous reaction and desorption of COS on MgO were measured to be 11.02 +/- 0.34 kJ.mol-1 and 6.30 +/- 0.81 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The results demonstrate that the initial uptake of COS on MgO is mainly contributed by an adsorption process and the steady state uptake is due to a catalytic reaction. The environmental implication was also discussed.

  12. Ribosome-dependent activation of stringent control.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Fernández, Israel S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-06-01

    In order to survive, bacteria continually sense, and respond to, environmental fluctuations. Stringent control represents a key bacterial stress response to nutrient starvation that leads to rapid and comprehensive reprogramming of metabolic and transcriptional patterns. In general, transcription of genes for growth and proliferation is downregulated, while those important for survival and virulence are upregulated. Amino acid starvation is sensed by depletion of the aminoacylated tRNA pools, and this results in accumulation of ribosomes stalled with non-aminoacylated (uncharged) tRNA in the ribosomal A site. RelA is recruited to stalled ribosomes and activated to synthesize a hyperphosphorylated guanosine analogue, (p)ppGpp, which acts as a pleiotropic secondary messenger. However, structural information about how RelA recognizes stalled ribosomes and discriminates against aminoacylated tRNAs is missing. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of RelA bound to the bacterial ribosome stalled with uncharged tRNA. The structure reveals that RelA utilizes a distinct binding site compared to the translational factors, with a multi-domain architecture that wraps around a highly distorted A-site tRNA. The TGS (ThrRS, GTPase and SpoT) domain of RelA binds the CCA tail to orient the free 3' hydroxyl group of the terminal adenosine towards a β-strand, such that an aminoacylated tRNA at this position would be sterically precluded. The structure supports a model in which association of RelA with the ribosome suppresses auto-inhibition to activate synthesis of (p)ppGpp and initiate the stringent response. Since stringent control is responsible for the survival of pathogenic bacteria under stress conditions, and contributes to chronic infections and antibiotic tolerance, RelA represents a good target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMID:27279228

  13. Temperature dependent carrier mobility in graphene: Effect of Pd nanoparticle functionalization and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bochen; Uddin, Md Ahsan; Singh, Amol; Webb, Richard; Koley, Goutam

    2016-02-01

    The two dimensional nature of graphene, with charge carriers confined within one atomic layer thickness, causes its electrical, optical, and sensing properties to be strongly influenced by the surrounding media and functionalization layers. In this study, the effect of catalytically active Pd nanoparticle (NP) functionalization and subsequent hydrogenation on the hall mobility and carrier density of chemical vapor deposition synthesized graphene has been investigated as a function of temperature. Prior to functionalization, the mobility decreased monotonically as the temperature was reduced from 298 to 10 K, indicating coulomb scattering as the dominant scattering mechanism as expected for bilayer graphene. Similar decreasing trend with temperature was also observed after 2 nm Pd deposition, however, hydrogenation of the Pd NP led to significant enhancement in mobility from ˜2250 to 3840 cm2/V s at room temperature, which further monotonically increased to 5280 cm2/V s at 10 K. We attribute this contrasting trend in temperature dependent mobility to a switch in the dominant scattering mechanism from coulomb to surface optical (SO) phonon scattering due to higher dielectric constant and polar nature of PdHx formed upon hydrogenation of the Pd NPs.

  14. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  15. Temperature dependence of porous silica antireflective (AR) coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongxing; Le, Yueqin; Zhang, Weiqing; Jiang, Minhua; Sun, Jinren; Liu, Xiaolin

    1998-02-01

    In this paper, the antireflective coatings consisting of porous silica particles from a silica sol are applied by dip method. The relationships among composition, viscosity and temperature have been studied. The coating homogeneity is opium for the laser wavelengths of 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm. The peak transmission of coated BK-7 glass substrate is higher than 99.5%. The laser induced damage thresholds of the antireflective coatings were range of 7 - 10 J/cm2, for 1 ns pulse width and 1064 nm wavelength. These damage thresholds were suitable for our national ICF program. It is noted that the optical homogeneity of coating and the viscosity of coating sol were strongly influenced by the temperatures in the duration of sol ripening.

  16. Temperature dependence of nanoscale friction for Fe on YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfeder, Igor; Krim, Jacqueline

    2012-05-01

    A magnetic probe microscopy study of levitation and atomic-scale friction is reported for Fe on YBCO (Tc = 92.5 K) in the temperature range 65-293 K. Below Tc, the friction coefficient is constant and exhibits no correlation with the strength of superconducting levitation forces. Above Tc, the friction coefficient increases progressively, and nearly doubles between Tc and room temperature. The results are discussed within the context of the underlying atomic-scale electronic and phononic mechanisms that give rise to friction, and it is concluded that contact electrification and static electricity may play a significant role in the non-superconducting phase. Given that the properties of YBCO can be finely tuned, the results point the way to a variety of interesting studies of friction and superconductors.

  17. Temperature dependence of the magnetic excitations in Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.; Nicklow, R.M.; Wakabayashi, N.

    1985-08-01

    Magnetic excitation spectra were measured for Gd in the and directions over the temperature range from 9 to 320/sup 0/K (T/sub c/ = 292.7/sup 0/K). Spin-wave-like modes are observed at T greater than or equal to T/sub c/. The critical wavevector for the appearance of these modes is proportional to the inverse correlation length.

  18. Temperature dependent primary irritant dermatitis from lemon perfume.

    PubMed

    Rothenborg, H W; Menné, T; Sjolin, K E

    1977-02-01

    In a recent outbreak of hand eczema amongst cleaning personnel after the introduction of a new, lemon-scented detergent, it was noted that the patients complained of a burning, stinging sensation when their hands were submerged in hot detergent solutions. Since routine patch testing with the Standard Series and perfume components was of no help in pinpointing the responsible agent, testing with selected perfume components was repeated at higher temperatures. Identical tests were placed on both forearms for 20 min, one arm being exposed to 43 degrees C, the other to 23-25 degrees C. Little or no reaction was seen on the "cold" arm, whereas the lemon perfume component Citral proved to be a strong primary irritant at higher temperatures. Histological examination of the test sites showed the reaction to be of a toxic (primary irritant) nature. Surprisingly, the toxic character could still be recongized in biopsies taken as late as 48 h after exposure. It is suggested that: 1. Heat plays an important part in the outbreak of primary irritant (toxic) dermatitis and can be used as an accelerating factor when testing for primary irritants. 2. It is important to be sure that detergents and detergent perfumes do not contain substances which act as irritants at the temperatures at which they are habitually used (45-50 degrees C). 3. We probably ought to use lukewarm rather than hot water for manual dishwashing and cleaning whenever it is possible.

  19. Temperature dependence of histidine ionization constants in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, S; Lecomte, J T

    1997-01-01

    The standard enthalpy of ionization of six titratable histidines in horse metaquomyoglobin was determined by repeating proton NMR titrations as a function of temperature and using the van't Hoff relationship. It was found that deltaH degrees varies between 16 and 37 kJ mol(-1) in the protein, compared with a value of 29 kJ mol(-1) in free histidine. The standard entropy change was evaluated by combining the enthalpy and free energy changes derived from the pKa values. Although the entropy change could not be precisely and accurately obtained by this method, it could be established that it spans a wide range, from -60 to 0 J K(-1) mol(-1), about the value of -23 J K(-1) mol(-1) for the free histidine. The entropy change was used within the framework of enthalpy-entropy compensation to partition the solvation component from the standard thermodynamic quantities for each of the titrating residues. It was shown that the partitioning of the values in the protein is not readily understood in terms of solvent accessibility or electrostatic interactions. The contribution of solvation effects to the temperature response appeared to be significant only in the case of His-119 and His-48. The standard quantities were also used to explore the energetics of proton binding in the native state at temperatures below the onset of thermal denaturation. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:9414235

  20. Efficiency and temperature dependence of water removal by membrane dryers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckrone, K. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The vapor pressure of water in equilibrium with sorption sites within a Nafion membrane is given by log P(WN) = -3580/T + 10.01, where P(WN) is expressed in Torr and T is the membrane temperature, in kelvin. The efficiency of dryers based on selective permeation of water through Nafion can thus be enhanced by cooling the membrane. Residual water in effluents exceeds equilibrium levels if insufficient time is allowed for water to diffuse to the membrane surface as gas passes through the dryer. For tubular configurations, this limitation can be avoided if L > or = Fc(10(3.8)/120 pi D), where L is the length of the tubular membrane, in centimeters, Fc is the gas flow rate, in mL/ min, and D is the diffusion coefficient for water in the carrier gas at the operating temperature of the dryer, in cm2/s. An efficient dryer that at room temperature dries gas to a dew point of -61 degrees C is described; the same dryer maintained at 0 degrees C yields a dew point of -80 degrees C and removes water as effectively as Mg(ClO4)2 or a dry ice/acetone slush. The use of Nafion membranes to construct devices capable of delivering gas streams with low but precisely controlled humidities is discussed.

  1. Temperature Dependence of the Microwave Dielectric Behavior of Selected Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, Jai N.

    1996-01-01

    A very sensitive thermal bath is designed to study the effect of temperature on the microwave dielectric response of a sample of nickel oxide and cobalt oxide. The sample under study is placed in a microwave resonant cavity in the TE(sub 011) mode. The perturbations of the electric field are recorded in terms of the frequency shifts and the width changes of the microwave resonant signal as seen on the oscilloscope. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant are calculated by using the values of the frequency shifts and width changes in the Slater's perturbation equations. The dielectric behavior of nickel oxide and cobalt oxide and also their mixture is studied at a microwave frequency of 9.2 GHz as a function of temperature. A computer program is written to analyze the dielectric constant values at different temperatures. The resonant cavity seems to be very sensitive in studying the dielectric relaxation mechanism in these materials. The dielectric behavior is also analyzed using Debye's equations, and relaxation times for these materials are calculated at microwave frequencies.

  2. A physical explanation of the temperature dependence of physiological processes mediated by cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Stuart

    2013-09-01

    The majority of biological rates are known to exhibit temperature dependence. Here I reveal a direct link between temperature and ecologically relevant rates such as swimming speeds in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes as well as fluid-pumping and filtration rates in many metazoans, and show that this relationship is driven by movement rates of cilia and flagella. I develop models of the temperature dependence of cilial and flagellar movement rates and evaluate these with an extensive compilation of data from the literature. The model captures the temperature dependence of viscosity and provides a mechanistic and biologically interpretable explanation for the temperature dependence of a range of ecologically relevant processes; it also reveals a clear dependence on both reaction rate-like processes and the physics of the environment. The incorporation of viscosity allows further insight into the effects of environmental temperature variation and of processes, such as disease, that affect the viscosity of blood or other body fluids.

  3. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  4. Time and temperature dependences of the magnetization reversal in a Co /Pd multilayer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. Scott; Harrell, J. W.; Matsunuma, S.

    2006-09-01

    The time and temperature dependences of the magnetization reversal have been measured in a high-coercivity Co /Pd multilayer film characterized by nucleation and domain wall motion. The time and field dependences of magnetic relaxation curves at room temperature were interpreted in terms of an energy barrier that depends linearly on reverse field, suggesting a Sharrock-type [M. P. Sharrock and J. T. McKinney, IEEE Trans. Magn. 17, 3020 (1981)] equation for the time and temperature dependences of coercivity with unity exponent. The sweep rate and temperature dependence of the coercivity were analyzed using the Sharrock equation to obtain the temperature dependence of the intrinsic, short-time coercivity H0 and the zero-field energy barrier E0. A single power law behavior was found for H0 versus the saturation magnetization Ms.

  5. Temperature and pressure dependences of kimberlite melts viscosity (experimental-theoretical study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persikov, Eduard; Bykhtiyarov, Pavel; Cokol, Alexsander

    2016-04-01

    Experimental data on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts (silicate 82 + carbonate 18, wt. %, 100NBO/T = 313) have been obtained for the first time at 100 MPa of CO2 pressure and at the lithostatic pressures up to 7.5 GPa in the temperature range 1350 oC - 1950 oC using radiation high gas pressure apparatus and press free split-sphere multi - anvil apparatus (BARS). Experimental data obtained on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts at moderate and high pressures is compared with predicted data on these dependences of viscosity of basaltic melts (100NBO/T = 58) in the same T, P - range. Dependences of the viscosity of model kimberlite and basaltic melts on temperature are consistent to the exponential Arrenian equation in the T, P - range of experimental study. The correct values of activation energies of viscous flow of kimberlite melts have been obtained for the first time. The activation energies of viscous flow of model kimberlite melts exponentially increase with increasing pressure and are equal: E = 130 ± 1.3 kJ/mole at moderate pressure (P = 100 MPa) and E = 160 ± 1.6 kJ/mole at high pressure (P = 5.5 GPa). It has been established too that the viscosity of model kimberlite melts exponentially increases on about half order of magnitude with increasing pressures from 100 MPa to 7.5 GPa at the isothermal condition (1800 oC). It has been established that viscosity of model kimberlite melts at the moderate pressure (100 MPa) is lover on about one order of magnitude to compare with the viscosity of basaltic melts, but at high pressure range (5.5 - 7.5 GPa), on the contrary, is higher on about half order of magnitude at the same values of the temperatures. Here we use both a new experimental data on viscosity of kimberlite melts and our structural chemical model for calculation and prediction the viscosity of magmatic melts [1] to determine the fundamental features of viscosity of

  6. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  7. Temperature dependence of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions in tympanal organs of locusts.

