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Sample records for activated thp-1 macrophages

  1. Virulent Mycobacterium bovis Beijing Strain Activates the NLRP7 Inflammasome in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Yang, Lifeng; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Xiangmei; Zhao, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in a wide range of mammals, including humans. Macrophages are the first line of host defense. They secrete proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), in response to mycobacterial infection, but the underlying mechanisms by which human macrophages are activated and release IL-1β following M. bovis infection are poorly understood. Here we show that the ‘nucleotide binding and oligomerization of domain-like receptor (NLR) family pyrin domain containing 7 protein’ (NLRP7) inflammasome is involved in IL-1β secretion and caspase-1 activation induced by M. bovis infection in THP-1 macrophages. NLRP7 inflammasome activation promotes the induction of pyroptosis as well as the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) and IL-1β mRNAs. Thus, the NLRP7 inflammasome contributes to IL-1β secretion and induction of pyroptosis in response to M. bovis infection in THP-1 macrophages. PMID:27043315

  2. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1β (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NFκB pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  3. Ganoderma lucidum Polysaccharides Induce Macrophage-Like Differentiation in Human Leukemia THP-1 Cells via Caspase and p53 Activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Chen, Shui-Tein; Wong, Chi-Huey; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation therapy by induction of tumor cells is an important method in the treatment of hematological cancers such as leukemia. Tumor cell differentiation ends cancer cells' immortality, thus stopping cell growth and proliferation. In our previous study, we found that fucose-containing polysaccharide fraction F3 extracted from Ganoderma lucidum can bring about cytokine secretion and cell death in human leukemia THP-1 cells. This prompted us to further investigate on how F3 induces the differentiation in human leukemia cells. We integrated time-course microarray analysis and network modeling to study the F3-induced effects on THP-1 cells. In addition, we determined the differentiation effect using Liu's staining, nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction assay, flow cytometer, western blotting and Q-PCR. We also examined the modulation and regulation by F3 during the differentiation process. Dynamic gene expression profiles showed that cell differentiation was induced in F3-treated THP-1 cells. Furthermore, F3-treated THP-1 cells exhibited enhanced macrophage differentiation, as demonstrated by changes in cell adherence, cell cycle arrest, NBT reduction and expression of differentiation markers including CD11b, CD14, CD68, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and myeloperoxidase. In addition, caspase cleavage and p53 activation were found to be significantly enhanced in F3-treated THP-1 cells. We unraveled the role of caspases and p53 in F3-induced THP-1 cells differentiation into macrophages. Our results provide a molecular explanation for the differentiation effect of F3 on human leukemia THP-1 cells and offer a prospect for a potential leukemia differentiation therapy.

  4. The Effect of Cadmium on COX-1 and COX-2 Gene, Protein Expression, and Enzymatic Activity in THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Korbecki, Jan; Kurzawski, Mateusz; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cadmium in concentrations relevant to those detected in human serum on cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression at mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels in THP-1 macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with various cadmium chloride (CdCl2) solutions for 48 h at final concentrations of 5 nM, 20 nM, 200 nM, and 2 μM CdCl2. The mRNA expression and protein levels of COXs were analyzed with RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and stable metabolite of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) concentrations in culture media were determined using ELISA method. Our study demonstrates that cadmium at the highest tested concentrations modulates COX-1 and COX-2 at mRNA level in THP-1 macrophages; however, the lower tested cadmium concentrations appear to inhibit COX-1 protein expression. PGE2 and TXB2 production is not altered by all tested Cd concentrations; however, the significant stimulation of PGE2 and TXB2 production is observed when macrophages are exposed to both cadmium and COX-2 selective inhibitor, NS-398. The stimulatory effect of cadmium on COXs at mRNA level is not reflected at protein and enzymatic activity levels, suggesting the existence of some posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational events that result in silencing of those genes' expression.

  5. Antigen activation of THP-1 human monocytic cells after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide from oral microorganisms and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Kelley, J I; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1999-05-01

    A human THP-1 monocyte cell line culture system has been utilized to evaluate the morphological changes in THP-1 cells and to measure expression of activation antigens (CD-11b, CD-11c, CD-14, CD-35, CD-68, CD-71 and HLA-DR) as evidence of maturation of THP-1 cells in response to stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the oral microorganisms, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. THP-1 cells were stimulated with LPS (1 microgram/ml) of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum for different time periods (1, 2, 4 and 7 d). Detection of different activation antigens on THP-1 cells was performed by indirect immunohistochemical staining followed by light microscopy. Confirmational studies were performed in parallel using indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy for detection of the corresponding activation antigens. Expression of different activation antigens by resting THP-1 cells revealed HLA-DR to be on 3% of the cells; CD-11b, 9%; CD-11c, 8%; CD-14, 22%; CD-35, 9% and CD-68, 7%. The CD-71 activation antigen was not expressed in untreated THP-1 cells. LPS stimulation increased expression of all activation antigens. A significant (p < 0.05) increase in expression of CD-11b, CD-11c, CD-14, CD-35, CD-68 and CD-71 was observed when GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) was supplemented during the treatment of THP-1 cells with LPS of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis. Activation and differentiation of THP-1 cells by LPS from oral microorganisms in the presence of GM-CSF supports a role for human macrophages in acute and chronic periodontal diseases and may explain the clinically observable periodontal exacerbations in some patients after GM-CSF therapy.

  6. Silymarin Constituents Enhance ABCA1 Expression in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limei; Rotter, Susanne; Ladurner, Angela; Heiss, Elke H.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Dirsch, Verena M.; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin is a hepatoprotective mixture of flavonolignans and flavonoids extracted from the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn). This study investigates the effect of major bioactive constituents from silymarin, silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, isosilybin B, silydianin, silychristin, isosilychristin, and taxifolin, on the expression of ABCA1, an important cholesterol efflux transporter, in THP-1-derived macrophages. Four of the studied compounds, isosilybin A, silybin B, silychristin and isosilychristin, were found to significantly induce ABCA1 protein expression without affecting cell viability. Moreover, isosilybin A, a partial PPARγ agonist, was found to promote cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings first show ABCA1 protein up-regulating activity of active constituents of silymarin and provide new avenues for their further study in the context of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26729088

  7. Catalase potentiates retinoic acid-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation into macrophage through inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiurong; Jin, Ting; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2007-06-01

    Macrophage differentiation plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and many other physiological processes. However, the role of reaction oxygen species in macrophage differentiation has not been elucidated. Here, we report functional characterization of catalase, an enzyme that degrades hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), in THP-1 monocyte differentiation. Treatment of THP-1 cells with catalase was able to synergize with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) to enhance macrophage differentiation, demonstrated by changes of cell adherence, cell cycle arrest, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and expression of differentiation markers including CD68, CD11b, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). ATRA could stimulate retinoic acid (RA) receptor-mediated transcription, but this was not affected by catalase. However, ATRA and catalase were capable of reducing transcriptional activity mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). Consistently, PPARgamma antagonists enhanced, and PPARgamma agonists inhibited MMP9 expression stimulated by ATRA and catalase in THP-1 cells. Therefore, these data indicate that catalase is able to potentiate ATRA-induced macrophage differentiation by inhibition of PPARgamma activity, underscoring an important interplay between H(2)O(2), RA, and PPARgamma in macrophages.

  8. Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus brasiliensis (1→6)-β-D-glucans show immunostimulatory activity on human THP-1 derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Alquini, Giovana; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z; Iacomini, Marcello; Wichers, Harry J; Van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2013-04-15

    The (1→6)-β-D-glucans from Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus brasiliensis were purified to evaluate their effects on the innate immune system. THP-1 macrophages were used to investigate the induction of the expression of TNF-α, IL1β, and COX-2 by RT-PCR. The purification of the polysaccharides gave rise to fractions containing 96-98% of glucose. The samples were analyzed by GC-MS, HPSEC and (13)C NMR, which confirmed the presence of homogeneous (1→6)-β-D-glucans. The β-glucans were incubated with THP-1 derived macrophages, for 3 h and 6 h to evaluate their effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Both β-glucans stimulated the expression of such genes as much as the pro-inflammatory control (LPS). When the cells were incubated with LPS+β-glucan, a significant inhibition of the expression of IL-1β and COX-2 was observed for both treatments after 3 h of incubation. By the results, we conclude that the (1→6)-β-D-glucans present an immunostimulatory activity when administered to THP-1 derived macrophages.

  9. Upconversion nanoparticle-mediated photodynamic therapy induces THP-1 macrophage apoptosis via ROS bursts and activation of the mitochondrial caspase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xing; Wang, Hao; Zheng, Longbin; Zhong, Zhaoyu; Li, Xuesong; Zhao, Jing; Kou, Jiayuan; Jiang, Yueqing; Zheng, Xiufeng; Liu, Zhongni; Li, Hongxia; Cao, Wenwu; Tian, Ye; Wang, You; Yang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is the most vital cardiovascular disease, which poses a great threat to human health. Macrophages play an important role in the progression of AS. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as a useful therapeutic modality not only in the treatment of cancer but also in the treatment of AS. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the activity of PDT, using mesoporous-silica-coated upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles encapsulating chlorin e6 (UCNPs-Ce6) in the induction of apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages. Here, we investigated the ability of UCNPs-Ce6-mediated PDT to induce THP-1 macrophage apoptosis by facilitating the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to depolarize mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Both Bax translocation and the release of cytochrome C were examined using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Our results indicated that the levels of ROS were significantly increased in the PDT group, resulting in both MPTP opening and MMP depolarization, which led to apoptosis. In addition, immunofluorescence and Western blotting revealed that PDT induced both Bax translocation and the release of cytochrome C, as well as upregulation of cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Therefore, we demonstrated that UCNPs-Ce6-mediated PDT induces apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages via ROS bursts. The proapoptotic factor Bax subsequently translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondria, resulting in the MPTP opening and cytochrome C release. This study demonstrated the great potential of UCNPs-Ce6-mediated PDT in the treatment of AS. PMID:26045663

  10. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  11. Highly Efficient Transfection of Human THP-1 Macrophages by Nucleofection

    PubMed Central

    Maeß, Marten B.; Wittig, Berith; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, as key players of the innate immune response, are at the focus of research dealing with tissue homeostasis or various pathologies. Transfection with siRNA and plasmid DNA is an efficient tool for studying their function, but transfection of macrophages is not a trivial matter. Although many different approaches for transfection of eukaryotic cells are available, only few allow reliable and efficient transfection of macrophages, but reduced cell vitality and severely altered cell behavior like diminished capability for differentiation or polarization are frequently observed. Therefore a transfection protocol is required that is capable of transferring siRNA and plasmid DNA into macrophages without causing serious side-effects thus allowing the investigation of the effect of the siRNA or plasmid in the context of normal cell behavior. The protocol presented here provides a method for reliably and efficiently transfecting human THP-1 macrophages and monocytes with high cell vitality, high transfection efficiency, and minimal effects on cell behavior. This approach is based on Nucleofection and the protocol has been optimized to maintain maximum capability for cell activation after transfection. The protocol is adequate for adherent cells after detachment as well as cells in suspension, and can be used for small to medium sample numbers. Thus, the method presented is useful for investigating gene regulatory effects during macrophage differentiation and polarization. Apart from presenting results characterizing macrophages transfected according to this protocol in comparison to an alternative chemical method, the impact of cell culture medium selection after transfection on cell behavior is also discussed. The presented data indicate the importance of validating the selection for different experimental settings. PMID:25226503

  12. Macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 downregulates the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 by activating the TLR2/NF-кB/ZNF202 pathway in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liangjie; Zhang, Zizhen; Zhang, Min; Yu, Xiaohua; Yao, Feng; Tan, Yulin; Liu, Dan; Gong, Duo; Chong, Huang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Xilong; Tian, Guoping; Tang, Chaoke

    2016-04-01

    Macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2) has been shown to promote the development of atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a transmembrane protein, plays a critical role in mediating cholesterol export from macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). However, whether MALP-2 can regulate the expression of ABCA1 is still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of MALP-2 on ABCA1 expression in THP-1 macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that the treatment of cells with MALP-2 decreased ABCA1 level and suppressed cholesterol efflux in both concentration- and time-dependent manners. The contents of intracellular cholesterol were significantly increased in the presence of MALP-2. Moreover, MALP-2-mediated inhibition of ABCA1 expression was abolished by siRNA of either Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). A similar effect was produced by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. In addition, MALP-2-induced activation of NF-κB markedly increased zinc finger protein 202 (ZNF202) level, and ZNF202 siRNA impaired the effects of MALP-2 on ABCA1 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that MALP-2 can decrease ABCA1 expression and subsequent cholesterol efflux through activation of the TLR2/NF-κB/ZNF202 signaling pathway in THP-1 macrophages. PMID:26922321

  13. Reduced PMA enhances the responsiveness of transfected THP-1 macrophages to polarizing stimuli.

    PubMed

    Maeß, Marten B; Wittig, Berith; Cignarella, Andrea; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2014-01-15

    Macrophages are versatile cells of the immune system which react to various external stimuli through different polarization patterns which adjust the cells to the required function whether it is removal of pathogens or necrotic cells, tissue repair or propagation of inflammation. As much of macrophage behavior is determined by their polarization, appropriate models to study macrophage polarization are required. Previously we have published a protocol for transfection of THP-1 macrophages, which in brief pre-differentiates THP-1 monocytes for 48h using 100ng/ml PMA, followed by detachment of the cells and eletroporation using Lonza nucleofector technology and finally includes further 48h of differentiation with 100ng/ml PMA. When we applied this protocol to study interleukin (IL) 10 dependent polarization, the cells were inert to the IL10 stimulus, as indicated by a failure to induce IL10 target genes such as SOCS3. Further investigation revealed that the cells were classically activated by the differentiation agent phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) as shown by induction of chemokine receptor CCR7. Subsequent reduction of PMA concentration during THP-1 macrophage differentiation significantly improved their response to IL10 as SOCS3 increased more than 40-fold. This increased responsiveness of the THP-1 macrophages was also confirmed for polarization with LPS and IFNγ. Up-regulation of classical activation markers CCL3, CCR7 and TNFα was enhanced from 18-, 21- and 70-fold, respectively, to 48-, 222- and 951-fold, respectively. Reduction of PMA concentration did not negatively affect macrophage differentiation or transfection efficiency. Expression of macrophage differentiation markers CD11b and CD68 as well as cell morphology remained unchanged. In addition transfection efficiency and rates of apoptosis and necrosis remained unaffected. Thus our revised protocol combines high transfection efficiency and cell vitality with a strong response to polarizing

  14. Capsaicin attenuates palmitate-induced expression of macrophage inflammatory protein 1 and interleukin 8 by increasing palmitate oxidation and reducing c-Jun activation in THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell) cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-E; Kim, Tae Ho; Yi, Sang-A; Hwang, Yun Cheong; Hwang, Won Sun; Choe, Sun Jung; Han, Seung Jin; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Dae Jung; Kang, Yup; Lee, Kwan-Woo

    2011-06-01

    Capsaicin, a spicy component of hot peppers, has been shown to improve inflammatory disease and obesity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory activity of capsaicin can be used to improve free fatty acid (FFA)-induced inflammation by reducing gene expression of macrophage inflammatory protein 1 (MIP-1) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) in THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell) macrophages. To investigate whether capsaicin ameliorates palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 gene expressions, we treated THP-1 cells with palmitate in the presence or absence of capsaicin and measured MIP-1 and IL-8 by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To elucidate the mechanism by which capsaicin effects on palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 gene expressions, we performed immunoblotting with stress kinase-related antibodies and measured palmitate oxidation and palmitate oxidation-related gene expression. Palmitate and stearate but not the unsaturated FFA oleate significantly increased MIP-1 and IL-8 expressions in THP-1 macrophages. Treatment with capsaicin or FFA oxidation stimulators inhibited palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 expressions in THP-1 macrophages. Capsaicin increased the gene expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and the β-oxidation of palmitate. Furthermore, capsaicin significantly reduced palmitate-stimulated activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38. Our data suggest that the attenuation of palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 gene expressions by capsaicin is associated with reduced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38 and preserved β-oxidation activity.

  15. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  16. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaolin; Li, Qian; Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Yiqing

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Arctigenin enhanced cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages. •The expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE was upregulated in arctigenin-treated cells. •Arctigenin promoted the expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. •Inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α reversed arctigenin-mediated biological effects. •Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux via activation of PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α.

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 polarizes THP-1 cells into M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Crystal; Singla, Reetu; Singal, Pawan K; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Singla, Dinender K

    2012-07-01

    It was hypothesized that monocyte treatment with bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) would significantly enhance monocyte polarization into M2 macrophages as well as increasing the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In a cell culture system using monocytes (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1), we studied the effects of BMP7 on monocytes polarizing into M2 macrophages. The data demonstrate that THP-1 cells contain a BMP type II receptor (BMPR2), and that its activation is significantly (p < 0.05) increased following treatment with BMP7. Furthermore, there was an increase of M2 macrophages, BMPR2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-1ra compared with the respective controls. Moreover, treatment with BMP7 caused a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), compared with the controls. In conclusion, we suggest for the first time that BMP7 has a unique potential to polarize monocytes into M2 macrophages, required for tissue repair, which will have significant applications for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:22720873

  18. Enhanced uptake of multiple sclerosis-derived myelin by THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) is myelin phagocytosis. It remains unclear why microglia and macrophages demyelinate axons in MS, but previously found or yet-unknown changes in the myelin of MS patients could contribute to this process. We therefore studied whether myelin from normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of MS donors is phagocytosed more efficiently than myelin from control donors. Methods Myelin was isolated from 11 MS and 12 control brain donors and labeled with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye pHrodo to quantify uptake in lysosomes. Phagocytosis by differentiated THP-1 macrophages and by primary human microglia was quantified with flow cytometry. Whereas myelin uptake by THP-1 macrophages reached a plateau after approximately 24 hours, uptake by primary human microglia showed an almost linear increase over a 72–hour period. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann–Whitney U test. Results MS-derived myelin was phagocytosed more efficiently by THP-1 macrophages after 6-hour incubation (P = 0.001 for the percentage of myelin-phagocytosing cells and P = 0.0005 for total myelin uptake) and after 24-hour incubation (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.0001, respectively), and by microglia after 24-hour incubation (P = 0.0106 for total myelin uptake). This enhanced uptake was not due to differences in the oxidation status of the myelin. Interestingly, myelin phagocytosis correlated negatively with the age of myelin donors, whereas the age of microglia donors showed a positive trend with myelin phagocytosis. Conclusions Myelin isolated from normal-appearing white matter of MS donors was phagocytosed more efficiently than was myelin isolated from control brain donors by both THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia. These data indicate that changes in MS myelin might precede phagocyte activation and subsequent demyelination in MS. Identifying these myelin changes responsible for enhancing phagocytic ability

  19. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolin; Li, Qian; Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Yiqing

    2013-11-15

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α.

  20. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolin; Li, Qian; Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Yiqing

    2013-11-15

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. PMID:24140409

  1. NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in THP-1 Target Cells Triggered by Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, known as the brain-eating amoeba, causes acute primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. During swimming and other recreational water activities, N. fowleri trophozoites penetrate the nasal mucosa and invade the olfactory bulbs, resulting in intense inflammatory reactions in the forebrain tissue. To investigate what kinds of inflammasome molecules are expressed in target cells due to N. fowleri infection, human macrophage cells (THP-1 cells) were cocultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a noncontact system, and consequently, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production was estimated. Caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production from THP-1 cells by Western blotting and the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis were observed at 3 h after cocultivation. In addition, the increased expression of ASC and NLRP3, which make up an inflammasome complex, was also observed at 3 h after cocultivation. To confirm the caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production via the NLRP3 inflammasome in THP-1 cells triggered by N. fowleri trophozoites, THP-1 cells were pretreated with several inhibitors. The inhibition assay showed that CA-074 (a cathepsin B inhibitor), glybenclamide (an NLRP3 molecule inhibitor), and N-benzyloxycarbony-Val-Ala-Asp(O-methyl)-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK; a caspase-1 inhibitor) reduced the levels of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production from THP-1 cells. This study suggests that N. fowleri infection induces the NLRP3 inflammasome, which activates caspase-1 and subsequently produces IL-1β, thus resulting in inflammation. PMID:27297387

  2. NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in THP-1 Target Cells Triggered by Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, known as the brain-eating amoeba, causes acute primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. During swimming and other recreational water activities, N. fowleri trophozoites penetrate the nasal mucosa and invade the olfactory bulbs, resulting in intense inflammatory reactions in the forebrain tissue. To investigate what kinds of inflammasome molecules are expressed in target cells due to N. fowleri infection, human macrophage cells (THP-1 cells) were cocultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a noncontact system, and consequently, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production was estimated. Caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production from THP-1 cells by Western blotting and the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis were observed at 3 h after cocultivation. In addition, the increased expression of ASC and NLRP3, which make up an inflammasome complex, was also observed at 3 h after cocultivation. To confirm the caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production via the NLRP3 inflammasome in THP-1 cells triggered by N. fowleri trophozoites, THP-1 cells were pretreated with several inhibitors. The inhibition assay showed that CA-074 (a cathepsin B inhibitor), glybenclamide (an NLRP3 molecule inhibitor), and N-benzyloxycarbony-Val-Ala-Asp(O-methyl)-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK; a caspase-1 inhibitor) reduced the levels of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production from THP-1 cells. This study suggests that N. fowleri infection induces the NLRP3 inflammasome, which activates caspase-1 and subsequently produces IL-1β, thus resulting in inflammation.

  3. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  4. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL. PMID:25130461

  5. L-Plastin Nanobodies Perturb Matrix Degradation, Podosome Formation, Stability and Lifetime in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Sarah; Boucherie, Ciska; Vandekerckhove, Joël

    2013-01-01

    Podosomes are cellular structures acting as degradation ‘hot-spots’ in monocytic cells. They appear as dot-like structures at the ventral cell surface, enriched in F-actin and actin regulators, including gelsolin and L-plastin. Gelsolin is an ubiquitous severing and capping protein, whereas L-plastin is a leukocyte-specific actin bundling protein. The presence of the capping protein CapG in podosomes has not yet been investigated. We used an innovative approach to investigate the role of these proteins in macrophage podosomes by means of nanobodies or Camelid single domain antibodies. Nanobodies directed against distinct domains of gelsolin, L-plastin or CapG were stably expressed in macrophage-like THP-1 cells. CapG was not enriched in podosomes. Gelsolin nanobodies had no effect on podosome formation or function but proved very effective in tracing distinct gelsolin populations. One gelsolin nanobody specifically targets actin-bound gelsolin and was effectively enriched in podosomes. A gelsolin nanobody that blocks gelsolin-G-actin interaction was not enriched in podosomes demonstrating that the calcium-activated and actin-bound conformation of gelsolin is a constituent of podosomes. THP-1 cells expressing inhibitory L-plastin nanobodies were hampered in their ability to form stable podosomes. Nanobodies did not perturb Ser5 phosphorylation of L-plastin although phosphorylated L-plastin was highly enriched in podosomes. Furthermore, nanobody-induced inhibition of L-plastin function gave rise to an irregular and unstable actin turnover of podosomes, resulting in diminished degradation of the underlying matrix. Altogether these results indicate that L-plastin is indispensable for podosome formation and function in macrophages. PMID:24236012

  6. Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL) induces phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages in THP-1 cells and human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Radha; Kumar, Natesh; Ballal, Suhas; Eligar, Sachin M; Anupama, S; Bhat, Ganapati; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Shastry, Padma

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), stimulates proliferation and secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the present study, we evaluated the ability of RBL to differentiate human monocytes to macrophages. RBL induced morphological changes indicative of differentiation in primary monocytes and THP-1 cells. Stimulation with RBL resulted in significant up-regulation of differentiation markers - CD54, HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines - IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Functionally, RBL profoundly increased phagocytic activity in monocytes. In THP-1 cells, RBL-induced phagocytosis was higher compared to the effect induced by combination of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RBL induced a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in comparison with a combined treatment of PMA+LPS. Mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of the NF-κB pathway in RBL-induced differentiation of monocytes. The data suggest that RBL mimics the combined action of PMA and LPS to induce morphological and functional differentiation in human monocytes and monocytic cell line - THP-1 to macrophages. Human monocytes differentiated to macrophages with RBL have the potential as an in vitro model to study macrophage biology. PMID:25555439

  7. Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL) induces phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages in THP-1 cells and human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Radha; Kumar, Natesh; Ballal, Suhas; Eligar, Sachin M; Anupama, S; Bhat, Ganapati; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Shastry, Padma

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), stimulates proliferation and secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the present study, we evaluated the ability of RBL to differentiate human monocytes to macrophages. RBL induced morphological changes indicative of differentiation in primary monocytes and THP-1 cells. Stimulation with RBL resulted in significant up-regulation of differentiation markers - CD54, HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines - IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Functionally, RBL profoundly increased phagocytic activity in monocytes. In THP-1 cells, RBL-induced phagocytosis was higher compared to the effect induced by combination of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RBL induced a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in comparison with a combined treatment of PMA+LPS. Mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of the NF-κB pathway in RBL-induced differentiation of monocytes. The data suggest that RBL mimics the combined action of PMA and LPS to induce morphological and functional differentiation in human monocytes and monocytic cell line - THP-1 to macrophages. Human monocytes differentiated to macrophages with RBL have the potential as an in vitro model to study macrophage biology.

  8. S-Allylcysteine, a garlic compound, increases ABCA1 expression in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Malekpour-Dehkordi, Zahra; Javadi, Ebrahim; Doosti, Mahmood; Paknejad, Maliheh; Nourbakhsh, Mitra; Yassa, Narguess; Gerayesh-Nejad, Siavash; Heshmat, Ramin

    2013-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a key mediator of cholesterol efflux to apoA-I in lipid-loaded macrophages, which is the first step of reverse cholesterol transport in vivo and a critical step in preventing atherosclerosis. Enhanced ABCA1 expression may inhibit foam cell formation and consequently reduce atherogenic risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC), the most abundant organosulfur compound in aged garlic extract, on the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in human THP-1 macrophages. The human monocyte THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophage cells in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA). Macrophage cells were then treated with different concentrations (10, 20 and 40 mM) of SAC for 24 h. Total RNA of treated macrophages was extracted and analyzed with real-time RT-PCR. ABCA1 protein expression was also analyzed with western blotting. Results showed that SAC increased the ABCA1 mRNA (1.82-, 2.07- and 2.23-fold) and protein (1.37-, 1.55- and 2.08-fold) expression in macrophage THP-1 cells compared with control (untreated cells). Results suggested that SAC can increase ABCA1 expression in macrophages and may be beneficial in promoting reverse cholesterol efflux. PMID:22610793

  9. Beryllium uptake and related biological effects studied in THP-1 differentiated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Lin, Lin; Hang, Wei; Yan, Xiaomei

    2009-11-01

    Investigation of cellular uptake of metal compounds is important in understanding metal-related toxicity and diseases. Inhalation of beryllium aerosols can cause chronic beryllium disease, a progressive, granulomatous fibrosis of the lung. Studies in laboratory animals and cultured animal cells indicate that alveolar macrophages take up beryllium compounds and participate in a hypersensitivity immune response to a beryllium-containing antigen. In the present work, human monocyte cell line THP-1 was induced with phorbol myristate acetate to differentiate into a macrophage. This cell with characteristics of human alveolar macrophages was employed to study cellular beryllium uptake and related biological effects. Morphological changes, phagocytosis of fluorescent latex beads, and cell surface CD14 expression were used to verify the successful differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. An improved mass spectrometry method for quantitative analysis of intracellular beryllium as opposed to the traditional radioisotopic approach was developed using ICP-MS. The influence of the solubility of beryllium compounds, exposure duration, and beryllium concentration on the incorporation of beryllium was studied. Our data indicated that the uptake of particulate BeO was much more significant than that of soluble BeSO(4), suggesting the major cellular uptake pathway is phagocytosis. Nevertheless, subsequent DAPI nuclear staining and PARP cleavage study indicated that beryllium uptake had a negligible effect on the apoptosis of THP-1 macrophages compared to the unstimulated macrophage control. Meanwhile, no substantial variation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha production was observed for THP-1 macrophages upon beryllium exposure. These data imply alveolar macrophages could have some level of tolerance to beryllium and this may explain why most Be-exposed individuals remain healthy throughout life.

  10. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  11. Chronic Iron Overload Results in Impaired Bacterial Killing of THP-1 Derived Macrophage through the Inhibition of Lysosomal Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Jun-Kai; Wang, Shih-Chung; Ho, Li-Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for living organisms and the disturbance of iron homeostasis is associated with altered immune function. Additionally, bacterial infections can cause major complications in instances of chronic iron overload, such as patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Monocytes and macrophages play important roles in maintaining systemic iron homoeostasis and in defense against invading pathogens. However, the effect of iron overload on the function of monocytes and macrophages is unclear. We elucidated the effects of chronic iron overload on human monocytic cell line (THP-1) and THP-1 derived macrophages (TDM) by continuously exposing them to high levels of iron (100 μM) to create I-THP-1 and I-TDM, respectively. Our results show that iron overload did not affect morphology or granularity of I-THP-1, but increased the granularity of I-TDM. Bactericidal assays for non-pathogenic E. coli DH5α, JM109 and pathogenic P. aeruginosa all revealed decreased efficiency with increasing iron concentration in I-TDM. The impaired P. aeruginosa killing ability of human primary monocyte derived macrophages (hMDM) was also found when cells are cultured in iron contained medium. Further studies on the bactericidal activity of I-TDM revealed lysosomal dysfunction associated with the inhibition of lysosomal acidification resulting in increasing lysosomal pH, the impairment of post-translational processing of cathepsins (especially cathepsin D), and decreased autophagic flux. These findings may explain the impaired innate immunity of thalassemic patients with chronic iron overload, suggesting the manipulation of lysosomal function as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27244448

  12. Cobalt protoporphyrin induces differentiation of monocytic THP-1 cells through regulation of cytoplasmic Ref-1-related NADPH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju Dong; Lee, Sang Kwon; Park, Si Eun; Kim, Kang Mi; Kim, Koanhoi; Park, Yeong Min; Park, Young Chul

    2011-11-01

    Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) is a potent and effective metalloporphyrin inducer of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) activity in many tissues. Here, we report that CoPP induces differentiation of monocytic THP-1 cells into macrophage-like cells. CoPP induced a marked growth inhibition with a slight reduction in viability, and increased adhesion and spreading of THP-1 cells. However, other protoporphyrins did not. CoPP also resulted in expression of CD11b, MMP9, MSR1, CD14 and ICAM-1, which are differentiation markers for macrophages. Interestingly, we observed a decrease of cytoplasmic redox factor-1 (Ref-1) levels in the process of CoPP-induced differentiation of THP-1 cells. In addition, knockdown of Ref-1 by siRNA enhanced cell adhesion induced by CoPP. Furthermore, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), completely abolished CoPP-induced adhesion of Ref-1-deficient cells using an siRNA. A cytosolic factor for NADPH oxidase activity, p47phox, was significantly increased in THP-1 cells by CoPP treatment. Κnockdown of Ref-1 increased CoPP-induced p47phox expression in THP-1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CoPP induces differentiation of monocytic THP-1 cells, and that the CoPP-induced differentiation is associated with cytoplasmic Ref-1-related NADPH oxidase activity.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella; Mirandola, Prisco; De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  14. Scavenger receptor of human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and murine macrophages for nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Takata, K; Horiuchi, S; Araki, N; Shiga, M; Saitoh, M; Morino, Y

    1989-11-17

    Long-term incubation of proteins with glucose undergo a series of nonenzymatic reactions to form advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) with fluorescence and brown color. The receptor for AGE-proteins was demonstrated in murine macrophages (Vlassara et al. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82. 5588). Our recent study with rat macrophages revealed that the receptor also recognized proteins modified with aliphatic aldehydes such as formaldehyde or glycolaldehyde, indicating its close identity to a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins (Takata, K. et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263. 14819). This notion was tested in the present study with human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells), human monocyte macrophages and murine peritoneal macrophages. Endocytic uptake of AGE-proteins and aldehyde-modified proteins was inhibited in a cross-competitive fashion. The receptor activities of THP-1 cells for AGE-albumin and aldehyde-modified proteins were induced synchronously by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Furthermore, upon reduction by NaBH4 of the Schiff base formed between proteins and glucose or aldehydes, no ligand activity was generated. However, once the ligand activity was generated, NaBH4 was no longer effective for the ligand activity. Thus, a structure in common between AGE-proteins and aldehyde-modified proteins may be crucial for recognition by the human macrophage receptor.

  15. Selection of reliable reference genes during THP-1 monocyte differentiation into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reliable reference genes are a vital prerequisite for any functional study employing quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) for analyzing gene expression. Yet a proper selection and assessment of the chosen reference genes is only rarely included into a study. To date, no reference genes have been validated for differentiation of THP-1 monocytes. Here we report on the selection of validated reference genes during differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Results The mRNA expression of 21 preselected potential reference genes was measured by RT-qPCR at several time-points over six days of PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. A ranking according to expression stability was calculated. Calculations were performed using Microsoft Excel-based applets GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Our results indicated ACTB (β-actin) (Cq ± SD, 14.1 ± 0.3) and RPL37A (ribosomal protein L37a) (14.5 ± 0.3) as the most stable genes. While other frequently used reference genes such as GAPDH (glycereraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) (20.8 ± 0.8) or G6PD (glucose-6-phophate dehydrogenase) (16.1 ± 1.0) were found to be not as reliable and were therefore unsuited for use as reference genes. These findings were validated by investigating mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor CD36, known to be regulated during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. Using ACTB and RPL37A as reference genes a profound and significant regulation of CD36 could be demonstrated, while use of G6PD resulted in a much less pronounced apparent regulation of CD36. Conclusion Consequently, it is recommended to normalize any real-time PCR-based expression data obtained during THP-1 monocyte differentiation using ACTB and RPL37A. PMID:21122122

  16. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 contributes to survival of Mycobacterium abscessus in human macrophages-like THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Maher Y.; Ahmad, Iman M.; Switzer, Barbara; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus (M.abs) is a rapidly growing mycobacterial species that infects macrophages, and is an important pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis. We studied the early stages of M.abs infection of macrophages, with emphasis on the role of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in this infection. THP-1 cells were activated using TPA into macrophage-like cells and infected with M.abs for different time points. M.abs infection robustly induced HO-1 expression in the THP-1 cells. Production of HO-1 was p38 MAPK-dependent, as p38 inhibitors suppressed HO-1 induction. Pretreatment with HO-1 inhibitors tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP) significantly inhibited M.abs growth inside macrophages. Furthermore, inhibiting HO-1 using HO-1 siRNA or the HO-1 upstream signaling molecule; Nrf2 using Nrf2 siRNA resulted in similar inhibition of M.abs. In contrast, inducing HO-1 did not increase M.abs intracellular growth above control. Products of HO-1 metabolism of heme are bilirubin, biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron. The addition of either bilirubin or biliverdin, but not CO, completely restored the SnPP inhibitory effect and partially that with HO-1 siRNA. To understand the mechanisms, we used Syto-62 labeled M.abs to infect macrophages. Interestingly, HO-1 inhibition promoted M.abs-containing phagosome fusion with lysosomes, which should enhance M.abs killing. M.abs infection enhanced THP-1 ROS production as demonstrated by increased DHE, DCF fluorescence, and EPR signal. HO-1 inhibition further increased ROS production in infected macrophages. Our results indicate that HO-1 induction is important for M.abs growth during the early stages of infection, and that the HO-1 products bilirubin and biliverdin, perhaps through modulation of intracellular ROS levels, may be involved. PMID:25638774

  17. Effects of Ferumoxides – Protamine Sulfate Labeling on Immunomodulatory Characteristics of Macrophage-like THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Janic, Branislava; Iskander, A. S. M.; Rad, Ali M.; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Arbab, Ali S.

    2008-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (SPIO) complexed with cationic transfection agent is used to label various mammalian cells. Labeled cells can then be utilized as an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes. However, certain number of in vivo administered labeled cells may be cleared from tissues by the host's macrophages. For successful translation to routine clinical application of SPIO labeling method it is important that this mode of in vivo clearance of iron does not elicit any diverse immunological effects. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that SPIO agent ferumoxides-protamine sulfate (FePro) incorporation into macrophages does not alter immunological properties of these cells with regard to differentiation, chemotaxis, and ability to respond to the activation stimuli and to modulate T cell response. We used THP-1 cell line as a model for studying macrophage cell type. THP-1 cells were magnetically labeled with FePro, differentiated with 100 nM of phorbol ester, 12-Myristate-13-acetate (TPA) and stimulated with 100 ng/ml of LPS. The results showed 1) FePro labeling had no effect on the changes in morphology and expression of cell surface proteins associated with TPA induced differentiation; 2) FePro labeled cells responded to LPS with slightly higher levels of NFκB pathway activation, as shown by immunobloting; TNF-α secretion and cell surface expression levels of CD54 and CD83 activation markers, under these conditions, were still comparable to the levels observed in non-labeled cells; 3) FePro labeling exhibited differential, chemokine dependent, effect on THP-1 chemotaxis with a decrease in cell directional migration to MCP-1; 4) FePro labeling did not affect the ability of THP-1 cells to down-regulate T cell expression of CD4 and CD8 and to induce T cell proliferation. Our study demonstrated that intracellular incorporation of FePro complexes does not alter overall immunological properties of THP-1 cells. The described experiments provide

  18. L-cystathionine inhibits oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced THP-1-derived macrophage inflammatory cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 generation via the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingzhu; Du, Junbao; Liu, Angie Dong; Holmberg, Lukas; Chen, Selena Y; Bu, Dingfang; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2015-05-28

    This study aimed to explore whether and how L-cystathionine had any regulatory effect on the inflammatory response in THP-1-derived macrophages cultured in vitro under oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) stimulation. The human monocyte line THP-1 cell was cultured in vitro and differentiated into macrophages after 24 hours of PMA induction. Macrophages were pretreated with L-cystathionine and then treated with ox-LDL. The results showed that compared with the controls, ox-LDL stimulation significantly upregulated the expression of THP-1-derived macrophage MCP-1 by enhancing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA binding with the MCP-1 promoter. Compared with the ox-LDL group, 0.3 mmol/L and 1.0 mmol/L L-cystathionine significantly inhibited the expression of THP-1-derived macrophage MCP-1. Mechanistically, 0.3 mmol/L and 1.0 mmol/L L-cystathionine suppressed phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 protein, as well as the DNA binding activity and DNA binding level of NF-κB with the MCP-1 promoter, which resulted in a reduced THP-1-derived macrophage MCP-1 generation. This study suggests that L-cystathionine could inhibit the expression of MCP-1 in THP-1-derived macrophages induced by ox-LDL via inhibition of NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and binding of the MCP-1 promoter sequence after entry into the nucleus.

  19. Docosahexaenoic acid ester of phloridzin inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in THP-1 differentiated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2015-03-01

    Phloridzin or phlorizin (PZ) is a predominant phenolic compound found in apple and also used in various natural health products. Phloridzin shows poor absorption and cellular uptake due to its hydrophilic nature. The aim was to investigate and compare the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ester of PZ (PZ-DHA) and its parent compounds (phloridzin and DHA), phloretin (the aglycone of PZ) and cyclooxygenase inhibitory drugs (diclofenac and nimesulide) on production of pro-inflammatory biomarkers in inflammation-induced macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulation. Human THP-1 monocytes were seeded in 24-well plates (5×10(5)/well) and treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 0.1μg/mL) for 48h to induce macrophage differentiation. After 48h, the differentiated macrophages were washed with Hank's buffer and treated with various concentrations of test compounds for 4h, followed by the LPS-stimulation (18h). Pre-exposure of PZ-DHA ester was more effective in reducing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels compared to DHA and nimesulide. However, diclofenac was the most effective in reducing prostaglandin (PGE2) level by depicting a dose-dependent response. However, PZ-DHA ester and DHA were the most effective in inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) among other test compounds. Our results suggest that PZ-DHA ester might possess potential therapeutic activity to treat inflammation related disorders such as type 2 diabetes, asthma, atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25637769

  20. Xylitol, an Anticaries Agent, Exhibits Potent Inhibition of Inflammatory Responses in Human THP-1-Derived Macrophages Infected With Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunjoo; Na, Hee Sam; Kim, Sheon Min; Wallet, Shannon; Cha, Seunghee; Chung, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Xylitol is a well-known anticaries agent and has been used for the prevention and treatment of dental caries. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of xylitol are evaluated for possible use in the prevention and treatment of periodontal infections. Methods Cytokine expression was stimulated in THP-1 (human monocyte cell line)-derived macrophages by live Porphyromonas gingivalis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a commercial multiplex assay kit were used to determine the effects of xylitol on live P. gingivalis–induced production of cytokine. The effects of xylitol on phagocytosis and the production of nitric oxide were determined using phagocytosis assay, viable cell count, and Griess reagent. The effects of xylitol on P. gingivalis adhesion were determined by immunostaining, and costimulatory molecule expression was examined by flow cytometry. Results Live P. gingivalis infection increased the production of representative proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, in a multiplicity of infection– and time-dependent manner. Live P. gingivalis also enhanced the release of cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-12 p40, eotaxin, interferon γ–induced protein 10, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1. The pretreatment of xylitol significantly inhibited the P. gingivalis– induced cytokines production and nitric oxide production. In addition, xylitol inhibited the attachment of live P. gingivalis on THP-1-derived macrophages. Furthermore, xylitol exerted anti-phagocytic activity against both Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis. Conclusion These findings suggest that xylitol acts as an antiinflammatory agent in THP-1-derived macrophages infected with live P. gingivalis, which supports its use in periodontitis. PMID:24592909

  1. The role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in immune tolerance: focus on macrophage polarization of THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Feng; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Ke-Fang; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Ge; Cai, Shao-Hui; Du, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages can be divided into two groups as M1 and M2 phenotype. Our results and other groups revealed that IFN-γ can up-regulate the IDO expression and differentiate THP-1 cells to M1 phenotype. Therefore we hypothesized that IDO may play potential roles in macrophage differentiation. Interesting, our results indicated that the ectopic IDO increases the expression of M2 markers such as IL-10 and CXCR4 while decreases the M1 markers such as CCR7 and IL-12p35. In contrast, the knockdown of IDO expression in THP-1 cells resulted in increased M1 markers and lower M2 markers. Our results suggested that the expression intensity of IDO modulates macrophages differentiation. These finding support the counter-regulatory role for IDO with regarding to the polarization of macrophages to restrain excessive or inappropriate immune activation in inflammatory or tumor microenvironment. It throws new light on the mechanisms about the immunosuppressive effect of IDO in tumor or inflammatory diseases.

  2. Inactivation of lipoprotein lipase occurs on the surface of THP-1 macrophages where oligomers of angiopoietin-like protein 4 are formed

    SciTech Connect

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Sukonina, Valentina; Kroupa, Olessia; Thulin, Petra; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Olivecrona, Thomas; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity is controlled by ANGPTL4 in THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both LPL and ANGPTL4 bind to THP-1 macrophages in a heparin-releasable fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only monomers of ANGPTL4 are present within THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Covalent oligomers of ANGPTL4 appear on cell surface and in medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of LPL coincide with ANGPTL4 oligomer formation on cell surfaces. -- Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins causing release of fatty acids for metabolic purposes in muscles and adipose tissue. LPL in macrophages in the artery wall may, however, promote foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. Angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 4 inactivates LPL and ANGPTL4 expression is controlled by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). The mechanisms for inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 was studied in THP-1 macrophages where active LPL is associated with cell surfaces in a heparin-releasable form, while LPL in the culture medium is mostly inactive. The PPAR{delta} agonist GW501516 had no effect on LPL mRNA, but increased ANGPTL4 mRNA and caused a marked reduction of the heparin-releasable LPL activity concomitantly with accumulation of inactive, monomeric LPL in the medium. Intracellular ANGPTL4 was monomeric, while dimers and tetramers of ANGPTL4 were present in the heparin-releasable fraction and medium. GW501516 caused an increase in the amount of ANGPTL4 oligomers on the cell surface that paralleled the decrease in LPL activity. Actinomycin D blocked the effects of GW501516 on ANGPTL4 oligomer formation and prevented the inactivation of LPL. Antibodies against ANGPTL4 interfered with the inactivation of LPL. We conclude that inactivation of LPL in THP-1 macrophages primarily occurs on the cell surface where oligomers of ANGPTL4 are formed.

  3. The Effects of Cadmium at Low Environmental Concentrations on THP-1 Macrophage Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Korbecki, Jan; Kurzawski, Mateusz; Tarnowski, Maciej; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-09-07

    Cadmium at environmental concentrations is a risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, in which macrophages play an important role. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cadmium at low environmental (nanomolar) concentrations on apoptotic processes in THP-1(acute monocytic leukemia cells line)-derived macrophages, with special focus on mitochondrial events involved. Macrophages were incubated with various cadmium chloride (CdCl₂) solutions for 48 h at final concentrations of 5 nM, 20 nM, 200 nM and 2 µM CdCl₂. Cell viability was measured using flow cytometry. Flow cytometric measurement (annexin V/FITC (annexin V/fluorescein isothiocyanate) and PI (propidium iodide) double staining) was used to quantify the extent of apoptosis. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy were used for imaging of apoptosis process. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were monitored using cytofluorimetry after cell staining with JC-1(5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazol-carbocyane iodide) probe. Mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels were measured cytofluorimetrically after incubation of cells with mitochondrial superoxide indicator (MitoSOX) red fluorescent marker. The mRNA expression of Bcl-2 and Bax was analysed with qRT-PCR. Our study demonstrates that cadmium, even at low environmental concentrations, exerts mitochondrial toxicity in THP-1 macrophages. Forty-eight-hour exposure to very low concentrations reduces cell viability and results in cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. The decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS production, increased Bax and decreased Bcl-2 mRNA expression are mitochondrial events involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis.

  4. The Effects of Cadmium at Low Environmental Concentrations on THP-1 Macrophage Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Korbecki, Jan; Kurzawski, Mateusz; Tarnowski, Maciej; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium at environmental concentrations is a risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, in which macrophages play an important role. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cadmium at low environmental (nanomolar) concentrations on apoptotic processes in THP-1(acute monocytic leukemia cells line)-derived macrophages, with special focus on mitochondrial events involved. Macrophages were incubated with various cadmium chloride (CdCl2) solutions for 48 h at final concentrations of 5 nM, 20 nM, 200 nM and 2 µM CdCl2. Cell viability was measured using flow cytometry. Flow cytometric measurement (annexin V/FITC (annexin V/fluorescein isothiocyanate) and PI (propidium iodide) double staining) was used to quantify the extent of apoptosis. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy were used for imaging of apoptosis process. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were monitored using cytofluorimetry after cell staining with JC-1(5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′-tetraethylbenzimidazol-carbocyane iodide) probe. Mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels were measured cytofluorimetrically after incubation of cells with mitochondrial superoxide indicator (MitoSOX) red fluorescent marker. The mRNA expression of Bcl-2 and Bax was analysed with qRT-PCR. Our study demonstrates that cadmium, even at low environmental concentrations, exerts mitochondrial toxicity in THP-1 macrophages. Forty-eight-hour exposure to very low concentrations reduces cell viability and results in cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. The decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS production, increased Bax and decreased Bcl-2 mRNA expression are mitochondrial events involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis. PMID:26370970

  5. Leoligin, the Major Lignan from Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale subsp. alpinum), Promotes Cholesterol Efflux from THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limei; Ladurner, Angela; Latkolik, Simone; Schwaiger, Stefan; Linder, Thomas; Hošek, Jan; Palme, Veronika; Schilcher, Nicole; Polanský, Ondřej; Heiss, Elke H; Stangl, Herbert; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2016-06-24

    Leoligin is a natural lignan found in Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale ssp. alpinum). The aim of this study was to examine its influence on cholesterol efflux and to address the underlying mechanism of action. Leoligin increases apo A1- as well as 1% human plasma-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages without affecting cell viability as determined by resazurin conversion. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein levels of the cholesterol efflux transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were upregulated, whereas the SR-B1 protein level remained unchanged upon treatment with leoligin (10 μM, 24 h). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR further uncovered that leoligin also increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA levels without affecting the half-life of the two mRNAs in the presence of actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor. Proteome analysis revealed the modulation of protein expression fingerprint in the presence of leoligin. Taken together, these results suggest that leoligin induces cholesterol efflux in THP-1-derived macrophages by upregulating ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. This novel activity suggests leoligin as a promising candidate for further studies addressing a possible preventive or therapeutic application in the context of atherosclerosis. PMID:27220065

  6. Leoligin, the Major Lignan from Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale subsp. alpinum), Promotes Cholesterol Efflux from THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Leoligin is a natural lignan found in Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale ssp. alpinum). The aim of this study was to examine its influence on cholesterol efflux and to address the underlying mechanism of action. Leoligin increases apo A1- as well as 1% human plasma-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages without affecting cell viability as determined by resazurin conversion. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein levels of the cholesterol efflux transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were upregulated, whereas the SR-B1 protein level remained unchanged upon treatment with leoligin (10 μM, 24 h). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR further uncovered that leoligin also increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA levels without affecting the half-life of the two mRNAs in the presence of actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor. Proteome analysis revealed the modulation of protein expression fingerprint in the presence of leoligin. Taken together, these results suggest that leoligin induces cholesterol efflux in THP-1-derived macrophages by upregulating ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. This novel activity suggests leoligin as a promising candidate for further studies addressing a possible preventive or therapeutic application in the context of atherosclerosis. PMID:27220065

  7. Effect of cortisol and/or DHEA on THP1-derived macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Bettina; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; D'Attilio, Luciano; Leon-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Bottasso, Oscar; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Bay, María Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem requiring an appropriate cell immune response to be controlled. Macrophages play a central role in the response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Given our prior studies in which adrenal steroids were found to modify the cellular immune responses from TB patients, it was sensible to analyze the immunomodulatory capability of cortisol and DHEA on macrophages infected with Mtb. The human macrophage-like THP-1 cells were infected with the H37Rv strain of Mtb and treated with Cortisol and DHEA at different doses. We monitored phagocytosis, intracellular-bacterial growth, autophagosoma formation, as well as cytokine gene expression and production. Cultures exposed to cortisol showed a decreased production of IL-1β, TNF-α, with DHEA being unable to modify the pattern of cytokine production or to reverse the cortisol inhibitory effects. Interestingly the intra-macrophagic bacterial burden was found reduced by DHEA treatment. While this effect was not related to a different cytokine pattern, in terms their production or mRNA expression, DHEA treatment did promote autophagy in Mtb-infected macrophages, irrespective of Cortisol presence. In essence, the better control of Mtb load by DHEA-treated macrophages seems to be dependent on an autophagic mechanism. The present results are relevant for two reasons as autophagy is not only important for clearance of mycobacteria but also for the prevention of tissue damage.

  8. Brucella melitensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis depict overlapping gene expression patterns induced in infected THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Masoudian, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens infecting mammalian cells have developed various strategies to suppress and evade their hosts' defensive mechanisms. In this line, the intracellular bacteria that are able to survive and propagate within their host cells must have developed strategies to avert their host's killing attitude. Studying the interface of host-pathogen confrontation can provide valuable information for defining therapeutic approaches. Brucellosis, caused by the Brucella strains, is a zoonotic bacterial disease that affects thousands of humans and animals around the world inflicting discomfort and huge economic losses. Similar to many other intracellular dwelling bacteria, infections caused by Brucella are difficult to treat, and hence any attempt at identifying new and common therapeutic targets would prove beneficial for the purpose of curing infections caused by the intracellular bacteria. In THP-1 macrophage infected with Brucella melitensis we studied the expression levels of four host's genes, i.e. EMP2, ST8SIA4, HCP5 and FRMD5 known to be involved in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data showed that at this molecular level, except for FRMD5 that was downregulated, the other three genes were upregulated by B. melitensis. Brucella melitensis and M. tuberculosis go through similar intracellular processes and interestingly two of the investigated genes, i.e. EMP2 and ST4SIA8 were upregulated in THP-1 cell infected with B. melitensis similar to that reported for THP-1 cells infected with M. tuberculosis. At the host-pathogen interaction interface, this study depicts overlapping changes for different bacteria with common survival strategies; a fact that implies designing therapeutic approaches based on common targets may be possible. PMID:27175205

  9. [Spectrophotometric determination of protein content in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages - description of the method].