    PubMed

    Möckel, Doreen; Kössl, Manfred; Lang, Julian; Nowotny, Manuela

    2012-09-15

    Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in tympanal organs of insects are vulnerable to manipulations that interfere with the animal's physiological state. Starting at a medium temperature, we raised and lowered the locust's body temperature within the range of 12 to 35°C by changing the temperature of the surrounding air, while recording DPOAEs. These experimental manipulations resulted in reversible amplitude changes of the 2f(1)-f(2) emission, which were dependent on stimulus frequency and level. Using low f(2) frequencies of up to 10 kHz, a temperature increase (median +8-9°C) led to an upward shift of DPOAE amplitudes of approximately +10 dB, whereas a temperature decrease (median -7°C) was followed by a reduction of DPOAE amplitudes by 3 to 5 dB. Both effects were only present in the range of the low-level component of DPOAE growth functions below L2 levels (levels of the f(2) stimulus) of approximately 30 dB SPL. DPOAEs evoked by higher stimulus levels as well as measurements using higher stimulation frequencies above 10 kHz remained unaffected by any temperature shifts. The Arrhenius activation energy was calculated from the -10 dB SPL thresholds (representing the low-level component) of growth functions, which had been measured with 8 and 10 kHz as f(2) frequencies and amounted to up to ~34 and 41 kJ mol(-1), respectively. Such activation energy values provide a hint that the dynein-tubulin system within the scolopidial receptors could play an essential part in the DPOAE generation in tympanal organs.

  8. Temperature-dependence of ink transport during thermal dip-pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sungwook; Felts, Jonathan R.; Wang, Debin; King, William P.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the control of tip temperature on feature size during dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) of mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) on Au. Heated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes operated between 25 °C and 50 °C wrote nanostructures of MHA for various dwell times and tip speeds. The feature size exhibited an exponential dependence on tip temperature with an apparent activation barrier of 165 kJ/mol. Analysis of the ink transfer process shows that, while ˜1/3 of the barrier is from ink dissolution into the meniscus, the rest reflects the barrier to adsorption onto the growing feature, a process that has been ignored in previous DPN models.

  9. Voltage Dependence of a Neuromodulator-Activated Ionic Current123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neuromodulatory inward current (IMI) generated by crab Cancer borealis stomatogastric ganglion neurons is an inward current whose voltage dependence has been shown to be crucial in the activation of oscillatory activity of the pyloric network of this system. It has been previously shown that IMI loses its voltage dependence in conditions of low extracellular calcium, but that this effect appears to be regulated by intracellular calmodulin. Voltage dependence is only rarely regulated by intracellular signaling mechanisms. Here we address the hypothesis that the voltage dependence of IMI is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways activated by extracellular calcium. We demonstrate that calmodulin inhibitors and a ryanodine antagonist can reduce IMI voltage dependence in normal Ca2+, but that, in conditions of low Ca2+, calmodulin activators do not restore IMI voltage dependence. Further, we show evidence that CaMKII alters IMI voltage dependence. These results suggest that calmodulin is necessary but not sufficient for IMI voltage dependence. We therefore hypothesize that the Ca2+/calmodulin requirement for IMI voltage dependence is due to an active sensing of extracellular calcium by a GPCR family calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and that the reduction in IMI voltage dependence by a calmodulin inhibitor is due to CaSR endocytosis. Supporting this, preincubation with an endocytosis inhibitor prevented W7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride)-induced loss of IMI voltage dependence, and a CaSR antagonist reduced IMI voltage dependence. Additionally, myosin light chain kinase, which is known to act downstream of the CaSR, seems to play a role in regulating IMI voltage dependence. Finally, a Gβγ-subunit inhibitor also affects IMI voltage dependence, in support of the hypothesis that this process is regulated by a G-protein-coupled CaSR. PMID:27257619

  10. THE TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT NATURE OF CORONAL DIMMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Robbrecht, Eva; Wang Yiming E-mail: Yi.Wang@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-09-01

    The opening-up of the magnetic field during solar eruptive events is often accompanied by a dimming of the local coronal emission. From observations of filament eruptions recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager on STEREO during 2008-2009, it is evident that these dimmings are much more pronounced in 19.5 nm than in the lower-temperature line 17.1 nm, as viewed either on the disk or above the limb. We conclude that most of the cooler coronal plasma is not ejected but remains gravitationally bound when the loops open up. This result is consistent with Doppler measurements by Imada and coworkers, who found that the upflow speeds in a transient coronal hole increased dramatically above a temperature of 1 MK; it is also consistent with the quasistatic behavior of polar plumes, as compared with the hotter interplume regions that are the main source of the fast solar wind. When the open flux reconnects and closes down again, the trapped plasma is initially heated to such high temperatures that it is no longer visible at Fe IX 17.1 nm. Correspondingly, 17.1 nm images show a dark ribbon or 'heat wave' propagating away from the polarity inversion line and coinciding with the brightened Fe XV 28.4 nm and Fe XII 19.5 nm post-eruptive loops and their footpoint areas. Such dark ribbons provide a clear example of dimmings that are not caused by a density depletion. The propagation of the 'heat wave' is driven by the closing-down, not the opening-up, of the flux and can be observed both off-limb and on-disk.

  11. Temperature dependent cubic and hexagonal close packing in micellar structures.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Nicole; Gerth, Stefan; Gutfreund, Philipp; Wolff, Max

    2014-11-14

    The interfacial structure and phase diagram of a micellar solution formed by the three block copolymer (EO20-PO70-EO20) also known as P123 solved in deuterated water close to a solid boundary is investigated with respect to temperature. We find a hysteretic behavior of the d-spacing of the micellar crystal and a spontaneous change in the lateral correlation length going hand in hand with a structural reorganization between cubic and hexagonal. The phase transitions may be initiated by a change in the shape of the micelles from spherical to elongated together with a minimization of the polymer water interface. PMID:25212786

  12. Mapping the temperature-dependent conformational landscapes of the dynamic enzymes cyclophilin A and urease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Robert; Keedy, Daniel; Warkentin, Matthew; Fraser, James; Moreau, David; Atakisi, Hakan; Rau, Peter

    Proteins populate complex, temperature-dependent ensembles of conformations that enable their function. Yet in X-ray crystallographic studies, roughly 98% of structures have been determined at 100 K, and most refined to only a single conformation. A combination of experimental methods enabled by studies of ice formation and computational methods for mining low-density features in electron density maps have been applied to determine the evolution of the conformational landscapes of the enzymes cyclophilin A and urease between 300 K and 100 K. Minority conformations of most side chains depopulate on cooling from 300 to ~200 K, below which subsequent conformational evolution is quenched. The characteristic temperatures for this depopulation are highly heterogeneous throughout each enzyme. The temperature-dependent ensemble of the active site flap in urease has also been mapped. These all-atom, site-resolved measurements and analyses rule out one interpretation of the protein-solvent glass transition, and give an alternative interpretation of a dynamical transition identified in site-averaged experiments. They demonstrate a powerful approach to structural characterization of the dynamic underpinnings of protein function. Supported by NSF MCB-1330685.

  13. Binary accretion rates: dependence on temperature and mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a series of 2D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas accretion on to binaries via a circumbinary disc, for a range of gas temperatures and binary mass ratios (q). We show that increasing the gas temperature increases the accretion rate on to the primary for all values of the binary mass ratio: for example, for q = 0.1 and a fixed binary separation, an increase of normalized sound speed by a factor of 5 (from our `cold' to `hot' simulations) changes the fraction of the accreted gas that flows on to the primary from 10 to ˜40 per cent. We present a simple parametrization for the average accretion rate of each binary component accurate to within a few per cent and argue that this parametrization (rather than those in the literature based on warmer simulations) is relevant to supermassive black hole accretion and all but the widest stellar binaries. We present trajectories for the growth of q during circumbinary disc accretion and argue that the period distribution of stellar `twin' binaries is strong evidence for the importance of circumbinary accretion. We also show that our parametrization of binary accretion increases the minimum mass ratio needed for spin alignment of supermassive black holes to q ˜ 0.4, with potentially important implications for the magnitude of velocity kicks acquired during black hole mergers.

  14. Seafloor Weathering Dependence on Temperature and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.; Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Most thinking on Earth's carbon cycle implicates silicate weathering as the dominant control of atmospheric CO2 concentration over long timescales. Recent analyses of alteration of basalt at the seafloor, however, suggest that seafloor weathering (low-temperature (<60C) chemical alteration of the upper oceanic crust due to hydrothermal seawater circulation) increases dramatically in warm, high CO2 periods of Earth's history. This raises the possibility that seafloor weathering could complement silicate weathering in maintaining Earth's long term climate stability. Moreover, seafloor weathering would be the only type of weathering available on an exoplanet entirely covered by water, so understanding how it might work is essential for understanding the habitable zones of such waterworlds. We have built a 2D numerical model of the flow of seawater through porous basalt coupled to chemical alteration reactions that can calculate alkalinity fluxes and carbonate deposition (seafloor weathering). I will present simulations in which we vary the seawater temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, which are boundary conditions to our model, over large ranges. These results will provide a constraint on the ability of seafloor weathering to act as an effective climate buffer on Earth and other planets. I can't give you a preview of the results yet because at the time of writing this abstract we haven't completed the simulations!

  15. Temperature dependent effects during Ag deposition on Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.N.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Hoffbauer, M.A.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; van der Veen, J.F.; FOM-Instituut voor Atoom-en Molecuulfysica, Amsterdam )

    1989-01-01

    The composition, structure, and morphology of ultrathin films grown by Ag deposition on Cu(110) were monitored as a function of temperature using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). Aligned backscattering measurements with 150 keV He ions indicate that the Ag resides on top of the Cu and there is no significant surface compound formation. Measurements with LEED show that the Ag is initially confined to the substrate troughs. Further deposition forces the Ag out of the troughs and results in a split c(2 {times} 4) LEED pattern, which is characteristic of a distorted Ag(111) monolayer template. As verified by both AES and MEIS measurements, postmonolayer deposition of Ag on Cu(110) at 300K leads to a pronounced 3-dimensional clustering. Ion blocking analysis of the Ag clusters show that the crystallites have a (110)-like growth orientation, implying that the Ag monolayer template undergoes a rearrangement. These data are confirmed by low temperature LEED results in the absence of clusters, which indicate that Ag multilayers grow from a Ag--Cu interface where the Ag is captured in the troughs. Changes observed in the film structure and morphology are consistent with a film growth mechanism that is driven by overlayer strain response to the substrate corrugation. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Microbial dynamics of commercial makgeolli depending on the storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Ae Ran; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak

    2012-08-01

    Market fresh makgeolli was stored at different temperatures of 4°C and 25°C to assess the change of the microbial diversity according to the storage temperature and period. Yeast counts increased until day 3 of storage and decreased thereafter. General and lactic acid bacterial counts continuously increased during storage. The data indicated that the control of growth of microorganisms, particularly general bacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), is essential. Total acid levels started to decrease in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and increased from day 6 of storage in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. The increase of total acid in the non-refrigerated condition greatly affected the quality of makgeolli. In both the fresh makgeolli samples stored at 4°C and 25°C, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and molds (Aspergillus tubingensis, Candida glaebosa, and Aspergillus niger) were noted. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns were almost constant regardless of the storage period. As for bacteria, Lactobacillus crustorum, L. brevis, and Microlaena stipoides were found in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and L. crustorum, Lactobacillus sp., L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. rhamnosus, and L. similis were found in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. In particular, in the makgeolli stored at 25°C, L. crustorum and L. plantarum presented dark bands and were identified as the primary microorganisms that affected spoilage of fresh makgeolli. PMID:22713986

  17. Temperature Dependence of Errors in Parameters Derived from Van't Hoff Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dec, Steven F.; Gill, Stanley J.

    1985-01-01

    The method of Clarke and Glew is broadly applicable to studies of the temperature dependence of equilibrium constant measurements. The method is described and examples of its use in comparing calorimetric results and temperature dependent gas solubility studies are provided. (JN)

  18. Temperature dependence of electrical characteristics of Pt/GaN Schottky diode fabricated by UHV e-beam evaporation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Temperature-dependent electrical characterization of Pt/n-GaN Schottky barrier diodes prepared by ultra high vacuum evaporation has been done. Analysis has been made to determine the origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of the Schottky barrier height, the ideality factor, and the Richardson constant calculated from the I-V-T characteristics. Variable-temperature Hall effect measurements have been carried out to understand charge transport at low temperature. The modified activation energy plot from the barrier inhomogeneity model has given the value of 32.2 A/(cm2 K2) for the Richardson constant A** in the temperature range 200 to 380 K which is close to the known value of 26.4A/(cm2 K2) for n-type GaN. PMID:24229424

  19. Symmetry-, time-, and temperature-dependent strength of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrica, Traian; Hua, Ming; Yakobson, Boris I.

    2006-01-01

    Although the strength of carbon nanotubes has been of great interest, their ideal value has remained elusive both experimentally and theoretically. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of underlying atomic mechanisms and evaluate the yield strain for arbitrary nanotubes at realistic conditions. For this purpose, we combine detailed quantum mechanical computations of failure nucleation and transition-state barriers with the probabilistic approach of the rate theory. The numerical results are then summarized in a concise set of equations for the breaking strain. We reveal a competition between two alternative routes of brittle bond breaking and plastic relaxation, determine the domains of their dominance, and map the nanotube strength as a function of chiral symmetry, tensile test time, and temperature. PMID:16581906

  20. Temperature dependence of the lowest excitonic transition for an InAs ultrathin quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. D.; Porwal, S.; Sharma, T. K.; Rustagi, K. C.