    PubMed

    Wolska, Jolanta; Janda, Katarzyna; Gutowska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are the basic building block of tissue, and are part of enzymes and hormones regulating many important life processes. Changes in their concentration control the metabolic processes of the cell. Quantitative determination of the protein content is divided into indirect methods (e.g. Kjeldahl method) and direct methods (buret method, Lowry, immunoenzymatic, formol method, based on incorporation of dye in the range of ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and based on the phenomenon of selective absorption of radiation in the infrared range). One of the methods for the determination of protein content is the spectrophotometric method described by Bradford. The protein concentration assay procedure utilizes the phenomenon of formation of the dye (Coomassie Brillant Blue G-250)-protein and colour intensity is proportional to the protein content in the solution. The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness of this method for determining the protein content in THP-1 cells cultured with extracts of nettle fruit stalks (Urtica dioica L.). Aqueous and alcohol extracts at two concentrations were used. It has been shown that the spectrophotometric determination of protein content by the Bradford method is an effective and accurate method for determining the concentration of protein in THP-1 macrophages. The results indicate that this method can be recommended for the determination of the protein content in other cell cultures. PMID:27116861

  10. Fibroblast growth factor 21 enhances cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wei; Yu, Xuejing; Wang, Honglian; Chen, Tielin; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xianggui; Zhou, Puhui; Nie, Fang; Zhou, Qin; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel metabolic regulator. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux and the expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) A1 and G1 in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Furthermore, the present study aimed to investigate the role of the liver X receptor (LXR) α in this process. A model of oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cells from human THP-1 cells was established. The effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux was analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. FGF21 was found to enhance apolipoprotein A1- and high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux. FGF21 was also observed to increase the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Furthermore, LXRα-short interfering RNA attenuated the stimulatory effects induced by FGF21. These findings suggest that FGF21 may have a protective effect against atherosclerosis by enhancing cholesterol efflux through the induction of LXRα-dependent ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression.

  11. [Spectrophotometric determination of protein content in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages - description of the method].

    PubMed

    Wolska, Jolanta; Janda, Katarzyna; Gutowska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are the basic building block of tissue, and are part of enzymes and hormones regulating many important life processes. Changes in their concentration control the metabolic processes of the cell. Quantitative determination of the protein content is divided into indirect methods (e.g. Kjeldahl method) and direct methods (buret method, Lowry, immunoenzymatic, formol method, based on incorporation of dye in the range of ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and based on the phenomenon of selective absorption of radiation in the infrared range). One of the methods for the determination of protein content is the spectrophotometric method described by Bradford. The protein concentration assay procedure utilizes the phenomenon of formation of the dye (Coomassie Brillant Blue G-250)-protein and colour intensity is proportional to the protein content in the solution. The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness of this method for determining the protein content in THP-1 cells cultured with extracts of nettle fruit stalks (Urtica dioica L.). Aqueous and alcohol extracts at two concentrations were used. It has been shown that the spectrophotometric determination of protein content by the Bradford method is an effective and accurate method for determining the concentration of protein in THP-1 macrophages. The results indicate that this method can be recommended for the determination of the protein content in other cell cultures.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 21 enhances cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wei; Yu, Xuejing; Wang, Honglian; Chen, Tielin; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xianggui; Zhou, Puhui; Nie, Fang; Zhou, Qin; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel metabolic regulator. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux and the expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) A1 and G1 in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Furthermore, the present study aimed to investigate the role of the liver X receptor (LXR) α in this process. A model of oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cells from human THP-1 cells was established. The effect of FGF21 on cholesterol efflux was analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. FGF21 was found to enhance apolipoprotein A1- and high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux. FGF21 was also observed to increase the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Furthermore, LXRα-short interfering RNA attenuated the stimulatory effects induced by FGF21. These findings suggest that FGF21 may have a protective effect against atherosclerosis by enhancing cholesterol efflux through the induction of LXRα-dependent ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. PMID:25334019

  13. Host gene expression for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Park, Hongtae; Park, Hyun-Eui; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, which causes considerable economic loss in the dairy industry and has a possible relationship to Crohn's disease (CD) in humans. As MAP has been detected in retail pasteurized milk samples, its transmission via milk is of concern. Despite its possible role in the etiology of CD, there have been few studies examining the interactions between MAP and human cells. In the current study, we applied Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to the transcription profiles generated from a murine model with MAP infection as part of a previously conducted study. Twenty-one genes were selected as potential host immune responses, compared with the transcriptional profiles in naturally MAP-infected cattle, and validated in MAP-infected human monocyte-derived macrophage THP-1 cells. Of these, the potential host responses included up-regulation of genes related to immune response (CD14, S100A8, S100A9, LTF, HP and CHCIL3), up-regulation of Th1-polarizing factor (CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10), down-regulation of genes related to metabolism (ELANE, IGF1, TCF7L2 and MPO) and no significant response of other genes (GADD45a, GPNMB, HMOX1, IFNG and NQO1) in THP-1 cells infected with MAP. PMID:25877879

  14. The choice of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate differentiation protocol influences the response of THP-1 macrophages to a pro-inflammatory stimulus.

    PubMed

    Lund, Maria E; To, Joyce; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Donnelly, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    The human monocytic cell line, THP-1, is the most widely used model for primary human monocytes/macrophages. This is because, following differentiation using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), THP-1 cells acquire a macrophage-like phenotype, which mimics, in many respects, primary human macrophages. Despite the widespread use of THP-1 cells in studies elucidating macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli, as well as the development and screening of potential therapeutics, there is currently no standardised protocol for the reliable differentiation of THP-1 monocytes to a macrophage phenotype using PMA. Consequently, reports using THP-1 cells have demonstrated significant phenotypic and functional differences between resultant THP-1 macrophage populations, which are largely attributable to the varying PMA differentiation methods used. Thus, to guarantee consistency and reproducibility between studies, and to ensure the relevance of THP-1 cells as an appropriate model for primary human macrophages, it is crucial to develop a standardised protocol for the differentiation of THP-1 macrophages. Accordingly, we compared the function and phenotype of THP-1 macrophages generated using the range of published PMA differentiation protocols, specifically in response to the pro-inflammatory stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrated that the function of the resultant THP-1 macrophage populations, as determined by tumour necrosis factor (TNF) secretion in response to LPS stimulation, varied significantly, and was dependent upon the concentration of PMA used to stimulate the differentiation of monocytes, and the period of rest following PMA exposure. These data indicate that exposure of monocytic THP-1 cells to 25 nM PMA over 48 h, followed by a recovery period of 24h in culture in the absence of PMA, was the optimal protocol for the differentiation of THP-1 cells.

  15. Curcumin enhanced cholesterol efflux by upregulating ABCA1 expression through AMPK-SIRT1-LXRα signaling in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-long; Liu, Mi-Hua; Hu, Hui-Jun; Feng, Hong-ru; Fan, Xiao-Juan; Zou, Wei-wen; Pan, Yong-quan; Hu, Xue-mei; Wang, Zuo

    2015-09-01

    Curcumin, a traditional Chinese derivative from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, is beneficial to health by modulating lipid metabolism and suppressing atherogenesis. A key part of atherosclerosis is the failure of macrophages to restore their cellular cholesterol homeostasis and the formation of foam cells. In this study, results showed that curcumin dramatically increased the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), promoted cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells, and reduced cellular cholesterol levels. Curcumin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and SIRT1, and then activated LXRα in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Inhibiting AMPK/SIRT1 activity by its specific inhibitor or by small interfering RNA could inhibit LXRα activation and abolish curcumin-induced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Thus, curcumin enhanced cholesterol efflux by upregulating ABCA1 expression through activating AMPK-SIRT1-LXRα signaling in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. This study describes a possible mechanism for understanding the antiatherogenic effects of curcumin on attenuating the progression of atherosclerosis.

  16. Effect of oxidative stress on plasma membrane fluidity of THP-1 induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Martínez, Paz; Morros, Antoni

    2013-02-01

    Plasma membrane is one of the preferential targets of reactive oxygen species which cause lipid peroxidation. This process modifies membrane properties such as membrane fluidity, a very important physical feature known to modulate membrane protein localization and function. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on plasma membrane fluidity regionalization of single living THP-1 macrophages. These cells were oxidized with H(2)O(2) at different concentrations, and plasma membrane fluidity was analyzed by two-photon microscopy in combination with the environment-sensitive probe Laurdan. Results show a significant H(2)O(2) concentration dependent increase in the frequency of rigid lipid regions, mainly attributable to lipid rafts, at the expense of the intermediate fluidity regions. A novel statistical analysis evaluated changes in size and number of lipid raft domains under oxidative stress conditions, as lipid rafts are platforms aiding cell signaling and are thought to have relevant roles in macrophage functions. It is shown that H(2)O(2) causes an increase in the number, but not the size, of raft domains. As macrophages are highly resistant to H(2)O(2), these new raft domains might be involved in cell survival pathways.

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92 Cells Activate Expression of Immunomodulatory Genes in THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    YANAGIHARA, Sae; GOTO, Hiroaki; HIROTA, Tatsuhiko; FUKUDA, Shinji; OHNO, Hiroshi; YAMAMOTO, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    To understand the immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92 cells suggested from our previous study of in vivo anti-allergy and anti-virus effects, host immune responses in macrophage-like THP-1 cells after 4 h (the early phase) and 24 h (the late phase) of cocultivation with L-92 cells were investigated by transcriptome analysis. In the early phase of L-92 treatment, various transcription regulator genes, such as, NFkB1, NFkB2, JUN, HIVEP2 and RELB, and genes encoding chemokines and cytokines, such as CCL4, CXCL11, CCL3 and TNF, were upregulated. Two transmembrane receptor genes, TLR7 and ICAM1, were also upregulated in the early phase of treatment. In contrast, many transmembrane receptor genes, such as IL7R, CD80, CRLF2, CD86, CD5, HLA-DQA1, IL2RA, IL15RA and CSF2RA, and some cytokine genes, including IL6, IL23A and CCL22, were significantly upregulated in the late phase after L-92 exposure. Some genes encoding cytokines, such as IL1A, IL1B and IL8, and the enzyme IDO1 were upregulated at both the early and the late phases of treatment. These results suggest that probiotic L-92 might promote Th1 and regulatory T-cell responses by activation of the MAPK signaling pathway, followed by the NOD-like receptor signaling pathway in THP-1 cells. PMID:25379363

  18. Urotensin II increases foam cell formation by repressing ABCA1 expression through the ERK/NF-κB pathway in THP-1 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Jian-Feng; Tang, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Min; Li, Yuan; Chen, Kong; Zeng, Meng-Ya; Yao, Feng; Xie, Wei; Zheng, Xi-Long; Zeng, Gao-Feng; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • U II reduces cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. • U II decreases the expression of ABCA1. • Inhibition of the ERK/NF-κB pathway reduces U II effects on ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. - Abstract: Objective: Foam cell formation in the arterial wall plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Recent studies showed that Urotensin II (U II) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of human U II on ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and the underlying mechanism in THP-1 macrophages. Methods and results: Cultured THP-1 macrophages were treated with U II, followed by measuring the intracellular lipid contents, cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 levels. The results showed that U II dramatically decreased ABCA1 levels and impaired cholesterol efflux. However, the effects of U II on ABCA1 protein expression and cellular cholesterol efflux were partially reversed by inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, suggesting the potential roles of ERK1/2 and NF-κB in ABCA1 expression, respectively. Conclusion: Our current data indicate that U II may have promoting effects on the progression of atherosclerosis, likely through suppressing ABCA1 expression via activation of the ERK/NF-κB pathway and reducing cholesterol efflux to promote macrophage foam cell formation.

  19. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ruairi C; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%-42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%-7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  20. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ruairi C.; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%–42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%–7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  1. The toxicity of rifampicin polylactic acid nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and human macrophage THP-1 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, M.; Rybalkina, E.; Barsegyan, G.; Onishchenko, G.; Lepekha, L.

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis is rapidly becoming a major health problem. The rise in tuberculosis incidence stimulates efforts to develop more effective delivery systems for the existing antituberculous drugs while decreasing the side effects. The nanotechnology may provide novel drug delivery tools allowing controlled drug release. Rifampicin is one of the main antituberculous drugs, characterized by high toxicity, and Poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer used for the preparation of encapsulated drugs. The aim of our work was to evaluate the toxicity of rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG using human macrophage THP-1 cell line. Our data demonstrate that rifampicin-PLLA is effective against M. bovis BCG in the infected macrophages. The drug is inducing the dysfunction of mitochondria and apoptosis in the macrophages and is acting as a potential substrate of Pgp thereby modulating cell chemosensitivity. The severity of the toxic effects of the rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles is increasing in a dose-dependent manner. We suggest that free rifampicin induces death of M. bovis BCG after PLLA degradation and diffusion from phago-lysosomes to cytoplasm causing mitochondria dysfunction and affecting the Pgp activity.

  2. The Effect of Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Molecular Markers of Cholesterol Homeostasis in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zavar Reza, Javad; Nahangi, Hossein; Mansouri, Reza; Dehghani, Ali; Mojarrad, Majid; Fathi, Mohammad; Nikzamir, Abdolrahim; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Macrophages derived foam cells are key factors in the maladaptive immune and inflammatory response. Objectives The study of the cholesterol homeostasis and the molecular factor involved in these cells is very important in understanding the process of atherosclerosis and the mechanisms that prevent its occurrence. Materials and Methods This experimental study investigated the effects of c9, t11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid (c9, t11-CLA). Alpha Linolenic Acid (LA), and Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) on the PPARα and ACAT1 mRNA expression by Real time PCR and cholesterol homeostasis in THP-1 macrophages derived foam cells. Results Incubation of CLA, LA, EPA, and synthetic ligands did not prevent increasing the cellular total cholesterol (TC). Free cholesterol (FC) is increased by Sandoz58-035 (P = 0.024) and decreased by fatty acids and Wy14643 (Pirinixic acid) (P = 0.035). The pattern of distribution of %EC is similar to the EC pattern distribution. The ACAT1 mRNA expression was significantly increased by EPA (P = 0.009), but c9, t11- CLA, LA, Wy14643, and Sandoz58-035 had no significant effect on the mRNA level of ACAT1 expression compared to DMSO(Dimethyl sulfoxide). Discussions In comparison to the control of Wy14643, Sandoz58-035, c9 and t11-CLA, EPA increased the PPARα mRNA levels (P = 0.024, P = 0.041, P = 0.043, and P = 0.004, respectively), even though, LA had no significant effect on the PPARα mRNA expression (P = 0.489). Conclusions Variations in the chemical structure of fatty acids can affect their physiological function. PMID:24396573

  3. [Serum amyloid A promotes the inflammatory response via p38-MAPK/SR-BI pathway in THP-1 macrophages].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming-Yan; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yu; Peng, Feng-Ling; Ou, Han-Xiao; Zheng, Xiang; Shi, Jin-Feng; Zeng, Gao-Feng; Mo, Zhong-Cheng

    2016-06-25

    To investigate the effect and mechanism of serum amyloid A (SAA) on the expression of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and inflammatory response in THP-1 macrophages, the human THP-1 cells were treated with SAA and p38-MAPK agonist (anisomycin) or p38-MAPK inhibitor (SB203580). Then, the expressions of SR-BI, phosphorylated p38-MAPK and inflammatory factors (MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1β) were examined by real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. The results showed that, compared with control group, SAA increased the levels of inflammatory factors (MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1β), down-regulated the expressions of SR-BI, and up-regulated the expression of phosphorylated p38-MAPK protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in THP-1 cells (P < 0.05). After treatment with SAA and p38-MAPK agonist (anisomycin) in THP-1 cells, the expression of SR-BI was down-regulated, and the levels of inflammatory factors and phosphorylated p38-MAPK protein expression were increased, compared with the group only treated by SAA (P < 0.05). In contrast, the SR-BI expression was up-regulated, whereas inflammatory factors and phosphorylated p38-MAPK protein expressions were decreased after the cells were treated with SAA and p38-MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) (P < 0.05). The results suggest that SAA-promoted inflammatory response in THP-1 macrophages may be through the phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and inhibition of SR-BI expression. PMID:27350202

  4. Visfatin contributes to the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages through the differential regulation of inflammatory cytokines in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mi Ran; Seo, Jeong Mi; Park, Hyun Young

    2014-04-01

    Visfatin is a novel multifunctional adipocytokine with inflammatory properties. Although a link between visfatin and atherosclerosis has recently been suggested, its actions in the development of atherosclerosis remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated a potential role and underlying mechanism(s) of visfatin in monocytes/macrophages differentiation, a critical early step in atherogenesis, using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated THP-1 cell models. The co-incubation of PMA with visfatin-induced CD36 expression with a concomitant increase in the phagocytosis of latex beads compared with PMA alone treatment. Moreover, visfatin markedly increased interleukin (IL)-1β secretion by enhancing IL-1β mRNA stability in a short-term incubation. Visfatin also significantly elevated the secretion of IL-6 as well as IL-1β in a longer incubation period, which was partially suppressed by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, BAY11-7082, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125. Furthermore, silencing IL-1β successfully blocked IL-6 secretion, CD36 expression, and NF-κB activation in response to visfatin. Collectively, these results suggest that visfatin enhances the IL-1β-dependent induction of IL-6 and CD36 via distinct signaling pathways mediated by JNK and NF-κB, respectively, and consequently, leading to the acceleration of monocytes/macrophages differentiation. PMID:24378536

  5. Visfatin contributes to the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages through the differential regulation of inflammatory cytokines in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mi Ran; Seo, Jeong Mi; Park, Hyun Young

    2014-04-01

    Visfatin is a novel multifunctional adipocytokine with inflammatory properties. Although a link between visfatin and atherosclerosis has recently been suggested, its actions in the development of atherosclerosis remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated a potential role and underlying mechanism(s) of visfatin in monocytes/macrophages differentiation, a critical early step in atherogenesis, using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated THP-1 cell models. The co-incubation of PMA with visfatin-induced CD36 expression with a concomitant increase in the phagocytosis of latex beads compared with PMA alone treatment. Moreover, visfatin markedly increased interleukin (IL)-1β secretion by enhancing IL-1β mRNA stability in a short-term incubation. Visfatin also significantly elevated the secretion of IL-6 as well as IL-1β in a longer incubation period, which was partially suppressed by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, BAY11-7082, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125. Furthermore, silencing IL-1β successfully blocked IL-6 secretion, CD36 expression, and NF-κB activation in response to visfatin. Collectively, these results suggest that visfatin enhances the IL-1β-dependent induction of IL-6 and CD36 via distinct signaling pathways mediated by JNK and NF-κB, respectively, and consequently, leading to the acceleration of monocytes/macrophages differentiation.

  6. Hydrolysis products generated by lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase differentially impact THP-1 macrophage cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Essaji, Yasmin; Yang, Yanbo; Albert, Carolyn J; Ford, David A; Brown, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages express lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and endothelial lipase (EL) within atherosclerotic plaques; however, little is known about how lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by these lipases might affect macrophage cell signalling pathways. We hypothesized that hydrolysis products affect macrophage cell signalling pathways associated with atherosclerosis. To test our hypothesis, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with products from total lipoprotein hydrolysis by recombinant LPL or EL. Using antibody arrays, we found that the phosphorylation of six receptor tyrosine kinases and three signalling nodes--most associated with atherosclerotic processes--was increased by LPL derived hydrolysis products. EL derived hydrolysis products only increased the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase A, which is also implicated in playing a role in atherosclerosis. Using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, we identified the species of triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines that were hydrolyzed by LPL and EL, and we identified the fatty acids liberated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To determine if the total liberated fatty acids influenced signalling pathways, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with a mixture of the fatty acids that matched the concentrations of liberated fatty acids from total lipoproteins by LPL, and we subjected cell lysates to antibody array analyses. The analyses showed that only the phosphorylation of Akt was significantly increased in response to fatty acid treatment. Overall, our study shows that macrophages display potentially pro-atherogenic signalling responses following acute treatments with LPL and EL lipoprotein hydrolysis products. PMID:23794138

  7. Sulforaphane exerts its anti-inflammatory effect against amyloid-β peptide via STAT-1 dephosphorylation and activation of Nrf2/HO-1 cascade in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Ye Won; Jhang, Kyoung A; Woo, So-Youn; Kang, Jihee Lee; Chong, Young Hae

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, accounting for most cases of dementia in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are still lacking. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane against Aβ1-42 monomers in human THP-1 microglia-like cells. The results showed that sulforaphane preferentially inhibited cathepsin B- and caspase-1-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by mostly Aβ1-42 monomers, an effect that potently reduced excessive secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that sulforaphane mitigated the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 induced by Aβ1-42 monomers. Sulforaphane also increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation, which was followed by upregulation of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane on Aβ1-42-induced IL-1β production was diminished by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1. Moreover, sulforaphane significantly attenuated the levels of microRNA-146a, which is selectively upregulated in the temporal cortex and hippocampus of AD brains. The aforementioned effects of sulforaphane were replicated by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, and Nrf2 activator. These results indicate that signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 dephosphorylation, HO-1 and its upstream effector, Nrf2, play a pivotal role in triggering an anti-inflammatory signaling cascade of sulforaphane that results in decreases of IL-1β release and microRNA-146a production in Aβ1-42-stimulated human microglia-like cells. These findings suggest that the phytochemical sulforaphane has a potential application in AD therapeutics.

  8. Inflammasomes-dependent regulation of IL-1β secretion induced by the virulent Mycobacterium bovis Beijing strain in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Zhao, Deming; Yue, Ruichao; Khan, Sher Hayat; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Yin, Xiaomin; Yang, Lifeng; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in cattle. Infection of macrophages with M. bovis leads to the activation of the "nucleotide binding and oligomerization, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domains-containing protein 3" (NLRP3) and "absent in melanoma 2" (AIM2) inflammasomes, which in turn triggers release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) that contributes to bacterial clearance and plays a crucial role in the host defense. However, NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation is influenced by several factors and how IL-1β secretion by M. bovis-infected macrophages is regulated via the inflammasome pathway remains unclear. Here we found that IL-1β secretion and pro-IL-1β protein accumulation were inhibited in THP-1 macrophages upon exposure to the virulent M. bovis Beijing strain in the presence of high K(+) concentrations, cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) and PR-619 (a deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor). Scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by N-acetylcysteine reduced IL-1β release independent of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Collectively, our results suggest that IL-1β secretion by M. bovis-infected THP-1 macrophages is reduced by high extracellular K(+) concentration, inhibition of new protein synthesis, deubiquitination, and ROS generation. PMID:25980833

  9. Inhibition of proinflammatory biomarkers in THP1 macrophages by polyphenols derived from chamomile, meadowsweet and willow bark.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Elaine M; Harbourne, Niamh; Marete, Eunice; Martyn, Danika; Jacquier, Jc; O'Riordan, Dolores; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-04-01

    Antiinflammatory compounds in the diet can alleviate excessive inflammation, a factor in the pathogenesis of common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This study examined three European herbs, chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria L.) and willow bark (Salix alba L.), which have been traditionally used to treat inflammation and their potential for use as antiinflammatory agents. Aqueous herbal extracts and isolated polyphenolic compounds (apigenin, quercetin and salicylic acid, 0-100 μM) were incubated with THP1 macrophages, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured. At concentrations of 10 μM, both apigenin and quercetin reduced IL-6 significantly ( p < 0.05). Apigenin at 10 μM and quercetin at 25 μM reduced TNF-α significantly ( p < 0.05). Amongst the herbal extracts, willow bark had the greatest antiinflammatory activity at reducing IL-6 and TNF-α production. This was followed by meadowsweet and then chamomile. The lowest effective antiinflammatory concentrations were noncytotoxic (MTT mitochondrial activity assay). The Comet assay, which was used to study the protective effect of the isolated phenols against oxidative damage, showed positive results for all three polyphenols. These are the first findings that demonstrate the antiinflammatory capacity of these herbal extracts.

  10. Syk protein tyrosine kinase involves PECAM-1 signaling through tandem immunotyrosine inhibitory motifs in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junchen; Wu, Yanling; Hu, Hai; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Ying; Mao, Huiming; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zhongmin; Chen, Bing-guan

    2011-01-01

    Although recent evidence supports a functional relationship between platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) and Syk tyrosine kinase, little is known about the interaction of Syk with PECAM-1. We report that down-regulation of Syk inhibits the spreading of human THP-1 macrophage cells. Moreover, our data indicate that Syk binds PECAM-1 through its immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM), and dual phosphorylation of the ITIM domain of PECAM-1 leads to activation of Syk. Our results indicate that the distance between the phosphotyrosines could be up to 22 amino acids in length, depending on the conformational flexibility, and that the dual ITIM tyrosine motifs of PECAM-1 facilitate immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-like signaling. The preferential binding of PECAM-1 to Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2 or Syk may depend on their relative affinities, and could provide a mechanism by which signal transduction from PECAM-1 is internally regulated by both positive and negative signaling enzymes. PMID:22000807

  11. Inhibition of proinflammatory biomarkers in THP1 macrophages by polyphenols derived from chamomile, meadowsweet and willow bark.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Elaine M; Harbourne, Niamh; Marete, Eunice; Martyn, Danika; Jacquier, Jc; O'Riordan, Dolores; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-04-01

    Antiinflammatory compounds in the diet can alleviate excessive inflammation, a factor in the pathogenesis of common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This study examined three European herbs, chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria L.) and willow bark (Salix alba L.), which have been traditionally used to treat inflammation and their potential for use as antiinflammatory agents. Aqueous herbal extracts and isolated polyphenolic compounds (apigenin, quercetin and salicylic acid, 0-100 μM) were incubated with THP1 macrophages, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured. At concentrations of 10 μM, both apigenin and quercetin reduced IL-6 significantly ( p < 0.05). Apigenin at 10 μM and quercetin at 25 μM reduced TNF-α significantly ( p < 0.05). Amongst the herbal extracts, willow bark had the greatest antiinflammatory activity at reducing IL-6 and TNF-α production. This was followed by meadowsweet and then chamomile. The lowest effective antiinflammatory concentrations were noncytotoxic (MTT mitochondrial activity assay). The Comet assay, which was used to study the protective effect of the isolated phenols against oxidative damage, showed positive results for all three polyphenols. These are the first findings that demonstrate the antiinflammatory capacity of these herbal extracts. PMID:22711544

  12. Apoptosis of THP-1 derived macrophages induced by sonodynamic therapy using a new sonosensitizer hydroxyl acetylated curcumin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Longbin; Sun, Xinyong; Zhu, Xing; Lv, Fengxiang; Zhong, Zhaoyu; Zhang, Feng; Guo, Wenhui; Cao, Wenwu; Yang, Liming; Tian, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin is extracted from the rhizomes of the traditional Chinese herb Curcuma longa. Our previous study indicated curcumin was able to function as a sonosensitizer. Hydroxyl acylated curcumin was synthesized from curcumin to eliminate the unstable hydroxy perssad in our group. The potential use of Hydroxyl acylated curcumin as a sonosensitizer for sonodynamic therapy (SDT) requires further exploration. This study investigated the sonodynamic effect of Hydroxyl acylated curcumin on THP-1 macrophage. THP-1 macrophages were cultured with Hydroxyl acylated curcumin at a concentration of 5.0 μg/mL for 4 hours and then exposed to pulse ultrasound irradiation (0.5 W/cm2 with 1.0 MHz ) for 5 min, 10 min and 15 min. Six hours later, cell viability decreased significantly by CCK-8 assay. After ultrasound irradiation, the ratio of apoptosis and necrosis in SDT group was higher than that in control, Hydroxyl acylated curcumin alone and ultrasound alone. Moreover, the apoptotic rate was higher than necrotic rate with the flow cytometry analysis. Furthermore, Hydroxyl acylated curcumin-SDT induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in THP-1 macrophages immediately after the ultrasound treatment while ROS generation was reduced significantly with the scavenger of singlet oxygen Sodium azide (NaN3). Hydroxyl acylated curcumin-SDT led to a conspicuous loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) compared with other groups, while MMP was increased significantly with the scavenger of singlet oxygen Sodium azide (NaN3), ROS inhibitor N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP) inhibitor Cyclosporin A (CsA). The cytochrome C, cleaved-Caspase-9, cleaved-Caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP upregulated after SDT through Western blotting. These findings suggested that Hydroxyl acylated curcumin under low-intensity ultrasound had sonodynamic effect on THP-1 macrophages via generation of intracellular singlet oxygen and mitochondria-caspase signaling

  13. Diverse HLA-I Peptide Repertoires of the APC Lines MUTZ3-Derived Immature and Mature Dendritic Cells and THP1-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nyambura, Lydon Wainaina; Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Baleeiro, Renato Brito; Walden, Peter

    2016-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are specialized APCs that process and present self-Ags for induction of tolerance and foreign Ags to initiate T cell-mediated immunity. Related to differentiation states they have specific phenotypes and functions. However, the impact of these differentiations on Ag processing and presentation remains poorly defined. To gain insight into this, we analyzed and compared the HLA-I peptidomes of MUTZ3-derived human immature and mature DC lines and THP1-derived macrophages by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We found that the HLA-I peptidomes were heterogeneous and individualized and were dominated by nonapeptides with similar HLA-I binding affinities and anchor residues. MUTZ3-derived DCs and THP1-derived macrophages were able to sample peptides from source proteins of almost all subcellular locations and were involved in various cellular functions in similar proportion, with preference to proteins involved in cell communication, signal transduction, protein metabolism, and transcription factor/regulator activity. PMID:27543614

  14. The Effects of Phellinus linteus Polysaccharide Extracts on Cholesterol Efflux in Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-Loaded THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-hui; Li, Yan; Cheng, Zhao-yun; Cai, Xi-guo; Wang, Hong-min

    2015-06-01

    The removal of excess cellular cholesterol is critical for maintaining cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Phellinus linteus polysaccharide extracts (PLPEs) is an immunomudulatory agent with a molecular weight of 153 kd. Here, we analyzed the effects of PLPEs on cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-loaded THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) macrophages. Various concentrations of PLPEs (5, 10, 20, and 100 μg/mL) were used to treat cells. Cholesterol efflux analysis was performed to analyze the cholesterol efflux ratio in PLPE-treated cells. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were conducted to assess the expression of target genes. Low dose of PLPEs (5-20 μg/mL) dose dependently enhanced cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I), evidenced by promoting the expression of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, and peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ, key regulators for cholesterol efflux. Moreover, GW9662, a potent antagonist of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ, inhibited PLPE (20 μg/mL)-promoted cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I in a dose-dependent fashion. However, high dose of PLPEs (100 μg/mL) inhibited cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I from ox-LDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages, enhanced the production of superoxide anion, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels, and raised nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits. Thus, these results indicate that low and high doses of PLPEs exhibit opposite effects on cholesterol efflux from ox-LDL-loaded THP-1 cells.

  15. MicroRNA-155 silencing enhances inflammatory response and lipid uptake in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ri-sheng; Hu, Guan-qiong; Lin, Bin; Lin, Zhi-yi; Sun, Cheng-chao

    2010-12-01

    It has been proposed that the inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is an important regulator of the immune system and has been shown to be involved in acute inflammatory response. However, the function of miR-155 in oxLDL-stimulated inflammation and atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here, we show that the exposure of human THP-1 macrophages to oxLDL led to a marked up-regulation of miR-155 in a dose-dependent manner. Silencing of endogenous miR-155 in THP-1 cells using locked nucleic acid-modified antisense oligonucleotides significantly enhanced oxLDL-induced lipid uptake, up-regulated the expression of scavenger receptors (lectinlike oxidized LDL receptor-1, cluster of differentiation 36 [CD36], and CD68), and promoted the release of several cytokines including interleukin (IL)-6, -8, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Luciferase reporter assay showed that targeting miR-155 promoted nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and potentiated the NF-κB-driven transcription activity. Moreover, miR-155 knockdown resulted in a marked increase in the protein amount of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), an important adapter protein used by Toll-like receptors to activate the NF-κB pathway. Our data demonstrate that miR-155 serves as a negative feedback regulator in oxLDL-stimulated THP-1 inflammatory responses and lipid uptake and thus might have potential therapeutic implications in atherosclerosis.

  16. Marrubium vulgare extract inhibits human-LDL oxidation and enhances HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Isabelle, Maxim; Cherki, Mounia; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2006-12-14

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the beneficial properties of aqueous extracts of Marrubium vulgare (AEM) towards cardiovascular disease by protecting human-LDL against lipid peroxidation and promoting HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux. Human-LDL were oxidised by incubation with CuSO(4) in the presence of increased concentrations of AEM (0-100 microg/ml). LDL lipid peroxidation was evaluated by conjugated diene formation, vitamin E disappearance as well as LDL-electrophoretic mobility. HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux assay was carried out in human THP-1 macrophages. Incubation of LDL with AEM significantly prolonged the lag phase (P=0.014), lowered the progression rate of lipid peroxidation (P=0.004), reduced the disappearance of vitamin E and the electrophoretic mobility in a dose-dependent manner. Also, incubation of HDL with AEM significantly increased HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages implicating an independent ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) pathways. Our findings suggest that M. vulgare provides a source of natural antioxidants, which inhibit LDL oxidation and enhance reverse cholesterol transport and thus can prevent cardiovascular diseases development. These antioxidant properties increase the anti-atherogenic potential of HDL.

  17. Effects of Endocrine Disruptor Compounds, Alone or in Combination, on Human Macrophage-Like THP-1 Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Couleau, N.; Falla, J.; Beillerot, A.; Battaglia, E.; D’Innocenzo, M.; Plançon, S.; Laval-Gilly, P.; Bennasroune, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunological effects on human macrophages of four endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs) using the differentiated human THP-1 cell line as a model. We studied first the effects of these EDCs, including Bisphenol A (BPA), di-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and 4-tert-octylphenol (4-OP), either alone or in combination, on cytokine secretion, and phagocytosis. We then determined whether or not these effects were mediated by estrogen receptors via MAPK pathways. It was found that all four EDCs studied reduced strongly the phagocytosis of the differentiated THP-1 cells and that several of these EDCs disturbed also TNF-α, IL-1 β and IL-8 cytokine secretions. Furthermore, relative to control treatment, decreased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was always associated with EDCs treatments—either alone or in certain combinations (at 0.1 μM for each condition). Lastly, as treatments by an estrogen receptor antagonist suppressed the negative effects on ERK 1/2 phosphorylation observed in cells treated either alone with BPA, DEHP, 4-OP or with the combined treatment of BPA and DEHP, we suggested that estrogen receptor-dependent pathway is involved in mediating the effects of EDCs on human immune system. Altogether, these results advocate that EDCs can disturb human immune response at very low concentrations. PMID:26133781

  18. The role of HSP27 in RACK1-mediated PKC activation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Emanuela; Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Pinto, Antonella; Guaita, Antonio; Racchi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) pseudosubstrate is a commercially available peptide that directly activates protein kinase C-β (PKCβ). We have recently shown that RACK1 pseudosubstrate, alone or in combination with classical immune activators, results in increased cytokine production and CD86 upregulation in primary leukocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrated a role of PKCβ and RACK1 in chemical allergen-induced CD86 expression and IL-8 production in both THP-1 cells and primary human dendritic cells. Aim of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms underlying RACK1 pseudosubstrate-induced immune activation and to compare it to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The human promyelocytic cell line THP-1 was used throughout the study. RACK1 pseudosubstrate induced rapid (5 min) and dose-related PKCβ activation as assessed by its membrane translocation. Among the proteins phosphorylated, we identified Hsp27. Both RACK1 pseudosubstrate and LPS induce its phosphorylation and release in culture medium. The release of Hsp27 induced by RACK1 pseudosubstrate was also confirmed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To evaluate the role of Hsp27 in RACK1 pseudosubstrate or LPS-induced cell activation, we conducted Hsp27 silencing and neutralization experiments. Both strategies confirmed the central role of Hsp27 in RACK1 pseudosubstrate or LPS-induced cell activation, as assessed by IL-8 production and upregulation of CD86. PMID:27178349

  19. THP-1 macrophage lipid accumulation unaffected by fatty acid double bond geometric or positional configuration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fatty acid type alters atherosclerotic lesion progression and macrophage lipid accumulation. Incompletely elucidated are the mechanisms by which fatty acids differing in double-bond geometric or positional configuration alter arterial lipid accumulation. The objective of this study was to ev...

  20. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta is required for the differentiation of THP-1 monocytic cells by phorbol ester.

    PubMed

    Vosper, Helen; Khoudoli, Guennadi A; Palmer, Colin NA

    2003-12-11

    BACKGROUND: PPARdelta (NR1C2) promotes lipid accumulation in human macrophages in vitro and has been implicated in the response of macrophages to vLDL. We have investigated the role of PPARdelta in PMA-stimulated macrophage differentiation.The THP-1 monocytic cell line which displays macrophage like differentiation in response to phorbol esters was used as a model system. We manipulated the response to PMA using a potent synthetic agonist of PPARdelta, compound F. THP-1 sub-lines that either over-expressed PPARdelta protein, or expressed PPARdelta anti-sense RNA were generated. We then explored the effects of these genetic modulations on the differentiation process. RESULTS: The PPARdelta agonist, compound F, stimulated differentiation in the presence of sub-nanomolar concentrations of phorbol ester. Several markers of differentiation were induced by compound F in a synergistic fashion with phorbol ester, including CD68 and IL8. Over-expression of PPARdelta also sensitised THP-1 cells to phorbol ester and correspondingly, inhibition of PPARdelta by anti-sense RNA completely abolished this response. CONCLUSIONS: These data collectively demonstrate that PPARdelta plays a fundamental role in mediating a subset of cellular effects of phorbol ester and supports observations from mouse knockout models that PPARdelta is involved in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses.

  1. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein inhibits THP-1-derived macrophage autophagy via TET2 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Peng, Juan; Liu, Yanhui; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Qin; Li, Yongqing; Tang, Zhihan; Wang, Zuo; Jiang, Zhisheng; Wei, Dangheng

    2015-02-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying its pro-atherosclerosis roles has not yet been well explored. DNA demethylation modification, via DNA methyltransferases or ten-eleven-translocation (TET) family, is a crisis epigenetic regulation for various biological and pathological processes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on macrophage autophagy and its potential epigenetic mechanism. Results showed that after treatment with 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg/L ox-LDL for 24 h, the autophagy markers Beclin 1 and LC3 expression were obviously decreased at protein levels (P < 0.05). The mRNA and protein expression of TET2 was evidently decreased (P < 0.05). After pre-treatment with TET2 siRNA, the mRNA and protein levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 decreased compared with the 80 mg/L treatment group (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein levels of Beclin 1 and LC3-II were up-regulated (P < 0.05) in the 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor) of pretreatment group. Consistent with the Western blot results, cell immunofluorescence showed that the protein concentration of LC3-II decreased in the TET2 siRNA group and increased in the 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine group. Taken together, these results showed that DNA demethylation modifications regulate ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages autophagy and TET2 might be a novel regulator.

  2. Walnut oil increases cholesterol efflux through inhibition of stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Walnuts significantly decrease total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in normo- and hypercholesterolemic individuals. No study to date has evaluated the effects of walnuts on cholesterol efflux, the initial step in reverse cholesterol transport, in macrophage-derived foam cells (MDFC). The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanisms by which walnut oil affects cholesterol efflux. Methods The extract of English walnuts (walnut oil) was dissolved in DMSO and applied to cultured THP-1 MDFC cells (0.5 mg/mL). THP-1 MDFC also were treated with human sera (10%, v:v) taken from subjects in a walnut feeding study. Cholesterol efflux was examined by liquid scintillation counting. Changes in gene expression were quantified by real time PCR. Results Walnut oil treatment significantly increased cholesterol efflux through decreasing the expression of the lipogenic enzyme stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) in MDFC. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the major n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids found in walnuts, recaptured SCD1 reduction in MDFC, a mechanism mediated through activation of nuclear receptor farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). Postprandial serum treatment also increased cholesterol efflux in MDFC. When categorized by baseline C-reactive protein (CRP; cut point of 2 mg/L), subjects in the lower CRP sub-group benefited more from dietary intervention, including a more increase in cholesterol efflux, a greater reduction in SCD1, and a blunted postprandial lipemia. Conclusion In conclusion, walnut oil contains bioactive molecules that significantly improve cholesterol efflux in MDFC. However, the beneficial effects of walnut intake may be reduced by the presence of a pro-inflammatory state. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00938340 PMID:21871057

  3. THP-1 monocytes but not macrophages as a potential alternative for CD34{sup +} dendritic cells to identify chemical skin sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrechts, Nathalie Verstraelen, Sandra Lodewyckx, Hanne; Felicio, Ana; Hooyberghs, Jef; Witters, Hilda; Tendeloo, Viggo van; Cauwenberge, Paul van; Nelissen, Inge; Heuvel, Rosette van den; Schoeters, Greet

    2009-04-15

    Early detection of the sensitizing potential of chemicals is an emerging issue for chemical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In our institute, an in vitro classification model for prediction of chemical-induced skin sensitization based on gene expression signatures in human CD34{sup +} progenitor-derived dendritic cells (DC) has been developed. This primary cell model is able to closely mimic the induction phase of sensitization by Langerhans cells in the skin, but it has drawbacks, such as the availability of cord blood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether human in vitro cultured THP-1 monocytes or macrophages display a similar expression profile for 13 predictive gene markers previously identified in DC and whether they also possess a discriminating capacity towards skin sensitizers and non-sensitizers based on these marker genes. To this end, the cell models were exposed to 5 skin sensitizers (ammonium hexachloroplatinate IV, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, eugenol, para-phenylenediamine, and tetramethylthiuram disulfide) and 5 non-sensitizers (L-glutamic acid, methyl salicylate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, tributyltin chloride, and zinc sulfate) for 6, 10, and 24 h, and mRNA expression of the 13 genes was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. The transcriptional response of 7 out of 13 genes in THP-1 monocytes was significantly correlated with DC, whereas only 2 out of 13 genes in THP-1 macrophages. After a cross-validation of a discriminant analysis of the gene expression profiles in the THP-1 monocytes, this cell model demonstrated to also have a capacity to distinguish skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. However, the DC model was superior to the monocyte model for discrimination of (non-)sensitizing chemicals.

  4. Evaluation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of the human TREM-1 gene in vitamin D3-matured THP-1 macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Isao

    2015-11-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) plays a role in inflammation by augmenting inflammatory responses through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. TREM-1 is expressed in mature macrophages, and is upregulated by stimulation with bacterial components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the present study, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the transcription of the human TREM-1 gene were examined using a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that TREM-1 mRNA was constitutively expressed at a low level in resting cells, and that its expression was upregulated by treatment with vitamin D3 (VitD3), but not by LPS. Importantly, TREM-1 mRNA expression was further upregulated by stimulation of the VitD3‑treated THP-1 cells with LPS. In addition, a luciferase reporter assay revealed that the serum response element (SRE) was involved in VitD3-induced promoter activity, whereas the activator protein-1 (AP-1) sites participated in the VitD3- and LPS-induced promoter activity. Of note, the CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) site contributed not only to basal, but also to VitD3- and LPS-induced promoter activity. Transfection with transcription factor oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) decoys indicated that transcription factors of the C/EBP and AP-1 families are likely involved in the basal, as well as in the VitD3- and LPS-induced TREM-1 transcription. Western blot analysis indicated that, of the members of the C/EBP family, C/EBPα was constitutively expressed in resting cells; its expression was enhanced by treatment with VitD3 and was further increased by treatment with VitD3 and LPS. Moreover, the expression of c-Fos and c-Jun (members of the AP-1 family) was augmented by treatment with both VitD3 and LPS. These observations indicate that members of the C/EBP family participate not only in basal, but also in the VitD3- and LPS-induced promoter activity of the human

  5. Phenolic-extract from argan oil (Argania spinosa L.) inhibits human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and enhances cholesterol efflux from human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Cloutier, Martin; Isabelle, Maxim; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2006-02-01

    Argan oil is rich in unsaturated fatty acids, tocopherol and phenolic compounds. These protective molecules make further study of its cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) action interesting. Furthermore, no previous study has explored the antioxidant activity of argan oil in comparison with olive oil. The present study was conducted to evaluate the beneficial properties of Virgin argan oil phenolic extracts (VAO-PE) towards CVD by: (A) protecting human (low-density lipoprotein, LDL) against lipid peroxidation and (B) promoting high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated cholesterol efflux. Human LDLs were oxidized by incubation with CuSO(4) in the presence of different concentrations of VAO-PE (0-320mug/ml). LDL lipid peroxidation was evaluated by conjugated diene and MDA formation as well as Vitamin E disappearance. Incubation of LDL with VAO-PE significantly prolonged the lag-phase and lowered the progression rate of lipid peroxidation (P<0.01) and reduced the disappearance of Vitamin E in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of HDL with VAO-PE significantly increased the fluidity of the HDL phospholipidic bilayer (P=0.0004) and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages. These results suggest that Virgin argan oil provides a source of dietary phenolic antioxidants, which prevent cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting LDL-oxidation and enhancing reverse cholesterol transport. These properties increase the anti-atherogenic potential of HDL. PMID:16019008

  6. Phenolic-extract from argan oil (Argania spinosa L.) inhibits human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and enhances cholesterol efflux from human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Cloutier, Martin; Isabelle, Maxim; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2006-02-01

    Argan oil is rich in unsaturated fatty acids, tocopherol and phenolic compounds. These protective molecules make further study of its cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) action interesting. Furthermore, no previous study has explored the antioxidant activity of argan oil in comparison with olive oil. The present study was conducted to evaluate the beneficial properties of Virgin argan oil phenolic extracts (VAO-PE) towards CVD by: (A) protecting human (low-density lipoprotein, LDL) against lipid peroxidation and (B) promoting high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated cholesterol efflux. Human LDLs were oxidized by incubation with CuSO(4) in the presence of different concentrations of VAO-PE (0-320mug/ml). LDL lipid peroxidation was evaluated by conjugated diene and MDA formation as well as Vitamin E disappearance. Incubation of LDL with VAO-PE significantly prolonged the lag-phase and lowered the progression rate of lipid peroxidation (P<0.01) and reduced the disappearance of Vitamin E in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of HDL with VAO-PE significantly increased the fluidity of the HDL phospholipidic bilayer (P=0.0004) and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages. These results suggest that Virgin argan oil provides a source of dietary phenolic antioxidants, which prevent cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting LDL-oxidation and enhancing reverse cholesterol transport. These properties increase the anti-atherogenic potential of HDL.

  7. Changes in the proteomic profile during the differential polarization status of the human monocyte-derived macrophage THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Hao; Jiang, Guanmin; Wang, Hongsheng; Wang, Xianfeng; Wang, Hao; Fang, Rui; Cai, Shaohui; Du, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and plastic populations that are an essential component of inflammation and host defense. To understand how macrophages respond to cytokine signals, we used 2DE to identify protein profiles in macrophages stimulated with interleukin 4 (M2) and those stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and interferon γ (M1). In total, 32 differentially expressed proteins in THP-1 cells were identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis. The different proteins were mainly involved in cellular structure, protein metabolism, stress response, oxidative response, and nitric oxide production during macrophage polarization. In particular, proteins playing important roles in production of nitric oxide (NO) were downregulated in M2 macrophages. Many antioxidant and heat shock proteins, which are related to oxidative response, were upregulated in M2 macrophages. More importantly, a remarkable decrease in intracellular ROS and NO production were detected in M2 macrophages. Our results provide a proteomic profile of differentially polarized macrophages and validate the function of the identified proteins, which may indicate possible mechanism of macrophage polarization process.

  8. Attenuation of niacin-induced prostaglandin D2 generation by omega-3 fatty acids in THP-1 macrophages and Langerhans dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    VanHorn, Justin; Altenburg, Jeffrey D; Harvey, Kevin A; Xu, Zhidong; Kovacs, Richard J; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2012-01-01

    Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid, is an organic compound that has several cardio-beneficial effects. However, its use is limited due to the induction of a variable flushing response in most individuals. Flushing occurs from a niacin receptor mediated generation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid metabolism. This study examined the ability of docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), to attenuate niacin-induced prostaglandins in THP-1 macrophages. Niacin induced both PGD2 and PGE2 generation in a dose-dependent manner. Niacin also caused an increase in cytosolic calcium and activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2. The increase in PGD2 and PGE2 was reduced by both docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, but not by oleic acid. Omega-3 PUFAs efficiently incorporated into cellular phospholipids at the expense of arachidonic acid, whereas oleic acid incorporated to a higher extent but had no effect on arachidonic acid levels. Omega-3 PUFAs also reduced surface expression of GPR109A, a human niacin receptor. Furthermore, omega-3 PUFAs also inhibited the niacin-induced increase in cytosolic calcium. Niacin and/or omega-3 PUFAs minimally affected cyclooxygenase-1 activity and had no effect on cyclooxygenase -2 activity. The effects of niacin on PGD2 generation were further confirmed using Langerhans dendritic cells. Results of the present study indicate that omega-3 PUFAs reduced niacin-induced prostaglandins formation by diminishing the availability of their substrate, as well as reducing the surface expression of niacin receptors. In conclusion, this study suggests that the regular use of omega-3 PUFAs along with niacin can potentially reduce the niacin-induced flushing response in sensitive patients. PMID:22442634

  9. LPS-induced NF-{kappa}B expression in THP-1Blue cells correlates with neopterin production and activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Jenny, Marcel; Kurz, Katharina; Klein, Angela; Ledochowski, Maximilian; Uberall, Florian; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} LPS induces NF-{kappa}B, neopterin formation and tryptophan degradation in THP-1 cells. {yields} Close dose- and time-dependent correlations exist between these biochemical events. {yields} Data provides some evidence for a parallel induction of them upon TLR stimulation. {yields} Results can be of considerable relevance also in vivo. -- Abstract: Neopterin production is induced in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells upon stimulation with Th1-type cytokine interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}). In parallel, IFN-{gamma} induces the tryptophan-(trp)-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and triggers the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Translocation of the signal transduction element nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is induced by ROS and accelerates the pro-inflammatory response by activation of other pro-inflammatory pathways. Therefore, a close relationship between NF-{kappa}B expression, the production of neopterin and the degradation of trp can be assumed, although this has not been demonstrated so far. In the present in vitro study we compared the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on NF-{kappa}B activation, neopterin formation and the degradation of trp in THP-1Blue cells, which represent the human myelomonocytic cell line THP-1 stably transfected with an NF-{kappa}B inducible reporter system. In cells stimulated with LPS, a significant induction of NF-{kappa}B was observed, and this was paralleled by an increase of kynureunine (kyn) and neopterin concentrations and a decline of trp. The increase of the kyn to trp quotient indicates accelerated IDO activity. Higher LPS concentrations and longer incubation of cells were associated with higher activities of all three biochemical pathways and significant correlations existed between NF-{kappa}B activation, neopterin release and trp degradation (all p < 0.001). We conclude that there is a parallel induction of NF-{kappa}B, neopterin

  10. Anticancer activity of chemically prepared shrimp low molecular weight chitin evaluation with the human monocyte leukaemia cell line, THP-1.

    PubMed

    Salah, R; Michaud, P; Mati, F; Harrat, Z; Lounici, H; Abdi, N; Drouiche, N; Mameri, N

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, anticancer activities of chitin, chitosan and low molecular weight chitin were evaluated using a human tumour cell line, THP-1. A molecular weight-activity relationship and an electrostatic interaction-activity relationship were determined. The cytotoxic effects of chitin and derivatives were also evaluated using a normal human foetal lung fibroblastic cell line, MRC-5 and the specific cytotoxicity of chitin and derivatives to tumour cell lines was demonstrated. The high antitumour effect of low molecular weight of chitin was established.

  11. Quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) peel polyphenols modulate LPS-induced inflammation in human THP-1-derived macrophages through NF-{kappa}B, p38MAPK and Akt inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija; Refai, Amira; Riahi, Ichrak; Fattouch, Sami; Karoui, Habib; Essafi, Makram

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quince peel polyphenols inhibit LPS-induced secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-8. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quince peel polyphenols augment LPS-induced secretion of IL-10 and IL-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quince peel polyphenols-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced secretion of TNF-{alpha} is partially mediated by IL-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The anti-inflammatory effects of quince polyphenols pass through NF-{kappa}B, p38MAPK and Akt inhibition. -- Abstract: Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of several pathologies, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease, atherosclerosis and cancer. A wide range of anti-inflammatory chemicals have been used to treat such diseases while presenting high toxicity and numerous side effects. Here, we report the anti-inflammatory effect of a non-toxic, cost-effective natural agent, polyphenolic extract from the Tunisian quince Cydonia oblonga Miller. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of human THP-1-derived macrophages induced the secretion of high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-{alpha} and the chemokine IL-8, which was inhibited by quince peel polyphenolic extract in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, quince polyphenols enhanced the level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 secreted by LPS-treated macrophages. We further demonstrated that the unexpected increase in IL-6 secretion that occurred when quince polyphenols were associated with LPS treatment was partially responsible for the polyphenols-mediated inhibition of TNF-{alpha} secretion. Biochemical analysis showed that quince polyphenols extract inhibited the LPS-mediated activation of three major cellular pro-inflammatory effectors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), p38MAPK and Akt. Overall, our data indicate that quince peel polyphenolic extract induces a potent anti-inflammatory effect that may prove useful for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and that a quince

  12. Optimization of the THP-1 activation assay to detect pharmaceuticals with potential to cause immune mediated drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Corti, Daniele; Galbiati, Valentina; Gatti, Nicolò; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Corsini, Emanuela

    2015-10-01

    Despite important impacts of systemic hypersensitivity induced by pharmaceuticals, for such endpoint no reliable preclinical approaches are available. We previously established an in vitro test to identify contact and respiratory allergens based on interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in THP-1 cells. Here, we challenged it for identification of pharmaceuticals associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions, with the idea that drug sensitizers share common mechanisms of cell activation. Cells were exposed to drugs associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions (streptozotocin, sulfamethoxazole, neomycin, probenecid, clonidine, procainamide, ofloxacin, methyl salicylate), while metformin was used as negative drug. Differently to chemicals, drugs tested were well tolerated, except clonidine and probenecid, with no signs of cytotoxicity up to 1-2mg/ml. THP-1 activation assay was adjusted, and conditions, that allow identification of all sensitizing drugs tested, were established. Next, using streptozotocin and selective inhibitors of PKC-β and p38 MAPK, two pathways involved in chemical allergen-induced cell activation, we tested the hypothesis that similar pathways were also involved in drug-induced IL-8 production and CD86 upregulation. Results indicated that drugs and chemical allergens share similar activation pathways. Finally, we made a structure-activity hypothesis related to hypersensitivity reactions, trying to individuate structural requisite that can be involved in immune mediated adverse reactions. PMID:26028146

  13. Effects of soy pinitol on the pro-inflammatory cytokines and scavenger receptors in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-treated THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won-Ha; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kang, Mi Ae; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong Bok; Jeon, Seon-Min

    2007-12-01

    Pinitol, a methylated form of D-chiro-inositol, acts as a insulin mediator. We investigated the effects of soy pinitol on the factors involved in foam cell formation using differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Pinitol slightly inhibited the lipid-laden foam cell formation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in a dose-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 releases were significantly reduced by pinitol treatment (0.05-0.5 mM), whereas interleukin-1beta and interleukin-8 secretions were significantly reduced in low-dose pinitol (0.05 or 0.1 mM) and 0.5 mM pinitol-treated cells, respectively, compared to no pinitol-treated cells. Gene expressions of CD36 and CD68 were significantly down-regulated by 0.05-0.5 mM pinitol compared to the oxLDL-treated control cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene expression was significantly decreased in 0.05-0.5 mM pinitol-treated cells compared to the no pinitol-treated macrophages. We conclude that pinitol has some inhibitory effects on foam cell formation by reducing lipid accumulation, secretion, and expression of some cytokines and macrophage scavenger receptor expression via its insulin-like action.

  14. Protein kinase C-alpha and -beta play antagonistic roles in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Dieter, P; Schwende, H

    2000-05-01

    The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells are investigated. Inhibition of PKC by RO 31-8220 reduces the phagocytosis of latex particles and the release of superoxide, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The proliferation of THP-1 cells is slightly enhanced by RO 31-8220. Stable transfection of THP-1 cells with asPKC-alpha, and incubation of THP-1 cells with antisense (as) PKC-alpha oligodeoxynucleotides reduces PKC-alpha levels and PKC activity. asPKC-alpha-transfected THP-1 cells show a decreased phagocytosis and a decreased release of superoxide, PGE(2) and TNF-alpha. The proliferation of asPKC-alpha-transfected THP-1 cells is enhanced. Stable transfection of THP-1 cells with asPKC-beta, and incubation of THP-1 cells with asPKC-beta oligodeoxynucleotides, reduces PKC-beta levels and PKC activity. asPKC-beta-transfected THP-1 cells show a decreased phagocytosis, a decreased TNF-alpha release, and a decreased proliferation. However, no difference is measured in the release of superoxide and PGE(2). These results suggest that: (1) PKC-alpha but not PKC-beta is involved in the release of superoxide and PGE(2); (2) TNF-alpha release and the phagocytosis of latex particles are mediated by PKC-alpha, PKC-beta, and other PKC isoenzymes; and (3) PKC-alpha and PKC-beta play antagonistic roles in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells. PKC-alpha promotes the differentiation process of THP-1 cells, PKC-beta retards the differentiation of THP-1 cells into macrophage-like cells. PMID:10822170

  15. Citrus bergamia Juice Extract Attenuates β-Amyloid-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Activation of THP-1 Cells Through MAPK and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Currò, Monica; Risitano, Roberto; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Cirmi, Santa; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Ientile, Riccardo; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to be effective in protecting against age-related cognitive and motor decline in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recently, a flavonoid-rich extract of Citrus bergamia juice (BJe) has been shown to display anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties against LPS-induced activation of human THP-1 monocytes. In the light of these observations, we wondered whether BJe may be beneficial against neuroinflammatory processes, such as those observed in Alzheimer’s disease. To this aim we used THP-1 monocytes to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial potential of BJe against amyloid-beta1–42 (Aβ1−42) -mediated inflammation. Exposure of THP-1 cells to Aβ1−42 significantly induced the expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and increased the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 as well as p46 and p54 members of JNK family. Moreover, Aβ1−42 raises AP-1 DNA binding activity in THP-1-treated cells. Interestingly, all these effects were reduced in the presence of BJe. Our data indicate that BJe may effectively counteract the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes/microglial cells exposed to amyloid fibrils, suggesting a promising role as a natural drug against neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:26853104

  16. Citrus bergamia Juice Extract Attenuates β-Amyloid-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Activation of THP-1 Cells Through MAPK and AP-1 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Currò, Monica; Risitano, Roberto; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Cirmi, Santa; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Ientile, Riccardo; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to be effective in protecting against age-related cognitive and motor decline in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recently, a flavonoid-rich extract of Citrus bergamia juice (BJe) has been shown to display anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties against LPS-induced activation of human THP-1 monocytes. In the light of these observations, we wondered whether BJe may be beneficial against neuroinflammatory processes, such as those observed in Alzheimer's disease. To this aim we used THP-1 monocytes to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial potential of BJe against amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42) -mediated inflammation. Exposure of THP-1 cells to Aβ1-42 significantly induced the expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and increased the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 as well as p46 and p54 members of JNK family. Moreover, Aβ1-42 raises AP-1 DNA binding activity in THP-1-treated cells. Interestingly, all these effects were reduced in the presence of BJe. Our data indicate that BJe may effectively counteract the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes/microglial cells exposed to amyloid fibrils, suggesting a promising role as a natural drug against neuroinflammatory processes.

  17. Involvement of miR-Let7A in inflammatory response and cell survival/apoptosis regulated by resveratrol in THP-1 macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Jun, Mira; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol, has multiple functions in cellular responses including apoptosis, survival, and differentiation. It also participates in the regulation of inflammatory response and oxidative stress. MicroRNA-Let-7A (miR-Let7A), known as a tumor suppressor miRNA, was recently reported to play a crucial role in both inflammation and apoptosis. Therefore, we examined involvement of miR-Let7A in the modulation of inflammation and cell survival/apoptosis regulated by resveratrol. MATERIALS/METHODS mRNA expression of pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), and protein expression of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), p-ASK1, and caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 were measured, and cell viability and Hoechst/PI staining for apoptosis were observed in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages with the treatment of resveratrol and/or miR-Let7A overexpression. RESULTS Pre-treatment with resveratrol (25-200 µM) resulted in significant recovery of the reduced cell viabilities under LPS-induced inflammatory condition and in markedly increased expression of miR-Let7A in non-stimulated or LPS-stimulated cells. Increased mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6 induced by LPS were significantly attenuated, and decreased levels of IL-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were significantly restored by resveratrol and miR-Let7A overexpression, respectively, or in combination. Decreased expression of IL-4 mRNA by LPS stimulation was also significantly increased by miR-Let7A overexpression co-treated with resveratrol. In addition, decreased SIRT1 mRNA levels, and increased p-ASK1 levels and PI-positive cells by LPS stimulation were significantly restored by resveratrol and miR-Let7A overexpression, respectively, or in combination. CONCLUSIONS miR-Let7A may be involved in the inflammatory response and cell survival/apoptosis modulated by resveratrol in human THP-1 macrophages

  18. Pepsin-pancreatin protein hydrolysates from extruded amaranth inhibit markers of atherosclerosis in LPS-induced THP-1 macrophages-like human cells by reducing expression of proteins in LOX-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is considered a progressive disease that affects arteries that bring blood to the heart, to the brain and to the lower end. It derives from endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, which play an important role in the thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death around the world and one factor that can contribute to its progression and prevention is diet. Our previous study found that amaranth hydrolysates inhibited LPS-induced inflammation in human and mouse macrophages by preventing activation of NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, extrusion improved the anti-inflammatory effect of amaranth protein hydrolysates in both cell lines, probably attributed to the production of bioactive peptides during processing. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the anti-atherosclerotic potential of pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysates from unprocessed and extruded amaranth in THP-1 lipopolysaccharide-induced human macrophages and suggest the mechanism of action. Results Unprocessed amaranth hydrolysate (UAH) and extruded amaranth hydrolysate (EAH) showed a significant reduction in the expression of interleukin-4 (IL-4) (69% and 100%, respectively), interleukin-6 (IL-6) (64% and 52%, respectively), interleukin-22 (IL-22) (55% and 70%, respectively). Likewise, UAH and EAH showed a reduction in the expression of monocyte-chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (35% and 42%, respectively), transferrin receptor-1 (TfR-1) (48% and 61%, respectively), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (59% and 63%, respectively), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (60% and 63%, respectively). Also, EAH reduced the expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) (27%), intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (28%) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) (19%), important molecular markers in the atherosclerosis pathway. EAH, led to a reduction of 58, 52 and 79% for

  19. Fenoterol inhibits LPS-induced AMPK activation and inflammatory cytokine production through β-arrestin-2 in THP-1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Ming; Zhang, You-Yi; He, Bei

    2015-06-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway is involved in regulating inflammation in several cell lines. We reported that fenoterol, a β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (β{sub 2}-AR) agonist, had anti-inflammatory effects in THP-1 cells, a monocytic cell line. Whether the fenoterol anti-inflammatory effect involves the AMPK pathway is unknown. In this study, we explored the mechanism of β{sub 2}-AR stimulation with fenoterol in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion in THP-1 cells. We studied whether fenoterol and β-arrestin-2 or AMPKα1 subunit knockdown could affect LPS-induced AMPK activation, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion. LPS-induced AMPK activation and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) release were reduced with fenoterol pretreatment of THP-1 cells. SiRNA knockdown of β-arrestin-2 abolished the fenoterol inhibition of LPS-induced AMPK activation and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) release, thus β-arrestin-2 mediated the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol on LPS-treated THP-1 cells. In addition, siRNA knockdown of AMPKα1 significantly attenuated the LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IL-1β release, so AMPKα1 was a key signaling molecule involved in LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine production. These results suggested the β{sub 2}-AR agonist fenoterol inhibited LPS-induced AMPK activation and IL-1β release via β-arrestin-2 in THP-1 cells. The exploration of these mechanisms may help optimize therapeutic agents targeting these pathways in inflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • β{sub 2}-AR agonist fenoterol exerts its protective effect on LPS-treated THP-1 cells. • Fenoterol inhibits LPS-induced AMPK activation and IL-1β production. • β-arrestin2 mediates fenoterol-inhibited AMPK activation and IL-1β release. • AMPKα1 is involved in LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IL-1β production.

  20. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  1. Effects of antidepressants on IP-10 production in LPS-activated THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Yang, Pinchen; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Wang, Peng-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder and cardiovascular disease are common serious illnesses worldwide. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors may reduce the mortality of cardiovascular disease patients with comorbid depression. Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), a type 1 T helper cell (Th1)-related chemokine, contributes to manifestations of atherosclerosis during cardiovascular inflammations; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking cardiovascular disease and effective antidepressants have remained elusive. We investigated the in vitro effects of six different classes of antidepressants on the IP-10 chemokine expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes, and their detailed intracellular mechanisms. The human monocytes were pretreated with antidepressants (10⁻⁸-10⁻⁵ M) before LPS-stimulation. IP-10 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then intracellular signaling was investigated using Western blotting and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Fluoxetine and bupropion suppressed LPS-induced IP-10 expression in monocytes, and they had no cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, fluoxetine inhibited LPS-induced IP-10 expression via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 pathway. Fluoxetine and bupropion could not only treat depression but also reduce Th1-related chemokine IP-10 production in human monocytes. Our results may indicate a possible mechanism related to how particular antidepressants reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Gypenoside XLIX, a naturally occurring gynosaponin, PPAR-alpha dependently inhibits LPS-induced tissue factor expression and activity in human THP-1 monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Van Hoan Tran; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2007-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved not only in the progression of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases, but is also associated with tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis and hence may be an attractive target for directed cancer therapeutics. Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP) is widely used in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, as well as cancers. Gypenoside (Gyp) XLIX, a dammarane-type glycoside, is one of the prominent components in GP. We have recently reported Gyp XLIX to be a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activator. Here we demonstrate that Gyp XLIX (0-300 {mu}M) concentration dependently inhibited TF promoter activity after induction by the inflammatory stimulus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human monocytic THP-1 cells transfected with promoter reporter constructs pTF-LUC. Furthermore, Gyp XLIX inhibited LPS-induced TF mRNA and protein overexpression in THP-1 monocyte cells. Its inhibition of LPS-induced TF hyperactivity was further confirmed by chromogenic enzyme activity assay. The activities of Gyp XLIX reported in this study were similar to those of Wy-14643, a potent synthetic PPAR-alpha activator. Furthermore, the Gyp XLIX-induced inhibitory effect on TF luciferase activity was completely abolished in the presence of the PPAR-alpha selective antagonist MK-886. The present findings suggest that Gyp XLIX inhibits LPS-induced TF overexpression and enhancement of its activity in human THP-1 monocytic cells via PPAR-alpha-dependent pathways. The data provide new insights into the basis of the use of the traditional Chinese herbal medicine G. pentaphyllum for the treatment of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases, as well as cancers.

  3. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mattana, Antonella; Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W; Henriquez, Fiona L; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-10-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response. PMID:27481240

  4. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W.; Henriquez, Fiona L.; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response. PMID:27481240

  5. Phytochemical evaluation, antioxidant assay, antibacterial activity and determination of cell viability (J774 and THP1 alpha cell lines) of P. sylvestris leaf crude and methanol purified fractions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dinesh C; Shukla, Ritu; Ali, Jasarat; Sharma, Swati; Bajpai, Priti; Pathak, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Phoenix sylvestris (Arecaceae family) known as Indian Date Palm has been identified as a component of traditional medicine against various ailments. The present study was focused on phytochemical screening of crude hexane, dichloromethane and methanol leaf extracts. The crude extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, and phenols in the plant leaves. In the study methanol extract was found most potent, so this extract was further fractionated by column chromatography and 9 methanol purified fractions (MPFs) were isolated. Most potential MPF8 (20:80 chloroform: methanol ratio fraction) significantly enhanced free radicals and antibacterial activity. The best MIC (Minimum inhibitory concentration) of MPF8 was investigated against M. luteus and E. coli at 1 mg/ml concentration. However, against other bacteria the MIC ranged from 1 mg/ml to 3 mg/ml. The GC-MS analysis showed the presence of many biologically active compounds such as alcohols, flavonoids, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, terpenoids fatty acid methyl esters, and phenolics. Pentadecanoic acid occupied maximum (52 %) area in GC-MS profiling. MPF8 was assayed for in-vitro cytotoxicity by MTT assay which confirms its less cytotoxicity at lower concentration and also significant ROS determination against J774 and THP1 cell lines after 2 and 4 hours. PMID:27047320

  6. Phytochemical evaluation, antioxidant assay, antibacterial activity and determination of cell viability (J774 and THP1 alpha cell lines) of P. sylvestris leaf crude and methanol purified fractions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dinesh C.; Shukla, Ritu; Ali, Jasarat; Sharma, Swati; Bajpai, Priti; Pathak, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Phoenix sylvestris (Arecaceae family) known as Indian Date Palm has been identified as a component of traditional medicine against various ailments. The present study was focused on phytochemical screening of crude hexane, dichloromethane and methanol leaf extracts. The crude extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, and phenols in the plant leaves. In the study methanol extract was found most potent, so this extract was further fractionated by column chromatography and 9 methanol purified fractions (MPFs) were isolated. Most potential MPF8 (20:80 chloroform: methanol ratio fraction) significantly enhanced free radicals and antibacterial activity. The best MIC (Minimum inhibitory concentration) of MPF8 was investigated against M. luteus and E. coli at 1 mg/ml concentration. However, against other bacteria the MIC ranged from 1 mg/ml to 3 mg/ml. The GC-MS analysis showed the presence of many biologically active compounds such as alcohols, flavonoids, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, terpenoids fatty acid methyl esters, and phenolics. Pentadecanoic acid occupied maximum (52 %) area in GC-MS profiling. MPF8 was assayed for in-vitro cytotoxicity by MTT assay which confirms its less cytotoxicity at lower concentration and also significant ROS determination against J774 and THP1 cell lines after 2 and 4 hours. PMID:27047320

  7. Immunomodulatory effects of individual and combined mycotoxins in the THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Solhaug, A; Karlsøen, L M; Holme, J A; Kristoffersen, A B; Eriksen, G S

    2016-10-01

    Mycotoxins commonly contaminate food and may pose a risk for disease in humans and animals. As they frequently co-occur, mixed exposures often take place. Monocyte function, including differentiation into active macrophages, is a central part of the immune response. Here we studied effects of naturally co-occurring mycotoxins in grain on monocyte function, and effects of individual and combined exposure on the differentiation process from monocytes into macrophages. The THP-1 cell line was used as a model system. The mycotoxins 2-amino-14,16-dimethyloctadecan-3-ol (AOD), alternariol (AOH), enniatin B (ENNB), deoxynivalenol (DON), sterigmatocystin (ST) and zearalenone (ZEA) differently affected cell viability in THP-1 monocytes, with DON as the most potent. AOH, ZEA and DON inhibited differentiation from monocytes into macrophages. Using this differentiation model, combined exposure of AOH, ZEA and DON were mainly found to be additive. However, the combination AOH+ZEA had somewhat synergistic effect at lower concentrations. Furthermore, alterations in macrophage functionality were found, as single exposure of AOH and ZEA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced TNF-α secretion, while DON increased this response. Overall, the mycotoxins affected monocyte viability and differentiation into macrophages differently. Combined exposures affected the differentiation process mainly additively. PMID:27453131

  8. I. Suppression by compound 48/80 of bacterial endotoxin-inducible monocytic tissue factor activity: direct blockade of factor VII binding to THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Chu, A J; Walton, M A; Seto, A; Fox, M J; Prasad, J K; Wang, Z G

    1999-10-18

    Hypercoagulation with upregulated monocytic tissue factor (TF) activity often occurs under a variety of inflammatory conditions including endotoxemia. The antagonism to bacterial endotoxin (LPS) signaling often results in the depression in TF upregulation. We herein report that compound 48/80 (48/80) significantly depressed LPS-induced TF activity in human and cebus monkey peripheral blood monocytes. Employing a model monocyte-like cell line (THP-1), we explored the regulatory mechanism to identify the inhibitory site(s) of 48/80. We determine whether the inhibition results from the blockade of LPS signaling. 48/80 dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced TF activity. Chase of LPS-challenged cells with 48/80 also significantly offset TF upregulation. In immunofluorescent approaches, FACScan analysis revealed that 48/80 had no effect on either LPS recognition or the expression of its receptors (CD14 and CD11b). Moreover, LPS-induced TF expression as well as synthesis remained unaffected in the presence of 48/80. Consistent with the independence of LPS action, 48/80 was also able to inhibit TF activity induced by A23187, ionomycin, or Quin-2 AM. Interestingly, 48/80 significantly decreased the FVII binding to either resting or LPS-challenged cells. In conclusion, our results elucidate that the inhibitory action of 48/80 was independent of LPS signaling including recognition, receptor expression, and the induced TF expression/ synthesis. However, 48/80 was able to directly block FVII binding to monocytic TF, thereby resulting in such antagonism to LPS-induced TF-initiated extrinsic coagulation.

  9. In vitro and in vivo studies of the antineoplastic activity of copper (II) compounds against human leukemia THP-1 and murine melanoma B16-F10 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Borges, Layla J H; Bull, Érika S; Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Azeredo, Nathalia F; Resende, Jackson A L C; Freitas, William R; Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Lemos, Luciana S; Jerdy, Hassan; Kanashiro, Milton M

    2016-11-10

    We investigated the antineoplastic activities of a previously reported copper (II) coordination compound, [Cu(BMPA)Cl2]CH3OH (1), and a new compound, [Cu(HBPA)Cl2]H2O (2), where BMPA is bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine and HBPA is (2-hydroxybenzyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, using various cellular models of human leukemia (THP-1, U937, HL60, Molt-4, JURKAT) and human colon cancer (COLO 205), as well as a murine highly metastatic melanoma (B16-F10) cell line. Compound (2) was characterized using several physical and chemical techniques, including X-ray diffraction studies. The IC50 values of the copper coordination complexes in the human leukemia cell lines ranged from 87.63 ± 1.02 to ≥400 μM at high cell concentrations and from 19.17 ± 1.06 to 97.67 ± 1.23 μM at low cell concentrations. Both compounds induced cell death, which was determined by cell cycle analyses and phosphatidylserine exposure studies. THP-1 cells released cytochrome c to the cytoplasm 12 h after treatment with 400 μM of compound (2). To evaluate the apoptosis pathway induced by compound (2), we measured the activities of initiator caspases 8 and 9 and executioner caspases 3 and 6. The results were suggestive of the activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. To investigate the activities of the compounds in vivo, we selected two sensitive cell lines from leukemia (THP-1) and solid tumor (B16-F10) lineages. BALB/c nude bearing THP-1 tumors treated with 12 mg·kg(-1) of compound (2) showed a 92.4% inhibition of tumor growth compared with the control group.

  10. Serum Levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, and MMP-9 in Patients Undergoing Carotid Artery Stenting and Regulation of MMP-9 in a New In Vitro Model of THP-1 Cells Activated by Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongrong; Jiang, Fan; Chen, Cindy Si; Wang, Tianzhu; Feng, Jinzhou; Tao, Tao; Qin, Xinyue

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiological process after carotid artery stenting (CAS). Monocyte is a significant source of inflammatory cytokines in vascular remodeling. Telmisartan could reduce inflammation. In our study, we first found that, after CAS, the serum IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, and MMP-9 levels were significantly increased, but only MMP-9 level was elevated no less than 3 months. Second, we established a new in vitro model, where THP-1 monocytes were treated with the supernatants of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were scratched by pipette tips, which mimics monocytes activated by mechanical injury of stenting. The treatment enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, migration and invasion ability, and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Elk-1 and MMP-9 expression were significantly increased. THP-1 cells pretreated with PD98095 (ERK1/2 inhibitor) attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Elk-1 and upregulation of MMP-9, while pretreatment with telmisartan merely decreased the phosphorylation of Elk-1 and MMP-9 expression. These results suggested that IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, and MMP-9 participate in the pathophysiological process after CAS. Our new in vitro model mimics monocytes activated by stenting. MMP-9 expression could be regulated through ERK1/2/Elk-1 pathway, and the protective effects of telmisartan after stenting are partly attributed to its MMP-9 inhibition effects via suppression of Elk-1. PMID:26113783

  11. Quercetin increases macrophage cholesterol efflux to inhibit foam cell formation through activating PPARγ-ABCA1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liqiang; Li, En; Wang, Feng; Wang, Tao; Qin, Zhiping; Niu, Shaohui; Qiu, Chunguang

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages could induce the formation of foam cells and increase the risk of developing atherosclerosis. We wonder if quercetin, one of flavonoids with anti-inflammation functions in different cell types, could elevate the development of foam cells formation in atherosclerosis. We treated foam cells derived from oxLDL induced THP-1 cells with quercetin, and evaluated the foam cells formation, cholesterol content and apoptosis of the cells. We found that quercetin induced the expression of ABCA1 in differentiated THP-1 cells, and increased the cholesterol efflux from THP-1 cell derived foam cells. Eventually, cholesterol level and the formation of foam cell derived from THP-1 cells decreased after quercetin treatment. In addition, quercetin activated PPARγ-LXRα pathway to upregulate ABCA1 expression through increasing protein level of PPARγ and its transcriptional activity. Inhibition of PPARγ activity by siRNA knockdown or the addition of chemical inhibitor, GW9662, abolished quercetin induced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux in THP-1 derived macrophages. Our data demonstrated that quercetin increased cholesterol efflux from macrophages through upregulating the expressions of PPARγ and ABCA1. Taken together, increasing uptake of quercetin or quercetin-rich foods would be an effective way to lower the risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:26617799

  12. Infection of human THP-1 cells with dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Iona, Elisabetta; Pardini, Manuela; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina; Colone, Marisa; Stringaro, Anna Rita; Teloni, Raffaela; Brunori, Lara; Nisini, Roberto; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Giannoni, Federico

    2012-09-01

    Dormant, non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain cultured in hypoxic conditions was used to infect THP-1 cells. CFUs counting, Kinyoun staining and electron microscopy showed that dormant bacilli infected THP-1 cells at a rate similar to replicating M. tuberculosis, but failed to grow during the first 6 days of infection. The absence of growth was specific to the intracellular compartment, as demonstrated by efficient growth in liquid medium. Quantification of β-actin mRNA recovered from infected cells showed that, in contrast with log-phase bacteria, infection with dormant bacilli determined a reduced THP-1 cell death. Gene expression of intracellular non-replicating bacteria showed a pattern typical of a dormant state. Intracellular dormant bacteria induced the activation of genes associated to a proinflammatory response in THP-1 cells. Though, higher levels of TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 mRNAs compared to aerobic H37Rv infected cells were not paralleled by increased cytokine accumulation in the supernatants. Moreover, dormant bacilli induced a higher expression of inducible cox-2 gene, accompanied by increased PGE2 secretion. Overall, our data describe a new model of in vitro infection using dormant M. tuberculosis that could provide the basis for understanding how non-replicating bacilli survive intracellularly and influence the maintenance of the hypoxic granuloma.

  13. Leptin induces the phagocytosis and protective immune response in Leishmania donovani infected THP-1 cell line and human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Dayakar, Alti; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an infectious disease responsible for several deaths in malnourished children due to impaired cell-mediated immunity, which is accompanied by low circulating leptin levels. The cytokine function of leptin is implicated for several immune regulation activities such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, innate and adaptive immunity. Its deficiency associated with polarization of Th2 response, which coincides with VL pathogenesis. To determine the cytokine role of leptin in case of experimental VL, we tested the leptin associated Th1/Th2 type cytokine profile at mRNA level from Leishmania donovani infected human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also tested the effect of leptin on macrophages activation (viz. studying the phosphorylation of signaling moieties), phagocytic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during infection. We observed that leptin induced Th1 specific response by upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α in THP-1 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-2 in PBMCs. We also observed the downregulation of Th2 type cytokine i.e. IL-10 in THP-1 and unaltered expression of cytokines i.e. TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-4 in PBMCs. In addition, leptin stimulates the macrophages by inducing phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt which are usually dephosphorylated in L. donovani infection. In concordance, leptin also induces the macrophage phagocytic activity by enhancing the intracellular ROS generation which helps in phagolysosome formation and oxidative killing of the parasite. In compilation, leptin is able to maintain the defensive environment against L. donovani infection through the classical macrophage activity.

  14. Induction of Central Host Signaling Kinases during Pneumococcal Infection of Human THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Thomas P.; Scholz, Annemarie; Kiachludis, Delia; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a widespread colonizer of the mucosal epithelia of the upper respiratory tract of human. However, pneumococci are also responsible for numerous local as well as severe systemic infections, especially in children under the age of five and the elderly. Under certain conditions, pneumococci are able to conquer the epithelial barrier, which can lead to a dissemination of the bacteria into underlying tissues and the bloodstream. Here, specialized macrophages represent an essential part of the innate immune system against bacterial intruders. Recognition of the bacteria through different receptors on the surface of macrophages leads thereby to an uptake and elimination of bacteria. Accompanied cytokine release triggers the migration of leukocytes from peripheral blood to the site of infection, where monocytes differentiate into mature macrophages. The rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis, resulting in the engulfment of bacteria, is thereby tightly regulated by receptor-mediated phosphorylation cascades of different protein kinases. The molecular cellular processes including the modulation of central protein kinases are only partially solved. In this study, the human monocytic THP-1 cell line was used as a model system to examine the activation of Fcγ and complement receptor-independent signal cascades during infection with S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci cultured either in chemically defined or complex medium showed no significant differences in pneumococcal phagocytosis by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 cells. Double immuno-fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays demonstrated a time-dependent uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae 35A inside of macrophages. Infections of THP-1 cells in the presence of specific pharmacological inhibitors revealed a crucial role of actin polymerization and importance of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Protein kinase B (Akt) as well during

  15. RNA Interference of Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Gene Expression in THP-1 Cell Line Leads to Toll-Like Receptor-4 Overexpression/Activation As Well As Up-modulation of Annexin-II1

    PubMed Central

    Maratheftis, Christos I; Giannouli, Stavroula; Spachidou, Maria P; Panayotou, George; Voulgarelis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a candidate transcription factor for the regulation of the Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) gene. Using a small interfering RNA-based (siRNA) process to silence IRF-1 gene expression in the leukemic monocytic cell line THP-1, we investigated whether such a modulation would alter TLR-4 expression and activation status in these cells. The siIRF-1 cells expressed elevated levels of TLR-4 mRNA and protein compared to controls by 90% and 77%, respectively. ICAM.1 protein expression and apoptosis levels were increased by 8.35- and 4.25-fold, respectively. The siIRF-1 cells overexpressed Bax mRNA compared to controls. Proteomic analysis revealed upmodulation of the Annexin-II protein in siIRF-1 THP-1 cells. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with an absence of full-length IRF-1 mRNA also overexpressed Annexin-II. It is plausible that this overexpression may lead to the activation of TLR-4 contributing to the increased apoptosis characterizing MDS. PMID:18084608

  16. [Anti-inflammatory activity of olive seed polyphenolic extract in the THP1-XBLUE-CD14 human monocytes cell line].

    PubMed

    Cortés Castell, Ernesto; Veciana Galindo, C; Torro Montell, L; Sirvent Segura, E; Rizo Baeza, M M; Gil Guillén, V

    2014-07-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar la actividad antiinflamatoria de un extracto de naturaleza polifenólica de huesos de oliva. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se incubó la línea celular THP1- XBlue-CD14 (invivogen), 80.000 células/pocillo, provocando inflamación (activación de NF-kb) mediante 0.1 μg/ml LPS (lipopolisacárido de E. coli) durante 24 horas. Se evaluó la presencia del extracto (10 y 50 mg/l, concentraciones bioseguras) durante 2 horas a 37 ºC, previa (efecto preventivo) y posterior a la activación proinflamatoria (efecto terapéutico) y se cuantificó colorimétricamente la actividad de fosfatasa alcalina, que se expresa bajo el control del promotor del factor transcripcional de NF-kb. Se evalúa el % actividad de NF-kb en efecto preventivo y terapéutico respecto a cultivos control de células con LPS y sin extracto añadido, que se consideran 100% de NF-kb.

  17. SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through the dysregulation of autophagy in human THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kitada, Munehiro; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation decreases autophagy in THP-1 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of autophagy induces inflammation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p62/Sqstm1 accumulation by impairment of autophagy is related to NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation is involved in the activation of mTOR and decreased AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Monocytes/macrophages are some of the cells involved in the inflammatory process in atherogenesis. Autophagy exerts a protective effect against cellular stresses like inflammation, and it is regulated by nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathway includes SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, which is implicated in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including inflammation and autophagy. The mechanism through which the dysfunction of SIRT1 contributes to the regulation of inflammation in relation to autophagy in monocytes/macrophages is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment with 2-[(2-Hydroxynaphthalen-1-ylmethylene)amino]-N-(1-phenethyl)benzamide (Sirtinol), a chemical inhibitor of SIRT1, induces the overexpression of inflammation-related genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6 through nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B signaling activation, which is associated with autophagy dysfunction, as shown through p62/Sqstm1 accumulation and decreased expression of light chain (LC) 3 II in THP-1 cells. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, also induces inflammation-related NF-{kappa}B activation. In p62/Sqstm1 knockdown cells, Sirtinol-induced inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation is blocked. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 is involved in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and

  18. Human beta casein fragment (54-59) modulates M. bovis BCG survival and basic transcription factor 3 (BTF3) expression in THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Dharamsheela; Saxena, Reshu; Singh, Vandana; Haq, Wahajul; Katti, S B; Singh, Bhupendra Narain; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Immunostimulatory peptides potentiate the immune system of the host and are being used as a viable adjunct to established therapeutic modalities in treatment of cancer and microbial infections. Several peptides derived from milk protein have been reported to induce immunostimulatory activity. Human β -casein fragment (54-59), natural sequence peptide (NS) carrying the Val-Glu-Pro-Ile-Pro-Tyr amino acid residues, was reported to activate the macrophages and impart potent immunostimulatory activity. In present study, we found that this peptide increases the clearance of M. bovis BCG from THP-1 cell line in vitro. The key biomolecules, involved in the clearance of BCG from macrophage like, nitric oxide, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, were not found to be significantly altered after peptide treatment in comparison to the untreated control. Using proteomic approach we found that BTF3a, an isoform of the Basic Transcription Factor, BTF3, was down regulated in THP-1 cell line after peptide treatment. This was reconfirmed by real time RT-PCR and western blotting. We report the BTF3a as a novel target of this hexapeptide. Based on the earlier findings and the results from the present studies, we suggest that the down regulation of BTF3a following the peptide treatment may augment the M. bovis BCG mediated apoptosis resulting in enhanced clearance of M. bovis BCG from THP-1 cell line.

  19. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  20. Vitamin D₃ metabolites enhance the NLRP3-dependent secretion of IL-1β from human THP-1 monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Tulk, Sarah E; Liao, Kuo-Chieh; Muruve, Daniel A; Li, Yan; Beck, Paul L; MacDonald, Justin A

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D3 has emerged as an important regulator of the immune system. With metabolic enzymes for vitamin D3 activation and vitamin D receptors (VDR) now identified in a variety of immune cells, the active vitamin D3 metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3, is thought to possess immunomodulatory properties. We examined whether 1,25(OH)2D3 might also enhance the NLRP3-dependent release of mature IL-1β from macrophages. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were stimulated with vitamin D3 metabolites and assessed for CYP27, CYP24, NLRP3, ASC, pro-caspase-1 expression by western blot and real-time qPCR as well as inflammasome activation with pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β release measured by ELISA. Exposure to 1,25(OH)2D3 had no effect on the basal expression levels of VDR; however, CYP27A1 transcript was suppressed and CYP24A1 transcript was substantively elevated. Both 1,25(OH)2D3 - and 25(OH)D3 induced IL-1β release from THP-1 cells, and these effects were blocked with application of the caspase-1 inhibitor YVAD and the NLRP3 inhibitors glyburide and Bay 11-7082. Interestingly, 1,25 (OH)2D3 exposure reduced NLRP3 protein expression but had no effect on ASC or pro-caspase-1 protein levels. The increase in mature IL-1β elicited by 1,25(OH)2D3 was modest compared to that found for ATP or C. difficile toxins. However, co-treatment of THP-1 cells with ATP and 1,25(OH)2D3 resulted in more IL-1β secretion than ATP or 1,25(OH)2D3 alone. PMID:25639477

  1. Vitamin D₃ metabolites enhance the NLRP3-dependent secretion of IL-1β from human THP-1 monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Tulk, Sarah E; Liao, Kuo-Chieh; Muruve, Daniel A; Li, Yan; Beck, Paul L; MacDonald, Justin A

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D3 has emerged as an important regulator of the immune system. With metabolic enzymes for vitamin D3 activation and vitamin D receptors (VDR) now identified in a variety of immune cells, the active vitamin D3 metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3, is thought to possess immunomodulatory properties. We examined whether 1,25(OH)2D3 might also enhance the NLRP3-dependent release of mature IL-1β from macrophages. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were stimulated with vitamin D3 metabolites and assessed for CYP27, CYP24, NLRP3, ASC, pro-caspase-1 expression by western blot and real-time qPCR as well as inflammasome activation with pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β release measured by ELISA. Exposure to 1,25(OH)2D3 had no effect on the basal expression levels of VDR; however, CYP27A1 transcript was suppressed and CYP24A1 transcript was substantively elevated. Both 1,25(OH)2D3 - and 25(OH)D3 induced IL-1β release from THP-1 cells, and these effects were blocked with application of the caspase-1 inhibitor YVAD and the NLRP3 inhibitors glyburide and Bay 11-7082. Interestingly, 1,25 (OH)2D3 exposure reduced NLRP3 protein expression but had no effect on ASC or pro-caspase-1 protein levels. The increase in mature IL-1β elicited by 1,25(OH)2D3 was modest compared to that found for ATP or C. difficile toxins. However, co-treatment of THP-1 cells with ATP and 1,25(OH)2D3 resulted in more IL-1β secretion than ATP or 1,25(OH)2D3 alone.

  2. Protective effect of thioredoxin upon NO-mediated cell injury in THP1 monocytic human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferret, P J; Soum, E; Negre, O; Wollman, E E; Fradelizi, D

    2000-01-01

    Although NO has been postulated to play important roles in host defences, it is potentially damaging for exposed cells, including for the macrophages producing the NO. Thus a network of radical acceptors and enzymes is thought to play an important redox-buffering role to protect cells against NO-mediated injury. We examined the properties of the redox systems superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), in regulating the viability of two human monocytic cell lines (THP1 and U937) exposed to the NO-generating compound diethylene triamine-nitric oxide (DETA-NO). We observed that NO-induced cytotoxic effects were time- and dose-dependent towards the two cell lines. After vitamin-induced differentiation in vitro with retinoic acid (RA) and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D(3) (VD), termed RA/VD, we observed that THP1 RA/VD cells became more resistant to NO-mediated cytotoxicity whereas the susceptibility of U937 cells was not modified. Using Western blotting and reverse-transcriptase PCR methods, we observed that gene transcription and protein expression of Trx and thioredoxin reductase were significantly increased upon RA/VD treatment and differentiation in THP1 cells. By contrast, SOD/catalase and GSH redox state remained unmodified. Finally, a stable transfectant THP1 line overexpressing Trx was found to be more resistant than THP1 control cells that were untransfected or transfected with an empty plasmid, when exposed to DETA-NO in vitro. In conclusion, we observed an inverse correlation between cell susceptibility to NO damaging effects and Trx expression, suggesting that the Trx system may have important preventative capacities towards NO-mediated cellular injury in monocytic macrophage cells. PMID:10698704

  3. Prolactin modulates cytokine production induced by culture filtrate proteins of M. bovis through different signaling mechanisms in THP1 cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Neri, Priscila A; López-Rincón, Gonzalo; Mancilla-Jiménez, Raúl; del Toro-Arreola, Susana; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Fafutis-Morris, Mary; Bueno-Topete, Miriam Ruth; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura

    2015-01-01

    The immunomodulatory functions of prolactin (PRL) are well recognized. Augmented PRL plasma levels were observed in patients with advanced tuberculosis (TB). Recently, we have reported that LPS and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) induced differential expression of PRL receptor (PRLR) isoforms in THP-1 cells and bovine macrophages, respectively. The aim of this work was to determine whether PRL should be considered as a potential modulator of the signaling pathways and cytokine synthesis, induced by culture filtrate protein (CFP) from M. bovis in THP-1 monocytes. The THP-1 cells were stimulated with PRL (20ng/mL), M. bovis CFP (50μg/mL). PRLR as well as phosphorylated STAT3, STAT5, Akt1/2/3, ERK1/2 and p38 expression were evaluated by Western blot. IL1-β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-8, and IL-10 concentrations were measured by ELISA. Our results demonstrated that the expression pattern of PRLR short isoforms is induced by M. bovis CFP. M bovis CFP induced phosphorylation of Akt2, ERK1/2, p38, STAT3, and STAT5 pathways. In turn, PRL only activated the JAK2/STAT3-5 signaling pathway. However, when combined both stimuli, PRL significantly increased STAT3-5 phosphorylation and downregulated Akt2, ERK1/2, and p38 phosphorylation. As expected, M. bovis CFP induced substantial amounts of IL1-β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12, and IL-10. However, the PRL costimulation considerably decreased IL1-β, TNF-α, and IL-12 secretion, and increased IL-10 production. This results suggest that up-regulation of IL-10 by PRL might be modulating the pro-inflammatory response against mycobacterial antigens through the MAPK pathway.

  4. Orostachys japonicus Inhibits Expression of the TLR4, NOD2, iNOS, and COX-2 Genes in LPS-Stimulated Human PMA-Differentiated THP-1 Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hong-Jung; Kim, Youngchul

    2015-01-01

    Orostachys japonicus is traditionally used as an inflammatory agent. In this report, we investigated the effects of O. japonicus extract on the expression of genes encoding pathogen-recognition receptors (TLR2, TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2) and proinflammatory factors (iNOS, COX-2, and cytokines) in LPS-stimulated PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. O. japonicus induced toxicity at high concentrations but had no effect at concentrations lower than 25 μg/mL. O. japonicus inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA levels, suppressed LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 transcription and translocation, and downregulated LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) mRNA levels. In addition, O. japonicus inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IκBα degradation and suppressed LPS-induced JNK, p38 MAPK, and ERK phosphorylation. Overall, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of O. japonicus are mediated by suppression of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, resulting in reduced TLR4, NOD2, iNOS, and COX-2 expression and inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:25810745

  5. Inhibitory effects of Chikusetsusaponin IVa on lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory responses in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Qi, J; Li, L; Wu, T; Wang, Y; Wang, X; Ning, Q

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated anti-inflammatory effects and possible mechanisms of Chikusetsusaponin IVa (Chi IVa), one of the main bioactive components in saponins from Panacis japonica (SPJ), which is used in traditional Tujia and Hmong Chinese medicine. To this end, changes in the inflammatory profiles of lipopolysacchride (LPS)-stimulated phrobol 12-myristate 13-acetate(PMA)-differented THP-1 macrophages were evaluated following Chi IVa treatment. The results showed that Chi IVa markedly decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at both the mRNA and protein level, which proved to be dose-dependent. Further studies revealed that Chi IVa strongly suppressed NF-κB activation and downregulated the phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK. Our present study demonstrates that Chi IVa suppresses the production of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells likely by inhibiting NF-κB activation and ERK, JNK, and p38 signal pathway phosphorylation.

  6. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H.; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the “pro-tumourigenic” effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation. Macrophages promote “pro-tumourigenic” cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the “pro-tumourigenic” characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  7. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming; Ning, Qin

    2010-05-28

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  8. Intracellular activity of tedizolid phosphate and ACH-702 versus Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the emergency of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is necessary the evaluation of new compounds. Findings Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, and ACH-702, a new isothiazoloquinolone, were tested against M. tuberculosis infected THP-1 macrophages. These two compounds significantly decreased the number of intracellular mycobacteria at 0.25X, 1X, 4X and 16X the MIC value. The drugs were tested either in nanoparticules or in free solution. Conclusion Tedizolid and ACH-702 have a good intracellular killing activity comparable to that of rifampin or moxifloxacin. PMID:24708819

  9. Interferon-γ enhances phorbol myristate acetate-induced cell attachment and tumor necrosis factor production via the NF-κB pathway in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2013-06-01

    During inflammation, activated macrophages express adhesion molecules and produce cytokines that interact with other hematopoietic and stromal cells. THP-1 non-adherent human monocytic cells differentiate into plastic-adherent macrophages via αVβ3 integrin, by ERK activation in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This has proven to be a valuable model for investigating functional monocyte/macrophage diversity. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a Th1-cytokine that is crucial in macrophage activation. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ on adhesion and the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. IFN-γ is incapable of inducing cell attachment and TNF production; however, it cumulatively upregulated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. IFN-γ increased αV integrin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and among these PMA-induced cell surface adhesion molecules, the blocking antibody for αV integrin suppressed adhesion and TNF production. Furthermore, IFN-γ enhanced PMA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and not ERK phosphorylation. Accordingly, the NF-κB pathway inhibitor (BAY 11-7082) inhibited the enhancing effect of IFN-γ on adhesion and TNF production. By contrast, the MEK inhibitor (U0126) almost completely eliminated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. In conclusion, IFN-γ regulates macrophage activation by mediating the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:23589028

  10. Interferon-γ enhances phorbol myristate acetate-induced cell attachment and tumor necrosis factor production via the NF-κB pathway in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2013-06-01

    During inflammation, activated macrophages express adhesion molecules and produce cytokines that interact with other hematopoietic and stromal cells. THP-1 non-adherent human monocytic cells differentiate into plastic-adherent macrophages via αVβ3 integrin, by ERK activation in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This has proven to be a valuable model for investigating functional monocyte/macrophage diversity. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a Th1-cytokine that is crucial in macrophage activation. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ on adhesion and the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. IFN-γ is incapable of inducing cell attachment and TNF production; however, it cumulatively upregulated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. IFN-γ increased αV integrin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and among these PMA-induced cell surface adhesion molecules, the blocking antibody for αV integrin suppressed adhesion and TNF production. Furthermore, IFN-γ enhanced PMA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and not ERK phosphorylation. Accordingly, the NF-κB pathway inhibitor (BAY 11-7082) inhibited the enhancing effect of IFN-γ on adhesion and TNF production. By contrast, the MEK inhibitor (U0126) almost completely eliminated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. In conclusion, IFN-γ regulates macrophage activation by mediating the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  11. IM-133N modulates cytokine secretion by RAW264.7 and THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Varma, R Sandeep; Guruprasad, Kanive P; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Kumar, L M Sharath; Babu, U Venkanna; Patki, S Pralhad

    2016-01-01

    An indigenous herbal extract IM-133N containing extracts of Prosopis glandulosa Torr and Symplocos racemosa Roxb were evaluated for potential immunomodulatory effects using RAW264.7 and THP-1 cells. The incubation of the cells for 24 h with IM-133N over a dose range 0-125 µg/ml did not cause cytotoxicity that exceeded 10%. The results indicated that non-cytotoxic doses of IM-133N effectively up-regulated iNOS, TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, IL-8 and IFNγ gene expression in both the RAW264.7 and THP-1 cells. The results also indicated IM-133N elicited dose-related increases in nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production by RAW264.7 or THP-1 cells. These results demonstrated that IM-133N could stimulate NO and induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by monocytes/macrophages. As clinical studies have shown IM-133N to be an effective immunomodulator without any adverse effects, the results of the present study provide further support for the potential use of this agent as an immunostimulant or as an immunotherapy adjuvant.

  12. Fumaric acid esters prevent the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated and ATP-triggered pyroptosis of differentiated THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Miglio, Gianluca; Veglia, Eleonora; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) exert therapeutic effects in patients with psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, however their mode of action remains elusive. Pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent pro-inflammatory form of programmed cell death, mediated by the activation of inflammasomes. To understand the pharmacological basis of the therapeutic effects of FAEs, the anti-pyroptotic activity of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and its hydrolysis metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) was studied in a model of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated pyroptosis of human macrophages. Phorbol myristate acetate-differentiated THP-1 cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (5 μg/ml; 4h), then pulsed with ATP (5mM; 1h). MMF, DMF, or parthenolide (positive control) were added 1h before the ATP pulse. The pyroptotic cell death was evaluated by morphological examination and quantified by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The ATP-triggered death of THP-1 cells (60.4 ± 4.0%) was significantly (P<0.01) prevented by DMF, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (pIC50 and maximal effect were 6.6 and 67.6 ± 1.2%, respectively). MMF was less efficacious than DMF. These effects were accompanied by a decreased intracellular activation of caspase-1 and interleukin-1β release from ATP-treated cells, thus suggesting that FAEs antagonise the effects of ATP by preventing the activation of the pyroptotic molecular cascade leading to cell death. These results indicate that FAEs are endowed with anti-pyroptotic activity, which may contribute to their therapeutic effects. PMID:26096886

  13. In vitro anti-inflammatory effects and immunomodulation by gemifloxacin in stimulated human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Hall, I H; Schwab, U; Ward, E S; Ives, T

    2004-09-01

    Cultured human THP-1 monocytes were exposed to serial concentrations of gemifloxacin over 4 h after pre-stimulation with zymogen A for 1 h or Staphylococcus aureus for 2 h. The following parameters were assessed: pH, phagocytosis, c-AMP, NO, TNFalpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and H2O2 levels, enzyme activities of protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase, SOD, gluthathion reductase, NAG and cathepsin D as well as lipid peroxidation. The reversiblity of these changes was determined in the presence of known blockers of the phagocytic process. The effects of gemifloxacin on DNA synthesis and killing of S. aureus was assessed in bacteria alone and in those bacteria phagocytosed by THP-1 monocytes over 24 h. Gemifloxacin in stimulated THP-1 monocytes over the first 30 min caused an increase in c-AMP, NO, H2O2 and TNFalpha levels and protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase, glutathione reductase, NAG and cathepsin D activities. The pH became more acidic and phagocytosis was stimulated. These parameters were reversed at 1 h and continued to decline until 4 h. Lipid peroxidation was at the highest levels at 1 h and IL-8 levels at 2 h. DNA synthesis and bacterial growth were suppressed at 2 h in both S. aureus alone and bacteria phagocytosed by THP-1 monocytes. These effects were at a higher magnitude at 24 h. Gemifloxacin initiates a phagocyticidal effect of THP-1 monocytes at an early time of 30 min which plays a role in killing bacteria but a higher magnitude of killing of bacteria occurs later by a standard static mechanism. This early action of gemifloxacin should decrease the spread of infection and the inflammatory response since the tissue destruction process was attenuated at 4 h.