    2006-03-01

    Temperature dependent photoluminescence and photoreflectance techniques are used to investigate the lowest excitonic transition of InAs ultrathin quantum well. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the lowest energy transition follows the band gap variation of GaAs barrier, which is well reproduced by calculated results based on the envelope function approximation with significant corrections due to strain and temperature dependences of the confinement potential. A redshift in photoluminescence peak energy compared to photoreflectance is observed at low temperatures. This is interpreted to show that the photoluminescence signal originates from the recombination of carriers occupying the band-tail states below the lowest critical point.

  1. Temperature dependence of intensities of the 8-12 micron bands of CFCl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanes, R.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute intensities of the 8-12 micron bands from Freon 11 (CFCl3) were measured at temperatures of 294 and 216 K. Intensities of the bands centered at 798, 847, 934, and 1082 per cm are all observed to depend on temperature. The temperature dependence for the 847 and 1082 per cm fundamental regions is attributed to underlying hot bands; for the nu2 + nu5 combination band (934 per cm), the observed temperature dependence is in close agreement with theoretical prediction. The implication of these results on atmospheric IR remote-sensing is briefly discussed.

  2. Integrated optic current transducers incorporating photonic crystal fiber for reduced temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sung-Moon; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-08-24

    Optical current transducers (OCT) are indispensable for accurate monitoring of large electrical currents in an environment suffering from severe electromagnetic interference. Temperature dependence of OCTs caused by its components, such as wave plates and optical fibers, should be reduced to allow temperature-independent operation. A photonic crystal fiber with a structural optical birefringence was incorporated instead of a PM fiber, and a spun PM fiber was introduced to overcome the temperature-dependent linear birefringence of sensing fiber coil. Moreover, an integrated optic device that provides higher stability than fiber-optics was employed to control the polarization and detect the phase of the sensed optical signal. The proposed OCT exhibited much lower temperature dependence than that from a previous study. The OCT satisfied the 0.5 accuracy class (IIEC 60044-8) and had a temperature dependence less than ± 1% for a temperature range of 25 to 78 °C.

  3. Temperature dependence of resistance in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q. L.; Wang, Shouguo; Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Ward, R. C. C.; Kohn, A.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of resistance in parallel P and antiparallel AP configurations RP,AP has been investigated in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe junctions with varying MgO barrier thicknesses tMgO. RAP exhibits a substantial decrease with increasing temperature for samples with tMgO ranging from 3.0 to 1.5 nm. In contrast, RP is approximately temperature independent when tMgO =3.0 nm and increases with temperature when tMgO=2.1 and 1.5 nm. Possible origins of this temperature dependence of resistance, which include taking into account a spin independent term and consideration of spin-flip scattering, are discussed. We attribute the temperature dependence of RP,AP to the misalignment of magnetic moments in the electrodes due to thermal excitations and its effect on the spin dependent tunneling.

  4. Integrated optic current transducers incorporating photonic crystal fiber for reduced temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sung-Moon; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-08-24

    Optical current transducers (OCT) are indispensable for accurate monitoring of large electrical currents in an environment suffering from severe electromagnetic interference. Temperature dependence of OCTs caused by its components, such as wave plates and optical fibers, should be reduced to allow temperature-independent operation. A photonic crystal fiber with a structural optical birefringence was incorporated instead of a PM fiber, and a spun PM fiber was introduced to overcome the temperature-dependent linear birefringence of sensing fiber coil. Moreover, an integrated optic device that provides higher stability than fiber-optics was employed to control the polarization and detect the phase of the sensed optical signal. The proposed OCT exhibited much lower temperature dependence than that from a previous study. The OCT satisfied the 0.5 accuracy class (IIEC 60044-8) and had a temperature dependence less than ± 1% for a temperature range of 25 to 78 °C. PMID:26368249

  5. Three Agt1 transporters from brewer's yeasts exhibit different temperature dependencies for maltose transport over the range of brewery temperatures (0–20 °C).

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Viljanen, Kaarina; Mattinen, Laura; Rautio, Jari; Londesborough, John

    2014-06-01

    Zero-trans rates of maltose transport by brewer's yeasts exert strong control over fermentation rates and are strongly temperature-dependent over the temperature range (20–0 °C) of brewery fermentations. Three α-glucoside transporters, ScAgt1(A60) (a Saccharomyces cerevisiae version of Agt1 from an ale strain), ScAgt1-A548V (a variant of ScAgt1(A60) with a single amino acid change in a transmembrane domain), and SbAgt1 (a Saccharomyces (eu)bayanus version from a lager strain), were compared. When expressed in the same laboratory yeast, grown at 24 °C and assayed at 0, 10, and 20 °C, SbAgt1 had the lowest absolute maltose uptake activity at 20 °C but smallest temperature dependence, ScAgt1-A548V had the highest activity but greatest temperature dependence, and ScAgt1(A60) had intermediate properties. ScAgt1(A60) exhibited higher absolute rates and smaller temperature dependencies when expressed in laboratory rather than brewer's strains. Absolute rates closely reflected the amounts of GFP-tagged ScAgt1(A60) transporter in each host's plasma membrane. Growth at 15 °C instead of 24 °C decreased the absolute activities of strains expressing ScAgt1(A60) by two- to threefold. Evidently, the kinetic characteristics of at least ScAgt1(A60) depended on the nature of the host plasma membrane. However, no consistent correlation was observed between transport activities and fatty acid or ergosterol compositions. PMID:25035870

  6. Time-, stress-, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Creep tests and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Wang, Guo-Yong; Su, Yan-Jing; Dai, L. H.; Ogata, Shigenobu; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, we performed experiments, atomistic simulations, and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) to study the creep behaviors of the nanotwinned (nt) and nanograined (ng) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C. The experimental data at various temperatures and different sustained stress levels provide sufficient information, which allows one to extract the deformation parameters reliably. The determined activation parameters and microscopic observations indicate transition of creep mechanisms with variation in stress level in the nt-Cu, i.e., from the Coble creep to the twin boundary (TB) migration and eventually to the perfect dislocation nucleation and activities. The experimental and simulation results imply that nanotwinning could be an effective approach to enhance the creep resistance of twin-free ng-Cu. The experimental creep results further verify the newly developed formula (Yang et al., 2016) that describes the time-, stress-, and temperature-dependent plastic deformation in polycrystalline copper.

  7. Resolving the energy and temperature dependence of C6H6 (∗) collisional relaxation via time-dependent bath temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    West, Niclas A; Winner, Joshua D; Bowersox, Rodney D W; North, Simon W

    2016-07-01

    The relaxation of highly vibrationally excited benzene, generated by 193 nm laser excitation, was studied using the transient rotational-translational temperature rise of the N2 bath, which was measured by proxy using two-line laser induced fluorescence of seeded NO. The resulting experimentally measured time-dependent N2 temperature rises were modeled with MultiWell based simulations of Collisional Energy Transfer (CET) from benzene vibration to N2 rotation-translation. We find that the average energy transferred in benzene deactivating collisions depends linearly on the internal energy of the excited benzene molecules and depends approximately linearly on the N2 bath temperature between 300 K and 600 K. The results are consistent with experimental studies and classical trajectory calculations of CET in similar systems. PMID:27394109

  8. Resolving the energy and temperature dependence of C6H6∗ collisional relaxation via time-dependent bath temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Niclas A.; Winner, Joshua D.; Bowersox, Rodney D. W.; North, Simon W.

    2016-07-01

    The relaxation of highly vibrationally excited benzene, generated by 193 nm laser excitation, was studied using the transient rotational-translational temperature rise of the N2 bath, which was measured by proxy using two-line laser induced fluorescence of seeded NO. The resulting experimentally measured time-dependent N2 temperature rises were modeled with MultiWell based simulations of Collisional Energy Transfer (CET) from benzene vibration to N2 rotation-translation. We find that the average energy transferred in benzene deactivating collisions depends linearly on the internal energy of the excited benzene molecules and depends approximately linearly on the N2 bath temperature between 300 K and 600 K. The results are consistent with experimental studies and classical trajectory calculations of CET in similar systems.

  9. Effect of interband interactions on the pressure dependence on transition temperature of MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu A.; Abah, Obinna

    2015-12-01

    A two-band BCS model with interactions, both phonon and non-phonon induced interactions, were employed to investigate the pressure dependence on superconducting transition temperature of two-band superconductor. We derived the transition temperature and its pressure dependence within Bogoliubov--Valatin formalism for magnesium diboride superconductor. We examined the influence of interband interactions on transition temperature at varying pressure and analyzed the relevance of this calculation in magnesium diboride, MgB2.

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Piezotronic and Piezophototronic Effects in a-axis GaN Nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingfu; Yu, Ruomeng; Peng, Wenbo; Wu, Wenzhuo; Li, Shuti; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-12-22

    The temperature dependence of the piezotronic and piezophototronic effects in a-axis GaN nanobelts from 77 to 300 K is investigated. The piezotronic effect is enhanced by over 440% under lower temp-eratures. Two independent processes are discovered to form a competing mechanism through the investigation of the temperature dependence of the piezophototronic effect in a-axis GaN nanobelts.

  11. Analysis of microwave heating of materials with temperature-dependent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ayappa, K.G.; Davis, H.T. ); Davis, E.A.; Gordon, J. )

    1991-03-01

    In this paper transient temperature profiles in multilayer slabs are predicted, by simultaneously solving Maxwell's equations with the heat conduction equation, using Galerkin-finite elements. It is assumed that the medium is homogeneous and has temperature-dependent dielectric and thermal properties. The method is illustrated with applications involving the heating of food and polymers with microwaves. The temperature dependence of dielectric properties affects the heating appreciably, as is shown by comparison with a constant property model.

  12. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  13. Temperature dependent surface modification of silica spheres with methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Jo, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Sae-Han; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Do-gyun

    2014-09-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the C=O stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  14. Analytical model of the temperature dependent properties of microresonators immersed in a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ilin, E. A.; Kehrbusch, J.; Radzio, B.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model of microresonators immersed in a viscous gas of varying temperature is presented and verified by experiments. Analytical expressions for both the temperature dependent resonant frequency and quality factor of the first flexural eigenmode were derived extending Sader's theory of viscous damping to small temperature variations. The model provides useful implications for the thermal stabilization of microresonators immersed in a gas as well as for the reduction in the influence of the temperature dependent gas properties on the resonant frequency. Finally, an analytical expression is deduced for the mass detection capability of a microresonator that undergoes temperature variations.

  15. Temperature dependence of optically dumped far-infrared (FIR) laser output power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the small signal gain and saturation power are derived using temperature-dependent rates in a four-level model. An expression is developed for the output power of a far-infrared oscillator as a function of temperature for both fixed pressure and fixed density. The results are valid in the regime of homogeneous broadening of the rotational transition and Doppler broadening of the pump transition. It is shown that, for most lasers, both the small signal gain and the saturation power decrease with increasing temperature. These effects have the overall result of increasing output power with decreasing temperatures.

  16. Temperature dependant electrical properties of formyl-TIPPCu(II)/p-Si heterojunction diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Dil Nawaz; Sayyad, Muhammad Hassan; Wahab, Fazal; Tahir, Muhammad; Yaseen, Muhammad; Munawar, Munawar Ali; Ali, Mukhtar

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports the temperature dependent electrical characterization of formyl-TIPPCu(II)/p-Si heterojunction diode which was fabricated by growing thin films of formyl-TIPPCu(II) on the p-type silicon substrate by thermal sublimation technique. The variation in electrical characteristics of the fabricated devices has been systematically investigated as the function of temperature by using current-voltage (I-V) measurements in the temperature range 299-339 K. The diode parameters like ideality factor, zero bias barrier height and parasitic series resistance have been found to be strongly temperature dependant. The zero bias barrier height increases while ideality factor and series resistance decreases with increasing temperature.

  17. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of a Polymer-Based Gas Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the temperature and humidity dependence of a polymer-based gas sensor. The measurement and analysis of three polymers indicates that resistance changes in the polymer films, due to temperature and humidity, can be positive or negative. The temperature sensitivity ranged from +1600 to -320 ppm/nd the relative sensitivity ranged from +1100 to -260 ppm/%.

  18. Temperature dependence of single-event burnout in n-channel power MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Gregory H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Galloway, Kenneth F.; Koga, Rocky

    1992-12-01

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power MOSFETs is investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data are presented which indicate that the SEB susceptibility of the power MOSFET decreases with increasing temperature. A previously reported analytical model that describes the SEB mechanism is updated to include temperature variations. This model is shown to agree with the experimental trends.

  19. On the temperature dependence of spin pumping in ferromagnet-topological insulator-ferromagnet spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. A.; Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    Topological insulators (TIs) have a large potential for spintronic devices owing to their spin-polarized, counter-propagating surface states. Recently, we have investigated spin pumping in a ferromagnet-TI-ferromagnet structure at room temperature. Here, we present the temperature-dependent measurement of spin pumping down to 10 K, which shows no variation with temperature.