  14. Ursolic Acid Activates Intracellular Killing Effect of Macrophages During Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Podder, Biswajit; Jang, Woong Sik; Nam, Kung-Woo; Lee, Byung-Eui; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most threatening infectious diseases to public health all over the world, for which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the etiological agent of pathogenesis. Ursolic acid (UA) has immunomodulatory function and exhibits antimycobacterial activity. However, the intracellular killing effect of UA has yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intracellular killing effect of UA during mycobacterial infection. The intracellular killing activity of UA was evaluated in the macrophage cell line THP-1 by the MGIT 960 system as well as by CFU count. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the level of nitric oxide (NO) were measured using DCF-DA and Griess reagent, respectively. Phagocytosis was observed by a fluorescence-based staining method, and the colony forming units were enumerated on 7H11 agar medium following infection. In addition, MRP8 mRNA expression was measured by qRT-PCR. UA significantly decreased the number of intracellular Mycobacterium through generation of ROS and NO. In addition, it profoundly activated the phagocytosis process of THP-1 cells during MTB-infection. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that UA activated the phagocytosis process in human monocyte cells through MRP8 induction. These data suggest that UA firmly contributes to the intracellular killing effect of macrophages during mycobacterial infection.

  15. Autocrine motility factor receptor promotes the proliferation of human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YINGCHAO; MA, LINA; WANG, CHUNMEI; SHENG, GUANGYAO; FENG, LEI; YIN, CHUYUN

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant activation of autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) has been implicated in several types of human cancer. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of AMFR on the regulation of proliferation in an acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1. THP-1 cells were transfected with AMFR-targeted small interfering (si)RNA and a plasmid encoding a truncated AMFR, AMFR-C, (pcDNA3.1-AMFR-C). The mRNA and protein levels of AMFR and the downstream targets, rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK2), cyclin D1, and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, were measured using reverse transcription-quantitatibe polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses. The effects on cell cycle and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The present study successfully established the knockdown of AMFR and expression of AMFR-C in the THP-1 cells. Downregulation of AMFR induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, and increased apoptosis of the THP-1 cells (all P<0.05). The AMFR siRNA increased the percentage of early apoptotic cells between 3.88±1.43 and 19.58±4.29% (P<0.05). The expression levels of ROCK2, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 were reduced by the downregulation of AMFR and enhanced by overexpression of AMFR-C. In conclusion, AMFR appears to be crucial for the proliferation of the THP-1 acute monocytic leukemia cell line. Therefore, AMFR may represent a potential target for the treatment of acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:26136223

  16. Toxicity of nickel ions and comprehensive analysis of nickel ion-associated gene expression profiles in THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; ZHANG, ZHI-WEI; XIE, YU-MEI; WANG, SHU-SHUI; QIU, QING-HUAN; ZHOU, YING-LING; ZENG, GUO-HONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the toxic effects and underlying mechanisms of nickel ions during therapeutic nickel-based alloy-treatment in congenital heart disease by investigating the metal-induced cytotoxicity to the human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line THP-1. THP-1 cells were treated with NiCl2·6H2O (25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 µM) for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. MTT was applied to detect THP-1 cell proliferation following NiCl2 treatment. Apoptosis of THP-1 cells was quantified using flow cytometry. Illumina sequencing was used for screening the associated genes, whose mRNA expression levels were further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. High concentrations of nickel ions had a significant suppressive effect on cell proliferation at the three concentrations investigated (200, 400 and 800 µM). Treatment with nickel ions (25–400 µM) for 48 h reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The mRNA expression levels of RELB, FIGF, SPI-1, CXCL16 and CRLF2 were significantly increased following nickel treatment. The results of the present study suggested that nickel ions exert toxic effects on THP-1 cell growth, which may indicate toxicity of the nickel ion during treatment of congenital heart disease. The identification of genes modified by the toxic effects of nickel on THP-1 cells (EPOR, RELB, FIGF, SPI-1, TGF-β1, CXCL16 and CRLF2) may aid in the development of interventional measures for the treatment/prevention of nickel ion-associated toxic effects during the treatment of congenital heart disease. PMID:26044615

  17. Induction of interleukin-1 production by ligands binding to the scavenger receptor in human monocytes and the THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Palkama, T

    1991-01-01

    Foam cell formation via lipid accumulation through the scavenger receptor in human monocyte/macrophages is believed to be one of the earliest events in atherogenesis. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of the scavenger receptor activates monocytes to produce interleukin-1 (IL-1). Polyinosinic acid (poly I) and fucoidan, both ligands known to bind to the scavenger receptor, induced IL-1 beta production in human monocytes. Polycytidylic acid, a structurally related compound to poly I, which does not bind to the scavenger receptor, was used as a negative control and had virtually no effect on IL-1 production. THP-1 cells, which normally do not express scavenger receptors, were almost unresponsive to poly I and fucoidan. PMA priming, which has been reported to up-regulate scavenger receptor expression in THP-1 cells, significantly enhanced IL-1 production by fucoidan and poly I. IL-1 produced by scavenger receptor stimulation was shown to be secreted extracellularly, and biologically active. Scavenger receptor-mediated IL-1 production was inhibited by H7, a protein kinase C inhibitor, and enhanced by IBMX, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP degradation, suggesting a synergistic effect of protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-mediated signal transduction pathways in scavenger receptor-mediated IL-1 production. Due to the potentially deleterious effects of IL-1 on the vessel wall, IL-1 produced by ligand binding to the scavenger receptor in human monocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Images Figure 3 PMID:1663075

  18. Isorhamnetin Attenuates Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Macrophage Apoptosis via PI3K/AKT Activation and HO-1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun; Sun, Guibo; Dong, Xi; Wang, Min; Qin, Meng; Yu, Yingli; Sun, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Isorhamnetin (Iso) is a flavonoid compound extracted from the Chinese herb Hippophae rhamnoides L. Previous studies have revealed its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities. This study investigated the ability of Iso to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced cell apoptosis in THP-1-derived macrophages. The effects of Iso on atherosclerosis in vivo were also evaluated in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice fed a high fat diet. Methods and Results Iso showed significant inhibitory effects on ox-LDL-induced THP-1-derived macrophage injuries via decreasing reactive oxygen species levels, lipid deposition, and caspase-3 activation, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, reducing the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, and regulating apoptosis-related proteins. We also determined the protective effects of Iso by PI3K/AKT activation and HO-1 induction. Iso reduced the atherosclerotic plaque size in vivo in ApoE-/- mice as assessed by oil red O, Sudan IV staining, and CD68-positive cells, and reduced macrophage apoptosis as assessed by caspase-3 and TUNEL assays in lesions. Conclusion In conclusion, our results show that Iso inhibited atherosclerotic plaque development in ApoE-/- mice by PI3K/AKT activation and HO-1 induction. PMID:25799286

  19. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  20. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  1. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation Decreases Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T.; Strand, Matthew J.; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R.; Kinney, William H.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  2. The influence of harpagoside and harpagide on TNFα-secretion and cell adhesion molecule mRNA-expression in IFNγ/LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Schopohl, P; Grüneberg, P; Melzig, M F

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation does not only lead to pain and functio laesa in the affected tissue but is also implicated in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Many medicinal plants show anti-inflammatory properties yet plant-constituents and their effect on molecular pathways involved in the attenuation of inflammation as well as cell migration are only poorly understood. Harpagophytum procumbens DC. ex MEISN. is a potent plant used as an immune modulator in traditional herbal medicine. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of harpagoside and harpagide on TNFα-secretion in undifferentiated and differentiated THP-1 cells under inflammatory conditions as well as their implication in cellular migration into inflamed tissue. We found that both iridoids decrease TNFα-secretion in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells whereas undifferentiated cells were poorly affected. Yet, in undifferentiated cells harpagoside and harpagide induced mRNA-expression of certain proteins involved in leukocyte transmigration. Especially TNFα and ICAM-1 mRNA-expression was positively affected after 3h and expression could be maintained on high levels even after 48h. L-selectin and PSGL-1 were strongly induced after 48h of stimulation. This ambiguous effect of harpagoside and harpagide highlights their immune modulatory function by facilitating cell migration into the inflamed tissue, whereby in consequence the anti-inflammatory activity of the resident macrophages was also found to be promoted.

  3. The influence of harpagoside and harpagide on TNFα-secretion and cell adhesion molecule mRNA-expression in IFNγ/LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Schopohl, P; Grüneberg, P; Melzig, M F

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation does not only lead to pain and functio laesa in the affected tissue but is also implicated in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Many medicinal plants show anti-inflammatory properties yet plant-constituents and their effect on molecular pathways involved in the attenuation of inflammation as well as cell migration are only poorly understood. Harpagophytum procumbens DC. ex MEISN. is a potent plant used as an immune modulator in traditional herbal medicine. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of harpagoside and harpagide on TNFα-secretion in undifferentiated and differentiated THP-1 cells under inflammatory conditions as well as their implication in cellular migration into inflamed tissue. We found that both iridoids decrease TNFα-secretion in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells whereas undifferentiated cells were poorly affected. Yet, in undifferentiated cells harpagoside and harpagide induced mRNA-expression of certain proteins involved in leukocyte transmigration. Especially TNFα and ICAM-1 mRNA-expression was positively affected after 3h and expression could be maintained on high levels even after 48h. L-selectin and PSGL-1 were strongly induced after 48h of stimulation. This ambiguous effect of harpagoside and harpagide highlights their immune modulatory function by facilitating cell migration into the inflamed tissue, whereby in consequence the anti-inflammatory activity of the resident macrophages was also found to be promoted. PMID:26979254

  4. A parasite rescue and transformation assay for antileishmanial screening against intracellular Leishmania donovani amastigotes in THP1 human acute monocytic leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surendra K; Sahu, Rajnish; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2012-12-30

    Leishmaniasis is one of the world's most neglected diseases, largely affecting the poorest of the poor, mainly in developing countries. Over 350 million people are considered at risk of contracting leishmaniasis, and approximately 2 million new cases occur yearly(1). Leishmania donovani is the causative agent for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the most fatal form of the disease. The choice of drugs available to treat leishmaniasis is limited (2);current treatments provide limited efficacy and many are toxic at therapeutic doses. In addition, most of the first line treatment drugs have already lost their utility due to increasing multiple drug resistance (3). The current pipeline of anti-leishmanial drugs is also severely depleted. Sustained efforts are needed to enrich a new anti-leishmanial drug discovery pipeline, and this endeavor relies on the availability of suitable in vitro screening models. In vitro promastigotes (4) and axenic amastigotes assays(5) are primarily used for anti-leishmanial drug screening however, may not be appropriate due to significant cellular, physiological, biochemical and molecular differences in comparison to intracellular amastigotes. Assays with macrophage-amastigotes models are considered closest to the pathophysiological conditions of leishmaniasis, and are therefore the most appropriate for in vitro screening. Differentiated, non-dividing human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP1) (make an attractive) alternative to isolated primary macrophages and can be used for assaying anti-leishmanial activity of different compounds against intracellular amastigotes. Here, we present a parasite-rescue and transformation assay with differentiated THP1 cells infected in vitro with Leishmania donovani for screening pure compounds and natural products extracts and determining the efficacy against the intracellular Leishmania amastigotes. The assay involves the following steps: (1) differentiation of THP1 cells to non-dividing macrophages, (2

  5. A Parasite Rescue and Transformation Assay for Antileishmanial Screening Against Intracellular Leishmania donovani Amastigotes in THP1 Human Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Surendra K.; Sahu, Rajnish; Walker, Larry A.; Tekwani, Babu L.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the world's most neglected diseases, largely affecting the poorest of the poor, mainly in developing countries. Over 350 million people are considered at risk of contracting leishmaniasis, and approximately 2 million new cases occur yearly1. Leishmania donovani is the causative agent for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the most fatal form of the disease. The choice of drugs available to treat leishmaniasis is limited 2;current treatments provide limited efficacy and many are toxic at therapeutic doses. In addition, most of the first line treatment drugs have already lost their utility due to increasing multiple drug resistance 3. The current pipeline of anti-leishmanial drugs is also severely depleted. Sustained efforts are needed to enrich a new anti-leishmanial drug discovery pipeline, and this endeavor relies on the availability of suitable in vitro screening models. In vitro promastigotes 4 and axenic amastigotes assays5 are primarily used for anti-leishmanial drug screening however, may not be appropriate due to significant cellular, physiological, biochemical and molecular differences in comparison to intracellular amastigotes. Assays with macrophage-amastigotes models are considered closest to the pathophysiological conditions of leishmaniasis, and are therefore the most appropriate for in vitro screening. Differentiated, non-dividing human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP1) (make an attractive) alternative to isolated primary macrophages and can be used for assaying anti-leishmanial activity of different compounds against intracellular amastigotes. Here, we present a parasite-rescue and transformation assay with differentiated THP1 cells infected in vitro with Leishmania donovani for screening pure compounds and natural products extracts and determining the efficacy against the intracellular Leishmania amastigotes. The assay involves the following steps: (1) differentiation of THP1 cells to non-dividing macrophages, (2) infection of

  6. A parasite rescue and transformation assay for antileishmanial screening against intracellular Leishmania donovani amastigotes in THP1 human acute monocytic leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surendra K; Sahu, Rajnish; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the world's most neglected diseases, largely affecting the poorest of the poor, mainly in developing countries. Over 350 million people are considered at risk of contracting leishmaniasis, and approximately 2 million new cases occur yearly(1). Leishmania donovani is the causative agent for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the most fatal form of the disease. The choice of drugs available to treat leishmaniasis is limited (2);current treatments provide limited efficacy and many are toxic at therapeutic doses. In addition, most of the first line treatment drugs have already lost their utility due to increasing multiple drug resistance (3). The current pipeline of anti-leishmanial drugs is also severely depleted. Sustained efforts are needed to enrich a new anti-leishmanial drug discovery pipeline, and this endeavor relies on the availability of suitable in vitro screening models. In vitro promastigotes (4) and axenic amastigotes assays(5) are primarily used for anti-leishmanial drug screening however, may not be appropriate due to significant cellular, physiological, biochemical and molecular differences in comparison to intracellular amastigotes. Assays with macrophage-amastigotes models are considered closest to the pathophysiological conditions of leishmaniasis, and are therefore the most appropriate for in vitro screening. Differentiated, non-dividing human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP1) (make an attractive) alternative to isolated primary macrophages and can be used for assaying anti-leishmanial activity of different compounds against intracellular amastigotes. Here, we present a parasite-rescue and transformation assay with differentiated THP1 cells infected in vitro with Leishmania donovani for screening pure compounds and natural products extracts and determining the efficacy against the intracellular Leishmania amastigotes. The assay involves the following steps: (1) differentiation of THP1 cells to non-dividing macrophages, (2

  7. Adipose tissue macrophages in insulin-resistant subjects are associated with collagen VI and fibrosis and demonstrate alternative activation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Michael; Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Unal, Resat; Rasouli, Neda; Gurley, Catherine M; Zhu, Beibei; Peterson, Charlotte A; Kern, Philip A

    2010-12-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages are associated with insulin resistance and are linked to changes in the extracellular matrix. To better characterize adipose macrophages, the extracellular matrix, and adipocyte-macrophage interactions, gene expression from adipose tissue and the stromal vascular fraction was assessed for markers of inflammation and fibrosis, and macrophages from obese and lean subjects were counted and characterized immunohistochemically. Coculture experiments examined the effects of adipocyte-macrophage interaction. Collagen VI gene expression was associated with insulin sensitivity and CD68 (r = -0.56 and 0.60, P < 0.0001) and with other markers of inflammation and fibrosis. Compared with adipose tissue from lean subjects, adipose tissue from obese subjects contained increased areas of fibrosis, which correlated inversely with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.58, P < 0.02) and positively with macrophage number (r = 0.70, P < 0.01). Although macrophages in crownlike structures (CLS) were more abundant in obese adipose tissue, the majority of macrophages were associated with fibrosis and were not organized in CLS. Macrophages in CLS were predominantly M1, but most other macrophages, particularly those in fibrotic areas, were M2 and also expressed CD150, a marker of M2c macrophages. Coculture of THP-1 macrophages with adipocytes promoted the M2 phenotype, with a lower level of IL-1 expression and a higher ratio of IL-10 to IL-12. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was more abundant in M2 macrophages and was further increased by coculture with adipocytes. Downstream effectors of TGF-β, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, collagen VI, and phosphorylated Smad, were increased in macrophages and adipocytes. Thus adipose tissue of insulin-resistant humans demonstrated increased fibrosis, M2 macrophage abundance, and TGF-β activity.

  8. Human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, controls intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Won; Chan, Qilin; Afton, Scott E; Caruso, Joseph A; Lai, Barry; Weintraub, Neal L; Qin, Zhenyu

    2012-02-01

    The copper transporter ATP7A has attracted significant attention since the discovery of its gene mutation leading to human Menkes disease. We previously reported that ATP7A is highly expressed in the human vasculature and identified a novel vascular function of ATP7A in modulation of the expression and activity of extracellular superoxide dismutase. We recently identified that ATP7A expression in THP-1 cells (a monocyte/macrophage model cell line) plays a role in the oxidation of low density lipoproteins, indicating that it is necessary to further investigate its expression and function in monocytes/macrophages. In the current study, we demonstrated the protein and mRNA expression of ATP7A in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. ATP7A was strongly co-localized with the trans-Golgi apparatus in PBMC-derived macrophages. Intracellular copper, detected by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, was found to be distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm in human THP-1 cells. To confirm the role of endogenous ATP7A in macrophage copper homeostasis, we performed inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in murine peritoneal macrophages, which showed markedly increased intracellular copper levels in macrophages isolated from ATP7A-deficient mice versus control mice. Moreover, the role of ATP7A in regulating macrophage responses to dermal wounds was studied by introduction of control and ATP7A-downregulated THP-1 cells into dermal wounds of nude mice. Infiltration of THP-1 cells into the wounded area (detected by expression of human macrophage markers MAC2 and CD68) was reduced in response to downregulation of ATP7A, hinting decreased macrophage accumulation subsequent to dermal wounds. In summary, alongside our previous studies, these findings indicate that human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, regulates intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to a dermal wound.

  9. Human Macrophage ATP7A is Localized in the trans-Golgi Apparatus, Controls Intracellular Copper Levels, and Mediates Macrophage Responses to Dermal Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won; Chan, Qilin; Afton, Scott E.; Caruso, Joseph A.; Lai, Barry; Weintraub, Neal L.; Qin, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    The copper transporter ATP7A has attracted significant attention since the discovery of its gene mutation leading to human Menkes disease. We previously reported that ATP7A is highly expressed in the human vasculature and identified a novel vascular function of ATP7A in modulation of the expression and activity of extracellular superoxide dismutase. We recently identified that ATP7A expression in THP-1 cells (a monocyte/macrophage model cell line) plays a role in the oxidation of low density lipoproteins, indicating that it is necessary to further investigate its expression and function in monocytes/macrophages. In the current study, we demonstrated the protein and mRNA expression of ATP7A in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. ATP7A was strongly co-localized with the trans-Golgi apparatus in PBMC-derived macrophages. Intracellular copper, detected by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, was found to be distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm in human THP-1 cells. To confirm the role of endogenous ATP7A in macrophage copper homeostasis, we performed inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in murine peritoneal macrophages, which showed markedly increased intracellular copper levels in macrophages isolated from ATP7A-deficient mice versus control mice. Moreover, the role of ATP7A in regulating macrophage responses to dermal wounds was studied by introduction of control and ATP7A-downregulated THP-1 cells into dermal wounds of nude mice. Infiltration of THP-1 cells into the wounded area (detected by expression of human macrophage markers MAC2 and CD68) was reduced in response to downregulation of ATP7A, hinting decreased macrophage accumulation subsequent to dermal wounds. In summary, alongside our previous studies, these findings indicate that human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, regulates intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to a dermal wound

  10. Zerumbone suppresses phorbol ester-induced expression of multiple scavenger receptor genes in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ai; Kaneko, Yuki; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2007-04-01

    Unregulated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) via macrophage scavenger receptors (SRs), such as lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), is a key event in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we used differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the human small intestine to evaluate the suppressive effects of 16 traditional food items selected from Okinawa on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced LOX-1 mRNA expression in THP-1 human monocyte-like cells. Three Zingiberaceae plants, Curcuma aromatica Salisbury, Curcuma longa L., and Zingiber zerumbet Smith, markedly suppressed that expression. When added to the apical sides of Caco-2 monolayers, zerumbone, a sesquiterpene from Z. zerumbet Smith, was found to permeate into the basolateral medium as an intact structure in a time-dependent manner. alpha-Humulene, a structural analog of zerumbone lacking the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group, did not suppress LOX-1 mRNA expression, indicating that its electrophilic moiety might play pivotal roles in its activities. Further, zerumbone attenuated the expression of SR-A, SR-PSOX, and CD36, but not that of CD68 or CLA-1, leading to a blockade of DiI-acLDL uptake, while it also inhibited the transcriptional activities of activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB. Together, our results indicate that zerumbone is a potential phytochemical for regulating atherosclerosis with reasonable action mechanisms.

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide augments febrile-range hyperthermia-induced heat shock protein 70 expression and extracellular release in human THP1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Ramarathnam, Aparna; Hasday, Jeffrey D; Singh, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a devastating and often lethal complication of severe infection, is characterized by fever and dysregulated inflammation. While infections activate the inflammatory response in part through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), fever can partially activate the heat shock response with generation of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Since extracellular HSPs, especially HSP70 (eHSP70), are proinflammatory TLR agonists, we investigated how exposure to the TLR4 agonist, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and febrile range hyperthermia (FRH; 39.5°C) modify HSP70 expression and extracellular release. Using differentiated THP1 cells, we found that concurrent exposure to FRH and LPS as well as TLR2 and TLR3 agonists synergized to activate expression of inducible HSP72 (HSPA1A) mRNA and protein via a p38 MAP kinase-requiring mechanism. Treatment with LPS for 6 h stimulated eHSP70 release; levels of eHSP70 released at 39.5°C were higher than at 37°C roughly paralleling the increase in intracellular HSP72 in the 39.5°C cells. By contrast, 6 h exposure to FRH in the absence of LPS failed to promote eHSP70 release. Release of eHSP70 by LPS-treated THP1 cells was inhibited by glibenclamide, but not brefeldin, indicating that eHSP70 secretion occurred via a non-classical protein secretory mechanism. Analysis of eHSP70 levels in exosomes and exosome-depleted culture supernatants from LPS-treated THP1 cells using ELISA demonstrated similar eHSP70 levels in unfractionated and exosome-depleted culture supernatants, indicating that LPS-stimulated eHSP70 release did not occur via the exosome pathway. Immunoblot analysis of the exosome fraction of culture supernatants from these cells showed constitutive HSC70 (HSPA8) to be the predominant HSP70 family member present in exosomes. In summary, we have shown that LPS stimulates macrophages to secrete inducible HSP72 via a non-classical non-exosomal pathway while synergizing with FRH exposure to increase both intracellular and secreted levels

  12. Cutting Edge: Inflammasome Activation in Primary Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Kortmann, Jens; Brubaker, Sky W.

    2015-01-01

    Murine NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory protein (Naip)1, Naip2, and Naip5/6 are host sensors that detect the cytosolic presence of needle and rod proteins from bacterial type III secretion systems and flagellin, respectively. Previous studies using human-derived macrophage-like cell lines indicate that human macrophages sense the cytosolic needle protein, but not bacterial flagellin. In this study, we show that primary human macrophages readily sense cytosolic flagellin. Infection of primary human macrophages with Salmonella elicits robust cell death and IL-1β secretion that is dependent on flagellin. We show that flagellin detection requires a full-length isoform of human Naip. This full-length Naip isoform is robustly expressed in primary macrophages from healthy human donors, but it is drastically reduced in monocytic tumor cells, THP-1, and U937, rendering them insensitive to cytosolic flagellin. However, ectopic expression of full-length Naip rescues the ability of U937 cells to sense flagellin. In conclusion, human Naip functions to activate the inflammasome in response to flagellin, similar to murine Naip5/6. PMID:26109648

  13. Cutting Edge: Inflammasome Activation in Primary Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Flagellin.

    PubMed

    Kortmann, Jens; Brubaker, Sky W; Monack, Denise M

    2015-08-01

    Murine NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory protein (Naip)1, Naip2, and Naip5/6 are host sensors that detect the cytosolic presence of needle and rod proteins from bacterial type III secretion systems and flagellin, respectively. Previous studies using human-derived macrophage-like cell lines indicate that human macrophages sense the cytosolic needle protein, but not bacterial flagellin. In this study, we show that primary human macrophages readily sense cytosolic flagellin. Infection of primary human macrophages with Salmonella elicits robust cell death and IL-1β secretion that is dependent on flagellin. We show that flagellin detection requires a full-length isoform of human Naip. This full-length Naip isoform is robustly expressed in primary macrophages from healthy human donors, but it is drastically reduced in monocytic tumor cells, THP-1, and U937, rendering them insensitive to cytosolic flagellin. However, ectopic expression of full-length Naip rescues the ability of U937 cells to sense flagellin. In conclusion, human Naip functions to activate the inflammasome in response to flagellin, similar to murine Naip5/6. PMID:26109648

  14. IRAK regulates macrophage foam cell formation by modulating genes involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux.

    PubMed

    Rana, Minakshi; Kumar, Amit; Tiwari, Rajiv Lochan; Singh, Vishal; Chandra, Tulika; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK1) is linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; however, its role in macrophage foam cell formation is not known. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of IRAK1 in lipid uptake, biosynthesis, and efflux in THP-1 derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). Ox-LDL (40 μg/mL, 15 minutes-48 hours) treatment induced time-dependent increase in IRAK1, IRAK4, and Stat1 activation in THP-1 derived macrophages. IRAK1/4 inhibitor (INH) or IRAK1 siRNA significantly attenuated cholesterol accumulation, DiI-Ox-LDL binding, and uptake while cholesterol efflux to apoAI and HDL was enhanced in THP-1 derived macrophages and HMDMs. Ox-LDL treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of CD36, LOX-1, SR-A, ABCA1, ABCG1, Caveolin-1, CYP27A1 while that of SR-BI was decreased. IRAK1/4 inhibition or IRAK1 knockdown, however, attenuated Ox-LDL-induced CD36 expression; augmented ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression while expression of others was unaffected in THP-1 derived macrophages and HMDMs. Moreover, IRAK1/4 inhibition had no significant effect on genes involved in lipid biosynthesis. In IRAK1/4 INH pre-treated THP-1 derived macrophages Ox-LDL-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and its binding to CD36 promoter was significantly attenuated while LXRα expression and its binding to the ABCA1/ABCG1 locus, NFATc2 activation and its binding to ABCA1 locus was enhanced. The present study thus demonstrates that IRAK regulates lipid accumulation by modulating CD36-mediated uptake and ABCA1-, ABCG1-dependent cholesterol efflux. Therefore, IRAK1 can be a potential target for preventing macrophage foam cell formation. PMID:27270491

  15. Secreted Thrombospondin-1 Regulates Macrophage Interleukin-1β Production and Activation through CD47

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Erica V.; Miller, Thomas W.; Ivins-O’Keefe, Kelly; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 regulates inflammation by engaging several cell surface receptors and by modulating activities of other secreted factors. We have uncovered a novel role of thrombospondin-1 in modulating production and activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β by human and murine macrophages. Physiological concentrations of thrombospondin-1 limit the induction by lipopolysaccharide of IL-1β mRNA and total protein production by human macrophages. This inhibition can be explained by the ability of thrombospondin-1 to disrupt the interaction between CD47 and CD14, thereby limiting activation of NFκB/AP-1 by lipopolysaccharide. Only the CD47-binding domain of thrombospondin-1 exhibits this activity. In contrast, CD47, CD36, and integrin-binding domains of thrombospondin-1 independently enhance the inflammasome-dependent maturation of IL-1β in human THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Correspondingly, mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages that lack either thrombospondin-1 or CD47 exhibit diminished induction of mature IL-1β in response to lipopolysaccharide. Lack of CD47 also limits lipopolysaccharide induction of IL-1β, NLRP3, and caspase-1 mRNAs. These data demonstrate that thrombospondin-1 exerts CD47-dependent and -independent pro-and anti-inflammatory effects on the IL-1β pathway. Therefore, thrombospondin-1 and its receptor CD47 may be useful targets for limiting the pro-inflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide and for treating endotoxemia. PMID:26813769

  16. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  17. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  18. Observation of phagocytosis of fullerene nanowhiskers by PMA-treated THP-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nudejima, S.; Miyazawa, K.; Okuda-Shimazaki, J.; Taniguchi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-treated THP-1 cells (macrophage-like cells) were exposed to the C60 fullerene nanowhiskers (C60 NWs) with an average length of about 6.0 μm and an average diameter of about 660 run and observed with an inverted optical phase-contrast microscope for 48 h. The C60 NWs were well and stably dispersed onto the dishes of culture medium during the observation. The number of cells that internalised C60 NWs gradually increased after the exposure to C60 NWs. But no alteration of cellular morphology was observed compared to the control group without exposure to C60 NWs during this period in this pilot study.

  19. Zn(II)-Chlorido complexes of phytohormone kinetin and its derivatives modulate expression of inflammatory mediators in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Hošek, Jan; Novotná, Radka; Babula, Petr; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Kinetin (N6-furfuryladenine) belongs to a group of plant growth hormones involved in cell division, differentiation and other physiological processes. One of the possible ways to obtain biologically active compounds is to complex biologically relevant natural compounds to suitable metal atoms. In this work, two structural groups of Zn(II) complexes [Zn(L(n))2Cl2]·Solv (1-5) and [Zn(HL(n))Cl3] · xL(n) (6-7); n=1-5, Solv=CH3OH for 1 and 2H2O for 2; x =1 for 6 and 2 for 7; involving a phytohormone kinetin and its derivatives (L(n)) were evaluated for their ability to modulate secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophage-like THP-1 cell model. The penetration of the complexes to cells was also detected. The mechanism of interactions of the zinc(II) complexes with a fluorescent sensor N-(6-methoxy-8-quinolyl)-p-toluene sulphonamide (TSQ) and sulfur-containing biomolecules (l-cysteine and reduced glutathione) was studied by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry and flow-injection analysis with fluorescence detection. The present study showed that the tested complexes exhibited a low cytotoxic effect on the THP-1 cell line (IC50>40 µM), apart from complex 4, with an IC50=10.9 ± 1.1 µM. Regarding the inflammation-related processes, the Zn(II) complexes significantly decreased IL-1β production by a factor of 1.47-2.22 compared with the control (DMSO), but did not affect TNF-α and MMP-2 secretions. However, application of the Zn(II) complexes noticeably changed the pro-MMP-2/MMP-2 ratio towards a higher amount of maturated MMP-2, when they induced a 4-times higher production of maturated MMP-2 in comparison with the vehicle-treated cells under LPS stimulation. These results indicated that the complexes are able to modulate an inflammatory response by influencing secretion and activity of several inflammation-related cytokines and enzymes. PMID:23755195

  20. Zn(II)-Chlorido Complexes of Phytohormone Kinetin and Its Derivatives Modulate Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hošek, Jan; Novotná, Radka; Babula, Petr; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Kinetin (N6-furfuryladenine) belongs to a group of plant growth hormones involved in cell division, differentiation and other physiological processes. One of the possible ways to obtain biologically active compounds is to complex biologically relevant natural compounds to suitable metal atoms. In this work, two structural groups of Zn(II) complexes [Zn(Ln)2Cl2]·Solv (1–5) and [Zn(HLn)Cl3]·xLn (6–7); n = 1–5, Solv = CH3OH for 1 and 2H2O for 2; x = 1 for 6 and 2 for 7; involving a phytohormone kinetin and its derivatives (Ln) were evaluated for their ability to modulate secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophage-like THP-1 cell model. The penetration of the complexes to cells was also detected. The mechanism of interactions of the zinc(II) complexes with a fluorescent sensor N-(6-methoxy-8-quinolyl)-p-toluene sulphonamide (TSQ) and sulfur-containing biomolecules (l-cysteine and reduced glutathione) was studied by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry and flow-injection analysis with fluorescence detection. The present study showed that the tested complexes exhibited a low cytotoxic effect on the THP-1 cell line (IC50>40 µM), apart from complex 4, with an IC50 = 10.9±1.1 µM. Regarding the inflammation-related processes, the Zn(II) complexes significantly decreased IL-1β production by a factor of 1.47–2.22 compared with the control (DMSO), but did not affect TNF-α and MMP-2 secretions. However, application of the Zn(II) complexes noticeably changed the pro-MMP-2/MMP-2 ratio towards a higher amount of maturated MMP-2, when they induced a 4-times higher production of maturated MMP-2 in comparison with the vehicle-treated cells under LPS stimulation. These results indicated that the complexes are able to modulate an inflammatory response by influencing secretion and activity of several inflammation-related cytokines and enzymes

  1. Prolonged ER Stressed-Hepatocytes drives an Alternative Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Fangming; Catapano, Michael; Diao, Li; Stanojcic, Mile; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the effects of hepatocytes on hepatic macrophages, particularly under the situation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We examined the effects of hepatocytes conditioned media (CM) from HepG2 treated with ER stress inducers, Tunicamycin (TM) or Thapsigargin (TG), on the secretion of cytokines, expression of ER stress markers and polarization of PMA activated THP-1 cells (pTHP-1). We found that CM decreased the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and interleukin (IL)-1β as well as other cytokines and chemokines from pTHP-1 cells. These effects are mediated by the inhibition of TLR4 expression and NF-κB signaling pathway. In addition, hepatocytes CM increased the expression of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in pTHP-1 cells. Preconditioning with ER stress inhibitor, small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) before addition of ER stressors, attenuated the ER stress in macrophages, the property of hepatocytes CM to alter TNF-α production and NF-κB expression by macrophages. Remarkably, treatment of macrophage with these CM leads to an alternative activation of macrophages mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) signaling pathway, which might be resulted from the secretion of IL-10 and IL-4 as well as releasing apoptotic bodies from hepatocytes under ER stress. Our results highlight a mechanism of ER stress transmission from hepatocytes to macrophage that drives an alternative activation of macrophages, which depends on the exposure of hepatocytes to severe and prolonged ER stress. PMID:25944791

  2. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  3. Positive Feedback Cycle of TNFα Promotes Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Induced THP-1 Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Shang, Weilong; Yuan, Jizhen; Hu, Zhen; Peng, Huagang; Zhu, Junmin; Hu, Qiwen; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hui; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Yinan; Li, Shu; Hu, Xiaomei; Rao, Xiancai

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) has been demonstrated to be of importance in Staphylococcus aureus related diseases, such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Dysregulated apoptosis in AD is remarkable, and SEB can induce apoptosis of various cell types. However, the mechanisms by which SEB induces apoptosis and influences disease processes remain unclear. In this study, the recombinant SEB-induced THP-1 monocyte apoptosis was demonstrated in the absence of preliminary cell activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. SEB could up-regulate the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in THP-1 cells and induce apoptosis via an extrinsic pathway. TNFα could in turn increase the expression of HLA-DRa, the SEB receptor on the cell surface. As a result, a positive feedback cycle of TNFα was established. TNFα expression and SEB-induced apoptosis were decreased by knocking down the expression of either HLA-DRa or TNFR1. Therefore, the feedback cycle of TNFα is crucial for SEB functions. This work provides insights into the mechanisms of SEB-induced monocyte apoptosis and emphasizes the major role of TNFα in future related studies. PMID:27709104

  4. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Graham, Joseph G.; Onyilagha, Frances I.; MacDonald, Laura J.; Doeppler, Heike R.; Storz, Peter; Kurten, Richard C.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E) mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E) mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E) expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A) in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA in human

  5. Heterogeneous expression of apolipoprotein-E by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tedla, Nicodemus; Glaros, Elias N; Brunk, Ulf T; Jessup, Wendy; Garner, Brett

    2004-11-01

    Apolipoprotein-E (apoE) is expressed at high levels by macrophages. In addition to its role in lipid transport, macrophage-derived apoE plays an important role in immunoregulation. Previous studies have identified macrophage subpopulations that differ substantially in their ability to synthesize specific cytokines and enzymes, however, potential heterogeneous macrophage apoE expression has not been studied. Here we examined apoE expression in human THP-1 macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry methods we reveal a striking heterogeneity in macrophage apoE expression in both cell types. In phorbol-ester-differentiated THP-1 macrophages, 5% of the cells over-expressed apoE at levels more than 50-fold higher than the rest of the population. ApoE over-expressing THP-1 macrophages contained condensed/fragmented nuclei and increased levels of activated caspase-3 indicating induction of apoptosis. In MDM, 3-5% of the cells also highly over-expressed apoE, up to 50-fold higher than the rest of the population; however, this was not associated with obvious nuclear alterations. The apoE over-expressing MDM were larger, more granular, and more autofluorescent than the majority of cells and they contained numerous vesicle-like structures that appeared to be coated by apoE. Flow cytometry experiments indicated that the apoE over-expressing subpopulation of MDM were positive for CD14, CD11b/Mac-1 and CD68. These observations suggest that specific macrophage subpopulations may be important for apoE-mediated immunoregulation and clearly indicate that subpopulation heterogeneity should be taken into account when investigating macrophage apoE expression.

  6. Heterogeneous expression of apolipoprotein-E by human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tedla, Nicodemus; Glaros, Elias N; Brunk, Ulf T; Jessup, Wendy; Garner, Brett

    2004-01-01

    Apolipoprotein-E (apoE) is expressed at high levels by macrophages. In addition to its role in lipid transport, macrophage-derived apoE plays an important role in immunoregulation. Previous studies have identified macrophage subpopulations that differ substantially in their ability to synthesize specific cytokines and enzymes, however, potential heterogeneous macrophage apoE expression has not been studied. Here we examined apoE expression in human THP-1 macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry methods we reveal a striking heterogeneity in macrophage apoE expression in both cell types. In phorbol-ester-differentiated THP-1 macrophages, 5% of the cells over-expressed apoE at levels more than 50-fold higher than the rest of the population. ApoE over-expressing THP-1 macrophages contained condensed/fragmented nuclei and increased levels of activated caspase-3 indicating induction of apoptosis. In MDM, 3–5% of the cells also highly over-expressed apoE, up to 50-fold higher than the rest of the population; however, this was not associated with obvious nuclear alterations. The apoE over-expressing MDM were larger, more granular, and more autofluorescent than the majority of cells and they contained numerous vesicle-like structures that appeared to be coated by apoE. Flow cytometry experiments indicated that the apoE over-expressing subpopulation of MDM were positive for CD14, CD11b/Mac-1 and CD68. These observations suggest that specific macrophage subpopulations may be important for apoE-mediated immunoregulation and clearly indicate that subpopulation heterogeneity should be taken into account when investigating macrophage apoE expression. PMID:15500620

  7. Purple corn anthocyanins inhibit diabetes-associated glomerular monocyte activation and macrophage infiltration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Kyung; Li, Jing; Kim, Jung-Lye; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Kwak, Su-Nam; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major diabetic complications and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In early DN, renal injury and macrophage accumulation take place in the pathological environment of glomerular vessels adjacent to renal mesangial cells expressing proinflammatory mediators. Purple corn utilized as a daily food is rich in anthocyanins exerting disease-preventive activities as a functional food. This study elucidated whether anthocyanin-rich purple corn extract (PCA) could suppress monocyte activation and macrophage infiltration. In the in vitro study, human endothelial cells and THP-1 monocytes were cultured in conditioned media of human mesangial cells exposed to 33 mM glucose (HG-HRMC). PCA decreased the HG-HRMC-conditioned, media-induced expression of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and monocyte integrins-β1 and -β2 through blocking the mesangial Tyk2 pathway. In the in vivo animal study, db/db mice were treated with 10 mg/kg PCA daily for 8 wk. PCA attenuated CXCR2 induction and the activation of Tyk2 and STAT1/3 in db/db mice. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that PCA alleviated mesangial expansion-elicited renal injury in diabetic kidneys. In glomeruli, PCA attenuated the induction of intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and CD11b. PCA diminished monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 transcription in the diabetic kidney, inhibiting the induction of the macrophage markers CD68 and F4/80. These results demonstrate that PCA antagonized the infiltration and accumulation of macrophages in diabetic kidneys through disturbing the mesangial IL-8-Tyk-STAT signaling pathway. Therefore, PCA may be a potential renoprotective agent treating diabetes-associated glomerulosclerosis.

  8. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    PubMed

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  9. Effect of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7-specific enterohaemolysin on interleukin-1β production differs between human and mouse macrophages due to the different sensitivity of NLRP3 activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Li; Song, Li-Qiong; Huang, Yuan-Ming; Xiong, Yan-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Sun, Hui; Zhu, Xin-Ping; Meng, Guang-Xun; Xu, Jian-Guo; Ren, Zhi-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 infection in humans can cause acute haemorrhagic colitis and severe haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The role of enterohaemolysin (Ehx) in the pathogenesis of O157:H7-mediated disease in humans remains undefined. Recent studies have revealed the importance of the inflammatory response in O157:H7 pathogenesis in humans. We previously reported that Ehx markedly induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the disparity in Ehx-induced IL-1β production between human and mouse macrophages and explored the underlying mechanism regarding the activation of NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes. In contrast to the effects on human differentiated THP-1 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Ehx exerted no effect on IL-1β production in mouse macrophages and splenocytes because of a disparity in pro-IL-1β cleavage into mature IL-1β upon caspase-1 activation. Additionally, Ehx significantly contributed to O157:H7-induced ATP release from THP-1 cells, which was not detected in mouse macrophages. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that Ehx was a key inducer of cathepsin B release in THP-1 cells but not in mouse IC-21 cells upon O157:H7 challenge. Inhibitor experiments indicated that O157:H7-induced IL-1β production was largely dependent upon caspase-1 activation and partially dependent upon ATP signalling and cathepsin B release, which were both involved in NLRP3 activation. Moreover, inhibition of K(+) efflux drastically diminished O157:H7-induced IL-1β production and cytotoxicity. The findings in this study may shed light on whether and how the Ehx contributes to the development of haemolytic uraemic syndrome in human O157:H7 infection. PMID:25580516

  10. Effect of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7-specific enterohaemolysin on interleukin-1β production differs between human and mouse macrophages due to the different sensitivity of NLRP3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Li; Song, Li-qiong; Huang, Yuan-Ming; Xiong, Yan-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Sun, Hui; Zhu, Xin-Ping; Meng, Guang-Xun; Xu, Jian-Guo; Ren, Zhi-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 infection in humans can cause acute haemorrhagic colitis and severe haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The role of enterohaemolysin (Ehx) in the pathogenesis of O157:H7-mediated disease in humans remains undefined. Recent studies have revealed the importance of the inflammatory response in O157:H7 pathogenesis in humans. We previously reported that Ehx markedly induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the disparity in Ehx-induced IL-1β production between human and mouse macrophages and explored the underlying mechanism regarding the activation of NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes. In contrast to the effects on human differentiated THP-1 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Ehx exerted no effect on IL-1β production in mouse macrophages and splenocytes because of a disparity in pro-IL-1β cleavage into mature IL-1β upon caspase-1 activation. Additionally, Ehx significantly contributed to O157:H7-induced ATP release from THP-1 cells, which was not detected in mouse macrophages. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that Ehx was a key inducer of cathepsin B release in THP-1 cells but not in mouse IC-21 cells upon O157:H7 challenge. Inhibitor experiments indicated that O157:H7-induced IL-1β production was largely dependent upon caspase-1 activation and partially dependent upon ATP signalling and cathepsin B release, which were both involved in NLRP3 activation. Moreover, inhibition of K+ efflux drastically diminished O157:H7-induced IL-1β production and cytotoxicity. The findings in this study may shed light on whether and how the Ehx contributes to the development of haemolytic uraemic syndrome in human O157:H7 infection. PMID:25580516

  11. Reactive oxygen species enhance TLR10 expression in the human monocytic cell line THP-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghee; Kim, Yeon Ju; Koh, Hyun Sook; Jang, Tae Yang; Park, Hyo Eun; Kim, Jae Young

    2010-01-01

    We investigated TLR10 expression in human monocytes, THP-1 cells, cultured in hypoxia (3% O(2)). Levels of both TLR10 mRNA and protein in THP-1 cells cultured in hypoxia were significantly higher than those cultured in normoxia (20% O(2)). We examined intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in hypoxic cells, and TLR10 expression in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), to determine whether the increase in TLR10 expression observed with hypoxia was due to an increase in intracellular ROS levels. We found that the level of intracellular ROS in cells subject to hypoxia was significantly higher than in normoxia. Experiments with ROS synthesis inhibitors revealed that hypoxia induced ROS production is mainly due to NADPH oxidase activity. TLR10 mRNA expression was increased by treatment with H(2)O(2) at concentrations ranging from 50 to 250 μM. We screened the TLR10 promoter and found putative binding sites for transcription factors (TFs), such as NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1. Next, we examined TF activities using a luciferase reporter assay. Activities of NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1 in the cells treated with H(2)O(2) were significantly higher than in untreated cells. The experiment with TF inhibitors revealed that ROS-induced upregulation of TLR10 expression is mainly due to NF-κB activation. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxia or ROS increase TLR10 expression in human monocytes and the transcriptional activities of NF-κB are involved in this process. Therefore, it is suggested that ROS produced by various exogenous stimuli may play a crucial role in the regulation of expression and function of TLR10 as second messengers.

  12. Interferon gamma induced by resveratrol analog, HS-1793, reverses the properties of tumor associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo Kyung; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You Soo; Choi, You Jin; Oh, Su Jung; Lee, Chan Woo; Lee, Kyu Yeol; Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Wol Soon

    2014-10-01

    Macrophages are capable of both inhibiting and promoting the growth and spread of cancers, depending on their activation state. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are a kind of alternatively activated M2 macrophage, which may contribute to tumor progression. Following our previous study to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of a synthetic resveratrol analog HS-1793, the current study demonstrated that HS-1793 treatment significantly increased IFN-γ secreting cells in splenocytes and decreased CD206+ macrophage infiltration compared to CD68+ cells in the tumor site with a higher expression of IFN-γ. As these results suggested that IFN-γ increased locally at the tumor sites could modulate the status of TAM, we designed an in vitro model to study macrophage morphology and functions in relation to the tumor microenvironment. Human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) differentiated to macrophages with M2-like phenotypes. TAM-like properties of CD206(high), CD204(high), IL-10(high), TGF-β(high), IL-6(low), IL-12(low), VEGF(high), and MMP-9(high) and promotion of tumor cell invasion were more pronounced in M-2-polarized THP-1 macrophages generated by differentiating THP-1 cells with PMA and subsequently polarizing them with Th2 cytokines (IL-4/IL-13). Upon IFN-γ exposure, THP-1-derived TAM changed their phenotypes to the M-1-like morphology and intracellular granular pattern with an expression of an increased level of proinflammatory and immunostimulatory cytokines and a reduced level of immunosuppressive and tumor progressive mediators. These results explain the underlying mechanism of the anti-tumor activity of HS-1793. The elevated level of IFN-γ production after HS-1793 treatment evoked reprogramming of M-2 phenotype TAM, which efficiently countered the immunosuppressive and tumor progressive influences of TAM.

  13. Vibrio cholerae porin OmpU mediates M1-polarization of macrophages/monocytes via TLR1/TLR2 activation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid; Sharma, Praveen K; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-11-01

    Polarization of the monocytes and macrophages toward the M1 and M2 states is important for hosts' defense against the pathogens. Moreover, it plays a crucial role to resolve the overwhelming inflammatory responses that can be harmful to the host. Polarization of macrophages/monocytes can be induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). PAMP-mediated monocyte/macrophage polarization is important during the infection, as pathogen can suppress host immune system by altering the polarization status of the macrophages/monocytes. OmpU, an outer membrane porin protein of Vibrio cholerae, possesses the ability to induce pro-inflammatory responses in monocytes/macrophages. It is also able to down-regulate the LPS-mediated activation of the monocytes/macrophages. Such observation leads us to believe that OmpU may induce a state that can be called as M1/M2-intermediate state. In the present study, we evaluated a set of M1 and M2 markers in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line, and THP-1 human monocytic cell line, in response to the purified OmpU protein. We observed that OmpU, as a PAMP, induced M1-polarization by activating the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway. OmpU induced formation of TLR1/TLR2-heterodimers. OmpU-mediated TLR-activation led to the MyD88 recruitment to the TLR1/TLR2 complex. MyD88, in turn, recruited IRAK1. Ultimately, OmpU-mediated signaling led to the activation and subsequent nuclear translocation of the NFκB p65 subunit. We also observed that blocking of the TLR1, TLR2, IRAK1, and NFκB affected OmpU-mediated production of M1-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-6.

  14. Unequivocal identification of intracellular aluminium adjuvant in a monocytic THP-1 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Matthew; Eriksson, Håkan; Siesjö, Peter; Darabi, Anna; Shardlow, Emma; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-based adjuvants (ABA) are the predominant adjuvants used in human vaccinations. While a consensus is yet to be reached on the aetiology of the biological activities of ABA several studies have identified shape, crystallinity and size as critical factors affecting their adjuvanticity. In spite of recent advances, the fate of ABA following their administration remains unclear. Few if any studies have demonstrated the unequivocal presence of intracellular ABA. Herein we demonstrate for the first time the unequivocal identification of ABA within a monocytic T helper 1 (THP-1) cell line, using lumogallion as a fluorescent molecular probe for aluminium. Use of these new methods revealed that particulate ABA was only found in the cell cytoplasm. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that ABA were contained within vesicle-like structures of approximately 0.5–1 μm in diameter. PMID:25190321

  15. Proteome analysis of human monocytic THP-1 cells primed with oxidized low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Han; Kim, Hyun Tae; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won Ha; Huh, Tae-Lin; Park, Yong Bok; Moon, Byung Jo; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2006-02-01

    Native low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) possess a wide variety of biological properties, and play a central role in atherogenesis. In this study, we used a proteomic analysis of human monocyte THP-1 cells induced with oxLDL or with LDL, to identify proteins potentially involved in atherosclerotic processes. Of the 2500 proteins detected, 93 were differentially expressed as a result of priming with LDL or oxLDL. The proteins were unambiguously identified by comparing the masses of their tryptic peptides with those of all known proteins using MALDI-TOF MS and the NCBI database. The largest differences in expression were observed for vimentin (94-fold increase), meningioma-expressed antigen 6 (48-fold increase), serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (40-fold increase), and beta-1,3-galactosyltransferase (15-fold increase). In contrast, the abundance of an unnamed protein product and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decreased 30-fold and 25-fold, respectively. The expression of some selected proteins was confirmed by Western blot and RT-PCR analyses. The proteins identified in this study are attractive candidates for further biomarker research. This description of the altered protein profiles induced by oxLDL in human monocytes will support functional studies of the macrophage-derived foam cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:16402358

  16. Rhodomyrtone Modulates Innate Immune Responses of THP-1 Monocytes to Assist in Clearing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Srisuwan, Sutthirat; Tongtawe, Pongsri; Srimanote, Potjanee; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to conventional antibiotics poses a major health problem. Moreover, S. aureus can survive within phagocytes, thus evading some antibiotics and the innate immune response. Rhodomyrtone, a bioactive compound from the leaves of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, possesses potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of rhodomyrtone on THP-1 monocytes in response to MRSA. Methods THP-1 monocytes were stimulated with heat-killed MRSA, followed by treatment with rhodomyrtone. The cell pellets were prepared to detect pro-inflammatory molecules using real-time PCR. The supernatants were collected to assess nitric oxide production using Griess assay. Assays for phagocytosis and bacterial killing by THP-1 monocytes were performed to determine if they were affected by rhodomyrtone. Results Expression of pro-inflammatory molecules including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS was enhanced in THP-1 monocytes stimulated with high doses of heat-killed MRSA (108 to 109 cfu/ml). In contrast, monocytes stimulated with MRSA at lower doses (106 to 107 cfu/ml) did not induce the expression of these cytokines. However, rhodomyrtone significantly increased the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, IL-6 and iNOS in monocytes stimulated with heat-killed MRSA at low doses, and displayed some anti-inflammatory activity by reducing TNF-α expression in monocytes stimulated with heat-killed MRSA at high doses. Treatment with rhodomyrtone also significantly up-regulated the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors, TLR2 and CD14, in THP-1 monocytes stimulated with heat-killed MRSA at 106 to 109 cfu/ml, while heat-killed MRSA alone did not induce the expression of these molecules. The ability of rhodomyrtone to eliminate MRSA from the monocytes was observed within 24 h after treatment. Conclusion Rhodomyrtone enhanced the expression of pattern

  17. HLA-G1, but Not HLA-G3, Suppresses Human Monocyte/Macrophage-mediated Swine Endothelial Cell Lysis.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Maeda, A; Lo, P C; Matsuura, R; Esquivel, E L; Asada, M; Sakai, R; Nakahata, K; Yamamichi, T; Umeda, S; Deguchi, K; Ueno, T; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The inhibitory function of HLA-G1, a class Ib molecule, on monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity was examined. The expression of inhibitory receptors that interact with HLA-G, immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2), ILT4, and KIR2DL4 (CD158d) on in vitro-generated macrophages obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated THP-1 cells were examined by flow cytometry. cDNAs of HLA-G1, HLA-G3, HLA-E, and human β2-microglobulin were prepared, transfected into pig endothelial cells (PECs), and macrophage- and the THP-1 cell-mediated PEC cytolysis was then assessed. In vitro-generated macrophages expressed not only ILT2 and ILT4 but CD158d as well. The transgenic HLA-G1 on PEC indicated a significant suppression in macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, which was equivalent to that of transgenic HLA-E. HLA-G1 was clearly expressed on the cell surface of PEC, whereas the levels of HLA-G3 were much lower and remained in the intracellular space. On the other hand, the PMA-activated THP-1 cell was less expressed these inhibitory molecules than in vitro-generated macrophages. Therefore, the HLA-G1 on PECs showed a significant but relatively smaller suppression to THP-1 cell-mediated cytotoxicity compared to in vitro-generated macrophages. These results indicate that by generating HLA-G1, but not HLA-G3, transgenic pigs can protect porcine grafts from monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:27320605

  18. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, suppresses phorbol ester-induced expression of multiple scavenger receptor genes in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ai; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2006-05-29

    Unregulated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) via macrophage scavenger receptors (SRs) such as lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a key event in atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the effects of five selected food phytochemicals on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced LOX-1 mRNA expression in THP-1 human monocyte-like cells. Nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, markedly reduced it in dose- and time-dependent manners. It also suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and c-Jun (Ser-63), thereby inhibiting the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1. Further nobiletin attenuated expression of SR-A, SR-PSOX, CD36, and CD68, but not CLA-1, mRNA, leading to the blockade of DiI-acLDL uptake. Together, our results suggest that nobiletin is a promising phytochemical for regulating atherosclerosis with reasonable action mechanisms.

  19. Cytokine induction by the hepatitis B virus capsid in macrophages is facilitated by membrane heparan sulfate and involves TLR2.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arik; Tal, Guy; Lider, Ofer; Shaul, Yosef

    2005-09-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core Ag (HBcAg) serves as the structural subunit of the highly immunogenic capsid shell. HBcAg harbors a unique arginine-rich C terminus that was implicated in immune responses induced by the capsid. In this study, we examined the capacity of the HBV capsid to induce proinflammatory and regulatory cytokines in human THP-1 macrophages and the possible underlying mechanism. Full-length HBc capsids, but not HBc-144 capsids lacking the arginine-rich domain of HBcAg, efficiently bound differentiated THP-1 macrophages and strongly induced TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12p40. Capsid binding to macrophages and cytokine induction were independent of the RNA associated with the arginine-rich domain. Soluble heparin and heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfates greatly diminished cytokine induction through inhibition of capsid binding to THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, serine phosphorylation in the arginine-rich domain modulates capsid binding to macrophages and the cytokine response. Induction of cytokines by the capsid involved activation of NF-kappaB, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK and did not require endosomal acidification. Finally, NF-kappaB activation by the capsid in HEK 293 cells specifically required expression of TLR2 and was compromised by soluble heparin. Thus, cytokine induction by the HBV capsid in macrophages is facilitated by interaction of its arginine-rich domain with membrane heparan sulfate and involves signaling through TLR2. PMID:16116207

  20. CD97/ADGRE5 Inhibits LPS Induced NF-κB Activation through PPAR-γ Upregulation in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Sun, Zewei; Zhao, Wenting; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Mingjie; Pan, Yanyun; Yan, Hui; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    CD97/ADGRE5 protein is predominantly expressed on leukocytes and belongs to the EGF-TM7 receptors family. It mediates granulocytes accumulation in the inflammatory tissues and is involved in firm adhesion of PMNC on activated endothelial cells. There have not been any studies exploring the role of CD97 in LPS induced NF-κB activation in macrophages. Therefore, we first measured the CD97 expression in LPS treated human primary macrophages and subsequently analyzed the levels of inflammatory factor TNF-α and transcription factor NF-κB in these macrophages that have been manipulated with either CD97 knockdown or overexpression. We found that a reported anti-inflammatory transcription factor, PPAR-γ, was involved in the CD97 mediated NF-κB suppression. Furthermore, by immunofluorescence staining, we established that CD97 overexpression not only inhibited LPS induced p65 expression in the nucleus but also promoted the PPAR-γ expression. Moreover, using CD97 knockout THP-1 cells, we further demonstrated that CD97 promoted PPAR-γ expression and decreased LPS induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, CD97 plays a negative role in LPS induced NF-κB activation and TNF-α secretion, partly through PPAR-γ upregulation. PMID:26997758

  1. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Timothy E. Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I}, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  2. Contribution of the Major ND10 Proteins PML, hDaxx and Sp100 to the Regulation of Human Cytomegalovirus Latency and Lytic Replication in the Monocytic Cell Line THP-1

    PubMed Central

    Wagenknecht, Nadine; Reuter, Nina; Scherer, Myriam; Reichel, Anna; Müller, Regina; Stamminger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, also termed nuclear domain 10 (ND10), have emerged as nuclear protein accumulations mediating an intrinsic cellular defense against viral infections via chromatin-based mechanisms, however, their contribution to the control of herpesviral latency is still controversial. In this study, we utilized the monocytic cell line THP-1 as an in vitro latency model for human cytomegalovirus infection (HCMV). Characterization of THP-1 cells by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis confirmed the expression of all major ND10 components. THP-1 cells with a stable, individual knockdown of PML, hDaxx or Sp100 were generated. Importantly, depletion of the major ND10 proteins did not prevent the terminal cellular differentiation of THP-1 monocytes. After construction of a recombinant, endotheliotropic human cytomegalovirus expressing IE2-EYFP, we investigated whether the depletion of ND10 proteins affects the onset of viral IE gene expression. While after infection of differentiated, THP-1-derived macrophages as well as during differentiation-induced reactivation from latency an increase in the number of IE-expressing cells was readily detectable in the absence of the major ND10 proteins, no effect was observed in non-differentiated monocytes. We conclude that PML, hDaxx and Sp100 primarily act as cellular restriction factors during lytic HCMV replication and during the dynamic process of reactivation but do not serve as key determinants for the establishment of HCMV latency. PMID:26057166

  3. A novel PPARα agonist propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide inhibits inflammation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Yan, Lu; Luo, Xiu-Mei; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Jing, Zuo; Yang, Li-Chao; Hu, Rong; Wang, Xuan; Huang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Our group synthesized propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist. Because PPARα activation is associated with inflammation control, we hypothesize that N15 may have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the effect of N15 on the regulation of inflammation in THP-1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In particular, we assessed the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines, three important types of cytokines that are released from monocytes and are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The results showed that N15 remarkably reduced the mRNA expression of chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). N15 also decreased the protein expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9. The reduction in the expression of cytokine mRNAs observed following N15 treatment was abrogated in THP-1 cells treated with PPARα siRNA, indicating that the anti-inflammatory effects of N15 are dependent on PPARα activation. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibition, which are dependent on PPARα activation, were also involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of N15. In conclusion, the novel PPARα agonist, N15, exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are mediated via PPARα activation and TLR4/NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. In our study, N15 exhibits promise for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  4. A novel PPARα agonist propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide inhibits inflammation in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Yan, Lu; Luo, Xiu-Mei; Peng, Lu; Guo, Han; Jing, Zuo; Yang, Li-Chao; Hu, Rong; Wang, Xuan; Huang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yi-Qing; Jin, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Our group synthesized propane-2-sulfonic acid octadec-9-enyl-amide (N15), a novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist. Because PPARα activation is associated with inflammation control, we hypothesize that N15 may have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the effect of N15 on the regulation of inflammation in THP-1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In particular, we assessed the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines, three important types of cytokines that are released from monocytes and are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The results showed that N15 remarkably reduced the mRNA expression of chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10), and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). N15 also decreased the protein expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9. The reduction in the expression of cytokine mRNAs observed following N15 treatment was abrogated in THP-1 cells treated with PPARα siRNA, indicating that the anti-inflammatory effects of N15 are dependent on PPARα activation. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibition, which are dependent on PPARα activation, were also involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of N15. In conclusion, the novel PPARα agonist, N15, exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are mediated via PPARα activation and TLR4/NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. In our study, N15 exhibits promise for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27318324

  5. Monocyte-macrophage membrane possesses free radicals scavenging activity: stimulation by polyphenols or by paraoxonase 1 (PON1).

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, M; Elias, A; Volkova, N; Aviram, M

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, we analysed free radicals scavenging activity of monocytes-macrophages in the absence or presence of antioxidants such as polyphenols or paraoxonase 1 (PON1). THP-1 human monocytic cell line, murine J774A.1 macrophages, as well as human primary monocytes have the capability to scavenge free radicals, as measured by the 1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) assay. This effect (which could be attributed to the cell's membrane) was cell number and incubation time dependent. Upon incubation of J774A.1 macrophages with acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL), with VLDL, or with the radical generator, AAPH, the cells' lipid peroxides content, and paraoxonase 2 (PON2) activity were significantly increased. While non-treated cells decreased DPPH absorbance by 65%, the Ac-LDL-, VLDL- or AAPH-treated cells, decreased it by only 33%, 30%, or 45%, respectively. We next analysed the effect of J774A.1 macrophage enrichment with antioxidants, such as polyphenols or PON1 on the cells' free radicals scavenging activity. Non-treated cells decreased DPPH absorbance by 50%, whereas vitamin E-, punicalagin- or PJ-treated cells significantly further decreased it, by 75%. Similarly, in PON1-treated cells DPPH absorbance was further decreased by 63%, in association with 23% increment in PON1 catalytic activity. In cells under oxidative stress [treated with AAPH-, or with oxidized LDL], PON1 activity was decreased by 31% or 40%, as compared to the activity observed in PON1 incubated with non-treated cells. We conclude that monocytes-macrophages possess free radicals scavenging activity, which is decreased under atherogenic conditions, and increased upon cell enrichment with potent antioxidants such as nutritional polyphenols, or PON1.

  6. Bioassay-Guided Fractionation and In Vitro Antiproliferative Effects of Fractions of Artemisia nilagirica on THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Gul, Mir Zahoor; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; K, Manjulatha; Bhat, Mohd Yasin; Maurya, Radheshyam; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    ABSTACT Artemisia nilagirica (Clarke) is a widely used medicinal herb in Indian traditional system of medicine. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of A. nilagirica extracts/fractions on inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in a human monocytic leukemia (THP-1) cell line. The crude extracts (A. nilagirica ethyl acetate extract [ANE] and A. nilagirica methanolic extract [ANA]) showed cytotoxic activity toward THP-1 cells with the IC50 values of 38.21 ± 7.37 and 132.41 ± 7.19 µg/ml, respectively. However, the cytotoxic activity of active fractions (ANE-B and ANM-9) obtained after column chromatography was found to be much more pronounced than their parent extracts. The IC50 values of ANE-B and ANM-9 were found to be 27.04 ± 2.54 µg/ml and 12.70 ± 4.79 µg/ml, respectively, suggesting greater susceptibility of the malignant cells. Cell cycle analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) assay revealed that inhibition of cell growth by A. nilagirica fractions on THP-1 cells was mediated by apoptosis. Active fractions of A. nilagirica increased the expression levels of caspase-3, -7, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), a critical member of the apoptotic pathway. These results suggested that active fractions of A. nilagirica may play a promising role in growth suppression by inducing apoptosis in human monocytic leukemic cells via mitochondria-dependent and death receptor-dependent apoptotic pathways. PMID:27618154

  7. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  8. Macrophage Immune Response Suppression by Recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens, the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Hemmati, Mina; Ebadat, Saeedeh; Movahedi, Bahram; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Macrophage immune responses are affected by the secretory proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This study aimed to examine the immune responses of macrophages to Mtb secretory antigens, namely ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10. Methods: THP-1 cells (a human monocytic cell line) were cultured and differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The cytotoxicity of the recombinant Mtb proteins was assessed using the MTT assay. Two important immune responses of macrophages, namely NO and ROS production, were measured in response to the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigens. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with SPSS, version 16, and considered significant at P<0.05. Results: The results showed that the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 proteins markedly reduced macrophage immune response. The treatment of the THP-1-differentiated cells with ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 reduced NO and ROS production. The treated THP-1-differentiated cells exhibited less inducible NO synthase activity than did the untreated cells. No toxic effect on macrophage viability was observed for the applied proteins at the different concentrations. Conclusion: It seems that the decline in macrophage immune response is due to the suppression of NO and ROS production pathways without any effect on cell viability. PMID:27365551

  9. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  10. C1q binding to dengue virus decreases levels of infection and inflammatory molecules transcription in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Douradinha, Bruno; McBurney, Sean P; Soares de Melo, Klecia M; Smith, Amanda P; Krishna, Neel K; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M; Evans, Jared D; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2014-01-22

    Dengue virus infection elicits a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease. The mechanisms leading to severe dengue are not known, however it has been reported that the complement system is hyper-activated in severe dengue. Screening of complement proteins demonstrated that C1q, a pattern recognition molecule, can bind directly to dengue virus envelope protein and to whole dengue virus serotype 2. Incubation of dengue virus serotype 2 with C1q prior to infection of THP-1 cells led to decreased virus infectivity and modulation of mRNA expression of immunoregulatory molecules suggesting reduced inflammatory responses.

  11. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Suhua

    2016-08-01

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

  12. Evaluation of the sensitizing potential of antibiotics in vitro using the human cell lines THP-1 and MUTZ-LC and primary monocyte‐derived dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, Katrin; Ott, Hagen; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele; Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens Malte

    2012-08-01

    Since the 7th amendment to the EU cosmetics directive foresees a complete ban on animal testing, alternative in vitro methods have been established to evaluate the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight compounds. To find out whether these novel in vitro assays are also capable to predict the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs, model compounds such as beta-lactams and sulfonamides – which are the most frequent cause of adverse drug reactions – were co-incubated with THP-1, MUTZ-LC, or primary monocyte‐derived dendritic cells for 48 h and subsequent expression of selected marker genes (IL-8, IL-1β, CES1, NQO1, GCLM, PIR and TRIM16) was studied by real time PCR. Benzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were recognized as sensitizing compounds because they are capable to induce the mRNA expression of these genes in moDCs and, except for IL-8, in THP-1 cells but not in MUTZ-LC. Ampicillin stimulated the expression of some marker genes in moDCs and THP-1 cells. SMX did not affect the expression of these genes in THP-1, however, in moDCs, at least PIR was enhanced and there was an increase of the release of IL-8. These data reveal that novel in vitro DC based assays might play a role in the evaluation of the allergenic potential of novel drug compounds, but these systems seem to lack the ability to detect the sensitizing potential of prohaptens that require metabolic activation prior to sensitization and moDCs seem to be superior with regard to the sensitivity compared with THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cell lines. -- Highlights: ► We tested the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs in vitro. ► In vitro assays were performed with moDCs and THP-1 cells. ► Beta-lactam antibiotics can be recognized as sensitizing compounds. ► They affect the expression of metabolic enzymes, cytokines and transcription factors. ► Sulfamethoxazole has no measurable effect on THP-1 cells and moDCs.

  13. Evaluation of the sensitizing potential of antibiotics in vitro using the human cell lines THP-1 and MUTZ-LC and primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Katrin; Ott, Hagen; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele; Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens Malte

    2012-08-01

    Since the 7th amendment to the EU cosmetics directive foresees a complete ban on animal testing, alternative in vitro methods have been established to evaluate the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight compounds. To find out whether these novel in vitro assays are also capable to predict the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs, model compounds such as beta-lactams and sulfonamides - which are the most frequent cause of adverse drug reactions - were co-incubated with THP-1, MUTZ-LC, or primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells for 48 h and subsequent expression of selected marker genes (IL-8, IL-1β, CES1, NQO1, GCLM, PIR and TRIM16) was studied by real time PCR. Benzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were recognized as sensitizing compounds because they are capable to induce the mRNA expression of these genes in moDCs and, except for IL-8, in THP-1 cells but not in MUTZ-LC. Ampicillin stimulated the expression of some marker genes in moDCs and THP-1 cells. SMX did not affect the expression of these genes in THP-1, however, in moDCs, at least PIR was enhanced and there was an increase of the release of IL-8. These data reveal that novel in vitro DC based assays might play a role in the evaluation of the allergenic potential of novel drug compounds, but these systems seem to lack the ability to detect the sensitizing potential of prohaptens that require metabolic activation prior to sensitization and moDCs seem to be superior with regard to the sensitivity compared with THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cell lines. PMID:22609641

  14. Royal Jelly Constituents Increase the Expression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase through Histone Acetylation in Monocytic THP-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Makino, Junya; Ogasawara, Rie; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Mitsugi, Yukari; Yamaguchi, Eiji; Itoh, Akichika; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-04-22

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is one of the main SOD isozymes and plays an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases by accelerating the dismutation reaction of superoxide. Royal jelly includes 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10H2DA, 2), which regulates the expression of various types of genes in epigenetics through the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) antagonism. The expression of EC-SOD was previously reported to be regulated epigenetically through histone acetylation in THP-1 cells. Therefore, we herein evaluated the effects of the royal jelly constituents 10-hydroxydecanoic acid (10HDA, 1), sebacic acid (SA, 3), and 4-hydroperoxy-2-decenoic acid ethyl ester (4-HPO-DAEE, 4), which is a derivative of 2, on the expression of EC-SOD in THP-1 cells. The treatment with 1 mM 1, 2, or 3 or 100 μM 4 increased EC-SOD expression and histone H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Moreover, the enrichment of acetylated histone H4 was observed in the proximal promoter region of EC-SOD and was caused by the partial promotion of ERK phosphorylation (only 4) and inhibition of HDAC activities, but not by the expression of HDACs. Overall, 4 exerted stronger effects than 1, 2, or 3 and has potential as a candidate or lead compound against atherosclerosis.

  15. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N; Pazos, Michael A; Hurley, Bryan P; Cherayil, Bobby J

    2016-01-01

    Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages) after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis. PMID:27505062

  16. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kejie; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N.; Pazos, Michael A.; Hurley, Bryan P.; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2016-01-01

    Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages) after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis. PMID:27505062

  17. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile. PMID:25752767

  18. Peptidoglycan recognition protein–peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S–PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile. PMID:25752767

  19. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile.

  20. Rap1 induces cytokine production in pro-inflammatory macrophages through NFκB signaling and is highly expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yin; Sukhova, Galina K; Wong, Hoi Kin; Xu, Aimin; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching

    2015-01-01

    Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) is essential for maintaining telomere length and structural integrity, but it also exerts other non-telomeric functions. The present study tested the hypothesis that Rap1 is released into the cytoplasm and induces production of pro-inflammatory cytokines via nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling in macrophages, a cell type involved in the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Western blotting analysis confirmed that Rap1 was present in the cytoplasm of differentiated human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1, a macrophage-like cell line). Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed a direct interaction between Rap1 and I kappa B kinase (IKK). Knockdown of Rap1 suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated activation of NFκB, and phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B α (IκBα) and p65 in THP-1 macrophages. The reduction of NFκB activity was paralleled by a decreased production of NFκB-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increased expression of IκBα (native NFκB inhibitor) in various macrophage models with pro-inflammatory phenotype, including THP-1, mouse peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived M1 macrophages. These changes were observed selectively in pro-inflammatory macrophages but not in bone marrow-derived M2 macrophages (with an anti-inflammatory phenotype), mouse lung endothelial cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells or human aortic smooth muscle cells. Immunostaining revealed that Rap1 was localized mainly in macrophage-rich areas in human atherosclerotic plaques and that the presence of Rap1 was positively correlated with the advancement of the disease process. In pro-inflammatory macrophages, Rap1 promotes cytokine production via NFκB activation favoring a pro-inflammatory environment which may contribute to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26505215

  1. Silver wire amplifies the signaling mechanism for IL-1beta production more than silver submicroparticles in human monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hye Jin; Pak, Pyo June; Park, Sung Hyo; Ju, Jae Eun; Kim, Joong-Su; Lee, Hoi-Seon; Chung, Namhyun

    2014-01-01

    Silver materials have been widely used in diverse fields. However, their toxicity and their mechanism, especially in different forms, have not been studied sufficiently. Thus, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) production were investigated using macrophage-like THP-1 cells in the presence of Ag microparticles (AgMPs, 2.7 µm), Ag submicroparticles (AgSMPs, 150 nm), and Ag wires (AgWs, 274 nm×5.3 µm). The levels of cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and IL-1β production by AgWs were higher than those by the other two AgSMPs and AgMPs. This trend was also observed with each step of the signaling mechanism for IL-1β production, which is a single pathway affiliated with ROS generation or lysosomal rupture or both, cathepsin B, caspase-1 (NALP3 inflammasome), and finally IL-1β production in THP-1 cells. All these results suggest that, for development of safe and effective silver materials, the shape or form of silver materials should be considered, especially for macrophage cell lines because epithelial cell lines are not overly sensitive to silver materials. PMID:25396430

  2. Pneumolysin-dependent and -independent gene expression identified by cDNA microarray analysis of THP-1 human mononuclear cells stimulated by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P David; Thornton, Justin; Barker, Katherine S; McDaniel, D Olga; Sacks, Gordon S; Swiatlo, Edwin; McDaniel, Larry S

    2003-04-01

    Pneumolysin is an important virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, interacting with the membranes of host cells to elicit a multitude of inflammatory responses. We used cDNA microarrays to identify genes which are responsive to S. pneumoniae in a pneumolysin-dependent and -independent fashion. The THP-1 human monocytic cell line was coincubated for 3 h with medium alone, with the virulent type 2 S. pneumoniae strain D39, or with the isogenic strain PLN, which does not express pneumolysin. RNA was isolated from the monocytes and hybridized on cDNA microarrays. Of 4,133 genes evaluated, 142 were found to be responsive in a pneumolysin-dependent fashion, whereas 40 were found to be responsive independent of pneumolysin. Genes that were up-regulated in cells exposed to D39 relative to those exposed to PLN included genes encoding proteins such as mannose binding lectin 1, lysozyme, alpha-1 catenin, cadherin 17, caspases 4 and 6, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta), interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3), IL-2 receptor beta (IL-2Rbeta), IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Ralpha), interferon receptor 2, and prostaglandin E synthase. Down-regulated genes included those encoding complement component receptor 2/CD21, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1). Pneumolysin-independent responses included down-regulation of the genes encoding CD68, CD53, CD24, transforming growth factor beta2, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1. These results demonstrate the striking effects of pneumolysin on the host cell upon exposure to S. pneumoniae.

  3. Alpinetin enhances cholesterol efflux and inhibits lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-loaded human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengming; Sang, Haiqiang; Fu, Xin; Liang, Ying; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Alpinetin is a natural flavonoid abundantly present in the ginger family. Here, we investigated the effect of alpinetin on cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 macrophages and human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). After exposing THP-1 macrophages to alpinetin, cholesterol efflux was determined by liquid scintillator. The mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), liver X receptor alpha (LXR-α), ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), and ABCG1 and scavenger receptor class B member 1 were determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. Alpinetin promoted apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density-lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux and elevated PPAR-γ and LXR-α mRNA and protein expression in a dose-dependent fashion in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages and HMDMs. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of PPAR-γ or LXR-α dose dependently reversed alpinetin-increased cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages, indicating the involvement of PPAR-γ and LXR-α in alpinetin-promoted cholesterol efflux. Alpinetin inhibited ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation and enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA and protein, which was reversed by specific knockdown of PPAR-γ or LXR-α. Taken together, our results reveal that alpinetin exhibits positive effects on cholesterol efflux and inhibits ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation, which might be through PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1/ABCG1 pathway.

  4. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-GuC)rin) activates disabled naC/ve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-N1), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1N2), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-N2) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions.

  5. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    PubMed

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  6. MMP-10 Regulates Collagenolytic Activity of Alternatively Activated Resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Maryam G.; McMahan, Ryan S.; Razumova, Maria V.; Hertz, Angie L.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H.; Regnier, Michael; Wang, Ying; Birkland, Timothy P.; Parks, William C.

    2015-01-01

    MMP-10 is expressed by macrophages and epithelium in response to injury, but its functions in wound repair are unknown. We observed increased collagen deposition and skin stiffness in Mmp10−/− wounds with no difference in collagen expression or re-epithelialization. Increased collagen deposition in Mmp10−/− wounds was accompanied by less collagenolytic activity and reduced expression of specific metallocollagenases, particularly MMP-8 and MMP-13, where MMP-13 was the key collagenase. Ablation and adoptive transfer approaches and cell-based models demonstrated that the MMP-10-dependent collagenolytic activity was a product of alternatively activated (M2) resident macrophages. These data demonstrate a critical role for macrophage MMP-10 in controlling the tissue remodeling activity of macrophages and moderating scar formation during wound repair. PMID:25927164

  7. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs.

  8. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-10-14

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs. PMID:26372376

  9. Nicotinate-Curcumin Impedes Foam Cell Formation from THP-1 Cells through Restoring Autophagy Flux.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hong-Feng; Li, Hai-Zhe; Tang, Ya-Ling; Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that a novel curcumin derivate nicotinate-curcumin (NC) has beneficial effects on the prevention of atherosclerosis, but the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Given that autophagy regulates lipid metabolism, the present study was designed to investigate whether NC decreases foam cell formation through restoring autophagy flux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 cells. Our results showed that ox-LDL (100 μg/ml) was accumulated in THP-1 cells and impaired autophagy flux. Ox-LDL-induced impairment of autophagy was enhanced by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) and rescued by the autophagy inducer rapamycin. The aggregation of ox-LDL was increased by CQ, but decreased by rapamycin. In addition, colocalization of lipid droplets with LC3-II was remarkably reduced in ox-LDL group. In contrast, NC (10 μM) rescued the impaired autophagy flux by significantly increasing level of LC3-II, the number of autophagolysosomes, and the degradation of p62 in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 cells. Inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling was required for NC-rescued autophagy flux. Notably, our results showed that NC remarkably promoted the colocalization of lipid droplets with autophagolysosomes, increased efflux of cholesterol, and reduced ox-LDL accumulation in THP-1 cells. However, treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or CQ reduced the protective effects of NC on lipid accumulation. Collectively, the findings suggest that NC decreases lipid accumulation in THP-1 cells through restoring autophagy flux, and further implicate that NC may be a potential therapeutic reagent to reverse atherosclerosis.

  10. Folic Acid Represses Hypoxia-Induced Inflammation in THP-1 Cells through Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/HIF-1α Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyan; He, Zhiying; Jiang, Xinwei; Hou, Mengjun; Tang, Zhihong; Zhen, Xiaozhou; Liang, Yuming; Ma, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Though hypoxia has been implicated as a cause of inflammation, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Folic acid has been shown to provide protection against oxidative stress and inflammation in patients with cardiovascular disease and various models approximating insult to tissue via inflammation. It has been reported that hypoxia-induced inflammation is associated with oxidative stress, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α), and production of pro-inflammatory molecules. Whether folic acid protects human monocytic cells (THP-1 cells) against hypoxia-induced damage, however, remains unknown. We used THP-1 cells to establish a hypoxia-induced cellular injury model. Pretreating THP-1 cells with folic acid attenuated hypoxia-induced inflammatory responses, including a decrease in protein and mRNA levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), coupled with increased levels of IL-10. Folic acid also reduced hypoxia-induced Akt phosphorylation and decreased nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α protein. Both LY294002 (a selective inhibitor of phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase, PI3K) and KC7F2 (a HIF-1α inhibitor) reduced levels of hypoxia-induced inflammatory cytokines. We also found that insulin (an Akt activator) and dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG, a HIF-1α activator) induced over-expression of inflammatory cytokines, which could be blocked by folic acid. Taken together, these findings demonstrate how folic acid attenuates the hypoxia-induced inflammatory responses of THP-1 cells through inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/HIF-1α pathway.

  11. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen induces proinflammatory monokine gene expression in the THP-1 human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    al-Daccak, R; Mehindate, K; Hébert, J; Rink, L; Mecheri, S; Mourad, W

    1994-01-01

    Soluble factors produced by Mycoplasma arthritidis play an important role in the pathology of arthritis in rodents, which closely resembles human rheumatoid arthritis. At least one of the products of these microorganisms, M. arthritidis-T cell mitogen (MAM), has biological activities in common with superantigens. These superantigens activate T cells in a V beta-restricted fashion, and this response is strictly dependent on the presence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cells. In the present study, we have examined the ability of MAM to induce proinflammatory monokine (interleukin 1 beta [IL-1 beta] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha]) gene expression in the THP-1 monocytic cell line. Treatment of these cells (which express a very low level of HLA-DR molecules) with gamma interferon (INF-gamma) induced HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP molecules and enabled them to respond to MAM in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in an increase in the level of steady-state mRNA for IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. Stimulation of the U937 monocytic cell line (MHC class II-negative even after INF-gamma treatment) with MAM did not induce either IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha transcription. Moreover, MAM adsorption on Raji (MHC class II-positive) cells resulted in the loss of its cytokine-inducing activity to induce monokine gene expression. These findings demonstrate clearly that MAM induces monokine gene expression following interaction with MHC class II molecules. Pretreatment of INF-gamma-treated THP-1 cells with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D prevented the induction of monokine mRNA, whereas cycloheximide superinduced mRNA after stimulation with MAM. Finally, our results, obtained with protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antiphosphotyrosine Western blotting (immunoblotting), indicate that protein tyrosine kinase is involved in MAM-induced IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha gene expression in the THP-1 monocytic cell line. The capacity of MAM to induce proinflammatory

  12. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the

  13. Vocal Fold Fibroblasts Immunoregulate Activated Macrophage Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N.; Chen, Fei; Jetté, Marie E.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that fibroblasts play a critical role in regulating inflammation during wound healing because they express several inflammatory mediators in response to bacteria. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) on the immunomodulatory properties of vocal fold fibroblasts (VFF) derived from polyps, scar and normal tissue co-cultured with macrophages, to provide insight into their interactions during the inflammatory process. Fibroblasts were co-cultured with CD14+ monocytes and after 7 days, wells were treated with LPS for 24 and 72 hours. Culture supernatants were collected and concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-1β, and MCP-1 were quantified by ELISA. Normal VFF and CD14+ monocultures were used as controls. Twenty-four hours after LPS activation, macrophages co-cultured with polyp VFF had significantly increased expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 compared to controls (p<0.0001). In contrast, macrophages co-cultured with scar VFF had significantly lower expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-12 with significantly higher IL-10 compared to control (p<0.0001). After 72 hours, macrophages co-cultured with polyp VFF increased expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and TGF-β (p<0.01) and macrophages co-cultured with scar VFF significantly decreased their expression of IL-1β and IL-12 compared to control (p<0.0001). Scar VFF at both time points produced significantly lower levels of IL-8, MCP-1, IL-6 and TGF-β compared to controls (p<0.05). Based on our findings, VFF and macrophages secrete several inflammatory mediators that modify their diverse functions. Polyp and scar VFF may play a role in regulating abnormal inflammatory responses, which could result in excessive ECM deposition that disrupts the function of the vocal folds. PMID:23123198

  14. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  15. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  16. Inhibition of Human Group IIA-Secreted Phospholipase A2 and THP-1 Monocyte Recruitment by Maslinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Yap, Wei Hsum; Ahmed, Nafees; Lim, Yang Mooi

    2016-10-01

    Maslinic acid is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid which has anti-inflammatory properties. A recent study showed that secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) may be a potential binding target of maslinic acid. The human group IIA (hGIIA)-sPLA2 is found in human sera and their levels are correlated with severity of inflammation. This study aims to determine whether maslinic acid interacts with hGIIA-sPLA2 and inhibits inflammatory response induced by this enzyme. It is shown that maslinic acid enhanced intrinsic fluorescence of hGIIA-sPLA2 and inhibited its enzyme activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Molecular docking revealed that maslinic acid binds to calcium binding and interfacial phospholipid binding site, suggesting that it inhibit access of catalytic calcium ion for enzymatic reaction and block binding of the enzyme to membrane phospholipid. The hGIIA-sPLA2 enzyme is also responsible in mediating monocyte recruitment and differentiation. Results showed that maslinic acid inhibit hGIIA-sPLA2-induced THP-1 cell differentiation and migration, and the effect observed is specific to hGIIA-sPLA2 as cells treated with maslinic acid alone did not significantly affect the number of adherent and migrated cells. Considering that hGIIA-sPLA2 enzyme is known to hydrolyze glyceroacylphospholipids present in lipoproteins and cell membranes, maslinic acid may bind and inhibit hGIIA-sPLA2 enzymatic activity, thereby reduces the release of fatty acids and lysophospholipids which stimulates monocyte migration and differentiation. This study is the first to report on the molecular interaction between maslinic acid and inflammatory target hGIIA-sPLA2 as well as its effect towards hGIIA-sPLA2-induced THP-1 monocyte adhesive and migratory capabilities, an important immune-inflammation process in atherosclerosis.

  17. Stable Toll-Like Receptor 10 Knockdown in THP-1 Cells Reduces TLR-Ligand-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai Van; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10) is the only orphan receptor whose natural ligand and function are unknown among the 10 human TLRs. In this study, to test whether TLR10 recognizes some known TLR ligands, we established a stable TLR10 knockdown human monocytic cell line THP-1 using TLR10 short hairpin RNA lentiviral particle and puromycin selection. Among 60 TLR10 knockdown clones that were derived from each single transduced cell, six clones were randomly selected, and then one of those clones, named E7, was chosen for the functional study. E7 exhibited approximately 50% inhibition of TLR10 mRNA and protein expression. Of all the TLRs, only the expression of TLR10 changed significantly in this cell line. Additionally, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced macrophage differentiation of TLR10 knockdown cells was not affected in the knockdown cells. When exposed to TLR ligands, such as synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL-1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and flagellin, significant induction of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression including Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Chemokine (C–C Motif) Ligand 20 (CCL20) expression, was found in the control THP-1 cells, whereas the TLR10 knockdown cells exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and CCL20. TNF-α was the only cytokine for which the expression did not decrease in the TLR10 knockdown cells from that measured in the control cells. Analysis of putative binding sites for transcription factors using a binding-site-prediction program revealed that the TNF-α promoter does not have putative binding sites for AP-1 or c-Jun, comprising a major transcription factor along with NF-κB for TLR signaling. Our results suggest that TLR10 is involved in the recognition of FSL-1, LPS, and flagellin and TLR-ligand-induced expression of TNF-α does not depend on TLR10. PMID:27258267

  18. Bordetella pertussis modulates human macrophage defense gene expression.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Hugo Alberto; Oviedo, Juan Marcos; Gorgojo, Juan Pablo; Lamberti, Yanina; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough, still causes outbreaks. We recently found evidence that B. pertussis can survive and even replicate inside human macrophages, indicating that this host cell might serve as a niche for persistence. In this work, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) that differentiates into macrophages in culture in order to investigate the host cell response to the infection and the mechanisms that promote that intracellular survival. To that end, we investigated the expression profile of a selected number of genes involved in cellular bactericidal activity and the inflammatory response during the early and late phases of infection. The bactericidal and inflammatory response of infected macrophages was progressively downregulated, while the number of THP-1 cells heavily loaded with live bacteria increased over time postinfection. Two of the main toxins of B. pertussis, pertussis toxin (Ptx) and adenylate cyclase (CyaA), were found to be involved in manipulating the host cell response. Therefore, failure to express either toxin proved detrimental to the development of intracellular infections by those bacteria. Taken together, these results support the relevance of host defense gene manipulation to the outcome of the interaction between B. pertussis and macrophages.

  19. Bordetella pertussis modulates human macrophage defense gene expression.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Hugo Alberto; Oviedo, Juan Marcos; Gorgojo, Juan Pablo; Lamberti, Yanina; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough, still causes outbreaks. We recently found evidence that B. pertussis can survive and even replicate inside human macrophages, indicating that this host cell might serve as a niche for persistence. In this work, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) that differentiates into macrophages in culture in order to investigate the host cell response to the infection and the mechanisms that promote that intracellular survival. To that end, we investigated the expression profile of a selected number of genes involved in cellular bactericidal activity and the inflammatory response during the early and late phases of infection. The bactericidal and inflammatory response of infected macrophages was progressively downregulated, while the number of THP-1 cells heavily loaded with live bacteria increased over time postinfection. Two of the main toxins of B. pertussis, pertussis toxin (Ptx) and adenylate cyclase (CyaA), were found to be involved in manipulating the host cell response. Therefore, failure to express either toxin proved detrimental to the development of intracellular infections by those bacteria. Taken together, these results support the relevance of host defense gene manipulation to the outcome of the interaction between B. pertussis and macrophages. PMID:27465637

  20. Gene expression profile of THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhi-De; Wei, Ting-Ting; Tang, Qing-Qin; Ma, Ning; Wang, Li-Li; Qin, Bao-Dong; Yin, Jian-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanisms under immune response against Candida albicans (C. albicans) remain largely unknown. To better understand the mechanisms of innate immune response against C. albicans, we analyzed the gene expression profile of THP-1 cells stimulated with heat-killed C. albicans. Methods THP-1 cells were stimulated with heat-killed C. albicans for 9 hours at a ratio of 1:1, and gene expression profile of the cells was analyzed using Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were defined as change folds more than 2 and with statistical significance. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analysis were used to systematically identify biological connections of differentially expressed genes, as well as the pathways associated with the immune response against C. albicans. Results A total of 355 genes were up-regulated and 715 genes were down-regulated significantly. The up-regulated genes were particularly involved in biological process of RNA processing and pathway of the spliceosome. In case of down-regulated genes, the particularly involved immune-related pathways were G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathway, calcium signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway and Ras pathway. Conclusions We depict the gene expression profile of heat-killed C. albicans stimulated THP-1 cells, and identify the major pathways involved in immune response against C. albicans. These pathways are potential candidate targets for developing anti-C. albicans agent. PMID:27275483

  1. Proteomic-Based Approach To Gain Insight into Reprogramming of THP-1 Cells Exposed to Leishmania donovani over an Early Temporal Window

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Alok Kumar; Pandey, Rajeev Kumar; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. It lives and multiplies within the harsh environment of macrophages. In order to investigate how intracellular parasite manipulate the host cell environment, we undertook a quantitative proteomic study of human monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1) following infection with L. donovani. We used the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) method and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare expression profiles of noninfected and L. donovani-infected THP-1 cells. We detected modifications of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting a global reprogramming of cell metabolism by the parasite. An increased abundance of proteins involved in gene transcription, RNA splicing (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins [hnRNPs]), histones, and DNA repair and replication was observed at 24 h postinfection. Proteins involved in cell survival and signal transduction were more abundant at 24 h postinfection. Several of the differentially expressed proteins had not been previously implicated in response to the parasite, while the others support the previously identified proteins. Selected proteomics results were validated by real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses. Similar changes were observed in L. donovani-infected human monocyte-derived primary macrophages. The effect of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene knockdown of proteins validated the relevance of the host quantitative proteomic screen. Our findings indicate that the host cell proteome is modulated after L. donovani infection, provide evidence for global reprogramming of cell metabolism, and demonstrate the complex relations between the host and parasite at the molecular level. PMID:25690103

  2. Phospholipid Scramblase 1 Modulates FcR-Mediated Phagocytosis in Differentiated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Herate, Cecile; Ramdani, Ghania; Grant, Nancy J; Marion, Sabrina; Gasman, Stephane; Niedergang, Florence; Benichou, Serge; Bouchet, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid Scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) was initially characterized as a type II transmembrane protein involved in bilayer movements of phospholipids across the plasma membrane leading to the cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine, but other cellular functions have been ascribed to this protein in signaling processes and in the nucleus. In the present study, expression and functions of PLSCR1 were explored in specialized phagocytic cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of PLSCR1 was found to be markedly increased in monocyte-derived macrophages compared to undifferentiated primary monocytes. Surprisingly, this 3-fold increase in PLSCR1 expression correlated with an apparent modification in the membrane topology of the protein at the cell surface of differentiated macrophages. While depletion of PLSCR1 in the monocytic THP-1 cell-line with specific shRNA did not inhibit the constitutive cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine observed in differentiated macrophages, a net increase in the FcR-mediated phagocytic activity was measured in PLSCR1-depleted THP-1 cells and in bone marrow-derived macrophages from PLSCR1 knock-out mice. Reciprocally, phagocytosis was down-regulated in cells overexpressing PLSCR1. Since endogenous PLSCR1 was recruited both in phagocytic cups and in phagosomes, our results reveal a specific role for induced PLSCR1 expression in the modulation of the phagocytic process in differentiated macrophages.

  3. Basic calcium phosphate crystals induce monocyte/macrophage IL-1β secretion through the NLRP3 inflammasome in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pazár, Borbála; Ea, Hang-Korng; Narayan, Sharmal; Kolly, Laeticia; Bagnoud, Nathalie; Chobaz, Véronique; Roger, Thierry; Lioté, Frédéric; So, Alexander; Busso, Nathalie

    2011-02-15

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are associated with severe osteoarthritis and acute periarticular inflammation. Three main forms of BCP crystals have been identified from pathological tissues: octacalcium phosphate, carbonate-substituted apatite, and hydroxyapatite. We investigated the proinflammatory effects of these BCP crystals in vitro with special regard to the involvement of the NLRP3-inflammasome in THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes and macrophages, and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). THP-1 cells stimulated with BCP crystals produced IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, primary human cells and BMDM from wild-type mice also produced high concentrations of IL-1β after crystal stimulation. THP-1 cells transfected with short hairpin RNA against the components of the NLRP3 inflammasome and mouse BMDM from mice deficient for NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, or caspase-1 did not produce IL-1β after BCP crystal stimulation. BCP crystals induced macrophage apoptosis/necrosis as demonstrated by MTT and flow cytometric analysis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that BCP crystals induce IL-1β secretion through activating the NLRP3 inflammasome. Furthermore, we speculate that IL-1 blockade could be a novel strategy to inhibit BCP-induced inflammation in human disease. PMID:21239716

  4. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Macrophage Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  5. Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin cause macrophage extracellular trap formation by bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Hellenbrand, Katrina M; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2012-05-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  6. Cytolytic activity against tumor cells by macrophage cell lines and augmentation by macrophage stimulants.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, T; Holden, H T

    1980-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that macrophage cell lines retained the ability to phagocytize, to secrete lysosomal enzymes, and to function as effector cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity. In this paper, the cytolytic activity of murine macrophage cell lines against tumor target cells was assessed using an 18-h 51Cr release assay. Of the macrophage cell lines tested, RAW 264, PU5-1.8 and IC-21 had intermediate to high levels of spontaneous cytolytic activity, P388D, and J774 had low to intermediate levels, while /WEHI-3 showed little or no cytolytic activity against RBL-5, MBL-2 and TU-5 target cells. Tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines could be augmented by the addition of macrophage stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C, indicating that the activation of macrophages by these stimulants does not require the participation of other cell types. Treatment with interferon also augmented the tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines. Although the mechanism by which these cell lines exert their spontaneous or boosted cytotoxic activity is not clear, it does not appear to be due to depletion of nutrients since cell lines with high metabolic and proliferative activities, such as WEHI-3 and RBL-5, showed little or no cytotoxicity and supernatants from the macrophage cell lines did not exert any cytotoxic effects in their essay. Thus, it appears that the different macrophage cell lines represent different levels of activation and/or differentiation and may be useful for studying the development of these processes as well as providing a useful tool for analyzing the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:6165690

  7. Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) induces AKT hyperphosphorylation, bortezomib-resistance and GLUT-1 plasma membrane exposure in THP-1 monocytic cell line

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway regulates multiple cellular processes such as cell proliferation, evasion from apoptosis, migration, glucose metabolism, protein synthesis and proper differentiation in immune cells. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic virus associated with several human malignancies, expresses a variety of latent and lytic proteins able to activate PI3K/AKT pathway, promoting the growth of infected cells and a successful viral infection. Results We found that KSHV latent infection of THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line derived from an acute monocytic leukemia patient, resulted in an increase of AKT phoshorylation, not susceptible to bortezomib-induced dephosphorylation, compared to the mock-infected THP-1. Accordingly, THP-1-infected cells displayed increased resistance to the bortezomib cytotoxic effect in comparison to the uninfected cells, which was counteracted by pre-treatment with AKT-specific inhibitors. Finally, AKT hyperactivation by KSHV infection correlated with plasma membrane exposure of glucose transporter GLUT1, particularly evident during bortezomib treatment. GLUT1 membrane trafficking is a characteristic of malignant cells and underlies a change of glucose metabolism that ensures the survival to highly proliferating cells and render these cells highly dependent on glycolysis. GLUT1 membrane trafficking in KSHV-infected THP-1 cells indeed led to increased sensitivity to cell death induced by the glycolysis inhibitor 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), further potentiated by its combination with bortezomib. Conclusions KSHV confers to the THP-1 infected cells an oncogenic potential by altering the phosphorylation, expression and localization of key molecules that control cell survival and metabolism such as AKT and GLUT1. Such modifications in one hand lead to resistance to cell death induced by some chemotherapeutic drugs such as bortezomib

  8. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential. PMID:15084924

  9. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential.

  10. Aqueous Extract of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and Ferulic Acid Reduce the Expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in LPS-Activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Simón; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation is essential for defending the body against pathogens; however, when inflammation becomes chronic, it is harmful to the body and is part of the pathophysiology of various diseases such as Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) among others. In chronic inflammation macrophages play an important role, mainly through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukin (IL)-1β, explained in part by activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a signaling pathway which culminates in the activation of Nuclear factor (NF)-κB, an important transcription factor in the expression of these proinflammatory genes. On the other hand, the benefits on health of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables are well described. In this work, the effects of aqueous extract of tomato and ferulic acid on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in LPS activated monocyte-derived THP-1 macrophages were investigated. In addition, using Western blot, we investigated whether the inhibition was due to the interference on activation of NF-κB. We found that both the tomato extract and ferulic acid presented inhibitory activity on the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β cytokine by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. The current results suggest that tomatoes and ferulic acid may contribute to prevention of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26307961

  11. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  12. Modulation of macrophage activation and programming in immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Yang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are central mediators of the immune, contributing both to the initiation and the resolution of inflammation. The concept of macrophage activation and program has stimulated interest in its definition, and functional significance in homeostasis and diseases. It has been known that macrophages could be differently activated and programmed into different functional subtypes in response to different types of antigen stumuli or different kinds of cytokines present in the microenvironment and could thus profoundly influence immune responses, but little is known about the state and exact regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program from cell or molecular signaling level in immunity. In this review, we summarize the recent finding regarding the regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program toward M1 and M2, especially on M2 macrophages.

  13. SARS coronavirus spike protein-induced innate immune response occurs via activation of the NF-kappaB pathway in human monocyte macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dosch, Susan F; Mahajan, Supriya D; Collins, Arlene R

    2009-06-01

    A purified recombinant spike (S) protein was studied for its effect on stimulating human peripheral blood monocyte macrophages (PBMC). We examined inflammatory gene mRNA abundances found in S protein-treated PBMC using gene arrays. We identified differential mRNA abundances of genes with functional properties associated with antiviral (CXCL10) and inflammatory (IL-6 and IL-8) responses. We confirmed cytokine mRNA increases by real-time quantitative(q) RT-PCR or ELISA. We further analyzed the sensitivity and specificity of the prominent IL-8 response. By real-time qRT-PCR, S protein was shown to stimulate IL-8 mRNA accumulation in a dose dependent manner while treatment with E protein did not. Also, titration of S protein-specific production and secretion of IL-8 by ELISA showed that the dose of 5.6nM of S produced a significant increase in IL-8 (p=0.003) compared to mock-treated controls. The increase in IL-8 stimulated by a concentration of 5.6nM of S was comparable to concentrations seen for S protein binding to ACE2 or to neutralizing monoclonal antibody suggesting a physiological relevance. An NF-kappaB inhibitor, TPCK (N-Tosyl-L-Phenylalanine Chloromethyl Ketone) could suppress IL-8 production and secretion in response to S protein in PBMC and THP-1 cells and in HCoV-229E virus-infected PBMC. Activation and translocation of NF-kappaB was shown to occur rapidly following exposure of PBMC or THP-1 cells to S protein using a highly sensitive assay for active nuclear NF-kappaB p65 transcription factor. The results further suggested that released or secreted S protein could activate blood monocytes through recognition by toll-like receptor (TLR)2 ligand.