  20. Hartmann flow with temperature-dependent physical properties. [magnetohydrodynamics of liquid metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linn, G. T.; Walker, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Attention is given to the steady, fully developed, one-dimensional flow of a liquid metal in which thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and viscosity are functions of temperature. It is found that the properties are decreasing functions of temperature and the first differences between temperature-dependent and constant properties are discussed.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Photodegradation of Dissolved Organic Matter to Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Particulate Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, Peter J.; Molot, Lewis A.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been studied for more than two decades. Usually, laboratory or “in-situ” experiments are used to determine photodegradation variables. A common problem with these experiments is that the photodegradation experiments are done at higher than ambient temperature. Five laboratory experiments were done to determine the effect of temperature on photochemical degradation of DOM. Experimental results showed strong dependence of photodegradation on temperature. Mathematical modeling of processes revealed that two different pathways engaged in photochemical transformation of DOM to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) strongly depend on temperature. Direct oxidation of DOM to DIC dominated at low temperatures while conversion of DOM to intermediate particulate organic carbon (POC) prior to oxidation to DIC dominated at high temperatures. It is necessary to consider this strong dependence when the results of laboratory experiments are interpreted in regard to natural processes. Photodegradation experiments done at higher than ambient temperature will necessitate correction of rate constants. PMID:26106898

  2. Temperature dependence of the frequency noise in a mid-IR DFB quantum cascade laser from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tombez, Lionel; Schilt, Stéphane; Di Francesco, Joab; Thomann, Pierre; Hofstetter, Daniel

    2012-03-26

    We report on the measurement of the frequency noise power spectral density in a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser over a wide temperature range, from 128 K to 303 K. As a function of the device temperature, we show that the frequency noise behavior is characterized by two different regimes separated by a steep transition at ≈200 K. While the frequency noise is nearly unchanged above 200 K, it drastically increases at lower temperature with an exponential dependence. We also show that this increase is entirely induced by current noise intrinsic to the device. In contrast to earlier publications, a single laser is used here in a wide temperature range allowing the direct assessment of the temperature dependence of the frequency noise.

  3. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  4. Physicochemical signatures of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Tardiff, Mark F.; Xu, Zhixiang; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Pham, Christine T. N.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are potentially powerful therapeutic tools that have the capacity to target drug payloads and imaging agents. However, some nanoparticles can activate complement, a branch of the innate immune system, and cause adverse side-effects. Recently, we employed an in vitro hemolysis assay to measure the serum complement activity of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles that differed by size, surface charge, and surface chemistry, quantifying the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity using a metric called Residual Hemolytic Activity (RHA). In the present work, we have used a decision tree learning algorithm to derive the rules for estimating nanoparticle-dependent complement response based on the data generated from the hemolytic assay studies. Our results indicate that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, namely, size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and mole percentage of the active surface ligand of a nanoparticle, can serve as good descriptors for prediction of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation in the decision tree modeling framework.

  5. High temperature intensifies negative density dependence of fitness in red flour beetles

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, William D; Thomas, Alison S; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Competition for food, space, or other depletable resources has strong impacts on the fitness of organisms and can lead to a pattern known as negative density dependence, where fitness decreases as population density increases. Yet, many resources that have strong impacts on fitness are nondepletable (e.g., moisture or temperature). How do these nondepletable resources interact with depletable resources to modify negative density dependence? We tested the hypothesis that negative density dependence is modulated by temperature in red flour beetles and tested the prediction that the strength of negative density dependence should decrease as temperature decreases. We measured the number of eggs laid, offspring development time, and the number of offspring that reached maturity at three temperatures and two food treatment combinations as we simultaneously manipulated adult population density. We demonstrated that low temperatures weaken negative density dependence in the number of eggs laid; this pattern was most evident when food was abundant. Density had no effect on development time, but low temperatures increased development time. The percent of eggs that emerged as adults decreased with both density and temperature and increased with food. Temperature, an abiotic driver, can thus modulate density-dependent processes in ectotherms. Therefore, models of population growth for ectotherms should incorporate the effects of temperature. PMID:25798223

  6. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed.

  7. Synapse Maturation by Activity-Dependent Ectodomain Shedding of SIRPα

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Terauchi, Akiko; Zhang, Lily Y.; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M.; Larsen, David J.; Sutton, Michael A.; Umemori, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Formation of appropriate synaptic connections is critical for proper functioning of the brain. After initial synaptic differentiation, active synapses are stabilized by neural activity-dependent signals to establish functional synaptic connections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent synapse maturation remain to be elucidated. Here we show that activity-dependent ectodomain shedding of SIRPα mediates presynaptic maturation. Two target-derived molecules, FGF22 and SIRPα, sequentially organize the glutamatergic presynaptic terminals during the initial synaptic differentiation and synapse maturation stages, respectively, in the mouse hippocampus. SIRPα drives presynaptic maturation in an activity-dependent fashion. Remarkably, neural activity cleaves the extracellular domain of SIRPα, and the shed ectodomain, in turn, promotes the maturation of the presynaptic terminal. This process involves CaM kinase, matrix metalloproteinases, and the presynaptic receptor CD47. Finally, SIRPα-dependent synapse maturation has significant impacts on synaptic function and plasticity. Thus, ectodomain shedding of SIRPα is an activity-dependent trans-synaptic mechanism for the maturation of functional synapses. PMID:24036914

  8. Temperature dependence of DNA condensation at high ionic concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Yanhui; Fan, Yangtao; Hu, Lin; Xu, Houqiang

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments pointed out that compact states of DNA condensed by multivalent cation prefer higher temperature. The condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in temperature. At the same time, a recent experimental work carried out in buffer solution without multivalent cation points out that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the temperature. DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. It is necessary to revolve the effects of temperature dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, and a model including the temperature dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the temperature dependence of toroid conformations. With an increase in temperature, the first periodic oscillation in the autocorrelation function shifts left and the number of segments containing the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments mentioned above, the long-axis length is defined to estimate the temperature dependence of condensation process further. At the temperatures defined in experiments mentioned above, the relation between long-axis length and temperature matches the experimental results.

  9. Fluctuating temperatures and ectotherm growth: distinguishing non-linear and time-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Kingsolver, Joel G; Higgins, Jessica K; Augustine, Kate E

    2015-07-01

    Most terrestrial ectotherms experience diurnal and seasonal variation in temperature. Because thermal performance curves are non-linear, mean performance can differ in fluctuating and constant thermal environments. However, time-dependent effects--effects of the order and duration of exposure to temperature--can also influence mean performance. We quantified the non-linear and time-dependent effects of diurnally fluctuating temperatures for larval growth rates in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta L., with four main results. First, the shape of the thermal performance curve for growth rate depended on the duration of exposure: for example, optimal temperature and thermal breadth were greater for growth rates measured over short (24 h during the last instar) compared with long (the entire period of larval growth) time periods. Second, larvae reared in diurnally fluctuating temperatures had significantly higher optimal temperatures and maximal growth rates than larvae reared in constant temperatures. Third, for larvae maintained at three mean temperatures (20, 25 and 30°C) and three diurnal temperature ranges (±0, ±5 and ±10°C), diurnal fluctuations had opposite effects on mean growth rates at low versus high mean temperature. Fourth, both short- and long-term thermal performance curves yielded poor predictions of the non-linear effects of fluctuating temperature on mean growth rates (compared with our experimental results) at higher mean temperatures. Our results suggest caution in using constant temperature studies to model the consequences of variable thermal environments. PMID:25987738

  10. Review of temperature dependence of thermal properties, dielectric properties, and perfusion of biological tissues at hyperthermic and ablation temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rossmanna, Christian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The application of supraphysiological temperatures (>40°C) to biological tissues causes changes at the molecular, cellular, and structural level, with corresponding changes in tissue function and in thermal, mechanical and dielectric tissue properties. This is particularly relevant for image-guided thermal treatments (e.g. hyperthermia and thermal ablation) delivering heat via focused ultrasound (FUS), radiofrequency (RF), microwave (MW), or laser energy; temperature induced changes in tissue properties are of relevance in relation to predicting tissue temperature profile, monitoring during treatment, and evaluation of treatment results. This paper presents a literature survey of temperature dependence of electrical (electrical conductivity, resistivity, permittivity) and thermal tissue properties (thermal conductivity, specific heat, diffusivity). Data of soft tissues (liver, prostate, muscle, kidney, uterus, collagen, myocardium and spleen) for temperatures between 5 to 90°C, and dielectric properties in the frequency range between 460 kHz and 3 GHz are reported. Furthermore, perfusion changes in tumors including carcinomas, sarcomas, rhabdomyosarcoma, adenocarcinoma and ependymoblastoma in response to hyperthmic temperatures up to 46°C are presented. Where appropriate, mathematical models to describe temperature dependence of properties are presented. The presented data is valuable for mathematical models that predict tissue temperature during thermal therapies (e.g. hyperthermia or thermal ablation), as well as for applications related to prediction and monitoring of temperature induced tissue changes. PMID:25955712

  11. Review of temperature dependence of thermal properties, dielectric properties, and perfusion of biological tissues at hyperthermic and ablation temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Christian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The application of supraphysiological temperatures (>40°C) to biological tissues causes changes at the molecular, cellular, and structural level, with corresponding changes in tissue function and in thermal, mechanical and dielectric tissue properties. This is particularly relevant for image-guided thermal treatments (e.g. hyperthermia and thermal ablation) delivering heat via focused ultrasound (FUS), radiofrequency (RF), microwave (MW), or laser energy; temperature induced changes in tissue properties are of relevance in relation to predicting tissue temperature profile, monitoring during treatment, and evaluation of treatment results. This paper presents a literature survey of temperature dependence of electrical (electrical conductivity, resistivity, permittivity) and thermal tissue properties (thermal conductivity, specific heat, diffusivity). Data of soft tissues (liver, prostate, muscle, kidney, uterus, collagen, myocardium and spleen) for temperatures between 5 to 90°C, and dielectric properties in the frequency range between 460 kHz and 3 GHz are reported. Furthermore, perfusion changes in tumors including carcinomas, sarcomas, rhabdomyosarcoma, adenocarcinoma and ependymoblastoma in response to hyperthmic temperatures up to 46°C are presented. Where appropriate, mathematical models to describe temperature dependence of properties are presented. The presented data is valuable for mathematical models that predict tissue temperature during thermal therapies (e.g. hyperthermia or thermal ablation), as well as for applications related to prediction and monitoring of temperature induced tissue changes. PMID:25955712

  12. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature-dependent absorption coefficient and conductivity of participating media

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fangzhou; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping

    2016-01-01

    A secondary optimization technique was proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient. In the proposed method, the stochastic particle swarm optimization was applied to solve the inverse problem. The coupled radiation and conduction problem was solved in a 1D absorbing, emitting, but non-scattering slab exposed to a pulse laser. It is found that in the coupled radiation and conduction problem, the temperature response is highly sensitive to conductivity but slightly sensitive to the optical properties. On the contrary, the radiative intensity is highly sensitive to optical properties but slightly sensitive to thermal conductivity. Therefore, the optical and thermal signals should both be considered in the inverse problem to estimate the temperature-dependent properties of the transparent media. On this basis, the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient were both estimated accurately by measuring the time-dependent temperature, and radiative response at the boundary of the slab. PMID:26912418

  13. Temperature dependent electrical transport behavior of InN/GaN heterostructure based Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Sinha, Neeraj; Kalghatgi, A. T.

    2011-02-15

    InN/GaN heterostructure based Schottky diodes were fabricated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The temperature dependent electrical transport properties were carried out for InN/GaN heterostructure. The barrier height and the ideality factor of the Schottky diodes were found to be temperature dependent. The temperature dependence of the barrier height indicates that the Schottky barrier height is inhomogeneous in nature at the heterostructure interface. The higher value of the ideality factor and its temperature dependence suggest that the current transport is primarily dominated by thermionic field emission (TFE) other than thermionic emission (TE). The room temperature barrier height obtained by using TE and TFE models were 1.08 and 1.43 eV, respectively.

  14. Membrane-Associated Ubiquitin Ligase SAUL1 Suppresses Temperature- and Humidity-Dependent Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Disch, Eva-Maria; Tong, Meixuezi; Kotur, Tanja; Koch, Gerald; Wolf, Carl-Asmus; Li, Xin; Hoth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved elaborate mechanisms to regulate pathogen defense. Imbalances in this regulation may result in autoimmune responses that are affecting plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis, SAUL1 encodes a plant U-box ubiquitin ligase and regulates senescence and cell death. Here, we show that saul1-1 plants exhibit characteristics of an autoimmune mutant. A decrease in relative humidity or temperature resulted in reduced growth and systemic lesioning of saul1-1 rosettes. These physiological changes are associated with increased expression of salicylic acid-dependent and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Consistently, resistance of saul1-1 plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, or Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Noco2 was enhanced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed alterations in saul1-1 chloroplast ultrastructure and cell-wall depositions. Confocal analysis on aniline blue-stained leaf sections and cellular universal micro spectrophotometry further showed that these cell-wall depositions contain callose and lignin. To analyze signaling downstream of SAUL1, we performed epistasis analyses between saul1-1 and mutants in the EDS1/PAD4/SAG101 hub. All phenotypes observed in saul1-1 plants at low temperature were dependent on EDS1 and PAD4 but not SAG101. Taken together, SAUL1 negatively regulates immunity upstream of EDS1/PAD4, likely through the degradation of an unknown activator of the pathway.