  14. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to the site of injury, internalize necrotic or foreign material. Along with phagocytosis, activated macrophages release proteolytic enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins into the extracellular environment. Pro-inflammatory monocytes and macrophages also induce tissue oxidative damage through the inflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). In this review we will highlight recent advances in molecular macrophage imaging. Particular stress will be given to macrophage functional and enzymatic activity imaging which targets phagocytosis, proteolysis and myeloperoxidase activity imaging. PMID:24729833

  15. Role of membrane-anchored heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor and CD9 on macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, N; Kihara, S; Yamashita, S; Higashiyama, S; Nakagawa, T; Shimomura, I; Funahashi, T; Kameda-Takemura, K; Kawata, S; Taniguchi, N; Matsuzawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal-growth-factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a potent mitogen for smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) belonging to the EGF family. We have previously determined that HB-EGF is expressed in macrophages and SMCs of human atherosclerotic lesions and that its membrane-anchored precursor, proHB-EGF, also has a juxtacrine mitogenic activity which is markedly enhanced by CD9, a surface marker of lymphohaemopoietic cells. Therefore, when both proHB-EGF and CD9 are expressed on macrophages, they may strongly promote the development of atherosclerosis. In the present study we have investigated the changes in proHB-EGF and CD9 in THP-1 cells during differentiation into macrophages and by the addition of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (OxLDL) and assessed juxtacrine growth activity of THP-1 macrophages for human aortic SMCs. HB-EGF and CD9 at both the mRNA and the protein level were up-regulated after differentiation into macrophages, and further expression of HB-EGF was induced by the addition of OxLDL or lysophosphatidylcholine. Juxtacrine induction by formalin-fixed growth was suppressed to control levels by an inhibitor of HB-EGF and was partially decreased by anti-CD9 antibodies. These results suggest that co-expression of proHB-EGF and CD9 on macrophages plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis by a juxtacrine mechanism. PMID:9396739

  16. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Pro-Inflammatory Responses, but Down-Regulates LPS-Mediated Effects in RAW 264.7, THP-1 and Human PBMCs

    PubMed Central

    Sakharwade, Sanica C.; Sharma, Praveen K.; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae porin OmpU plays a crucial role in the survival of the organism in the human gut. Various observations suggest critical involvement of OmpU in V. cholerae pathogenesis. However, OmpU is poorly characterized in terms of its ability to evoke cellular responses, particularly in the context of host immune system. Therefore, towards characterizing V. cholerae OmpU for its host immunomodulatory functions, we have studied the ability of OmpU to elicit pro-inflammatory responses in a range of immune cells which include, mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, human THP-1 monocytes and human PBMCs. We have observed that purified OmpU induces pro-inflammatory responses in terms of production of NO, TNFα and IL-6. Interestingly, pre-treatment of the cells with OmpU suppresses the production of NO, TNFα, IL-6 as well as IL-12 upon subsequent activation with LPS. Our results therefore suggest that V. cholerae OmpU may have a differential regulatory role in terms of host immunomodulatory function: it can induce pro-inflammatory responses in target host immune cells, whereas it can also exert suppressive effect on LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses. In addition, our study indicates that purified OmpU may have the ability to skew the Th1 response towards the Th2 response, presumably via suppression of IL-12 production. PMID:24086753

  17. AKT mediated glycolytic shift regulates autophagy in classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matta, Sumit Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is considered as an innate defense mechanism primarily due to its role in the targeting of intracellular pathogens for lysosomal degradation. Here we report inhibition of autophagy as an adaptive response in classically activated macrophages that helps achieve high cellular ROS production and cell death-another hallmark of innate mechanisms. We show prolonged classical activation of Raw 264.7 macrophages by treating them with IFN-γ and LPS inhibited autophagy. The inhibition of autophagy was dependent on nitric oxide (NO) production which activated the AKT-mTOR signaling, the known negative regulators of autophagy. Autophagy inhibition in these cells was accompanied with a shift to aerobic glycolysis along with a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MOMP). The decline in MOMP coupled with autophagy inhibition led to increased mitochondrial content and considerably elevated cellular ROS, eventually causing cell death. Next, using specific siRNA mediated knockdowns we show AKT was responsible for the glycolytic shift and autophagy inhibition in activated macrophages. Surprisingly, AKT knockdown in activated macrophages also rescued them from cell death. Finally we show that AKT mediated autophagy inhibition in the activated macrophages correlated with the depletion of glucose from the extracellular medium, and glucose supplementation not only rescued autophagy levels and reversed other phenotypes of activated macrophages, but also inhibited cell death. Thus we report here a novel link between AKT mediated glycolytic metabolism and autophagy in the activated macrophages, and provide a possible mechanism for sustained macrophage activation in vivo.

  18. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  19. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  20. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-01

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  1. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1. PMID:27261736

  2. The human CD5L/AIM-CD36 axis: A novel autophagy inducer in macrophages that modulates inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sanjurjo, Lucía; Amézaga, Núria; Aran, Gemma; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Arias, Lilibeth; Armengol, Carolina; Borràs, Francesc E; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2015-01-01

    CD5L (CD5 molecule-like) is a secreted glycoprotein that participates in host response to bacterial infection. CD5L influences the monocyte inflammatory response to the bacterial surface molecules lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by inhibiting TNF secretion. Here we studied the intracellular events that lead to macrophage TNF inhibition by human CD5L. To accomplish this goal, we performed functional analyses with human monocytic THP1 macrophages, as well as with peripheral blood monocytes. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) reversed the inhibitory effect of CD5L on TNF secretion. Among the various PtdIns3K isoforms, our results indicated that CD5L activates PtdIns3K (whose catalytic subunit is termed PIK3C3), a key modulator involved in autophagy. Further analysis revealed a concomitant enhancement of autophagy markers such as cellular LC3-II content, increased LC3 puncta, as well as LC3-LysoTracker Red colocalization. Moreover, electron microscopy showed an increased presence of cytosolic autophagosomes in THP1 macrophages overexpressing CD5L. Besides preventing TNF secretion, CD5L also inhibited IL1B and enhanced IL10 secretion. This macrophage anti-inflammatory pattern of CD5L was reverted upon silencing of autophagy protein ATG7 by siRNA transfection. Additional siRNA experiments in THP1 macrophages indicated that the induction of autophagy mechanisms by CD5L was achieved through cell-surface scavenger receptor CD36, a multiligand receptor expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Our data represent the first evidence that CD36 is involved in autophagy and point to a significant contribution of the CD5L-CD36 axis to the induction of macrophage autophagy.

  3. The human CD5L/AIM-CD36 axis: A novel autophagy inducer in macrophages that modulates inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sanjurjo, Lucía; Amézaga, Núria; Aran, Gemma; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Arias, Lilibeth; Armengol, Carolina; Borràs, Francesc E; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2015-01-01

    CD5L (CD5 molecule-like) is a secreted glycoprotein that participates in host response to bacterial infection. CD5L influences the monocyte inflammatory response to the bacterial surface molecules lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by inhibiting TNF secretion. Here we studied the intracellular events that lead to macrophage TNF inhibition by human CD5L. To accomplish this goal, we performed functional analyses with human monocytic THP1 macrophages, as well as with peripheral blood monocytes. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) reversed the inhibitory effect of CD5L on TNF secretion. Among the various PtdIns3K isoforms, our results indicated that CD5L activates PtdIns3K (whose catalytic subunit is termed PIK3C3), a key modulator involved in autophagy. Further analysis revealed a concomitant enhancement of autophagy markers such as cellular LC3-II content, increased LC3 puncta, as well as LC3-LysoTracker Red colocalization. Moreover, electron microscopy showed an increased presence of cytosolic autophagosomes in THP1 macrophages overexpressing CD5L. Besides preventing TNF secretion, CD5L also inhibited IL1B and enhanced IL10 secretion. This macrophage anti-inflammatory pattern of CD5L was reverted upon silencing of autophagy protein ATG7 by siRNA transfection. Additional siRNA experiments in THP1 macrophages indicated that the induction of autophagy mechanisms by CD5L was achieved through cell-surface scavenger receptor CD36, a multiligand receptor expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Our data represent the first evidence that CD36 is involved in autophagy and point to a significant contribution of the CD5L-CD36 axis to the induction of macrophage autophagy. PMID:25713983

  4. Human macrophage polarization in vitro: maturation and activation methods compared.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Daphne Y S; Glim, Judith E; Stavenuiter, Andrea W D; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla; Amor, Sandra; Dijkstra, Christine D; Beelen, Robert H J

    2014-09-01

    Macrophages form a heterogeneous cell population displaying multiple functions, and can be polarized into pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, by environmental factors. Their activation status reflects a beneficial or detrimental role in various diseases. Currently several in vitro maturation and activation protocols are used to induce an M1 or M2 phenotype. Here, the impact of different maturation factors (NHS, M-CSF, or GM-CSF) and activation methods (IFN-γ/LPS, IL-4, dexamethason, IL-10) on the macrophage phenotype was determined. Regarding macrophage morphology, pro-inflammatory (M1) activation stimulated cell elongation, and anti-inflammatory (M2) activation induced a circular appearance. Activation with pro-inflammatory mediators led to increased CD40 and CD64 expression, whereas activation with anti-inflammatory factors resulted in increased levels of MR and CD163. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was induced by activation with IFN-γ/LPS, and TGF-β production was enhanced by the maturation factors M-CSF and GM-CSF. Our data demonstrate that macrophage marker expression and cytokine production in vitro is highly dependent on both maturation and activation methods. In vivo macrophage activation is far more complex, since a plethora of stimuli are present. Hence, defining the macrophage activation status ex vivo on a limited number of markers could be indecisive. From this study we conclude that maturation with M-CSF or GM-CSF induces a moderate anti- or pro-inflammatory state respectively, compared to maturation with NHS. CD40 and CD64 are the most distinctive makers for human M1 and CD163 and MR for M2 macrophage activation and therefore can be helpful in determining the activation status of human macrophages ex vivo.

  5. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  6. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis. PMID:27482886

  7. A heteroglycan from the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune modulates LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion by THP-1 monocytes through phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Astridur; Thorlacius, Gudny Ella; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia; Vikingsson, Arnor; Freysdottir, Jona; Hardardottir, Ingibjorg

    2014-09-25

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) have been consumed as food and used in folk medicine since ancient times to alleviate a variety of diseases. Cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc have been shown to produce complex exopolysaccharides with antioxidant and antiviral activity. Furthermore, Nostoc sp. are common in cyanolichen symbiosis and lichen polysaccharides are known to have immunomodulating effects. Nc-5-s is a heteroglycan isolated from free-living colonies of Nostoc commune and its structure has been characterized in detail. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Nc-5-s on the inflammatory response of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 monocytes and how the effects are mediated. THP-1 monocytes primed with interferon-γ and stimulated with LPS in the presence of Nc-5-s secreted less of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 and more of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 than THP-1 monocytes stimulated without Nc-5-s. In contrast, Nc-5-s increased LPS-induced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-8. Nc-5-s decreased LPS-induced phosphorylation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and Akt kinase, but did not affect phosphorylation of the p38 kinase, activation of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway, nor DNA binding of c-fos. These results show that Nc-5-s has anti-inflammatory effects on IL-6 and IL-10 secretion by THP-1 monocytes, but its effects are pro-inflammatory when it comes to TNF-α and IL-8. Furthermore, they show that the effects of Nc-5-s may be mediated through the ERK1/2 pathway and/or the Akt/phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway and their downstream effectors. The ability of Nc-5-s to decrease IL-6 secretion, increase IL-10 secretion and moderate ERK1/2 activation indicates a potential for its development as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:24877713

  8. Curcumin Represses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation via TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB and P2X7R Signaling in PMA-Induced Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fanqi; Ye, Bozhi; Cao, Jiatian; Cai, Xueli; Lin, Lu; Huang, Shanjun; Huang, Weijian; Huang, Zhouqing

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, the pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is closely related to the progression of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to assess the effects of curcumin on NLRP3 inflammasome in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced macrophages and explore its underlying mechanism. Methods: Human monocytic THP-1 cells were pretreated with curcumin for 1 h and subsequently induced with PMA for 48 h. Total protein was collected for Western blot analysis. Cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β release and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 translocation were detected by ELISA assay and cellular NF-κB translocation kit, respectively. Results: Curcumin significantly reduced the expression of NLRP3 and cleavage of caspase-1 and IL-1β secretion in PMA-induced macrophages. Moreover, Bay (a NF-κB inhibitor) treatment considerably suppressed the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in PMA-induced THP-1 cells. Curcumin also markedly inhibited the upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), phosphorylation level of IκB-α, and activation of NF-κB in PMA-induced macrophages. In addition, purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) siRNA was administered, and it significantly decreased NLRP3 inflammasome expression in PMA-induced macrophages. Furthermore, curcumin reversed PMA-stimulated P2X7R activation, which further reduced the expression of NLRP3 and cleavage of caspase-1 and IL-1β secretion. Silencing of P2X7R using siRNA also suppressed the activation of NF-κB pathway in PMA-induced macrophages, but P2X7R-silenced cells did not significantly decrease the expression of TLR4 and MyD88. Conclusion: Curcumin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome through suppressing TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB and P2X7R pathways in PMA-induced macrophages. PMID:27777559

  9. [Production of recombinant human interleukin-38 and its inhibitory effect on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in THP-1 cells].

    PubMed

    Yuan, X L; Li, Y; Pan, X H; Zhou, M; Gao, Q Y; Li, M C

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38 is the latest member of the IL-1 cytokine family. However, as a result of lacking efficient method to generate relatively large quantity of IL-38, its precise functions are poorly understood. In the present study, the cloning, expression, purification, and activity analysis of recombinant human IL-38 was described. Human IL-38 cDNA was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-44. The recombinant IL-38 containing a C-hexahistidine tag was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) which induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed fusion protein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. IL-38 protein was largely found in the soluble fraction. The purified IL-38 appeared a single band on SDS-PAGE, the yield of IL-38 was 4 mg from 1 L of bacterial culture, and the purity was more than 98% with low endotoxin level (<0.1 EU/μg). Western blotting confirmed the identity of the purified protein. Activity analysis showed that IL-38 can inhibit effectively the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in lipopolysaccharide-activated THP-1 cells. The production and characterization of biologically active IL-38 will be beneficial for its potential role in clinical applications. PMID:27414784

  10. Role of protein haptenation in triggering maturation events in the dendritic cell surrogate cell line THP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Megherbi, Rym; Kiorpelidou, Evanthia; Foster, Brian; Rowe, Cliff; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Goldring, Christopher E.; Park, B. Kevin

    2009-07-15

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation in response to contact sensitizers is a crucial step in the induction of sensitization reactions; however the underlying mechanism of activation remains unknown. To test whether the extent of protein haptenation is a determinant in DC maturation, we tested the effect of five dinitrophenyl (DNP) analogues of different reactivity, on maturation markers in the cell line, THP-1. The potencies of the test compounds in upregulating CD54 levels, inducing IL-8 release and triggering p38 MAPK phosphorylation did not correlate with their ability to deplete intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels or cause cell toxicity. However, the compounds' potency at inducing p38 phosphorylation was significantly associated with the amount of intracellular protein adducts formed (p < 0.05). Inhibition experiments show that, at least for DNFB, p38 MAP kinase signalling controls compound-specific changes in CD54 expression and IL-8 release. 2D-PAGE analysis revealed that all the DNP analogues appeared to bind similar proteins. The analogues failed to activate NFkB, however, they activated Nrf2, which was used as a marker of oxidative stress. Neither GSH depletion, by use of buthionine sulfoximine, nor treatment with the strongly lysine-reactive hapten penicillin elicited maturation. We conclude that protein haptenation, probably through reactive cysteine residues may be a trigger for maturation events in this in vitro model and that p38 activation may be a discriminatory marker for the classification of potency of chemical sensitizers.

  11. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Sonodynamic Therapy Inhibits RIPK1/RIPK3-Dependent Necroptosis in THP-1-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang; Yao, Jianting; Yan, Meng; Sun, Xin; Wang, Wei; Gao, Weiwei; Tian, Zhen; Guo, Shuyuan; Dong, Zengxiang; Li, Bicheng; Gao, Tielei; Shan, Peng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Haiyang; Cheng, Jiali; Gao, Qianping; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu; Tian, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis, or programmed necrosis, contributes to the formation of necrotic cores in atherosclerotic plaque in animal models. However, whether inhibition of necroptosis ameliorates atherosclerosis is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that necroptosis occurred in clinical atherosclerotic samples, suggesting that it may also play an important role in human atherosclerosis. We established an in vitro necroptotic model in which necroptosis was induced in THP-1-derived foam cells by serum deprivation. With this model, we demonstrated that 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonodynamic therapy (ALA-SDT) inhibited necroptosis while promoting apoptosis. ALA-SDT activated the caspase-3 and caspase-8 pathways in foam cells, which is responsible for the switch from necroptosis to apoptosis. The inhibition of either caspase-8 or caspase-3 abolished the anti-necroptotic effect of ALA-SDT. In addition, we found that caspase-3 activation peaked 4 hours after ALA-SDT treatment, 2 hours earlier than maximal caspase-8activation. Taken together, our data indicate that ALA-SDT mediates the switch from necroptosis to apoptosis by activating the caspase-3 and caspase-8 pathways and may improve the prognosis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26911899

  12. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Sonodynamic Therapy Inhibits RIPK1/RIPK3-Dependent Necroptosis in THP-1-Derived Foam Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang; Yao, Jianting; Yan, Meng; Sun, Xin; Wang, Wei; Gao, Weiwei; Tian, Zhen; Guo, Shuyuan; Dong, Zengxiang; Li, Bicheng; Gao, Tielei; Shan, Peng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Haiyang; Cheng, Jiali; Gao, Qianping; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu; Tian, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis, or programmed necrosis, contributes to the formation of necrotic cores in atherosclerotic plaque in animal models. However, whether inhibition of necroptosis ameliorates atherosclerosis is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that necroptosis occurred in clinical atherosclerotic samples, suggesting that it may also play an important role in human atherosclerosis. We established an in vitro necroptotic model in which necroptosis was induced in THP-1-derived foam cells by serum deprivation. With this model, we demonstrated that 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonodynamic therapy (ALA-SDT) inhibited necroptosis while promoting apoptosis. ALA-SDT activated the caspase-3 and caspase-8 pathways in foam cells, which is responsible for the switch from necroptosis to apoptosis. The inhibition of either caspase-8 or caspase-3 abolished the anti-necroptotic effect of ALA-SDT. In addition, we found that caspase-3 activation peaked 4 hours after ALA-SDT treatment, 2 hours earlier than maximal caspase-8activation. Taken together, our data indicate that ALA-SDT mediates the switch from necroptosis to apoptosis by activating the caspase-3 and caspase-8 pathways and may improve the prognosis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26911899

  13. Alternative activation modifies macrophage resistance to Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel; Aranday-Cortés, Elihú; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of macrophage alternative activation in the intracellular pathogen natural disease resistance phenotype of the host. Macrophage monolayers from resistant (R) (3) or susceptible (S) (3) cattle donors were treated with 10 ng/ml of bovine recombinant IL-4 (rbIL-4), and infected with virulent and avirulent Mycobacterium bovis (MOI 10:1). Bactericidal assays were performed to assess the bacterial phagocytic index and intracellular survival. Total RNA was reverse transcribed and used to analyze the relative changes in gene expression of IL-10, IL-12, IL-18 IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1, MCP-2, IL-6, MIP-1, MIP-3, iNOS, ARGII and SLAM by real time PCR. Cell supernatants were collected and nitric oxide and arginase production was assessed. Apoptosis induction was measured by TUNEL. IL-4 treatment increased the phagocytic index in both R and S macrophages; however intracellular survival was augmented mainly in S macrophages. Alternative activation decreased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide production and DNA fragmentation mainly in R macrophages. On the other hand, arginase production was not different between R and S macrophages. Alternative activation modifies the macrophage response against M. bovis. IL-4 treatment minimized the functional differences that exist between R and S macrophages.

  14. Flavonoid Fraction of Bergamot Juice Reduces LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response through SIRT1-Mediated NF-κB Inhibition in THP-1 Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Roberto; Currò, Monica; Cirmi, Santa; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Campiglia, Pietro; Caccamo, Daniela; Ientile, Riccardo; Navarra, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Plant polyphenols exert anti-inflammatory activity through both anti-oxidant effects and modulation of pivotal pro-inflammatory genes. Recently, Citrus bergamia has been studied as a natural source of bioactive molecules with antioxidant activity, but few studies have focused on molecular mechanisms underlying their potential beneficial effects. Several findings have suggested that polyphenols could influence cellular function by acting as activators of SIRT1, a nuclear histone deacetylase, involved in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling. On the basis of these observations we studied the anti-inflammatory effects produced by the flavonoid fraction of the bergamot juice (BJe) in a model of LPS-stimulated THP-1 cell line, focusing on SIRT1-mediated NF-κB inhibition. We demonstrated that BJe inhibited both gene expression and secretion of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α) by a mechanism involving the inhibition of NF-κB activation. In addition, we showed that BJe treatment reversed the LPS-enhanced acetylation of p65 in THP-1 cells. Interestingly, increasing concentrations of Sirtinol were able to suppress the inhibitory effect of BJe via p65 acetylation, underscoring that NF-κB–mediated inflammatory cytokine production may be directly linked to SIRT1 activity. These results suggest that BJe may be useful for the development of alternative pharmacological strategies aimed at reducing the inflammatory process. PMID:25260046

  15. The macrophage response to bacteria. Modulation of macrophage functional activity by peptidoglycan from Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R; Gustafson, J E; Keist, R

    1992-01-01

    Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis organisms have been shown to be particularly efficient in inducing in a pure population of bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes secretory and cellular activities. In the present study, the ability of peptidoglycan from this Gram-negative organism to trigger a macrophage response was compared with that elicited by peptidoglycan from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The results show that the three peptidoglycans were similarly active in triggering the secretion of tumour necrosis factor and tumouricidal activity but differed considerably in their ability to induce the generation of nitrite in macrophages; in this respect, peptidoglycan from M. catarrhalis was particularly potent. The impressive capacity of M. catarrhalis peptidoglycan to induce in low concentration the secretion of tumour necrosis factor and nitrite and tumouricidal activity may, in addition to its lipopolysaccharide, contribute to the extraordinary potential of this organism to trigger the functional activities of macrophages. PMID:1516255

  16. Maternal immune activation leads to activated inflammatory macrophages in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Onore, Charity E.; Schwartzer, Jared J.; Careaga, Milo; Bennan, Robert F.; Ashwood, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown an association between infection or inflammation during pregnancy and increased risk of autism in the child. In addition, animal models have illustrated that maternal inflammation during gestation can cause autism-relevant behaviors in the offspring; so called maternal immune activation (MIA) models. More recently, permanent changes in T cell cytokine responses were reported in children with autism and in offspring of MIA mice; however, the cytokine responses of other immune cell populations have not been thoroughly investigated in these MIA models. Similar to changes in T cell function, we hypothesized that following MIA, offspring will have long-term changes in macrophage function. To test this theory, we utilized the poly (I:C) MIA mouse model in C57BL/6J mice and examined macrophage cytokine production in adult offspring. Pregnant dams were given either a single injection of 20 mg/kg polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid, poly (I:C), or saline delivered intraperitoneally on gestational day 12.5. When offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams reached 10 weeks of age, femurs were collected and bone marrow-derived macrophages were generated. Cytokine production was measured in bone marrow-derived macrophages incubated for 24 h in either growth media alone, LPS, IL-4/LPS, or IFN-γ/LPS. Following stimulation with LPS alone, or the combination of IFN-γ/LPS, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams produced higher levels of IL-12(p40) (p < 0.04) suggesting an increased M1 polarization. In addition, even without the presence of a polarizing cytokine or LPS stimulus, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams exhibited a higher production of CCL3 (p = 0.05). Moreover, CCL3 levels were further increased when stimulated with LPS, or polarized with either IL-4/LPS or IFN-γ/LPS (p < 0.05) suggesting a general increase in production of this chemokine. Collectively, these data suggest that MIA can produce lasting

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis- induced neutrophil extracellular traps activate human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braian, Clara; Hogea, Valentin; Stendahl, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity.

  18. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  19. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  20. Requirement for non-regulated, constitutive calcium influx in macrophage survival signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Tano, Jean-Yves; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the role of constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx in macrophage survival. {yields} Survival signaling exhibits a mandatory requirement for constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx. {yields} CAM/CAMKII couples constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx to survival signaling. -- Abstract: The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT axis and the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) pathway play critical roles in macrophage survival. In cells other than macrophages proper operation of those two pathways requires Ca{sup 2+} influx into the cell, but if that is the case in macrophages remains unexplored. In the present work we used THP-1-derived macrophages and a pharmacological approach to examine for the first time the role of constitutive, non-regulated Ca{sup 2+} influx in PI3K/AKT and NF{kappa}B signaling. Blocking constitutive function of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channels with the organic channel blocker SKF96365 completely prevented phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, AKT and its downstream target BAD in TNF{alpha}-treated macrophages. A similar effect was observed upon treating macrophages with the calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor W-7 or the calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor KN-62. In addition, pre-treating macrophages with SKF96365 significantly enhanced TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that in THP-1-derived macrophages survival signaling depends, to a significant extent, on constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx presumably through a mechanism that involves the CAM/CAMKII axis as a coupling component between constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx and activation of survival signaling.

  1. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  2. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  4. Lipoteichoic Acid Isolated from Weissella cibaria Increases Cytokine Production in Human Monocyte-Like THP-1 Cells and Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi-Fan; Lee, Yoon-Doo; Park, Jae-Yeon; Kim, Seongjae; Lee, Youn-Woo; Jeon, Boram; Jagdish, Deepa; Kim, Hangeun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-07-28

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have beneficial effects on intestinal health and skin diseases. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria, is known to induce the production of several cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 and affect the intestinal microflora, anti-aging, sepsis, and cholesterol level. In this study, Weissella cibaria was isolated from Indian dairy products, and we examined its immune-enhancing effects. Live and heatkilled W. cibaria did not induce the secretion of immune-related cytokines, whereas LTA isolated from W. cibaria (cLTA) significantly increased the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. cLTA increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappalight-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases in THP-1 cells. The secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 was also increased in the cLTA-treated mouse splenocytes. These results suggest that cLTA, but not W. cibaria whole cells, has immune-boosting potential and can be used to treat immunosuppression diseases. PMID:27012236

  5. Sesquiterpene lactones induce distinct forms of cell death that modulate human monocyte-derived macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    López-Antón, Nancy; Hermann, Corinna; Murillo, Renato; Merfort, Irmgard; Wanner, Gerhard; Vollmar, Angelika M; Dirsch, Verena M

    2007-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SQTLs) are shown to possess anti-inflammatory as well as cytotoxic activity. No study, however, links both activities. We, therefore, hypothesized that SQTL-treated, dying cells might induce an anti-inflammatory response in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Here we show that SQTLs bearing either an alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclopentenone or an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone induce different forms of cell death. Whereas the cyclopentenone SQTL induced typical apoptosis, the alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs-induced cell death lacked partly classical signs of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation. All SQTLs, however, activated caspases and the nuclear morphology of cell death was dependent on caspase activation. Most interestingly, alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs induced a more pronounced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure than the cyclopentenone SQTL. Especially, 7-hydroxycostunolide (HC), with an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone substituted with a hydroxyl group, showed a striking fast and pronounced PS translocation. This result was in agreement with a strong activation of phagocytosis in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Interestingly, HC-treated Jurkat cells led to an early (3.5 h) but transient increase in TNF-alpha levels in macrophage coculture. Release of TGF-beta remained unaffected after 18 h. We propose that this type of SQTL may influence local inflammation by transiently activating the immune system and help to clear cells by inducing a form of cell death that promotes phagocytosis.

  6. Subcellular localization and regulation of StarD4 protein in macrophages and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Calderon-Dominguez, Maria; Ren, Shunlin; Marques, Dalila; Redford, Kaye; Medina-Torres, Miguel Angel; Hylemon, Phillip; Gil, Gregorio; Pandak, William M

    2011-10-01

    StarD4 is a member of the StarD4 subfamily of START domain proteins with a characteristic lipid binding pocket specific for cholesterol. The objective of this study was to define StarD4 subcellular localization, regulation, and function. Immunobloting showed that StarD4 is highly expressed in the mouse fibroblast cell line 3T3-L1, in human THP-1 macrophages, Kupffer cells (liver macrophages), and hepatocytes. In 3T3-L1 cells and THP-1 macrophages, StarD4 protein appeared localized to the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). More specifically, in THP-1 macrophages StarD4 co-localized to areas of the ER enriched in Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1), and was closely associated with budding lipid droplets. The addition of purified StarD4 recombinant protein to an in vitro assay increased ACAT activity 2-fold, indicating that StarD4 serves as a rate-limiting step in cholesteryl ester formation by delivering cholesterol to ACAT-1-enriched ER. In addition, StarD4 protein was found to be highly regulated and to redistribute in response to sterol levels. In summary, these observations, together with our previous findings demonstrating the ability of increased StarD4 expression to increase bile acid synthesis and cholesteryl ester formation, provide strong evidence for StarD4 as a highly regulated, non-vesicular, directional, intracellular transporter of cholesterol which plays a key role in the maintenance of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis.

  7. Folate Receptor β Regulates Integrin CD11b/CD18 Adhesion of a Macrophage Subset to Collagen.

    PubMed

    Machacek, Christian; Supper, Verena; Leksa, Vladimir; Mitulovic, Goran; Spittler, Andreas; Drbal, Karel; Suchanek, Miloslav; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-09-15

    Folate, also known as vitamin B9, is necessary for essential cellular functions such as DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. It is supplied to the cell via several transporters and receptors, including folate receptor (FR) β, a GPI-anchored protein belonging to the folate receptor family. As FRβ shows a restricted expression to cells of myeloid origin and only a subset of activated macrophages and placental cells have been shown to express functional FRβ, it represents a promising target for future therapeutic strategies. In this study, we performed affinity purification and mass spectrometric analysis of the protein microenvironment of FRβ in the plasma membrane of human FRβ(+) macrophages and FRβ-transduced monocytic THP-1 cells. In this manner, we identified a novel role of FRβ: that is, we report functional interactions of FRβ with receptors mediating cellular adhesion, in particular the CD11b/CD18 β2 integrin heterodimer complement receptor type 3/Mac-1. This interaction results in impeded adhesion of FRβ(+) human primary macrophages and THP-1 cells to collagen in comparison with their FRβ(-) counterparts. We further show that FRβ is only expressed by human macrophages when differentiated with M-CSF. These findings thus identify FRβ as a novel CD11b/CD18 regulator for trafficking and homing of a subset of macrophages on collagen. PMID:27534550

  8. Gentiana scabra Reduces SR-A Expression and Oxidized-LDL Uptake in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin-Sheng; Liu, Pang-Yen; Lian, Chen-Hao; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lai, Jenn-Haung; Ho, Ling-Jun; Yang, Shih-Ping; Cheng, Shu-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Background Macrophages can imbibe low-density lipoprotein (LDL) through scavenger receptors to become foam cells, which is critical in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Mounting evidence suggests that the anti-inflammatory nature of Chinese herbs have the capacity to halt the complex mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis. This study examined the effects of Chinese herbs on foam cell formation. Methods Chinese herbs were obtained from the Sun Ten pharmaceutic company. Using oxidized LDL (OxLDL) uptake and a cell toxicity assay, we screened more than 30 types of Chinese herbs. Western blotting was used to determine expressions of scavenger receptors (SRs) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities. Results We found that Gentiana scabra reduced oxidized LDL uptake effectively in THP-1 macrophages (p < 0.05 vs. OxLDL treated control). Moreover, treatment with Gentiana scabra in THP-1 macrophages resulted in decreased expression of scavenger receptor- A (SR-A) (p < 0.05 vs. control). Molecular investigation revealed that Gentiana scabra inhibited SR-A protein expression, possibly by regulating ERK signaling pathways (p < 0.05 vs. control). Conclusions By regulating SR-A expression, Gentiana scabra reduced oxidized LDL uptake in human macrophages. These results support the potential use of Gentiana scabra in treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27471359

  9. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  10. PE_PGRS30 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mediates suppression of proinflammatory immune response in macrophages through its PGRS and PE domains.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Shweta; Gupta, Vineet Kumar; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2016-09-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen relies on its ability to survive inside macrophages and evade host immune mechanisms. M. tuberculosis employs multiple strategies to confer resistance against immune system including inhibition of phago-lysosomal fusion, modulation of cytokine responses and granuloma formation. PE_PGRS proteins, uniquely present in pathogenic mycobacteria, are cell surface molecules that are suggested to interact with host cells. PE_PGRS proteins have also been implicated in its pathogenesis. In the present study, immuno-regulatory property of Rv1651c-encoded PE_PGRS30 protein was explored. Infection of PMA-differentiated human THP-1 macrophages with Mycobacterium smegmatis harbouring pVV(1651c) resulted in reduced production of IL-12, TNF-α and IL-6, as compared to infection with M. smegmatis harbouring the control plasmid pVV16. No differential effect was observed on bacterial persistence inside macrophages or on macrophage mortality upon infection with the two recombinant strains. Infection of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant M. smegmatis expressing deletion variants of PE_PGRS30 indicated that anti-inflammatory function of the protein is possessed by its PGRS and PE domains while the C-terminal domain, when expressed alone, displayed antagonistic effect in terms of TNF-α secretion. These results suggest that PE_PGRS30 interferes with macrophage immune functions important for activation of adaptive T-cell responses. PMID:27129781

  11. PE_PGRS30 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mediates suppression of proinflammatory immune response in macrophages through its PGRS and PE domains.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Shweta; Gupta, Vineet Kumar; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2016-09-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen relies on its ability to survive inside macrophages and evade host immune mechanisms. M. tuberculosis employs multiple strategies to confer resistance against immune system including inhibition of phago-lysosomal fusion, modulation of cytokine responses and granuloma formation. PE_PGRS proteins, uniquely present in pathogenic mycobacteria, are cell surface molecules that are suggested to interact with host cells. PE_PGRS proteins have also been implicated in its pathogenesis. In the present study, immuno-regulatory property of Rv1651c-encoded PE_PGRS30 protein was explored. Infection of PMA-differentiated human THP-1 macrophages with Mycobacterium smegmatis harbouring pVV(1651c) resulted in reduced production of IL-12, TNF-α and IL-6, as compared to infection with M. smegmatis harbouring the control plasmid pVV16. No differential effect was observed on bacterial persistence inside macrophages or on macrophage mortality upon infection with the two recombinant strains. Infection of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant M. smegmatis expressing deletion variants of PE_PGRS30 indicated that anti-inflammatory function of the protein is possessed by its PGRS and PE domains while the C-terminal domain, when expressed alone, displayed antagonistic effect in terms of TNF-α secretion. These results suggest that PE_PGRS30 interferes with macrophage immune functions important for activation of adaptive T-cell responses.

  12. Phospholipidomic Profile Variation on THP-1 Cells Exposed to Skin or Respiratory Sensitizers and Respiratory Irritant.

    PubMed

    Martins, João D; Maciel, Elisabete A; Silva, Ana; Ferreira, Isabel; Ricardo, Fernando; Domingues, Pedro; Neves, Bruno M; Domingues, Maria Rosário M; Cruz, Maria Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Occupational exposure to low molecular weight reactive chemicals often leads to development of allergic reactions such as allergic contact dermatitis and respiratory allergies. Further insights into the interaction of these chemicals with physiopathological relevant cellular models might provide the foundations for novel non-animal approaches to safety assessment. In this work we used the human THP-1 cell line to determine phospholipidome changes induced by the skin sensitizer 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB), the respiratory allergen hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and the irritant methyl salicylate (MESA). We detected that these chemicals differently induce lipid peroxidation and modulate THP-1 IL-1β, IL-12B, IL-8, CD86, and HMOX1 transcription. Decreased phosphatidylethanolamine content was detected in cells exposed to MESA, while profound alterations in the relative abundance of cardiolipin species were observed in cells exposed to DNFB. All chemicals tested induced a decrease in the relative abundance of plasmanyl phosphatidylcholine species PC (O-16:0e/18:1) and phosphatidylinositol species PI (34:1), while increasing PI (38:4). An increased abundance of oleic acid was observed in the phospholipids of cells exposed to DNFB while a decreased abundance of palmitic acid was detected in cells treated with MESA or DNFB. We conclude that both specific and common alterations at phospholipidome levels are triggered by the different chemicals, while not allowing a complete distinction between them using a Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP). The common effects observed at phospholipids level with all the chemicals tested might be related to unspecific cell cytotoxic mechanisms that nevertheless may contribute to the elicitation of specific immune responses. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2639-2651, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26946329

  13. MHC class I-related neonatal Fc receptor for IgG is functionally expressed in monocytes, intestinal macrophages, and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Meng, G; Dickinson, B L; Li, X; Mizoguchi, E; Miao, L; Wang, Y; Robert, C; Wu, B; Smith, P D; Lencer, W I; Blumberg, R S

    2001-03-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, an MHC class I-related molecule, functions to transport IgG across polarized epithelial cells and protect IgG from degradation. However, little is known about whether FcRn is functionally expressed in immune cells. We show here that FcRn mRNA was identifiable in human monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. FcRn heavy chain was detectable as a 45-kDa protein in monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and in purified human intestinal macrophages, peripheral blood monocytes, and dendritic cells by Western blot analysis. FcRn colocalized in vivo with macrosialin (CD68) and Ncl-Macro, two macrophage markers, in the lamina propria of human small intestine. The heavy chain of FcRn was associated with the beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) light chain in U937 and THP-1 cells. FcRn bound human IgG at pH 6.0, but not at pH 7.5. This binding could be inhibited by human IgG Fc, but not Fab. FcRn could be detected on the cell surface of activated, but not resting, THP-1 cells. Furthermore, FcRn was uniformly present intracellularly in all blood monocytes and intestinal macrophages. FcRn was detectable on the cell surface of a significant fraction of monocytes at lower levels and on a small subset of tissue macrophages that expressed high levels of FcRn on the cell surface. These data show that FcRn is functionally expressed and its cellular distribution is regulated in monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, suggesting that it may confer novel IgG binding functions upon these cell types relative to typical Fc gamma Rs: Fc gamma RI, Fc gamma RII, and Fc gamma RIII.

  14. Down-regulation of miR-20a-5p triggers cell apoptosis to facilitate mycobacterial clearance through targeting JNK2 in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoliang; Liu, Xi; Wang, Wenfei; Cai, Yi; Li, Shaoyuan; Chen, Qi; Liao, Mingfeng; Zhang, Mingxia; Zeng, Gucheng; Zhou, Boping; Feng, Carl G; Chen, Xinchun

    2016-09-16

    Induction of cell apoptosis is one of the major host defense mechanisms through which macrophages control Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. However, the mechanisms underlying macrophage apoptosis triggered by Mtb infection are still largely unknown. In this study, a microarray profiling survey revealed 14 miRNAs were down-regulated in CD14+ monocytes from active pulmonary tuberculosis patients, and only the reduction of miR-20a-5p could be reversed after successful anti-tuberculosis treatment. Validation of miR-20a-5p expression was confirmed using real time qPCR. Moreover, miR-20a-5p expression also decreased in differentiated THP-1 macrophages after mycobacterial infection in vitro. Functional assays through forced or inhibited expression of miR-20a-5p in THP-1 macrophages demonstrated that miR-20a-5p functioned as a negative regulator of mycobacterial-triggered apoptosis. Importantly, inhibition of miR-20a-5p expression resulted in more efficient mycobacterial clearance from infected THP-1 macrophages while miR-20a-5p overexpression promoted mycobacterial survival. Mechanistically, miR-20a-5p was demonstrated to regulate Bim expression in a JNK2-dependent manner, unlike Bcl2, and luciferase assay showed JNK2 was a novel direct target of miR-20a-5p. Together, our findings indicate that downregulation of miR-20a-5p triggers macrophage apoptosis as a novel mechanism for host defense against mycobacterial infection. PMID:27494776

  15. Ox-LDL induces monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation in vivo: Possible role for the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (M-CSF-R).

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Bianca; Partoush, Ayelet; Volkova, Nina; Aviram, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and LDL oxidation play a pivotal role in early atherogenesis. We thus questioned possible mechanisms for oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL)-induced monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation in vivo. Mouse peritoneal mononuclear cells, that were isolated 1, 2, or 3 days after Ox-LDL intraperitoneal injection, gradually exhibited the characteristic macrophage morphology, along with the expression of the cell-surface antigen CD11b. Molecular mechanisms involved in Ox-LDL-induced differentiation were further investigated in vitro using the THP-1 monocytic cell line. THP-1 cells incubated with Ox-LDL in the presence of as low as 1 ng/ml of PMA differentiated into macrophages, as evidenced by morphologic, phenotypic, and functional properties. Stimulation of monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation was selective to Ox-LDL (and not native LDL), was dependent on the extent of LDL oxidation, and required Ox-LDL internalization by the cells. These effects of Ox-LDL could be attributed to its major oxysterols, 7-ketocholesterol and 7beta-hydroxycholesterol. Finally, the stimulation of monocyte differentiation to macrophages by Ox-LDL was shown to require the M-CSF-receptor, since blocking the binding to the receptor abolished Ox-LDL/7beta-hydroxycholesterol-induced differentiation. Furthermore, Ox-LDL/7beta-hydroxycholesterol elicited tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the M-CSF-R. We thus conclude that Ox-LDL induces monocyte differentiation to macrophages in vivo and this phenomenon involves activation of the M-CSF-receptor.

  16. Role of interferon-gamma against invasion by Toxoplasma gondii in a human monocytic cell line (THP1): involvement of the parasite's secretory phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Gómez Marín, J E; Bonhomme, A; Guenounou, M; Pinon, J M

    1996-05-01

    We examined the role of IFN gamma in protection against Toxoplasma gondii in the monocytoid cell line THP1. The addition of IFN gamma to cultured infected THP1 cells reduced the number of parasitized cells without altering intracellular multiplication during the first 24 hr. This reduction was potentiated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We also examined the role of an enzyme important for T. gondii cellular invasion, secretory phospholipase-A2 (sPLA2) and its relation with IFN gamma-induced protection. Treatment of cells or parasites with a specific inhibitor of sPLA2 significantly reduced the number of infected cells at 6 hr. The addition of exogenous sPLA2 from Naja naja venom did not interfere with the protective effect of IFN gamma and conferred protection when used alone. PLA2 activity was measured in supernatants of parasites maintained in the presence of IFN gamma, and the results suggested that IFN gamma opposes cell invasion by T. gondii by suppressing parasite production of PLA2.

  17. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models. PMID:27350756

  18. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  19. Active autophagy but not lipophagy in macrophages with defective lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, Stefanie; Chandak, Prakash G.; Korbelius, Melanie; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Leopold, Christina; Obrowsky, Sascha; Rainer, Silvia; Doddapattar, Prakash; Aflaki, Elma; Wegscheider, Martin; Sachdev, Vinay; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Kolb, Dagmar; Radovic, Branislav; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    During autophagy, autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes to degrade damaged organelles and misfolded proteins. Breakdown products are released into the cytosol and contribute to energy and metabolic building block supply, especially during starvation. Lipophagy has been defined as the autophagy-mediated degradation of lipid droplets (LDs) by lysosomal acid lipase. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme catalyzing the initial step of lipolysis by hydrolyzing triglycerides (TGs) in cytosolic LDs. Consequently, most organs and cells, including macrophages, lacking ATGL accumulate TGs, resulting in reduced intracellular free fatty acid concentrations. Macrophages deficient in hormone-sensitive lipase (H0) lack TG accumulation albeit reduced in vitro TG hydrolase activity. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated in lipase-deficient macrophages to counteract their energy deficit. We therefore generated mice lacking both ATGL and HSL (A0H0). Macrophages from A0H0 mice showed 73% reduced neutral TG hydrolase activity, resulting in TG-rich LD accumulation. Increased expression of cathepsin B, accumulation of LC3-II, reduced expression of p62 and increased DQ-BSA dequenching suggest intact autophagy and functional lysosomes in A0H0 macrophages. Markedly decreased acid TG hydrolase activity and lipid flux independent of bafilomycin A1 treatment, however, argue against effective lysosomal degradation of LDs in A0H0 macrophages. We conclude that autophagy of proteins and cell organelles but not of LDs is active as a compensatory mechanism to circumvent and balance the reduced availability of energy substrates in A0H0 macrophages. PMID:26143381

  20. PTEN deficiency promotes macrophage infiltration and hypersensitivity of prostate cancer to IAP antagonist/radiation combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Chris W D; Maxwell, Pamela J; Ong, Chee Wee; Redmond, Kelly M; McCann, Christopher; Neisen, Jessica; Ward, George A; Chessari, Gianni; Johnson, Christopher; Crawford, Nyree T; LaBonte, Melissa J; Prise, Kevin M; Robson, Tracy; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Longley, Daniel B; Waugh, David J J

    2016-02-16

    PTEN loss is prognostic for patient relapse post-radiotherapy in prostate cancer (CaP). Infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is associated with reduced disease-free survival following radical prostatectomy. However, the association between PTEN loss, TAM infiltration and radiotherapy response of CaP cells remains to be evaluated. Immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of surgically-resected Gleason 7 tumors confirmed that PTEN loss correlated with increased CXCL8 expression and macrophage infiltration. However PTEN status had no discernable correlation with expression of other inflammatory markers by CaP cells, including TNF-α. In vitro, exposure to conditioned media harvested from irradiated PTEN null CaP cells induced chemotaxis of macrophage-like THP-1 cells, a response partially attenuated by CXCL8 inhibition. Co-culture with THP-1 cells resulted in a modest reduction in the radio-sensitivity of DU145 cells. Cytokine profiling revealed constitutive secretion of TNF-α from CaP cells irrespective of PTEN status and IR-induced TNF-α secretion from THP-1 cells. THP-1-derived TNF-α increased NFκB pro-survival activity and elevated expression of anti-apoptotic proteins including cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP-1) in CaP cells, which could be attenuated by pre-treatment with a TNF-α neutralizing antibody. Treatment with a novel IAP antagonist, AT-IAP, decreased basal and TNF-α-induced cIAP-1 expression in CaP cells, switched TNF-α signaling from pro-survival to pro-apoptotic and increased radiation sensitivity of CaP cells in co-culture with THP-1 cells. We conclude that targeting cIAP-1 can overcome apoptosis resistance of CaP cells and is an ideal approach to exploit high TNF-α signals within the TAM-rich microenvironment of PTEN-deficient CaP cells to enhance response to radiotherapy.

  1. PTEN deficiency promotes macrophage infiltration and hypersensitivity of prostate cancer to IAP antagonist/radiation combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Chris W.D.; Maxwell, Pamela J.; Ong, Chee Wee; Redmond, Kelly M.; McCann, Christopher; Neisen, Jessica; Ward, George A.; Chessari, Gianni; Johnson, Christopher; Crawford, Nyree T.; LaBonte, Melissa J.; Prise, Kevin M.; Robson, Tracy; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Longley, Daniel B.; Waugh, David J.J.

    2016-01-01

    PTEN loss is prognostic for patient relapse post-radiotherapy in prostate cancer (CaP). Infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is associated with reduced disease-free survival following radical prostatectomy. However, the association between PTEN loss, TAM infiltration and radiotherapy response of CaP cells remains to be evaluated. Immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of surgically-resected Gleason 7 tumors confirmed that PTEN loss correlated with increased CXCL8 expression and macrophage infiltration. However PTEN status had no discernable correlation with expression of other inflammatory markers by CaP cells, including TNF-α. In vitro, exposure to conditioned media harvested from irradiated PTEN null CaP cells induced chemotaxis of macrophage-like THP-1 cells, a response partially attenuated by CXCL8 inhibition. Co-culture with THP-1 cells resulted in a modest reduction in the radio-sensitivity of DU145 cells. Cytokine profiling revealed constitutive secretion of TNF-α from CaP cells irrespective of PTEN status and IR-induced TNF-α secretion from THP-1 cells. THP-1-derived TNF-α increased NFκB pro-survival activity and elevated expression of anti-apoptotic proteins including cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP-1) in CaP cells, which could be attenuated by pre-treatment with a TNF-α neutralizing antibody. Treatment with a novel IAP antagonist, AT-IAP, decreased basal and TNF-α-induced cIAP-1 expression in CaP cells, switched TNF-α signaling from pro-survival to pro-apoptotic and increased radiation sensitivity of CaP cells in co-culture with THP-1 cells. We conclude that targeting cIAP-1 can overcome apoptosis resistance of CaP cells and is an ideal approach to exploit high TNF-α signals within the TAM-rich microenvironment of PTEN-deficient CaP cells to enhance response to radiotherapy. PMID:26799286

  2. Identification of the lectin-like receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human macrophages and its potential role as a scavenger receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, H; Kondratenko, N; Green, S; Steinberg, D; Quehenberger, O

    1998-01-01

    A new receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), has recently been cloned from bovine endothelial cells and human lung. A limited tissue-distribution study suggested that the protein was mainly produced by the vascular endothelium. In the present study we demonstrate that LOX-1 is also expressed in macrophages, where it may function as a scavenger receptor. LOX-1 was not detected in undifferentiated THP-1 cells or in freshly isolated human blood monocytes. However, mature human monocyte-derived macrophages and differentiated THP-1 cells showed high levels of LOX-1 transcripts. Consistent with these results, immunofluorescence staining and FACS analysis demonstrated that LOX-1 protein is expressed on the plasma membrane of macrophages. Western-blot analysis of membranes from macrophages (but not those from monocytes) identified a single band, with an apparent molecular mass of about 40 kDa, that displayed oxidized LDL-binding activity. These results suggest that differentiation induces the expression of LOX-1 in macrophages, where it may play a role as a scavenger receptor and/or a receptor for oxidized LDL. PMID:9693095

  3. p47 GTPases Regulate Toxoplasma gondii Survival in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Barbara A.; Greene, Robert I.; Henry, Stanley C.; Annecharico, Kimberly L.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Denkers, Eric Y.; Sher, Alan; Taylor, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is critical for resistance to Toxoplasma gondii. IFN-γ strongly activates macrophages and nonphagocytic host cells to limit intracellular growth of T. gondii; however, the cellular factors that are required for this effect are largely unknown. We have shown previously that IGTP and LRG-47, members of the IFN-γ-regulated family of p47 GTPases, are required for resistance to acute T. gondii infections in vivo. In contrast, IRG-47, another member of this family, is not required. In the present work, we addressed whether these GTPases are required for IFN-γ-induced suppression of T. gondii growth in macrophages in vitro. Bone marrow macrophages that lacked IGTP or LRG-47 displayed greatly attenuated IFN-γ-induced inhibition of T. gondii growth, while macrophages that lacked IRG-47 displayed normal inhibition. Thus, the ability of the p47 GTPases to limit acute infection in vivo correlated with their ability to suppress intracellular growth in macrophages in vitro. Using confocal microscopy and sucrose density fractionation, we demonstrated that IGTP largely colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum markers, while LRG-47 was mainly restricted to the Golgi. Although both IGTP and LRG-47 localized to vacuoles containing latex beads, neither protein localized to vacuoles containing live T. gondii. These results suggest that IGTP and LRG-47 are able to regulate host resistance to acute T. gondii infections through their ability to inhibit parasite growth within the macrophage. PMID:15908352

  4. Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoa D.; Qiu, Yifu; Cui, Xiaojin; Goh, Y.P. Sharon; Mwangi, Julia; David, Tovo; Mukundan, Lata; Brombacher, Frank; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    All homeotherms utilize thermogenesis to maintain core body temperature, ensuring that cellular functions and physiologic processes can ensue in cold environments1-3. In the prevailing model, when the hypothalamus senses cold temperatures, it triggers sympathetic discharge, resulting in the release of noradrenaline in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT)4,5. Acting via the β3-adrenergic receptors, noradrenaline induces lipolysis in white adipocytes6, whereas it stimulates the expression of thermogenic genes, such as PPARγ coactivator 1a (Ppargc1a), uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (Acsl1), in brown adipocytes7-9. However, the precise nature of all the cell types involved in this efferent loop is not well established. Here we report an unexpected requirement for the interleukin 4 (IL4)-stimulated program of alternative macrophage activation in adaptive thermogenesis. Cold exposure rapidly promoted alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which secrete catecholamines to induce thermogenic gene expression in BAT and lipolysis in WAT. Absence of alternatively activated macrophages impaired metabolic adaptations to cold, whereas administration of IL4 increased thermogenic gene expression, fatty acid mobilization, and energy expenditure, all in a macrophage-dependent manner. We have thus discovered a surprising role for alternatively activated macrophages in the orchestration of an important mammalian stress response, the response to cold. PMID:22101429

  5. An inducible transgene reports activation of macrophages in live zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Leslie E; Chien, An-Tzu; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Hall, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are the most functionally heterogenous cells of the hematopoietic system. Given many diseases are underpinned by inappropriate macrophage activation, macrophages have emerged as a therapeutic target to treat disease. A thorough understanding of what controls macrophage activation will likely reveal new pathways that can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. Live imaging fluorescent macrophages within transgenic zebrafish larvae has provided a valuable window to investigate macrophage behavior in vivo. Here we describe the first transgenic zebrafish line that reports macrophage activation, as evidenced by induced expression of an immunoresponsive gene 1(irg1):EGFP transgene. When combined with existing reporter lines that constitutively mark macrophages, we reveal this unique transgenic line can be used to live image macrophage activation in response to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and xenografted human cancer cells. We anticipate the Tg(irg1:EGFP) line will provide a valuable tool to explore macrophage activation and plasticity in the context of different disease models.

  6. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Ouyang, Zi-Jun; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Gong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xu-Dong; Sun, Yang Xu, Qiang

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects millions of people worldwide. Although the etiology of this disease is uncertain, accumulating evidence indicates a key role for the activated mucosal immune system. In the present study, we examined the effects of the natural compound fraxinellone on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, an animal model that mimics IBD. Treatment with fraxinellone significantly reduced weight loss and diarrhea in mice and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic signs of the disease. In addition, the activities of myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase were markedly suppressed, while the levels of glutathione were increased in colitis tissues following fraxinellone treatment. This compound also decreased the colonic levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of fraxinellone in mice with experimental colitis were attributed to its inhibition of CD11b{sup +} macrophage infiltration. The mRNA levels of macrophage-related molecules in the colon, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), were also markedly inhibited following fraxinellone treatment. The results from in vitro assays showed that fraxinellone significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-1β and IL-18 as well as the activity of iNOS in both THP-1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. The mechanisms responsible for these effects were attributed to the inhibitory role of fraxinellone in NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Overall, our results support fraxinellone as a novel drug candidate in the treatment of colonic inflammation. - Highlights: • Fraxinellone, a lactone compound, alleviated DSS induced colitis. • The effects of fraxinellone were attributed to its inhibition on

  7. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  8. Piceatannol and its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, induce SIRT1 expression in THP-1 human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shinpei; Kinoshita, Yosuke; Maruki-Uchida, Hiroko; Yanae, Koji; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical that is present in large amounts in passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) seeds, and is an analog of resveratrol. Recently, the absorption and metabolism of piceatannol were investigated in rats, and isorhapontigenin, O-methyl piceatannol, was detected as a piceatannol metabolite in rat plasma. To elucidate the function of piceatannol and its metabolites, we investigated the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in THP-1 monocytic cells after treatment with piceatannol and its metabolites, and compared their effects with those of resveratrol and its metabolites. Piceatannol and resveratrol upregulated the expression levels of SIRT1 mRNA and SIRT1 protein. An extract of passion fruit seeds, which contained high levels of piceatannol, also upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression. As for the metabolites, isorhapontigenin upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression, whereas resveratrol glucuronides and sulfate did not affect SIRT1 expression. These findings indicate that after intake of piceatannol, not only piceatannol itself, but also its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, contributed to the upregulation of SIRT1 expression. PMID:25360511

  9. Single and combined genotoxicity effects of six pollutants on THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Wang, Haiyan; Han, Daxiong

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the single and combined genotoxic effects of six food pollutants (Chrysoidine G, Sudan I, acid orange II, malachite green, acrylamide, and potassium bromate) on THP-1 cells through comet assay. The results of the single tests indicated that the pollutants increased the percentage of tail DNA (% tail DNA) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the % tail DNA values induced by synthetic colorants (Chrysoidine G, Sudan I, acid orange II, and malachite green) were significantly higher than those by acrylamide or potassium bromate at most concentrations. In the combined tests, Chrysoidine G (422 μmol/L) or acrylamide (400 μmol/L) was mixed with different concentrations of the other five pollutants respectively. In the first combined tests, most mixtures significantly increased the % tail DNA values with the exception of Chrysoidine G and acid orange II. In the second tests, there were no significant differences in the % tail DNA values between the single and combined tests at most cases. PMID:27375233

  10. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  11. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  12. A CRE/ATF-like site in the upstream regulatory sequence of the human interleukin 1 beta gene is necessary for induction in U937 and THP-1 monocytic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J G; Chandra, G; Clay, W C; Stinnett, S W; Haneline, S A; Lorenz, J J; Patel, I R; Wisely, G B; Furdon, P J; Taylor, J D

    1993-01-01

    Transfection of U937 and THP-1 cells with a recombinant plasmid, pIL1(4.0kb)-CAT, containing 4 kb of the interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) gene upstream regulatory sequence resulted in inducer-dependent expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity. Treatment of the transfected cells with various combinations of the inducers lipopolysaccharide, phorbol myristate acetate, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP upregulated the IL-1 beta promoter. In U937 and THP-1 cells, maximum stimulation of both the endogenous IL-1 beta gene and pIL1(4.0kb)-CAT transfectants was observed following treatment with the combination of inducing agents lipopolysaccharide-phorbol myristate acetate-dibutyryl cyclic AMP. This combination of inducing agents was used to identify and study, at the molecular level, some of the regulatory elements necessary for induction of the IL-1 beta gene. A series of 5' deletion derivatives of the upstream regulatory sequence were used in transient transfection assays to identify an 80-bp fragment located between -2720 and -2800 bp upstream of the mRNA start site that was required for induction. Exonuclease III mapping, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), and DNA sequence analysis of this region were used to identify a transcription factor binding sequence which contained a potential cyclic AMP response element (CRE/ATF)- and NF-kappa B-like binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CRE/ATF-like site resulted in the loss of binding of a specific factor or factors as determined by EMSA. The loss of binding activity directly correlated with a loss of approximately 75% of promoter activity as determined in transient transfection assays. As determined by EMSA, the factor binding to the CRE/ATF-like site was present in nuclear extracts prepared from both uninduced and induced THP-1 and U937 cells. However, the intensity of the band appeared to be increased when nuclear extracts from induced cells were used. In contrast to the CRE/ATF mutation, which

  13. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  14. Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins regulate perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 lipid-droplet-associated proteins in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Varela, Lourdes M; López, Sergio; Ortega-Gómez, Almudena; Bermúdez, Beatriz; Buers, Insa; Robenek, Horst; Muriana, Francisco J G; Abia, Rocío

    2015-04-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages contributes to atherosclerosis. Within macrophages, lipids are stored in lipid droplets (LDs); perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 are the main LD-associated proteins. Postprandial triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins induce LD accumulation in macrophages. The role of postprandial lipoproteins in perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 regulation was studied. TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) induced the levels of intracellular TGs, LDs and perilipin-2 protein expression in THP-1 macrophages and in Apoe(-/-) mice bone-marrow-derived macrophages with low and high basal levels of TGs. Perilipin-3 was only synthesized in mice macrophages with low basal levels of TGs. The regulation was dependent on the fatty acid composition of the lipoproteins; monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) more strongly attenuated these effects compared with saturated fatty acids. In THP-1 macrophages, immunofluorescence microscopy and freeze-fracture immunogold labeling indicated that the lipoproteins translocated perilipin-3 from the cytoplasm to the LD surface; only the lipoproteins that were rich in PUFAs suppressed this effect. Chemical inhibition showed that lipoproteins induced perilipin-2 protein expression through the peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor (PPAR) PPARα and PPARγ pathways. Overall, our data indicate that postprandial TRLs may be involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation through the regulation of perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 proteins in macrophages. Because the fatty acid composition of the lipoproteins is dependent on the type of fat consumed, the ingestion of olive oil, which is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, and fish oil, which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, can be considered a good nutritional strategy to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis by LD-associated proteins decrease. PMID:25595097

  15. Visualisation of nitric oxide generated by activated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leone, A M; Furst, V W; Foxwell, N A; Cellek, S; Moncada, S

    1996-04-01

    We have visualised the release and approximate diffusion profile of nitric oxide (NO) from activated murine macrophages using a high transmission microscope coupled to a high sensitivity photon counting camera. The images generated by NO were cell-associated and spread over an area of approximately 175 micrometers from the activated macrophage. The signals obtained were dependent on the presence of exogenous L-arginine in the medium and followed a time course similar to that previously described for the generation of NO by the inducible form of NO synthase. The light signal was attenuated by the inhibitor of NO synthase, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Studies using superoxide-deficient macrophages further confirmed that the signals detected were generated by NO rather than reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8660339

  16. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed Central

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  17. Fine-tuning of macrophage activation using synthetic rocaglate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bidisha; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Devine, William G.; Kobzik, Lester; Beeler, Aaron B.; Porco, John A.; Kramnik, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria represent a significant global threat. Given the dearth of new antibiotics, host-directed therapies (HDTs) are especially desirable. As IFN-gamma (IFNγ) plays a central role in host resistance to intracellular bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we searched for small molecules to augment the IFNγ response in macrophages. Using an interferon-inducible nuclear protein Ipr1 as a biomarker of macrophage activation, we performed a high-throughput screen and identified molecules that synergized with low concentration of IFNγ. Several active compounds belonged to the flavagline (rocaglate) family. In primary macrophages a subset of rocaglates 1) synergized with low concentrations of IFNγ in stimulating expression of a subset of IFN-inducible genes, including a key regulator of the IFNγ network, Irf1; 2) suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and type I IFN and 3) induced autophagy. These compounds may represent a basis for macrophage-directed therapies that fine-tune macrophage effector functions to combat intracellular pathogens and reduce inflammatory tissue damage. These therapies would be especially relevant to fighting drug-resistant pathogens, where improving host immunity may prove to be the ultimate resource. PMID:27086720

  18. Inability of tumour cells to elicit the respiratory burst in cytotoxic, activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, S M; Hill, H R

    1982-01-01

    Activated macrophages from Corynebacterium parvum-treated mice are cytotoxic to non-antibody-coated tumour cells and have an augmented respiratory burst potential when compared to resident macrophages. We have investigated the possible involvement of the respiratory burst as an effector mechanism in this type of tumour killing. Scavengers of toxic metabolites of oxygen such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, ethanol, and cytochrome c did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity in this system. To investigate whether or not neoplastic cells stimulate the macrophage respiratory burst, we exposed activated macrophages to viable tumour cells and monitored macrophage superoxide anion production, chemiluminescence, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity. None of these indicators of the macrophage respiratory burst was stimulated by the tumour cells towards which the macrophages were cytotoxic. The data suggest that the macrophages burst is not utilized as an effector mechanism in the non-antibody-mediated macrophage tumour cytotoxicity reaction. PMID:6277777

  19. Elevated CO2 selectively inhibits interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor expression and decreases phagocytosis in the macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Naizhen; Gates, Khalilah L.; Trejo, Humberto; Favoreto, Silvio; Schleimer, Robert P.; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Beitel, Greg J.; Sporn, Peter H. S.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated blood and tissue CO2, or hypercapnia, is common in severe lung disease. Patients with hypercapnia often develop lung infections and have an increased risk of death following pneumonia. To explore whether hypercapnia interferes with host defense, we studied the effects of elevated PCO2 on macrophage innate immune responses. In differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human and mouse alveolar macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other Toll-like receptor ligands, hypercapnia inhibited expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-6, nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent cytokines critical for antimicrobial host defense. Inhibition of IL-6 expression by hypercapnia was concentration dependent, rapid, reversible, and independent of extracellular and intracellular acidosis. In contrast, hypercapnia did not down-regulate IL-10 or interferon-β, which do not require NF-κB. Notably, hypercapnia did not affect LPS-induced degradation of IκBα, nuclear translocation of RelA/p65, or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, but it did block IL-6 promoter-driven luciferase activity in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. Elevated PCO2 also decreased phagocytosis of opsonized polystyrene beads and heat-killed bacteria in THP-1 and human alveolar macrophages. By interfering with essential innate immune functions in the macrophage, hypercapnia may cause a previously unrecognized defect in resistance to pulmonary infection in patients with advanced lung disease.—Wang, N., Gates, K. L., Trejo, H., Favoreto, Jr., S., Schleimer, R. P., Sznajder, J. I., Beitel, G. J., Sporn, P. H. S. Elevated CO2 selectively inhibits interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor expression and decreases phagocytosis in the macrophage. PMID:20181940

  20. NOTCH reprograms mitochondrial metabolism for proinflammatory macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Chi, Feng; Guo, Tongsheng; Punj, Vasu; Lee, W.N. Paul; French, Samuel W.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is implicated in macrophage activation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the NOTCH1 pathway dictates activation of M1 phenotypes in isolated mouse hepatic macrophages (HMacs) and in a murine macrophage cell line by coupling transcriptional upregulation of M1 genes with metabolic upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ROS (mtROS) to augment induction of M1 genes. Enhanced mitochondrial glucose oxidation was achieved by increased recruitment of the NOTCH1 intracellular domain (NICD1) to nuclear and mitochondrial genes that encode respiratory chain components and by NOTCH-dependent induction of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 (Pdp1) expression, pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, and glucose flux to the TCA cycle. As such, inhibition of the NOTCH pathway or Pdp1 knockdown abrogated glucose oxidation, mtROS, and M1 gene expression. Conditional NOTCH1 deficiency in the myeloid lineage attenuated HMac M1 activation and inflammation in a murine model of alcoholic steatohepatitis and markedly reduced lethality following endotoxin-mediated fulminant hepatitis in mice. In vivo monocyte tracking further demonstrated the requirement of NOTCH1 for the migration of blood monocytes into the liver and subsequent M1 differentiation. Together, these results reveal that NOTCH1 promotes reprogramming of mitochondrial metabolism for M1 macrophage activation. PMID:25798621

  1. Phenylbutyrate induces LL-37-dependent autophagy and intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rekha, Rokeya Sultana; Rao Muvva, S S V Jagadeeswara; Wan, Min; Raqib, Rubhana; Bergman, Peter; Brighenti, Susanna; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    LL-37 is a human antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the cathelicidin family with multiple activities including a mediator of vitamin D-induced autophagy in human macrophages, resulting in intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In a previous trial in healthy volunteers, we have shown that LL-37 expression and subsequent Mtb-killing can be further enhanced by 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), also an inducer of LL-37 expression. Here, we explore a potential mechanism(s) behind PBA and LL-37-induced autophagy and intracellular killing of Mtb. Mtb infection of macrophages downregulated the expression of both the CAMP transcript and LL-37 peptide as well as certain autophagy-related genes (BECN1 and ATG5) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, activation of LC3-II in primary macrophages and THP-1 cells was not detected. PBA and the active form of vitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3), separately or particularly in combination, were able to overcome Mtb-induced suppression of LL-37 expression. Notably, reactivation of autophagy occurred by stimulation of macrophages with PBA and promoted colocalization of LL-37 and LC3-II in autophagosomes. Importantly, PBA treatment failed to induce autophagy in Mtb-infected THP-1 cells, when the expression of LL-37 was silenced. However, PBA-induced autophagy was restored when the LL-37 knockdown cells were supplemented with synthetic LL-37. Interestingly, we have found that LL-37-induced autophagy was mediated via P2RX7 receptor followed by enhanced cytosolic free Ca(2+), and activation of AMPK and PtdIns3K pathways. Altogether, these results suggest a novel activity for PBA as an inducer of autophagy, which is LL-37-dependent and promotes intracellular killing of Mtb in human macrophages.

  2. Use of the human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cell line and co-incubation with microsomes to identify and differentiate hapten and prohapten sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Chipinda, Itai; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Templeton, Steven P; Siegel, Paul D

    2011-02-27

    Consumer and medical products can contain leachable chemical allergens which can cause skin sensitization. Recent efforts have been directed at the development of non-animal based tests such as in vitro cell activation assays for the identification of skin sensitizers. Prohapten identification by in vitro assays is still problematic due to the lack of prohapten bioactivation. The present study evaluated the effect of hapten and prohapten exposure on cell surface markers expression (CD86, CD54 and CD40) in the human monocytic leukemia, THP-1, cell line. Upregulation of activation and costimulatory markers are key events in the allergic sensitization process and have been reported to serve as indicators of skin sensitization. Cells were exposed to the prohaptens benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), carvone oxime (COx), cinnamic alcohol (CA) and isoeugenol (IEG) at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 μM for 24 and 48 h. The direct-binding haptens dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), benzoquinone (BQ), hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) and benzylbromide (BB) were used as positive controls. Cells were also exposed to the irritants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sulfanilamide (SFA). Bioactivation of prohaptens was achieved by adding aroclor-induced rat liver microsomes (S9) to the cell cultures. Consistent upregulation of surface expressions of CD86, CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD40 was observed in THP-1 cells treated with direct-acting haptens (±S9) or prohapten (+S9). Upregulation of these markers was not observed after exposure to skin irritants or prohaptens in the absence of exogenously added S9. In conclusion, modification of in vitro cell culture assays to include co-incubation with microsomes enhances identification of prohaptens and allows them to be clearly distinguished from direct-binding haptens. PMID:21163322

  3. Influence of a static magnetic field (250 mT) on the antioxidant response and DNA integrity in THP1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Salem; Douki, Thery; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Garrel, Catherine; Guiraud, Pascale; Favier, Alain; Sakly, Mohsen; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of static magnetic field (SMF) exposure in antioxidant enzyme activity, the labile zinc fraction and DNA damage in THP1 cells (monocyte line). Cell culture flasks were exposed to SMF (250 mT) during 1 h (group 1), 2 h (group 2) and 3 h (group 3). Our results showed that cell viability was slightly lower in SMF-exposed groups compared to a sham exposed group. However, SMF exposure failed to alter malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration (+6%, p > 0.05) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (-5%, p > 0.05), catalase (CAT) (-6%, p > 0.05) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities (+38%, p > 0.05) in group 3 compared to the sham exposed group. DNA analysis by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) revealed that SMF exposure did not exert any DNA damage in groups 1 and 2. However, it induced a low level of DNA single strand breaks in cells of group 3. To further explore the oxidative DNA damage, cellular DNA for group 3 was isolated, hydrolyzed and analysed by HPLC-EC. The level of 8-oxodGuo in this group remained unchanged compared to the sham exposed group (+6.5%, p > 0.05). Cells stained with zinc-specific fluorescent probes zinpyr-1 showed a decrease of labile zinc fraction in all groups exposed to SMF. Our data showed that SMF exposure (250 mT, during 3 h) did not cause oxidative stress and DNA damage in THP1 cells. However, SMF could alter the intracellular labile zinc fraction.

  4. Carbon nanohorns allow acceleration of osteoblast differentiation via macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Miyako, Eijiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ushijima, Natsumi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Russier, Julie; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the proof-of-concept on the osteoblast differentiation capacity by CNHs will allow future studies focused on CNHs as ideal therapeutic materials for bone regeneration.Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the

  5. Rabies virus replication in primary murine bone marrow macrophages and in human and murine macrophage-like cell lines: implications for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Ray, N B; Ewalt, L C; Lodmell, D L

    1995-02-01

    To determine whether rabies viruses replicate in macrophage or macrophage-like cells, several human and murine macrophage-like cell lines, as well as primary cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages, were incubated with the Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) virus and several different street rabies viruses (SRV). ERA rabies virus replicated well in human monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and murine macrophage IC-21 cells, as well as primary cultures of murine macrophages. Minimal replication was detected in murine monocytic WEHI-3BD- and PU5-1R cells, and ERA virus did not replicate in murine monocytic P388D1 or J774A.1 cells. A tissue culture-adapted SRV of bat origin also replicated in IC-21 and U937 cells. Non-tissue culture-adapted SRV isolated from different animal species, particularly bats, replicated minimally in U937, THP-1, IC-21 cells and primary murine bone marrow macrophages. To determine whether rabies virus replication is dependent upon the state of differentiation of the macrophage-like cell, human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). ERA rabies virus replicated in the differentiated HL-60 cells but not in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Persistent infections were established in macrophage-like U937 cells with ERA rabies virus and SRV, and infectious SRV was isolated from adherent bone marrow cells of mice that had been infected 96 days previously. Virus harvested from persistently infected U937 cells and the adherent bone marrow cells had specifically adapted to each cell. This specificity was shown by the inability of the viruses to infect macrophages other than U937 cells and primary bone marrow macrophages, respectively. Virus titers of the persistently infected U937 cells fluctuated with extended cell passage. After 30 passages, virus released from the cells had lost virulence as shown by its inability to kill intracranially inoculated mice. However, the avirulent virus released from the

  6. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  7. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  8. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract in THP-1 Cells Exposed to Particulate Matter PM10

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Young Mi; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence support health risks associated with the exposure to airborne particulate matter with a diameter of <10 μM (PM10). PM10 stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators. Thus, we assumed that natural antioxidants might provide health benefits attenuating hazardous effects of PM10. In the present study, we examined the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on THP-1 monocytic cells exposed to PM10. PM10 induced cytotoxicity and the production of ROS. It also increased the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). PPE at 10–100 μg mL−1 attenuated the production of ROS and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, in THP-1 cells stimulated by PM10 (100 μg mL−1). PPE also attenuated the adhesion of PM10-stimulated THP-1 cells to EA.hy926 endothelial cells. PPE constituents, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated PM10-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and punicalagin was less cytotoxic compared to ellagic acid. The present study suggests that PPE and punicalagin may be useful in alleviating inflammatory reactions due to particulate matter. PMID:27247608

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract in THP-1 Cells Exposed to Particulate Matter PM10.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Young Mi; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence support health risks associated with the exposure to airborne particulate matter with a diameter of <10 μM (PM10). PM10 stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators. Thus, we assumed that natural antioxidants might provide health benefits attenuating hazardous effects of PM10. In the present study, we examined the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on THP-1 monocytic cells exposed to PM10. PM10 induced cytotoxicity and the production of ROS. It also increased the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). PPE at 10-100 μg mL(-1) attenuated the production of ROS and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, in THP-1 cells stimulated by PM10 (100 μg mL(-1)). PPE also attenuated the adhesion of PM10-stimulated THP-1 cells to EA.hy926 endothelial cells. PPE constituents, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated PM10-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and punicalagin was less cytotoxic compared to ellagic acid. The present study suggests that PPE and punicalagin may be useful in alleviating inflammatory reactions due to particulate matter. PMID:27247608

  11. Release of salusin-beta from human monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kengo; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2010-06-01

    Salusin-alpha and salusin-beta are related bioactive peptides biosynthesized from the same precursor, prosalusin. Despite the potent hemodynamic and proatherosclerotic activities of salusin-beta, its exact distribution and biological functions remain largely undetermined because of technical difficulties associated with its unique physicochemical characteristics, such as marked adhesiveness to polypropylene and polystyrene. By circumventing these problems, we recently established a specific radioimmunoassay for detecting immunoreactive human salusin-beta. In the current study, we demonstrated the release of salusin-beta from the human monoblastic leukemia cell lines, THP-1 and U937. Dilution curves of extracted conditioned media from both cells were parallel with those of standard human salusin-beta by radioimmunoassay. Reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with radioimmunoassay detection of the culture supernatants revealed a major immunoreactive component that co-eluted with authentic salusin-beta. Both cell lines secreted salusin-beta-like immunoreactivity (LI) into serum-free media as a function of time (1234.3 + or - 122.7 and 186.7 + or - 9.1 fmol/10(5) cells per 24h). When THP-1 and U937 cells differentiated into macrophages after incubation with 2-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), they secreted far greater amounts of salusin-beta-LI into the culture supernatant (3351.9 + or - 899.3 and 1545.8 + or - 183.3 fmol/10(5) cells per 24h). TPA treatment accelerated the processing of prosalusin into its cleaved fragments, suggesting that the increased secretion of salusin-beta-LI in THP-1-derived macrophages was caused by the enhanced intracellular processing of prosalusin. Stimulation with the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulted in increased secretion of salusin-beta without inducing expression of the gene for preprosalusin, suggesting that TNF-alpha and LPS stimulated

  12. Macrophage activation and human immunodeficiency virus infection: HIV replication directs macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype while previous activation modulates macrophage susceptibility to infection and viral production.

    PubMed

    Porcheray, Fabrice; Samah, Boubekeur; Léone, Cathie; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Gras, Gabriel

    2006-05-25

    Macrophages are pivotal for the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, but whether their role in HIV infection is protective or deleterious remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of pro- and anti-inflammatory stimuli on macrophage sensitivity to two different aspects of HIV infection: their susceptibility to infection stricto sensu, which we measured by endpoint titration method, and their ability to support virus spread, which we measured by using an RT activity assay in infection kinetics. We show a partially protective role for pro-inflammatory agents as well as for IL-4. We also illustrate that various different stimuli display differential effects on macrophage susceptibility to HIV and on virus replication that occurs thereafter. On the other hand, HIV replication strongly repressed CD206 and CD163 expression, thus clearly orientating macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype, but independently of TNF. Taken together, our results emphasize that HIV infection of macrophages sets up inflammation at the cell level but through unexpected mechanisms. This may limit target susceptibility and participate in virus clearance but may also result in tissue damage.

  13. Crosstalk between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics and macrophage bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Oliva-Ramírez, Jacqueline; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B; Pineda-Olvera, Benjamín; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological functions show rhythmic fluctuations with 24-hr periodicity regulated by circadian proteins encoded by the so-called ‘clock’ genes. The absence or deregulation of circadian proteins in mice leads to metabolic disorders and in vitro models have shown that the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages follows a circadian rhythm so showing a link between circadian rhythmicity, metabolism and immunity. Recent evidence reveals that mitochondrial shape, position and size, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics, are related to both cell metabolism and immune function. However, studies addressing the simultaneous crosstalk between circadian rhythm, mitochondrial dynamics and cell immune function are scarce. Here, by using an in vitro model of synchronized murine peritoneal macrophages, we present evidence that the mitochondrial dynamics and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) follow a circadian rhythmic pattern. In addition, it is shown that the fusion of mitochondria along with high Δψm, indicative of high mitochondrial activity, precede the highest phagocytic and bactericidal activity of macrophages on Salmonella typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest a timely coordination between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics, and the bactericidal capacity of macrophages. PMID:24903615

  14. Endocytosis of indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles by macrophages provokes pyroptosis requiring NLRP3-ASC-Caspase1 axis that can be prevented by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Abderrahim; Muzembo, Basilua André; Yagyu, Ken-ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensebé, Luc; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) are of considerable importance because workers exposed to indium compounds have been diagnosed with interstitial lung disease or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; however, the pathophysiology of these diseases is undefined. Here, mice intraperitoneally inoculated with ITO-nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) resulted in peritonitis dependent in NLRP3 inflammasome, with neutrophils recruitment and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Withal peritoneal macrophages exposed ex vivo to ITO-NPs caused IL-1β secretion and cytolysis. Further, alveolar macrophages exposed to ITO-NPs in vitro showed ITO-NP endocytosis and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, ensued cell death by cytolysis. This cell death was RIPK1-independent but caspase1-dependent, and thus identified as pyroptosis. Endocytosis of ITO-NPs by activated THP-1 cells induced pyroptosis with IL-1β/TNF-α production and cytolysis, but not in activated THP-1 cells with knockdown of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1. However, exposing activated THP-1 cells with NLRP3 or ASC knockdown to ITO-NPs resulted in cell death but without cytolysis, with deficiency in IL-1β/TNF-α, and revealing features of apoptosis. While, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with macrophages impaired both inflammation and cell death induced by ITO-NPs. Together, our findings provide crucial insights to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases caused by ITO particles, and identify MSCs as a potent therapeutic. PMID:27194621

  15. Alternatively activated macrophages derived from monocytes and tissue macrophages are phenotypically and functionally distinct

    PubMed Central

    Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Girgis, Natasha M.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Jenkins, Stephen; Ward, Lauren N.; Kurtz, Zachary D.; Wiens, Kirsten E.; Tang, Mei San; Basu-Roy, Upal; Mansukhani, Alka; Allen, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages adopt an alternatively activated phenotype (AAMs) when activated by the interleukin-4receptor(R)α. AAMs can be derived either from proliferation of tissue resident macrophages or recruited inflammatory monocytes, but it is not known whether these different sources generate AAMs that are phenotypically and functionally distinct. By transcriptional profiling analysis, we show here that, although both monocyte and tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of Arg1, Chi3l3, and Retnla, only monocyte-derived AAMs up-regulated Raldh2 and PD-L2. Monocyte-derived AAMs were also CX3CR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP)high and expressed CD206, whereas tissue-derived AAMs were CX3CR1-GFP and CD206 negative. Monocyte-derived AAMs had high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and promoted the differentiation of FoxP3+ cells from naïve CD4+ cells via production of retinoic acid. In contrast, tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of uncoupling protein 1. Hence monocyte-derived AAM have properties associated with immune regulation, and the different physiological properties associated with AAM function may depend on the distinct lineage of these cells. PMID:24695852

  16. Macrophages as effector cells of protective immunity in murine schistosomiasis: macrophage activation in mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Natovitz, P C; Farrar, W L; Leonard, E J

    1984-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses contributing to macrophage activation were compared in mice that demonstrated partial resistance to challenge Schistosoma mansoni infection as a result of vaccination with radiation-attenuated cercariae or of ongoing low-grade primary infection. Vaccinated mice developed significant delayed hypersensitivity reactions to soluble schistosome antigens in vivo. Splenocytes from vaccinated animals responded to in vitro culture with various specific antigens (soluble adult worm extract, living or disrupted schistosomula) by proliferation and production of macrophage-activating lymphokines as did lymphocytes from S. mansoni-infected animals. Macrophage-activating factors produced by spleen cells from vaccinated mice upon specific antigen stimulation eluted as a single peak on Sephadex G-100 with a molecular weight of approximately 50,000 and contained gamma interferon activity. Moreover, peritoneal macrophages with larvicidal and tumoricidal activity were recovered from vaccinated mice after intraperitoneal challenge with soluble schistosome antigens, a procedure also observed to elicit activated macrophages in S. mansoni-infected animals. These observations demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated cercariae stimulates many of the same cellular responses observed after primary S. mansoni infection, and suggest that lymphokine-activated macrophages may participate in the effector mechanism of vaccine-induced and concomitant immunity to challenge schistosome infection. This is the first demonstration of a potential immune effector mechanism in the irradiated vaccine model. PMID:6609885

  17. Magnetometric measurements of macrophage activity in the liver after administration of different perfluorochemicals.

    PubMed

    Koester, M B; Lutz, J

    1994-01-01

    The activity of liver macrophages was evaluated using a magnetometric method after administration of different perfluorochemicals. Following treatment with perfluoroctylbromide a significant shorter time period of diminished macrophage activity was found compared with a mixture of perfluorodecalin and perfluorotripropylamine. Results obtained with the magnetometric method on liver macrophages were more sensitive compared with those of colloidal carbon clearance of total body RES.

  18. Rickettsia australis Activates Inflammasome in Human and Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, Claire; Bechelli, Jeremy; Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Saito, Tais; Azar, Sasha R.; Ismail, Nahed; Walker, David H.; Fang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsiae actively escape from vacuoles and replicate free in the cytoplasm of host cells, where inflammasomes survey the invading pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of Rickettsia australis with the inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages. R. australis induced a significant level of IL-1β secretion by human macrophages, which was significantly reduced upon treatment with an inhibitor of caspase-1 compared to untreated controls, suggesting caspase-1-dependent inflammasome activation. Rickettsia induced significant secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in vitro by infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) as early as 8–12 h post infection (p.i.) in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of these cytokines was accompanied by cleavage of caspase-1 and was completely abrogated in BMMs deficient in caspase-1/caspase-11 or apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC), suggesting that R. australis activate the ASC-dependent inflammasome. Interestingly, in response to the same quantity of rickettsiae, NLRP3-/- BMMs significantly reduced the secretion level of IL-1β compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to cytosolic recognition of R. australis in vitro. Rickettsial load in spleen, but not liver and lung, of R. australis-infected NLRP3-/- mice was significantly greater compared to WT mice. These data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome plays a role in host control of bacteria in vivo in a tissue-specific manner. Taken together, our data, for the first time, illustrate the activation of ASC-dependent inflammasome by R. australis in macrophages in which NLRP3 is involved. PMID:27362650

  19. Biological effects of double-walled carbon nanotubes on the innate immune system: An in vitro study on THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dekali, Samir; Bachelet, Christine; Maunoir-Regimbal, Séverine; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Crouzier, David

    2016-07-15

    DWCNTs have numerous industrial and biomedical applications and several studies reported that they could act as immunomodulator systems. The immune system is the first line of defence of the human body when exposed to particulate matter. In order to investigate DWCNTs' role on innate immunity, we used THP-1 monocytic cells for the purpose of this study. We showed that DWCNTs were not cytotoxic until 6h, 24h, 48h and 72h of incubation with THP-1 monocytic cells (concentrations tested from 10 to 50μg/mL). From 6h to 72h of incubation of THP-1 cells with DWCNTs, we measured a significant increase of the baseline cell index using xCELLigence(®) technology showing cell adhesion. After 24h of exposure, DWCNTs agglomerates were localized in THP-1 monocyte cytoplasm and cell adhesion was observed simultaneously with a significant increase in the expression of CD11b and CD14 cell surface proteins. Pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-10) was also measured in supernatants after 6h or 24h of exposure to DWCNTs. This pro-inflammatory response was increased in THP-1 monocytic cells pre-treated with LPS. Altogether, our data indicate that DWCNTs induce an increased pro-inflammatory response of THP-1 monocytes and seem to modulate cell surface protein expression confirming that DWCNTs could act as stimulators of innate immunity. PMID:27475286

  20. Biological effects of double-walled carbon nanotubes on the innate immune system: An in vitro study on THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dekali, Samir; Bachelet, Christine; Maunoir-Regimbal, Séverine; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Crouzier, David

    2016-07-15

    DWCNTs have numerous industrial and biomedical applications and several studies reported that they could act as immunomodulator systems. The immune system is the first line of defence of the human body when exposed to particulate matter. In order to investigate DWCNTs' role on innate immunity, we used THP-1 monocytic cells for the purpose of this study. We showed that DWCNTs were not cytotoxic until 6h, 24h, 48h and 72h of incubation with THP-1 monocytic cells (concentrations tested from 10 to 50μg/mL). From 6h to 72h of incubation of THP-1 cells with DWCNTs, we measured a significant increase of the baseline cell index using xCELLigence(®) technology showing cell adhesion. After 24h of exposure, DWCNTs agglomerates were localized in THP-1 monocyte cytoplasm and cell adhesion was observed simultaneously with a significant increase in the expression of CD11b and CD14 cell surface proteins. Pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-10) was also measured in supernatants after 6h or 24h of exposure to DWCNTs. This pro-inflammatory response was increased in THP-1 monocytic cells pre-treated with LPS. Altogether, our data indicate that DWCNTs induce an increased pro-inflammatory response of THP-1 monocytes and seem to modulate cell surface protein expression confirming that DWCNTs could act as stimulators of innate immunity.

  1. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Interleukin-32 induces the differentiation of monocytes into macrophage-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Netea, Mihai G.; Lewis, Eli C.; Azam, Tania; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Jaekal, Jun; Bae, Su-Young; Dinarello, Charles A.; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    After emigration from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, monocytes enter tissues and differentiate into macrophages, the prototype scavenger of the immune system. By ingesting and killing microorganisms and removing cellular debris, macrophages also process antigens as a first step in mounting a specific immune response. IL-32 is a cytokine inducing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines via p38-MAPK and NF-κB. In the present study, we demonstrate that IL-32 induces differentiation of human blood monocytes as well as THP-1 leukemic cells into macrophage-like cells with functional phagocytic activity for live bacteria. Muramyl dipepide (MDP), the ligand for the intracellular nuclear oligomerization domain (NOD) 2 receptor, has no effect on differentiation alone but augments the monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation by IL-32. Unexpectedly, IL-32 reversed GM-CSF/IL-4-induced dendritic cell differentiation to macrophage-like cells. Whereas the induction of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 by IL-32 is mediated by p38-MAPK, IL-32-induced monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is mediated through nonapoptotic, caspase-3-dependent mechanisms. Thus, IL-32 not only contributes to host responses through the induction of proinflammatory cytokines but also directly affects specific immunity by differentiating monocytes into macrophage-like cells. PMID:18296636

  3. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis.

  4. Evaluation of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals using expression of co-stimulatory molecules, CD54 and CD86, on the naive THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Sakaguchi, H; Ito, Y; Okuda, M; Suzuki, H

    2003-04-01

    It has been known that dendritic cells (DCs) including Langerhans cells (LCs) play a critical role in the skin sensitization process. Many attempts have been made to develop in vitro sensitization tests that employ DCs derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC-DC) or CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34+ HPC) purified from cord blood or bone marrow. However, the use of the DCs in in vitro methods has been difficult due to the nature of these cells such as low levels in the source and/or donor-to-donor variability. In our studies, we employed the human monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1, in order to avoid some of these difficulties. At the start, we examined whether treatment of the cells with various cytokines could produce DCs from THP-1. Treatment of THP-1 cells with cytokines such as GM-CSF, IL-4, TNF-alpha, and/or PMA did induce some phenotypic changes in THP-1 cells that were characteristic of DCs. Subsequently, responses to a known sensitizer, dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and a non-sensitizer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, CD54 and CD86, were examined between the naive cells and the cytokine-treated cells. Interestingly, the naive THP-1 cells responded only to DNCB and the response to the sensitizer was more distinct than cytokine-treated THP-1 cells. Similar phenomena were also observed in the human myeloid leukemia cell line, KG-1. Furthermore, with treatment of DNCB, naive THP-1 cells showed augmented expression of HLA, CD80 and secretion of IL-1 beta. The response of THP-1 cells to a sensitizer was similar to that of LCs/DCs. Upon demonstrating the differentiation of monocyte cells in our system, we then evaluated a series of chemicals, including known sensitizers and non-sensitizers, for their potential to augment CD54 and CD86 expression on naive THP-1 cells. Indeed, known sensitizers such as PPD and 2-MBT significantly augmented CD54 and CD86 expression in a

  5. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and

  6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro. PMID:8629860

  7. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  8. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  9. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages with Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles Drives NFκB and Autophagy Dependent Bacillary Killing.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O'Connor, Gemma; O'Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Keane, Joseph; O'Sullivan, Mary P

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has pushed our available repertoire of anti-TB therapies to the limit of effectiveness. This has increased the urgency to develop novel treatment modalities, and inhalable microparticle (MP) formulations are a promising option to target the site of infection. We have engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) MPs which can carry a payload of anti-TB agents, and are successfully taken up by human alveolar macrophages. Even without a drug cargo, MPs can be potent immunogens; yet little is known about how they influence macrophage function in the setting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To address this issue we infected THP-1 macrophages with Mtb H37Ra or H37Rv and treated with MPs. In controlled experiments we saw a reproducible reduction in bacillary viability when THP-1 macrophages were treated with drug-free MPs. NFκB activity was increased in MP-treated macrophages, although cytokine secretion was unaltered. Confocal microscopy of immortalized murine bone marrow-derived macrophages expressing GFP-tagged LC3 demonstrated induction of autophagy. Inhibition of caspases did not influence the MP-induced restriction of bacillary growth, however, blockade of NFκB or autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors reversed this MP effect on macrophage function. These data support harnessing inhaled PLGA MP-drug delivery systems as an immunotherapeutic in addition to serving as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. Such "added value" could be exploited in the generation of inhaled vaccines as well as inhaled MDR-TB therapeutics when used as an adjunct to existing treatments. PMID:26894562

  10. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages with Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles Drives NFκB and Autophagy Dependent Bacillary Killing

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O’Connor, Gemma; O’Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has pushed our available repertoire of anti-TB therapies to the limit of effectiveness. This has increased the urgency to develop novel treatment modalities, and inhalable microparticle (MP) formulations are a promising option to target the site of infection. We have engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) MPs which can carry a payload of anti-TB agents, and are successfully taken up by human alveolar macrophages. Even without a drug cargo, MPs can be potent immunogens; yet little is known about how they influence macrophage function in the setting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To address this issue we infected THP-1 macrophages with Mtb H37Ra or H37Rv and treated with MPs. In controlled experiments we saw a reproducible reduction in bacillary viability when THP-1 macrophages were treated with drug-free MPs. NFκB activity was increased in MP-treated macrophages, although cytokine secretion was unaltered. Confocal microscopy of immortalized murine bone marrow-derived macrophages expressing GFP-tagged LC3 demonstrated induction of autophagy. Inhibition of caspases did not influence the MP-induced restriction of bacillary growth, however, blockade of NFκB or autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors reversed this MP effect on macrophage function. These data support harnessing inhaled PLGA MP-drug delivery systems as an immunotherapeutic in addition to serving as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. Such “added value” could be exploited in the generation of inhaled vaccines as well as inhaled MDR-TB therapeutics when used as an adjunct to existing treatments. PMID:26894562

  11. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages with Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles Drives NFκB and Autophagy Dependent Bacillary Killing.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O'Connor, Gemma; O'Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Keane, Joseph; O'Sullivan, Mary P

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has pushed our available repertoire of anti-TB therapies to the limit of effectiveness. This has increased the urgency to develop novel treatment modalities, and inhalable microparticle (MP) formulations are a promising option to target the site of infection. We have engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) MPs which can carry a payload of anti-TB agents, and are successfully taken up by human alveolar macrophages. Even without a drug cargo, MPs can be potent immunogens; yet little is known about how they influence macrophage function in the setting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To address this issue we infected THP-1 macrophages with Mtb H37Ra or H37Rv and treated with MPs. In controlled experiments we saw a reproducible reduction in bacillary viability when THP-1 macrophages were treated with drug-free MPs. NFκB activity was increased in MP-treated macrophages, although cytokine secretion was unaltered. Confocal microscopy of immortalized murine bone marrow-derived macrophages expressing GFP-tagged LC3 demonstrated induction of autophagy. Inhibition of caspases did not influence the MP-induced restriction of bacillary growth, however, blockade of NFκB or autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors reversed this MP effect on macrophage function. These data support harnessing inhaled PLGA MP-drug delivery systems as an immunotherapeutic in addition to serving as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. Such "added value" could be exploited in the generation of inhaled vaccines as well as inhaled MDR-TB therapeutics when used as an adjunct to existing treatments.

  12. Nucleophosmin Mutants Promote Adhesion, Migration and Invasion of Human Leukemia THP-1 Cells through MMPs Up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Jingrong; Shao, Huiyuan; Chen, Xianchun; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Quan, Jing; Zou, Qin; Jin, Hongjun; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1) has been defined as a unique subgroup in the new classification of myeloid neoplasm, and the AML patients with mutated NPM1 frequently present extramedullary infiltration, but how NPM1 mutants regulate this process remains elusive. In this study, we found that overexpression of type A NPM1 gene mutation (NPM1-mA) enhanced the adhesive, migratory and invasive potential in THP-1 AML cells lacking mutated NPM1. NPM1-mA had up-regulated expression and gelatinolytic matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 activity, as assessed by real-time PCR, western blotting and gelatin zymography. Following immunoprecipitation analysis to identify the interaction of NPM1-mA with K-Ras, we focused on the effect of NPM1-mA overexpression on the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling axis and showed that NPM1-mA increased the MEK and ERK phosphorylation levels, as evaluated by western blotting. Notably, a specific inhibitor of the ERK/MAPK pathway (PD98059), but not p38/MAPK, JNK/MAPK or PI3-K/AKT inhibitors, markedly decreased the cell invasion numbers in a transwell assay. Further experiments demonstrated that blocking the ERK/MAPK pathway by PD98059 resulted in reduced MMP-2/9 protein levels and MMP-9 activity. Additionally, NPM1-mA overexpression had down-regulated gene expression and protein production of tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2) in THP-1 cells. Furthermore, evaluation of gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that MMP-2 was overexpressed in AML patient samples with NPM1 mutated and high MMP-2 expression associated with leukemic skin infiltration. Taken together, our results reveal that NPM1 mutations contribute to the invasive potential of AML cells through MMPs up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK signaling pathway activation and offer novel insights into the potential role of NPM1 mutations in leukemogenesis. PMID:26884713

  13. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Peng; Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian; Peng, Hui; Clewell, Rebecca; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shuangqing; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation.

  14. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1) Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study examined alpha (α-) particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1) for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure. PMID:23097634

  15. Inhibition of lanthanide nanocrystal-induced inflammasome activation in macrophages by a surface coating peptide through abrogation of ROS production and TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) influx.

    PubMed

    Yao, Han; Zhang, Yunjiao; Liu, Liu; Xu, Youcui; Liu, Xi; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wei, Pengfei; Jin, Peipei; Wen, Long-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Lanthanide-based nanoparticles (LNs) hold great promise in medicine. A variety of nanocrystals, including LNs, elicits potent inflammatory response through activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We have previously identified an LNs-specific surface coating peptide RE-1, with the sequence of 'ACTARSPWICG', which reduced nanocrystal-cell interaction and abrogated LNs-induced autophagy and toxicity in both HeLa cells and liver hepatocytes. Here we show that RE-1 coating effectively inhibited LNs-induced inflammasome activation, mostly mediated by NLRP3, in mouse bone marrow derived macrophage (BMDM) cells, human THP-1 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages and also reduced LNs-elicited inflammatory response in vivo. RE-1 coating had no effect on cellular internalization of LNs in BMDM cells, in contrast to the situation in HeLa cells where cell uptake of LNs was significantly inhibited by RE-1. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the inflammasome-inhibiting effect of RE-1, we assessed several parameters known to influence nanocrystal-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. RE-1 coating did not reduce potassium efflux, which occurred after LNs treatment in BMDM cells and was necessary but insufficient for LNs-induced inflammasome activation. RE-1 did decrease lysosomal damage induced by LNs, but the inhibitor of cathepsin B did not affect LNs-elicited caspase 1 activation and IL-1β release, suggesting that lysosomal damage was not critically important for LNs-induced inflammasome activation. On the other hand, LNs-induced elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), critically important for inflammasome activation, was largely abolished by RE-1 coating, with the reduction on NADPH oxidase-generated ROS playing a more prominent role for RE-1's inflammasome-inhibiting effect than the reduction on mitochondria-generated ROS. ROS generation further triggered Ca(2+) influx, an event that was mediated by Transient Receptor Potential M2 (TRPM2) and was

  16. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  17. Evaluation of the Effects of Some Brazilian Medicinal Plants on the Production of TNF-α and CCL2 by THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gusman, Grasielle S.; Campana, Priscilla R. V.; Castro, Luciano C.; Castilho, Rachel O.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Braga, Fernão C.

    2015-01-01

    Several plant species are traditionally used in Brazil to treat various inflammatory diseases. Tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) are key inflammatory mediators in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis, respectively; nevertheless, only a few extracts have been assayed against these targets. We herein report the effect of 19 plant extracts on TNF-α and CCL2 release by lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated THP-1 cells, a human monocytic leukemia cell line, along with their radical scavenging activity on DPPH. The extracts of Caryocar brasiliense, Casearia sylvestris, Coccoloba cereifera, and Terminalia glabrescens inhibited TNF-α production in a concentration-dependent manner. Fractionation of these extracts potentiated the anti-TNF-α effect, which was shown to concentrate in polar fractions, mainly composed by polyphenols. Significant CCL2 inhibition was elicited by Lippia sidoides and Terminalia glabrescens extracts, whose fractionation resulted in highly active low polar fractions. All assayed extracts showed strong radical scavenging activity, but antioxidant activity did not correlate with inhibition of TNF-α or CCL2 production. Our results allowed identifying extracts with selective capacity to block cytokine production; therefore, further purification of these extracts may yield molecules that could be useful in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25878716

  18. New insights into the multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function.

    PubMed

    Ginhoux, Florent; Schultze, Joachim L; Murray, Peter J; Ochando, Jordi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have protective roles in immunity to pathogens, tissue development, homeostasis and repair following damage. Maladaptive immunity and inflammation provoke changes in macrophage function that are causative of disease. Despite a historical wealth of knowledge about macrophages, recent advances have revealed unknown aspects of their development and function. Following development, macrophages are activated by diverse signals. Such tissue microenvironmental signals together with epigenetic changes influence macrophage development, activation and functional diversity, with consequences in disease and homeostasis. We discuss here how recent discoveries in these areas have led to a multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function. In connection with this, we also discuss how technical advances facilitate a new roadmap for the isolation and analysis of macrophages at high resolution.

  19. Curcuminoids Modulate the PKCδ/NADPH Oxidase/Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling Pathway and Suppress Matrix Invasion during Monocyte-Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Lan; Chen, Pei-Yi; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Tai, Mi-Hsueh; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2015-10-14

    Monocyte recruitment and invasion play critical roles in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. The reduction in monocyte adhesion and infiltration is thought to exert antiatherosclerotic effects. Curcumin, demethoxycurcumin (DMC), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) are the major active components of curcuminoids and exhibit several biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, and hypocholesterolemic activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the antiatherogenic effects and mechanisms of curcuminoids during monocyte to macrophage differentiation. The results showed that curcumin, DMC, and BDMC (20 μM) suppressed matrix invasion from 100.0 ± 5.0% to 24.8 ± 1.4%, 26.6 ± 2.9%, and 33.7 ± 1.7%, respectively, during PMA-induced THP-1 differentiation. We found that curcuminoids significantly reduced PMA-induced CD11b and MMP-9 expression by THP-1 cells. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by PMA (126.7 ± 2.1%) was markedly attenuated by curcumin, DMC, and BDMC to 99.5 ± 7.8%, 87.8 ± 8.2%, and 89.8 ± 7.6%, respectively, resulting in the down-regulation of CD11b and MMP-9 expression. We demonstrated that curcuminoids inhibited NADPH oxidase through the down-regulation of NOX2 expression and the reduction of p47phox membrane translocation. Moreover, we found involvement of PKCδ in the PMA-induced NOX2, CD11b, and MMP-9 mRNA expression. Curcumin, DMC, and BDMC decreased the active form of PKCδ protein stimulated by PMA in THP-1 cells. Overall, our results reveal that curcuminoids suppress matrix invasion through the inhibition of the PKCδ/NADPH oxidase/ROS signaling pathway during monocyte-macrophage differentiation. PMID:26414495

  20. GM-CSF Promotes Macrophage Alternative Activation after Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Larry; Marlier, Arnaud; Lee, Yashang; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Cantley, Lloyd G.