  15. Manganese oxide phases and morphologies: A study on calcination temperature and atmospheric dependence.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Matthias; Fenske, Daniela; Bardenhagen, Ingo; Westphal, Anne; Knipper, Martin; Plaggenborg, Thorsten; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna; Parisi, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Manganese oxides are one of the most important groups of materials in energy storage science. In order to fully leverage their application potential, precise control of their properties such as particle size, surface area and Mn (x) (+) oxidation state is required. Here, Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 nanoparticles as well as mesoporous α-Mn2O3 particles were synthesized by calcination of Mn(II) glycolate nanoparticles obtained through an economical route based on a polyol synthesis. The preparation of the different manganese oxides via one route facilitates assigning actual structure-property relationships. The oxidation process related to the different MnO x species was observed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showing time- and temperature-dependent phase transformations occurring during oxidation of the Mn(II) glycolate precursor to α-Mn2O3 via Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 in O2 atmosphere. Detailed structural and morphological investigations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder XRD revealed the dependence of the lattice constants and particle sizes of the MnO x species on the calcination temperature and the presence of an oxidizing or neutral atmosphere. Furthermore, to demonstrate the application potential of the synthesized MnO x species, we studied their catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic media. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed the best performance for the mesoporous α-Mn2O3 species. PMID:25671151

  16. Manganese oxide phases and morphologies: A study on calcination temperature and atmospheric dependence

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Daniela; Bardenhagen, Ingo; Westphal, Anne; Knipper, Martin; Plaggenborg, Thorsten; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna; Parisi, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Summary Manganese oxides are one of the most important groups of materials in energy storage science. In order to fully leverage their application potential, precise control of their properties such as particle size, surface area and Mnx + oxidation state is required. Here, Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 nanoparticles as well as mesoporous α-Mn2O3 particles were synthesized by calcination of Mn(II) glycolate nanoparticles obtained through an economical route based on a polyol synthesis. The preparation of the different manganese oxides via one route facilitates assigning actual structure–property relationships. The oxidation process related to the different MnOx species was observed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showing time- and temperature-dependent phase transformations occurring during oxidation of the Mn(II) glycolate precursor to α-Mn2O3 via Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 in O2 atmosphere. Detailed structural and morphological investigations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder XRD revealed the dependence of the lattice constants and particle sizes of the MnOx species on the calcination temperature and the presence of an oxidizing or neutral atmosphere. Furthermore, to demonstrate the application potential of the synthesized MnOx species, we studied their catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic media. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed the best performance for the mesoporous α-Mn2O3 species. PMID:25671151

  17. Analysis of printed organic MOSFET characteristics with a focus on the temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Hiroshi; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Hayashi, Takuro; Tanimoto, Yuta; Sato, Kenshiro; Chen, Lei; Kikuchihara, Hideyuki; Miura-Mattausch, Mitiko; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2016-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the device characteristics of printed organic MOSFETs with a focus on the temperature dependence is reported. In particular, an anomalous behavior of the temperature dependence of the I ds-V gs characteristic is observed, which is found to be increased at higher temperature in MOSFETs fabricated with the printing technology. Our analysis suggests that the temperature dependence of the trap density and the carrier transport mechanism are the causes for this anomalous increase at higher temperature. The results obtained with the compact model HiSIM-Organic, developed based on the physics of carrier dynamics in organic materials, confirm these conclusions. Improving stable characteristics in circuit applications are demonstrated to be achievable at higher temperatures, due to these anomalous properties of organic MOSFETs fabricated by applying the printing technology.

  18. Temperature dependence of exciton and charge carrier dynamics in organic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, A. D.; Kendrick, M. J.; Loth, M.; Anthony, J. E.; Ostroverkhova, O.

    2011-12-01

    We report on physical mechanisms behind the temperature-dependent optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and photoconductivity in spin-coated films of a functionalized anthradithiophene (ADT) derivative, ADT-triethylsilylethynyl (TES)-F, and its composites with C60 and another ADT derivative, ADT-TIPS-CN. Measurements of absorption and PL spectra, PL lifetimes, and transient photocurrent were performed at temperatures between 98 and 300 K as a function of applied electric field. In pristine ADT-TES-F films, absorptive and emissive species were identified to be disordered H aggregates whose properties are affected by static and dynamic disorder. The exciton bandwidths were ≤0.06 and ˜0.115 eV for absorptive and emissive aggregates, respectively, indicative of higher disorder in the emissive species. The exciton in the latter was found to be delocalized over approximately four to five molecules. The PL properties were significantly modified upon adding a guest molecule to the ADT-TES-F host. In ADT-TES-F/C60 composites, the PL was considerably quenched due to photoinduced electron transfer from ADT-TES-F to C60, while in ADT-TES-F/ADT-TIPS-CN blends, the PL was dominated by emission from an exciplex formed between ADT-TES-F and ADT-TIPS-CN molecules. In all materials, the PL quantum yield dramatically decreased as the temperature increased due to thermally activated nonradiative recombination. Considerable electric-field-induced PL quenching was observed at low temperatures at electric fields above ˜105 V/cm due to tunneling into dark states. No significant contribution of ADT-TES-F emissive exciton dissociation to transient photocurrent was observed. In all materials, charge carriers were photogenerated at sub-500-ps time scales, limited by the laser pulse width, with temperature- and electric-field-independent photogeneration efficiency. In ADT-TES-F/C60 (2%) composites, the photogeneration efficiency was a factor of 2-3 higher than that in pristine ADT

  19. Describing Temperature-Dependent Self-Diffusion Coefficients and Fluidity of 1- and 3-Alcohols with the Compensated Arrhenius Formalism.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, Allison M; Forsythe, Grant E; Petrowsky, Matt; Frech, Roger

    2016-09-22

    The location of the hydroxyl group in monohydroxy alcohols greatly affects the temperature dependence of the liquid structure due to hydrogen bonding. Temperature-dependent self-diffusion coefficients, fluidity (the inverse of viscosity), dielectric constant, and density have been measured for several 1-alcohols and 3-alcohols with varying alkyl chain lengths. The data are modeled using the compensated Arrhenius formalism (CAF). The CAF follows a modified transition state theory using an Arrhenius-like expression to describe the transport property, which consists of a Boltzmann factor containing an energy of activation, Ea, and an exponential prefactor containing the temperature-dependent solution dielectric constant, εs(T). Both 1- and 3-alcohols show the Ea of diffusion coefficients (approximately 43 kJ mol(-1)) is higher than the Ea of fluidity (approximately 35 kJ mol(-1)). The temperature dependence of the exponential prefactor in these associated liquids is explained using the dielectric constant and the Kirkwood-Frölich correlation factor, gk. It is argued that the dielectric constant must be used to account for the additional temperature dependence due to variations in the liquid structure (e.g., hydrogen bonding) for the CAF to accurately model the transport property. PMID:27580069

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Viscoelastic Properties of a Confined Liquid Polymer Measured by Using an Oscillating Optical Fiber Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Shintaro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamamoto, Yuya; Zhang, Hedong

    2010-08-01

    We measured the temperature dependence of the viscoelastic properties of a liquid polymer confined and sheared within a nanometer-sized gap. In the viscoelastic measurements, we used the fiber wobbling method, a highly sensitive method that we have developed for measuring shear forces. As a liquid sample, we used the fluoropolyether lubricant Fomblin Zdol4000. Our experimental results showed that the temperature dependence of the viscosity was well expressed by the well-known Andrade equation, even in the confined state. The activation enthalpy was calculated by assuming that Eyring's theory of viscosity holds for gaps of a width ranging from 100 nm down to a few nanometers. We observed a significant decrease in the activation enthalpy for gaps smaller than 10 nm. Elasticity, which only appeared for confinement in gaps smaller than 10 nm, roughly decreased with increasing temperature.

  1. [Feeding activity, spontaneous activity and body core temperature of saddle-back tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis)].

    PubMed

    Petry, H

    1991-02-01

    Eating behaviour and spontaneous activity (videometry) as well as deep body temperature (radiotelemetry) of 3 adult Saddle Back Tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis) were investigated (singly housed, environmental temperature 28 degrees C, relative air humidity 60%, light 6:00-18:00 h, drinking-water and pelleted colony diet ad lib.). The experimental animals (1 female, 2 males; 3-8 years old), born in captivity, showed only some slight individual differences within their inborn species pattern, with regard to the 3 measured parameters. The monkeys were, like wild-living individuals, strictly light-active. They moved in the day-time nearly uninterrupted without special rhythm and slept remarkably deep through the whole night. Food intake occurred during the whole day with varying intensity. The body temperature of the 3 monkeys showed individual daytime-means between 38.8-39.9 degrees C, whereby the temperature fluctuated dependent on their moving activity with a range of about +/- 0.5 degrees C. At night the body temperature of the animals averaged between 35.9-36.6 degrees C.

  2. Exponential temperature dependence of the penetration depth in single crystal MgB2.

    PubMed

    Manzano, F; Carrington, A; Hussey, N E; Lee, S; Yamamoto, A; Tajima, S

    2002-01-28

    The temperature dependence of the London penetration depth, lambda(T), was measured in both single crystal and polycrystalline MgB2 samples by a high-resolution, radio frequency technique. A clear exponential temperature dependence of lambda(T) was observed at low temperature, indicating s-wave pairing. A BCS fit to the lowest temperature data gives an in-plane energy gap Delta of 30+/-2 K (2Delta/T(c) = 1.5+/-0.1), which is significantly smaller than the standard BCS weak coupling value of 3.5. We find that the data are best described by a two-gap model.

  3. Temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in W/CoFeB bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Takaya; Taniguchi, Takuya; Kim, Sanghoon; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Park, Byong-Guk; Moriyama, Takahiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Ono, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in a W/CoFeB bilayer. The SMR is found to increase with decreasing temperature. An analysis based on the SMR theory suggests that the spin Hall angle of W and/or the spin polarization of CoFeB can be the origin of the temperature dependence of the SMR. We also find that the spin diffusion length and the resistivity of W do not significantly vary with temperature, which indicates the necessity of further study on the electron transport mechanism in W films to reveal the origin of the spin Hall effect in W.

  4. Temperature dependence of the electron Landé g-factor in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Schupp, T.; As, D. J.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron Landé g-factor in bulk cubic GaN is investigated over an extremely broad temperature range from 15 K up to 500 K by time-resolved Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. The g-factor is found to be approximately constant over the full investigated temperature range. Calculations by k .p -theory predict a negligible temperature dependence g(T) in complete agreement with the experiment as a consequence of the large band-gap and small spin orbit splitting in cubic GaN.

  5. Decreased body temperature dependent appearance of behavioral despair in the forced swimming test in mice.

    PubMed

    Arai, I; Tsuyuki, Y; Shiomoto, H; Satoh, M; Otomo, S

    2000-08-01

    Effects of body temperature on the immobile response and brain glucose metabolism were examined in the forced swimming test in mice. The first experiment was performed to study behavior, after initial periods of vigorous activity, a characteristic immobile posture occurred when the water was 25 and 35 degrees C. However, several minutes after forced swimming at 25 degrees C, significantly decreased spontaneous motility occurred in a time-dependent manner, but no changes was observed at 35 degrees C. Our interpretation was that mechanisms of acquisition and retention of the forced swim-induced immobile response differed. Body temperature was also significantly decreased at 25 degrees C but not at 35 degrees C in the forced swimming test. This lowering of body temperature almost paralleled the immobile response. The second experiment was a biochemical study in which the uptake of [(14)C] 2-deoxy-d-glucose into the brain significantly decreased after forced swimming at 25 degrees C but did not change in the forced swim loaded mice when the water was 35 degrees C. These results suggested two types of immobile mechanisms in the forced swimming test: (1) an early phase acquisition of the immobile response which might be related to adaptive response and (2) a late phase to retain the immobile response which might be related to the decrease in brain glucose metabolism.

  6. Temperature-dependent kinetics of the vinyl radical (C2H3) self-reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Taatjes, Craig A.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Knepp, Adam M.; Ismail, Huzeifa; Green, William H.; Abel, Paul R.; Fahr, Askar; Osborn, David L

    2008-10-01

    The rate coefficient for the self-reaction of vinyl radicals has been measured by two independent methods. The rate constant as a function of temperature at 20 Torr has been determined by a laser-photolysis/laser absorption technique. Vinyl iodide is photolyzed at 266 nm, and both the vinyl radical and the iodine atom photolysis products are monitored by laser absorption. The vinyl radical concentration is derived from the initial iodine atom concentration, which is determined by using the known absorption cross section of the iodine atomic transition to relate the observed absorption to concentration. The measured rate constant for the self-reaction at room temperature is approximately a factor of 2 lower than literature recommendations. The reaction displays a slightly negative temperature dependence, which can be represented by a negative activation energy, (E{sub a}/R) = -400 K. The laser absorption results are supported by independent experiments at 298 K and 4 Torr using time-resolved synchrotron-photoionization mass-spectrometric detection of the products of divinyl ketone and methyl vinyl ketone photolysis. The photoionization mass spectrometry experiments additionally show that methyl + propargyl are formed in the vinyl radical self-reaction, with an estimated branching fraction of 0.5 at 298 K and 4 Torr.

  7. Series solution to coupled nonlinear heat and moisture transfer in slabs with temperature-dependent diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2014-12-01

    The two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM) is applied to solve the one-dimensional coupled heat and moisture diffusion problem for a slab with temperature-dependent thermal and moisture diffusivities, which are expressed by a linear function and an exponential function of temperature, respectively. One surface of the slab is subjected to convective hygrothermal loading and the other has constant prescribed temperature and moisture. Approximate analytical (series) solutions for the temperature and moisture profiles in the slab are derived. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical results for a slab subjected to a sudden change in surface temperature illustrate the effects of temperature-dependent diffusivities on the transient temperature and moisture profiles of the slab. The results indicate that the nonlinear effect originating from the varying moisture diffusivity is not negligible for resin composites. The DTMis a useful new analytical method for solving nonlinear coupled transient problems.

  8. Thermal expansion, anharmonicity and temperature-dependent Raman spectra of single- and few-layer MoSe₂ and WSe₂.

    PubMed

    Late, Dattatray J; Shirodkar, Sharmila N; Waghmare, Umesh V; Dravid, Vinayak P; Rao, C N R

    2014-06-01

    We report the temperature-dependent Raman spectra of single- and few-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 in the range 77-700 K. We observed linear variation in the peak positions and widths of the bands arising from contributions of anharmonicity and thermal expansion. After characterization using atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the temperature coefficients of the Raman modes were determined. Interestingly, the temperature coefficient of the A(2)(2u) mode is larger than that of the A(1g) mode, the latter being much smaller than the corresponding temperature coefficients of the same mode in single-layer MoS2 and of the G band of graphene. The temperature coefficients of the two modes in single-layer MoSe2 are larger than those of the same modes in single-layer WSe2. We have estimated thermal expansion coefficients and temperature dependence of the vibrational frequencies of MoS2 and MoSe2 within a quasi-harmonic approximation, with inputs from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. We show that the contrasting temperature dependence of the Raman-active mode A(1g) in MoS2 and MoSe2 arises essentially from the difference in their strain-phonon coupling. PMID:24692405

  9. Temperature dependent photoluminescence and micromapping of multiple stacks InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ming Jaffré, Alexandre Alvarez, José Kleider, Jean-Paul Boutchich, Mohamed; Jittrong, Apichat; Chokamnuai, Thitipong; Panyakeow, Somsak; Kanjanachuchai, Songphol

    2015-02-27

    We utilized temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) techniques to investigate 1, 3 and 5 stack InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on cross-hatch patterns. PL mapping can well reproduce the QDs distribution as AFM and position dependency of QD growth. It is possible to observe crystallographic dependent PL. The temperature dependent spectra exhibit the QDs energy distribution which reflects the size and shape. The inter-dot carrier coupling effect is observed and translated as a red shift of 120mV on the [1–10] direction peak is observed at 30K on 1 stack with regards to 3 stacks samples, which is assigned to lateral coupling.

  10. Determination of endocrine disrupting compounds using temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography: II. Fast screening of free steroids and related low-molecular-mass compounds fraction in the environmental samples derived from surface waters, treated and untreated sewage waters as well as activated sludge material.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Włodarczyk, Elzbieta; Baran, Michał J

    2009-10-30

    In the present work solid-phase extraction protocol based on C18 tubes and organic water washing solvents as well as isocratic HPLC procedure focused on quantification of free steroids and related low-molecular-mass endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), characterized by different polarity varied from estetrol to progesterone, were studied. Described separation method involves temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography with mobile phase modified with beta-cyclodextrin. Using such analytical approach the environmental samples derived from Baltic Sea, selected lakes and rivers of the Middle Pomerania in northern part of Poland as well as untreated and treated sewage water from municipal sewage treatment plant near Koszalin were analyzed. Moreover, some preliminary data concerning estriol, testosterone and equilin biodegradation involving activated sludge material were reported. Cluster and principal components analysis of the acquired data sets confirms a high separation and quantification throughput of the solid-phase extraction and isocratic HPLC protocols presented. The method can be useful for simple and rapid classification of the environmental samples characterized by different sources of EDCs loading. The results of this work extend the utility of temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography as an inexpensive, efficient and accurate analytical tool appropriate for characterisation and quantification of complex environmental samples. PMID:19356767

  11. Stress and temperature dependence of the avalanche dynamics during creep deformation of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Herrero-Gómez, Carlos; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the mesoscopic origin of plasticity in metallic glasses remains still an open issue. At the microscopic level, Shear Transformation Zones (STZ), composed by dozens of atoms, have been identified as the basic unit of the deformation process. Macroscopically, metallic glasses perform either homogeneous or inhomogeneous flow depending on the experimental conditions. However, the emergence of macroscopic behavior resulting from STZ interactions is still an open issue and is of great interest. In the current work we present an approach to analyze the different interaction mechanisms of STZ’s by studying the statistics of the avalanches produced by a metallic glass during tensile creep deformation. We identified a crossover between different regimes of avalanches, and we analyzed the dependence of such crossover on the experimental conditions, namely stress and temperature. We interpret such crossover as a transition from 3D random STZ activity to localized 2D nano-shear bands. The experimental time at which the crossover takes place seems to depend on the overall strain and strain rate in the sample PMID:27654069

  12. Stress and temperature dependence of the avalanche dynamics during creep deformation of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Gómez, Carlos; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of the mesoscopic origin of plasticity in metallic glasses remains still an open issue. At the microscopic level, Shear Transformation Zones (STZ), composed by dozens of atoms, have been identified as the basic unit of the deformation process. Macroscopically, metallic glasses perform either homogeneous or inhomogeneous flow depending on the experimental conditions. However, the emergence of macroscopic behavior resulting from STZ interactions is still an open issue and is of great interest. In the current work we present an approach to analyze the different interaction mechanisms of STZ’s by studying the statistics of the avalanches produced by a metallic glass during tensile creep deformation. We identified a crossover between different regimes of avalanches, and we analyzed the dependence of such crossover on the experimental conditions, namely stress and temperature. We interpret such crossover as a transition from 3D random STZ activity to localized 2D nano-shear bands. The experimental time at which the crossover takes place seems to depend on the overall strain and strain rate in the sample

  13. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

    PubMed

    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-01

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-08-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K. The nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shifts for both and A1g modes has been observed. The first-order temperature coefficients of Raman shifts are obtained to be ‑0.0093 (cm‑1/K) and ‑0.0122 (cm‑1/K) for and A1g peaks, respectively. A physical model, including thermal expansion and three- and four-phonon anharmonic effects, is used quantitatively to analyze the observed nonlinear temperature dependence. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of monolayer WS2 is extracted from the experimental data for the first time. It is found that thermal expansion coefficient of out-plane mode is larger than one of in-plane mode, and TECs of and A1g modes are temperature-dependent weakly and strongly, respectively. It is also found that the nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shift of mode mainly originates from the anharmonic effect of three-phonon process, whereas one of A1g mode is mainly contributed by thermal expansion effect in high temperature region, revealing that thermal expansion effect cannot be ignored.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K. The nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shifts for both and A1g modes has been observed. The first-order temperature coefficients of Raman shifts are obtained to be −0.0093 (cm−1/K) and −0.0122 (cm−1/K) for and A1g peaks, respectively. A physical model, including thermal expansion and three- and four-phonon anharmonic effects, is used quantitatively to analyze the observed nonlinear temperature dependence. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of monolayer WS2 is extracted from the experimental data for the first time. It is found that thermal expansion coefficient of out-plane mode is larger than one of in-plane mode, and TECs of and A1g modes are temperature-dependent weakly and strongly, respectively. It is also found that the nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shift of mode mainly originates from the anharmonic effect of three-phonon process, whereas one of A1g mode is mainly contributed by thermal expansion effect in high temperature region, revealing that thermal expansion effect cannot be ignored. PMID:27576751

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K. The nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shifts for both and A1g modes has been observed. The first-order temperature coefficients of Raman shifts are obtained to be -0.0093 (cm(-1)/K) and -0.0122 (cm(-1)/K) for and A1g peaks, respectively. A physical model, including thermal expansion and three- and four-phonon anharmonic effects, is used quantitatively to analyze the observed nonlinear temperature dependence. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of monolayer WS2 is extracted from the experimental data for the first time. It is found that thermal expansion coefficient of out-plane mode is larger than one of in-plane mode, and TECs of and A1g modes are temperature-dependent weakly and strongly, respectively. It is also found that the nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shift of mode mainly originates from the anharmonic effect of three-phonon process, whereas one of A1g mode is mainly contributed by thermal expansion effect in high temperature region, revealing that thermal expansion effect cannot be ignored. PMID:27576751

  17. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd2Ti2O7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 1012 ions/cm2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures.

  18. Temperature dependence of spectral induced polarization data: experimental results and membrane polarization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairlein, Katharina; Bücker, Matthias; Hördt, Andreas; Hinze, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements are affected by temperature variations due to a variety of temperature-dependent parameters that control the complex electrical conductivity. Most important is the influence of the ion mobility, which increases with increasing temperature. It is responsible for the increase of the conductivity of the fluid in the pores with temperature and influences the electrical double layer on the mineral surface. This work is based on laboratory measurements of 13 sandstone samples from different sources with different geological and petrophysical characteristics. We measured the complex impedance in a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz and a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. The main observation is a decrease of the characteristic time (defined by the inverse of the frequency, at which the phase shift is maximum) with increasing temperature. The strength of this decrease differs from one sample to another. The temperature dependence of the phase shift magnitude cannot easily be generalized, as it depends on the particular sample. The experimental findings suggest that neglecting the influence of temperature on complex conductivity may lead to significant errors when estimating hydraulic conductivity from relaxation time. We also simulate the temperature dependence with a theoretical model of membrane polarization and review some of the model properties, with an emphasis on the temperature dependence of the parameters. The model reproduces several features characterizing the measured data, including the temperature dependence of the characteristic times. Computed tomography and microscope images of the pore structure of three samples also allow us to associate differences in the geometrical parameters used in the modelling with pore scale parameters of the actual samples.

  19. Fight versus flight: physiological basis for temperature-dependent behavioral shifts in lizards.

    PubMed

    Herrel, A; James, R S; Van Damme, R

    2007-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a behavioral shift from flight to aggressive behavior occurs at low temperatures in some lizards. Our data for the agamid lizard Trapelus pallida demonstrate how the effect of temperature on whole organism performance traits such as sprint speed (much lower performance at lower temperature) and bite force (largely independent of temperature) may explain the shift from flight to fight behavior with decreasing temperature. Moreover, our data hint at the physiological basis for this effect as isolated muscle power output, twitch and tetanus time traits, relevant to sprinting, appear to be strongly temperature-dependent muscle properties. Maximal muscle force production, on the other hand, appears largely independent of temperature. Unexpectedly, differences in the physiological properties of jaw versus limb muscle were observed that enhance the ability of the jaw muscle to generate maximal force at all temperatures tested. Thus our data show how behavioral responses may be determined by the limitations set by temperature on physiological processes.

  20. Temperature-dependent stress response in oysters, Crassostrea virginica: pollution reduces temperature tolerance in oysters.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Flores, Jason F; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-09-12

    Combined effects of temperature and a toxic metal, cadmium (Cd), on energy metabolism were studied in a model marine bivalve, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, acclimated at 20, 24 and 28 degrees C and exposed to 50microgl(-1) of Cd. Both increasing temperature and Cd exposure led to a rise in standard metabolic rates, and combined stressors appeared to override the capability for aerobic energy production resulting in impaired stress tolerance. Oysters exposed to elevated temperature but not Cd showed no significant change in condition, survival rate and lipid peroxidation, whereas those exposed to both Cd and temperature stress suffered high mortality accompanied by low condition index and elevated lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, RNA/DNA ratios indicative of protein synthesis rate, and levels of glutathione, which is involved in metal detoxification, increased in Cd-exposed oysters at 20 degrees C but not at 28 degrees C. Implications of the synergism between elevated temperatures and cadmium stress on energy metabolism of oysters are discussed in the light of the potential effects of climate change on oyster populations in polluted areas.

  1. Temperature dependence of elastic and strength properties of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the elastic and strength properties of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy at room temperature, 116K (-250 F), and 394K (+250 F). Results are presented for unidirectional 0, 90, and 45 degree laminates, and + or - 30, + or - 45, and + or - 60 degree angle-ply laminates. The stress-strain behavior of the 0 and 90 degree laminates is essentially linear for all three temperatures and that the stress-strain behavior of all other laminates is linear at 116K. A second-order curve provides the best fit for the temperature is linear at 116K. A second-order curve provides the best fit for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus of all laminates and for the principal shear modulus. Poisson's ratio appears to vary linearly with temperature. all moduli decrease with increasing temperature except for E (sub 1) which exhibits a small increase. The strength temperature dependence is also quadratic for all laminates except the 0 degree - laminate which exhibits linear temperature dependence. In many cases the temperature dependence of properties is nearly linear.

  2. Quantification of energy losses in organic solar cells from temperature-dependent device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörmann, Ulrich; Kraus, Julia; Gruber, Mark; Schuhmair, Christoph; Linderl, Theresa; Grob, Stefan; Kapfinger, Stephan; Klein, Konrad; Stutzman, Martin; Krenner, Hubert J.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    Owing to the excitonic nature of photoexcitations in organic semiconductors, the working mechanism of organic solar cells relies on the donor-acceptor (D/A) concept enabling photoinduced charge transfer at the interface between two organic materials with suitable energy-level alignment. However, the introduction of such a heterojunction is accompanied by additional energy losses compared to an inorganic homojunction cell due to the presence of a charge-transfer (CT) state at the D/A interface. By careful examination of planar heterojunctions of the molecular semiconductors diindenoperylene (DIP) and C60 we demonstrate that three different analysis techniques of the temperature dependence of solar-cell characteristics yield reliable values for the effective photovoltaic energy gap at the D/A interface. The retrieved energies are shown to be consistent with direct spectroscopic measurements and the D/A energy-level offset determined by photoemission spectroscopy. Furthermore, we verify the widespread assumption that the activation energy of the dark saturation current ΔE and the CT energy ECT may be regarded as identical. The temperature-dependent analysis of open-circuit voltage VOC and dark saturation current is then applied to a variety of molecular planar heterojunctions. The congruency of ΔE and ECT is again found for all material systems with the exception of copper phthalocyanine/C60. The general rule of thumb for organic semiconductor heterojunctions, that VOC at room temperature is roughly half a volt below the CT energy, is traced back to comparable intermolecular electronic coupling in all investigated systems.

  3. Temperature dependency of resonance fluorescence from InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Dephasing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, Joanna M.; Erlingsson, Sigurdur I.

    2016-07-01

    We report a study on temperature-dependent resonant fluorescence from InAs/GaAs quantum dots. We combined spectral and temporal measurements in order to identify sources of dephasing. In the spectral domain, we observed temperature-dependent broadening of the zero-phonon line as 0.3 μ eV /K , and a temperature-dependent phonon broadband. Time-resolved autocorrelation measurements revealed temperature-dependent spin pumping times between T1 ,s=6 ns (4 K) and 0.5 ns (15 K). These results are compared against theoretical modeling with a master equation for a four-level system coupled to phonon and spin baths. We explained the results by phonon-mediated hole-spin scattering between two excited states, with the piezophonons as a dominant mechanism.

  4. Accelerated life testing and temperature dependence of device characteristics in GaAs CHFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, M.; Leon, R.; Vu, D. T.; Okuno, J.; Johnson, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated life testing of GaAs complementary heterojunction field effect transistors (CHFET) was carried out. Temperature dependence of single and synchronous rectifier CHFET device characteristics were also obtained.

  5. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells.

    PubMed

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Wasik, Bethany R; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-20

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature.

  6. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Günter; Lünse, Christina; Suckling, Colin; Scott, Fraser

    2014-07-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  7. Temperature dependence of the spin relaxation in highly degenerate ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Prestgard, M. C.; Siegel, G.; Tiwari, A.; Roundy, R.; Raikh, M.

    2015-02-28

    Zinc oxide is considered a potential candidate for fabricating next-generation transparent spintronic devices. However, before this can be achieved, a thorough scientific understanding of the various spin transport and relaxation processes undergone in this material is essential. In the present paper, we are reporting our investigations into these processes via temperature dependent Hanle experiments. ZnO thin films were deposited on c-axis sapphire substrates using a pulsed laser deposition technique. Careful structural, optical, and electrical characterizations of the films were performed. Temperature dependent non-local Hanle measurements were carried out using an all-electrical scheme for spin injection and detection over the temperature range of 20–300 K. From the Hanle data, spin relaxation time in the films was determined at different temperatures. A detailed analysis of the data showed that the temperature dependence of spin relaxation time follows the linear-in-momentum Dyakonov-Perel mechanism.

  8. Temperature dependence diode parameters studies of Al/CuPc/n-Si/Al structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ratnesh; Kaur, Ramneek; Sharma, Mamta; Kaur, Maninder; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of Al/CuPc/n-Si/Al metal-organic-semiconductor diode. The copper phthalocyanine as organic layer is deposited on Si substrate by thermal evaporation technique. The temperature dependent current-voltage measurements are performed on Al/CuPc/n-Si structure. The important diode parameters i.e. the barrier height and ideality factor have been calculated. The temperature dependence of barrier height and ideality factor has been studied.

  9. The temperature-dependence of rapid low temperature reactions: experiment, understanding and prediction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ian W M; Sage, Amy M; Donahue, Neil M; Herbst, Eric; Quan, Donghui

    2006-01-01

    Despite the success of the CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme) method in measuring rate coefficients for neutral-neutral reactions of radicals down close to the very low temperatures prevalent in dense interstellar clouds (ISCs), there are still many reactions of potential importance in the chemistry of these objects for which there have been no measurements of low temperature rate coefficients. One important class of reactions is that between atomic and molecular free radicals and unsaturated hydrocarbons; that is, alkynes and alkenes. Based on semi-empirical arguments and correlations of 'room temperature' rate coefficients, k(298 K), for reactions of this type with the difference between the ionisation energy of the alkyne/alkene and the electron affinity of the radical, we suggest which reactions between the radicals, C(3P), O(3P), N(4S), CH, C2H and CN, and carbon chain molecules (Cn) and cyanopolyynes (HC2nCN and NCC2nCN) are likely to be fast at the temperature of dense ISCs. These reactions and rate coefficients have been incorporated into a purely gas-phase model (osu2005) of ISC chemistry. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed.

  10. Chemometric evaluation of temperature-dependent surface-enhanced Raman spectra of riboflavin: What is the best multivariate approach to describe the effect of temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaislová, Alžběta; Kalhousová, Milena; Gráfová, Michaela; Matějka, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Riboflavin is an essential nutrient involved in energetic metabolism. It is used as a pharmacologically active substance in treatment of several diseases. From analytical point of view, riboflavin can be used as an active part of sensors for substances with affinity to riboflavin molecules. In biological environment, metal substrates coated with riboflavin are exposed to temperatures that are different from room temperature. Hence, it is important to describe the influence of temperature on adsorbed molecules of riboflavin, especially on orientation of molecules towards the metal surface and on stability of adsorbed molecular layer. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigation of architecture of molecular layers adsorbed on metal surfaces because the spectral features in SERS spectra change with varying orientation of molecules towards the metal surface, as well as with changes in mutual interactions among adsorbed molecules. In this study, riboflavin was adsorbed on electrochemically prepared massive silver substrates that were exposed to temperature changes according to four different temperature programs. Raman spectra measured at different temperatures were compared considering positions of spectral bands, their intensities, bandwidths and variability of all these parameters. It was found out that increase of substrate temperature up to 50 °C does not lead to any observable decomposition of riboflavin molecules, but the changes of band intensity ratios within individual spectra are apparent. To distinguish sources of variability beside changes in band intensities and widths, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied. Discriminant Analysis (DA) was used to explore if the SERS spectra can be separated according to temperature. The results of Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression demonstrate the possibility to predict the sample temperature using SERS spectral features. Results of all performed experiments and

  11. Temperature-dependent isovector pairing gap equations using a path integral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Belabbas, M.; Oudih, M. R.; Benhamouda, N.

    2007-10-15

    Temperature-dependent isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing gap equations have been established by means of the path integral approach. These equations generalize the BCS ones for the pairing between like particles at finite temperature. The method has been numerically tested using the one-level model. It has been shown that the gap parameter {delta}{sub np} has a behavior analogous to that of {delta}{sub nn} and {delta}{sub pp} as a function of the temperature: one notes the presence of a critical temperature. Moreover, it has been shown that the isovector pairing effects remain beyond the critical temperature that corresponds to the pairing between like particles.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Rheology and Polymer Diffusion in Silica/Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Wei-Shao; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell; Meth, Jeffrey; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Time-temperature superposition using the WLF equation is well-established for both the zero shear viscosity and the polymer diffusion coefficient in homopolymer melts. This talk will present the temperature-dependence of polymer dynamics in polymer nanocomposites comprised of polystyrene and phenyl-capped silica nanoparticles (0 - 50 vol%). The WLF equation fits the temperature dependence of the tracer polymer diffusion coefficient and the fitting parameter (B/fo) decreases smoothly with nanoparticle concentration suggesting an increase in the thermal expansion coefficient for the free volume. The WLF equation also fits the temperature dependence of the zero shear viscosity from oscillatory shear experiments, although the fitting parameter (B/fo) increases substantially with nanoparticle concentration. This discrepancy between the diffusion and rheology will be discussed with respect to the reptation model, which predicts that the temperature dependence of polymer diffusion depends predominately on the temperature dependence of local viscosity, and the elastic response in nanocomposites. National Science Foundation DMR-12-10379.

  13. Physicochemical signatures of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Tardiff, Mark F.; Xu, Zhixiang; Hourcade, Dennis; Pham, Christine; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-03-21

    Nanoparticles are potentially powerful therapeutic tools that have the capacity to target drug payloads and imaging agents. However, some nanoparticles can activate complement, a branch of the innate immune system, and cause adverse side-effects. Recently, we developed an in vitro hemolytic assay protocol for measuring the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity of serum samples and applied this protocol to several nanoparticle formulations that differed in size, surface charge, and surface chemistry; quantifying the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity using a metric called Residual Hemolytic Activity (RHA). In the present work, we have used a decision tree learning algorithm to derive the rules for estimating nanoparticle-dependent complement response based on the data generated from the hemolytic assay studies. Our results indicate that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, namely, size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and mole percentage of the active surface ligand of a nanoparticle, can serve as good descriptors for prediction of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation in the decision tree modeling framework. The robustness and predictability of the model can be improved by training the model with additional data points that are uniformly distributed in the RHA/physicochemical descriptor space and by incorporating instability effects on nanoparticle physicochemical properties into the model.

  14. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry and the temperature dependence of molecular depth profiles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta-layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C(60)(+) primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield, and topography are evaluated between 90 and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution, and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup

  15. Temperature-dependent residual shear strength characteristics of smectite-rich landslide soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, Tatsuya; Matsuura, Sumio; Okamoto, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    On gentle clayey slopes in weathered argillaceous rock areas, there exist many landslides which repeatedly reactivate with slow movement. The slip surface soils of these landslides are sometimes composed dominantly of swelling clay mineral (smectite) which is well known to show extremely low residual friction angle. From field data monitored at landslide sites in Japan, it has become clear that some landslides with relatively shallow slip surface begin to move and become active in late autumn or early winter every year. In such cases, the triggering mechanisms of landslides have not been understood well enough, because landslide initiation and movement are not always clearly linked with rises in pore water pressures (ground water levels). In this study, we focus on the influence of seasonal variation in ground temperature on slope stability and have investigated the effect of temperature on the shear strength of slip surface soils. Undisturbed soil samples were collected by boring from the Busuno landslide in Japan. We performed box shear experiments on undisturbed slip surface soils at low temperature ranges (approximately 5-25 °C). XRD analysis revealed that these soils contain high fraction of smectite. Slickensided slip surface within test specimen was coincided with the shearing plane of the shear box and shear displacement was applied precisely along the localized slip surface. Experiments were performed under slow shearing rate condition (0.005mm/min) and the results showed that shear strength decreased with decreasing temperature. Temperature effect was rather significant on frictional angle than on cohesion. Ring shear experiments were also performed on normally-consolidated remoulded samples. Under residual strength condition, temperature-change experiments (cooling-event tests) ranging approximately from 5 to 25 °C were performed on smectite-rich landslide soils and commercial bentonites. As well as the results by box shear test, shear weakening

  16. Ultrawideband temperature-dependent dielectric properties of animal liver tissue in the microwave frequency range.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Converse, Mark C; Booske, John H; Hagness, Susan C

    2006-04-01

    The development of ultrawideband (UWB) microwave diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, such as UWB microwave breast cancer detection and hyperthermia treatment, is facilitated by accurate knowledge of the temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of biological tissues. To this end, we characterize the temperature-dependent dielectric properties of a representative tissue type-animal liver-from 0.5 to 20 GHz. Since discrete-frequency linear temperature coefficients are impractical and inappropriate for applications spanning wide frequency and temperature ranges, we propose a novel and compact data representation technique. A single-pole Cole-Cole model is used to fit the dielectric properties data as a function of frequency, and a second-order polynomial is used to fit the Cole-Cole parameters as a function of temperature. This approach permits rapid estimation of tissue dielectric properties at any temperature and frequency.

  17. In-vitro study of the temperature dependence of the optoacoustic conversion efficiency in biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S M; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M

    2012-03-31

    The applicability of the optoacoustic (OA) method for monitoring temperature during thermal impact on biological tissues is studied experimentally. Tissues under study were chicken breast (as a model of muscle), porcine lard (as a model of fatty tissue) and porcine liver (as a model of richly perfused tissue). The temperature dependences of the amplitude of the OA signals excited in biological tissues were measured in-vitro in the temperature range of 20 - 80 Degree-Sign C under the narrow laser beam conditions. Measurements were performed in two regimes: during heating and cooling. Similarities and differences in the behaviour of the dependences in different temperature ranges associated with different structural composition of the samples were obtained. The accuracy of temperature reconstruction from experimental data for the investigated tissue types was evaluated. It is shown that during tissue coagulation its temperature can be determined with an accuracy of about 1 Degree-Sign C.

  18. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L’vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni–Mn–Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10‑4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10‑6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  19. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    2011-07-22

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature atmore » 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  20. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    2011-11-13

    Version 01 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature atmore » 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  1. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    2008-12-03

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature atmore » 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  2. In-vitro study of the temperature dependence of the optoacoustic conversion efficiency in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, S. M.; Khokhlova, Tanya D.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.

    2012-03-01

    The applicability of the optoacoustic (OA) method for monitoring temperature during thermal impact on biological tissues is studied experimentally. Tissues under study were chicken breast (as a model of muscle), porcine lard (as a model of fatty tissue) and porcine liver (as a model of richly perfused tissue). The temperature dependences of the amplitude of the OA signals excited in biological tissues were measured in-vitro in the temperature range of 20 — 80 °C under the narrow laser beam conditions. Measurements were performed in two regimes: during heating and cooling. Similarities and differences in the behaviour of the dependences in different temperature ranges associated with different structural composition of the samples were obtained. The accuracy of temperature reconstruction from experimental data for the investigated tissue types was evaluated. It is shown that during tissue coagulation its temperature can be determined with an accuracy of about 1 °C.

  3. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni-Mn-Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10-4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10-6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  4. Examination of temperature dependent subgroup formulations in direct whole core transport calculation for power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Y. S.; Lee, U. C.; Joo, H. G.

    2012-07-01

    The traditional subgroup method which has been applied for lattice transport calculations has an inherent limitation for non-uniform temperature distributions. As a measure to incorporate temperature dependence into the subgroup formulation, the subgroup level and number density adjustment method have been proposed. In this paper, the temperature dependent subgroup formulations employed for reflecting the non-uniform temperature effects on the resonance spatial self-shielding are examined for the whole core transport calculation with the thermal feedback. For 2D pin-cell problem with non-uniform temperature profiles, the inherent limitation of conventional subgroup method is confirmed. And the improvement in terms of reactivity is observed with the proposed adjustment scheme. For the real PWR core calculation with thermal feedback in the hot-full-power condition, the noticeable correction for the fuel temperature coefficient by about 10% more negative is obtained with the correction schemes. (authors)

  5. Cortisol is involved in temperature-dependent sex determination in the Japanese flounder.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toshiya; Yoshinaga, Norifumi; Yazawa, Takashi; Gen, Koichiro; Kitano, Takeshi

    2010-08-01

    In vertebrates, sex is normally determined by genotype. However, in poikilothermal vertebrates, including reptiles, amphibians, and fishes, sex determination is greatly influenced by environmental factors, such as temperature. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying environmental sex determination in these species. The Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is a teleost fish with an XX/XY sex determination system. However, XX flounder can be induced to develop into predominantly either phenotypic females or males, by rearing at 18 or 27 C, respectively, during the sex differentiation period. Therefore, the flounder provides an excellent model to study the molecular mechanisms underlying temperature-dependent sex determination. We previously showed that an aromatase inhibitor, an antiestrogen, and 27 C treatments cause masculinization of XX flounder, as well as suppression of mRNA expression of ovary-type aromatase (cyp19a1), a steroidogenic enzyme responsible for the conversion of androgens to estrogens in the gonads. Furthermore, estrogen administration completely inhibits masculinization by these treatments, suggesting suppression of cyp19a1 mRNA expression, and the resultant estrogen biosynthesis may trigger masculinization of the XX flounder induced by high water temperature. Here, we demonstrated that cortisol causes female-to-male sex reversal by directly suppressing cyp19a1 mRNA expression via interference with cAMP-mediated activation and that metyrapone (an inhibitor of cortisol synthesis) inhibits 27 C-induced masculinization of XX flounder. Moreover, cortisol concentrations in 27 C-reared juveniles were significantly higher than in 18 C-reared fishes during sexual differentiation. These results strongly suggest that masculinization by high water temperature is ascribable to elevation of cortisol concentration during gonadal sex differentiation in the flounder.

  6. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  7. Temperature dependence of metabolic rates for microbial growth, maintenance, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Price, P. Buford; Sowers, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Our work was motivated by discoveries of prokaryotic communities that survive with little nutrient in ice and permafrost, with implications for past or present microbial life in Martian permafrost and Europan ice. We compared the temperature dependence of metabolic rates of microbial communities in permafrost, ice, snow, clouds, oceans, lakes, marine and freshwater sediments, and subsurface aquifer sediments. Metabolic rates per cell fall into three groupings: (i) a rate, μg(T), for growth, measured in the laboratory at in situ temperatures with minimal disturbance of the medium; (ii) a rate, μm(T), sufficient for maintenance of functions but for a nutrient level too low for growth; and (iii) a rate, μs(T), for survival of communities imprisoned in deep glacial ice, subsurface sediment, or ocean sediment, in which they can repair macromolecular damage but are probably largely dormant. The three groups have metabolic rates consistent with a single activation energy of ≈110 kJ and that scale as μg(T):μm(T):μs(T) ≈ 106:103:1. There is no evidence of a minimum temperature for metabolism. The rate at -40°C in ice corresponds to ≈10 turnovers of cellular carbon per billion years. Microbes in ice and permafrost have metabolic rates similar to those in water, soil, and sediment at the same temperature. This finding supports the view that, far below the freezing point, liquid water inside ice and permafrost is available for metabolism. The rate μs(T) for repairing molecular damage by means of DNA-repair enzymes and protein-repair enzymes such as methyltransferase is found to be comparable to the rate of spontaneous molecular damage. PMID:15070769

  8. Temperature dependence of metabolic rates for microbial growth, maintenance, and survival.

    PubMed

    Price, P Buford; Sowers, Todd

    2004-03-30

    Our work was motivated by discoveries of prokaryotic communities that survive with little nutrient in ice and permafrost, with implications for past or present microbial life in Martian permafrost and Europan ice. We compared the temperature dependence of metabolic rates of microbial communities in permafrost, ice, snow, clouds, oceans, lakes, marine and freshwater sediments, and subsurface aquifer sediments. Metabolic rates per cell fall into three groupings: (i) a rate, microg(T), for growth, measured in the laboratory at in situ temperatures with minimal disturbance of the medium; (ii) a rate, microm(T), sufficient for maintenance of functions but for a nutrient level too low for growth; and (iii) a rate, micros(T), for survival of communities imprisoned in deep glacial ice, subsurface sediment, or ocean sediment, in which they can repair macromolecular damage but are probably largely dormant. The three groups have metabolic rates consistent with a single activation energy of approximately 110 kJ and that scale as microg(T):microm(T):micros(T) approximately 10(6):10(3):1. There is no evidence of a minimum temperature for metabolism. The rate at -40 degrees C in ice corresponds to approximately 10 turnovers of cellular carbon per billion years. Microbes in ice and permafrost have metabolic rates similar to those in water, soil, and sediment at the same temperature. This finding supports the view that, far below the freezing point, liquid water inside ice and permafrost is available for metabolism. The rate micros(T) for repairing molecular damage by means of DNA-repair enzymes and protein-repair enzymes such as methyltransferase is found to be comparable to the rate of spontaneous molecular damage.

  9. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  10. Dependence of soil respiration on soil temperature and soil moisture in successional forests in Southern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tang, X.-L.; Zhou, G.-Y.; Liu, S.-G.; Zhang, D.-Q.; Liu, S.-Z.; Li, J.; Zhou, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in soil respiration and its relationship with biophysical factors in forests near the Tropic of Cancer remain highly uncertain. To contribute towards an improvement of actual estimates, soil respiration rates, soil temperature, and soil moisture were measured in three successional subtropical forests at the Dinghushan Nature Reserve (DNR) in southern China from March 2003 to February 2005. The overall objective of the present study was to analyze the temporal variations of soil respiration and its biophysical dependence in these forests. The relationships between biophysical factors and soil respiration rates were compared in successional forests to test the hypothesis that these forests responded similarly to biophysical factors. The seasonality of soil respiration coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with high respiration rates in the hot humid season (April-September) and with low rates in the cool dry season (October-March). Soil respiration measured at these forests showed a clear increasing trend with the progressive succession. Annual mean (?? SD) soil respiration rate in the DNR forests was (9.0 ?? 4.6) Mg CO2-C/hm2per year, ranging from (6.1 ?? 3.2) Mg CO2-C/hm2per year in early successional forests to (10.7 ?? 4.9) Mg CO2-C/hm2 per year in advanced successional forests. Soil respiration was correlated with both soil temperature and moisture. The T/M model, where the two biophysical variables are driving factors, accounted for 74%-82% of soil respiration variation in DNR forests. Temperature sensitivity decreased along progressive succession stages, suggesting that advanced-successional forests have a good ability to adjust to temperature. In contrast, moisture increased with progressive succession processes. This increase is caused, in part, by abundant respirators in advanced-successional forest, where more soil moisture is needed to maintain their activities. ?? 2006 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of

  11. Temperature-Dependent Friction and Wear Behavior of PTFE and MoS2

    DOE PAGES

    Babuska, T. F.; Pitenis, A. A.; Jones, M. R.; Nation, B. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Argibay, N.

    2016-06-16

    We present an investigation of the temperature-dependent friction behavior of PTFE, MoS2, and PTFE-on- MoS2. Friction behavior was measured while continuously varying contact temperature in the range -150 to 175°C while sliding in dry nitrogen, as well as for self-mated PTFE immersed in liquid nitrogen. These results contrast with previous reports of monotonic inverse temperature dependent friction behavior, as well as reported high-friction transitions and plateaus at temperatures below about -20°C that were not observed, providing new insights about the molecular mechanisms of macro-scale friction. The temperature-dependent friction behavior characteristic of self-mated PTFE was found also on the PTFE-on-MoS2 slidingmore » contact, suggesting that PTFE friction was defined by sub-surface deformation mechanisms and internal friction even when sliding against a lamellar lubricant with extremely low friction coefficient (μ ~ 0.02). The various relaxation temperatures of PTFE were found in the temperature-dependent friction behavior, showing excellent agreement with reported values acquired using torsional techniques measuring internal friction. Additionally, hysteresis in friction behavior suggests an increase in near-surface crystallinity at upon exceeding the high temperature relaxation, Tα~ 116°C.« less

  12. (abstract) Ulysses Solar Wind Ion Temperatures: Radial, Latitudinal, and Dynamical Dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Smith, E. J.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Balogh, A.

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the Ulysses SWOOPS plasma experiment are used to determine the dependencies of solar wind ion temperatures upon radial distance, speed, and other parameters, and to estimate solar wind heating. Comparisons with three dimensional temperature estimates determined from the ion spectra by a least squares fitting program will be provided (only small samples of data have been reduced with this program).

  13. Temperature dependence dynamical permeability characterization of magnetic thin film using near-field microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Le Thanh; Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Wang, Xuan-Cong; Ong, C. K.

    2011-08-01

    A temperature dependence characterization system of microwave permeability of magnetic thin film up to 5 GHz in the temperature range from room temperature up to 423 K is designed and fabricated as a prototype measurement fixture. It is based on the near field microwave microscopy technique (NFMM). The scaling coefficient of the fixture can be determined by (i) calibrating the NFMM with a standard sample whose permeability is known; (ii) by calibrating the NFMM with an established dynamic permeability measurement technique such as shorted microstrip transmission line perturbation method; (iii) adjusting the real part of the complex permeability at low frequency to fit the value of initial permeability. The algorithms for calculating the complex permeability of magnetic thin films are analyzed. A 100 nm thick FeTaN thin film deposited on Si substrate by sputtering method is characterized using the fixture. The room temperature permeability results of the FeTaN film agree well with results obtained from the established short-circuited microstrip perturbation method. Temperature dependence permeability results fit well with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The temperature dependence of the static magnetic anisotropy H_K^{sta}, the dynamic magnetic anisotropy H_K^{dyn}, the rotational anisotropy Hrot, together with the effective damping coefficient αeff, ferromagnetic resonance fFMR, and frequency linewidth Δf of the thin film are investigated. These temperature dependent magnetic properties of the magnetic thin film are important to the high frequency applications of magnetic devices at high temperatures.

  14. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz. PMID:27250143

  15. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  16. Cumulative Activation of Voltage-Dependent KVS-1 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patricio; Garst-Orozco, Jonathan; Baban, Beravan; de Santiago-Castillo, Jose Antonio; Covarrubias, Manuel; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we reveal the existence of a novel use-dependent phenomenon in potassium channels, which we refer to as cumulative activation (CA). CA consists of an increase in current amplitude in response to repetitive depolarizing step pulses to the same potential. CA persists for up to 20 s and is similar to a phenomenon called “voltage-dependent facilitation” observed in some calcium channels. The KVS-1 K+ channel, which exhibits CA, is a rapidly activating and inactivating voltage-dependent potassium channel expressed in chemosensory and other neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. It is unusual in being most closely related to the Shab (Kv2) family of potassium channels, which typically behave like delayed rectifier K+ channels in other species. The magnitude of CA depends on the frequency, voltage, and duration of the depolarizing step pulse. CA also radically changes the activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel, suggesting that the channel may undergo a physical modification in a use-dependent manner; thus, a model that closely simulates the behavior of the channel postulates the existence of two populations of channels, unmodified and modified. Use-dependent changes in the behavior of potassium channels, such as CA observed in KVS-1, could be involved in functional mechanisms of cellular plasticity such as synaptic depression that represent the cellular basis of learning and memory. PMID:18199775

  17. Temperature-dependent stability of supported five-fold twinned copper nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Silly, Fabien; Castell, Martin R

    2009-04-28

    The temperature-dependent structure transition of supported Cu nanocrystals on SrTiO3(001)-(2 x 1) is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We experimentally determine the phase map of supported Cu icosahedral, decahedral, and truncated octahedral nanocrystal shapes as a function of substrate temperature during Cu deposition. We show that a supported nanocrystal of 8500 atoms at a nucleation temperature of 480 degrees C has the same probability of adopting an icosahedral or octahedral shape. PMID:19323548

  18. Temperature dependence of single-event burnout in n-channel power MOSFET's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. H.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Galloway, K. F.; Koga, R.

    1994-03-01

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's) is investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data are presented which indicate that the SEB susceptibility of the power MOSFET decreases with increasing temperature. A previously reported analytical model that describes the SEB mechanism is updated to include temperature variations. This model is shown to agree with the experimental trends.

  19. Generalized inverse analysis for fins of different profiles with all temperature-dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kuljeet; Das, Ranjan

    2016-08-01

    An inverse analysis is done to predict unknown and optimal dimensions of a fin satisfying either a given temperature or maximizing heat transfer rate. The profile simulating many geometries involves all temperature-dependent heat transfer modes. A hybrid algorithm is used to estimate relevant fin parameters. The present study shall be useful in selecting optimal dimensions to achieve either a particular temperature distribution or maximize heat transfer rate on various profiles.

  20. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of solids - Rare-gas solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    A method presented by Schlosser et al. (1989) for analyzing the pressure dependence of experimental melting-temperature data is applied to rare-gas solids. The plots of the logarithm of the reduced melting temperature vs that of the reduced pressure are straight lines in the absence of phase transitions. The plots of the reduced melting temperatures for Ar, Kr, and Xe are shown to be approximately straight lines.