    2015-01-01

    After kidney ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, monocytes home to the kidney and differentiate into activated macrophages. Whereas proinflammatory macrophages contribute to the initial kidney damage, an alternatively activated phenotype can promote normal renal repair. The microenvironment of the kidney during the repair phase mediates the transition of macrophage activation from a proinflammatory to a reparative phenotype. In this study, we show that macrophages isolated from murine kidneys during the tubular repair phase after I/R exhibit an alternative activation gene profile that differs from the canonical alternative activation induced by IL-4–stimulated STAT6 signaling. This unique activation profile can be reproduced in vitro by stimulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages with conditioned media from serum-starved mouse proximal tubule cells. Secreted tubular factors were found to activate macrophage STAT3 and STAT5 but not STAT6, leading to induction of the unique alternative activation pattern. Using STAT3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages and pharmacologic inhibition of STAT5, we found that tubular cell-mediated macrophage alternative activation is regulated by STAT5 activation. Both in vitro and after renal I/R, tubular cells expressed GM-CSF, a known STAT5 activator, and this pathway was required for in vitro alternative activation of macrophages by tubular cells. Furthermore, administration of a neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF after renal I/R attenuated kidney macrophage alternative activation and suppressed tubular proliferation. Taken together, these data show that tubular cells can instruct macrophage activation by secreting GM-CSF, leading to a unique macrophage reparative phenotype that supports tubular proliferation after sterile ischemic injury. PMID:25388222

  1. l-Cystathionine Inhibits the Mitochondria-Mediated Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingzhu; Du, Junbao; Chen, Siyao; Liu, Angie Dong; Holmberg, Lukas; Chen, Yonghong; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the regulatory role of l-cystathionine in human macrophage apoptosis induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and its possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells were induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and differentiated into macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with ox-LDL after pretreatment with l-cystathionine. Superoxide anion, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening were examined. Caspase-9 activities and expression of cleaved caspase-3 were measured. The results showed that compared with control group, ox-LDL treatment significantly promoted superoxide anion generation, release of cytochrome c (cytc) from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and cell apoptosis, in addition to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential as well as increased MPTP opening. However, 0.3 and 1.0 mmol/L l-cystathionine significantly reduced superoxide anion generation, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and markedly decreased MPTP opening in ox-LDL + l-cystathionine macrophages. Moreover, compared to ox-LDL treated-cells, release of cytc from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and apoptosis levels in l-cystathionine pretreated cells were profoundly attenuated. Taken together, our results suggested that l-cystathionine could antagonize mitochondria-mediated human macrophage apoptosis induced by ox-LDL via inhibition of cytc release and caspase activation. PMID:25514411

  2. Macrophage Activation Redirects Yersinia-Infected Host Cell Death from Apoptosis to Caspase-1-Dependent Pyroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergsbaken, Tessa; Cookson, Brad T

    2007-01-01

    Infection of macrophages by Yersinia species results in YopJ-dependent apoptosis, and naïve macrophages are highly susceptible to this form of cell death. Previous studies have demonstrated that macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prior to infection are resistant to YopJ-dependent cell death; we found this simultaneously renders macrophages susceptible to killing by YopJ− Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb). YopJ− Yptb-induced macrophage death was dependent on caspase-1 activation, resulting in rapid permeability to small molecules, followed by membrane breakdown and DNA damage, and accompanied by cleavage and release of proinflammatory interleukin-18. Induction of caspase-1-dependent death, or pyroptosis, required the bacterial type III translocon but none of its known translocated proteins. Wild-type Yptb infection also triggered pyroptosis: YopJ-dependent activation of proapoptotic caspase-3 was significantly delayed in activated macrophages and resulted in caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis. The transition to susceptibility was not limited to LPS activation; it was also seen in macrophages activated with other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and intact nonviable bacteria. Yptb infection triggered macrophage activation and activation of caspase-1 in vivo. Y. pestis infection of activated macrophages also stimulated caspase-1 activation. These results indicate that host signaling triggered by TLR and other activating ligands during the course of Yersinia infection redirects both the mechanism of host cell death and the downstream consequences of death by shifting from noninflammatory apoptosis to inflammatory pyroptosis. PMID:17983266

  3. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Nadhia H. C.; Ferrari, Raquel A. M.; Silva, Daniela F. T.; Nunes, Fabio D.; Bussadori, Sandra K.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle. PMID:25076002

  4. Differential roles of the protein corona in the cellular uptake of nanoporous polymer particles by monocyte and macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Gause, Katelyn T; Kamphuis, Marloes M J; Ang, Ching-Seng; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Reynolds, Eric C; Nice, Edouard C; Caruso, Frank

    2013-12-23

    Many biomolecules, mainly proteins, adsorb onto polymer particles to form a dynamic protein corona in biological environments. The protein corona can significantly influence particle-cell interactions, including internalization and pathway activation. In this work, we demonstrate the differential roles of a given protein corona formed in cell culture media in particle uptake by monocytes and macrophages. By exposing disulfide-stabilized poly(methacrylic acid) nanoporous polymer particles (PMASH NPPs) to complete cell growth media containing 10% fetal bovine serum, a protein corona, with the most abundant component being bovine serum albumin, was characterized. Upon adsorption onto the PMASH NPPs, native bovine serum albumin (BSA) was found to undergo conformational changes. The denatured BSA led to a significant decrease in internalization efficiency in human monocytic cells, THP-1, compared with the bare particles, due to reduced cell membrane adhesion. In contrast, the unfolded BSA on the NPPs triggered class A scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis in differentiated macrophage-like cells (dTHP-1) without a significant impact on the overall internalization efficiency. Taken together, this work demonstrates the disparate effects of a given protein corona on particle-cell interactions, highlighting the correlation between protein corona conformation in situ and relevant biological characteristics for biological functionalities.

  5. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  6. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  7. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  8. Macrophages migrate in an activation-dependent manner to chemokines involved in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In neuroinflammatory diseases, macrophages can play a dual role in the process of tissue damage, depending on their activation status (M1 / M2). M1 macrophages are considered to exert damaging effects to neurons, whereas M2 macrophages are reported to aid regeneration and repair of neurons. Their migration within the central nervous system may be of critical importance in the final outcome of neurodegeneration in neuroinflammatory diseases e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). To provide insight into this process, we examined the migratory capacity of human monocyte-derived M1 and M2 polarised macrophages towards chemoattractants, relevant for neuroinflammatory diseases like MS. Methods Primary cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evoke proinflammatory (M1) activation or IL-4 to evoke anti-inflammatory (M2) activation. In a TAXIScan assay, migration of M0, M1 and M2 towards chemoattractants was measured and quantified. Furthermore the adhesion capacity and the expression levels of integrins as well as chemokine receptors of M0, M1 and M2 were assessed. Alterations in cell morphology were analysed using fluorescent labelling of the cytoskeleton. Results Significant differences were observed between M1 and M2 macrophages in the migration towards chemoattractants. We show that M2 macrophages migrated over longer distances towards CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL12 and C1q compared to non-activated (M0) and M1 macrophages. No differences were observed in the adhesion of M0, M1 and M2 macrophages to multiple matrix components, nor in the expression of integrins and chemokine receptors. Significant changes were observed in the cytoskeleton organization upon stimulation with CCL2, M0, M1 and M2 macrophages adopt a spherical morphology and the cytoskeleton is rapidly rearranged. M0 and M2 macrophages are able to form filopodia, whereas M1 macrophages only adapt a spherical morphology. Conclusions

  9. Some biochemical and functional characteristics of macrophages activated by Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Makioka, A; Kobayashi, A

    1984-01-01

    Phagocytosis, enzyme activities and capacity to release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2-) of peritoneal macrophages from mice inoculated with Tetrahymena pyriformis, a free-living ciliate, were examined in comparison with resident and BCG-activated macrophages. Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis of sheep erythrocytes was markedly increased in Tetrahymena-activated macrophages to the same level as that seen in BCG-activated ones. Tetrahymena-activated macrophages showed an increased level of acid phosphatase (lysosomal enzyme) and a reduced level of alkaline phosphodiesterase I (plasma membrane ectoenzyme) as compared with resident macrophages. Similar changes in the activities of the two enzymes were also observed in BCG-activated macrophages. Both Tetrahymena- and BCG-activated macrophages exhibited more enhanced capacity to release H2O2 and O2- than resident macrophages when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. In the macrophages from mice inoculated with varying doses of Tetrahymena, a significant correlation was observed between the increased capacity of H2O2 and O2- release as observed in the present study, and the enhanced toxoplasmacidal activity as observed in a previous study, in a dose-dependent fashion.

  10. Controlled release of cytokines using silk-biomaterials for macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Andrew R D; Spiller, Kara L; Freytes, Donald O; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Kaplan, David L

    2015-12-01

    Polarization of macrophages into an inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype is important for clearing pathogens and wound repair, however chronic activation of either type of macrophage has been implicated in several diseases. Methods to locally control the polarization of macrophages is of great interest for biomedical implants and tissue engineering. To that end, silk protein was used to form biopolymer films that release either IFN-γ or IL-4 to control the polarization of macrophages. Modulation of the solubility of the silk films through regulation of β-sheet (crystalline) content enabled a short-term release (4-8 h) of either cytokine, with smaller amounts released out to 24 h. Altering the solubility of the films was accomplished by varying the time that the films were exposed to water vapor. The released IFN-γ or IL-4 induced polarization of THP-1 derived macrophages into the M1 or M2 phenotypes, respectively. The silk biomaterials were able to release enough IFN-γ or IL-4 to repolarize the macrophage from M1 to M2 and vice versa, demonstrating the well-established plasticity of macrophages. High β-sheet content films that are not soluble and do not release the trapped cytokines were also able to polarize macrophages that adhered to the surface through degradation of the silk protein. Chemically conjugating IFN-γ to silk films through disulfide bonds allowed for longer-term release to 10 days. The release of covalently attached IFN-γ from the films was also able to polarize M1 macrophages in vitro. Thus, the strategy described here offers new approaches to utilizing biomaterials for directing the polarization of macrophages.

  11. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  12. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  13. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages. PMID:8176226

  14. STAT1 Signaling within Macrophages Is Required for Antifungal Activity against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Hole, Camaron R.; Wozniak, Karen L.; Olszewski, Michal A.; Mueller, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO. PMID:26351277

  15. Activation of peritoneal macrophages to cytoxicity against B16 melanoma cells by Serratia marcescens polyribosome fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Serratia marcescens polyribosomes (SMPR) have been shown to elicit an anti-tumor response in vivo. The in-vitro effects of SMPR on macrophages as the nonspecific mediators of the anti-tumor response have not previously been examined. The first objective of this research project is to corroborate and analyze the in-vivo results by the development and application of an in-vitro cytotoxicity assay. The second objective is to examine the effect of SMPR upon previously unstimulated peritoneal macrophages as representing the mechanism of cytotoxicity. The third objective is to identify the minimal effective component of SMPR responsible for an effect on macrophages. Results revealed that SMPR preparations exert a number of effects upon macrophages. Morphologic changes included increased spreading and increased perinuclear vacuolization. Macrophages were shown to be metabolically activate by two lines of evidence. SMPR-treated macrophages exhibited increased cellular metabolism by the increased uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine and by the increased levels of secreted leucine aminopeptidase as compared to control macrophages. Results also showed that SMPR activates macrophages to cytotoxicity against syngeneic tumor target cells. Buoyant-density fractions were isolated and assayed for macrophage activating ability. Results showed 50S ribosomal subunits to be the smallest fraction effective for macrophage activation. Both the RNA and protein were necessary for complete effectiveness.

  16. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed Central

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-01-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  17. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-08-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  18. Hydrogen sulfide suppresses oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-stimulated monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 generation from macrophages via the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Junbao; Huang, Yaqian; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Qiaoli; Zhao, Manman; Zhu, Mingzhu; Liu, Jia; Chen, Stella X; Bu, Dingfang; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the generation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-stimulated monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) from macrophages and possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages were pretreated with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and hexyl acrylate and then treated with ox-LDL. The results showed that ox-LDL treatment down-regulated the H2S/cystathionine-β-synthase pathway, with increased MCP-1 protein and mRNA expression in both THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages. Hexyl acrylate promoted ox-LDL-induced inflammation, whereas the H2S donor NaHS inhibited it. NaHS markedly suppressed NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter in ox-LDL-treated macrophages. Furthermore, NaHS decreased the ratio of free thiol groups in p65, whereas the thiol reductant DTT reversed the inhibiting effect of H2S on the p65 DNA binding activity. Most importantly, site-specific mutation of cysteine 38 to serine in p65 abolished the effect of H2S on the sulfhydration of NF-κB and ox-LDL-induced NF-κB activation. These results suggested that endogenous H2S inhibited ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation by suppressing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter. The sulfhydration of free thiol group on cysteine 38 in p65 served as a molecular mechanism by which H2S inhibited NF-κB pathway activation in ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation.

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Suppresses Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (Ox-LDL)-stimulated Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 generation from Macrophages via the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junbao; Huang, Yaqian; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Qiaoli; Zhao, Manman; Zhu, Mingzhu; Liu, Jia; Chen, Stella X.; Bu, Dingfang; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the generation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-stimulated monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) from macrophages and possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages were pretreated with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and hexyl acrylate and then treated with ox-LDL. The results showed that ox-LDL treatment down-regulated the H2S/cystathionine-β-synthase pathway, with increased MCP-1 protein and mRNA expression in both THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages. Hexyl acrylate promoted ox-LDL-induced inflammation, whereas the H2S donor NaHS inhibited it. NaHS markedly suppressed NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter in ox-LDL-treated macrophages. Furthermore, NaHS decreased the ratio of free thiol groups in p65, whereas the thiol reductant DTT reversed the inhibiting effect of H2S on the p65 DNA binding activity. Most importantly, site-specific mutation of cysteine 38 to serine in p65 abolished the effect of H2S on the sulfhydration of NF-κB and ox-LDL-induced NF-κB activation. These results suggested that endogenous H2S inhibited ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation by suppressing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter. The sulfhydration of free thiol group on cysteine 38 in p65 served as a molecular mechanism by which H2S inhibited NF-κB pathway activation in ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation. PMID:24550391

  20. Preparation, characterization, and safety evaluation of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for protein delivery into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Anne-Sophie; Kell, Arnold J; Barnes, Michael; Stals, Sandra; Gonçalves, David; Girard, Denis; Lavigne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Following infection, HIV establishes reservoirs within tissues that are inaccessible to optimal levels of antiviral drugs or within cells where HIV lies latent, thus escaping the action of anti-HIV drugs. Macrophages are a persistent reservoir for HIV and may contribute to the rebound viremia observed after antiretroviral treatment is stopped. In this study, we further investigate the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-based nanocarriers as a new strategy to enhance penetration of therapeutic molecules into macrophages. We have prepared stable PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) and evaluated their capacity to transport an active molecule into the human monocyte/macrophage cell line THP-1 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a proof-of-concept compound. Intracellular localization of fluorescent BSA molecules encapsulated into PLGA NPs was monitored in live cells using confocal microscopy, and cellular uptake was quantified by flow cytometry. In vitro and in vivo toxicological studies were performed to further determine the safety profile of PLGA NPs including inflammatory effects. The size of the PLGA NPs carrying BSA (PLGA-BSA) in culture medium containing 10% serum was ~126 nm in diameter, and they were negatively charged at their surface (zeta potential =−5.6 mV). Our confocal microscopy studies and flow cytometry data showed that these PLGA-BSA NPs are rapidly and efficiently taken up by THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) at low doses. We found that PLGA-BSA NPs increased cellular uptake and internalization of the protein in vitro. PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic for THP-1 MDM cells, did not modulate neutrophil apoptosis in vitro, and did not show inflammatory effect in vivo in the murine air pouch model of acute inflammation. In contrast to BSA alone, BSA encapsulated into PLGA NPs increased leukocyte infiltration in vivo, suggesting the in vivo enhanced delivery and protection of the protein by the polymer nanocarrier. We demonstrated that PLGA

  1. Oleoylethanolamide exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-induced THP-1 cells by enhancing PPARα signaling and inhibiting the NF-κB and ERK1/2/AP-1/STAT3 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichao; Guo, Han; Li, Ying; Meng, Xianglan; Yan, Lu; Dan Zhang; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Hao; Peng, Lu; Xie, Qiang; Jin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory actions of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced THP-1 cells. The cells were stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml) in the presence or absence of OEA (10, 20 and 40 μM). The pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated by qRT-PCR and ELISA. The THP-1 cells were transiently transfected with PPARα small-interfering RNA, and TLR4 activity was determined with a blocking test using anti-TLR4 antibody. Additionally, a special inhibitor was used to analyse the intracellular signaling pathway. OEA exerted a potent anti-inflammatory effect by reducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TLR4 expression, and by enhancing PPARα expression. The modulatory effects of OEA on LPS-induced inflammation depended on PPARα and TLR4. Importantly, OEA inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation, IκBα degradation, expression of AP-1, and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and STAT3. In summary, our results demonstrated that OEA exerts anti-inflammatory effects by enhancing PPARα signaling, inhibiting the TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, and interfering with the ERK1/2-dependent signaling cascade (TLR4/ERK1/2/AP-1/STAT3), which suggests that OEA may be a therapeutic agent for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27721381

  2. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects.

  3. Inhibition of TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-1β by Pretreatment of Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages with Menaquinone-7 and Cell Activation with TLR Agonists In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Maresz, Katarzyna; Lee, Pei-Sheng; Wu, Jia-Ching; Ho, Chi-Tang; Popko, Janusz; Mehta, Dilip S; Stohs, Sidney J; Badmaev, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Circulatory markers of low-grade inflammation such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) positively correlate with endothelial damage, atheroma formation, cardiovascular disease, and aging. The natural vitamin K2-menaquinone-7 (MK-7) added to the cell culture of human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs) at the same time as toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists did not influence the production of TNF-α. When the cells were pretreated up to 6 h with MK-7 before treatment with TLR agonists, MK-7 did not inhibit significantly the production of TNF-α after the TLR activation. However, 30 h pretreatment of hMDMs with at least 10 μM of MK-7 effectively and dose dependently inhibited the proinflammatory function of hMDMs. Pretreatment of hMDMs with 10 μM of MK-7 for 30 h resulted in 20% inhibition of TNF-α production after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation (P < .05) and 43% inhibition after macrophage-activating lipopeptide (MALP) activation (P < .001). Pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PMPP) activation was inhibited by 20% with MK-7 pretreatment; however, this inhibition was not statistically significant. The 30 h pretreatment of a THP-1-differentiated monocyte cell line with MK-7 resulted in a dose-dependent downregulation of TNFα, IL-1α, and IL-1β gene expression as evaluated by RNA semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). MK-7 is able to modulate immune and inflammatory reactions in the dose-response inhibition of TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-1β gene expression and protein production by the healthy hMDMs in vitro. PMID:27200471

  4. Effects of Berberine on NLRP3 and IL-1β Expressions in Monocytic THP-1 Cells with Monosodium Urate Crystals-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Urate crystals-induced inflammation is a critical factor during the initiation of gouty arthritis. Berberine is well known for its anti-inflammatory activity. However, the underlying effects of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation remain obscure. Objectives. This study is set to explore the protective effect and mechanism of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation in human monocytic THP-1 cells. Methods. The mRNA levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were measured by Real-Time PCR, and the protein levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were determined by ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. Results. The NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions were significantly increased in model group compared to that in normal group (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there was significant reduction in the expressions of NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA in groups 6.25 μM berberine and 25 μM berberine when compared with model group (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Therefore, berberine alleviates monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation by downregulating NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions. The regulatory effects of berberine may be related to the inactivation of NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:27689075

  5. Effects of Berberine on NLRP3 and IL-1β Expressions in Monocytic THP-1 Cells with Monosodium Urate Crystals-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Urate crystals-induced inflammation is a critical factor during the initiation of gouty arthritis. Berberine is well known for its anti-inflammatory activity. However, the underlying effects of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation remain obscure. Objectives. This study is set to explore the protective effect and mechanism of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation in human monocytic THP-1 cells. Methods. The mRNA levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were measured by Real-Time PCR, and the protein levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were determined by ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. Results. The NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions were significantly increased in model group compared to that in normal group (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there was significant reduction in the expressions of NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA in groups 6.25 μM berberine and 25 μM berberine when compared with model group (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Therefore, berberine alleviates monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation by downregulating NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions. The regulatory effects of berberine may be related to the inactivation of NLRP3 inflammasome.

  6. Low-power laser irradiation enhance macrophage phagocytic capacity through Src activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Phagocytosis and subsequent degradation of pathogens by macrophages play a pivotal role in host innate immunity in mammals. Laser irradiation has been found to produce photobiological effects with evidence of interference with organic functions. In this study, we focused our attention on the effects of He-Ne laser on the phagocytic activity of macrophages, the regulation mechanism of phagocytosis was also discussed. Our results indicated that Low-power laser irradiation can enhance the phagocytosis of macrophage through activation of Src.

  7. Expression of macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) in atherosclerosis and regulation by histamine via the H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Akihide; Wang, Ke-Yong; Shimajiri, Shohei; Guo, Xin; Tasaki, Takashi; Yamada, Sohsuke; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) is a member of the CC-family of chemokines and is synthesized by monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we investigate the relationship between monocytes/macrophages and histamine in atherosclerosis and discover that histamine levels regulate various immunologically important molecules and influences atherosclerotic progression. Immunohistochemical analysis of human atherosclerotic lesions revealed that macrophages and DCs express CCL22. The human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) adhered to culture plates and morphologically changed to macrophage-like cells when treated with tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Macrophage-like cells derived from THP-1 cells and cultivated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) show similar expression of CCL22. Gene expression of CCL22 was also detected in THP-1 cells treated with histamine and the expression of the protein produced by the CCL22 gene is similar in PBMCs and THP-1 cells. In addition, the histamine H2 receptor mediated these reactions. Our results suggest that CCL22 expression in monocytes is regulated by histamine, and that CCL22 is involved centrally in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In conclusion, CCL22 is a marker that is a characteristic of the monocytes/ macrophages migrating into atherosclerotic lesions and histamine plays a role in regulating its expression.

  8. The generation of macrophages with anti-inflammatory activity in the absence of STAT6 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Bryan D.; Chandrasekaran, Prabha; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Dalby, Elizabeth; Suresh, Rahul; Sarkar, Arup; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Mosser, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages readily change their phenotype in response to exogenous stimuli. In this work, macrophages were stimulated under a variety of experimental conditions, and phenotypic alterations were correlated with changes in gene expression. We identified 3 transcriptionally related populations of macrophages with immunoregulatory activity. They were generated by stimulating cells with TLR ligands in the presence of 3 different "reprogramming" signals: high-density ICs, PGE2, or Ado. All 3 of these cell populations produced high levels of transcripts for IL-10 and growth and angiogenic factors. They also secreted reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12. All 3 macrophage phenotypes could partially rescue mice from lethal endotoxemia, and therefore, we consider each to have anti-inflammatory activity. This ability to regulate innate-immune responses occurred equally well in macrophages from STAT6-deficient mice. The lack of STAT6 did not affect the ability of macrophages to change cytokine production reciprocally or to rescue mice from lethal endotoxemia. Furthermore, treatment of macrophages with IL-4 failed to induce similar phenotypic or transcriptional alterations. This work demonstrates that there are multiple ways to generate macrophages with immunoregulatory activity. These anti-inflammatory macrophages are transcriptionally and functionally related to each other and are quite distinct from macrophages treated with IL-4. PMID:26048978

  9. Macrophage-oriented cytotoxic activity of novel triterpene saponins extracted from roots of Securidaca inappendiculata.

    PubMed

    Yui, S; Ubukata, K; Hodono, K; Kitahara, M; Mimaki, Y; Kuroda, M; Sashida, Y; Yamazaki, M

    2001-10-01

    It is recognized that macrophages in peripheral tissues often proliferate under pathological conditions such as tumors, inflammation and atherosclerosis. Because the growth state of macrophages is believed to be a factor regulating the pathological process of the diseases, substances that regulate macrophage growth or survival may be useful for disease control. In this paper, we identified the activity inhibiting macrophage growth in a hot water extract of roots of Securidaca inappendiculata. The extract markedly inhibited macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF/CSF-1)-induced growth of macrophages, whereas it exerted a less potent effect on growth of Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated thymocytes or M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow cells. The inhibition of macrophage growth was caused by a cytotoxic effect rather than a cytostatic effect. Cell death was due to the induction of apoptosis, as judged by staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated d-UTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). The cytotoxic activity seemed to be specific to peripheral macrophages; it showed a weak effect on the growth and survival of tumor cell lines including a macrophage-like cell line, J-774.1. Moreover, the saponin fraction induced apoptotic cell death of macrophages only when they were stimulated by M-CSF; it did not affect the viability of macrophages cultured without M-CSF or with granulocyte/macrophage-CSF. We determined the structures of the two active triterpene saponin compounds in the fraction, named securioside A and securioside B having a 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic group which is essential for the cell death-inducing activity. They are believed to be the primary compounds of new drugs for the treatment of pathological states in which macrophage proliferation occurs. PMID:11606030

  10. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  11. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    PubMed Central

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-01-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus. PMID:6286497

  12. IL-1β production through the NLRP3 inflammasome by hepatic macrophages links hepatitis C virus infection with liver inflammation and disease.

    PubMed

    Negash, Amina A; Ramos, Hilario J; Crochet, Nanette; Lau, Daryl T Y; Doehle, Brian; Papic, Neven; Delker, Don A; Jo, Juandy; Bertoletti, Antonio; Hagedorn, Curt H; Gale, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver disease. Liver inflammation underlies infection-induced fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer but the processes that promote hepatic inflammation by HCV are not defined. We provide a systems biology analysis with multiple lines of evidence to indicate that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by intrahepatic macrophages confers liver inflammation through HCV-induced inflammasome signaling. Chronic hepatitis C patients exhibited elevated levels of serum IL-1β compared to healthy controls. Immunohistochemical analysis of healthy control and chronic hepatitis C liver sections revealed that Kupffer cells, resident hepatic macrophages, are the primary cellular source of hepatic IL-1β during HCV infection. Accordingly, we found that both blood monocyte-derived primary human macrophages, and Kupffer cells recovered from normal donor liver, produce IL-1β after HCV exposure. Using the THP-1 macrophage cell-culture model, we found that HCV drives a rapid but transient caspase-1 activation to stimulate IL-1β secretion. HCV can enter macrophages through non-CD81 mediated phagocytic uptake that is independent of productive infection. Viral RNA triggers MyD88-mediated TLR7 signaling to induce IL-1β mRNA expression. HCV uptake concomitantly induces a potassium efflux that activates the NLRP3 inflammasome for IL-1β processing and secretion. RNA sequencing analysis comparing THP1 cells and chronic hepatitis C patient liver demonstrates that viral engagement of the NLRP3 inflammasome stimulates IL-1β production to drive proinflammatory cytokine, chemokine, and immune-regulatory gene expression networks linked with HCV disease severity. These studies identify intrahepatic IL-1β production as a central feature of liver inflammation during HCV infection. Thus, strategies to suppress NLRP3 or IL-1β activity could offer therapeutic actions to reduce hepatic inflammation and mitigate disease.

  13. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide activates iron regulatory factor in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Drapier, J C; Hirling, H; Wietzerbin, J; Kaldy, P; Kühn, L C

    1993-09-01

    Biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine modulates activity of iron-dependent enzymes, including mitochondrial acontiase, an [Fe-S] protein. We examined the effect of NO on the activity of iron regulatory factor (IRF), a cytoplasmic protein which modulates both ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability by binding to specific mRNA sequences called iron responsive elements (IREs). Murine macrophages were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide to induce NO synthase activity and cultured in the presence or absence of NG-substituted analogues of L-arginine which served as selective inhibitors of NO synthesis. Measurement of the nitrite concentration in the culture medium was taken as an index of NO production. Mitochondria-free cytosols were then prepared and aconitase activity as well as IRE binding activity and induction of IRE binding activity were correlated and depended on NO synthesis after IFN-gamma and/or LPS stimulation. Authentic NO gas as well as the NO-generating compound 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) also conversely modulated aconitase and IRE binding activities of purified recombinant IRF. These results provide evidence that endogenously produced NO may modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in iron homeostasis and support the hypothesis that the [Fe-S] cluster of IRF mediates iron-dependent regulation. PMID:7504626

  14. Complement factor H interferes with Mycobacterium bovis BCG entry into macrophages and modulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Carroll, Maria V; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an accomplished intracellular pathogen, particularly within the macrophage and this is of the utmost importance in the host-pathogen stand-off observed in the granuloma during latent tuberculosis. Contact with innate immune molecules is one of the primary interactions that can occur with the pathogen M. tuberculosis once inhaled. Complement proteins may play a role in facilitating M. tuberculosis interactions with macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that factor H, a complement regulatory protein that down-regulates complement alternative pathway activation, binds directly to the model organism M. bovis BCG. Binding of factor H reaches saturation at 5-10μg of factor H/ml, well below the plasma level. C4 binding protein (C4BP) competed with factor H for binding to mycobacteria. Factor H was also found to inhibit uptake of M. bovis BCG by THP-1 macrophage cells in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time qPCR analysis showed stark differential responses of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the early stages of phagocytosis, as evident from elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10, TGF-β and IL-12 levels, when THP-1:BCG interaction took place in the presence of factor H. Our results suggest that factor H can interfere with mycobacterial entry into macrophages and modulate inflammatory cytokine responses, particularly during the initial stages of infection, thus affecting the extracellular survival of the pathogen. Our results offer novel insights into complement activation-independent functions of factor H during the host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis.

  15. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  16. A transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression controls macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Anup; Bose, Mainak; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2013-11-01

    In mammalian macrophages, the expression of a number of cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Upon macrophage activation, proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs are translated, although the expression of miRNAs targeting these mRNAs remains largely unaltered. We show that there is a transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression during the early phase of the inflammatory response in macrophages, which leads to the protection of cytokine mRNAs from miRNA-mediated repression. This derepression occurs through Ago2 phosphorylation, which results in its impaired binding to miRNAs and to the corresponding target mRNAs. Macrophages expressing a mutant, non-phosphorylatable AGO2--which remains bound to miRNAs during macrophage activation--have a weakened inflammatory response and fail to prevent parasite invasion. These findings highlight the relevance of the transient relief of miRNA repression for macrophage function.

  17. Bactericidal Activity of Human Macrophages: Analysis of Factors Influencing the Killing of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Martin J.

    1970-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of listericidal activity of human macrophages grown from blood monocytes. Phagocytosis of Listeria monocytogenes was inhibited by a glycolytic poison (NaF) but was unaffected by anaerobic conditions, cyanide, or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). Killing by macrophages was slower than that by neutrophils, and Listeria phagocytized by macrophages began to synthesize deoxyribonucleic acid within 3 hr of the time of ingestion. Differentiated macrophages ingested and killed more organisms per cell than newly isolated monocytes. Maximal killing of Listeria required oxygen but was unaffected by cyanide or DNP. Macrophages isolated from patients with chronic intracellular infection (leprosy, tuberculosis, fungal diseases) and from patients with active Hodgkin's disease were more bactericidal than macrophages from normal subjects. Images PMID:16557814

  18. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  19. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, Francois; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  1. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang; Liu, Hao; Wang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui; Xu, Meiying

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  2. Critical illness induces alternative activation of M2 macrophages in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We recently reported macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue of critically ill patients. Classically activated macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue is a known feature of obesity, where it is linked with increasing insulin resistance. However, the characteristics of adipose tissue macrophage accumulation in critical illness remain unknown. Methods We studied macrophage markers with immunostaining and gene expression in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue from healthy control subjects (n = 20) and non-surviving prolonged critically ill patients (n = 61). For comparison, also subcutaneous in vivo adipose tissue biopsies were studied from 15 prolonged critically ill patients. Results Subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue biopsies from non-surviving prolonged critically ill patients displayed a large increase in macrophage staining. This staining corresponded with elevated gene expression of "alternatively activated" M2 macrophage markers arginase-1, IL-10 and CD163 and low levels of the "classically activated" M1 macrophage markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS). Immunostaining for CD163 confirmed positive M2 macrophage staining in both visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from critically ill patients. Surprisingly, circulating levels and tissue gene expression of the alternative M2 activators IL-4 and IL-13 were low and not different from controls. In contrast, adipose tissue protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor required for M2 differentiation and acting downstream of IL-4, was markedly elevated in illness. In subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies from surviving critically ill patients, we could confirm positive macrophage staining with CD68 and CD163. We also could confirm elevated arginase-1 gene expression and elevated PPARγ protein levels. Conclusions Unlike obesity, critical illness evokes adipose tissue

  3. Targeting androgen receptor to suppress macrophage-induced EMT and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tianjing; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Wang, Xiaohai; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Li, Lei; Jiang, Qi; Jin, Jie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-10-01

    Early studies suggested macrophages might play roles in inflammation-associated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we first showed that CD68(+) macrophages were identified in both epithelium and the stromal area of human BPH tissues. We then established an in vitro co-culture model with prostate epithelial and macrophage cell lines to study the potential impacts of infiltrating macrophages in the BPH development and found that co-culturing prostate epithelial cells with macrophages promoted migration of macrophages. In a three-dimensional culture system, the sphere diameter of BPH-1 prostate cells was significantly increased during coculture with THP-1 macrophage cells. Mechanism dissection suggested that expression levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as N-cadherin, Snail, and TGF-β2, were increased, and administration of anti-TGF-β2 neutralizing antibody during co-culture suppressed the EMT and THP-1-mediated growth of BPH-1 cells, suggesting THP-1 might go through EMT to influence the BPH development and progression. Importantly, we found that modulation of androgen receptor (AR) in BPH-1 and mPrE cells significantly increased THP-1 and RAW264.7 cell migration, respectively, and enhanced expression levels of EMT markers, suggesting that AR in prostate epithelial cells might play a role in promoting macrophage-mediated EMT in prostate epithelial cells. Silencing AR function via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, decreased the macrophage migration to BPH-1 cells and suppressed EMT marker expression. Together, these results provide the first evidence to demonstrate that prostate epithelial AR function is important for macrophage-mediated EMT and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells, which represents a previously unrecognized role of AR in the cross-talk between macrophages and prostate epithelial cells. These results may provide new insights for a new therapeutic

  4. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP. PMID:26529190

  5. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP.

  6. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D Modulates Antibacterial and Inflammatory Response in Human Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Heulens, Nele; Korf, Hannelie; Mathyssen, Carolien; Everaerts, Stephanie; De Smidt, Elien; Dooms, Christophe; Yserbyt, Jonas; Gysemans, Conny; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Mathieu, Chantal; Janssens, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with increased inflammation and defective antibacterial responses in the airways. Interestingly, vitamin D has been shown to suppress inflammation and to improve antibacterial defense. However, it is currently unknown whether vitamin D may modulate inflammation and antibacterial defects in human cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed airways. To explore these unresolved issues, alveolar macrophages obtained from non-smoking and smoking subjects as well as human cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated THP-1 macrophages were stimulated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) to address inflammatory and antibacterial responses. Although basal levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines did not differ between non-smoking and smoking subjects, 1,25(OH)2D did reduce levels of IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1 in alveolar macrophages in response to LPS/IFN-γ, although not statistically significant for TNF-α and IL-6 in smokers. CSE did not significantly alter vitamin D metabolism (expression levels of CYP24A1 or CYP27B1) in THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, stimulation with 1,25(OH)2D reduced mRNA expression levels and/or protein levels of IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 in CSE-treated THP-1 macrophages. 1,25(OH)2D did not improve defects in phagocytosis of E. coli bacteria or the oxidative burst response in CSE-treated THP-1 macrophages or alveolar macrophages from smokers. However, 1,25(OH)2D significantly enhanced mRNA expression and/or protein levels of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin in alveolar macrophages and THP-1 macrophages, independently of CS exposure. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence that vitamin D could be a new strategy for attenuating airway inflammation and improving antibacterial defense in CS-exposed airways. PMID:27513734

  7. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D Modulates Antibacterial and Inflammatory Response in Human Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Heulens, Nele; Korf, Hannelie; Mathyssen, Carolien; Everaerts, Stephanie; De Smidt, Elien; Dooms, Christophe; Yserbyt, Jonas; Gysemans, Conny; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Mathieu, Chantal; Janssens, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with increased inflammation and defective antibacterial responses in the airways. Interestingly, vitamin D has been shown to suppress inflammation and to improve antibacterial defense. However, it is currently unknown whether vitamin D may modulate inflammation and antibacterial defects in human cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed airways. To explore these unresolved issues, alveolar macrophages obtained from non-smoking and smoking subjects as well as human cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated THP-1 macrophages were stimulated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) to address inflammatory and antibacterial responses. Although basal levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines did not differ between non-smoking and smoking subjects, 1,25(OH)2D did reduce levels of IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1 in alveolar macrophages in response to LPS/IFN-γ, although not statistically significant for TNF-α and IL-6 in smokers. CSE did not significantly alter vitamin D metabolism (expression levels of CYP24A1 or CYP27B1) in THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, stimulation with 1,25(OH)2D reduced mRNA expression levels and/or protein levels of IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 in CSE-treated THP-1 macrophages. 1,25(OH)2D did not improve defects in phagocytosis of E. coli bacteria or the oxidative burst response in CSE-treated THP-1 macrophages or alveolar macrophages from smokers. However, 1,25(OH)2D significantly enhanced mRNA expression and/or protein levels of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin in alveolar macrophages and THP-1 macrophages, independently of CS exposure. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence that vitamin D could be a new strategy for attenuating airway inflammation and improving antibacterial defense in CS-exposed airways. PMID:27513734

  8. SIRT1 Suppresses Activator Protein-1 Transcriptional Activity and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, Jin-Jing; Jia, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Yang, Rui-Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Yu-Sheng; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    SIRT1 (Sirtuin type 1), a mammalian orthologue of yeast SIR2 (silent information regulator 2), has been shown to mediate a variety of calorie restriction (CR)-induced physiological events, such as cell fate regulation via deacetylation of the substrate proteins. However, whether SIRT1 deacetylates activator protein-1 (AP-1) to influence its transcriptional activity and target gene expression is still unknown. Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 directly interacts with the basic leucine zipper domains of c-Fos and c-Jun, the major components of AP-1, by which SIRT1 suppressed the transcriptional activity of AP-1. This process requires the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Notably, SIRT1 reduced the expression of COX-2, a typical AP-1 target gene, and decreased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production of peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs). pMΦs with SIRT1 overexpression displayed improved phagocytosis and tumoricidal functions, which are associated with depressed PGE2. Furthermore, SIRT1 protein level was up-regulated in CR mouse pMΦs, whereas elevated SIRT1 decreased COX-2 expression and improved PGE2-related macrophage functions that were reversed following inhibition of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Thus, our results indicate that SIRT1 may be a mediator of CR-induced macrophage regulation, and its deacetylase activity contributes to the inhibition of AP-1 transcriptional activity and COX-2 expression leading to amelioration of macrophage function. PMID:20042607

  9. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell apoptosis induced by supernatant from Aβ1-40-stimulated THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chu, Yanqi; Zhang, Lan; Yin, Linlin; Li, Lin

    2012-08-01

    Excessive accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) has been proposed as a pivotal event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Possible mechanisms underlying Aβ-induced neurotoxicity include inflammation and apoptosis. Here, the protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 (GRg1) on neuronal damage was examined in an in vitro inflammatory neurodegeneration model. Supernatant from Aβ(1-40)-stimulated THP-1 monocytes was added to SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell culture medium. Incubation of SK-N-SH cells with cell-free supernatant from Aβ(1-40) (125nM)-treated THP-1 monocytes for 24 h significantly increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, cell apoptosis, Bax and caspase-3 expression in SK-N-SH cells. However, pretreating THP-1 monocytes with GRg1 (50, 100 or 150 μM) for 30 min markedly reduced IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α levels in Aβ(1-40)-stimulated supernatant. LDH release, cell apoptosis, Bax and caspase-3 expression in SK-N-SH cells were significantly decreased when cultured with cell-free supernatant from Aβ(1-40)-stimulated THP-1 monocytes that were pretreated with GRg1. The results suggest that Aβ(1-40)-induced neuronal injury and apoptosis may be mediated by inflammatory monocyte reactions, and GRg1 exerts a protective effect against Aβ(1-40)-induced neuronal injury and apoptosis, likely through its anti-inflammatory mechanism.

  10. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  11. Macrophage Infiltration and Alternative Activation during Wound Healing Promote MEK1-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christine; Telerman, Stephanie B; Reimer, Andreas S; Sequeira, Ines; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Arwert, Esther N; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-02-15

    Macrophages are essential for the progression and maintenance of many cancers, but their role during the earliest stages of tumor formation is unclear. To test this, we used a previously described transgenic mouse model of wound-induced skin tumorigenesis, in which expression of constitutively active MEK1 in differentiating epidermal cells results in chronic inflammation (InvEE mice). Upon wounding, the number of epidermal and dermal monocytes and macrophages increased in wild-type and InvEE skin, but the increase was greater, more rapid, and more sustained in InvEE skin. Macrophage ablation reduced tumor incidence. Furthermore, bioluminescent imaging in live mice to monitor macrophage flux at wound sites revealed that macrophage accumulation was predictive of tumor formation; wounds with the greatest number of macrophages at day 5 went on to develop tumors. Gene expression profiling of flow-sorted monocytes, macrophages, and T cells from InvEE and wild-type skin showed that as wound healing progressed, InvEE macrophages altered their phenotype. Throughout wound healing and after wound closure, InvEE macrophages demonstrated sustained upregulation of several markers implicated in alternative macrophage activation including arginase-1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor (CD206). Notably, inhibition of ARG1 activity significantly reduced tumor formation and epidermal proliferation in vivo, whereas addition of L-arginase to cultured keratinocytes stimulated proliferation. We conclude that macrophages play a key role in early, inflammation-mediated skin tumorigenesis, with mechanistic evidence suggesting that ARG1 secretion drives tumor development by stimulating epidermal cell proliferation. These findings highlight the importance of cancer immunotherapies aiming to polarize tumor-associated macrophages toward an antitumor phenotype. PMID:26754935

  12. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  13. A Novel Carboline Derivative Inhibits Nitric Oxide Formation in Macrophages Independent of Effects on Tumor Necrosis Factor α and Interleukin-1β Expression

    PubMed Central

    Poola, Bhaskar; Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Nantz, Michael H.; Lein, Pamela J.; Gorin, Fredric

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a maladaptive immune response to peripheral nerve injury that causes a chronic painful condition refractory to most analgesics. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), has been implicated as a key factor in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. β-Carbolines are a large group of natural and synthetic indole alkaloids, some of which block activation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), a predominant transcriptional regulator of NOS expression. Here, we characterize the inhibitory effects of a novel 6-chloro-8-(glycinyl)-amino-β-carboline (8-Gly carb) on NO formation and NF-κB activation in macrophages. 8-Gly carb was significantly more potent than the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester in inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation in primary rat macrophages. 8-Gly carb interfered with NF-κB–mediated gene expression in differentiated THP1-XBlue cells, a human NF-κB reporter macrophage cell line, but only at concentrations severalfold higher than needed to significantly inhibit NO production. 8-Gly carb also had no effect on tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)–induced phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in differentiated THP1 cells, and did not inhibit lipopolysaccharide- or TNFα-stimulated expression of TNFα and interleukin-1β. These data demonstrate that relative to other carbolines and pharmacologic inhibitors of NOS, 8-Gly carb exhibits a unique pharmacological profile by inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation independent of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression. Thus, this novel carboline derivative holds promise as a parent compound, leading to therapeutic agents that prevent the development of neuropathic pain mediated by macrophage-derived NO without interfering with cytokine expression required for neural recovery following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25538105

  14. Macrophage activation of allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation in the guinea pig mixed leukocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Greineder, D K; Rosenthal, A S

    1975-05-01

    The role of the macrophage in the guinea pig mixed leukocyte culture was investigated. Macrophages obtained from oil-induced peritoneal exudates, peritoneal wash-out cells, spleen, and alveolar washings were found to be effective stimulators of allogeneic lymph node and splenic lymphocyte DNA synthesis. The stimulatory properties of macrophages proved radioresistant but viability dependent. Unfractionated lymph node cells or adherence column purified lymph node lymphocytes and thymocytes were only minimally active as stimulators, even in the presence of macrophages syngeneic to the responder lymphocytes. Allogeneic fibroblasts, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, L2C leukemia cells, and xenogeneic (murine) macrophages failed to simulate. These data provide evidence that the macrophage is the predominant stimulator of the mixed leukocyte culture in the guinea pig.

  15. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  16. Cell Motility Is Decreased in Macrophages Activated by Cancer Cell-Conditioned Medium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ahreum; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Lee, Jae-Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immune responses to various foreign antigens. Many products from primary tumors influence the activation and transmigration of macrophages. Here, we investigated a migration of macrophages stimulated with cancer cell culture-conditioned medium (CM). Macrophage activation by treatment with CM of B16F10 cells were judged by the increase in protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). The location where macrophages were at 4 h-incubation with control medium or CM was different from where they were at 5 h-incubation in culture dish. Percentage of superimposed macrophages at every 1 h interval was gradually increased by CM treatment as compared to control. Total coverage of migrated track expressed in coordinates was smaller and total distance of migration was shorter in CM-treated macrophages than that in control. Rac1 activity in CM-treated macrophages was also decreased as compared to that in control. When macrophages were treated with CM in the presence of dexamethasone (Dex), an increase in COX2 protein levels, and a decrease in Rac1 activity and total coverage of migration were reversed. In the meanwhile, biphasic changes were detected by Dex treatment in section distance of migration at each time interval, which was more decreased at early time and then increased at later time. Taken together, data demonstrate that macrophage motility could be reduced in accordance with activation in response to cancer cell products. It suggests that macrophage motility could be a novel marker to monitor cancer-associated inflammatory diseases and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24404340

  17. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in β-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPARγ ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis.

  18. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinases with microtubules in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Taxol, a microtubule-binding diterpene, mimics many effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on mouse macrophages. The LPS-mimetic effects of taxol appear to be under the same genetic control as responses to LPS itself. Thus we have postulated a role for microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) in the response of macrophages to LPS. Stimulation of macrophages by LPS quickly induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). MAPK are generally considered cytosolic enzymes. Herein we report that much of the LPS-activatable pool of MAPK in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages is microtubule associated. By immunofluorescence, MAPK were localized to colchicine- and nocodazole- disruptible filaments. From both mouse brain and RAW 264.7 macrophages, MAPK could be coisolated with polymerized tubulin. Fractionation of primary macrophages into cytosol-, microfilament-, microtubule-, and intermediated filament-rich extracts revealed that approximately 10% of MAPK but none of MAPK kinase (MEK1A and MEK2) was microtubule bound. Exposure of macrophages to LPS did not change the proportion of MAPK bound to microtubules, but preferentially activated the microtubule- associated pool. These findings confirm the prediction that LPS activates a kinase bound to microtubules. Together with LPS-mimetic actions of taxol and the shared genetic control of responses to LPS and taxol, these results support the hypothesis that a major LPS-signaling pathway in mouse macrophages may involve activation of one or more microtubule-associated kinases. PMID:8666946

  19. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  20. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  1. Activation of macrophages for destruction of Francisella tularensis: identification of cytokines, effector cells, and effector molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, A H; Polsinelli, T; Green, S J; Nacy, C A

    1992-01-01

    Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) was grown in culture with nonadherent resident, starch-elicited, or Proteose Peptone-elicited peritoneal cells. Numbers of bacteria increased 4 logs over the input inoculum in 48 to 72 h. Growth rates were faster in inflammatory cells than in resident cells: generation times for the bacterium were 3 h in inflammatory cells and 6 h in resident macrophages. LVS-infected macrophage cultures treated with lymphokines did not support growth of the bacterium, although lymphokines alone had no inhibitory effects on replication of LVS in culture medium devoid of cells. Removal of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) by immunoaffinity precipitation rendered lymphokines ineffective for induction of macrophage anti-LVS activity, and recombinant IFN-gamma stimulated both resident and inflammatory macrophage populations to inhibit LVS growth in vitro. Inflammatory macrophages were more sensitive to effects of IFN-gamma: half-maximal activity was achieved at 5 U/ml for inflammatory macrophages and 20 U/ml for resident macrophages. IFN-gamma-induced anti-LVS activity correlated with the production of nitrite (NO2-), an oxidative end product of L-arginine-derived nitric oxide (NO). Anti-LVS activity and nitrite production were both completely inhibited by the addition of either the L-arginine analog NG-monomethyl-L-arginine or anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies to activated macrophage cultures. Thus, macrophages can be activated by IFN-gamma to suppress the growth of F. tularensis by generation of toxic levels of NO, and inflammatory macrophages are substantially more sensitive to activation activities of IFN-gamma for this effector reaction than are more differentiated resident cells. PMID:1541555

  2. Anoctamin 6 mediates effects essential for innate immunity downstream of P2X7 receptors in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Kmit, Arthur; Romao, Ana M.; Jantarajit, Walailak; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-02-01

    Purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) are fundamental to innate immune response. In macrophages, transient stimulation of P2X7R activates several transport mechanisms and induces the scrambling of phospholipids with subsequent membrane blebbing and apoptosis. These processes support phagocytosis and subsequent killing of phagocytosed bacteria. Here we demonstrate that the stimulation of P2X7 receptors activates anoctamin 6 (ANO6, TMEM16F), a protein that functions as Ca2+ dependent phospholipid scramblase and Ca2+-activated Cl- channel. Inhibition or knockdown of ANO6 attenuates ATP-induced cell shrinkage, cell migration and phospholipid scrambling. In mouse macrophages, Ano6 produces large ion currents by stimulation of P2X7 receptors and contributes to ATP-induced membrane blebbing and apoptosis, which is largely reduced in macrophages from Ano6-/- mice. ANO6 supports bacterial phagocytosis and killing by mouse and human THP-1 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that anoctamin 6 is an essential component of the immune defense by macrophages.

  3. Stimulation of Macrophages with the β-Glucan Produced by Aureobasidium pullulans Promotes the Secretion of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Koji; Iwai, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Daisuke; Aoki, Shiho; Uchiyama, Hirofumi; Okabe, Mitsuyasu; Hayakawa, Sumio; Takaoka, Akinori; Miyazaki, Tadaaki

    2015-01-01

    A β-glucan produced by Aureobasidium pullulans (AP-PG) is consisting of a β-(1,3)-linked main chain with β-(1,6)-linked glucose side residues. Various β-glucans consisting of β-(1,3)-linked main chain including AP-PG are believed to exhibit anti-tumor activities, and actually, anti-tumor activities of AP-PG in mice have been demonstrated. In this study, we demonstrate that stimulation with AP-PG induces TRAIL expression in mouse and human macrophage-like cell lines. TRAIL is known to be a cytokine which specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells, but not in untransformed cells. The expression of TRAIL mRNA after stimulation with AP-PG was increased in RAW264.7 cells, Mono Mac 6 cells, and macrophage-differentiated THP-1 cells. The mRNA expression of TNF-α and FasL is only weakly increased after stimulation with AP-PG. The induction activity of TRAIL by curdlan, a bacterial β-glucan, was very similar to that by AP-PG in RAW264.7 cells, but weaker in macrophage-differentiated THP-1 cells. Activation of caspases was found in HeLa cells after treatment with the supernatant of cultured medium from AP-PG-stimulated Mono Mac 6 cells, and was inhibited by the anti-TRAIL neutralizing antibody. These findings suggest that the stimulation with AP-PG effectively induces TRAIL in macrophages, and that it may be related to apoptosis induction of tumor cells. PMID:25875639

  4. Human macrophage activation. Modulation of mannosyl, fucosyl receptor activity in vitro by lymphokines, gamma and alpha interferons, and dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Mokoena, T; Gordon, S

    1985-01-01

    We describe a sensitive assay to measure immune activation of human macrophages in cell culture. Freshly isolated blood monocytes from normal subjects lack the ability to endocytose and degrade mannosyl-terminated glycoconjugates via specific receptors, but acquired this activity after cultivation in autologous serum for approximately 3 d. Addition of specific antigen, purified protein derivative, or T cell mitogens to mononuclear cells prevented the appearance of macrophage mannosyl receptor activity and lymphokine, gamma-, and alpha-interferons selectively down-regulated receptor activity in monocyte-macrophage targets. The effects of antigen challenge and gamma-interferon on mannosyl receptors can be prevented by 10(-8) M dexamethasone. Dexamethasone also inhibited release of another macrophage activation marker, plasminogen activator, which was increased by both gamma- and alpha-interferons. These studies show that activation of human macrophages is regulated by opposing actions of lymphokines and glucocorticoids. PMID:2579101

  5. IL-33 Priming Enhances Peritoneal Macrophage Activity in Response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vuvi G; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2014-08-01

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family and plays a role in the host defense against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In this study, we investigated the function of IL-33 and its receptor in in vitro macrophage responses to Candida albicans. Our results demonstrate that pre-sensitization of isolated peritoneal macrophages with IL-33 enhanced their pro-inflammatory cytokine production and phagocytic activity in response to C. albicans. These macrophage activities were entirely dependent on the ST2-MyD88 signaling pathway. In addition, pre-sensitization with IL-33 also increased ROS production and the subsequent killing ability of macrophages following C. albicans challenge. These results indicate that IL-33 may increase anti-fungal activity against Candida through macrophage-mediated resistance mechanisms. PMID:25177252

  6. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple