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Sample records for activated transcription factor

  1. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Luisa; Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Colarossi, Cristina; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2), encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology. PMID:26770207

  2. Selective Activation of Transcription by a Novel CCAAT Binding Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sankar N.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Karsenty, Gerard; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    1988-07-01

    A novel CCAAT binding factor (CBF) composed of two different subunits has been extensively purified from rat liver. Both subunits are needed for specific binding to DNA. Addition of this purified protein to nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stimulates transcription from several promoters including the α 2(I) collagen, the α 1(I) collagen, the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), and the adenovirus major late promoter. Point mutations in the CCAAT motif that show either no binding or a decreased binding of CBF likewise abolish or reduce activation of transcription by CBF. Activation of transcription requires, therefore, the specific binding of CBF to its recognition sites.

  3. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  4. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  5. Activating Transcription Factor 3 and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, David; Raivich, Gennadij; Anderson, Patrick Norval

    2012-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) belongs to the ATF/cyclic AMP responsive element binding family of transcription factors and is often described as an adaptive response gene whose activity is usually regulated by stressful stimuli. Although expressed in a number of splice variants and generally recognized as a transcriptional repressor, ATF3 has the ability to interact with a number of other transcription factors including c-Jun to form complexes which not only repress, but can also activate various genes. ATF3 expression is modulated mainly at the transcriptional level and has markedly different effects in different types of cell. The levels of ATF3 mRNA and protein are normally very low in neurons and glia but their expression is rapidly upregulated in response to injury. ATF3 expression in neurons is closely linked to their survival and the regeneration of their axons following axotomy, and that in peripheral nerves correlates with the generation of a Schwann cell phenotype that is conducive to axonal regeneration. ATF3 is also induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands but acts as a negative regulator of TLR signaling, suppressing the innate immune response which is involved in immuno-surveillance and can enhance or reduce the survival of injured neurons and promote the regeneration of their axons. PMID:22347845

  6. Thyroid-specific transcription factors control Hex promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Puppin, Cinzia; D'Elia, Angela V.; Pellizzari, Lucia; Russo, Diego; Arturi, Franco; Presta, Ivan; Filetti, Sebastiano; Bogue, Clifford W.; Denson, Lee A.; Damante, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The homeobox-containing gene Hex is expressed in several cell types, including thyroid follicular cells, in which it regulates the transcription of tissue- specific genes. In this study the regulation of Hex promoter activity was investigated. Using co- transfection experiments, we demonstrated that the transcriptional activity of the Hex gene promoter in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells is ∼10-fold greater than that observed in HeLa and NIH 3T3 cell lines (which do not normally express the Hex gene). To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences, we evaluated the effect of the thyroid- specific transcription factor TTF-1 on the Hex promoter activity. TTF-1 produced 3–4-fold increases in the Hex promoter activity. Gel- retardation assays and mutagenesis experiments revealed the presence of functionally relevant TTF-1 binding sites in the Hex promoter region. These in vitro data may also have functional relevance in vivo, since a positive correlation between TTF-1 and Hex mRNAs was demonstrated in human thyroid tissues by means of RT–PCR analysis. The TTF-1 effect, however, is not sufficient to explain the difference in Hex promoter activity between FRTL-5 and cells that do not express the Hex gene. For this reason, we tested whether Hex protein is able to activate the Hex promoter. Indeed, co-transfection experiments indicate that Hex protein is able to increase the activity of its own promoter in HeLa cells ∼4-fold. TTF-1 and Hex effects are additive: when transfected together in HeLa cells, the Hex promoter activity is increased 6–7-fold. Thus, the contemporary presence of both TTF-1 and Hex could be sufficient to explain the higher transcriptional activity of the Hex promoter in thyroid cells with respect to cell lines that do not express the Hex gene. These findings demonstrate the existence of direct cross-regulation between thyroid-specific transcription factors. PMID:12655000

  7. Transcription factors of Lotus: regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis requires coordinated changes in transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dale; Stranne, Maria; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Pakseresht, Nima; Welham, Tracey; Hiraka, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Sato, Shusei; Paquette, Suzanne; Wang, Trevor L; Martin, Cathie; Bailey, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Isoflavonoids are a class of phenylpropanoids made by legumes, and consumption of dietary isoflavonoids confers benefits to human health. Our aim is to understand the regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Many studies have shown the importance of transcription factors in regulating the transcription of one or more genes encoding enzymes in phenylpropanoid metabolism. In this study, we coupled bioinformatics and coexpression analysis to identify candidate genes encoding transcription factors involved in regulating isoflavonoid biosynthesis in Lotus (Lotus japonicus). Genes encoding proteins belonging to 39 of the main transcription factor families were examined by microarray analysis of RNA from leaf tissue that had been elicited with glutathione. Phylogenetic analyses of each transcription factor family were used to identify subgroups of proteins that were specific to L. japonicus or closely related to known regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in other species. R2R3MYB subgroup 2 genes showed increased expression after treatment with glutathione. One member of this subgroup, LjMYB14, was constitutively overexpressed in L. japonicus and induced the expression of at least 12 genes that encoded enzymes in the general phenylpropanoid and isoflavonoid pathways. A distinct set of six R2R3MYB subgroup 2-like genes was identified. We suggest that these subgroup 2 sister group proteins and those belonging to the main subgroup 2 have roles in inducing isoflavonoid biosynthesis. The induction of isoflavonoid production in L. japonicus also involves the coordinated down-regulation of competing biosynthetic pathways by changing the expression of other transcription factors. PMID:22529285

  8. Arhgap36-dependent activation of Gli transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Paul G.; Ni, Jun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Nguyen, Vien; Crapster, J. Aaron; Hovestadt, Volker; Kool, Marcel; Jones, David T. W.; Mich, John K.; Firestone, Ari J.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Chen, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation and Gli-dependent transcription play critical roles in embryonic patterning, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. By conducting a genome-scale cDNA overexpression screen, we have identified the Rho GAP family member Arhgap36 as a positive regulator of the Hh pathway in vitro and in vivo. Arhgap36 acts in a Smoothened (Smo)-independent manner to inhibit Gli repressor formation and to promote the activation of full-length Gli proteins. Arhgap36 concurrently induces the accumulation of Gli proteins in the primary cilium, and its ability to induce Gli-dependent transcription requires kinesin family member 3a and intraflagellar transport protein 88, proteins that are essential for ciliogenesis. Arhgap36 also functionally and biochemically interacts with Suppressor of Fused. Transcriptional profiling further reveals that Arhgap36 is overexpressed in murine medulloblastomas that acquire resistance to chemical Smo inhibitors and that ARHGAP36 isoforms capable of Gli activation are up-regulated in a subset of human medulloblastomas. Our findings reveal a new mechanism of Gli transcription factor activation and implicate ARHGAP36 dysregulation in the onset and/or progression of GLI-dependent cancers. PMID:25024229

  9. Activation of Archaeal Transcription Mediated by Recruitment of Transcription Factor B*

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Simon M.; Thumann, Sybille; Richau, Renate; Weirauch, Matt T.; Lowe, Todd M.; Thomm, Michael; Hausner, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Archaeal promoters consist of a TATA box and a purine-rich adjacent upstream sequence (transcription factor B (TFB)-responsive element (BRE)), which are bound by the transcription factors TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and TFB. Currently, only a few activators of archaeal transcription have been experimentally characterized. The best studied activator, Ptr2, mediates activation by recruitment of TBP. Here, we present a detailed biochemical analysis of an archaeal transcriptional activator, PF1088, which was identified in Pyrococcus furiosus by a bioinformatic approach. Operon predictions suggested that an upstream gene, pf1089, is polycistronically transcribed with pf1088. We demonstrate that PF1088 stimulates in vitro transcription by up to 7-fold when the pf1089 promoter is used as a template. By DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments, we show that the binding site of PF1088 is located directly upstream of the BRE of pf1089. Mutational analysis indicated that activation requires the presence of the binding site for PF1088. Furthermore, we show that activation of transcription by PF1088 is dependent upon the presence of an imperfect BRE and is abolished when the pf1089 BRE is replaced with a BRE from a strong archaeal promoter. Gel shift experiments showed that TFB recruitment to the pf1089 operon is stimulated by PF1088, and TFB seems to stabilize PF1088 operator binding even in the absence of TBP. Taken together, these results represent the first biochemical evidence for a transcriptional activator working as a TFB recruitment factor in Archaea, for which the designation TFB-RF1 is suggested. PMID:22496454

  10. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  11. An efficient algorithm to identify coordinately activated transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haiyan

    2010-03-01

    Identification of transcription factor (TF) activities associated with a certain physiological/experimental condition is one of the preliminary steps to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks and to identify signal transduction pathways. TF activities are often indicated by the activities of its target genes. Existing studies on identifying TF activities through target genes usually assume the equivalence between co-regulation and co-expression. However, genes with correlated expression profiles may not be co-regulated. In the mean time, although multiple TFs can be activated coordinately, there is a lack of efficient methods to identify coordinately activated TFs. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm embedding a dynamic programming procedure to identify a subset of TFs that are potentially coordinately activated under a given condition by utilizing ranked lists of differentially expressed target genes. Applying our algorithm to microarray expression data sets for a number of diseases, our approach found subsets of TFs that are highly likely associated with the given disease processes. PMID:20060041

  12. Theory on the dynamic memory in the transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, R.

    2011-04-01

    We develop a theory to explain the origin of the static and dynamical memory effects in transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation. Our results suggest that the following inequality conditions should be satisfied to observe such memory effects: (a) τL≫max(τR,τE), (b) τLT≫τT, and (c) τI⩾(τEL+τTR) where τL is the average time required for the looping-mediated spatial interactions of enhancer—transcription-factor complex with the corresponding promoter—RNA-polymerase or eukaryotic RNA polymerase type II (PolII in eukaryotes) complex that is located L base pairs away from the cis-acting element, (τR,τE) are respectively the search times required for the site-specific binding of the RNA polymerase and the transcription factor with the respective promoter and the cis-regulatory module, τLT is the time associated with the relaxation of the looped-out segment of DNA that connects the cis-acting site and promoter, τT is the time required to generate a complete transcript, τI is the transcription initiation time, τEL is the elongation time, and τTR is the termination time. We have theoretically derived the expressions for the various searching, looping, and loop-relaxation time components. Using the experimentally determined values of various time components we further show that the dynamical memory effects cannot be experimentally observed whenever the segment of DNA that connects the cis-regulatory element with the promoter is not loaded with bulky histone bodies. Our analysis suggests that the presence of histone-mediated compaction of the connecting segment of DNA can result in higher values of looping and loop-relaxation times, which is the origin of the static memory in the transcription activation that is mediated by the memory gene loops in eukaryotes.

  13. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD.

  14. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  15. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, José R.; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M.; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C.; Arrabal, María D.; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  16. Transcriptional Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Transcription Factor Regulation and Function, Mechanisms of Initiation, and Roles of Activators and Coactivators

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Steven; Young, Elton T.

    2011-01-01

    Here we review recent advances in understanding the regulation of mRNA synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many fundamental gene regulatory mechanisms have been conserved in all eukaryotes, and budding yeast has been at the forefront in the discovery and dissection of these conserved mechanisms. Topics covered include upstream activation sequence and promoter structure, transcription factor classification, and examples of regulated transcription factor activity. We also examine advances in understanding the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery, conserved coactivator complexes, transcription activation domains, and the cooperation of these factors in gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22084422

  17. Bidirectional Transcription Arises from Two Distinct Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, Benjamin S; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C; Adelman, Karen

    2015-06-18

    Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding, and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression.

  18. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  19. WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy.

  20. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  1. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1.

  2. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1. PMID:26149570

  3. Prediction of Pathway Activation by Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobioticresponsive transcription factors (TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  4. Activation domains of transcription factors mediate replication dependent transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R D; Lee, B A; Jackson, S P; Proudfoot, N J

    1996-01-01

    Transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter containing the three Sp1 binding sites and TATA box can be activated without Tat by template DNA replication. Here we show that this activation can also be mediated by recombinant GAL4 fusion proteins containing the activation domains of Sp1, VP16 or CTF (or by full-length GAL4) targeted to the HIV-1 promoter by replacing the Sp1 sites with five GAL4 binding sites. Thus Sp1 is not unique in its ability to mediate replication activated transcription, although the degree of processivity elicited by the different activators varied significantly from strongly processive (GAL4-VP16) to relatively non-processive (GAL4-Sp1 or -CTF). Processive GAL4-VP16-activated transcription, but not efficient initiation, required multiple GAL4 binding sites. In the presence of Tat, transcription with GAL4-SP1 and GAL4-CTF was further activated (principally at the level of processivity) but GAL4-VP16-potentiated transcription was only slightly stimulated. The Tat-dependent switch from non-processive to fully processive transcription was particularly marked for GAL4-Sp1, an effect which may be relevant to the selection of Sp1 binding sites by the HIV-1 promoter. PMID:8604293

  5. Transcriptional activation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2.

    PubMed Central

    Gaubatz, S; Imhof, A; Dosch, R; Werner, O; Mitchell, P; Buettner, R; Eilers, M

    1995-01-01

    The Myc protein binds to and transactivates the expression of genes via E-box elements containing a central CAC(G/A)TG sequence. The transcriptional activation function of Myc is required for its ability to induce cell cycle progression, cellular transformation and apoptosis. Here we show that transactivation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2. AP-2 inhibits transactivation by Myc via two distinct mechanisms. First, high affinity binding sites for AP-2 overlap Myc-response elements in two bona fide target genes of Myc, prothymosin-alpha and ornithine decarboxylase. On these sites, AP-2 competes for binding of either Myc/Max heterodimers or Max/Max homodimers. The second mechanism involves a specific interaction between C-terminal domains of AP-2 and the BR/HLH/LZ domain of Myc, but not Max or Mad. Binding of AP-2 to Myc does not preclude association of Myc with Max, but impairs DNA binding of the Myc/Max complex and inhibits transactivation by Myc even in the absence of an overlapping AP-2 binding site. Taken together, our data suggest that AP-2 acts as a negative regulator of transactivation by Myc. Images PMID:7729426

  6. Variable Glutamine-Rich Repeats Modulate Transcription Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gemayel, Rita; Chavali, Sreenivas; Pougach, Ksenia; Legendre, Matthieu; Zhu, Bo; Boeynaems, Steven; van der Zande, Elisa; Gevaert, Kris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Babu, M. Madan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excessive expansions of glutamine (Q)-rich repeats in various human proteins are known to result in severe neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and several ataxias. However, the physiological role of these repeats and the consequences of more moderate repeat variation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Q-rich domains are highly enriched in eukaryotic transcription factors where they act as functional modulators. Incremental changes in the number of repeats in the yeast transcriptional regulator Ssn6 (Cyc8) result in systematic, repeat-length-dependent variation in expression of target genes that result in direct phenotypic changes. The function of Ssn6 increases with its repeat number until a certain threshold where further expansion leads to aggregation. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that the Ssn6 repeats affect its solubility and interactions with Tup1 and other regulators. Thus, Q-rich repeats are dynamic functional domains that modulate a regulator’s innate function, with the inherent risk of pathogenic repeat expansions. PMID:26257283

  7. Characterization of the transcriptional activation domains of human TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1).

    PubMed

    Qiao, Cheng; Jiang, Yajie; Deng, Cuilan; Huang, Zebo; Teng, Kaixuan; Chen, Lan; Liu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1) is a human transcriptional factor, which has a N-terminal TEA/ATTS domain supposedly for DNA binding and C-terminal PRD and STY domains for transcriptional activation. Taking advantage of the efficient reporter design of yeast two-hybrid system, we characterized the TEF3-1 domains in activating gene expression. Previously study usually mentioned that the C-terminal domain of TEF3-1 has the transcriptional activity, however, our data shows that the peptides TEF3-11-66 and TEF3-1197-434 functioned as two independent activation domains, suggesting that N-terminal domain of TEF3-1 also has transcriptional activation capacity. Additionally, more deletions of amino acids 197-434 showed that only the peptides TEF3-1197-265 contained the minimum sequences for the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain. The protein structure is predicted to contain a helix-turn-helix structure in TEF3-11-66 and four β sheets in TEF3-1197-265. Finally, after the truncated fragments of TEF3-1 were expressed in HUVEC cells, the whole TEF3-1 and the two activation domains could increase F-actin stress fiber, cell proliferation, migration and targeted gene expression. Further analysis and characterization of the activation domains in TEF3-1 may broaden our understanding of the gene involved in angiogenesis and other pathological processes.

  8. Wounding activates p38 map kinase and activation transcription factor 3 in leading keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Harper, Erin G; Alvares, Stacy M; Carter, William G

    2005-08-01

    Quiescent epidermis anchors to laminin 5 in the basement membrane via integrin alpha6beta4. Wounding elevates expression of laminin 5, generating leading keratinocytes (LKs) that migrate via beta1 integrins. Laminin 5 was evaluated as a regulator of cell signaling, and mRNA and protein expression in LKs. An in vitro wound model was developed based on suspension and re-adhesion of quiescent human keratinocytes (HKs). DNA microarrays identified multiple mRNAs elevated 1.5 hours after suspension and re-adhesion including activation transcription factor 3 (ATF3). In vitro and in vivo, levels of ATF3 protein elevate in nuclei of LKs, but not in nuclei of the following cells, 2 hours after suspension or wounding but decline by 12-18 hours post injury. Significantly, null defects in laminin 5 or integrin beta4 that inhibit anchorage chronically elevate ATF3 in vivo. This suggests that adhesion to laminin 5, but not other ligands, suppresses activation. On suspension, ATF3 and other transcripts in the microarrays are elevated by phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P-p38), a stress kinase that regulates mRNA and cell motility. Inhibition of P-p38 with SB203580 prevents phosphorylation of ATF2, a transcription factor for ATF3 in LKs. Re-adhesion to laminin 5 via alpha6beta4 dephosphorylates P-p38 and suppresses ATF3 protein relative to cells in suspension. Thus, wounding of quiescent HKs disrupts laminin 5 adhesion to activate p38, generating mRNA transcripts that define LKs. Adhesion to deposits of laminin 5 via alpha6beta4 suppresses P-p38 and activation mRNAs including ATF3. Defects in laminin 5 and alpha6beta4 sustain P-p38 with probable pathological effects on transcription and migration.

  9. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  10. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  11. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  12. The nuclear factor SPBP contains different functional domains and stimulates the activity of various transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Rekdal, C; Sjøttem, E; Johansen, T

    2000-12-22

    SPBP (stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element binding protein) was originally cloned from a cDNA expression library by virtue of its ability to bind to a platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element in the human stromelysin-1 promoter. A 937-amino acid-long protein was deduced from a 3995-nucleotide murine cDNA sequence. By analyses of both human and murine cDNAs, we now show that SPBP is twice as large as originally found. The human SPBP gene contains six exons and is located on chromosome 22q13.1-13.3. Two isoforms differing in their C termini are expressed due to alternative splicing. PCR analyses of multitissue cDNA panels showed that SPBP is expressed in most tissues except for ovary and prostate. Functional mapping revealed that SPBP is a nuclear, multidomain protein containing an N-terminal region with transactivating ability, a novel type of DNA-binding domain containing an AT hook motif, and a bipartite nuclear localization signal as well as a C-terminal zinc finger domain. This type of zinc finger domain is also found in the trithorax family of chromatin-based transcriptional regulator proteins. Using cotransfection experiments, we find that SPBP enhances the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors such as c-Jun, Ets1, Sp1, and Pax6. Hence, SPBP seems to act as a transcriptional coactivator. PMID:10995766

  13. The transcription factor GFI1 negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liuluan; Meng, Qingcai; Liang, Shuntao; Ma, Yaluan; Li, Rui; Li, Guoli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-11-28

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion downstream of Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation is tightly controlled at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in the maturation of pro-IL-1β, with NLRP3 expression identified as the limiting factor for inflammasome activation. Previously, we had demonstrated that the zinc-finger protein GFI1 inhibits pro-IL-1β transcription. Here, we show that GFI1 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in macrophages. GFI1 suppressed Nlrp3 transcription via two mechanisms: (1) by binding to the Gli-responsive element 1 (GRE1) in the Nlrp3 promoter; and (2) by antagonizing the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Thus, GFI1 negatively regulates TLR-mediated IL-1β production at both transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  14. Mapping neural circuits with activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Kaoru; Zhang, Yi; Rao, Yi; Wang, Jing W

    2012-03-01

    Abstract: Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a calcium-responsive transcription factor. We describe here an NFAT-based neural tracing method-CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA)-for labeling active neurons in behaving animals. In this system, sustained neural activity induces nuclear import of the chimeric transcription factor LexA-VP16-NFAT, which in turn drives green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression only in active neurons. We tested this system in Drosophila and found that volatile sex pheromones excite specific neurons in the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, complex courtship behavior associated with multi-modal sensory inputs activated neurons in the ventral nerve cord. This method harnessing the mechanism of activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor can be used to identify active neurons in specific neuronal population in behaving animals. PMID:22236090

  15. Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 Reprograms Angiogenic Activities of Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lauren W.; Cox, Nicole I.; Phelps, Cody A.; Lai, Shao-Chiang; Poddar, Arjun; Talbot, Conover; Mu, David

    2016-01-01

    Through both gain- and loss-of-TTF-1 expression strategies, we show that TTF-1 positively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and that the VEGF promoter element contains multiple TTF-1-responsive sequences. The major signaling receptor for VEGF, i.e VEGFR2, also appears to be under a direct and positive regulation of TTF-1. The TTF-1-dependent upregulation of VEGF was moderately sensitive to rapamycin, implicating a partial involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, hypoxia did not further increase the secreted VEGF level of the TTF-1+ lung cancer cells. The TTF-1-induced VEGF upregulation occurs in both compartments (exosomes and exosome-depleted media (EDM)) of the conditioned media. Surprisingly, the EDM of TTF-1+ lung cancer cells (designated EDM-TTF-1+) displayed an anti-angiogenic activity in the endothelial cell tube formation assay. Mechanistic studies suggest that the increased granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) level in the EDM-TTF-1+ conferred the antiangiogenic activities. In human lung cancer, the expression of TTF-1 and GM-CSF exhibits a statistically significant and positive correlation. In summary, this study provides evidence that TTF-1 may reprogram lung cancer secreted proteome into an antiangiogenic state, offering a novel basis to account for the long-standing observation of favorable prognosis associated with TTF-1+ lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:26912193

  16. Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 Reprograms Angiogenic Activities of Secretome.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren W; Cox, Nicole I; Phelps, Cody A; Lai, Shao-Chiang; Poddar, Arjun; Talbot, Conover; Mu, David

    2016-02-25

    Through both gain- and loss-of-TTF-1 expression strategies, we show that TTF-1 positively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and that the VEGF promoter element contains multiple TTF-1-responsive sequences. The major signaling receptor for VEGF, i.e VEGFR2, also appears to be under a direct and positive regulation of TTF-1. The TTF-1-dependent upregulation of VEGF was moderately sensitive to rapamycin, implicating a partial involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, hypoxia did not further increase the secreted VEGF level of the TTF-1(+) lung cancer cells. The TTF-1-induced VEGF upregulation occurs in both compartments (exosomes and exosome-depleted media (EDM)) of the conditioned media. Surprisingly, the EDM of TTF-1(+) lung cancer cells (designated EDM-TTF-1(+)) displayed an anti-angiogenic activity in the endothelial cell tube formation assay. Mechanistic studies suggest that the increased granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) level in the EDM-TTF-1(+) conferred the antiangiogenic activities. In human lung cancer, the expression of TTF-1 and GM-CSF exhibits a statistically significant and positive correlation. In summary, this study provides evidence that TTF-1 may reprogram lung cancer secreted proteome into an antiangiogenic state, offering a novel basis to account for the long-standing observation of favorable prognosis associated with TTF-1(+) lung adenocarcinomas.

  17. Transcription-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor activation by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Thomas E; Sang, Yingying; Ma, Yongxian; Abounader, Roger; Rosen, Eliot M; Xia, Shuli; Laterra, John

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms and biological implications of coordinated receptor tyrosine kinase coactivation remain poorly appreciated. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met are frequently coexpressed in cancers, including those associated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) overexpression, such as malignant astrocytoma. In a previous analysis of the HGF-induced transcriptome, we found that two EGFR agonists, transforming growth factor-alpha and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), are prominently up-regulated by HGF in human glioma cells. We now report that stimulating human glioblastoma cells with recombinant HGF induces biologically relevant EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation at Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) increased 6 to 24 h after cell stimulation with HGF and temporally coincided with the induction of transforming growth factor-alpha (~5-fold) and HB-EGF (~23-fold) expression. Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) phosphorylation, in response to HGF, was inhibited by cycloheximide and actinomycin D, consistent with a requirement for DNA transcription and RNA translation. Specifically, blocking HB-EGF binding to EGFR with the antagonist CRM197 inhibited HGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation by 60% to 80% and inhibited HGF-induced S-G(2)-M transition. CRM197 also inhibited HGF-induced anchorage-dependent cell proliferation but had no effect on HGF-mediated cytoprotection. These findings establish that EGFR can be activated with functional consequences by HGF as a result of EGFR ligand expression. This transcription-dependent cross-talk between the HGF receptor c-Met and EGFR expands our understanding of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling networks and may have considerable consequences for oncogenic mechanisms and cancer therapeutics.

  18. Encoding four gene expression programs in the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Cellular signaling response pathways often exhibit a bow-tie topology [1,2]: multiple upstream stress signals converge on a single shared transcription factor, which is thought to induce different downstream gene expression programs (Figure 1A). However, if several different signals activate the same transcription factor, can each signal then induce a specific gene expression response? A growing body of literature supports a temporal coding theory where information about environmental signals can be encoded, at least partially, in the temporal dynamics of the shared transcription factor [1,2]. For example, in the case of the budding yeast transcription factor Msn2, different stresses induce distinct Msn2 activation dynamics: Msn2 shows pulsatile nuclear activation with dose-dependent frequency under glucose limitation, but sustained nuclear activation with dose-dependent amplitude under oxidative stress [3]. These dynamic patterns can then lead to differential gene expression responses [3-5], but it is not known how much specificity can be obtained. Thus, a major question of this temporal coding theory is how many gene response programs or cellular functions can be robustly encoded by dynamic control of a single transcription factor. Here we provide the first direct evidence that, simply by regulating the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor, it is possible to preferentially induce four distinct gene expression programs. PMID:27046808

  19. Transcription factor expression in lipopolysaccharide-activated peripheral-blood-derived mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Smith, Kelly D.; Strobe, Katie L.; Nissen, Stephanie M.; Haudenschild, Christian D.; Zhou, Daixing; Vasicek, Thomas J.; Held, G. A.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Hood, Leroy E.; Aderem, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a key role in integrating and modulating biological information. In this study, we comprehensively measured the changing abundances of mRNAs over a time course of activation of human peripheral-blood-derived mononuclear cells (“macrophages”) with lipopolysaccharide. Global and dynamic analysis of transcription factors in response to a physiological stimulus has yet to be achieved in a human system, and our efforts significantly advanced this goal. We used multiple global high-throughput technologies for measuring mRNA levels, including massively parallel signature sequencing and GeneChip microarrays. We identified 92 of 1,288 known human transcription factors as having significantly measurable changes during our 24-h time course. At least 42 of these changes were previously unidentified in this system. Our data demonstrate that some transcription factors operate in a functional range below 10 transcripts per cell, whereas others operate in a range three orders of magnitude greater. The highly reproducible response of many mRNAs indicates feedback control. A broad range of activation kinetics was observed; thus, combinatorial regulation by small subsets of transcription factors would permit almost any timing input to cis-regulatory elements controlling gene transcription. PMID:17913878

  20. ATF2 on the Double – Activating Transcription Factor and DNA Damage Response Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bhoumik, Anindita; Bergami, Pablo Lopez; Ronai, Ze’ev

    2010-01-01

    The Activating Transcription Factor 2 (ATF2) has been implicated in transcription and DNA damage control, through its phosphorylation by JNK/p38 or ATM/ATR, respectively. ATF2 activities have also been associated with skin tumor development and progression. Here we summarize our present understanding of ATF2 regulation, function and contribution to malignant and non malignant skin tumor development. PMID:17935492

  1. Retinoic acid receptors and GATA transcription factors activate the transcription of the human lecithin:retinol acyltransferase gene

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kun; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2008-01-01

    Lecithin retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) catalyzes the esterification of retinol (vitamin A). Retinyl esters and LRAT protein levels are reduced in many types of cancer cells. We present data that both the LRAT and retinoic acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) mRNA levels in the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 are lower than those in cultured normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC). The activity of the human LRAT promoter (2.0 kb) driving a luciferase reporter gene in PC-3 cells is less than 40% of that in PrEC cells. Retinoic acid (RA) treatment increased this LRAT promoter-luciferase activity in PrEC cells, but not in PC-3 cells. Deletion of various regions of the human LRAT promoter demonstrated that a 172-bp proximal promoter region is essential for LRAT transcription and confers RA responsiveness in PrEC cells. This 172-bp region, contained within the 186 bp pLRAT/luciferase construct, has five putative GATA binding sites. Co-transfection of RARβ2 or RARγ and the transcription factor GATA-4 increased LRAT (pLRAT186) promoter activity in both PrEC and PC-3 cells. In addition, we found that both retinoic acid and retinol induced transcripts for the STRA6 gene, which encodes a membrane receptor involved in retinol (vitamin A) uptake, in PrEC cells but not in PC-3 cells. In summary, our data show that the transcriptional regulation of the human LRAT gene is aberrant in human prostate cancer cells and that GATA transcription factors are involved in the transcriptional activation of LRAT in PrEC cells. PMID:18652909

  2. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  3. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  4. O-GlcNAc modification of Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors negatively regulates their transcriptional activities.

    PubMed

    Ha, Changhoon; Lim, Kihong

    2015-11-13

    The addition of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on serine or threonine modifies a myriad of proteins and regulates their function, stability and localization. O-GlcNAc modification is common among chromosome-associated proteins, such as transcription factors, suggesting its extensive involvement in gene expression regulation. In this study, we demonstrate the O-GlcNAc status of the Sp family members of transcription factors and the functional impact on their transcriptional activities. We highlight the presence of O-GlcNAc residues in Sp3 and Sp4, but not Sp2, as demonstrated by their enrichment in GlcNAc positive protein fractions and by detection of O-GlcNAc residues on Sp3 and Sp4 co-expressed in Escherichia coli together with O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) using an O-GlcNAc-specific antibody. Deletion mutants of Sp3 and Sp4 indicate that the majority of O-GlcNAc sites reside in their N-terminal transactivation domain. Overall, using reporter gene assays and co-immunoprecipitations, we demonstrate a functional inhibitory role of O-GlcNAc modifications in Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Thereby, our study strengthens the current notion that O-GlcNAc modification is an important regulator of protein interactome.

  5. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Kornepati, Anand V. R.; Marshall, Joy B.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such “synergistic activation mediators” can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed. PMID:26668372

  6. Myeloid leukemia factor is a conserved regulator of RUNX transcription factor activity involved in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bras, Stéphanie; Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Gobert, Vanessa; Augé, Benoît; Breig, Osman; Sanial, Matthieu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Haenlin, Marc; Plessis, Anne; Waltzer, Lucas

    2012-03-27

    Defining the function of the genes that, like RUNX1, are deregulated in blood cell malignancies represents an important challenge. Myeloid leukemia factors (MLFs) constitute a poorly characterized family of conserved proteins whose founding member, MLF1, has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia in humans. To gain insight into the functions of this family, we investigated the role of the Drosophila MLF homolog during blood cell development. Here we report that mlf controls the homeostasis of the Drosophila hematopoietic system. Notably, mlf participates in a positive feedback loop to fine tune the activity of the RUNX transcription factor Lozenge (LZ) during development of the crystal cells, one of the two main blood cell lineages in Drosophila. At the molecular level, our data in cell cultures and in vivo strongly suggest that MLF controls the number of crystal cells by protecting LZ from degradation. Remarkably, it appears that the human MLF1 protein can substitute for MLF in the crystal cell lineage. In addition, MLF stabilizes the human oncogenic fusion protein RUNX1-ETO and is required for RUNX1-ETO-induced blood cell disorders in a Drosophila model of leukemia. Finally, using the human leukemic blood cell line Kasumi-1, we show that MLF1 depletion impairs RUNX1-ETO accumulation and reduces RUNX1-ETO-dependent proliferation. Thus, we propose that the regulation of RUNX protein levels is a conserved feature of MLF family members that could be critical for normal and pathological blood cell development. PMID:22411814

  7. Mammalian cAMP-responsive element can activate transcription in yeast and binds a yeast factor(s) that resembles the mammalian transcription factor ANF.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R H; Jones, N C

    1989-01-01

    The human ATF and AP1 transcription factors bind to highly related DNA sequences. Their consensus binding sites differ by a single nucleotide, but this single change is crucial in determining factor binding specificity. We have previously identified an AP1 (yAP1) binding activity in yeast. In this report we identify a yeast ATF (yATF) binding activity whose specificity can be distinguished from that of yAP1 by the same crucial nucleotide that distinguishes binding of human ATF and AP1. The ATF binding site can act as an efficient upstream activating sequence in vivo, suggesting that yATF is a transcriptional activator. The yATF DNA-binding complex is phosphorylated and the binding activity of partially purified yATF can be enhanced in vitro by the addition of protein kinase A, indicating that the phosphorylation state of yATF may be important in determining its ability to bind DNA. Images PMID:2538834

  8. A combined expression-interaction model for inferring the temporal activity of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanxin; Klutstein, Michael; Simon, Itamar; Mitchell, Tom; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2009-08-01

    Methods suggested for reconstructing regulatory networks can be divided into two sets based on how the activity level of transcription factors (TFs) is inferred. The first group of methods relies on the expression levels of TFs, assuming that the activity of a TF is highly correlated with its mRNA abundance. The second treats the activity level as unobserved and infers it from the expression of the genes that the TF regulates. While both types of methods were successfully applied, each suffers from drawbacks that limit their accuracy. For the first set, the assumption that mRNA levels are correlated with activity is violated for many TFs due to post-transcriptional modifications. For the second, the expression level of a TF which might be informative is completely ignored. Here we present the post-transcriptional modification model (PTMM) that, unlike previous methods, utilizes both sources of data concurrently. Our method uses a switching model to determine whether a TF is transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally regulated. This model is combined with a factorial HMM to reconstruct the interactions in a dynamic regulatory network. Using simulated and real data, we show that PTMM outperforms the other two approaches discussed above. Using real data, we also show that PTMM can recover meaningful TF activity levels and identify post-transcriptionally modified TFs, many of which are supported by other sources. Supporting website: www.sb.cs.cmu.edu/PTMM/PTMM.html.

  9. RNA helicase A activity is inhibited by oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Schneider, Jeffrey A.; Sajwan, Kamal; Graham, Garrett T.; Griffin, Brittany; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Youbi, Sarah E.; Kallarakal, Abraham; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Casey, John L.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases impact RNA structure and metabolism from transcription through translation, in part through protein interactions with transcription factors. However, there is limited knowledge on the role of transcription factor influence upon helicase activity. RNA helicase A (RHA) is a DExH-box RNA helicase that plays multiple roles in cellular biology, some functions requiring its activity as a helicase while others as a protein scaffold. The oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1 requires RHA to enable Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncogenesis and growth; a small molecule, YK-4-279 disrupts this complex in cells. Our current study investigates the effect of EWS-FLI1 upon RHA helicase activity. We found that EWS-FLI1 reduces RHA helicase activity in a dose-dependent manner without affecting intrinsic ATPase activity; however, the RHA kinetics indicated a complex model. Using separated enantiomers, only (S)-YK-4-279 reverses the EWS-FLI1 inhibition of RHA helicase activity. We report a novel RNA binding property of EWS-FLI1 leading us to discover that YK-4-279 inhibition of RHA binding to EWS-FLI1 altered the RNA binding profile of both proteins. We conclude that EWS-FLI1 modulates RHA helicase activity causing changes in overall transcriptome processing. These findings could lead to both enhanced understanding of oncogenesis and provide targets for therapy. PMID:25564528

  10. Pattern of Transcription Factor Activation in Helicobacter pylori–Infected Mongolian Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Takahiko; Lu, Hong; Wu, Jeng–Yih; Ohno, Tomoyuki; Wu, Michael J.; Genta, Robert M.; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Helicobacter pylori interact with epithelial cells resulting in activation of cellular signaling pathways leading to an inflammatory response. The pattern and timing of transcription factor activation in H pylori-infected gastric mucosa remain unclear. We investigated the roles of transcription factors in the gastric mucosa of H pylori-infected gerbils over the course of the infection. Methods Six-week-old male Mongolian gerbils were inoculated orally with H pylori TN2GF4 or isogenic cagE mutants and examined at 1, 3, 9, and 18 months. We examined the expression of 54 transcription factors using DNA/protein arrays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Phosphorylation status of mitogen-activated protein kinases and I κB were evaluated by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. Results Ten transcription factors were up-regulated by H pylori infection. Six of these factors, including activator protein-1 (AP-1) and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), reached maximal levels at 3 months and were strongly correlated with cellular inflammation and ulceration. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase correlated with activation of AP-1 and CREB. Levels of nuclear factor-κB and interferon-stimulated responsive element (ISRE) peaked at 18 months and correlated with the presence of severe atrophy and with phosphorylation of Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and IκB. Conclusions The gastric mucosal transcription factors induced by H pylori infection differed according to the phase and outcome of infection; AP-1 and CREB levels were early responders related to inflammation and ulceration, whereas NF-κB and ISRE were late responders related to atrophy. PMID:17383425

  11. Role of SIRT1 and FOXO factors in eNOS transcriptional activation by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ning; Strand, Susanne; Schlufter, Frank; Siuda, Daniel; Reifenberg, Gisela; Kleinert, Hartmut; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2013-08-01

    Many of the cardiovascular protective effects of resveratrol are attributable to an enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Resveratrol has been shown to enhance eNOS gene expression as well as eNOS enzymatic activity. The aim of the present study was to analyze the molecular mechanisms of eNOS transcriptional activation by resveratrol. Treatment of human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells with resveratrol led to a concentration-dependent upregulation of eNOS expression. In luciferase reporter gene assay, resveratrol enhanced the activity of human eNOS promoter fragments (3500, 1600, 633 and 263bp in length, respectively), indicating that the proximal promoter region is required for resveratrol-induced eNOS transcriptional activation. Knockdown of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) by siRNA prevented the upregulation of eNOS mRNA and protein by resveratrol. Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are established downstream targets of SIRT1. siRNA-mediated knockdown of FOXO1 and FOXO3a abolished the effect of resveratrol on eNOS expression, indicating the involvement of these factors. Resveratrol treatment enhanced the expression of FOXO1 and FOXO3a in EA.hy 926 cells. Reporter gene assay using promoter containing forkhead response elements showed increased FOXO factor activity by resveratrol. In electrophoretic mobility shift assay, the enhanced binding of nuclear proteins to the eNOS promoter regions by resveratrol could be blocked by antibodies against FOXO1 and FOXO3a. In conclusion, resveratrol enhances the expression and activity of FOXO transcription factors. The SIRT1/FOXO factor axis is involved in resveratrol-induced eNOS transcriptional activation.

  12. The transcription factor p53: Not a repressor, solely an activator

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin; Steiner, Lydia; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The predominant function of the tumor suppressor p53 is transcriptional regulation. It is generally accepted that p53-dependent transcriptional activation occurs by binding to a specific recognition site in promoters of target genes. Additionally, several models for p53-dependent transcriptional repression have been postulated. Here, we evaluate these models based on a computational meta-analysis of genome-wide data. Surprisingly, several major models of p53-dependent gene regulation are implausible. Meta-analysis of large-scale data is unable to confirm reports on directly repressed p53 target genes and falsifies models of direct repression. This notion is supported by experimental re-analysis of representative genes reported as directly repressed by p53. Therefore, p53 is not a direct repressor of transcription, but solely activates its target genes. Moreover, models based on interference of p53 with activating transcription factors as well as models based on the function of ncRNAs are also not supported by the meta-analysis. As an alternative to models of direct repression, the meta-analysis leads to the conclusion that p53 represses transcription indirectly by activation of the p53-p21-DREAM/RB pathway. PMID:25486564

  13. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    James M. Samet1,2, Robert Silbajoris1, Tony Huang1 and Ilona Jaspers3

    1Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborato...

  14. DNA methylation, riboswitches, and transcription factor activity: fundamental mechanisms of gene-nutrient interactions involving vitamins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janet; Vieira, Amandio

    2006-12-01

    Nutrient-gene interactions occur with a variety of nutrients including some minerals, vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids and other lipids. Fundamental molecular mechanisms that underlie many of the effects of nutrients on gene expression are presented herein. Two of the mechanisms described influence gene transcription: DNA methylation and transcription factor activation. Another mechanism, riboswitching, can regulate gene expression at different levels, for example, at the mRNA translation level. The first two mechanisms are widely distributed across animal phyla. Riboswitches are documented primarily in more primitive organisms, but may prove to be of wider relevance. Riboswitches are known for several vitamins; those involving thiamine are presented here. The role of folates and retinoids in DNA methylation and transcriptional factor (nuclear retinoid receptor) activities, respectively, is presented in the context of cell proliferation and differentiation, and related physiological or pathological effects during embryogenesis and cancer.

  15. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5

    PubMed Central

    Nezich, Catherine L.; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I.

    2015-01-01

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy. PMID:26240184

  16. The Drosophila Transcription Factors Tinman and Pannier Activate and Collaborate with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 to Promote Heart Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Lovato, TyAnna L.; Sensibaugh, Cheryl A.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Martinez, Melody M.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the MADS domain transcription factor Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2) is regulated by numerous and overlapping enhancers which tightly control its transcription in the mesoderm. To understand how Mef2 expression is controlled in the heart, we identified a late stage Mef2 cardiac enhancer that is active in all heart cells beginning at stage 14 of embryonic development. This enhancer is regulated by the NK-homeodomain transcription factor Tinman, and the GATA transcription factor Pannier through both direct and indirect interactions with the enhancer. Since Tinman, Pannier and MEF2 are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates, and since their vertebrate homologs can convert mouse fibroblast cells to cardiomyocytes in different activator cocktails, we tested whether over-expression of these three factors in vivo could ectopically activate known cardiac marker genes. We found that mesodermal over-expression of Tinman and Pannier resulted in approximately 20% of embryos with ectopic Hand and Sulphonylurea receptor (Sur) expression. By adding MEF2 alongside Tinman and Pannier, a dramatic expansion in the expression of Hand and Sur was observed in almost all embryos analyzed. Two additional cardiac markers were also expanded in their expression. Our results demonstrate the ability to initiate ectopic cardiac fate in vivo by the combination of only three members of the conserved Drosophila cardiac transcription network, and provide an opportunity for this genetic model system to be used to dissect the mechanisms of cardiac specification. PMID:26225919

  17. SUMOylation of the KRAB zinc-finger transcription factor PARIS/ZNF746 regulates its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Tamotsu; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2016-05-13

    Parkin-interacting substrate (PARIS), a member of the family of Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc-finger transcription factors, is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase parkin. PARIS represses the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that PARIS can be SUMOylated, and its SUMOylation plays a role in the repression of PGC-1a promoter activity. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT y (PIASy) was identified as an interacting protein of PARIS and shown to enhance its SUMOylation. PIASy repressed PGC-1a promoter activity, and this effect was attenuated by PARIS in a manner dependent on its SUMOylation status. Co-expression of SUMO-1 with PIASy completely repressed PGC-1a promoter activity independently of PARIS expression. PARIS-mediated PGC-1a promoter repression depended on the activity of histone deacetylases (HDAC), whereas PIASy repressed the PGC-1a promoter in an HDAC-independent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that PARIS and PIASy modulate PGC-1a gene transcription through distinct molecular mechanisms.

  18. Exploring the transcription factor activity in high-throughput gene expression data using RLQ analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interpretation of gene expression microarray data in the light of external information on both columns and rows (experimental variables and gene annotations) facilitates the extraction of pertinent information hidden in these complex data. Biologists classically interpret genes of interest after retrieving functional information from a subset of genes of interest. Transcription factors play an important role in orchestrating the regulation of gene expression. Their activity can be deduced by examining the presence of putative transcription factors binding sites in the gene promoter regions. Results In this paper we present the multivariate statistical method RLQ which aims to analyze microarray data where additional information is available on both genes and samples. As an illustrative example, we applied RLQ methodology to analyze transcription factor activity associated with the time-course effect of steroids on the growth of primary human lung fibroblasts. RLQ could successfully predict transcription factor activity, and could integrate various other sources of external information in the main frame of the analysis. The approach was validated by means of alternative statistical methods and biological validation. Conclusions RLQ provides an efficient way of extracting and visualizing structures present in a gene expression dataset by directly modeling the link between experimental variables and gene annotations. PMID:23742070

  19. Visualization of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) activation in living cells.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Koh; Luo, Zeping; Schaufele, Fred; Peterlin, B Matija

    2015-01-16

    Regulation of transcription elongation by positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) plays a central role in determining the state of cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. In cells, P-TEFb exists in active and inactive forms. Its release from the inactive 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex is a critical step for P-TEFb to activate transcription elongation. However, no good method exists to analyze this P-TEFb equilibrium in living cells. Only inaccurate and labor-intensive cell-free biochemical assays are currently available. In this study, we present the first experimental system to monitor P-TEFb activation in living cells. We created a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to detect interactions between P-TEFb and its substrate, the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. When cells were treated with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, which releases P-TEFb from the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, they turned green. Other known P-TEFb-releasing agents, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, bromodomain and extraterminal bromodomain inhibitors, and protein kinase C agonists, also scored positive in this assay. Finally, we identified 5'-azacytidine as a new P-TEFb-releasing agent. This release of P-TEFb correlated directly with activation of human HIV and HEXIM1 transcription. Thus, our visualization of P-TEFb activation by fluorescent complementation assay could be used to find new P-TEFb-releasing agents, compare different classes of agents, and assess their efficacy singly and/or in combination.

  20. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  1. Stress-Activated Cap’n’collar Transcription Factors in Aging and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Bohmann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Cap’n’collar (Cnc) transcription factors are conserved in metazoans and have important developmental and homeostatic functions. The vertebrate Nrf1, Nrf2, and Nrf3, the Caenorhabditis elegans SKN-1, and the Drosophila CncC comprise a subgroup of Cnc factors that mediate adaptive responses to cellular stress. The most studied stress-activated Cnc factor is Nrf2, which orchestrates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stressors and electrophilic xenobiotics. In rodent models, signaling by Nrf2 defends against oxidative stress and aging-associated disorders, such as neurodegeneration, respiratory diseases, and cancer. In humans, polymorphisms that decrease Nrf2 abundance have been associated with various pathologies of the skin, respiratory system, and digestive tract. In addition to preventing disease in rodents and humans, Cnc factors have lifespan-extending and anti-aging functions in invertebrates. However, despite the pro-longevity and antioxidant roles of stress-activated Cnc factors, their activity paradoxically declines in aging model organisms and in humans suffering from progressing respiratory disease or neurodegeneration. We review the roles and regulation of stress-activated Cnc factors across species, present all reported instances in which their activity is paradoxically decreased in aging and disease, and discuss the possibility that the pharmacological restoration of Nrf2 signaling may be useful in the prevention and treatment of age-related diseases. PMID:20215646

  2. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Rahim, Ahad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Ward, Natalie J.; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Johnson, Mark R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruses to neonatal rodents as an alternative to the existing technology of generating germline transgenic light producing rodents. At this age, neonates acquire immune tolerance to the conditionally responsive luciferase reporter. This simple and transferrable procedure permits surrogate quantitation of transcription factor activity over the lifetime of the animal. We show principal efficacy by temporally quantifying NFκB activity in the brain, liver and lungs of somatotransgenic reporter mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. This response is ablated in Tlr4−/− mice or when co-administered with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. Furthermore, we show the malleability of this technology by quantifying NFκB-mediated luciferase expression in outbred rats. Finally, we use somatotransgenic bioimaging to longitudinally quantify LPS- and ActivinA-induced upregulation of liver specific glucocorticoid receptor and Smad2/3 reporter constructs in somatotransgenic mice, respectively. PMID:26138224

  3. Visna virus Tat protein: a potent transcription factor with both activator and suppressor domains.

    PubMed Central

    Carruth, L M; Hardwick, J M; Morse, B A; Clements, J E

    1994-01-01

    Visna virus is a pathogenic lentivirus of sheep tat is distantly related to the primate lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The visna virus genome encodes a small regulatory protein, Tat, which is necessary for efficient viral replication and enhanced viral transcription. To investigate the mechanism of action of the visna Tat protein and to localize the protein domain(s) responsible for transcriptional activation, chimeric proteins containing visna virus Tat sequences fused to the DNA binding domain of the yeast transactivation factor GAL4 (residues 1 to 147) were made. The GAL4-Tat fusion proteins were transfected into cells and tested for the ability to activate the adenovirus E1b promoter via upstream GAL4 DNA binding sites. Full-length GAL4-Tat fusion proteins were weak transactivators in this system, giving only a two- to fourfold increase in transcription in several cell types, including HeLa and sheep choroid plexus cells. In contrast, fusion of the N-terminal region of the Tat protein to GAL4 revealed a potent activation domain. Amino acids 13 to 38 appeared to be the most critical for activation. No other region of the protein showed any activation in the GAL4 system. This N-terminal region of the visna virus Tat protein has a large number of acidic and hydrophobic residues, suggesting that Tat has an acidic activation domain common to many transcriptional transactivators. Mutations in hydrophobic and bulky aromatic residues dramatically reduced the activity of the chimeric protein. Competition experiments suggest that mechanism of the visna virus Tat activation domain may closely resemble that of the herpesvirus activator VP16 and human immunodeficiency virus Tat, a related lentivirus activator, since both significantly reduce the level of visna virus Tat activation. Finally, a domain between residues 39 and 53 was identified in the Tat protein that, in the GAL4 system, negatively regulates activation by Tat. Images PMID:8083955

  4. Cdk-activating kinase complex is a component of human transcription factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Shiekhattar, R; Mermelstein, F; Fisher, R P; Drapkin, R; Dynlacht, B; Wessling, H C; Morgan, D O; Reinberg, D

    1995-03-16

    Transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) contains a kinase capable of phosphorylating the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we report the identification of the Cdk-activating kinase (Cak) complex (Cdk7 and cyclin H) as a component of TFIIH after extensive purification of TFIIH by chromatography. We find that affinity-purified antibodies directed against cyclin H inhibit TFIIH-dependent transcription and that both cyclin H and Cdk7 antibodies inhibit phosphorylation of the CTD of the largest subunit of the RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Cak is present in at least two distinct complexes, TFIIH and a smaller complex that is unable to phosphorylate RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Both Cak complexes, as well as recombinant Cak, phosphorylate a CTD peptide. Finally, TFIIH was shown to phosphorylate both Cdc2 and Cdk2, suggesting that there could be a link between transcription and the cell cycle machinery.

  5. Activation of BPV-1 replication in vitro by the transcription factor E2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Li, Rong; Mohr, Ian J.; Clark, Robin; Botchan, Michael R.

    1991-10-01

    Soluble extracts from uninfected murine cells supplemented with purified viral E1 and E2 proteins support the replication of exogenously added papilloma virus DNA. The E2 transactivator stimulates the binding of the E1 replication protein to the minimal origin of replication and activates DNA replication. These results support the concept that transcription factors have a direct role in the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotes by participating in the assembly of a complex at the origin of replication.

  6. Free radical activity of industrial fibers: role of iron in oxidative stress and activation of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, P S; Brown, D M; Beswick, P H; MacNee, W; Rahman, I; Donaldson, K

    1997-01-01

    We studied asbestos, vitreous fiber (MMVF10), and refractory ceramic fiber (RCF1) from the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers' Association fiber repository regarding the following: free radical damage to plasmid DNA, iron release, ability to deplete glutathione (GSH), and activate redox-sensitive transcription factors in macrophages. Asbestos had much more free radical activity than any of the man-made vitreous fibers. More Fe3+ was released than Fe2+ and more of both was released at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.2. Release of iron from the different fibers was generally not a good correlate of ability to cause free radical injury to the plasmid DNA. All fiber types caused some degree of oxidative stress, as revealed by depletion of intracellular GSH. Amosite asbestos upregulated nuclear binding of activator protein 1 transcription factor to a greater level than MMVF10 and RCF1; long-fiber amosite was the only fiber to enhance activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B). The use of cysteine methyl ester and buthionine sulfoximine to modulate GSH suggested that GSH homeostasis was important in leading to activation of transcription factors. We conclude that the intrinsic free radical activity is the major determinant of transcription factor activation and therefore gene expression in alveolar macrophages. Although this was not related to iron release or ability to deplete macrophage GSH at 4 hr, GSH does play a role in activation of NF kappa B. Images Figure 1. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B PMID:9400744

  7. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    PubMed

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression.

  8. Transforming but not immortalizing oncogenes activate the transcription factor PEA1.

    PubMed Central

    Wasylyk, C; Imler, J L; Wasylyk, B

    1988-01-01

    The transcription factor PEA1 (a homologue of AP1 and c-jun) is highly active in several fibroblast cell lines, compared to its low activity in a myeloma and an embryo-carcinoma (EC) cell line. Serum components are essential to attain these high levels of PEA1 activity in fibroblasts. This serum requirement is abrogated by transformation with the oncogenes c-Ha-ras, v-src and polyoma middle T (Py-MT) but not by immortalization with polyoma large T (Py-LT), v-myc, c-myc or SV40 large T (SV40T). Expression in myeloma cells of the same transforming oncogenes, as well as v-mos and c-fos, activates PEA1, whereas expression of the same immortalizing oncogenes and EIA does not. These results suggest that a common target for transforming oncogenes is PEA1. Serum components have no effect on PEA1 activity in the myeloma and EC cell lines. In contrast, retinoic acid treatment of F9 EC cells augments PEA1 activity. These results suggest that transforming oncogene expression compensates for the absence of cell type-specific factors which are required to activate PEA1. Activation of PEA1 may lead to altered transcription of a set of transformation-related genes. Images PMID:3142763

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  10. Occupancy of the Drosophila hsp70 promoter by a subset of basal transcription factors diminishes upon transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Lyubov A; Nabirochkina, Elena N; Kurshakova, Mariya M; Robert, Flavie; Krasnov, Aleksey N; Evgen'ev, Mihail B; Kadonaga, James T; Georgieva, Sofia G; Tora, Làszlò

    2005-12-13

    The presence of general transcription factors and other coactivators at the Drosophila hsp70 gene promoter in vivo has been examined by polytene chromosome immunofluorescence and chromatin immunoprecipitation at endogenous heat-shock loci or at a hsp70 promoter-containing transgene. These studies indicate that the hsp70 promoter is already occupied by TATA-binding protein (TBP) and several TBP-associated factors (TAFs), TFIIB, TFIIF (RAP30), TFIIH (XPB), TBP-free/TAF-containg complex (GCN5 and TRRAP), and the Mediator complex subunit 13 before heat shock. After heat shock, there is a significant recruitment of the heat-shock transcription factor, RNA polymerase II, XPD, GCN5, TRRAP, or Mediator complex 13 to the hsp70 promoter. Surprisingly, upon heat shock, there is a marked diminution in the occupancy of TBP, six different TAFs, TFIIB, and TFIIF, whereas there is no change in the occupancy of these factors at ecdysone-induced loci under the same conditions. Hence, these findings reveal a distinct mechanism of transcriptional induction at the hsp70 promoters, and further indicate that the apparent promoter occupancy of the general transcriptional factors does not necessarily reflect the transcriptional state of a gene. PMID:16330756

  11. Differential expression of two activating transcription factor 5 isoforms in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Luisa; La Rosa, Cristina; Forte, Stefano; Calabrese, Giovanna; Colarossi, Cristina; Aiello, Eleonora; Salluzzo, Salvatore; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the activating transcription/cAMP response element-binding protein family of basic leucine zipper proteins that plays an important role in cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The ATF5 gene generates two transcripts: ATF5 isoform 1 and ATF5 isoform 2. A number of studies indicate that ATF5 could be an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in several tumor types; however, so far, the role of ATF5 has not been investigated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Methods Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immuno-histochemical staining were used to study ATF5 mRNA and protein expression in PTC. Results We report here that ATF5 is expressed more in PTC tissue than in normal thyroid tissue. Furthermore, this is the first study that describes the presence of both ATF5 isoforms in PTC. Conclusion These findings could provide potential applications in PTC cancer treatment. PMID:27785070

  12. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jutta C.; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L.; Quail, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5′-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  13. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jutta C; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L; Quail, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5'-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  14. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jutta C; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L; Quail, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5'-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation.

  15. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs.

  16. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs. PMID:24879639

  17. Acetylation-deacetylation of the transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) regulates its transcriptional activity and nucleocytoplasmic localization.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yumiko; Garduño, Lakisha; Theodore, Melanie; Yang, Jianqi; Arinze, Ifeanyi J

    2011-03-01

    Activation of Nrf2 by covalent modifications that release it from its inhibitor protein Keap1 has been extensively documented. In contrast, covalent modifications that may regulate its action after its release from Keap1 have received little attention. Here we show that CREB-binding protein induced acetylation of Nrf2, increased binding of Nrf2 to its cognate response element in a target gene promoter, and increased Nrf2-dependent transcription from target gene promoters. Heterologous sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) decreased acetylation of Nrf2 as well as Nrf2-dependent gene transcription, and its effects were overridden by dominant negative SIRT1 (SIRT1-H355A). The SIRT1-selective inhibitors EX-527 and nicotinamide stimulated Nrf2-dependent gene transcription, whereas resveratrol, a putative activator of SIRT1, was inhibitory, mimicking the effect of SIRT1. Mutating lysine to alanine or to arginine at Lys(588) and Lys(591) of Nrf2 resulted in decreased Nrf2-dependent gene transcription and abrogated the transcription-activating effect of CREB-binding protein. Furthermore, SIRT1 had no effect on transcription induced by these mutants, indicating that these sites are acetylation sites. Microscope imaging of GFP-Nrf2 in HepG2 cells as well as immunoblotting for Nrf2 showed that acetylation conditions resulted in increased nuclear localization of Nrf2, whereas deacetylation conditions enhanced its cytoplasmic rather than its nuclear localization. We posit that Nrf2 in the nucleus undergoes acetylation, resulting in binding, with basic-region leucine zipper protein(s), to the antioxidant response element and consequently in gene transcription, whereas deacetylation disengages it from the antioxidant response element, thereby resulting in transcriptional termination and subsequently in its nuclear export. PMID:21196497

  18. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase activity-responsive transcription factors: From hydroxylation to gene expression and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2008-01-01

    Most homeostatic processes including gene transcription occur as a result of deviations in physiological tone that threatens the survival of the organism. A prototypical homeostatic stress response includes changes in gene expression following alterations in oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate levels. Each of these cofactors plays an important role in cellular metabolism. Accordingly, a family of enzymes known as the Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes are a group of dioxygenases that have evolved to sense changes in 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and iron via changes in enzyme activity. Indeed, PHDs are a part of an established oxygen sensor system that regulates transcriptional regulation of hypoxia/stress-regulated genes and thus are an important component of events leading to cellular rescue from oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate deprivations. The ability of PHD activity to regulate homeostatic responses to oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate metabolism has led to the development of small molecule inhibitors of the PHDs as a strategy for activating or augmenting cellular stress responses. These small molecules are proving effective in preclinical models of stroke and Parkinson's disease. However the precise protective pathways engaged by PHD inhibition are only beginning to be defined. In the current review, we summarize the role of iron, 2-oxoglutarate and oxygen in the PHD catalyzed hydroxylation reaction and provide a brief discussion of some of the transcription factors that play an effective role in neuroprotection against oxidative stress as a result of changes in PHD activity. PMID:17981760

  19. HEMERA Couples the Proteolysis and Transcriptional Activity of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs in Arabidopsis Photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yongjian; Li, Meina; Pasoreck, Elise K.; Long, Lingyun; Shi, Yiting; Galvão, Rafaelo M.; Chou, Conrad L.; Wang, He; Sun, Amanda Y.; Zhang, Yiyin C.; Jiang, Anna; Chen, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes (phys) are red and far-red photoreceptors that control plant development and growth by promoting the proteolysis of a family of antagonistically acting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, the PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs). We have previously shown that the degradation of PIF1 and PIF3 requires HEMERA (HMR). However, the biochemical function of HMR and the mechanism by which it mediates PIF degradation remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that HMR acts upstream of PIFs in regulating hypocotyl growth. Surprisingly, genome-wide analysis of HMR- and PIF-dependent genes reveals that HMR is also required for the transactivation of a subset of PIF direct-target genes. We show that HMR interacts with all PIFs. The HMR-PIF interaction is mediated mainly by HMR’s N-terminal half and PIFs’ conserved active-phytochrome B binding motif. In addition, HMR possesses an acidic nine-amino-acid transcriptional activation domain (9aaTAD) and a loss-of-function mutation in this 9aaTAD impairs the expression of PIF target genes and the destruction of PIF1 and PIF3. Together, these in vivo results support a regulatory mechanism for PIFs in which HMR is a transcriptional coactivator binding directly to PIFs and the 9aaTAD of HMR couples the degradation of PIF1 and PIF3 with the transactivation of PIF target genes. PMID:25944101

  20. Molecular genetics of blood-fleshed peach reveals activation of anthocyanin biosynthesis by NAC transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Wang, Huiliang; Gu, Chao; Dare, Andrew P; Espley, Richard V; He, Huaping; Allan, Andrew C; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanin pigmentation is an important consumer trait in peach (Prunus persica). In this study, the genetic basis of the blood-flesh trait was investigated using the cultivar Dahongpao, which shows high levels of cyanidin-3-glucoside in the mesocarp. Elevation of anthocyanin levels in the flesh was correlated with the expression of an R2R3 MYB transcription factor, PpMYB10.1. However, PpMYB10.1 did not co-segregate with the blood-flesh trait. The blood-flesh trait was mapped to a 200-kb interval on peach linkage group (LG) 5. Within this interval, a gene encoding a NAC domain transcription factor (TF) was found to be highly up-regulated in blood-fleshed peaches when compared with non-red-fleshed peaches. This NAC TF, designated blood (BL), acts as a heterodimer with PpNAC1 which shows high levels of expression in fruit at late developmental stages. We show that the heterodimer of BL and PpNAC1 can activate the transcription of PpMYB10.1, resulting in anthocyanin pigmentation in tobacco. Furthermore, silencing the BL gene reduces anthocyanin pigmentation in blood-fleshed peaches. The transactivation activity of the BL-PpNAC1 heterodimer is repressed by a SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein-like TF, PpSPL1. Low levels of PpMYB10.1 expression in fruit at early developmental stages is probably attributable to lower levels of expression of PpNAC1 plus the presence of high levels of repressors such as PpSPL1. We present a mechanism whereby BL is the key gene for the blood-flesh trait in peach via its activation of PpMYB10.1 in maturing fruit. Partner TFs such as basic helix-loop-helix proteins and NAC1 are required, as is the removal of transcriptional repressors.

  1. Cleavage of the JunB transcription factor by caspases generates a carboxyl-terminal fragment that inhibits activator protein-1 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason K H; Pearson, Joel D; Maser, Brandon E; Ingham, Robert J

    2013-07-26

    The activator protein-1 (AP-1) family transcription factor, JunB, is an important regulator of proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and the immune response. In this report, we show that JunB is cleaved in a caspase-dependent manner in apoptotic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell lines and that ectopically expressed JunB is cleaved in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells treated with the NALP1b inflammasome activator, anthrax lethal toxin. In both cases, we identify aspartic acid 137 as the caspase cleavage site and demonstrate that JunB can be directly cleaved in vitro by multiple caspases at this site. Cleavage of JunB at aspartic acid 137 separates the N-terminal transactivation domain from the C-terminal DNA binding and dimerization domains, and we show that the C-terminal cleavage fragment retains both DNA binding activity and the ability to interact with AP-1 family transcription factors. Furthermore, this fragment interferes with the binding of full-length JunB to AP-1 sites and inhibits AP-1-dependent transcription. In summary, we have identified and characterized a novel mechanism of JunB post-translational modification and demonstrate that the C-terminal JunB caspase cleavage product functions as a potent inhibitor of AP-1-dependent transcription.

  2. Ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion activates transcription elongation in coagulation factor VII gene expression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsuo; Miyawaki, Yuhri; Okuyama, Eriko; Murata, Moe; Ando, Yumi; Kato, Io; Takagi, Yuki; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    Coagulation FVII (Factor VII) is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein synthesized in hepatocytes. It was reported previously that FVII gene (F7) expression was up-regulated by ribavirin treatment in hepatitis C virus-infected haemophilia patients; however, its precise mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of ribavirin-induced up-regulation of F7 expression in HepG2 (human hepatoma cell line). We found that intracellular GTP depletion by ribavirin as well as other IMPDH (inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase) inhibitors, such as mycophenolic acid and 6-mercaptopurine, up-regulated F7 expression. FVII mRNA transcription was mainly enhanced by accelerated transcription elongation, which was mediated by the P-TEFb (positive-transcription elongation factor b) complex, rather than by promoter activation. Ribavirin unregulated ELL (eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) 3 mRNA expression before F7 up-regulation. We observed that ribavirin enhanced ELL3 recruitment to F7, whereas knockdown of ELL3 diminished ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation. Ribavirin also enhanced recruitment of CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9) and AFF4 to F7. These data suggest that ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion recruits a super elongation complex containing P-TEFb, AFF4 and ELL3, to F7, and modulates FVII mRNA transcription elongation. Collectively, we have elucidated a basal mechanism for ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation by acceleration of transcription elongation, which may be crucial in understanding its pleiotropic functions in vivo.

  3. Active opsin loci adopt intrachromosomal loops that depend on the photoreceptor transcription factor network.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2011-10-25

    Rod and cone opsin genes are expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in their respective photoreceptor subtypes in the mammalian retina. Previous transgenic mouse studies showed that functional interactions between the distal enhancer and proximal promoter of rhodopsin and long/medium-wavelength (L/M) opsin genes are essential for regulating their cell-type-specific transcription. We have used chromosomal conformation capture assays in mouse retinas to investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for this interaction. Here we show that each opsin gene forms intrachromosomal loops in the appropriate photoreceptor subtype, while maintaining a linear configuration in other cell types where it is silent. The enhancer forms physical contacts not only with the promoter but also with the coding regions of each opsin locus. ChIP assays showed that cell-type-specific target binding by three key photoreceptor transcription factors-cone--rod homeobox (CRX), neural retina leucine zipper (NRL), and nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group E, member 3 (NR2E3)--is required for the appropriate local chromosomal organization and transcription of rod and cone opsins. Similar correlations between chromosomal loops and active transcription of opsin genes were also observed in human photoreceptors. Furthermore, quantitative chromosomal conformation capture on human retinas from two male donors showed that the L/M enhancer locus control region (LCR) loops with either the L or M promoter in a near 3:1 ratio, supporting distance-dependent competition between L and M for LCR. Altogether, our results suggest that the photoreceptor transcription factor network cooperatively regulates the chromosomal organization of target genes to precisely control photoreceptor subtype-specific gene expression.

  4. Dynamic transcription factor activity and networks during ErbB2 breast oncogenesis and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M S; Peñalver Bernabé, B; Shin, S; Asztalos, S; Dubbury, S J; Mui, M D; Bellis, A D; Bluver, D; Tonetti, D A; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Broadbelt, L J; Jeruss, J S; Shea, L D

    2014-12-01

    Tissue development and disease progression are multi-stage processes controlled by an evolving set of key regulatory factors, and identifying these factors necessitates a dynamic analysis spanning relevant time scales. Current omics approaches depend on incomplete biological databases to identify critical cellular processes. Herein, we present TRACER (TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRrays), which was employed to quantify the dynamic activity of numerous transcription factor (TFs) simultaneously in 3D and networks for TRACER (NTRACER), a computational algorithm that allows for cellular rewiring to establish dynamic regulatory networks based on activity of TF reporter constructs. We identified major hubs at various stages of culture associated with normal and abnormal tissue growth (i.e., ELK-1 and E2F1, respectively) and the mechanism of action for a targeted therapeutic, lapatinib, through GATA-1, which were confirmed in human ErbB2 positive breast cancer patients and human ErbB2 positive breast cancer cell lines that were either sensitive or resistant to lapatinib.

  5. Binding of basal transcription factor TFIIH to the acidic activation domains of VP16 and p53.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Pearson, A; Coulombe, B; Truant, R; Zhang, S; Regier, J L; Triezenberg, S J; Reinberg, D; Flores, O; Ingles, C J

    1994-01-01

    Acidic transcriptional activation domains function well in both yeast and mammalian cells, and some have been shown to bind the general transcription factors TFIID and TFIIB. We now show that two acidic transactivators, herpes simplex virus VP16 and human p53, directly interact with the multisubunit human general transcription factor TFIIH and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart, factor b. The VP16- and p53-binding domains in these factors lie in the p62 subunit of TFIIH and in the homologous subunit, TFB1, of factor b. Point mutations in VP16 that reduce its transactivation activity in both yeast and mammalian cells weaken its binding to both yeast and human TFIIH. This suggests that binding of activation domains to TFIIH is an important aspect of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:7935417

  6. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  7. (-)-Epicatechin gallate (ECG) stimulates osteoblast differentiation via Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ)-mediated transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Byun, Mi Ran; Sung, Mi Kyung; Kim, A Rum; Lee, Cham Han; Jang, Eun Jung; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Noh, Minsoo; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease characterized by low bone mass and is caused by an imbalance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. It is known that the bioactive compounds present in green tea increase osteogenic activity and decrease the risk of fracture by improving bone mineral density. However, the detailed mechanism underlying these beneficial effects has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the osteogenic effect of (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), a major bioactive compound found in green tea. We found that ECG effectively stimulates osteoblast differentiation, indicated by the increased expression of osteoblastic marker genes. Up-regulation of osteoblast marker genes is mediated by increased expression and interaction of the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). ECG facilitates nuclear localization of TAZ through PP1A. PP1A is essential for osteoblast differentiation because inhibition of PP1A activity was shown to suppress ECG-mediated osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the results showed that ECG stimulates osteoblast differentiation through the activation of TAZ and RUNX2, revealing a novel mechanism for green tea-stimulated osteoblast differentiation.

  8. WRKY6 Transcription Factor Restricts Arsenate Uptake and Transposon Activation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Castrillo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; de Lorenzo, Laura; Crevillén, Pedro; Fraile-Escanciano, Ana; TC, Mohan; Mouriz, Alfonso; Catarecha, Pablo; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Olsson, Sanna; Leo del Puerto, Yolanda; Mateos, Isabel; Rojo, Enrique; Hernández, Luis E.; Jarillo, Jose A.; Piñeiro, Manuel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Leyva, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Stress constantly challenges plant adaptation to the environment. Of all stress types, arsenic was a major threat during the early evolution of plants. The most prevalent chemical form of arsenic is arsenate, whose similarity to phosphate renders it easily incorporated into cells via the phosphate transporters. Here, we found that arsenate stress provokes a notable transposon burst in plants, in coordination with arsenate/phosphate transporter repression, which immediately restricts arsenate uptake. This repression was accompanied by delocalization of the phosphate transporter from the plasma membrane. When arsenate was removed, the system rapidly restored transcriptional expression and membrane localization of the transporter. We identify WRKY6 as an arsenate-responsive transcription factor that mediates arsenate/phosphate transporter gene expression and restricts arsenate-induced transposon activation. Plants therefore have a dual WRKY-dependent signaling mechanism that modulates arsenate uptake and transposon expression, providing a coordinated strategy for arsenate tolerance and transposon gene silencing. PMID:23922208

  9. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  10. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  11. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael

    2011-06-23

    Plants utilize light as a source of information via families of photoreceptors such as the red/far-red absorbing phytochromes (PHY) and the blue/UVA absorbing cryptochromes (CRY). The main goal of the Neff lab is to use molecular-genetic mutant screens to elucidate signaling components downstream of these photoreceptors. Activation-tagging mutagenesis led to the identification of two putative transcription factors that may be involved in both photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling pathways. sob1-D (suppressor of phyB-dominant) mutant phenotypes are caused by the over-expression of a Dof transcription factor previously named OBP3. Our previous studies indicate that OBP3 is a negative regulator of light-mediated cotyledon expansion and may be involved in modulating responsiveness to the growth-regulating hormone auxin. The sob2-D mutant uncovers a role for LEP, a putative AP2/EREBP-like transcription factor, in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation and responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid. Based on photobiological and genetic analysis of OBP3-knockdown and LEP-null mutations, we hypothesize that these transcription factors are involved in both light-mediated seedling development and hormone signaling. To examine the role that these genes play in photomorphogenesis we will: 1) Further explore the genetic role of OBP3 in cotyledon/leaf expansion and other photomorphogenic processes as well as examine potential physical interactions between OBP3 and CRY1 or other signaling components that genetically interact with this transcription factor 2) Test the hypothesis that OBP3 is genetically involved in auxin signaling and root development as well as examine the affects of this hormone and light on OBP3 protein accumulation. 3) Test the hypothesis that LEP is involved in seed germination, seedling photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling. Together these experiments will lead to a greater understanding of the complexity of interactions between photoreceptors and DNA

  12. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT. PMID:26160345

  13. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  14. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  15. The Transcriptional Activator Krüppel-like Factor-6 Is Required for CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, John N.; Zhang, Jingya; Liu, Jia; Sawai, Setsu; Chapouly, Candice; Horng, Sam; Kramer, Elisabeth G.; Loo, Hannah; Burlant, Natalie; Nudelman, German; Lee, Young-Min; Braun, David A.; Lu, Q. Richard; Narla, Goutham; Raine, Cedric S.; Friedman, Scott L.; Casaccia, Patrizia; John, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth factors of the gp130 family promote oligodendrocyte differentiation, and viability, and myelination, but their mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Here, we show that these effects are coordinated, in part, by the transcriptional activator Krüppel-like factor-6 (Klf6). Klf6 is rapidly induced in oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLP) by gp130 factors, and promotes differentiation. Conversely, in mice with lineage-selective Klf6 inactivation, OLP undergo maturation arrest followed by apoptosis, and CNS myelination fails. Overlapping transcriptional and chromatin occupancy analyses place Klf6 at the nexus of a novel gp130-Klf-importin axis, which promotes differentiation and viability in part via control of nuclear trafficking. Klf6 acts as a gp130-sensitive transactivator of the nuclear import factor importin-α5 (Impα5), and interfering with this mechanism interrupts step-wise differentiation. Underscoring the significance of this axis in vivo, mice with conditional inactivation of gp130 signaling display defective Klf6 and Impα5 expression, OLP maturation arrest and apoptosis, and failure of CNS myelination. PMID:27213272

  16. The Transcriptional Activator Krüppel-like Factor-6 Is Required for CNS Myelination.

    PubMed

    Laitman, Benjamin M; Asp, Linnéa; Mariani, John N; Zhang, Jingya; Liu, Jia; Sawai, Setsu; Chapouly, Candice; Horng, Sam; Kramer, Elisabeth G; Mitiku, Nesanet; Loo, Hannah; Burlant, Natalie; Pedre, Xiomara; Hara, Yuko; Nudelman, German; Zaslavsky, Elena; Lee, Young-Min; Braun, David A; Lu, Q Richard; Narla, Goutham; Raine, Cedric S; Friedman, Scott L; Casaccia, Patrizia; John, Gareth R

    2016-05-01

    Growth factors of the gp130 family promote oligodendrocyte differentiation, and viability, and myelination, but their mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Here, we show that these effects are coordinated, in part, by the transcriptional activator Krüppel-like factor-6 (Klf6). Klf6 is rapidly induced in oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLP) by gp130 factors, and promotes differentiation. Conversely, in mice with lineage-selective Klf6 inactivation, OLP undergo maturation arrest followed by apoptosis, and CNS myelination fails. Overlapping transcriptional and chromatin occupancy analyses place Klf6 at the nexus of a novel gp130-Klf-importin axis, which promotes differentiation and viability in part via control of nuclear trafficking. Klf6 acts as a gp130-sensitive transactivator of the nuclear import factor importin-α5 (Impα5), and interfering with this mechanism interrupts step-wise differentiation. Underscoring the significance of this axis in vivo, mice with conditional inactivation of gp130 signaling display defective Klf6 and Impα5 expression, OLP maturation arrest and apoptosis, and failure of CNS myelination.

  17. Transcription termination factor rho prefers catalytically active elongation complexes for releasing RNA.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipak; Chalissery, Jisha; Sen, Ranjan

    2008-07-18

    RNA polymerase pauses at different DNA sequences during transcription elongation, and this pausing is associated with distinct conformational state(s) of the elongation complex (EC). Transcription termination by the termination factor Rho, an RNA-dependent molecular motor, requires pausing of the EC in the termination zone of Rho-dependent terminators. We hypothesized that the conformational state(s) of the EC associated with this pausing would influence the action of Rho. Analyses of the pausing behavior of the EC at the termination points of two well known Rho-dependent terminators revealed that Rho prefers actively transcribing complexes for termination. RNA release kinetics from stalled ECs showed that the rate of RNA release by Rho was reduced if the EC was irreversibly backtracked, if its RNA exit channel was modified by an RNA hairpin, or the bridge helix/trigger loop movement in its active site was perturbed. These defects were overcome significantly by enhancing the rate of ATP hydrolysis either by increasing the concentration of ATP or by using a Rho mutant with higher ATPase activity. We propose that the force generated from ATP hydrolysis of Rho is the key factor in dislodging the EC through its molecular motor action, and this process is facilitated when the EC is in a catalytically competent state, undergoing rapid "Brownian ratchet" motion.

  18. Negative regulation of TLR-signaling pathways by activating transcription factor-3.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Mark M; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Kubelka, Lindsey; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hai, Tsonwin; Williams, Bryan R G

    2007-09-15

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is rapidly induced by LPS in mouse macrophages and regulates TLR4 responses. We show that ATF3 is rapidly induced by various TLRs in mouse macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), as well as plasmacytoid and myeloid subsets of human DCs. In primary macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the atf3 gene (ATF3-knockout (KO)), TLR-stimulated levels of IL-12 and IL-6 were elevated relative to responses in wild-type macrophages. Similarly, targeted deletion of atf3 correlated with enhanced responsiveness of myeloid DCs to TLR activation as measured by IL-12 secretion. Ectopic expression of ATF3 antagonized TLR-stimulated IL-12p40 activation in a reporter assay. In vivo, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide, a TLR9 agonist, given i.p. to ATF3-KO mice resulted in enhanced cytokine production from splenocytes. Furthermore, while ATF3-KO mice challenged with a sublethal dose of PR8 influenza virus were delayed in body weight recovery in comparison to wild type, the ATF3-KO mice showed higher titers of serum neutralizing Ab against PR8 5 mo postinfection. Thus, ATF3 behaves as a negative regulatory transcription factor in TLR pathways and, accordingly, deficiency in atf3 alters responses to immunological challenges in vivo. ATF3 dysregulation merits further exploration in diseases such as type I diabetes and cancer, where altered innate immunity has been implicated in their pathogenesis.

  19. Anti-psoriatic drug anthralin activates transcription factor NF-kappa B in murine keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K N; Podda, M; Packer, L; Baeuerle, P A

    1996-06-01

    Anthralin is one of the most effective and safest therapeutic agents for the treatment of psoriasis, a skin disease characterized by epidermal hyperproliferation and hyperkeratosis. The drug induces and inflammatory response in the skin involving the expression of cytokine and cell adhesion molecule genes that is thought to be essential for its therapeutic efficacy. Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) generated in vivo during the auto-oxidation of anthralin were discussed as mediators of the inflammatory response, but it is not yet understood how this is translated into novel inflammatory gene expression. In this study, we show that at little as 10 microM anthralin can activate a prototypic form of transcription factor NF-(kappa)B, a central transcriptional regulator of inflammatory and immune responses. Two different lines of evidence show that ROIs, in particular H2O2, are second messengers for the anthralin-induced NF-(kappa)B activation. Firstly, the activation could be inhibited by the structurally unrelated antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate. Secondly, keratinocytes stably overexpressing catalase showed a significant reduction of NF-(kappa)B activation, while stable overexpression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase augmented the anthralin effect. Our data suggest that ROI-induced NF-(kappa)B plays a role in the anti-psoriatic activity of the drug anthralin.

  20. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1. These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1+ increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of the O-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1+. Loss of omh1+ abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1+ resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2+ or cbf12+. This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:26896331

  1. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  2. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  3. Transcriptional activation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL38 promoter conferred by the cis-acting downstream activation sequence is mediated by a cellular transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Guzowski, J F; Singh, J; Wagner, E K

    1994-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 strict late (gamma) UL38 promoter contains three cis-acting transcriptional elements: a TATA box, a specific initiator element, and the downstream activation sequence (DAS). DAS is located between positions +20 and +33 within the 5' untranslated leader region and strongly influences transcript levels during productive infection. In this communication, we further characterize DAS and investigate its mechanism of action. DAS function has a strict spacing requirement, and DAS contains an essential 6-bp core element. A similarly positioned element from the gamma gC gene (UL44) has partial DAS function within the UL38 promoter context, and the promoter controlling expression of the gamma US11 transcript contains an identically located element with functional and sequence similarity to UL38 DAS. These data suggest that downstream elements are a common feature of many HSV gamma promoters. Results with recombinant viruses containing modifications of the TATA box or initiator element of the UL38 promoter suggest that DAS functions to increase transcription initiation and not the efficiency of transcription elongation. In vitro transcription assays using uninfected HeLa nuclear extracts show that, as in productive infection with recombinant viruses, the deletion of DAS from the UL38 promoter dramatically decreases RNA expression. Finally, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking experiments show that DAS DNA forms a specific, stable complex with a cellular protein (the DAS-binding factor) of approximately 35 kDa. These data strongly suggest that the interaction of cellular DAS-binding factor with DAS is required for efficient expression of UL38 and other HSV late genes. Images PMID:7966567

  4. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. •HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-κB through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  5. A modified reverse one-hybrid screen identifies transcriptional activation in Phyochrome-Interacting Factor 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional activation domains (TAD) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput...

  6. Acetylation of steroidogenic factor 1 protein regulates its transcriptional activity and recruits the coactivator GCN5.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A L; Lund, J; Martinez, P; Hedin, L

    2001-10-01

    Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that plays an essential role in the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both sexes. SF-1 belongs to the hormone nuclear receptor superfamily and possesses an N-terminal DNA binding domain and a C-terminal ligand binding domain. Activation function domain 2 is located C-terminal of the ligand binding domain of SF-1 and is important for the transactivation of target genes. Coactivators with histone acetyltransferase activity such as cAMP response element-binding protein-binding protein and steroid receptor coactivator 1 interact and increase SF-1-mediated transcriptional activity. In this study we demonstrate that SF-1 is acetylated in vivo. Histone acetyltransferase GCN5 acetylates SF-1 in vitro. Moreover, we found that SF-1 recruited a novel coactivator GCN5, which can be a newly identified coactivator for SF-1. Acetylation of SF-1 stimulates its transcriptional activity. Inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, increased SF-1-mediated transactivation and stabilized and induced the nuclear export of the SF-1 protein.

  7. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arsheed H.; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K.; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of BK Virus by Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Joslynn A.; Manley, Kate; Dugan, Aisling S.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    The human polyomavirus BK virus (BKV) is a common virus for which 80 to 90% of the adult population is seropositive. BKV reactivation in immunosuppressed patients or renal transplant patients is the primary cause of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVN). Using the Dunlop strain of BKV, we found that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important regulatory role in BKV infection. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that NFAT4 bound to the viral promoter and regulated viral transcription and infection. The mutational analysis of the NFAT binding sites demonstrated complex functional interactions between NFAT, c-fos, c-jun, and the p65 subunit of NF-κB that together influence promoter activity and viral growth. These data indicate that NFAT is required for BKV infection and is involved in a complex regulatory network that both positively and negatively influences promoter activity and viral infection. PMID:19955309

  9. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  10. Contrahelicase activity of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor mtDBP

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2005-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) is a transcription termination factor that is able to arrest bidirectionally mitochondrial RNA chain elongation. The observation that the mtDBP binding site in the main non-coding region is located in correspondence of the 3′ end of the triplex structure, where the synthesis of heavy strand mitochondrial (mt) DNA is either prematurely terminated or allowed to continue, raised the question whether mtDBP could also regulate mtDNA replication. By using a helicase assay in the presence of the replicative helicase of SV40, we show that mtDBP is able to inhibit the enzyme thus acting as a contrahelicase. The impairing activity of mtDBP is bidirectional as it is independent of the orientation of the protein binding site. The inhibition is increased by the presence of the guanosine-rich sequence that flanks mtDBP binding site. Finally, a mechanism of abrogation of mtDBP contrahelicase activity is suggested that is based on the dissociation of mtDBP from DNA caused by the passage of the RNA polymerase through the protein–DNA complex. All these findings favour the view that mtDBP, besides serving as transcription termination factor, could also act as a negative regulator of mtDNA synthesis at the level of D-loop expansion. PMID:16006625

  11. Single-molecule quantification of lipotoxic expression of activating transcription factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dennis W.; Rutledge, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a member of the mammalian activation transcription factor/cAMP, physiologically important in the regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory target genes. We compared the induction of ATF3 protein as measured by Western blot analysis with single-molecule localization microscopy dSTORM to quantify the dynamics of accumulation of intranuclear ATF3 of triglyceride-rich (TGRL) lipolysis product-treated HAEC (Human Aortic Endothelial Cells). The ATF3 expression rate within the first three hours after treatment with TGRL lipolysis products is about 3500/h. After three hours we detected 33,090 ± 3,491 single-molecule localizations of ATF3. This was accompanied by significant structural changes in the F-actin network of the cells at ~3-fold increased localization precision compared to widefield microscopy after treatment. Additionally, we discovered a cluster size of approximately 384 nanometers of ATF3 molecules. We show for the first time the time course of ATF3 accumulation in the nucleus undergoing lipotoxic injury. Furthermore, we demonstrate ATF3 accumulation associated with increased concentrations of TGRL lipolysis products occurs in large aggregates. PMID:25189785

  12. Rapid Synthesis and Screening of Chemically Activated Transcription Factors with GFP-based Reporters

    PubMed Central

    Botstein, David; Noyes, Marcus B.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to rationally design and build synthetic circuits with desired quantitative properties, as well as provide tools to interrogate the structure of native control circuits. In both cases, the ability to program gene expression in a rapid and tunable fashion, with no off-target effects, can be useful. We have constructed yeast strains containing the ACT1 promoter upstream of a URA3 cassette followed by the ligand-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor and VP16. By transforming this strain with a linear PCR product containing a DNA binding domain and selecting against the presence of URA3, a constitutively expressed artificial transcription factor (ATF) can be generated by homologous recombination. ATFs engineered in this fashion can activate a unique target gene in the presence of inducer, thereby eliminating both the off-target activation and nonphysiological growth conditions found with commonly used conditional gene expression systems. A simple method for the rapid construction of GFP reporter plasmids that respond specifically to a native or artificial transcription factor of interest is also provided. PMID:24300440

  13. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates domain-specific inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Sharma, Nikhil; Browne, Heidi Adlman; Trepman, Alissa Z.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A heterogeneous population of inhibitory neurons controls the flow of information through a neural circuit1–3. Inhibitory synapses that form on pyramidal neuron dendrites modulate the summation of excitatory synaptic potentials4–6 and prevent the generation of dendritic calcium spikes7,8. Precisely timed somatic inhibition limits both the number of action potentials and the time window during which firing can occur8,9. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates inhibitory synapse number and function in cell culture10, but how this transcription factor affects the inhibitory inputs that form on distinct domains of a neuron in vivo was unclear. Here we show that in the mouse hippocampus behaviourally driven expression of NPAS4 coordinates the redistribution of inhibitory synapses made onto a CA1 pyramidal neuron, simultaneously increasing inhibitory synapse number on the cell body while decreasing the number of inhibitory synapses on the apical dendrites. This rearrangement of inhibition is mediated in part by the NPAS4 target gene brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), which specifically regulates somatic, and not dendritic, inhibition. These findings indicate that sensory stimuli, by inducing NPAS4 and its target genes, differentially control spatial features of neuronal inhibition in a way that restricts the output of the neuron while creating a dendritic environment that is permissive for plasticity. PMID:24201284

  14. Synergistic transcriptional activation by CTF/NF-I and the estrogen receptor involves stabilized interactions with a limiting target factor.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, E; Dusserre, Y; Wahli, W; Mermod, N

    1991-01-01

    Transcription initiation at eukaryotic protein-coding gene promoters is regulated by a complex interplay of site-specific DNA-binding proteins acting synergistically or antagonistically. Here, we have analyzed the mechanisms of synergistic transcriptional activation between members of the CCAAT-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (CTF/NF-I) family and the estrogen receptor. By using cotransfection experiments with HeLa cells, we show that the proline-rich transcriptional activation domain of CTF-1, when fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain, synergizes with each of the two estrogen receptor-activating regions. Cooperative DNA binding between the GAL4-CTF-1 fusion and the estrogen receptor does not occur in vitro, and in vivo competition experiments demonstrate that both activators can be specifically inhibited by the overexpression of a proline-rich competitor, indicating that a common limiting factor is mediating their transcriptional activation functions. Furthermore, the two activators functioning synergistically are much more resistant to competition than either factor alone, suggesting that synergism between CTF-1 and the estrogen receptor is the result of a stronger tethering of the limiting target factor(s) to the two promoter-bound activators. Images PMID:2038313

  15. A Global Genomic and Genetic Strategy to Predict Pathway Activation of Xenobiotic Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors(TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  16. Transcription factor GATA-6 activates expression of gastroprotective trefoil genes TFF1 and TFF2.

    PubMed

    Al-azzeh, E D; Fegert, P; Blin, N; Gött, P

    2000-02-29

    One of the early events in inflammation and epithelial restitution of the gastrointestinal tract is the up-regulation of secretory peptides belonging to the trefoil factor family (TFF) that promote cell migration, protect and heal the mucosa. Their major expression site is stomach (TFF1, TFF2) and intestine (TFF3). Located in the 5'-flanking region of the genes are several consensus sites for members of the GATA transcription factors known to control gut-specific gene expression. By reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), GATA-6 was shown to be expressed in a variety of tumor cell lines of gastric, intestinal and pancreatic origin. In MKN45, KATOIII and LS174T, cotransfection with TFF reporter genes and GATA-6 expression vectors revealed that GATA-6 activates TFF1 and TFF2 4-6-fold, without an effect on TFF3. The functional contribution of GATA binding sequences in the reverse orientation was further characterized by reporter gene assays using TFF2 deletion constructs and by gel shift experiments. PMID:10684977

  17. Quantifying colocalization of a conditionally active transcription factor FOXP3 in three-dimensional cellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Allan, Sarah E.; Levings, Megan K.

    2009-02-01

    Biological macromolecular interactions between proteins, transcription factors, DNA and other types of biomolecules, are fundamentally important to several cellular and biological processes. 3D Multi-channel confocal microscopy and colocalization analysis of fluorescent signals have proven to be invaluable tools for detecting such molecular interactions. The aim of this work was to quantify colocalization of the FOXP3 transcription factor in 3D cellular space generated from the confocal 3D image sets. 293T cells transfected with a conditionally active form of FOXP3 were stained for nuclei with Hoechst, for FOXP3 with anti-FOXP3 conjugated to PE, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen used as protein translocation and activation agent. Since the protein signal was weak and nonspecific intensity contributions were strong, it was difficult to perform colocalization analysis and estimate colocalization quantities. We performed 3D restoration by deconvolution method on the confocal images using experimentally measured point spread functions (PSFs) and subsequently a color shift correction. The deconvolution method eliminated nonspecific intensity contributions originating from PSF imposed by optical microscopy diffraction resolution limits and noise since these factors significantly affected colocalization analysis and quantification. Visual inspection of the deconvolved 3D image suggested that the FOXP3 molecules are predominantly colocalized within the nuclei although the fluorescent signals from FOXP3 molecules were also present in the cytoplasm. A close inspection of the scatter plot (colocalization map) and correlation quantities such as the Pearsons and colocalization coefficients showed that the fluorescent signals from the FOXP3 molecules and DNA are strongly correlated. In conclusion, our colocalization quantification approach confirms the preferential association of the FOXP3 molecules with the DNA despite the presence of fluorescent signals from the former one both in the

  18. The ERF11 Transcription Factor Promotes Internode Elongation by Activating Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Park, Jeongmoo; Tyler, Ludmila; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Qiu, Kai; Nam, Edward A; Lumba, Shelley; Desveaux, Darrell; McCourt, Peter; Kamiya, Yuji; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in promoting stem elongation in plants. Previous studies show that GA activates its signaling pathway by inducing rapid degradation of DELLA proteins, GA signaling repressors. Using an activation-tagging screen in a reduced-GA mutant ga1-6 background, we identified AtERF11 to be a novel positive regulator of both GA biosynthesis and GA signaling for internode elongation. Overexpression of AtERF11 partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of ga1-6 AtERF11 is a member of the ERF (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR) subfamily VIII-B-1a of ERF/AP2 transcription factors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Overexpression of AtERF11 resulted in elevated bioactive GA levels by up-regulating expression of GA3ox1 and GA20ox genes. Hypocotyl elongation assays further showed that overexpression of AtERF11 conferred elevated GA response, whereas loss-of-function erf11 and erf11 erf4 mutants displayed reduced GA response. In addition, yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and transient expression assays showed that AtERF11 enhances GA signaling by antagonizing the function of DELLA proteins via direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, AtERF11 overexpression also caused a reduction in the levels of another phytohormone ethylene in the growing stem, consistent with recent finding showing that AtERF11 represses transcription of ethylene biosynthesis ACS genes. The effect of AtERF11 on promoting GA biosynthesis gene expression is likely via its repressive function on ethylene biosynthesis. These results suggest that AtERF11 plays a dual role in promoting internode elongation by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis and activating GA biosynthesis and signaling pathways. PMID:27255484

  19. The ERF11 Transcription Factor Promotes Internode Elongation by Activating Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Tyler, Ludmila; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Qiu, Kai; Lumba, Shelley; Desveaux, Darrell; McCourt, Peter; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in promoting stem elongation in plants. Previous studies show that GA activates its signaling pathway by inducing rapid degradation of DELLA proteins, GA signaling repressors. Using an activation-tagging screen in a reduced-GA mutant ga1-6 background, we identified AtERF11 to be a novel positive regulator of both GA biosynthesis and GA signaling for internode elongation. Overexpression of AtERF11 partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of ga1-6. AtERF11 is a member of the ERF (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR) subfamily VIII-B-1a of ERF/AP2 transcription factors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Overexpression of AtERF11 resulted in elevated bioactive GA levels by up-regulating expression of GA3ox1 and GA20ox genes. Hypocotyl elongation assays further showed that overexpression of AtERF11 conferred elevated GA response, whereas loss-of-function erf11 and erf11 erf4 mutants displayed reduced GA response. In addition, yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and transient expression assays showed that AtERF11 enhances GA signaling by antagonizing the function of DELLA proteins via direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, AtERF11 overexpression also caused a reduction in the levels of another phytohormone ethylene in the growing stem, consistent with recent finding showing that AtERF11 represses transcription of ethylene biosynthesis ACS genes. The effect of AtERF11 on promoting GA biosynthesis gene expression is likely via its repressive function on ethylene biosynthesis. These results suggest that AtERF11 plays a dual role in promoting internode elongation by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis and activating GA biosynthesis and signaling pathways. PMID:27255484

  20. Regulation of selected genome loci using de novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-type transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Morbitzer, Robert; Römer, Patrick; Boch, Jens; Lahaye, Thomas

    2010-12-14

    Proteins that can be tailored to bind desired DNA sequences are key tools for molecular biology. Previous studies suggested that DNA-binding specificity of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from the bacterial genus Xanthomonas is defined by repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) of tandem-arranged 34/35-amino acid repeat units. We have studied chimeras of two TALEs differing in RVDs and non-RVDs and found that, in contrast to the critical contributions by RVDs, non-RVDs had no major effect on the DNA-binding specificity of the chimeras. This finding suggests that one needs only to modify the RVDs to generate designer TALEs (dTALEs) to activate transcription of user-defined target genes. We used the scaffold of the TALE AvrBs3 and changed its RVDs to match either the tomato Bs4, the Arabidopsis EGL3, or the Arabidopsis KNAT1 promoter. All three dTALEs transcriptionally activated the desired promoters in a sequence-specific manner as mutations within the targeted DNA sequences abolished promoter activation. This study is unique in showing that chromosomal loci can be targeted specifically by dTALEs. We also engineered two AvrBs3 derivatives with four additional repeat units activating specifically either the pepper Bs3 or UPA20 promoter. Because AvrBs3 activates both promoters, our data show that addition of repeat units facilitates TALE-specificity fine-tuning. Finally, we demonstrate that the RVD NK mediates specific interaction with G nucleotides that thus far could not be targeted specifically by any known RVD type. In summary, our data demonstrate that the TALE scaffold can be tailored to target user-defined DNA sequences in whole genomes.

  1. Transcriptional activation of human CDCA8 gene regulated by transcription factor NF-Y in embryonic stem cells and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Can; Miao, Cong-Xiu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Lv-Jun; Gu, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Di; Chen, Lian-Sheng; Lin, Ge; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2015-09-11

    The cell division cycle associated 8 (CDCA8) gene plays an important role in mitosis. Overexpression of CDCA8 was reported in some human cancers and is required for cancer growth and progression. We found CDCA8 expression was also high in human ES cells (hESCs) but dropped significantly upon hESC differentiation. However, the regulation of CDCA8 expression has not yet been studied. Here, we characterized the CDCA8 promoter and identified its cis-elements and transcription factors. Three transcription start sites were identified. Reporter gene assays revealed that the CDCA8 promoter was activated in hESCs and cancer cell lines. The promoter drove the reporter expression specifically to pluripotent cells during early mouse embryo development and to tumor tissues in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that CDCA8 is transcriptionally activated in hESCs and cancer cells. Mechanistically, two key activation elements, bound by transcription factor NF-Y and CREB1, respectively, were identified in the CDCA8 basic promoter by mutation analyses and electrophoretic motility shift assays. NF-Y binding is positively correlated with promoter activities in different cell types. Interestingly, the NF-YA subunit, binding to the promoter, is primarily a short isoform in hESCs and a long isoform in cancer cells, indicating a different activation mechanism of the CDCA8 transcription between hESCs and cancer cells. Finally, enhanced CDCA8 promoter activities by NF-Y overexpression and reduced CDCA8 transcription by NF-Y knockdown further verified that NF-Y is a positive regulator of CDCA8 transcription. Our study unearths the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CDCA8 expression in hESCs and cancer cells, which provides a better understanding of its biological functions.

  2. Nuclear factor RIP140 modulates transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaillès, V; Dauvois, S; L'Horset, F; Lopez, G; Hoare, S; Kushner, P J; Parker, M G

    1995-01-01

    A conserved region in the hormone-dependent activation domain AF2 of nuclear receptors plays an important role in transcriptional activation. We have characterized a novel nuclear protein, RIP140, that specifically interacts in vitro with this domain of the estrogen receptor. This interaction was increased by estrogen, but not by anti-estrogens and the in vitro binding capacity of mutant receptors correlates with their ability to stimulate transcription. RIP140 also interacts with estrogen receptor in intact cells and modulates its transcriptional activity in the presence of estrogen, but not the anti-estrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen. In view of its widespread expression in mammalian cells, RIP140 may interact with other members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors and thereby act as a potential co-activator of hormone-regulated gene transcription. Images PMID:7641693

  3. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  4. Inhibition of Phosphatase Activity Follows Decline in Sulfatase Activity and Leads to Transcriptional Effects through Sustained Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor MITF

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Arylsulfatase B (B-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Decline in ARSB has been shown in malignant prostate, colonic, and mammary cells and tissues, and decline in ARSB leads to transcriptional events mediated by galectin-3 with AP-1 and Sp1. Increased mRNA expression of GPNMB (transmembrane glycoprotein NMB) in HepG2 cells and in hepatic tissue from ARSB-deficient mice followed decline in expression of ARSB and was mediated by the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), but was unaffected by silencing galectin-3. Since GPNMB is increased in multiple malignancies, studies were performed to determine how decline in ARSB increased GPNMB expression. The mechanism by which decline in ARSB increased nuclear phospho-MITF was due to reduced activity of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase with Src homology (SH2) domains that regulates multiple cellular processes. SHP2 activity declined due to increased binding with chondroitin 4-sulfate when ARSB was reduced. When SHP2 activity was inhibited, phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-associated phosphokinase (MAPK) and of MITF increased, leading to GPNMB promoter activation. A dominant negative SHP2 construct, the SHP2 inhibitor PHSP1, and silencing of ARSB increased phospho-p38, nuclear MITF, and GPNMB. In contrast, constitutively active SHP2 and overexpression of ARSB inhibited GPNMB expression. The interaction between chondroitin 4-sulfate and SHP2 is a novel intersection between sulfation and phosphorylation, by which decline in ARSB and increased chondroitin 4-sulfation can inhibit SHP2, thereby regulating downstream tyrosine phosphorylations by sustained phosphorylations with associated activation of signaling and transcriptional events. PMID:27078017

  5. Regulation of human prohormone convertase 2 promoter activity by the transcription factor EGR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, E; Ayoubi, T A; Meulemans, S M; Van De Ven, W J

    1997-01-01

    Prohormone convertases are involved in the tissue-specific endoproteolytic processing of prohormones and neuropeptide precursors within the secretory pathway. In the present study, we have isolated genomic clones comprising the 5'-terminal region of the human prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) gene and established characteristics of the PC2 promoter region. The proximal promoter region is very G+C-rich and does not contain a canonical TATA box or a CAAT box. Transient expression assays with a set of human PC2 gene fragments containing progressive 5' deletions demonstrate that the proximal promoter region is capable of directing high levels of neuroendocrine-specific expression of reporter gene constructs. In addition, we show that the transcription factor EGR-1 interacts with two distinct elements within the proximal human PC2 promoter region. Transfection experiments also demonstrate that EGR-1 is able to enhance PC2 promoter activity. PMID:9359835

  6. Molecular imaging of nuclear factor-Y transcriptional activity maps proliferation sites in live animals

    PubMed Central

    Goeman, Frauke; Manni, Isabella; Artuso, Simona; Ramachandran, Balaji; Toietta, Gabriele; Bossi, Gianluca; Rando, Gianpaolo; Cencioni, Chiara; Germoni, Sabrina; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Bacchetti, Silvia; Maggi, Adriana; Sacchi, Ada; Ciana, Paolo; Piaggio, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    In vivo imaging involving the use of genetically engineered animals is an innovative powerful tool for the noninvasive assessment of the molecular and cellular events that are often targets of therapy. On the basis of the knowledge that the activity of the nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factor is restricted in vitro to proliferating cells, we have generated a transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc (for mitosis-luciferase), in which an NF-Y–dependent promoter controls luciferase expression. In these mice, bioluminescence imaging of NF-Y activity visualizes areas of physiological cell proliferation and regeneration during response to injury. Using this tool, we highlight for the first time a role of NF-Y activity on hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. MITO-Luc reporter mice should facilitate investigations into the involvement of genes in cell proliferation and provide a useful model for studying aberrant proliferation in disease pathogenesis. They should be also useful in the development of new anti/proproliferative drugs and assessment of their efficacy and side effects on nontarget tissues. PMID:22379106

  7. Molecular imaging of nuclear factor-Y transcriptional activity maps proliferation sites in live animals.

    PubMed

    Goeman, Frauke; Manni, Isabella; Artuso, Simona; Ramachandran, Balaji; Toietta, Gabriele; Bossi, Gianluca; Rando, Gianpaolo; Cencioni, Chiara; Germoni, Sabrina; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Bacchetti, Silvia; Maggi, Adriana; Sacchi, Ada; Ciana, Paolo; Piaggio, Giulia

    2012-04-01

    In vivo imaging involving the use of genetically engineered animals is an innovative powerful tool for the noninvasive assessment of the molecular and cellular events that are often targets of therapy. On the basis of the knowledge that the activity of the nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factor is restricted in vitro to proliferating cells, we have generated a transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc (for mitosis-luciferase), in which an NF-Y-dependent promoter controls luciferase expression. In these mice, bioluminescence imaging of NF-Y activity visualizes areas of physiological cell proliferation and regeneration during response to injury. Using this tool, we highlight for the first time a role of NF-Y activity on hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. MITO-Luc reporter mice should facilitate investigations into the involvement of genes in cell proliferation and provide a useful model for studying aberrant proliferation in disease pathogenesis. They should be also useful in the development of new anti/proproliferative drugs and assessment of their efficacy and side effects on nontarget tissues. PMID:22379106

  8. Post-transcriptional control of GRF transcription factors by microRNA miR396 and GIF co-activator affects leaf size and longevity.

    PubMed

    Debernardi, Juan M; Mecchia, Martin A; Vercruyssen, Liesbeth; Smaczniak, Cezary; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Inze, Dirk; Rodriguez, Ramiro E; Palatnik, Javier F

    2014-08-01

    The growth-regulating factors (GRFs) are plant-specific transcription factors. They form complexes with GRF-interacting factors (GIFs), a small family of transcriptional co-activators. In Arabidopsis thaliana, seven out of the nine GRFs are controlled by microRNA miR396. Analysis of Arabidopsis plants carrying a GRF3 allele insensitive to miR396 revealed a strong boost in the number of cells in leaves, which was further enhanced synergistically by an additional increase of GIF1 levels. Genetic experiments revealed that GRF3 can still increase cell number in gif1 mutants, albeit to a much lesser extent. Genome-wide transcript profiling indicated that the simultaneous increase of GRF3 and GIF1 levels causes additional effects in gene expression compared to either of the transgenes alone. We observed that GIF1 interacts in vivo with GRF3, as well as with chromatin-remodeling complexes, providing a mechanistic explanation for the synergistic activities of a GRF3-GIF1 complex. Interestingly, we found that, in addition to the leaf size, the GRF system also affects the organ longevity. Genetic and molecular analysis revealed that the functions of GRFs in leaf growth and senescence can be uncoupled, demonstrating that the miR396-GRF-GIF network impinges on different stages of leaf development. Our results integrate the post-transcriptional control of the GRF transcription factors with the progression of leaf development.

  9. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Firoze . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu; Kannan, Subburaj; Wang Jianling

    2006-01-15

    Signaling mechanisms in aniline-induced fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen are not known. Previous studies have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron accumulation and oxidative stress in the spleen, which may cause activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and regulate the transcription of genes involved in fibrosis and/or tumorigenesis. To test this, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline via drinking water for 30 days, and activation of transcription factor AP-1 was determined in the splenocyte nuclear extracts (NEs). AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the NEs of freshly isolated splenocytes from aniline-treated rats increased in comparison to the controls, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). AP-1 binding was also determined in the NEs of cultured splenocytes (2 h and 24 h), which showed even a greater increase in binding activity at 2 h. The specificity of AP-1 binding for relevant DNA motifs was confirmed by competition EMSA and by supershift EMSA using antibodies specific to c-Jun and c-Fos. To further explore the signaling mechanisms in the AP-1 activation, phosphorylation patterns of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Aniline exposure induced increases in the phosphorylation of the three classes of MAPKs: extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2), and p38 MAPKs. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression showed a 3-fold increase in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. These observations suggest a strong association among MAPK phosphorylation, AP-1 activation, and enhanced TGF-{beta}1 gene expression. The observed sequence of events subsequent to aniline exposure could regulate genes that lead to fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  10. Diabetes-induced activation of nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, and its inhibition by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, Renu A; Koppolu, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Chen, Shali

    2003-11-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in the retina in diabetes, and long-term administration of antioxidants inhibits the development of retinopathy in diabetic rats. The purpose of this study is to determine how diabetes affects the activation of a redox-sensitive nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, NF-kappaB, and its inhibition by antioxidants. Alloxan diabetic rats were assigned to receive standard diet or the diet supplemented with multiple antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, Trolox, dl alpha-tocopherol acetate, N-acetyl cysteine, beta-carotene, and selenium for up to 14 months. NF-kappaB activation, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were measured in the retina at 2, 8 and 14 months of diabetes. Retinal NF-kappaB was activated by about 60% at two months after induction of diabetes, remained activated for up to 14 months of diabetes, and the duration of diabetes had no effect on the intensity of NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were elevated by over 50% in the retina of rats diabetic for 14 months, and nitrotyrosine levels were elevated by over two folds. Administration of the antioxidants to the rats for the entire duration of diabetes inhibited activation of NF-kappaB and elevations in oxidative stress, nitric oxides and nitrotyrosine formation without ameliorating the severity of hyperglycemia. These in vivo results were confirmed by in vitro studies showing that high glucose activates NF-kappaB and elevates NO and lipid peroxides in both retinal endothelial cells and pericytes that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Thus, the results suggest that the activation of retinal NF-KB in diabetes is an early event in the development of retinopathy, and it remains active when the retinal capillary cell death is accelerating, and histopathology is developing. Beneficial effects of antioxidants on the development of diabetic retinopathy might involve inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and its downstream pathways in the retina.

  11. Regulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene transcription by macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, K J; Fowles, L F; Colman, M S; Ostrowski, M C; Hume, D A

    1995-01-01

    The mouse urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene was used as a model macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-inducible gene to investigate CSF-1 signalling pathways. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that induction of uPA mRNA by CSF-1 and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was at the transcriptional level in bone marrow-derived macrophages. CSF-1 and PMA synergized strongly in the induction of uPA mRNA, showing that at least some components of CSF-1 action are mediated independently of protein kinase C. Promoter targets of CSF-1 signalling were investigated with NIH 3T3 cells expressing the human CSF-1 receptor (c-fms). uPA mRNA was induced in these cells by treatment with CSF-1, and a PEA3/AP-1 element at -2.4 kb in the uPA promoter was involved in this response. Ets transcription factors can act through PEA3 sequences, and the involvement of Ets factors in the induction of uPA was confirmed by use of a dominant negative Ets-2 factor. Expression of the DNA binding domain of Ets-2 fused to the lacZ gene product prevented CSF-1-mediated induction of uPA mRNA in NIH 3T3 cells expressing the CSF-1 receptor. Examination of ets-2 mRNA expression in macrophages showed that it was also induced synergistically by CSF-1 and PMA. In the macrophage cell line RAW264, the uPA PEA3/AP-1 element mediated a response to both PMA and cotransfected Ets-2. uPA promoter constructs were induced 60- to 130-fold by Ets-2 expression, and the recombinant Ets-2 DNA binding domain was able to bind to the uPA PEA3/AP-1 element. This work is consistent with a proposed pathway for CSF-1 signalling involving sequential activation of fms, ras, and Ets factors. PMID:7760840

  12. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation. PMID:26404494

  13. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-09-25

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation.

  14. RAI1 Transcription Factor Activity Is Impaired in Mutants Associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Canales, Cesar P.; Cao, Lei; Perez, Irene C.; Srivastava, Anand K.; Young, Juan I.; Walz, Katherina

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) is a complex genomic disorder mostly caused by the haploinsufficiency of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1), located in the chromosomal region 17p11.2. In a subset of SMS patients, heterozygous mutations in RAI1 are found. Here we investigate the molecular properties of these mutated forms and their relationship with the resulting phenotype. We compared the clinical phenotype of SMS patients carrying a mutation in RAI1 coding region either in the N-terminal or the C-terminal half of the protein and no significant differences were found. In order to study the molecular mechanism related to these two groups of RAI1 mutations first we analyzed those mutations that result in the truncated protein corresponding to the N-terminal half of RAI1 finding that they have cytoplasmic localization (in contrast to full length RAI1) and no ability to activate the transcription through an endogenous target: the BDNF enhancer. Similar results were found in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a SMS patient carrying RAI1 c.3103insC, where both mutant and wild type products of RAI1 were detected. The wild type form of RAI1 was found in the chromatin bound and nuclear matrix subcellular fractions while the mutant product was mainly cytoplasmic. In addition, missense mutations at the C-terminal half of RAI1 presented a correct nuclear localization but no activation of the endogenous target. Our results showed for the first time a correlation between RAI1 mutations and abnormal protein function plus they suggest that a reduction of total RAI1 transcription factor activity is at the heart of the SMS clinical presentation. PMID:23028815

  15. Transcription factor NFAT1 controls allergic contact hypersensitivity through regulation of activation induced cell death program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Gi-Cheon; Hwang, Ji Sun; Kim, Young; Chae, Chang-Suk; Nam, Jong Hee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Rudra, Dipayan; Surh, Charles D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by allergen specific T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of transcription factor NFAT1 in the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. NFAT1 knock out (KO) mice spontaneously developed CHS-like skin inflammation in old age. Healthy young NFAT1 KO mice displayed enhanced susceptibility to hapten-induced CHS. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from NFAT1 KO mice displayed hyper-activated properties and produced significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory T helper 1(Th1)/Th17 type cytokines. NFAT1 KO T cells were more resistant to activation induced cell death (AICD), and regulatory T cells derived from these mice showed a partial defect in their suppressor activity. NFAT1 KO T cells displayed a reduced expression of apoptosis associated BCL-2/BH3 family members. Ectopic expression of NFAT1 restored the AICD defect in NFAT1 KO T cells and increased AICD in normal T cells. Recipient Rag2−/− mice transferred with NFAT1 KO T cells showed more severe CHS sensitivity due to a defect in activation induced hapten-reactive T cell apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest the NFAT1 plays a pivotal role as a genetic switch in CD4+/CD8+ T cell tolerance by regulating AICD process in the T cell mediated skin inflammation. PMID:26777750

  16. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Kwon, Tae-Hyung; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Lee, Su-Jin; Park, Nyun-Ho; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-01-01

    Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A), one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK)-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:27043582

  17. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Mazumder, B.; Fox, P. L.

    2000-01-01

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  18. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, C K; Mazumder, B; Fox, P L

    2000-07-14

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  19. The loss of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) reduces bone toughness and fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Wadeer, Sandra A; Whitehead, Jack M; Rowland, Barbara J; Granke, Mathilde; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Yang, Xiangli; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-05-01

    Even though age-related changes to bone tissue affecting fracture risk are well characterized, only a few matrix-related factors have been identified as important to maintaining fracture resistance. As a gene critical to osteoblast differentiation, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is possibly one of these important factors. To test the hypothesis that the loss of ATF4 affects the fracture resistance of bone beyond bone mass and structure, we harvested bones from Atf4+/+ and Atf4-/- littermates at 8 and 20 weeks of age (n≥9 per group) for bone assessment across several length scales. From whole bone mechanical tests in bending, femurs from Atf4-/- mice were found to be brittle with reduced toughness and fracture toughness compared to femurs from Atf4+/+ mice. However, there were no differences in material strength and in tissue hardness, as determined by nanoindentation, between the genotypes, irrespective of age. Tissue mineral density of the cortex at the point of loading as determined by micro-computed tomography was also not significantly different. However, by analyzing local composition by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), bone tissue of Atf4-/- mice was found to have higher mineral to collagen ratio compared to wild-type tissue, primarily at 20 weeks of age. From RS analysis of intact femurs at 2 orthogonal orientations relative to the polarization axis of the laser, we also found that the organizational-sensitive peak ratio, ν1Phosphate per Amide I, changed to a greater extent upon bone rotation for Atf4-deficient tissue, implying bone matrix organization may contribute to the brittleness phenotype. Target genes of ATF4 activity are not only important to osteoblast differentiation but also in maintaining bone toughness and fracture toughness.

  20. POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, represses transcription of ADH5/FDH by interacting with the zinc finger and interfering with DNA binding activity of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Suh, Dongchul; Edenberg, Howard J; Hur, Man-Wook

    2002-07-26

    The POZ domain is a protein-protein interaction motif that is found in many transcription factors, which are important for development, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription repression. We cloned the POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, that recognizes the cis-element (bp -38 to -22) located just upstream of the core Sp1 binding sites (bp -22 to +22) of the ADH5/FDH minimal promoter (bp -38 to +61) in vitro and in vivo, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The ADH5/FDH minimal promoter is potently repressed by the FBI-1. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down showed that the POZ domains of FBI-1, Plzf, and Bcl-6 directly interact with the zinc finger DNA binding domain of Sp1. DNase I footprinting assays showed that the interaction prevents binding of Sp1 to the GC boxes of the ADH5/FDH promoter. Gal4-POZ domain fusions targeted proximal to the GC boxes repress transcription of the Gal4 upstream activator sequence-Sp1-adenovirus major late promoter. Our data suggest that POZ domain represses transcription by interacting with Sp1 zinc fingers and by interfering with the DNA binding activity of Sp1.

  1. Mutational Analysis of AREA, a Transcriptional Activator Mediating Nitrogen Metabolite Repression in Aspergillus nidulans and a Member of the “Streetwise” GATA Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Arst, Herbert N.

    1998-01-01

    Summary: The transcriptional activator AREA is a member of the GATA family of transcription factors and mediates nitrogen metabolite repression in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The nutritional versatility of A. nidulans and its amenability to classical and reverse genetic manipulations make the AREA DNA binding domain (DBD) a useful model for analyzing GATA family DBDs, particularly as structures of two AREA-DNA complexes have been determined. The 109 extant mutant forms of the AREA DBD surveyed here constitute one of the highest totals of eukaryotic transcription factor DBD mutants, are discussed in light of the roles of individual residues, and are compared to corresponding mutant sequence changes in other fungal GATA factor DBDs. Other topics include delineation of the DBD using both homology and mutational truncation, use of frameshift reversion to detect regions of tolerance to mutational change, the finding that duplication of the DBD can apparently enhance AREA function, and use of the AREA system to analyze a vertebrate GATA factor DBD. Some major points to emerge from work on the AREA DBD are (i) tolerance to sequence change (with retention of function) is surprisingly great, (ii) mutational changes in a transcription factor can have widely differing, even opposing, effects on expression of different structural genes so that monitoring expression of one or even several structural genes can be insufficient and possibly misleading, and (iii) a mutational change altering local hydrophobic packing and DNA binding target specificity can markedly influence the behavior of mutational changes elsewhere in the DBD. PMID:9729601

  2. The AP-1 family member FOS blocks transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, Rosa; Nogueira, Edson; Bassett, Mary H.; Carr, Bruce R.; Suzuki, Takashi; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Andò, Sebastiano; Rainey, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid production in the adrenal zona glomerulosa is under the control of angiotensin II (Ang II), which, upon binding to its receptor, activates protein kinase C (PKC) within these cells. PKC is a potent inhibitor of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17. We have demonstrated that, in the ovary, PKC activates expression of FOS, a member of the AP-1 family, and increased expression of this gene is linked to CYP17 downregulation. However, the pathway and the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of PKC on CYP17 expression are not defined. Herein, we demonstrated that Ang II inhibited CYP17 through PKC and ERK1/2-activated FOS and that blocking FOS expression decreased PKC-mediated inhibition. Although CYP17 transcription was activated by the nuclear receptor SF-1, expression of FOS resulted in a decrease in SF-1-mediated gene transcription. FOS physically interacted with the hinge region of SF-1 and modulated its transactivity, thus preventing binding of cofactors such as SRC1 and CBP, which were necessary to fully activate CYP17 transcription. Collectively, these results indicate a new regulatory mechanism for SF-1 transcriptional activity that might influence adrenal zone-specific expression of CYP17, a mechanism that can potentially be applied to other steroidogenic tissues. PMID:20980388

  3. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Evi; Csaba, Gergely; Zimmer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs) from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score), which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal) i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score. PMID:27723775

  4. Transforming growth factor-1 promotes the transcriptional activation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Yin, Wan-Le; Ba, Yu-Feng; Tian, Lin; Gu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Ming-Sheng; Zhong, Chu-Nan

    2012-11-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a pivotal role in promoting the growth, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. However, to date little is known about the oncogenic mechanisms of CAFs. This study aimed to identify the microenvironmental factors involved in tumor development and progression directed by CAFs in liver metastases. Tissue samples collected from 20 patients with colorectal liver metastases were used in this study. Histological and morphological characterization of the samples was performed using hybridization and immunohistological assays. The mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was measured by northern blotting. The expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As a result, co-expression of Thy-1 (CD90) and α-SMA was identified in CAFs, while normal liver samples were negative for α-SMA and Thy-1. Compared with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) incubation, the expression of α-SMA increased significantly following transforming growth factor-1 (TGF-1) incubation (P<0.05), while platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) caused a significant suppression of α-SMA expression (P<0.05). PAI-1 expression was significantly lower in unstimulated fibroblasts compared to TGF-1-treated fibroblasts (P<0.01). The levels of PAI-1 transcription were significantly higher in CAFs from the patient samples compared with the healthy controls. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAFs may be important in migration, matrix degradation, invasion and angiogenesis of tumors, and TGF-1 may promote the activation of PAI-1 transcription in CAFs.

  5. Simple enzymatic assays for the in vitro motor activity of transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boudvillain, Marc; Walmacq, Céline; Schwartz, Annie; Jacquinot, Frédérique

    2010-01-01

    The transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli is a ring-shaped homo-hexameric protein that preferentially interacts with naked cytosine-rich Rut (Rho utilization) regions of nascent RNA transcripts. Once bound to the RNA chain, Rho uses ATP as an energy source to produce mechanical work and disruptive forces that ultimately lead to the dissociation of the ternary transcription complex. Although transcription termination assays have been useful to study Rho activity in various experimental contexts, they do not report directly on Rho mechanisms and kinetics. Here, we describe complementary ATP-dependent RNA-DNA helicase and streptavidin displacement assays that can be used to monitor in vitro Rho's motor activity in a more direct and quantitative manner.

  6. Structure-Function Analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster Caudal Transcription Factor Provides Insights into Core Promoter-preferential Activation.

    PubMed

    Shir-Shapira, Hila; Sharabany, Julia; Filderman, Matan; Ideses, Diana; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Mannervik, Mattias; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2015-07-10

    Regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription is critical for the proper development, differentiation, and growth of an organism. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters encompass the RNA start site and consist of functional elements such as the TATA box, initiator, and downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. We have previously discovered that Drosophila Caudal, which is a master regulator of genes involved in development and differentiation, is a DPE-specific transcriptional activator. Here, we show that the mouse Caudal-related homeobox (Cdx) proteins (mCdx1, mCdx2, and mCdx4) are also preferential core promoter transcriptional activators. To elucidate the mechanism that enables Caudal to preferentially activate DPE transcription, we performed structure-function analysis. Using a systematic series of deletion mutants (all containing the intact DNA-binding homeodomain) we discovered that the C-terminal region of Caudal contributes to the preferential activation of the fushi tarazu (ftz) Caudal target gene. Furthermore, the region containing both the homeodomain and the C terminus of Caudal was sufficient to confer core promoter-preferential activation to the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain. Importantly, we discovered that Drosophila CREB-binding protein (dCBP) is a co-activator for Caudal-regulated activation of ftz. Strikingly, dCBP conferred the ability to preferentially activate the DPE-dependent ftz reporter to mini-Caudal proteins that were unable to preferentially activate ftz transcription themselves. Taken together, it is the unique combination of dCBP and Caudal that enables the co-activation of ftz in a core promoter-preferential manner.

  7. Constitutive activation of Drosophila CncC transcription factor reduces lipid formation in the fat body.

    PubMed

    Karim, M Rezaul; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the vertebrate stress-response transcription factors Nrf1 and Nrf2 are involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of Nrf1-and Nrf2-mediated lipid metabolism remain unclear. To elucidate the precise roles of Nrfs in this process, we analyzed the physiological role of CncC in lipid metabolism as a Drosophila model for vertebrate Nrf1 and Nrf2. We first examined whether CncC activity is repressed under physiological conditions through a species-conserved NHB1 (N-terminal homology box 1) domain, similar to that observed for Nrf1. Deletion of the NHB1 domain (CncCΔN) led to CncC-mediated rough-eye phenotypes and the induced expression of the CncC target gene gstD1 both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, we decided to explore how CncCΔN overexpression affects the formation of the fat body, which is the major lipid storage organ. Intriguingly, CncCΔN caused a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride (TG) levels in the fat body compared to wild type. We found that CncCΔN induced a number of genes related to innate immunity that might have an effect on the regulation of cellular lipid storage. Our study provides new insights into the regulatory mechanism of CncC and its role in lipid homeostasis.

  8. Cilostazol promotes production of melanin by activating the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF).

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Zhang, Yu-Pei; Yan, Hai-Zhen; Xu, Yi; Du, Tian-Min

    2014-01-10

    Cilostazol, a licensed clinical drug for the treatment of intermittent claudication, is a phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor that selectively inhibits PDE3, a cAMP-degrading enzyme, thus elevating levels of intracellular cAMP. It has been reported that pigment production by melanocytes both tans the skin and protects against skin cancers. The effects of cilostazol in melanogenesis are as yet unknown. In this study, treatment with cilostazol was found to promote the production of melanin as well as increase both Tyrosinase enzymatic activity and expression of the Tyrosinase gene. Importantly, we also found that cilostazol led to increased expression of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), the "master regulator" of both melanocyte differentiation and pigment production. Interestingly, knockdown of MITF using siRNA abolished the effects of cilostazol in melanogenesis, thereby suggesting that MITF might play a critical role in melanogenesis. Increased expression of MITF was abolished by treatment with H-89, a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, thereby suggesting that the PKA pathway plays a critical role in cilostazol-induced expression of MITF. Cilostazol in fact enhanced expression of p-CREB, which was inhibited by H-89. Moreover, this cilostazol-induced increase in expression of MITF was inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA. These data suggest that induction of MITF via the PKA/CREB pathway plays a critical role in cilostazol-induced production of melanin in B16-F10 melanoma cells.

  9. Band-pass processing in a GPCR signaling pathway selects for NFAT transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Sumit, M; Neubig, R R; Takayama, S; Linderman, J J

    2015-11-01

    Many biological processes are rhythmic and proper timing is increasingly appreciated as being critical for development and maintenance of physiological functions. To understand how temporal modulation of an input signal influences downstream responses, we employ microfluidic pulsatile stimulation of a G-protein coupled receptor, the muscarinic M3 receptor, in single cells with simultaneous real-time imaging of both intracellular calcium and NFAT nuclear localization. Interestingly, we find that reduced stimulation with pulses of ligand can give more efficient transcription factor activation, if stimuli are timed appropriately. Our experiments and computational analyses show that M3 receptor-induced calcium oscillations form a low pass filter while calcium-induced NFAT translocation forms a high pass filter. The combination acts as a band-pass filter optimized for intermediate frequencies of stimulation. We demonstrate that receptor desensitization and NFAT translocation rates determine critical features of the band-pass filter and that the band-pass may be shifted for different receptors or NFAT dynamics. As an example, we show that the two NFAT isoforms (NFAT4 and NFAT1) have shifted band-pass windows for the same receptor. While we focus specifically on the M3 muscarinic receptor and NFAT translocation, band-pass processing is expected to be a general theme that applies to multiple signaling pathways.

  10. Akt regulates basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor-coactivator complex formation and activity during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, Anne B; Taylor, Jennifer; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Figueroa, Claudia; Kwok, Roland P S; Turner, David L

    2003-07-01

    Neural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulate neurogenesis in vertebrates. Signaling by peptide growth factors also plays critical roles in regulating neuronal differentiation and survival. Many peptide growth factors activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and subsequently the Akt kinases, raising the possibility that Akt may impact bHLH protein function during neurogenesis. Here we demonstrate that reducing expression of endogenous Akt1 and Akt2 by RNA interference (RNAi) reduces neuron generation in P19 cells transfected with a neural bHLH expression vector. The reduction in neuron generation from decreased Akt expression is not solely due to decreased cell survival, since addition of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK rescues cell death associated with loss of Akt function but does not restore neuron formation. This result indicates that Akt1 and Akt2 have additional functions during neuronal differentiation that are separable from neuronal survival. We show that activated Akt1 enhances complex formation between bHLH proteins and the transcriptional coactivator p300. Activated Akt1 also significantly augments the transcriptional activity of the bHLH protein neurogenin 3 in complex with the coactivators p300 or CBP. In addition, inhibition of endogenous Akt activity by the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 abolishes transcriptional cooperativity between the bHLH proteins and p300. We propose that Akt regulates the assembly and activity of bHLH-coactivator complexes to promote neuronal differentiation.

  11. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Fuda, Nicholas J.; Mahat, Dig B.; Core, Leighton J.; Guertin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes. PMID:27492368

  12. Selective down-regulation of tyrosinase family gene TYRP1 by inhibition of the activity of melanocyte transcription factor, MITF

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Tsuji, Yoshiaki; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2002-01-01

    Tyrosinase (TYR), tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TYRP1/gp75) and dopachrome tautomerase (DCT/TYRP2) belong to a family of melanocyte-specific gene products involved in melanin pigmentation. During melanocyte development expression of tyrosinase family genes is thought to be orchestrated in part by the binding of a shared basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor MITF to the M box, a regulatory element conserved among these genes. In transformed melanocytes, expression of tyrosinase and TYRPs is highly variable. Whereas TYR expression in melanoma cells is regulated by both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms, TYRP1/gp75 transcription is often completely extinguished during melanoma tumor progression. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of selective repression of TYRP1 transcription. Interestingly, in early stage melanoma cells TYRP1 mRNA could be induced by inhibition of protein synthesis. Transient transfection experiments with a minimal TYRP1 promoter showed that the promoter activity correlates with expression of the endogenous TYRP1 gene. Nucleotide deletion analysis revealed novel regulatory sequences that attenuate the M box-dependent MITF activity, but which are not involved in the repression of TYRP1. Gel mobility shift analysis showed that binding of the transcription factor MITF to the TYRP1 M box is selectively inhibited in TYRP1– cells. These data suggest that protein factors that modulate the activity of MITF in melanoma cells repress TYRP1 and presumably other MITF target genes. PMID:12136092

  13. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Nancy; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, end products of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, influence functions of virtually all organs and tissues through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Circulating levels of glucocorticoids fluctuate naturally in a circadian fashion and regulate the transcriptional activity of GR in target tissues. The basic helix-loop-helix protein CLOCK, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), and its heterodimer partner BMAL1 are self-oscillating transcription factors that generate circadian rhythms in both the central nervous system and periphery. We found that CLOCK/BMAL1 repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity in a HAT-activity- dependent fashion. In serum-shock-synchronized cells, transactivational activity of GR, accessed by mRNA expression of an endogenous-responsive gene, fluctuated spontaneously in a circadian fashion in reverse phase with CLOCK/BMAL1 mRNA expression. CLOCK and GR interacted with each other physically, and CLOCK suppressed binding of GR to its DNA recognition sequences by acetylating multiple lysine residues located in its hinge region. These findings indicate that CLOCK/BMAL1 functions as a reverse-phase negative regulator of glucocorticoid action in target tissues, possibly by antagonizing biological actions of diurnally fluctuating circulating glucocorticoids. Further, these results suggest that a peripheral target tissue circadian rhythm indirectly influences the functions of every organ and tissue inside the body through modulation of the ubiquitous and diverse actions of glucocorticoids.—Nader, N., Chrousos, G. P., Kino, T. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications. PMID:19141540

  14. Stimulation of ribosomal RNA gene promoter by transcription factor Sp1 involves active DNA demethylation by Gadd45-NER pathway.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Pallavi; Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    The well-studied Pol II transcription factor Sp1 has not been investigated for its regulatory role in rDNA transcription. Here, we show that Sp1 bound to specific sites on rDNA and localized into the nucleoli during the G1 phase of cell cycle to activate rDNA transcription. It facilitated the recruitment of Pol I pre-initiation complex and impeded the binding of nucleolar remodeling complex (NoRC) to rDNA resulting in the formation of euchromatin active state. More importantly, Sp1 also orchestrated the site-specific binding of Gadd45a-nucleotide excision repair (NER) complex resulting in active demethylation and transcriptional activation of rDNA. Interestingly, knockdown of Sp1 impaired rDNA transcription due to reduced engagement of the Gadd45a-NER complex and hypermethylation of rDNA. Thus, the present study unveils a novel role of Sp1 in rDNA transcription involving promoter demethylation. PMID:27156884

  15. Mutant p53 is a transcriptional co-factor that binds to G-rich regulatory regions of active genes and generates transcriptional plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Quante, Timo; Otto, Benjamin; Brázdová, Marie; Kejnovská, Iva; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying mutant p53 (mutp53) “gain-of-function” (GOF) are still insufficiently understood, but there is evidence that mutp53 is a transcriptional regulator that is recruited by specialized transcription factors. Here we analyzed the binding sites of mutp53 and the epigenetic status of mutp53-regulated genes that had been identified by global expression profiling upon depletion of endogenous mutp53 (R273H) expression in U251 glioblastoma cells. We found that mutp53 preferentially and autonomously binds to G/C-rich DNA around transcription start sites (TSS) of many genes characterized by active chromatin marks (H3K4me3) and frequently associated with transcription-competent RNA polymerase II. Mutp53-bound regions overlap predominantly with CpG islands and are enriched in G4-motifs that are prone to form G-quadruplex structures. In line, mutp53 binds and stabilizes a well-characterized G-quadruplex structure in vitro. Hence, we assume that binding of mutp53 to G/C-rich DNA regions associated with a large set of cancer-relevant genes is an initial step in their regulation by mutp53. Using GAS1 and HTR2A as model genes, we show that mutp53 affects several parameters of active transcription. Finally, we discuss a dual mode model of mutp53 GOF, which includes both stochastic and deterministic components. PMID:22894900

  16. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits p53 sequence-specific DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and association with transcription factor ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X W; Forrester, K; Yeh, H; Feitelson, M A; Gu, J R; Harris, C C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic active hepatitis caused by infection with hepatitis B virus, a DNA virus, is a major risk factor for human hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the oncogenicity of several DNA viruses is dependent on the interaction of their viral oncoproteins with cellular tumor-suppressor gene products, we investigated the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) and human wild-type p53 protein. HBX complexes with the wild-type p53 protein and inhibits its sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro. HBX expression also inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo and the in vitro association of p53 and ERCC3, a general transcription factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. Therefore, HBX may affect a wide range of p53 functions and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:8134379

  17. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  18. Dioxin receptor and SLUG transcription factors regulate the insulator activity of B1 SINE retrotransposons via an RNA polymerase switch.

    PubMed

    Román, Angel Carlos; González-Rico, Francisco J; Moltó, Eduardo; Hernando, Henar; Neto, Ana; Vicente-Garcia, Cristina; Ballestar, Esteban; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; White, Robert J; Montoliu, Lluís; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M

    2011-03-01

    Complex genomes utilize insulators and boundary elements to help define spatial and temporal gene expression patterns. We report that a genome-wide B1 SINE (Short Interspersed Nuclear Element) retrotransposon (B1-X35S) has potent intrinsic insulator activity in cultured cells and live animals. This insulation is mediated by binding of the transcription factors dioxin receptor (AHR) and SLUG (SNAI2) to consensus elements present in the SINE. Transcription of B1-X35S is required for insulation. While basal insulator activity is maintained by RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription, AHR-induced insulation involves release of Pol III and engagement of Pol II transcription on the same strand. B1-X35S insulation is also associated with enrichment of heterochromatin marks H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 downstream of B1-X35S, an effect that varies with cell type. B1-X35S binds parylated CTCF and, consistent with a chromatin barrier activity, its positioning between two adjacent genes correlates with their differential expression in mouse tissues. Hence, B1 SINE retrotransposons represent genome-wide insulators activated by transcription factors that respond to developmental, oncogenic, or toxicological stimuli. PMID:21324874

  19. Transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B) mediates noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Fakhera; Ackermann, Sandra; Kahlert, Yvonne; Volland, Ruth; Roels, Frederik; Engesser, Anne; Hertwig, Falk; Kocak, Hayriye; Hero, Barbara; Dreidax, Daniel; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Berthold, Frank; Nürnberg, Peter; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal pediatric tumor that originates from the developing sympathetic nervous system and shows a broad range of clinical behavior, ranging from fatal progression to differentiation into benign ganglioneuroma. In experimental neuroblastoma systems, retinoic acid (RA) effectively induces neuronal differentiation, and RA treatment has been therefore integrated in current therapies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation are still poorly understood. We here investigated the role of transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B), a key factor in sympathetic nervous system development, in neuroblastoma pathogenesis and differentiation. Microarray analyses of primary neuroblastomas (n = 649) demonstrated that low TFAP2B expression was significantly associated with unfavorable prognostic markers as well as adverse patient outcome. We also found that low TFAP2B expression was strongly associated with CpG methylation of the TFAP2B locus in primary neuroblastomas (n = 105) and demethylation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in induction of TFAP2B expression in vitro, suggesting that TFAP2B is silenced by genomic methylation. Tetracycline inducible re-expression of TFAP2B in IMR-32 and SH-EP neuroblastoma cells significantly impaired proliferation and cell cycle progression. In IMR-32 cells, TFAP2B induced neuronal differentiation, which was accompanied by up-regulation of the catecholamine biosynthesizing enzyme genes DBH and TH, and down-regulation of MYCN and REST, a master repressor of neuronal genes. By contrast, knockdown of TFAP2B by lentiviral transduction of shRNAs abrogated RA-induced neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2)c neuroblastoma cells almost completely. Taken together, our results suggest that TFAP2B is playing a vital role in retaining RA responsiveness and mediating noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma. PMID:26598443

  20. Transforming growth factor β signaling upregulates the expression of human GDP-fucose transporter by activating transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ma, Anna; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    GDP-fucose transporter plays a crucial role in fucosylation of glycoproteins by providing activated fucose donor, GDP-fucose, for fucosyltransferases in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Fucose-containing glycans are involved in many biological processes, which are essential for growth and development. Mutations in the GDP-fucose transporter gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome II, a disease characterized by slow growth, mental retardation and immunodeficiency. However, no information is available regarding its transcriptional regulation. Here, by using human cells, we show that TGF-β1 specifically induces the GDP-fucose transporter expression, but not other transporters tested such as CMP-sialic acid transporter, suggesting a diversity of regulatory pathways for the expression of these transporters. The regulatory elements that are responsive to the TGF-β1 stimulation are present in the region between bp -330 and -268 in the GDP-fucose transporter promoter. We found that this region contains two identical octamer GC-rich motifs (GGGGCGTG) that were demonstrated to be essential for the transporter expression. We also show that the transcription factor Sp1 specifically binds to the GC-rich motifs in vitro and Sp1 coupled with phospho-Smad2 is associated with the promoter region covering the Sp1-binding motifs in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, we further confirmed that Sp1 is essential for the GDP-fucose transporter expression stimulated by TGF-β1 using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the role of TGF-β signaling in regulation of the GDP-fucose transporter expression via activating Sp1. This is the first transcriptional study for any nucleotide sugar transporters that have been identified so far. Notably, TGF-β1 receptor itself is known to be modified by fucosylation. Given the essential role of GDP-fucose transporter in fucosylation, the finding that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of

  1. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the results of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.

  2. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    DOE PAGES

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; et al

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the resultsmore » of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.« less

  3. A Global Genomic and Genetic Strategy to Identify, Validate and Use Gene Signatures of Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in Prediction of Pathway Activation in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors. Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening as well as their involvement in disease states. ...

  4. Simulated binding of transcription factors to active and inactive regions folds human chromosomes into loops, rosettes and topological domains

    PubMed Central

    Brackley, Chris A.; Johnson, James; Kelly, Steven; Cook, Peter R.; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Biophysicists are modeling conformations of interphase chromosomes, often basing the strengths of interactions between segments distant on the genetic map on contact frequencies determined experimentally. Here, instead, we develop a fitting-free, minimal model: bivalent or multivalent red and green ‘transcription factors’ bind to cognate sites in strings of beads (‘chromatin’) to form molecular bridges stabilizing loops. In the absence of additional explicit forces, molecular dynamic simulations reveal that bound factors spontaneously cluster—red with red, green with green, but rarely red with green—to give structures reminiscent of transcription factories. Binding of just two transcription factors (or proteins) to active and inactive regions of human chromosomes yields rosettes, topological domains and contact maps much like those seen experimentally. This emergent ‘bridging-induced attraction’ proves to be a robust, simple and generic force able to organize interphase chromosomes at all scales. PMID:27060145

  5. Fungal-specific transcription factor AbPf2 activates pathogenicity in Alternaria brassicicola

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yangrae; Ohm, Robin A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Srivastava, Akhil

    2012-12-03

    Alternaria brassicicola is a successful saprophyte and necrotrophic plant pathogen. To identify molecular determinants of pathogenicity, we created non-pathogenic mutants of a transcription factor-encoding gene, AbPf2. The frequency and timing of germination and appressorium formation on host plants were similar between the non-pathogenic abpf2 mutants and wild-type A. brassicicola. The mutants were also similar in vitro to wild-type A. brassicicola in terms of vegetative growth, conidium production, and responses to a phytoalexin, reactive oxygen species and osmolites. The hyphae of the mutants grew slowly but did not cause disease symptoms on the surface of host plants. Transcripts of the AbPf2 gene increased exponentially soon after wild-type conidia contacted their host plants . A small amount of AbPf2 protein, as monitored using GFP fusions, was present in young, mature conidia. The protein level decreased during saprophytic growth, but increased and was located primarily in fungal nuclei during pathogenesis. Levels of the proteins and transcripts sharply decreased following colonization of host tissues beyond the initial infection site. When expression of the transcription factor was induced in the wild-type during early pathogenesis, 106 fungal genes were also induced in the wild-type but not in the abpf2 mutants. Notably, 33 of the 106 genes encoded secreted proteins, including eight putative effector proteins. Plants inoculated with abpf2 mutants expressed higher levels of genes associated with photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway and primary metabolism, but lower levels of defense-related genes. Our results suggest that AbPf2 is an important regulator of pathogenesis, but does not affect other cellular processes in A. brassicicola.

  6. Activating Transcription Factor 3-mediated Chemo-intervention with Cancer Chemokines in a Noncanonical Pathway under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun; Park, Jiyeon; Oh, Chang Gyu; Choi, Hye Jin; Song, Bo Gyoung; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yong Sik; Moon, Yuseok

    2014-01-01

    The cell-protective features of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response are chronically activated in vigorously growing malignant tumor cells, which provide cellular growth advantages over the adverse microenvironment including chemotherapy. As an intervention with ER stress responses in the intestinal cancer cells, preventive exposure to flavone apigenin potentiated superinduction of a regulatory transcription factor, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), which is also known to be an integral player coordinating ER stress response-related gene expression. ATF3 superinduction was due to increased turnover of ATF3 transcript via stabilization with HuR protein in the cancer cells under ER stress. Moreover, enhanced ATF3 caused inhibitory action against ER stress-induced cancer chemokines that are potent mediators determining the survival and metastatic potential of epithelial cancer cells. Although enhanced ATF3 was a negative regulator of the well known proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB, blocking of NF-κB signaling did not affect ER stress-induced chemokine expression. Instead, immediately expressed transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1) was positively involved in cancer chemokine induction by ER stressors. ER stress-induced EGR-1 and subsequent chemokine production were repressed by ATF3. Mechanistically, ATF3 directly interacted with and recruited HDAC1 protein, which led to epigenetic suppression of EGR-1 expression and subsequent chemokine production. Conclusively, superinduced ATF3 attenuated ER stress-induced cancer chemokine expression by epigenetically interfering with induction of EGR-1, a transcriptional modulator crucial to cancer chemokine production. Thus, these results suggest a potent therapeutic intervention of ER stress response-related cancer-favoring events by ATF3. PMID:25122760

  7. Activating transcription factor 3-mediated chemo-intervention with cancer chemokines in a noncanonical pathway under endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun; Park, Jiyeon; Oh, Chang Gyu; Choi, Hye Jin; Song, Bo Gyoung; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yong Sik; Moon, Yuseok

    2014-09-26

    The cell-protective features of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response are chronically activated in vigorously growing malignant tumor cells, which provide cellular growth advantages over the adverse microenvironment including chemotherapy. As an intervention with ER stress responses in the intestinal cancer cells, preventive exposure to flavone apigenin potentiated superinduction of a regulatory transcription factor, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), which is also known to be an integral player coordinating ER stress response-related gene expression. ATF3 superinduction was due to increased turnover of ATF3 transcript via stabilization with HuR protein in the cancer cells under ER stress. Moreover, enhanced ATF3 caused inhibitory action against ER stress-induced cancer chemokines that are potent mediators determining the survival and metastatic potential of epithelial cancer cells. Although enhanced ATF3 was a negative regulator of the well known proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB, blocking of NF-κB signaling did not affect ER stress-induced chemokine expression. Instead, immediately expressed transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1) was positively involved in cancer chemokine induction by ER stressors. ER stress-induced EGR-1 and subsequent chemokine production were repressed by ATF3. Mechanistically, ATF3 directly interacted with and recruited HDAC1 protein, which led to epigenetic suppression of EGR-1 expression and subsequent chemokine production. Conclusively, superinduced ATF3 attenuated ER stress-induced cancer chemokine expression by epigenetically interfering with induction of EGR-1, a transcriptional modulator crucial to cancer chemokine production. Thus, these results suggest a potent therapeutic intervention of ER stress response-related cancer-favoring events by ATF3.

  8. A major peroxiredoxin-induced activation of Yap1 transcription factor is mediated by reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds and reveals a low level of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Shoko; Murayama, Asako; Naganuma, Akira; Nomoto, Akio; Kuge, Shusuke

    2009-02-13

    Redox reactions involving cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange are crucial for the intracellular monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Yap1, the master transcription factor for the oxidative stress response in budding yeast, is activated by the formation of disulfide bonds in response to H(2)O(2). Gpx3 (glutathione peroxidase-like protein 3) acts as a receptor for H(2)O(2), and Ybp1 (Yap1-binding protein 1) is crucial for Gpx3-dependent disulfide bond formation in Yap1. We previously reported that Tsa1, a major peroxiredoxin in yeast cells, is required for activation of Yap1 in a widely used yeast strain, W303-1b, carrying the ybp1-1 mutant allele encoding a truncated Ybp1 protein. In the present study, we show that Tsa1 can interact with Yap1 via disulfide linkages and induce the formation of intramolecular disulfide bonds in Yap1 in ybp1-1 cells. The results provide evidence that Prx can have intrinsic activity as an H(2)O(2) receptor and can relay H(2)O(2) as a signal to the Prx target proteins in terms of formation of disulfide linkage. Furthermore, our data reveal that there is more of the reduction-resistant active form of Yap1 (i.e. Yap1 (oxII)) when it is partnered with Gpx3 than with Tsa1. These data support our hypothesis that changes in the redox status of Yap1 to reduction-resistant forms by multiple disulfide bond formation are important for determining the level and duration of Yap1 activity in the dynamic equilibrium of redox reactions in cells exposed to H(2)O(2). PMID:19106090

  9. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells.

  10. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 stabilizes transcription factor Gli2 and enhances the activity of Hedgehog signaling in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengwei; Xu, Liyao; Zhang, Junyan; Lu, Quqin; Luo, Shiwen; Xu, Linlin

    2016-03-18

    The Gli transcription factors are primary transcriptional regulators that mediate the activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Recent studies have revealed that Gli proteins are also regulated transcriptionally and post-translationally through noncanonical mechanisms, independent of Hh signaling. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the regulation of Gli proteins remain unclear. Using a differential mass-spectrometry approach, we found that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) is associated with transcription factor Gli2. Overexpression of ALDH1A1 increased Gli2 protein levels; in contrast, ALDH1A1 depletion facilitated Gli2 degradation. In addition, Gli2 mRNA expression was not affected by ectopic expression of ALDH1A1, indicating the role of ALDH1A1 in the stabilization of Gli2. Further investigation showed that ALDH1A1 prolonged the stability of Gli2 protein in a catalytic-independent manner. Finally, we showed that overexpression of ALDH1A1 activated the Hh signaling pathway and promoted cell growth, migration and invasion in hepatocellular cancer cells. Together, these results illustrate regulatory roles of ALDH1A1 in the activation of the Hh signaling pathway and highlight a novel mechanism for the aberrant activation of the Hh signaling pathway in hepatocellular cancer cells. PMID:26896768

  12. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors establish CD8(+) T cell identity through intrinsic HDAC activity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shaojun; Li, Fengyin; Zeng, Zhouhao; Zhao, Yunjie; Yu, Shuyang; Shan, Qiang; Li, Yalan; Phillips, Farrah C; Maina, Peterson K; Qi, Hank H; Liu, Chengyu; Zhu, Jun; Pope, R Marshall; Musselman, Catherine A; Zeng, Chen; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell dichotomy is essential for effective cellular immunity. How individual T cell identity is established remains poorly understood. Here we show that the high-mobility group (HMG) transcription factors Tcf1 and Lef1 are essential for repressing CD4(+) lineage-associated genes including Cd4, Foxp3 and Rorc in CD8(+) T cells. Tcf1- and Lef1-deficient CD8(+) T cells exhibit histone hyperacetylation, which can be ascribed to intrinsic histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in Tcf1 and Lef1. Mutation of five conserved amino acids in the Tcf1 HDAC domain diminishes HDAC activity and the ability to suppress CD4(+) lineage genes in CD8(+) T cells. These findings reveal that sequence-specific transcription factors can utilize intrinsic HDAC activity to guard cell identity by repressing lineage-inappropriate genes. PMID:27111144

  13. Controlling the motor activity of a transcription-repair coupling factor: autoinhibition and the role of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abigail J; Szczelkun, Mark D; Savery, Nigel J

    2007-01-01

    Motor proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis to movement along nucleic acids play a variety of essential roles in DNA metabolism. Often these enzymes function as components of macromolecular complexes, and DNA translocation by the motor protein drives movement of other components of the complex. In order to understand how the activity of motor proteins is regulated within multi-protein complexes we have studied the bacterial transcription-repair coupling factor, Mfd, which is a helicase superfamily 2 member that binds to RNA polymerase (RNAP) and removes stalled transcription complexes from DNA. Using an oligonucleotide displacement assay that monitors protein movement on double-stranded DNA we show that Mfd has little motor activity in isolation, but exhibits efficient oligonucleotide displacement activity when bound to a stalled transcription complex. Deletion of the C-terminal domain of Mfd increases the ATPase activity of the protein and allows efficient oligo-displacement in the absence of RNAP. Our results suggest that an autoinhibitory domain ensures the motor activity of Mfd is only functional within the correct macromolecular context: recruitment of Mfd to a stalled transcription complex relieves the autoinhibition and unmasks the motor activity.

  14. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho—a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity—is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal ‘RNA binding’ domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal ‘motor’ domain. We also show that the ‘motor’ domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors. PMID:25999346

  15. Thanatos-associated protein 7 associates with template activating factor-Ibeta and inhibits histone acetylation to repress transcription.

    PubMed

    Macfarlan, Todd; Parker, J Brandon; Nagata, Kyosuke; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    The posttranslational modifications of histones on chromatin or a lack thereof is critical in transcriptional regulation. Emerging studies indicate a role for histone-binding proteins in transcriptional activation and repression. We have previously identified template-activating factor-Ibeta (TAF-Ibeta, also called PHAPII, SET, and I(2)(pp2A)) as a component of a cellular complex called inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) that masks histone acetylation in vitro and blocks histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-dependent transcription in living cells. TAF-Ibeta has also been shown to associate with transcription factors, including nuclear receptors, to regulate their activities. To identify novel interactors of TAF-Ibeta, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a previously uncharacterized human protein called thanatos-associated protein-7 (THAP7), a member of a large family of THAP domain-containing putative DNA-binding proteins. In this study we demonstrate that THAP7 associates with TAF-Ibeta in vitro and map their association domains to a C-terminal predicted coiled-coil motif on THAP7 and the central region of TAF-Ibeta. Similarly, stably transfected THAP7 associates with endogenous TAF-Ibeta in intact cells. Like TAF-Ibeta, THAP7 associates with histone H3 and histone H4 and inhibits histone acetylation. The histone-interacting domain of THAP7 is sufficient for this activity in vitro. Promoter-targeted THAP7 can also recruit TAF-Ibeta and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors/nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) proteins to promoters, and knockdown of TAF-Ibeta by small interfering RNA relieves THAP7-mediated repression, indicating that, like nuclear hormone receptors, THAP7 may represent a novel class of transcription factor that uses TAF-Ibeta as a corepressor to maintain histones in a hypoacetylated, repressed state. PMID:16195249

  16. Post-translational Control of the Temporal Dynamics of Transcription Factor Activity Regulates Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiao-Jiang; Yuan, Liqun; Tiberi, Luca; Claeys, Annelies; De Geest, Natalie; Yan, Jiekun; van der Kant, Rob; Xie, Wei R; Klisch, Tiemo J; Shymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-01-28

    Neurogenesis is initiated by the transient expression of the highly conserved proneural proteins, bHLH transcriptional regulators. Here, we discover a conserved post-translational switch governing the duration of proneural protein activity that is required for proper neuronal development. Phosphorylation of a single Serine at the same position in Scute and Atonal proneural proteins governs the transition from active to inactive forms by regulating DNA binding. The equivalent Neurogenin2 Threonine also regulates DNA binding and proneural activity in the developing mammalian neocortex. Using genome editing in Drosophila, we show that Atonal outlives its mRNA but is inactivated by phosphorylation. Inhibiting the phosphorylation of the conserved proneural Serine causes quantitative changes in expression dynamics and target gene expression resulting in neuronal number and fate defects. Strikingly, even a subtle change from Serine to Threonine appears to shift the duration of Atonal activity in vivo, resulting in neuronal fate defects. PMID:26824657

  17. Activation of the neu tyrosine kinase induces the fos/jun transcription factor complex, the glucose transporter and ornithine decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the ability of the neu tyrosine kinase to induce a signal for the activation of cell growth-regulated genes. Serum-starved NIH 3T3 cells expressing an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF- R)/neu construct encoding a hybrid receptor protein were stimulated with EGF and the activation of the neu tyrosine kinase and stimulation of growth factor inducible genes were followed at the mRNA, protein, and activity levels, and compared to the corresponding responses in the neu proto-oncogene and oncogene expressing cells. Induction of the expression of jun mRNAs was an immediate early effect of EGF stimulation, followed by a marked increase in the biosynthesis of the fos/jun transcription factor complex and an increased transcription factor activity as measured by a recombinant transcription unit using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays. In distinction, elevated AP- 1/PEA-1 activity in the absence of a significant increase in jun and fos expression was characteristic of the neu oncogene-expressing cells. The glucose transporter mRNA increased at 2 h of EGF stimulation and was associated with enhanced glucose transport of the EGF-treated cells. An increase of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) mRNA and activity followed these changes. In contrast, serum-starved, EGF-treated neu proto-oncogene- and oncogene-expressing cells showed constitutively low and high glucose transporter and ODC activities, respectively. These findings demonstrate that the chimeric EGF-R/neu receptor is capable of activating the expression of both immediate early genes and biochemical activities associated with cell growth stimulation. PMID:2572601

  18. Ancient default activators of terminal photoreceptor differentiation in the pancrustacean compound eye: the homeodomain transcription factors Otd and Pph13.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Markus; Cook, Tiffany; Zelhof, Andrew C

    2016-02-01

    The origin of the Drosophila compound eye predates the ancestor of Pancrustacea, the arthropod clade that includes insects and Crustaceans. Recent studies in emerging model systems for pancrustacean development-the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and water flea Daphnia pulex-have begun to shed light on the evolutionary conservation of transcriptional mechanisms found for the Drosophila compound eye. Here, we discuss the conserved roles of the transcription factors Otd and Pph13, which complement each other in two terminal events of photoreceptor differentiation: rhabdomere morphogenesis and transcriptional default activation of opsin gene expression. The synthesis of these data allows us to frame an evolutionary developmental model of the earliest events that generated the wavelength-specific photoreceptor subtypes of pancrustacean compound eyes. PMID:27436551

  19. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jung; Jang, In-Cheol; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15 However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. PMID:27246098

  20. Protein intrinsic disorder in Arabidopsis NAC transcription factors: transcriptional activation by ANAC013 and ANAC046 and their interactions with RCD1.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Kryger, Mikael; Stender, Emil G P; Kragelund, Birthe B; Willemoës, Martin; Skriver, Karen

    2015-01-15

    Protein ID (intrinsic disorder) plays a significant, yet relatively unexplored role in transcription factors (TFs). In the present paper, analysis of the transcription regulatory domains (TRDs) of six phylogenetically representative, plant-specific NAC [no apical meristem, ATAF (Arabidopsis transcription activation factor), cup-shaped cotyledon] TFs shows that the domains are present in similar average pre-molten or molten globule-like states, but have different patterns of order/disorder and MoRFs (molecular recognition features). ANAC046 (Arabidopsis NAC 046) was selected for further studies because of its simple MoRF pattern and its ability to interact with RCD1 (radical-induced cell death 1). Experiments in yeast and thermodynamic characterization suggest that its single MoRF region is sufficient for both transcriptional activation and interaction with RCD1. The remainder of the large regulatory domain is unlikely to contribute to the interaction, since the domain and truncations thereof have similar affinities for RCD1, which are also similar for ANAC013-RCD1 interactions. However, different enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding were revealed for ANAC046 and ANAC013, suggestive of differences in binding mechanisms. Although substitution of both hydrophobic and acidic residues of the ANAC046 MoRF region abolished binding, substitution of other residues, even with α-helix-breaking proline, was less disruptive. Together, the biophysical analyses suggest that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation does not involve folding-upon-binding, but rather fuzziness or an unknown structure in ANAC046. We suggest that the ANAC046 regulatory domain functions as an entropic chain with a terminal hot spot interacting with RCD1. RCD1, a cellular hub, may be able to interact with many different TFs by exploiting their ID-based flexibility, as demonstrated for its interactions with ANAC046 and ANAC013.

  1. Protein intrinsic disorder in Arabidopsis NAC transcription factors: transcriptional activation by ANAC013 and ANAC046 and their interactions with RCD1.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Kryger, Mikael; Stender, Emil G P; Kragelund, Birthe B; Willemoës, Martin; Skriver, Karen

    2015-01-15

    Protein ID (intrinsic disorder) plays a significant, yet relatively unexplored role in transcription factors (TFs). In the present paper, analysis of the transcription regulatory domains (TRDs) of six phylogenetically representative, plant-specific NAC [no apical meristem, ATAF (Arabidopsis transcription activation factor), cup-shaped cotyledon] TFs shows that the domains are present in similar average pre-molten or molten globule-like states, but have different patterns of order/disorder and MoRFs (molecular recognition features). ANAC046 (Arabidopsis NAC 046) was selected for further studies because of its simple MoRF pattern and its ability to interact with RCD1 (radical-induced cell death 1). Experiments in yeast and thermodynamic characterization suggest that its single MoRF region is sufficient for both transcriptional activation and interaction with RCD1. The remainder of the large regulatory domain is unlikely to contribute to the interaction, since the domain and truncations thereof have similar affinities for RCD1, which are also similar for ANAC013-RCD1 interactions. However, different enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding were revealed for ANAC046 and ANAC013, suggestive of differences in binding mechanisms. Although substitution of both hydrophobic and acidic residues of the ANAC046 MoRF region abolished binding, substitution of other residues, even with α-helix-breaking proline, was less disruptive. Together, the biophysical analyses suggest that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation does not involve folding-upon-binding, but rather fuzziness or an unknown structure in ANAC046. We suggest that the ANAC046 regulatory domain functions as an entropic chain with a terminal hot spot interacting with RCD1. RCD1, a cellular hub, may be able to interact with many different TFs by exploiting their ID-based flexibility, as demonstrated for its interactions with ANAC046 and ANAC013. PMID:25348421

  2. Induction of metallothionein I by phenolic antioxidants requires metal-activated transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) and zinc.

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yongyi; Palmiter, Richard D; Wood, Kristi M; Ma, Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Phenolic antioxidants, such as tBHQ [2,5-di-(t-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone], induce Mt1 (metallothionein 1) gene expression and accumulation of MT protein. Induction of Mt1 mRNA does not depend on protein synthesis, and correlates with oxidation-reduction functions of the antioxidants. In the present study, we analysed the biochemical pathway of the induction. Induction depends on the presence of MTF-1 (metal-activated transcription factor 1), a transcription factor that is required for metal-induced transcription of Mt1, but does not require nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, a tBHQ-activated CNC bZip (cap 'n' collar basic leucine zipper) protein, that is responsible for regulating genes encoding phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. Moreover, tBHQ induces the expression of MRE-beta Geo, a reporter gene driven by five metal response elements that constitute an optimal MTF-1 binding site. Reconstitution of Mtf1 -null cells with MTF-1 restores induction by both zinc and tBHQ. Unlike activation of phase II genes by tBHQ, induction of Mt1 expression does not occur in the presence of EDTA, when cells are cultured in zinc-depleted medium, or in cells with reduced intracellular 'free' zinc due to overexpression of ZnT1, a zinc-efflux transporter, indicating that induction requires zinc. In addition, fluorescence imaging reveals that tBHQ increases cytoplasmic free zinc concentration by mobilizing intracellular zinc pools. These findings establish that phenolic antioxidants activate Mt1 transcription by a zinc-dependent mechanism, which involves MTF-1 binding to metal regulator elements in the Mt1 gene promoter. PMID:14998373

  3. Sulforaphane homologues: Enantiodivergent synthesis of both enantiomers, activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor and selective cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Elhalem, Eleonora; Recio, Rocío; Werner, Sabine; Lieder, Franziska; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; López-Lázaro, Miguel; Fernández, Inmaculada; Khiar, Noureddine

    2014-11-24

    Reported is an enantiodivergent approach for the synthesis of both enantiomers of sulforaphane (SFN) homologues with different chain lengths between the sulfinyl sulfur and the isothiocyanate groups and different substituents on the sulfinyl sulfur. The homologues were designed in order to unravel the effect of all the diversity elements included in sulforaphane's structure. The key step of the approach is the diastereoselective synthesis of both sulfinate ester epimers at sulfur, using as single chiral auxiliary the sugar derived diacetone-d-glucose. The approach allows the first synthesis of both enantiomers of 5-methylsulfinylpentyl isothiocyanate, and the biologically important 6-methylsulfinylhexyl isothiocyanate (6-HITC) found in Japanese horseradish, wasabi (Wasabia japonica). The ability of the synthesized compounds as inductors of phase II detoxifying enzymes has been studied by determining their ability to activate the cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2. The cytotoxic activity of all the synthesized compounds against human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and foetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) is also reported. PMID:25299679

  4. Prognosis of hormone-dependent breast cancers: implications of the presence of dysfunctional transcriptional networks activated by insulin via the immune transcription factor T-bet.

    PubMed

    McCune, Kasi; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Thorat, Mangesh A; Nephew, Kenneth P; Badve, Sunil; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2010-01-15

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive breast cancers that co-express transcription factors GATA-3 and FOXA1 have a favorable prognosis. These transcription factors form an autoregulatory hormonal network that influences estrogen responsiveness and sensitivity to hormonal therapy. Disruption of this network may be a mechanism whereby ERalpha-positive breast cancers become resistant to therapy. The transcription factor T-bet is a negative regulator of GATA-3 in the immune system. In this study, we report that insulin increases the expression of T-bet in breast cancer cells, which correlates with reduced expression of GATA-3, FOXA1, and the ERalpha:FOXA1:GATA-3 target gene GREB-1. The effects of insulin on GATA-3 and FOXA1 could be recapitulated through overexpression of T-bet in MCF-7 cells (MCF-7-T-bet). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed reduced ERalpha binding to GREB-1 enhancer regions in MCF-7-T-bet cells and in insulin-treated MCF-7 cells. MCF-7-T-bet cells were resistant to tamoxifen in the presence of insulin and displayed prolonged extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT activation in response to epidermal growth factor treatment. ERalpha-positive cells with intrinsic tamoxifen resistance as well as MCF-7 cells with acquired tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistance expressed elevated levels of T-bet and/or reduced levels of FOXA1 and GATA-3. Analysis of publicly available databases revealed ERalpha-positive/T-bet-positive breast cancers expressing lower levels of FOXA1 (P = 0.0137) and GATA-3 (P = 0.0063) compared with ERalpha-positive/T-bet-negative breast cancers. Thus, T-bet expression in primary tumors and circulating insulin levels may serve as surrogate biomarkers to identify ERalpha-positive breast cancers with a dysfunctional hormonal network, enhanced growth factor signaling, and resistance to hormonal therapy.

  5. Activating transcription factor-4 promotes mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L.; Shiozaki, Yuji; Okamura, Kayo; Chick, Wallace S.; Williams, Kristina; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Tintut, Yin; Adams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that upregulation of the ER stress–induced pro-osteogenic transcription factor ATF4 plays an important role in vascular calcification, a common complication in patients with aging, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ATF4 in vascular calcification using global Atf4 KO, smooth muscle cell–specific (SMC-specific) Atf4 KO, and transgenic (TG) mouse models. Reduced expression of ATF4 in global ATF4-haplodeficient and SMC-specific Atf4 KO mice reduced medial and atherosclerotic calcification under normal kidney and CKD conditions. In contrast, increased expression of ATF4 in SMC-specific Atf4 TG mice caused severe medial and atherosclerotic calcification. We further demonstrated that ATF4 transcriptionally upregulates the expression of type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporters (PiT1 and PiT2) by interacting with C/EBPβ. These results demonstrate that the ER stress effector ATF4 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification through increased phosphate uptake in vascular SMCs. PMID:27812542

  6. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-B in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Munhoz, Carolina D; Kawamoto, Elisa M; Yshii, Lidia M; Lima, Larissa S; Curi-Boaventura, Maria F; Salgado, Thais M L; Curi, Rui; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-kappaB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-kappaB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM) for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment) activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-kappaB activation. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) and activates NF-kappaB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells. PMID:19183502

  7. Reconstitution of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells with somatostatin transcription factor-1 partially restores insulin promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Harmon, J S; Tanaka, Y; Olson, L K; Robertson, R P

    1998-06-01

    We have reported that chronic culture of HIT-T15 cells in medium containing supraphysiologic glucose concentrations (11.1 mmol/l) causes a decrease in insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin release. Furthermore, decreases in insulin gene transcription and binding activity of two essential beta-cell transcription factors, somatostatin transcription factor-1 (STF-1; also known as GSTF, IDX-1, IPF-1, PDX-1, and GSF) and RIPE-3b1 activator, are associated with this glucotoxic effect. In this study, we observed that the loss of RIPE-3b1 occurs much earlier (79% decrease at passage [p]81) than the loss of STF-1 (65% decrease at p104), with abolishment of both factors by p122. Since the STF-1, but not the RIPE-3b1 activator, gene has been cloned, we examined its restorative effects on insulin gene promoter activity after reconstitution with STF-1 cDNA. Basal insulin promoter activities normalized to early (p71-74) passage cells (1.000 +/- 0.069) were 0.4066 +/- 0.093 and 0.142 +/- 0.034 for intermediate (p102-106) and late (p118-122) passage cells, respectively. Early, intermediate, and late passage cells, all chronically cultured in medium containing 11.1 mmol/l glucose, were transfected with STF-1 alone or cotransfected with E2-5, an E-box factor known to be synergistically associated with STF-1. Compared with basal levels, we observed a trend toward an increase in insulin promoter activity in intermediate passage cells with STF-1 transfection (1.43-fold) that became a significant increase when E2-5 was cotransfected (1.78-fold). In late passage cells, transfection of STF-1 alone significantly stimulated a 2.2-fold increase in the insulin promoter activity. Cotransfection of STF-1 and E2-5 in late passage cells stimulated insulin promoter activity 2.8-fold, which was 40% of the activity observed in early passage cells. Control studies in glucotoxic betaTC-6 cells deficient in RIPE-3b1 activator but not STF-1 did not demonstrate an increase in insulin promoter

  8. Reconstitution of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells with somatostatin transcription factor-1 partially restores insulin promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Harmon, J S; Tanaka, Y; Olson, L K; Robertson, R P

    1998-06-01

    We have reported that chronic culture of HIT-T15 cells in medium containing supraphysiologic glucose concentrations (11.1 mmol/l) causes a decrease in insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin release. Furthermore, decreases in insulin gene transcription and binding activity of two essential beta-cell transcription factors, somatostatin transcription factor-1 (STF-1; also known as GSTF, IDX-1, IPF-1, PDX-1, and GSF) and RIPE-3b1 activator, are associated with this glucotoxic effect. In this study, we observed that the loss of RIPE-3b1 occurs much earlier (79% decrease at passage [p]81) than the loss of STF-1 (65% decrease at p104), with abolishment of both factors by p122. Since the STF-1, but not the RIPE-3b1 activator, gene has been cloned, we examined its restorative effects on insulin gene promoter activity after reconstitution with STF-1 cDNA. Basal insulin promoter activities normalized to early (p71-74) passage cells (1.000 +/- 0.069) were 0.4066 +/- 0.093 and 0.142 +/- 0.034 for intermediate (p102-106) and late (p118-122) passage cells, respectively. Early, intermediate, and late passage cells, all chronically cultured in medium containing 11.1 mmol/l glucose, were transfected with STF-1 alone or cotransfected with E2-5, an E-box factor known to be synergistically associated with STF-1. Compared with basal levels, we observed a trend toward an increase in insulin promoter activity in intermediate passage cells with STF-1 transfection (1.43-fold) that became a significant increase when E2-5 was cotransfected (1.78-fold). In late passage cells, transfection of STF-1 alone significantly stimulated a 2.2-fold increase in the insulin promoter activity. Cotransfection of STF-1 and E2-5 in late passage cells stimulated insulin promoter activity 2.8-fold, which was 40% of the activity observed in early passage cells. Control studies in glucotoxic betaTC-6 cells deficient in RIPE-3b1 activator but not STF-1 did not demonstrate an increase in insulin promoter

  9. LIM homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 inhibits skeletal muscle differentiation in part via transcriptional activation of Msx1 and Msx2.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, Yusaku; Tanaka, Kiyoko; Kitajima, Kenji; Tanegashima, Kosuke; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Hara, Takahiko

    2015-02-15

    LIM homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 is known to be an important regulator of neuronal development, homeostasis of hair follicle stem cells, and self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells; however, its function in skeletal muscle development is poorly understood. In this study, we found that overexpression of Lhx2 completely inhibits the myotube-forming capacity of C2C12 cells and primary myoblasts. The muscle dedifferentiation factors Msx1 and Msx2 were strongly induced by the Lhx2 overexpression. Short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Lhx2 in the developing limb buds of mouse embryos resulted in a reduction in Msx1 and Msx2 mRNA levels, suggesting that they are downstream target genes of Lhx2. We found two Lhx2 consensus-binding sites in the -2097 to -1189 genomic region of Msx1 and two additional sites in the -536 to +73 genomic region of Msx2. These sequences were shown by luciferase reporter assay to be essential for Lhx2-mediated transcriptional activation. Moreover, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Lhx2 is present in chromatin DNA complexes bound to the enhancer regions of the Msx1 and Msx2 genes. These data demonstrate that Msx1 and Msx2 are direct transcriptional targets of Lhx2. In addition, overexpression of Lhx2 significantly enhanced the mRNA levels of bone morphogenetic protein 4 and transforming growth factor beta family genes. We propose that Lhx2 is involved in the early stage of skeletal muscle development by inducing multiple differentiation inhibitory factors.

  10. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Sousuke; Asayama, Munehiko

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ) factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits) are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation. PMID:19838335

  11. Functional interplay of SP family members and nuclear factor Y is essential for transcriptional activation of the human Calreticulin gene.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Julian A; Keller, Manuela; Seipel, Katja; Pabst, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Calreticulin (CALR) is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein involved in a variety of cellular processes including the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, proper protein folding, differentiation and immunogenic cell death. More recently, a crucial role for CALR in the pathogenesis of certain hematologic malignancies was discovered: in clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia, CALR overexpression mediates a block in differentiation, while somatic mutations have been found in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) or thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). However, the mechanisms underlying CALR promoter activation have insufficiently been investigated so far. By dissecting the core promoter region, we could identify a functional TATA-box relevant for transcriptional activation. In addition, we characterized two evolutionary highly conserved cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) within the proximal promoter each composed of one binding site for the transcription factors SP1 and SP3 as well as for the nuclear transcription factor Y (NFY) and we verified binding of these factors to their cognate sites in vitro and in vivo.

  12. MEF2-dependent recruitment of the HAND1 transcription factor results in synergistic activation of target promoters.

    PubMed

    Morin, Steves; Pozzulo, Gina; Robitaille, Lynda; Cross, Jay; Nemer, Mona

    2005-09-16

    HAND proteins are tissue-restricted members of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family that play critical roles in cell differentiation and organogenesis including placental, cardiovascular, and craniofacial development. Nevertheless, the molecular basis underlying the developmental action of HAND proteins remains undefined. Within the embryo, HAND1 is first detected in the developing heart where it becomes restricted to the atrial and left ventricular compartments, a pattern identical to that of the Nppa gene, which encodes atrial natriuretic factor, the major secretory product of the heart. We hereby report that the cardiac atrial natriuretic factor promoter is directly activated by HAND1, making it the first known HAND1 transcriptional target. The action of HAND1 does not require heterodimerization with class I basic helix-loop-helix factors or DNA binding through E-box elements. Instead, HAND1 is recruited to the promoter via physical interaction with MEF2 proteins. MEF2/HAND1 interaction results in synergistic activation of MEF2-dependent promoters, and MEF2 binding sites are sufficient to mediate this synergy. MEF2 binding to DNA is not enhanced in the presence of HAND1. Instead, cooperativity likely results from corecruitment of co-activators such as CREB-binding protein. The related HAND2 protein can also synergize with MEF2. Thus, HAND proteins act as cell-specific developmental co-activators of the MEF2 family of transcription factors. These findings identify a novel mechanism for HAND action in the heart and provide a general paradigm to understand the mechanism of HAND action in organogenesis.

  13. New role for Kruppel-like factor 14 as a transcriptional activator involved in the generation of signaling lipids.

    PubMed

    de Assuncao, Thiago M; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A; Huebert, Robert C; Urrutia, Raul A; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-05-30

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  14. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  15. The Transcriptional Repressor Polycomb Group Factor 6, PCGF6, Negatively Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Promotes Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Boukhaled, Giselle M; Cordeiro, Brendan; Deblois, Genevieve; Dimitrov, Vassil; Bailey, Swneke D; Holowka, Thomas; Domi, Anisa; Guak, Hannah; Chiu, Huai-Hsuan Clare; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Lupien, Mathieu; White, John H; Krawczyk, Connie M

    2016-08-16

    Pro-inflammatory signals provided by the microenvironment are critical to activate dendritic cells (DCs), components of the innate immune system that shape both innate and adaptive immunity. However, to prevent inappropriate immune activation, mechanisms must be in place to restrain DC activation to ensure DCs are activated only once sufficient stimuli have been received. Here, we report that DC activation and immunogenicity are regulated by the transcriptional repressor Polycomb group factor 6 (PCGF6). Pcgf6 is rapidly downregulated upon stimulation, and this downregulation is necessary to permit full DC activation. Silencing PCGF6 expression enhanced both spontaneous and stimulated DC activation. We show that PCGF6 associates with the H3K4me3 demethylase JARID1c, and together, they negatively regulate H3K4me3 levels in DCs. Our results identify two key regulators, PCGF6 and JARID1c that temper DC activation and implicate active transcriptional silencing via histone demethylation as a previously unappreciated mechanism for regulating DC activation and quiescence.

  16. The Transcriptional Repressor Polycomb Group Factor 6, PCGF6, Negatively Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Promotes Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Boukhaled, Giselle M; Cordeiro, Brendan; Deblois, Genevieve; Dimitrov, Vassil; Bailey, Swneke D; Holowka, Thomas; Domi, Anisa; Guak, Hannah; Chiu, Huai-Hsuan Clare; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Lupien, Mathieu; White, John H; Krawczyk, Connie M

    2016-08-16

    Pro-inflammatory signals provided by the microenvironment are critical to activate dendritic cells (DCs), components of the innate immune system that shape both innate and adaptive immunity. However, to prevent inappropriate immune activation, mechanisms must be in place to restrain DC activation to ensure DCs are activated only once sufficient stimuli have been received. Here, we report that DC activation and immunogenicity are regulated by the transcriptional repressor Polycomb group factor 6 (PCGF6). Pcgf6 is rapidly downregulated upon stimulation, and this downregulation is necessary to permit full DC activation. Silencing PCGF6 expression enhanced both spontaneous and stimulated DC activation. We show that PCGF6 associates with the H3K4me3 demethylase JARID1c, and together, they negatively regulate H3K4me3 levels in DCs. Our results identify two key regulators, PCGF6 and JARID1c that temper DC activation and implicate active transcriptional silencing via histone demethylation as a previously unappreciated mechanism for regulating DC activation and quiescence. PMID:27498878

  17. The forkhead transcription factor Foxl2 is sumoylated in both human and mouse: sumoylation affects its stability, localization, and activity.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Mara; Deiana, Manila; Meloni, Alessandra; Marcia, Loredana; Puddu, Alessandro; Cao, Antonio; Schlessinger, David; Crisponi, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The FOXL2 forkhead transcription factor is expressed in ovarian granulosa cells, and mutated FOXL2 causes the blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) and predisposes to premature ovarian failure. Inactivation of Foxl2 in mice demonstrated its indispensability for female gonadal sex determination and ovary development and revealed its antagonism of Sox9, the effector of male testis development. To help to define the regulatory activities of FOXL2, we looked for interacting proteins. Based on yeast two-hybrid screening, we found that FOXL2 interacts with PIAS1 and UBC9, both parts of the sumoylation machinery. We showed that human FOXL2 is sumoylated in transfected cell lines, and that endogenous mouse Foxl2 is comparably sumoylated. This modification changes its cellular localization, stability and transcriptional activity. It is intriguing that similar sumoylation and regulatory consequences have also been reported for SOX9, the male counterpart of FOXL2 in somatic gonadal tissues. PMID:20209145

  18. c-Fos: an AP-1 transcription factor with an additional cytoplasmic, non-genomic lipid synthesis activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Caputto, Beatriz L; Cardozo Gizzi, Andrés M; Gil, Germán A

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms that co-ordinately activate lipid synthesis when high rates of membrane biogenesis are needed to support cell growth are largely unknown. c-Fos, a well known AP-1 transcription factor, has emerged as a unique protein with the capacity to associate to specific enzymes of the pathway of synthesis of phospholipids at the endoplasmic reticulum and activate their synthesis to accompany genomic decisions of growth. Herein, we discuss this cytoplasmic, non-genomic effect of c-Fos in the context of other mechanisms that have been proposed to regulate lipid synthesis.

  19. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation. PMID:23232059

  20. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation.

  1. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V W; Jo, Chulman

    2016-04-26

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD.

  2. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Jo, Chulman

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD. PMID:27112200

  3. Transcriptional activation of the H-ferritin gene in differentiated Caco-2 cells parallels a change in the activity of the nuclear factor Bbf.

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, M A; Faniello, M C; D'Agostino, P; Quaresima, B; Tiano, M T; Pignata, S; Russo, T; Cimino, F; Costanzo, F

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the mechanisms that regulate the expression of the heavy (H) ferritin subunit in the colon carcinoma Caco-2 cell line allowed to differentiate spontaneously in vitro. The differentiation process of these cells in continuous culture is accompanied by an accumulation of the mRNA coding for the apoferritin H chain. The analysis of Caco-2 subclones stably transfected with an H-chain promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) construct revealed that the mRNA increase is paralleled by an enhanced transcription of the H gene, driven by the -100 to +4 region of the H promoter. The H gene transcriptional activation seems to be a specific feature of differentiated Caco-2 cells, since the activity of other promoters did not change upon differentiation. The -100 to +4 region of the H promoter binds a transcription factor called Bbf (B-box binding factor); electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assay analyses showed that the retarded complex due to Bbf-H promoter interaction is significantly increased in the differentiated cells. We propose that the activation of H-ferritin gene expression may be associated with the establishment of a differentiated phenotype in Caco-2 cells, and that the H-ferritin gene transcriptional up-regulation is accompanied by a modification in the activity of the transcription factor Bbf. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7487931

  4. NFAT activation by membrane potential follows a calcium pathway distinct from other activity-related transcription factors in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Juan Antonio; Gaggero, Eduardo; Hidalgo, Jorge; Leal, Nancy; Jaimovich, Enrique; Carrasco, M Angélica

    2008-03-01

    Depolarization of skeletal muscle cells triggers intracellular Ca2+ signals mediated by ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors. Previously, we have reported that K+-induced depolarization activates transcriptional regulators ERK, cAMP response element-binding protein, c-fos, c-jun, and egr-1 through IP3-dependent Ca2+ release, whereas NF-kappa B activation is elicited by both ryanodine and IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ signals. We have further shown that field stimulation with electrical pulses results in an NF-kappa B activation increase dependent of the amount of pulses and independent of their frequency. In this work, we report the results obtained for nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-mediated transcription and translocation generated by both K+ and electrical stimulation protocols in primary skeletal muscle cells and C2C12 cells. The Ca2+ source for NFAT activation is through release by ryanodine receptors and extracellular Ca2+ entry. We found this activation to be independent of the number of pulses within a physiological range of stimulus frequency and enhanced by long-lasting low-frequency stimulation. Therefore, activation of the NFAT signaling pathway differs from that of NF-kappa B and other transcription factors. Calcineurin enzyme activity correlated well with the relative activation of NFAT translocation and transcription using different stimulation protocols. Furthermore, both K+-induced depolarization and electrical stimulation increased mRNA levels of the type 1 IP3 receptor mediated by calcineurin activity, which suggests that depolarization may regulate IP3 receptor transcription. These results confirm the presence of at least two independent pathways for excitation-transcription coupling in skeletal muscle cells, both dependent on Ca2+ release and triggered by the same voltage sensor but activating different intracellular release channels. PMID:18184878

  5. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinases Upregulate System xc− via Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α and Activating Transcription Factor 4 – A Pathway Active in Glioblastomas and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul; Kassubek, Rebecca; Albrecht, Philipp; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Meakin, Paul J.; Hayes, John D.; Aronica, Eleonora; Smolders, Ilse; Ludolph, Albert C.; Methner, Axel; Conrad, Marcus; Massie, Ann; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) relay growth factor signaling and mediate cytoprotection and cell growth. The cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc− imports cystine while exporting glutamate, thereby promoting glutathione synthesis while increasing extracellular cerebral glutamate. The aim of this study was to analyze the pathway through which growth factor and PI3K signaling induce the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc− and to demonstrate its biological significance for neuroprotection, cell growth, and epilepsy. Results: PI3Ks induce system xc− through glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) inhibition, general control non-derepressible-2-mediated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, and the subsequent translational up-regulation of activating transcription factor 4. This pathway is essential for PI3Ks to modulate oxidative stress resistance of nerve cells and insulin-induced growth in fibroblasts. Moreover, the pathway is active in human glioblastoma cells. In addition, it is induced in primary cortical neurons in response to robust neuronal activity and in hippocampi from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Innovation: Our findings further extend the concepts of how growth factors and PI3Ks induce neuroprotection and cell growth by adding a new branch to the signaling network downstream of GSK-3β, which, ultimately, leads to the induction of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc−. Importantly, the induction of this pathway by neuronal activity and in epileptic hippocampi points to a potential role in epilepsy. Conclusion: PI3K-regulated system xc− activity is not only involved in the stress resistance of neuronal cells and in cell growth by increasing the cysteine supply and glutathione synthesis, but also plays a role in the pathophysiology of tumor- and non-tumor-associated epilepsy by up-regulating extracellular cerebral glutamate. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20: 2907–2922. PMID:24219064

  6. Estrogen receptor beta inhibits transcriptional activity of hypoxia inducible factor-1 through the downregulation of arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in prevention of breast cancer development and metastasis. We have shown previously that ERβ inhibits hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α mediated transcription, but the mechanism by which ERβ works to exert this effect is not understood. Methods Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, luciferase assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to ascertain the implication of ERβ on HIF-1 function. Results In this study, we found that the inhibition of HIF-1 activity by ERβ expression was correlated with ERβ's ability to degrade aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) via ubiquitination processes leading to the reduction of active HIF-1α/ARNT complexes. HIF-1 repression by ERβ was rescued by overexpression of ARNT as examined by hypoxia-responsive element (HRE)-driven luciferase assays. We show further that ERβ attenuated the hypoxic induction of VEGF mRNA by directly decreasing HIF-1α binding to the VEGF gene promoter. Conclusions These results show that ERβ suppresses HIF-1α-mediated transcription via ARNT down-regulation, which may account for the tumour suppressive function of ERβ. PMID:21435239

  7. Myocardin-related transcription factor-A controls myofibroblast activation and fibrosis in response to myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Small, Eric M.; Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Gerard, Robert D.; Richardson, James A.; DiMaio, J. Michael; Sadek, Hesham; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Olson, Eric N.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Myocardial infarction (MI) results in loss of cardiac myocytes in the ischemic zone of the heart followed by fibrosis and scar formation, which diminish cardiac contractility and impede angiogenesis and repair. Myofibroblasts, a specialized cell type that switches from a fibroblast-like state to a contractile, smooth muscle-like state, are believed to be primarily responsible for fibrosis of the injured heart and other tissues, although the transcriptional mediators of fibrosis and myofibroblast activation remain poorly defined. Myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are SRF co-factors that promote a smooth muscle phenotype and are emerging as components of stress-responsive signaling. Objective We aimed to examine the effect of MRTF-A on cardiac remodeling and fibrosis. Methods and Results Here we show that MRTF-A controls the expression of a fibrotic gene program that includes genes involved in extracellular matrix production and smooth muscle cell differentiation in the heart. In MRTF-A null mice, fibrosis and scar formation following MI or Angiotensin (Ang) II treatment are dramatically diminished compared with wild-type littermates. This protective effect of MRTF-A deletion is associated with a reduction in expression of fibrosis-associated genes, including collagen 1a2, a direct transcriptional target of SRF/MRTF-A. Conclusions We conclude that MRTF-A regulates myofibroblast activation and fibrosis in response to the renin-angiotensin system and post-MI remodeling. PMID:20558820

  8. Role of activating transcription factor 3 in the synthesis of latency-associated transcript and maintenance of herpes simplex virus 1 in latent state in ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Minfeng; Du, Te; Zhou, Grace; Roizman, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A key property of herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) is their ability to establish latent infection in sensory or autonomic ganglia and to reactivate on physical, hormonal, or emotional stress. In latently infected ganglia, HSVs express a long noncoding RNA, a latency-associated transcript (LAT), which plays a key role in maintaining latently infected neurons, but not viral proteins. To investigate the events leading to reactivation, we examined the use of ganglionic organ cultures that enable rapid reactivation in medium containing antibody to nerve growth factor (NGF) or delayed reactivation in medium containing NGF and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Here we report the discovery that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a stress response protein, profoundly affects the interaction of HSV with its host. Specifically, (i) ATF3 is induced by stress, such as inhibition of protein synthesis or infection; (ii) in infected cells, ATF3 enhances the accumulation of LAT by acting on the response elements in the promoter of the LAT precursor RNA; (iii) ATF3 is induced nearly 100-fold in ganglionic organ cultures; and (iv) ATF3 plays a key role in the maintenance of the latent state, inasmuch as expression of ATF3 bereft of the C-terminal activation domain acts as a dominant negative factor, inducing HSV gene expression in ganglionic organ cultures harboring latent virus and incubated in medium containing NGF and EGF. Thus, ATF3 is a component of a cluster of cellular proteins that together with LAT maintain the integrity of the neurons harboring latent virus. PMID:26305977

  9. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  10. The role of factor inhibiting HIF (FIH-1) in inhibiting HIF-1 transcriptional activity in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Enfeng; Zhang, Chunyang; Polavaram, Navatha; Liu, Fengming; Wu, Gang; Schroeder, Mark A; Lau, Julie S; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Jiang, Shi-Wen; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Datta, Kaustubh; Li, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for about 38% of primary brain tumors in the United States. GBM is characterized by extensive angiogenesis induced by vascular growth factors and cytokines. The transcription of these growth factors and cytokines is regulated by the Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1(HIF-1), which is a key regulator mediating the cellular response to hypoxia. It is known that Factor Inhibiting HIF-1, or FIH-1, is also involved in the cellular response to hypoxia and has the capability to physically interact with HIF-1 and block its transcriptional activity under normoxic conditions. Delineation of the regulatory role of FIH-1 will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism responsible for tumor growth and progression and may lead to the design of new therapies targeting cellular pathways in response to hypoxia. Previous studies have shown that the chromosomal region of 10q24 containing the FIH-1 gene is often deleted in GBM, suggesting a role for the FIH-1 in GBM tumorigenesis and progression. In the current study, we found that FIH-1 is able to inhibit HIF-mediated transcription of GLUT1 and VEGF-A, even under hypoxic conditions in human glioblastoma cells. FIH-1 has been found to be more potent in inhibiting HIF function than PTEN. This observation points to the possibility that deletion of 10q23-24 and loss or decreased expression of FIH-1 gene may lead to a constitutive activation of HIF-1 activity, an alteration of HIF-1 targets such as GLUT-1 and VEGF-A, and may contribute to the survival of cancer cells in hypoxia and the development of hypervascularization observed in GBM. Therefore FIH-1 can be potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM patients with poor prognosis.

  11. Analysis of the DNA-binding and dimerization activities of Neurospora crassa transcription factor NUC-1.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Y; Metzenberg, R L

    1994-12-01

    NUC-1, a positive regulatory protein of Neurospora crassa, controls the expression of several unlinked target genes involved in phosphorus acquisition. The carboxy-terminal end of the NUC-1 protein has sequence similarity to the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Bacterially expressed and in vitro-synthesized proteins, which consist of the carboxy-terminal portion of NUC-1, bind specifically to upstream sequences of two of its target genes, pho2+ and pho-4+. These upstream sequences contain the core sequence, CACGTG, a target for many helix-loop-helix proteins. A large loop region (47 amino acids) separates the helix I and helix II domains. Mutations and deletion within the loop region did not interfere with the in vitro or in vivo functions of the protein. Immediately carboxy-proximal to the helix II domain, the NUC-1 protein contains an atypical zipper domain which is essential for function. This domain consists of a heptad repeat of alanine and methionine rather than leucine residues. Analysis of mutant NUC-1 proteins suggests that the helix II and the zipper domains are essential for the protein dimerization, whereas the basic and the helix I domains are involved in DNA binding. The helix I domain, even though likely to participate in dimer formation while NUC-1 is bound to DNA, is not essential for in vitro dimerization.

  12. The Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA Maintains an Accessible Nucleosome Configuration at Enhancers for Tissue-Specific Gene Activation.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Donahue, Greg; Kakumanu, Akshay; Watts, Jason A; Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B Franklin; Lee, Dolim; Kaestner, Klaus H; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear DNA wraps around core histones to form nucleosomes, which restricts the binding of transcription factors to gene regulatory sequences. Pioneer transcription factors can bind DNA sites on nucleosomes and initiate gene regulatory events, often leading to the local opening of chromatin. However, the nucleosomal configuration of open chromatin and the basis for its regulation is unclear. We combined low and high levels of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion along with core histone mapping to assess the nucleosomal configuration at enhancers and promoters in mouse liver. We find that MNase-accessible nucleosomes, bound by transcription factors, are retained more at liver-specific enhancers than at promoters and ubiquitous enhancers. The pioneer factor FoxA displaces linker histone H1, thereby keeping enhancer nucleosomes accessible in chromatin and allowing other liver-specific transcription factors to bind and stimulate transcription. Thus, nucleosomes are not exclusively repressive to gene regulation when they are retained with, and exposed by, pioneer factors.

  13. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy. PMID:26885857

  14. Functional characterization of NAC55 transcription factor from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) as a novel transcriptional activator modulating reactive oxygen species accumulation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Niu, Fangfang; Wang, Chen; Yan, Jingli; Guo, Xiaohua; Wu, Feifei; Yang, Bo; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2016-09-01

    NAC transcription factors (TFs) are plant-specific and play important roles in development, responses to biotic and abiotic cues and hormone signaling. So far, only a few NAC genes have been reported to regulate cell death. In this study, we identified and characterized a NAC55 gene isolated from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). BnaNAC55 responds to multiple stresses, including cold, heat, abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA) and a necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. BnaNAC55 has transactivation activity and is located in the nucleus. BnaNAC55 is able to form homodimers in planta. Unlike ANAC055, full-length BnaNAC55, but not either the N-terminal NAC domain or C-terminal regulatory domain, induces ROS accumulation and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when expressed both in oilseed rape protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, BnaNAC55 expression causes obvious nuclear DNA fragmentation. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis identified that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating ROS production and scavenging, defense response as well as senescence are significantly induced. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay, we further confirm that BnaNAC55 could activate the expression of a few ROS and defense-related gene expression. Taken together, our work has identified a novel NAC TF from oilseed rape that modulates ROS accumulation and cell death. PMID:27312204

  15. Activation of c-Jun transcription factor by substitution of a charged residue in its N-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffler, W K; Levinson, A D; Bauer, E A

    1994-01-01

    C-Jun is a cellular transcription factor that can control gene expression in response to treatment of cells with phorbol esters, growth factors, and expression of some oncogenes. The ability of c-Jun to catalyze the transcription of certain genes is controlled, in part, by changes in the phosphorylation state of specific amino acids in c-Jun. One of the major sites that is phosphorylated during signal response is Ser73. Here we show that substitution of a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at 73 constitutively increased transcriptional activity of c-Jun. The Asp73 substitution also enhanced its availability to bind to DNA in a whole cell extract without altering its intrinsic DNA binding activity since the intrinsic activity was unaltered for the c-Jun mutant proteins expressed in a bacterial system. The negatively charged Asp substitution may mimic the negative charge of a phosphorylated serine at 73. The substitution of an uncharged alanine at 73 resulted in lowered activities. The N-terminal end of c-Jun containing these substitutions was fused to the DNA-binding region of the bovine papilloma virus E2 protein, and was able to confer the same activation properties to the fusion protein at the heterologous E2 DNA-binding site. Ser73 lies in a region of c-Jun previously proposed to bind an uncharacterized inhibitor, perhaps related to a protein of approximately 17.5 kD that coprecipitates along with our c-Jun or the JunE2 fusion products. Images PMID:8165146

  16. The Zinc Finger Transcription Factor ZXDC Activates CCL2 Gene Expression by Opposing BCL6-mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Jon E.; Fontes, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The zinc finger X-linked duplicated (ZXD) family of transcription factors has been implicated in regulating transcription of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in antigen presenting cells; roles beyond this function are not yet known. The expression of one gene in this family, ZXD family zinc finger C (ZXDC), is enriched in myeloid lineages and therefore we hypothesized that ZXDC may regulate myeloid-specific gene expression. Here we demonstrate that ZXDC regulates genes involved in myeloid cell differentiation and inflammation. Overexpression of the larger isoform of ZXDC, ZXDC1, activates expression of monocyte-specific markers of differentiation and synergizes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (which causes differentiation) in the human leukemic monoblast cell line U937. To identify additional gene targets of ZXDC1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed multiple inflammatory gene clusters regulated by ZXDC1. Using a combination of approaches we show that ZXDC1 activates transcription of a gene within one of the regulated clusters, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2; monocyte chemoattractant protein 1; MCP1) via a previously defined distal regulatory element. Further, ZXDC1-dependent up-regulation of the gene involves eviction of the transcriptional repressor B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), a factor known to be important in resolving inflammatory responses, from this region of the promoter. Collectively, our data show that ZXDC1 is a regulator in the process of myeloid function and that ZXDC1 is responsible for Ccl2 gene de-repression by BCL6. PMID:23954399

  17. Angiotensin II and norepinephrine activate specific calcineurin-dependent NFAT transcription factor isoforms in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Ida G; Kvaløy, Heidi; Austbø, Bjørg; Christensen, Geir; Carlson, Cathrine R

    2011-11-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) and angiotensin II (ANG II) are primary effectors of the sympathetic adrenergic and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, mediating hypertrophic, apoptotic, and fibrotic events in the myocardium. As NE and ANG II have been shown to affect intracellular calcium in cardiomyocytes, we hypothesized that they activate the calcium-sensitive, prohypertrophic calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFATc) signaling pathway. More specifically, we have investigated isoform-specific activation of NFAT in NE- and ANG II-stimulated cardiomyocytes, as it is likely that each of the four calcineurin-dependent isoforms, c1-c4, play specific roles. We have stimulated neonatal ventriculocytes from C57/B6 and NFAT-luciferase reporter mice with ANG II or NE and quantified NFAT activity by luciferase activity and phospho-immunoblotting. ANG II and NE increased calcineurin-dependent NFAT activity 2.4- and 1.9-fold, measured as luciferase activity after 24 h of stimulation, and induced protein synthesis, measured by radioactive leucine incorporation after 24 and 72 h. To optimize measurements of NFAT isoforms, we examined the specificity of NFAT antibodies on peptide arrays and by immunoblotting with designed blocking peptides. Western analyses showed that both effectors activate NFATc1 and c4, while NFATc2 activity was regulated by NE only, as measured by phospho-NFAT levels. Neither ANG II nor NE activated NFATc3. As today's main therapies for heart failure aim at antagonizing the adrenergic and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, understanding their intracellular actions is of importance, and our data, through validating a method for measuring myocardial NFATs, indicate that ANG II and NE activate specific NFATc isoforms in cardiomyocytes.

  18. Development of a fluorescent microsphere-based multiplexed high-throughput assay system for profiling of transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Takuro; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), which play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in the human genome, are highly regulated by a variety of mechanisms. A single extracellular stimulus can trigger multiple signaling pathways, and these in turn can activate multiple TFs to mediate the inducible expression of target genes. Alterations in the activities of TFs are often associated with human diseases, such as altered activating factor 1, estrogen receptor, and p53 function in cancer, nuclear factor kappaB in inflammatory diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in obesity. A systematic assay for profiling the activation of TFs will aid in elucidating the mechanisms of TF activation, reveal altered TFs associated with human diseases, and aid in developing assays for drug discovery. Here, we developed a 24-plex fluorescent microsphere-based TF activation assay system with a 96-well plate format. The assay system enabled high-throughput profiling of the DNA binding activity of TFs in multiple samples with high sensitivity. PMID:16834534

  19. Krüppel-like Factor 7 engineered for transcriptional activation promotes axon regeneration in the adult corticospinal tract.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Murray G; Wang, Zimei; Lerch, Jessica K; Motti, Dario; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Christopher B; Lee, Jae K; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2012-05-01

    Axon regeneration in the central nervous system normally fails, in part because of a developmental decline in the intrinsic ability of CNS projection neurons to extend axons. Members of the KLF family of transcription factors regulate regenerative potential in developing CNS neurons. Expression of one family member, KLF7, is down-regulated developmentally, and overexpression of KLF7 in cortical neurons in vitro promotes axonal growth. To circumvent difficulties in achieving high neuronal expression of exogenous KLF7, we created a chimera with the VP16 transactivation domain, which displayed enhanced neuronal expression compared with the native protein while maintaining transcriptional activation and growth promotion in vitro. Overexpression of VP16-KLF7 overcame the developmental loss of regenerative ability in cortical slice cultures. Adult corticospinal tract (CST) neurons failed to up-regulate KLF7 in response to axon injury, and overexpression of VP16-KLF7 in vivo promoted both sprouting and regenerative axon growth in the CST of adult mice. These findings identify a unique means of promoting CST axon regeneration in vivo by reengineering a developmentally down-regulated, growth-promoting transcription factor. PMID:22529377

  20. The splicing regulator PTBP1 controls the activity of the transcription factor Pbx1 during neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Anthony J; Lin, Chia-Ho; Damianov, Andrey; Adams, Katrina L; Novitch, Bennett G; Black, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 control programs of alternative splicing during neuronal development. PTBP2 was found to maintain embryonic splicing patterns of many synaptic and cytoskeletal proteins during differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) into early neurons. However, the role of the earlier PTBP1 program in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and NPCs was not clear. We show that PTBP1 controls a program of neuronal gene expression that includes the transcription factor Pbx1. We identify exons specifically regulated by PTBP1 and not PTBP2 as mouse ESCs differentiate into NPCs. We find that PTBP1 represses Pbx1 exon 7 and the expression of the neuronal Pbx1a isoform in ESCs. Using CRISPR-Cas9 to delete regulatory elements for exon 7, we induce Pbx1a expression in ESCs, finding that this activates transcription of neuronal genes. Thus, PTBP1 controls the activity of Pbx1 to suppress its neuronal transcriptional program prior to induction of NPC development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09268.001 PMID:26705333

  1. A trans-Activation Domain in Yeast Heat Shock Transcription Factor Is Essential for Cell Cycle Progression during Stress

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Kevin A.; Santoro, Nicholas; Koch, Keith A.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    1999-01-01

    Gene expression in response to heat shock is mediated by the heat shock transcription factor (HSF), which in yeast harbors both amino- and carboxyl-terminal transcriptional activation domains. Yeast cells bearing a truncated form of HSF in which the carboxyl-terminal transcriptional activation domain has been deleted [HSF(1-583)] are temperature sensitive for growth at 37°C, demonstrating a requirement for this domain for sustained viability during thermal stress. Here we demonstrate that HSF(1-583) cells undergo reversible cell cycle arrest at 37°C in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and exhibit marked reduction in levels of the molecular chaperone Hsp90. As in higher eukaryotes, yeast possesses two nearly identical isoforms of Hsp90: one constitutively expressed and one highly heat inducible. When expressed at physiological levels in HSF(1-583) cells, the inducible Hsp90 isoform encoded by HSP82 more efficiently suppressed the temperature sensitivity of this strain than the constitutively expressed gene HSC82, suggesting that different functional roles may exist for these chaperones. Consistent with a defect in Hsp90 production, HSF(1-583) cells also exhibited hypersensitivity to the Hsp90-binding ansamycin antibiotic geldanamycin. Depletion of Hsp90 from yeast cells wild type for HSF results in cell cycle arrest in both G1/S and G2/M phases, suggesting a complex requirement for chaperone function in mitotic division during stress. PMID:9858564

  2. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Fat-Moon; Lien, Gi-Shih; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Chia-Nan; Lu, Shao-Yu; Yan, Ming-De

    2013-01-01

    Activating transcription factor-(ATF-) 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002) is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG) derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK), and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug. PMID:24222778

  3. Multiple forms of the human gene-specific transcription factor USF. II. DNA binding properties and transcriptional activity of the purified HeLa USF.

    PubMed

    Sawadogo, M

    1988-08-25

    The gene-specific upstream stimulatory transcription factor (USF) is required for maximal expression of the adenovirus major late promoter in vivo as well as in vitro. We have examined the DNA binding and transcriptional properties of USF purified to near-homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei (Sawadogo, M., Van Dyke, M. W., Gregor, P. D., and Roeder, R. G. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11985-11993). The 44-and 43,000-dalton forms of USF displayed identical affinities for the major late promoter upstream sequence. Specific binding parameters were greatly influenced by neighboring sequences, but not by the topological state of the DNA. The dissociation rate was highly dependent upon the concentration of competitor DNA, indicating that USF can efficiently transfer from one binding site to another by passing through a doubly bound intermediate state (direct transfer mechanism). Transcription stimulation by purified USF showed titration curves identical to those observed with cruder preparations of the transcription factor. However, the overall stimulation observed at saturating USF concentration was significantly lower with the purified protein. By contrast, interaction with TATA box-binding RNA polymerase II transcription factor D was observed with both USF-containing fractions. This could suggest the existence of two different mechanisms for upstream sequence-dependent transcription stimulation, where one critical component (or some necessary modification of the upstream factor itself) may be missing in reactions reconstituted with purified USF.

  4. Activating transcription factor 4 is involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis contributing to vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiao-Hui; Chang, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Li, Yu-Lin; Teng, Xu; Zhu, Yi; Du, Jie; Tang, Chao-Shu; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2013-09-01

    Our previous work reported that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-mediated apoptosis was activated during vascular calcification (VC). Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor in osteoblastogenesis and ERS-induced apoptosis. However, whether ATF4 is involved in ERS-mediated apoptosis contributing to VC remains unclear. In the present study, in vivo VC was induced in rats by administering vitamin D3 plus nicotine. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro was induced by incubation in calcifying media containing β-glycerophosphate and CaCl2. ERS inhibitors taurine or 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuated ERS and VSMC apoptosis in calcified rat arteries, reduced calcification and retarded the VSMC contractile phenotype transforming into an osteoblast-like phenotype in vivo. Inhibition of ERS retarded the VSMC phenotypic transition into an osteoblast-like cell phenotype and reduced VSMC calcification and apoptosis in vitro. Interestingly, ATF4 was activated in calcified aortas and calcified VSMCs in vitro. ATF4 knockdown attenuated ERS-induced apoptosis in calcified VSMCs. ATF4 deficiency blocked VSMC calcification and negatively regulated the osteoblast phenotypic transition of VSMCs in vitro. Our results demonstrate that ATF4 was involved at least in part in the process of ERS-mediated apoptosis contributing to VC.

  5. Transforming growth factor-alpha-induced transcriptional activation of the vascular permeability factor (VPF/VEGF) gene requires AP-2-dependent DNA binding and transactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Gille, J; Swerlick, R A; Caughman, S W

    1997-01-01

    The endothelial cell-specific mitogen vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) represents a central regulator of cutaneous angiogenesis. Increased VPF/VEGF expression has recently been reported in psoriatic skin and healing wounds, both conditions in which transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF alpha) and its ligand, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are markedly up-regulated. Since TGF alpha strongly induces VPF/VEGF synthesis in keratinocytes, TGF alpha-mediated VPF/VEGF expression is likely to play a significant role in the initiation and maintenance of increased vascular hyperpermeability and hyperproliferation in skin biology. The objectives of the present studies were to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for TGF alpha-induced transcriptional activation of the VPF/VEGF gene. We have identified a GC-rich TGF alpha-responsive region between -88 bp and -65 bp of the VPF/VEGF promoter that is necessary for constitutive and TGF alpha-inducible transcriptional activation. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, this region binds Sp1-dependent protein complexes constitutively and an additional TGF alpha-inducible protein complex that is distinct from Sp1 protein. Both AP-2 and Egr-1 transcription factors were detected as components of the TGF alpha-inducible protein complex in supershift EMSA studies. In co-transfection studies, an AP-2 but not an Egr-1 expression vector activated VPF/VEGF transcription, thus indicating that AP-2 protein is functionally important in TGF alpha-induced VPF/VEGF gene expression. By clarifying regulatory mechanisms that are critical for angiogenic processes in the skin, these studies may form the basis for new therapeutic strategies to modulate VPF/VEGF expression in cutaneous inflammation and wound healing. PMID:9049304

  6. Dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor is regulated by an RNA-protein scaffold complex.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonia; Findlay, Gregory M; Bandukwala, Hozefa S; Oberdoerffer, Shalini; Baust, Beate; Li, Zhigang; Schmidt, Valentina; Hogan, Patrick G; Sacks, David B; Rao, Anjana

    2011-07-12

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are Ca(2+)-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression in many cell types. NFAT proteins are heavily phosphorylated and reside in the cytoplasm of resting cells; when cells are stimulated by a rise in intracellular Ca(2+), NFAT proteins are dephosphorylated by the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and translocate to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. Here we show that phosphorylated NFAT1 is present in a large cytoplasmic RNA-protein scaffold complex that contains a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), NRON [noncoding (RNA) repressor of NFAT]; a scaffold protein, IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAP); and three NFAT kinases, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase. Combined knockdown of NRON and IQGAP1 increased NFAT dephosphorylation and nuclear import exclusively after stimulation, without affecting the rate of NFAT rephosphorylation and nuclear export; and both NRON-depleted T cells and T cells from IQGAP1-deficient mice showed increased production of NFAT-dependent cytokines. Our results provide evidence that a complex of lincRNA and protein forms a scaffold for a latent transcription factor and its regulatory kinases, and support an emerging consensus that lincRNAs that bind transcriptional regulators have a similar scaffold function.

  7. Interactions of the ubiquitous octamer-binding transcription factor-1 with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 and the glucocorticoid receptor mediate prolactin and glucocorticoid-induced β-casein gene expression in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2013-03-01

    Regulation of milk protein gene expression by lactogenic hormones (prolactin and glucocorticoids) provides an attractive model for studying the mechanisms by which protein and steroid hormones synergistically regulate gene expression. β-Casein is one of the major milk proteins and its expression in mammary epithelial cells is stimulated by lactogenic hormones. The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 and glucocorticoid receptor are essential downstream mediators of prolactin and glucocorticoid signaling, respectively. Previous studies have shown that mutating the octamer-binding site of the β-casein gene proximal promoter dramatically reduces the hormonal induction of the promoter activity. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this report, we show that lactogenic hormones rapidly induce the binding of octamer-binding transcription factor-1 to the β-casein promoter and this induction is not mediated by either increasing the expression of octamer-binding transcription factor-1 or inducing its translocation to the nucleus. Rather, lactogenic hormones induce physical interactions between the octamer-binding transcription factor-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5, and glucocorticoid receptor to form a ternary complex, and these interactions enhance or stabilize the binding of these transcription factors to the promoter. Abolishing these interactions significantly reduces the hormonal induction of β-casein gene transcription. Thus, our study indicates that octamer-binding transcription factor-1 may serve as a master regulator that facilitates the DNA binding of both signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 and glucocorticoid receptor in hormone-induced β-casein expression, and defines a novel mechanism of regulation of tissue-specific gene expression by the ubiquitous octamer-binding transcription factor-1.

  8. Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB by retrieval is required for long-term memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Emiliano; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Maldonado, Héctor; Romano, Arturo

    2005-01-01

    Several studies support that stored memories undergo a new period of consolidation after retrieval. It is not known whether this process, termed reconsolidation, requires the same transcriptional mechanisms involved in consolidation. Increasing evidence supports the participation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in memory. This was initially demonstrated in the crab Chasmagnathus model of associative contextual memory, in which re-exposure to the training context induces a well characterized reconsolidation process. Here we studied the role of NF-kappaB in reconsolidation. NF-kappaB was specifically activated in trained animals re-exposed to the training context but not to a different context. NF-kappaB was not activated when animals were re-exposed to the context after a weak training protocol insufficient to induce long-term memory. A specific inhibitor of the NF-kappaB pathway, sulfasalazine, impaired reconsolidation when administered 20 min before re-exposure to the training context but was not effective when a different context was used. These findings indicate for the first time that NF-kappaB is activated specifically by retrieval and that this activation is required for memory reconsolidation, supporting the view that this molecular mechanism is required in both consolidation and reconsolidation.

  9. Optogenetic Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Reis, Jakeb M; Xia, Yan; Rashid, Asim J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Walters, Brandon J; Brechun, Katherine E; Borisenko, Vitali; Josselyn, Sheena A; Karanicolas, John; Woolley, G Andrew

    2015-11-19

    Current approaches for optogenetic control of transcription do not mimic the activity of endogenous transcription factors, which act at numerous sites in the genome in a complex interplay with other factors. Optogenetic control of dominant negative versions of endogenous transcription factors provides a mechanism for mimicking the natural regulation of gene expression. Here we describe opto-DN-CREB, a blue-light-controlled inhibitor of the transcription factor CREB created by fusing the dominant negative inhibitor A-CREB to photoactive yellow protein (PYP). A light-driven conformational change in PYP prevents coiled-coil formation between A-CREB and CREB, thereby activating CREB. Optogenetic control of CREB function was characterized in vitro, in HEK293T cells, and in neurons where blue light enabled control of expression of the CREB targets NR4A2 and c-Fos. Dominant negative inhibitors exist for numerous transcription factors; linking these to optogenetic domains offers a general approach for spatiotemporal control of native transcriptional events. PMID:26590638

  10. Yeast DEAD box protein Mss116p is a transcription elongation factor that modulates the activity of mitochondrial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Wojtas, Ireneusz D; Tessitore, Kassandra; Henderson, Simmone; McAllister, William T

    2014-07-01

    DEAD box proteins have been widely implicated in regulation of gene expression. Here, we show that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD box protein Mss116p, previously known as a mitochondrial splicing factor, also acts as a transcription factor that modulates the activity of the single-subunit mitochondrial RNA polymerase encoded by RPO41. Binding of Mss116p stabilizes paused mitochondrial RNA polymerase elongation complexes in vitro and favors the posttranslocated state of the enzyme, resulting in a lower concentration of nucleotide substrate required to escape the pause; this mechanism of action is similar to that of elongation factors that enhance the processivity of multisubunit RNA polymerases. In a yeast strain in which the RNA splicing-related functions of Mss116p are dispensable, overexpression of RPO41 or MSS116 increases cell survival from colonies that were exposed to low temperature, suggesting a role for Mss116p in enhancing the efficiency of mitochondrial transcription under stress conditions. PMID:24732805

  11. hTERT promotes tumor angiogenesis by activating VEGF via interactions with the Sp1 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Ding, Deqiang; Hao, Wanyu; Yang, Fan; Wu, Xiaoying; Wang, Miao; Xu, Xiaoling; Ju, Zhenyu; Liu, Jun-Ping; Song, Zhangfa; Shay, Jerry W.; Guo, Yunliang; Cong, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is recognized as an important hallmark of cancer. Although telomerase is thought to be involved in tumor angiogenesis, the evidence and underlying mechanism remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) activates vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression through interactions with the VEGF promoter and the transcription factor Sp1. hTERT binds to Sp1 in vitro and in vivo and stimulates angiogenesis in a manner dependent on Sp1. Deletion of the mTert gene in the first generation of Tert null mice compromised tumor growth, with reduced VEGF expression. In addition, we show that hTERT expression levels are positively correlated with those of VEGF in human gastric tumor samples. Together, our results demonstrate that hTERT facilitates tumor angiogenesis by up-regulating VEGF expression through direct interactions with the VEGF gene and the Sp1 transcription factor. These results provide novel insights into hTERT function in tumor progression in addition to its role in telomere maintenance. PMID:27325744

  12. A novel dual kinase function of the RET proto-oncogene negatively regulates activating transcription factor 4-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Yarmand, Rozita; Sinha, Krishna M; Gururaj, Anupama E; Ahmed, Zamal; Rizvi, Yasmeen Q; Huang, Su-Chen; Ladbury, John E; Bogler, Oliver; Williams, Michelle D; Cote, Gilbert J; Gagel, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    The RET proto-oncogene, a tyrosine kinase receptor, is widely known for its essential role in cell survival. Germ line missense mutations, which give rise to constitutively active oncogenic RET, were found to cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, a dominant inherited cancer syndrome that affects neuroendocrine organs. However, the mechanisms by which RET promotes cell survival and prevents cell death remain elusive. We demonstrate that in addition to cytoplasmic localization, RET is localized in the nucleus and functions as a tyrosine-threonine dual specificity kinase. Knockdown of RET by shRNA in medullary thyroid cancer-derived cells stimulated expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a master transcription factor for stress-induced apoptosis, through activation of its target proapoptotic genes NOXA and PUMA. RET knockdown also increased sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We observed that RET physically interacted with and phosphorylated ATF4 at tyrosine and threonine residues. Indeed, RET kinase activity was required to inhibit the ATF4-dependent activation of the NOXA gene because the site-specific substitution mutations that block threonine phosphorylation increased ATF4 stability and activated its targets NOXA and PUMA. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ATF4 occupancy increased at the NOXA promoter in TT cells treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or the ATF4 inducer eeyarestatin as well as in RET-depleted TT cells. Together these findings reveal RET as a novel dual kinase with nuclear localization and provide mechanisms by which RET represses the proapoptotic genes through direct interaction with and phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of ATF4 during the pathogenesis of medullary thyroid cancer.

  13. Activation of the Transcription Factor NF-[Kappa]B by Retrieval Is Required for Long-Term Memory Reconsolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Hector; Romano, Arturo; Merlo, Emiliano; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2005-01-01

    Several studies support that stored memories undergo a new period of consolidation after retrieval. It is not known whether this process, termed reconsolidation, requires the same transcriptional mechanisms involved in consolidation. Increasing evidence supports the participation of the transcription factor NF-[Kappa]B in memory. This was…

  14. The Intracellular Domain of Teneurin-1 Induces the Activity of Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) by Binding to Transcriptional Repressor HINT1

    PubMed Central

    Schöler, Jonas; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Thiry, Stéphane; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Teneurins are large type II transmembrane proteins that are necessary for the normal development of the CNS. Although many studies highlight the significance of teneurins, especially during development, there is only limited information known about the molecular mechanisms of function. Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal intracellular domain (ICD) of teneurins can be cleaved at the membrane and subsequently translocates to the nucleus, where it can influence gene transcription. Because teneurin ICDs do not contain any intrinsic DNA binding sequences, interaction partners are required to affect transcription. Here, we identified histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) as a human teneurin-1 ICD interaction partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen. This interaction was confirmed in human cells, where HINT1 is known to inhibit the transcription of target genes by directly binding to transcription factors at the promoter. In a whole transcriptome analysis of BS149 glioblastoma cells overexpressing the teneurin-1 ICD, several microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) target genes were found to be up-regulated. Directly comparing the transcriptomes of MITF versus TEN1-ICD-overexpressing BS149 cells revealed 42 co-regulated genes, including glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB). Using real-time quantitative PCR to detect endogenous GPNMB expression upon overexpression of MITF and HINT1 as well as promoter reporter assays using GPNMB promoter constructs, we could demonstrate that the teneurin-1 ICD binds HINT1, thus switching on MITF-dependent transcription of GPNMB. PMID:25648896

  15. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O'Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  16. Cooperative Activation of a Eukaryotic Transcription Factor: Interaction between Cu(I) and Yeast ACE1 Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Peter; Hamer, Dean

    1989-07-01

    Cu ions activate yeast metallothionein gene transcription by altering the conformation and DNA-binding activity of the ACE1 transcription factor. We show that this conformational switch occurs in an all-or-none highly cooperative fashion (Hill coefficient = 4). Analysis of the subunit composition of ACE1 bound to DNA indicates that cooperativity results from the binding of multiple Cu(I) ions to the cysteine-rich DNA-binding domain. Surprisingly, DNA has little effect on the interaction between Cu(I) and ACE1 as assayed by partial proteolysis; this suggests that the effect of the metal on DNA binding is primarily kinetic rather than thermodynamic. Although Ag(I) also activates ACE1, it acts less cooperatively than the smaller Cu(I) ion and the resulting metalloprotein has a reduced affinity for DNA. The cooperative interaction between Cu and ACE1 allows the cell to respond to a small change in metal concentration by a large change in gene expression.

  17. The chromatin remodeler CHD7 regulates adult neurogenesis via activation of SoxC transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weijun; Khan, Muhammad Amir; Bellvis, Pablo; Zhu, Zhe; Bernhardt, Olga; Herold-Mende, Christel; Liu, Hai-Kun

    2013-07-01

    Chromatin factors that regulate neurogenesis in the central nervous system remain to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that the chromatin remodeler chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7), a protein frequently mutated in human CHARGE syndrome, is a master regulator of neurogenesis in mammalian brain. CHD7 is selectively expressed in actively dividing neural stem cells (NSCs) and progenitors. Genetic inactivation of CHD7 in NSCs leads to a reduction of neuronal differentiation and aberrant dendritic development of newborn neurons. Strikingly, physical exercise can rescue the CHD7 mutant phenotype in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. We further show that in NSCs, CHD7 stimulates the expression of Sox4 and Sox11 genes via remodeling their promoters to an open chromatin state. Our study demonstrates an essential role of CHD7 in activation of the neuronal differentiation program in NSCs, thus providing insights into epigenetic regulation of stem cell differentiation and molecular mechanism of human CHARGE syndrome. PMID:23827709

  18. Transcriptional activation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor promoter by human p53.

    PubMed Central

    Ludes-Meyers, J H; Subler, M A; Shivakumar, C V; Munoz, R M; Jiang, P; Bigger, J E; Brown, D R; Deb, S P; Deb, S

    1996-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) promoter is activated by both wild-type and tumor-derived mutant p53. In this communication, we demonstrate that EGFR promoter sequence requirements for transactivation by wild-type and mutant p53 are different. Transient-expression assays with EGFR promoter deletions identified a wild-type human p53 response element, 5'-AGCTAGACGTCCGGGCAGCCCCCGGCG -3', from positions --265 to --239. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and DNase I footprinting assays indicated that wild-type p53 binds sequence specifically to the response element. Using circularly permuted DNA fragments containing the p53-binding site, we show that wild-type p53 binding induces DNA bending at this site. We further show that the EGFR promoter is also activated by tumor-derived p53 mutants p53-143A, p53-175H, p53-248W, p53-273H, and p53-281G. However, the transactivation by mutant p53 does not require the wild-type p53-binding site. The minimal EGFR promoter from positions --104 to --20 which does not contain the wild-type p53-binding site is transactivated by the p53 mutants but not by the wild-type protein, showing a difference in the mechanism of transactivation by wild-type and mutant p53. Transactivation of the EGFR promoter by p53 may represent a novel mechanism of cell growth regulation. PMID:8887630

  19. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  20. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain (“BEN-solo” factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  1. Diphenylarsinic Acid Induced Activation of Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes: Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Upregulation of Transcription Factors, and Release of Brain-Active Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Mami; Kojima, Mikiya; Asai, Ryota; Kanehira, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Fumika; Takahata, Kazuaki; Arakaki, Rina; Aoyama, Yohei; Yoshida, Hikari; Yoshida, Kenji; Yukawa, Kazunori; Tashiro, Tomoko; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-03-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was detected as the primary compound responsible for the arsenic poisoning that occurred in Kamisu, Ibaraki, Japan, where people using water from a well that was contaminated with a high level of arsenic developed neurological (mostly cerebellar) symptoms and dysregulation of regional cerebral blood flow. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of DPAA-induced cerebellar symptoms, we focused on astrocytes, which have a brain-protective function. Incubation with 10 µM DPAA for 96 h promoted cell proliferation, increased the expression of antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70), and induced the release of cytokines (MCP-1, adrenomedullin, FGF2, CXCL1, and IL-6). Furthermore, DPAA overpoweringly increased the phosphorylation of three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and SAPK/JNK), which indicated MAPK activation, and subsequently induced expression and/or phosphorylation of transcription factors (Nrf2, CREB, c-Jun, and c-Fos) in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. Structure-activity relationship analyses of DPAA and other related pentavalent organic arsenicals revealed that DPAA at 10 µM activated astrocytes most effective among organic arsenicals tested at the same dose. These results suggest that in a cerebellum exposed to DPAA, abnormal activation of the MAPK-transcription factor pathway and irregular secretion of these neuroactive, glioactive, and/or vasoactive cytokines in astrocytes can be the direct/indirect cause of functional abnormalities in surrounding neurons, glial cells, and vascular cells: This in turn might lead to the onset of cerebellar symptoms and disruption of cerebral blood flow. PMID:26645585

  2. Functional Analysis of Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes at the transcriptional level. Modification of TF activity dynamically alters the transcriptome, which leads to metabolic and phenotypic changes. Thus, functional analysis of TFs using ‘omics-based’ methodologies is one of the most important areas of the post-genome era. In this mini-review, we present an overview of Arabidopsis TFs and introduce strategies for the functional analysis of plant TFs, which include both traditional and recently developed technologies. These strategies can be assigned to five categories: bioinformatic analysis; analysis of molecular function; expression analysis; phenotype analysis; and network analysis for the description of entire transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19478073

  3. RNA helicase HEL-1 promotes longevity by specifically activating DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mihwa; Seo, Keunhee; Hwang, Wooseon; Koo, Hee Jung; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Seong; Han, Seong Kyu; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Yoontae; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2015-08-01

    The homeostatic maintenance of the genomic DNA is crucial for regulating aging processes. However, the role of RNA homeostasis in aging processes remains unknown. RNA helicases are a large family of enzymes that regulate the biogenesis and homeostasis of RNA. However, the functional significance of RNA helicases in aging has not been explored. Here, we report that a large fraction of RNA helicases regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, we show that a DEAD-box RNA helicase, helicase 1 (HEL-1), promotes longevity by specifically activating the DAF-16/forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor signaling pathway. We find that HEL-1 is required for the longevity conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) and is sufficient for extending lifespan. We further show that the expression of HEL-1 in the intestine and neurons contributes to longevity. HEL-1 enhances the induction of a large fraction of DAF-16 target genes. Thus, the RNA helicase HEL-1 appears to promote longevity in response to decreased IIS as a transcription coregulator of DAF-16. Because HEL-1 and IIS are evolutionarily well conserved, a similar mechanism for longevity regulation via an RNA helicase-dependent regulation of FOXO signaling may operate in mammals, including humans. PMID:26195740

  4. RNA helicase HEL-1 promotes longevity by specifically activating DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mihwa; Seo, Keunhee; Hwang, Wooseon; Koo, Hee Jung; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Seong; Han, Seong Kyu; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Yoontae; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2015-08-01

    The homeostatic maintenance of the genomic DNA is crucial for regulating aging processes. However, the role of RNA homeostasis in aging processes remains unknown. RNA helicases are a large family of enzymes that regulate the biogenesis and homeostasis of RNA. However, the functional significance of RNA helicases in aging has not been explored. Here, we report that a large fraction of RNA helicases regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, we show that a DEAD-box RNA helicase, helicase 1 (HEL-1), promotes longevity by specifically activating the DAF-16/forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor signaling pathway. We find that HEL-1 is required for the longevity conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) and is sufficient for extending lifespan. We further show that the expression of HEL-1 in the intestine and neurons contributes to longevity. HEL-1 enhances the induction of a large fraction of DAF-16 target genes. Thus, the RNA helicase HEL-1 appears to promote longevity in response to decreased IIS as a transcription coregulator of DAF-16. Because HEL-1 and IIS are evolutionarily well conserved, a similar mechanism for longevity regulation via an RNA helicase-dependent regulation of FOXO signaling may operate in mammals, including humans.

  5. A Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene, PfMSX, Activates Expression of Pif Gene in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mi; He, Maoxian; Huang, Xiande; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We reported pearl oyster Pinctada fucata cDNA and genomic characterization of a new homeobox-containing protein, PfMSX. The PfMSX gene encodes a transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus. Analyses of PfMSX mRNA in tissues and developmental stages showed high expressions in mantle or D-shaped larvae. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) PfMSX binded to MSX consensus binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the Pif promoter. In co-transfection experiment PfMSX transactivated reporter constructs containing Pif promoter sequences, and mutation of the MSX-binding sites attenuated transactivation. A knockdown experiment using PfMSX dsRNA showed decreased Pif mRNA and unregular crystallization of the nacreous layer using scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggested that PfMSX was a conserved homeodomain transcription factor gene, which can activate Pif gene expression through MSX binding site, and was then involved in the mineralization process in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Our data provided important clues about mechanisms regulating biomineralization in pearl oyster. PMID:25099698

  6. A homeodomain transcription factor gene, PfMSX, activates expression of Pif gene in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mi; He, Maoxian; Huang, Xiande; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We reported pearl oyster Pinctada fucata cDNA and genomic characterization of a new homeobox-containing protein, PfMSX. The PfMSX gene encodes a transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus. Analyses of PfMSX mRNA in tissues and developmental stages showed high expressions in mantle or D-shaped larvae. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) PfMSX binded to MSX consensus binding sites in the 5' flanking region of the Pif promoter. In co-transfection experiment PfMSX transactivated reporter constructs containing Pif promoter sequences, and mutation of the MSX-binding sites attenuated transactivation. A knockdown experiment using PfMSX dsRNA showed decreased Pif mRNA and unregular crystallization of the nacreous layer using scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggested that PfMSX was a conserved homeodomain transcription factor gene, which can activate Pif gene expression through MSX binding site, and was then involved in the mineralization process in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Our data provided important clues about mechanisms regulating biomineralization in pearl oyster.

  7. The HMG-box transcription factor SoxNeuro acts with Tcf to control Wg/Wnt signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Chao, Anna T; Jones, Whitney M; Bejsovec, Amy

    2007-03-01

    Wnt signaling specifies cell fates in many tissues during vertebrate and invertebrate embryogenesis. To understand better how Wnt signaling is regulated during development, we have performed genetic screens to isolate mutations that suppress or enhance mutations in the fly Wnt homolog, wingless (wg). We find that loss-of-function mutations in the neural determinant SoxNeuro (also known as Sox-neuro, SoxN) partially suppress wg mutant pattern defects. SoxN encodes a HMG-box-containing protein related to the vertebrate Sox1, Sox2 and Sox3 proteins, which have been implicated in patterning events in the early mouse embryo. In Drosophila, SoxN has previously been shown to specify neural progenitors in the embryonic central nervous system. Here, we show that SoxN negatively regulates Wg pathway activity in the embryonic epidermis. Loss of SoxN function hyperactivates the Wg pathway, whereas its overexpression represses pathway activity. Epistasis analysis with other components of the Wg pathway places SoxN at the level of the transcription factor Pan (also known as Lef, Tcf) in regulating target gene expression. In human cell culture assays, SoxN represses Tcf-responsive reporter expression, indicating that the fly gene product can interact with mammalian Wnt pathway components. In both flies and in human cells, SoxN repression is potentiated by adding ectopic Tcf, suggesting that SoxN interacts with the repressor form of Tcf to influence Wg/Wnt target gene transcription. PMID:17267442

  8. Ser¹¹⁹ phosphorylation modulates the activity and conformation of PRRXL1, a homeodomain transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Soares-dos-Reis, Ricardo; Pessoa, Ana S; Matos, Mariana R; Falcão, Miguel; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; Monteiro, Filipe A; Lima, Deolinda; Reguenga, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    PRRXL1 [paired related homeobox-like 1; also known as DRG11 (dorsal root ganglia 11)] is a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor expressed in DRG and dSC (dorsal spinal cord) nociceptive neurons. PRRXL1 is crucial for the establishment and maintenance of nociceptive circuitry, as Prrxl1(-/-) mice present neuronal loss, reduced pain sensitivity and failure to thrive. In the present study, we show that PRRXL1 is highly phosphorylated in vivo, and that its multiple band pattern on electrophoretic analysis is the result of different phosphorylation states. PRRXL1 phosphorylation appears to be differentially regulated along the dSC and DRG development and it is mapped to two functional domains. One region comprises amino acids 107-143, whereas the other one encompasses amino acids 227-263 and displays repressor activity. Using an immunoprecipitation-MS approach, two phosphorylation sites were identified, Ser¹¹⁹ and Ser²³⁸. Phosphorylation at Ser¹¹⁹ is shown to be determinant for PRRXL1 conformation and transcriptional activity. Ser¹¹⁹ phosphorylation is thus proposed as a mechanism for regulating PRRXL1 function and conformation during nociceptive system development.

  9. Upregulation of heat shock factor 1 transcription activity is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Shulian; Ma, Wanli; Fei, Teng; Lou, Qiang; Zhang, Yaqin; Cui, Xiukun; Qin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Guangchao; Dong, Zheng; Ma, Yuanfang; Song, Zhengshun; Hu, Yanzhong

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is associated with tissue‑specific tumorigenesis in a number of mouse models, and has been used a as prognostic marker of cancer types, including breast and prostatic cancer. However, its role in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not well understood. Using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining, it was identified that HSF1 and its serine (S) 326 phosphorylation, a biomarker of HSF1 activation, are significantly upregulated in human HCC tissues and HCC cell lines compared with their normal counterparts. Cohort analyses indicated that upregulation of the expression of HSF1 and its phospho‑S326 is significantly correlated with HCC progression, invasion and patient survival prognosis (P<0.001); however, not in the presence of a hepatitis B virus infection and the expression of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen. Knockdown of HSF1 with shRNA induced the protein expression of tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein, resulting in attenuated plc/prf5 cell growth and colony formation in vitro. Taken together, these data markedly support that HSF1 is a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC.

  10. Two different factors act separately or together to specify functionally distinct activities at a single transcriptional enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, D; Yamamoto, K R

    1986-01-01

    The expression of genes fused downstream of the Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MoMSV) long terminal repeat is stimulated by glucocorticoids. We mapped the glucocorticoid response element that conferred this hormonal regulation and found that it is a hormone-dependent transcriptional enhancer, designated Sg; it resides within DNA fragments that also carry a previously described enhancer element (B. Levinson, G. Khoury, G. Vande Woude, and P. Gruss, Nature [London] 295:568-572, 1982), here termed Sa, whose activity is independent of the hormone. Nuclease footprinting revealed that purified glucocorticoid receptor bound at multiple discrete sites within and at the borders of the tandemly repeated sequence motif that defines Sa. The Sa and Sg activities stimulated the apparent efficiency of cognate or heterologous promoter utilization, individually providing modest enhancement and in concert yielding higher levels of activity. A deletion mutant lacking most of the tandem repeat but retaining a single receptor footprint sequence lost Sa activity but still conferred Sg activity. The two enhancer components could also be distinguished physiologically: both were operative within cultured rat fibroblasts, but only Sg activity was detectable in rat exocrine pancreas cells. Therefore, the sequence determinants of Sa and Sg activity may be interdigitated, and when both components are active, the receptor and a putative Sa factor can apparently bind and act simultaneously. We concluded that MoMSV enhancer activity is effected by at least two distinct binding factors, suggesting that combinatorial regulation of promoter function can be mediated even from a single genetic element. Images PMID:3023887

  11. Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6) modulates the transcriptional level of GRP78 and GRP94 in CIK cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangqin; Zhang, Tao; Mao, Huiling; Mi, Yichuan; Zhong, Bin; Wei, Lili; Liu, Xiancheng; Hu, Chengyu

    2016-05-01

    ATF transcription factors are stress proteins containing alkaline area-leucine zipper and play an important role in endoplasmic reticulum stress. ATF6 is a protective protein which regulates the adaptation of cells to ER stress by modulating the transcription of UPR (Unfolded Protein Response) target genes, including GRP78 and GRP94. In the present study, a grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) ATF6 full-length cDNA (named CiATF6, KT279356) has been cloned and identified. CiATF6 is 4176 bp in length, comprising 159 nucleotides of 5'-untranslated sequence, a 1947 nucleotides open reading frame and 2170 nucleotides of 3'-untranslated sequences. The largest open reading frame of CiATF6 translates into 648 aa with a typical DNA binding domain (BRLZ domain) and shares significant homology to the known ATF6 counterparts. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed its closer evolutionary relationship with other fish counterparts, especially with Zebrafish ATF6. RT-PCR showed that CiATF6 was ubiquitously expressed and significantly up-regulated after stimulation with thermal stress in all tested grass carp tissues. In order to know more about the role of CiATF6 in ER stress, recombinant CiATF6N with His-tag was over-expressed in Rosetta Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography with Ni-NTA His-Bind Resin. In vitro, gel mobility shift assays were employed to analyze the interaction of CiATF6 protein with the promoters of grass carp GRP78 and GRP94, respectively. The result has shown that CiATF6 could bind to these promoters with high affinity by means of its BRLZ mainly. To further study the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of CiATF6, Dual-luciferase reporter assays were applied. Recombinant plasmids of pGL3-GRP78P and pGL3-CiGRP94P were constructed and transiently co-transfected with pcDNA3.1-CiATF6 (pcDN3.1-CiATF6-nBRLZ, respectively) into C. idella kidney (CIK) cells. The result has shown that CiATF6 could activate CiGRP78 and Ci

  12. Modulation of Cytokine Production and Transcription Factors Activities in Human Jurkat T Cells by Thymol and Carvacrol

    PubMed Central

    Gholijani, Nasser; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Kalantar, Fathollah; Ramezani, Amin; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Thymol and carvacrol, two main components of thyme, have shown anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of these components on Jurkat leukemia cells as an in vitro T cell model and their molecular mechanisms of activity. Methods: Cells were cultured in the presence of components and subsequently stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)/calcium ionophore for evaluating interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The activation of T cell transcription factors that included nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFATs), activator protein-1 (AP-1; c-Jun/c-Fos), and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were examined by Western blot analysis. Results: Thymol and carvacrol at 25 µg/ml significantly reduced IL-2 levels from 119.4 ± 8pg/ml in control cells treated only with PMA/Calcium ionophore and the solvent to 66.9 ± 6.4pg/ml (thymol) and 32.3 ± 3.6pg/ml (carvacrol) and IFN-γ from 423.7 ± 19.7pg/ml in control cells to 311.9 ± 11.6pg/ml (thymol) and 293.5 ± 16.7pg/ml (carvacrol). Western blot analyses of nuclear extracts showed that the same concentrations of components significantly reduced NFAT-2 to 44.2 ± 2.7% (thymol) and 91.4 ± 2.3% (carvacrol) of the control (p<0.05), and c-Fos to 31.2 ± 6.2% (thymol) and 27.6 ± 3.1% (carvacrol) of the control (p<0.01). No effects on NFAT-1, c-Jun and phospho-NF-κBp65 levels were observed. Conclusion: Thymol and carvacrol could contribute to modulation of T cell activity by reducing IL-2 and IFN-γ production possibly through down regulation of AP-1 and NFAT-2 transcription factors suggesting their potential usefulness for reduction of T cell overactivity in immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26793612

  13. A novel AMPK activator from Chinese herb medicine and ischemia phosphorylate the cardiac transcription factor FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingying; Ma, Heng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; He, Leilei; Wu, Jianming; Gao, Xiaoping; Ren, Jun; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Oleanolic Acid (OA) is a nature product extracted from Chinese Herb Medicine which is traditionally used as treatment of diabetes and ischemic heart diseases. Mounting evidence showed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has cardioprotective effect against ischemic injury and the forkhead transcription factor 3 (FOXO3) was recently identified as a downstream target of AMPK. We hypothesize that OA may protect against ischemic dysfunction of cardiomyocytes via activation of AMPK signaling pathway. Male C57BL/6 mice which were subjected to in vivo regional cardiac ischemia stimulated AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation, as well as phosphorylation of downstream FOXO3 (Ser413) and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC). The natural product, OA, significantly stimulated cardiac AMPK activation in cardiomyocyes in time- and dose-dependent manners. The mechanism of AMPK activation by OA may be due to the loss mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) as shown by JC-1 fluorescence assay. Intriguingly, OA as an AMPK activator also triggered FOXO3 (Ser413) phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, OA treatment can protect cardiomyocytes from contractile dysfunction induced by hypoxia. Taken together, the results indicated that both ischemia and OA stimulated cardiac AMPK phosphorylation, as well downstream FOXO3 phosphorylation. The cardioprotective effect of OA maybe associated with activation of AMPK signaling pathways.

  14. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM)

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3′ untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF–myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  15. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  16. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells.

  17. A novel transcriptional factor with Ser/Thr kinase activity involved in the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signalling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, S; Takeuchi, M; Deguchi, M; Tsuji, T; Gahara, Y; Nagata, K

    2000-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) shows a variety of biological activities in various organs or cells. Recently some factors such as Smads (Sma and Mad proteins) and TGF-beta activating kinase 1 ('TAK1') have been characterized as signalling molecules downstream of TGF-beta. Several TGF-beta response elements have been identified such as cAMP response element, Smad binding element, and recognition sites for activating protein-1 and stimulating protein-1 in various gene promoters. We also reported a TGF-beta response element in the human C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) gene promoter. In this paper, we report on a novel factor which regulates the TGF-beta response promoter. This factor, named TSF1 (TGF-beta stimulated factor 1), possessed DNA-binding ability and activated the TGF-beta responsive CNP promoter or vascular endothelial growth factor gene promoter which possesses a sequence element analogous to the TGF-beta responsive GC-rich element of the CNP promoter. TSF1 did not directly activate a Smads-dependent promoter from plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene, but it showed enhancement in co-operation with Smad3 and Smad4. Interestingly, this factor had the structural features of a Ser/Thr kinase and actually exhibited protein kinase activity. TSF1 mRNA as well as its protein level were stimulated by TGF-beta treatment. Thus, TSF1 is an unique factor with two biological functions, transcriptional regulation and protein phosphorylation, that may be involved in TGF-beta signals. PMID:10947953

  18. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  19. Characterization of ABF-1, a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor expressed in activated B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Massari, M E; Rivera, R R; Voland, J R; Quong, M W; Breit, T M; van Dongen, J J; de Smit, O; Murre, C

    1998-06-01

    Proteins of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family are required for a number of different developmental pathways, including neurogenesis, lymphopoiesis, myogenesis, and sex determination. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we have identified a new bHLH transcription factor, ABF-1, from a human B-cell cDNA library. Within the bHLH region, ABF-1 shows a remarkable conservation with other HLH proteins, including tal-1, NeuroD, and paraxis. Its expression pattern is restricted to a subset of lymphoid tissues, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines, and activated human B cells. ABF-1 is capable of binding an E-box element either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with E2A. Furthermore, a heterodimeric complex containing ABF-1 and E2A can be detected in EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. ABF-1 contains a transcriptional repression domain and is capable of inhibiting the transactivation capability of E47 in mammalian cells. ABF-1 represents the first example of a B-cell-restricted bHLH protein, and its expression pattern suggests that ABF-1 may play a role in regulating antigen-dependent B-cell differentiation.

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Activated Transcription Factor ATF6α Requires the Disulfide Isomerase PDIA5 To Modulate Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Arisa; Taouji, Said; Lhomond, Stéphanie; Jensen, Devon; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Pasquet, Jean-Max; Schekman, Randy

    2014-01-01

    ATF6α, a membrane-anchored transcription factor from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that modulates the cellular response to stress as an effector of the unfolded-protein response (UPR), is a key player in the development of tumors of different origin. ATF6α activation has been linked to oncogenic transformation and tumor maintenance; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon remains elusive. Here, using a phenotypic small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening, we identified a novel role for ATF6α in chemoresistance and defined the protein disulfide isomerase A5 (PDIA5) as necessary for ATF6α activation upon ER stress. PDIA5 contributed to disulfide bond rearrangement in ATF6α under stress conditions, thereby leading to ATF6α export from the ER and activation of its target genes. Further analysis of the mechanism demonstrated that PDIA5 promotes ATF6α packaging into coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicles and that the PDIA5/ATF6α activation loop is essential to confer chemoresistance on cancer cells. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PDIA5/ATF6α axis restored sensitivity to the drug treatment. This work defines the mechanisms underlying the role of ATF6α activation in carcinogenesis and chemoresistance; furthermore, it identifies PDIA5 as a key regulator ATF6α-mediated cellular functions in cancer. PMID:24636989

  1. Postmitotic diversification of olfactory neuron types is mediated by differential activities of the HMG-box transcription factor SOX-2

    PubMed Central

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Vidal, Berta; Chang, Chieh; Hobert, Oliver; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Diversification of neuron classes is essential for functions of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms that generate individual olfactory neuron types are only beginning to be understood. Here we describe a role of the highly conserved HMG-box transcription factor SOX-2 in postmitotic specification and alternative differentiation of the Caenorhabditis elegansAWC and AWB olfactory neurons. We show that SOX-2 partners with different transcription factors to diversify postmitotic olfactory cell types. SOX-2 functions cooperatively with the OTX/OTD transcription factor CEH-36 to specify an AWC “ground state,” and functions with the LIM homeodomain factor LIM-4 to suppress this ground state and drive an AWB identity instead. Our findings provide novel insights into combinatorial codes that drive terminal differentiation programs in the nervous system and reveal a biological function of the deeply conserved Sox2 protein that goes beyond its well-known role in stem cell biology. PMID:26341465

  2. Ultraviolet B Regulation of Transcription Factor Families

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S.J.; Bowden, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged and repeated exposure of the skin to ultraviolet light (UV) leads not only to aging of the skin but also increases the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Damage of cells induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) light both at the DNA level and molecular level initiates the activation of transcription factor pathways, which in turn regulate the expression of a number of genes termed the “UV response genes”. Two such transcription factor families that are activated in this way are those of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) families. These two transcription factor families have been identified to be involved in the processes of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell survival and therefore play important roles in tumorigenesis. The study of these two transcription factor pathways and the cross-talk between them in response to UVB exposure may help with the development of new chemopreventive strategies for the prevention of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:17979627

  3. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-11-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  4. G-actin sequestering protein thymosin-β4 regulates the activity of myocardin-related transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Tsuyoshi Hayashi, Ken’ichiro

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Tβ4 competed with MRTF-A for G-actin binding. •Tβ4 activated the MRTF–SRF signaling pathway. •Tβ4 increased the endogenous expression of SRF-dependent genes. -- Abstract: Myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are robust coactivators of serum response factor (SRF). MRTFs contain three copies of the RPEL motif at their N-terminus, and they bind to monomeric globular actin (G-actin). Previous studies illustrate that G-actin binding inhibits MRTF activity by preventing the MRTFs nuclear accumulation. In the living cells, the majority of G-actin is sequestered by G-actin binding proteins that prevent spontaneous actin polymerization. Here, we demonstrate that the most abundant G-actin sequestering protein thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) was involved in the regulation of subcellular localization and activity of MRTF-A. Tβ4 competed with MRTF-A for G-actin binding; thus, interfering with G-actin–MRTF-A complex formation. Tβ4 overexpression induced the MRTF-A nuclear accumulation and activation of MRTF–SRF signaling. The activation rate of MRTF-A by the Tβ4 mutant L17A, whose affinity for G-actin is very low, was lower than that by wild-type Tβ4. In contrast, the β-actin mutant 3DA, which has a lower affinity for Tβ4, more effectively suppressed MRTF-A activity than wild-type β-actin. Furthermore, ectopic Tβ4 increased the endogenous expression of SRF-dependent actin cytoskeletal genes. Thus, Tβ4 is an important MRTF regulator that controls the G-actin–MRTFs interaction.

  5. A WRKY transcription factor recruits the SYG1-like protein SHB1 to activate gene expression and seed cavity enlargement.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojun; Li, Wei; Zhou, Yun; Ni, Min

    2013-01-01

    Seed development in Arabidopsis and in many dicots involves an early proliferation of the endosperm to form a large embryo sac or seed cavity close to the size of the mature seed, followed by a second phase during which the embryo grows and replaces the endosperm. Short hypocotyl under BLUE1 (SHB1) is a member of the SYG1 protein family in fungi, Caenorhabditis elegans, flies, and mammals. SHB1 gain-of-function enhances endosperm proliferation, increases seed size, and up-regulates the expression of the WRKY transcription factor gene MINISEED3 (MINI3) and the LRR receptor kinase gene HAIKU2 (IKU2). Mutations in either IKU2 or MINI3 retard endosperm proliferation and reduce seed size. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the seed cavity and hence the seed size remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of MINI3 and IKU2 is repressed before fertilization and after 4 days after pollination (DAP), but is activated by SHB1 from 2 to 4 DAP prior to the formation of the seed cavity. SHB1 associates with their promoters but without a recognizable DNA binding motif, and this association is abolished in mini3 mutant. MINI3 binds to W-boxes in, and recruits SHB1 to, its own and IKU2 promoters. Interestingly, SHB1, but not MINI3, activates transcription of pMINI3::GUS or pIKU2::GUS. We reveal a critical developmental switch through the activation of MINI3 expression by SHB1. The recruitment of SHB1 by MINI3 to its own and IKU2 promoters represents a novel two-step amplification to counter the low expression level of IKU2, which is a trigger for endosperm proliferation and seed cavity enlargement. PMID:23505389

  6. Use of green fluorescent fusion protein to track activation of the transcription factor osterix during early osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai Guangping; Christodoulou, Ioannis; Bishop, Anne E.; Polak, Julia M. . E-mail: julia.polak@imperial.ac.uk

    2005-08-12

    Osterix (Osx) is a transcription factor required for the differentiation of preosteoblasts into fully functioning osteoblasts. However, the pattern of Osx activation during preosteoblast differentiation and maturation has not been clearly defined. Our aim was to study Osx activation during these processes in osteoblasts differentiating from murine and human embryonic stem cells (ESC). To do this, we constructed an Osx-GFP fusion protein reporter system to track Osx translocation within the cells. The distribution of Osx-GFP at representative stages of differentiation was also investigated by screening primary osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, synoviocytes, and pre-adipocytes. Our experiments revealed that Osx-GFP protein was detectable in the cytoplasm of cultured, differentiated ESC 4 days after plating of enzymatically dispersed embryoid bodies. Osterix-GFP protein became translocated into the nucleus on day 7 following transfer of differentiated ESC to osteogenic medium. After 14 days of differentiation, cells showing nuclear translocation of Osx-GFP formed rudimentary bone nodules that continued to increase in number over the following weeks (through day 21). We also found that Osx translocated into the nuclei of mesenchymal stem cells (C3H10T1/2) and pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and showed partial activation in pre-adipocytes (MC3T3-L1). These data suggest that Osx activation occurs at a very early point in the differentiation of the mesenchymal-osteoblastic lineage.

  7. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  8. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  9. Interplay between viral Tat protein and c-Jun transcription factor in controlling LTR promoter activity in different human immunodeficiency virus type I subtypes.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Renée M; Derking, Ronald; Breidel, Seyguerney; Speijer, Dave; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 transcription depends on cellular transcription factors that bind to sequences in the long-terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Each HIV-1 subtype has a specific LTR promoter configuration, and minor sequence changes in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or their arrangement can influence transcriptional activity, virus replication and latency properties. Previously, we investigated the proviral latency properties of different HIV-1 subtypes in the SupT1 T cell line. Here, subtype-specific latency and replication properties were studied in primary PHA-activated T lymphocytes. No major differences in latency and replication capacity were measured among the HIV-1 subtypes. Subtype B and AE LTRs were studied in more detail with regard to a putative AP-1 binding site using luciferase reporter constructs. c-Jun, a member of the AP-1 transcription factor family, can activate both subtype B and AE LTRs, but the latter showed a stronger response, reflecting a closer match with the consensus AP-1 binding site. c-Jun overexpression enhanced Tat-mediated transcription of the viral LTR, but in the absence of Tat inhibited basal promoter activity. Thus, c-Jun can exert a positive or negative effect via the AP-1 binding site in the HIV-1 LTR promoter, depending on the presence or absence of Tat. PMID:24447950

  10. An RNA polymerase II transcription factor has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1989-01-01

    A transcription factor required for synthesis of accurately initiated run-off transcripts by RNA polymerase II has been purified and shown to have an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity that is strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters. This transcription factor, designated delta, was purified more than 3000-fold from extracts of crude rat liver nuclei and has a native molecular mass of approximately 230 kDa. DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) and transcription activities copurify when delta is analyzed by hydrophobic interaction and ion-exchange HPLC, arguing that transcription factor delta possesses an ATPase (dATPase) activity. ATPase (dATPase) is specific for adenine nucleotides; ATP and dATP, but not CTP, UTP, or GTP, are hydrolyzed. ATPase (dATPase) is stimulated by both double-stranded and single-stranded DNAs, including pUC18, ssM13, and poly(dT); however, DNA fragments containing the TATA region of either the adenovirus 2 major late or mouse interleukin 3 promoters stimulate ATPase as much as 10-fold more effectively than DNA fragments containing nonpromoter sequences. These data suggest the intriguing possibility that delta plays a critical role in the ATP (dATP)-dependent activation of run-off transcription through a direct interaction with the TATA region of promoters. Images PMID:2552440

  11. Plakophilin-3 Catenin Associates with the ETV1/ER81 Transcription Factor to Positively Modulate Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, William A.; Lee, Moonsup; Miller, Rachel K.; Ahmed, Zamal; Ji, Hong; Link, Todd M.; Lee, Gilbert R.; Kloc, Malgorzata; Ladbury, John E.; McCrea, Pierre D.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the plakophilin-catenin sub-family (Pkp-1, -2, and -3) facilitate the linkage of desmosome junctional components to each other (e.g. desmosomal cadherins to desmoplakin) and the intermediate-filament cytoskeleton. Pkps also contribute to desmosomal stabilization and the trafficking of its components. The functions of Pkps outside of the desmosome are less well studied, despite evidence suggesting their roles in mRNA regulation, small-GTPase modulation (e.g. mid-body scission) during cell division, and cell survival following DNA damage. Pkp-catenins are further believed to have roles in the nucleus given their nuclear localization in some contexts and the known nuclear roles of structurally related catenins, such as beta-catenin and p120-catenin. Further, Pkp-catenin activities in the nuclear compartment have become of increased interest with the identification of interactions between Pkp2-catenin and RNA Pol III and Pkp1 with single-stranded DNA. Consistent with earlier reports suggesting possible nuclear roles in development, we previously demonstrated prominent nuclear localization of Pkp3 in Xenopus naïve ectoderm (“animal cap”) cells and recently resolved a similar localization in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, we report the association and positive functional interaction of Pkp3 with a transcription factor, Ets variant gene 1 (ETV1), which has critical roles in neural development and prominent roles in human genetic disease. Our results are the first to report the interaction of a sequence-specific transcription factor with any Pkp. Using Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian cells, we provide evidence for the Pkp3:ETV1 complex on both biochemical and functional levels. PMID:24475179

  12. Profiling of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation levels predicts transcription factor activity and survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Hascher, Antje; Isken, Fabienne; Tickenbrock, Lara; Thoennissen, Nils; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Tschanter, Petra; Disselhoff, Christine; Wang, Yipeng; Becker, Anke; Thiede, Christian; Ehninger, Gerhard; zur Stadt, Udo; Koschmieder, Steffen; Seidl, Matthias; Müller, Frank U.; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Schlenke, Peter; McClelland, Michael; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Dugas, Martin; Serve, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is commonly associated with alterations in transcription factors because of altered expression or gene mutations. These changes might induce leukemia-specific patterns of histone modifications. We used chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray to analyze histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) patterns in primary AML (n = 108), acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 28), CD34+ cells (n = 21) and white blood cells (n = 15) specimens. Hundreds of promoter regions in AML showed significant alterations in H3K9me3 levels. H3K9me3 deregulation in AML occurred preferentially as a decrease in H3K9me3 levels at core promoter regions. The altered genomic regions showed an overrepresentation of cis-binding sites for ETS and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response elements (CREs) for transcription factors of the CREB/CREM/ATF1 family. The decrease in H3K9me3 levels at CREs was associated with increased CRE-driven promoter activity in AML blasts in vivo. AML-specific H3K9me3 patterns were not associated with known cytogenetic abnormalities. But a signature derived from H3K9me3 patterns predicted event-free survival in AML patients. When the H3K9me3 signature was combined with established clinical prognostic markers, it outperformed prognosis prediction based on clinical parameters alone. These findings demonstrate widespread changes of H3K9me3 levels at gene promoters in AML. Signatures of histone modification patterns are associated with patient prognosis in AML. PMID:20498303

  13. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  14. HIGH-DIMENSIONAL PROFILING OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVITY DIFFERENTIATES TOXCAST CHEMICAL GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ToxCast™ project at the U.S. EPA uses a diverse battery of high throughput screening assays and informatics models to rapidly characterize the activity of chemicals. A central goal of the project is to provide empirical evidence to aid in the prioritization of chemicals for a...

  15. Single Cell Analysis of Transcriptional Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Joo, Lucy M.; LeRoy, Gary; Janicki, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene activation is thought to occur through a series of temporally defined regulatory steps. However, this process has not been completely evaluated in single living mammalian cells. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the timing and coordination of gene activation events, we tracked the recruitment of GCN5 (histone acetyltransferase), RNA polymerase II, Brd2 and Brd4 (acetyl-lysine binding proteins), in relation to a VP16-transcriptional activator, to a transcription site that can be visualized in single living cells. All accumulated rapidly with the VP16 activator as did the transcribed RNA. RNA was also detected at significantly more transcription sites in cells expressing the VP16-activator compared to a p53-activator. After α-amanitin pre-treatment, the VP16-activator, GCN5, and Brd2 are still recruited to the transcription site but the chromatin does not decondense. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that a strong activator can rapidly overcome the condensed chromatin structure of an inactive transcription site and supercede the expected requirement for regulatory events to proceed in a temporally defined order. Additionally, activator strength determines the number of cells in which transcription is induced as well as the extent of chromatin decondensation. As chromatin decondensation is significantly reduced after α-amanitin pre-treatment, despite the recruitment of transcriptional activation factors, this provides further evidence that transcription drives large-scale chromatin decondensation. PMID:20422051

  16. The Transcription Factors Tec1 and Ste12 Interact with Coregulators Msa1 and Msa2 To Activate Adhesion and Multicellular Development

    PubMed Central

    van der Felden, Julia; Weisser, Sarah; Brückner, Stefan; Lenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related yeast species, the TEA transcription factor Tec1, together with a second transcription factor, Ste12, controls development, including cell adhesion and filament formation. Tec1-Ste12 complexes control target genes through Tec1 binding sites (TEA consensus sequences [TCSs]) that can be further combined with Ste12 binding sites (pheromone response elements [PREs]) for cooperative DNA binding. The activity of Tec1-Ste12 complexes is known to be under negative control of the Dig1 and Dig2 (Dig1/2) transcriptional corepressors that confer regulation by upstream signaling pathways. Here, we found that Tec1 and Ste12 can associate with the transcriptional coregulators Msa1 and Msa2 (Msa1/2), which were previously found to associate with the cell cycle transcription factor complexes SBF (Swi4/Swi6 cell cycle box binding factor) and MBF (Mbp1/Swi6 cell cycle box binding factor) to control G1-specific transcription. We further show that Tec1-Ste12-Msa1/2 complexes (i) do not contain Swi4 or Mbp1, (ii) assemble at single TCSs or combined TCS-PREs in vitro, and (iii) coregulate genes involved in adhesive and filamentous growth by direct promoter binding in vivo. Finally, we found that, in contrast to Dig proteins, Msa1/2 seem to act as coactivators that enhance the transcriptional activity of Tec1-Ste12. Taken together, our findings add an additional layer of complexity to our understanding of the control mechanisms exerted by the evolutionarily conserved TEA domain and Ste12-like transcription factors. PMID:24732795

  17. Plumbagin Promotes the Generation of Astrocytes from Rat Spinal Cord Neural Progenitors Via Activation of the Transcription Factor Stat3

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongquan; Mughal, Mohamed; Ouyang, Xin; Jiang, Haiyang; Luo, Tae-Gen Son Weiming; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4 naphthoquinone) is a naturally occurring low molecular weight lipophilic phytochemical derived from roots of plants of the Plumbago genus. Plumbagin has been reported to have several clinically relevant biological activities in non-neural cells including antiatherosclerotic, anticoagulant, anticarcinogenic, antitumor and bactericidal effects. In a recent screen of a panel of botanical pesticides we identified plumbagin as having neuroprotective activity. In the present study we determined if plumbagin could modify the developmental fate of rat E14.5 embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPC). Plumbagin exhibited no cytotoxicity when applied to cultured NPC at concentrations below 1 µM. At a concentration of 0.1 µM, plumbagin significantly enhanced the proliferation of NPC as indicated by a 17% increase in the percentage of cells incorporating bromo-deoxyuridine. plumbagin at a concentration of 0.1 pM (but not 0.1 µM), stimulated the production of astrocytes as indicated by increased GFAP expression. Plumbagin selectively induced the proliferation and differentiation of glial progenitor cells without affecting the proliferation or differentiation of neuron-restricted progenitors. Plumbagin (0.1 pM) rapidly activated the transcription factor Stat3 in NPC, and a Stat3 inhibitor peptide prevented both plumbagin-induced astrocyte formation and proliferation. These findings demonstrate the ability of a low molecular weight naturally occurring phytochemical to control the fate of glial progenitor cells by a mechanism involving the Stat3 signaling pathway. PMID:20456019

  18. S6K-STING interaction regulates cytosolic DNA-mediated activation of the transcription factor IRF3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Alain, Tommy; Szretter, Kristy J; Stephenson, Kyle; Pol, Jonathan G; Atherton, Matthew J; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Fonseca, Bruno D; Zakaria, Chadi; Chen, Lan; Rangwala, Zainab; Hesch, Adam; Chan, Eva Sin Yan; Tuinman, Carly; Suthar, Mehul S; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Ashkar, Ali A; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C; Gale, Michael; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Diamond, Michael S; Mossman, Karen; Sonenberg, Nahum; Wan, Yonghong; Lichty, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Cytosolic DNA-mediated activation of the transcription factor IRF3 is a key event in host antiviral responses. Here we found that infection with DNA viruses induced interaction of the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTOR downstream effector and kinase S6K1 and the signaling adaptor STING in a manner dependent on the DNA sensor cGAS. We further demonstrated that the kinase domain, but not the kinase function, of S6K1 was required for the S6K1-STING interaction and that the TBK1 critically promoted this process. The formation of a tripartite S6K1-STING-TBK1 complex was necessary for the activation of IRF3, and disruption of this signaling axis impaired the early-phase expression of IRF3 target genes and the induction of T cell responses and mucosal antiviral immunity. Thus, our results have uncovered a fundamental regulatory mechanism for the activation of IRF3 in the cytosolic DNA pathway.

  19. Three novel acetylation sites in the Foxp3 transcription factor regulate the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye-Sook; Lim, Hyung W.; Wu, Jessica; Schnoelzer, Martina; Verdin, Eric; Ott, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The Foxp3 transcription factor is the master regulator of regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation and function. Its activity is regulated by reversible acetylation. Using mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated proteins, we identify three novel acetylation sites in murine Foxp3 (K31, K262, and K267) and the corresponding sites in human FoxP3 proteins. Newly raised modification-specific antibodies against acetylated K31 and K267 confirm acetylation of these residues in murine Tregs. Mutant Foxp3 proteins carrying arginine substitutions at the three acetylation sites (3KR) accumulate in T cells to higher levels than wildtype Foxp3 and exert better suppressive activity in co-culture experiments. Acetylation and stability of wildtype, but not mutant, Foxp3 is enhanced when cells are treated with Ex-527, an inhibitor of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1. Treatment with Ex-527 promotes Foxp3 expression during induced Treg differentiation, enhances Foxp3 levels in natural Tregs, and prevents loss of Foxp3 expression in adoptively transferred Tregs in mice. Our data identify SIRT1 as a negative regulator of Treg function via deacetylation of three novel target sites in Foxp3. SIRT1 inhibitors strengthen the suppressive activity of Tregs and may be useful in enhancing Treg-based therapeutic approaches to autoimmune diseases or graft rejections. PMID:22312127

  20. S6K-STING interaction regulates cytosolic DNA-mediated activation of the transcription factor IRF3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Alain, Tommy; Szretter, Kristy J; Stephenson, Kyle; Pol, Jonathan G; Atherton, Matthew J; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Fonseca, Bruno D; Zakaria, Chadi; Chen, Lan; Rangwala, Zainab; Hesch, Adam; Chan, Eva Sin Yan; Tuinman, Carly; Suthar, Mehul S; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Ashkar, Ali A; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C; Gale, Michael; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Diamond, Michael S; Mossman, Karen; Sonenberg, Nahum; Wan, Yonghong; Lichty, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Cytosolic DNA-mediated activation of the transcription factor IRF3 is a key event in host antiviral responses. Here we found that infection with DNA viruses induced interaction of the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTOR downstream effector and kinase S6K1 and the signaling adaptor STING in a manner dependent on the DNA sensor cGAS. We further demonstrated that the kinase domain, but not the kinase function, of S6K1 was required for the S6K1-STING interaction and that the TBK1 critically promoted this process. The formation of a tripartite S6K1-STING-TBK1 complex was necessary for the activation of IRF3, and disruption of this signaling axis impaired the early-phase expression of IRF3 target genes and the induction of T cell responses and mucosal antiviral immunity. Thus, our results have uncovered a fundamental regulatory mechanism for the activation of IRF3 in the cytosolic DNA pathway. PMID:27043414

  1. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor transcription factors are released from activated human platelets and shed in microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ray, Denise M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Pollock, Stephen J; Murant, Thomas I; O'Brien, Jamie J; Blumberg, Neil; Francis, Charles W; Taubman, Mark B; Phipps, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its ligands are important regulators of lipid metabolism, inflammation, and diabetes. We previously demonstrated that anucleate human platelets express the transcription factor PPARgamma and that PPARgamma ligands blunt platelet activation. To further understand the nature of PPARgamma in platelets, we determined the platelet PPARgamma isoform(s) and investigated the fate of PPARgamma following platelet activation. Our studies demonstrated that human platelets contain only the PPARgamma1 isoform and after activation with thrombin, TRAP, ADP or collagen PPARgamma is released from internal stores. PPARgamma release was blocked by a cytoskeleton inhibitor, Latrunculin A. Platelet-released PPARgamma was complexed with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and retained its ability to bind DNA. Interestingly, the released PPARgamma and RXR were microparticle associated and the released PPARgamma/RXR complex retained DNA-binding ability. Additionally, a monocytic cell line, THP-1, is capable of internalizing PMPs. Further investigation following treatment of these cells with the PPARgamma agonist, rosiglitazone and PMPs revealed a possible transcellular mechanism to attenuate THP-1 activation. These new findings are the first to demonstrate transcription factor release from platelets, revealing the complex spectrum of proteins expressed and expelled from platelets, and suggests that platelet PPARgamma has an undiscovered role in human biology. PMID:18217139

  3. Transcriptional Activity of Erythroid Kruppel-like Factor (EKLF/KLF1) Modulated by PIAS3 (Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT3)*

    PubMed Central

    Siatecka, Miroslawa; Soni, Shefali; Planutis, Antanas; Bieker, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF or KLF1) is a transcription factor crucial for red cell development that is directly involved in regulation of a large number of erythroid genes. EKLF serves mostly as an activator of expression of these genes; however, it can act also as a repressor. Here, we present evidence that EKLF interacts with proteins from the PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT) family that convey repressive activity to EKLF in the absence of sumoylation. Our studies identify PIAS3 as a transcriptional corepressor of EKLF for at least a subset of its target genes during erythropoiesis (e.g. β-globin, α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein). We demonstrate an interaction between EKLF and PIAS proteins confirmed by in vivo coimmunoprecipitation assays with both exogenous and endogenous proteins. We identified an LXXLL signature motif located near the N terminus of PIAS proteins that, although not involved in the EKLF-PIAS3 interaction, is required for the transrepression activity. Knockdown of endogenous PIAS3 accelerates differentiation of both murine erythroleukemia cells, as well as fetal liver cells, whereas an increase in PIAS3 levels inhibits this increase. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that PIAS3 preferentially occupies the β-globin promoter in undifferentiated murine erythroleukemia cells. Together these results demonstrate that an interaction between EKLF and PIAS3 provides a novel mode of regulation of EKLF activity in the absence of sumolylation and furthermore shows an important involvement of PIAS proteins in erythropoiesis. PMID:25713074

  4. Enhanced Oxidative Stress Resistance through Activation of a Zinc Deficiency Transcription Factor in Brachypodium distachyon1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M.; Alderman, Stephen; Dombrowski, James E.; Martin, Ruth C.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity in animal systems, characterizing conserved pathways known to increase oxidative stress resistance could prove fruitful for crop improvement strategies. This report argues for the usefulness and practicality of the model organism Brachypodium distachyon for identifying and validating stress resistance factors. Specifically, we focus on a zinc deficiency B. distachyon basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BdbZIP10, and its role in oxidative stress in the model organism B. distachyon. When overexpressed, BdbZIP10 protects plants and callus tissue from oxidative stress insults, most likely through distinct and direct activation of protective oxidative stress genes. Increased oxidative stress resistance and cell viability through the overexpression of BdbZIP10 highlight the utility of investigating conserved stress responses between plant and animal systems. PMID:25228396

  5. Resveratrol-induced Apoptosis is mediated by Early Growth Response-1, Krüppel-like Factor 4, and Activating Transcription Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Nichelle C.; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Seong-Ho; Eling, Thomas E.; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol, a dietary phytoalexin readily available in the diet, is reported to possess anti-tumorigenic properties in several cancers, including colorectal. However, the underlying mechanism(s) involved is not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the effect of resveratrol treatment on gene modulation in human colorectal cancer cells and identified activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) as the most highly induced gene after treatment. We confirmed that resveratrol up-regulates ATF3 expression, both at the mRNA and protein level, and showed resveratrol involvement in ATF3 transcriptional regulation. Analysis of the ATF3 promoter revealed the importance of early growth response-1 (Egr-1; located at −245 to −236) and Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4; located at −178 to −174) putative binding sites in resveratrol-mediated ATF3 transactivation. Specificity of these sites to the Egr-1 and KLF4 protein was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Resveratrol increased Egr-1 and KLF4 expression, which preceded ATF3 expression, and further suggests Egr-1 and KLF4 involvement in resveratrol-mediated activity. We provide evidence for Egr-1 and KLF4 interaction in the presence of resveratrol, which may facilitate ATF3 transcriptional regulation by this compound. Furthermore, we demonstrate induction of apoptosis by resveratrol is mediated, in part, by increased ATF3 expression. Taken together, these results provide a novel mechanism by which resveratrol induces ATF3 expression and represent an additional explanation of how resveratrol exerts its anti-tumorigenic effects in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:21205742

  6. E sub 1 BF is an essential RNA polymerase I transcription factor with an intrinsic protein kinase activity that can modulate rRNA gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhang; Huifeng Niu; Jacob, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors previously described the purification and characterization of E{sub 1}BF, a rat rRNA gene core promoter-binding factor that consists of two polypeptides of 89 and 79 kDa. When this factor was incubated in the absence of any exogenous protein kinase under conditions optimal for protein phosphorylation, the 79-kDa polypeptide of E{sub 1}BF was selectively phosphorylated. The labeled phosphate could be removed from the E{sub 1}BF polypeptide by treatment with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase or potato acid phosphatase. Elution of the protein from the E{sub 1}BF-promoter complex formed in an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay followed by incubation of the concentrated eluent with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the selective labeling o the 79-kDa band. The E{sub 1}BF-associated protein kinase did not phosphorylate casein or histone H1. These data demonstrate that (1) polymerase I promoter-binding factor E{sub 1}BF contains an intrinsic substrate-specific protein kinase and (2) E{sub 1}BF is an essential polymerase I transcription factor that can modulate rRNA gene transcription by protein phosphorylation. Further, these studies have provided a direct means to identify a protein kinase or any other enzyme that can interact with a specific DNA sequence.

  7. Lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX is able to upregulate expression of NF-{kappa}B p65. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX enhances nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 via increasing p-I{kappa}B-{alpha} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX stimulates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LTB4 activates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. -- Abstract: The issue that lipid metabolism enzyme and its metabolites regulate transcription factors in cancer cell is not fully understood. In this study, we first report that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and its metabolite leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are capable of activating nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) in hepatoma cells. We found that the treatment of MK886 (an inhibitor of 5-LOX) or knockdown of 5-LOX was able to downregulate the expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 at the mRNA level and decreased the phosphorylation level of inhibitor {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) in the cytoplasm of hepatoma HepG2 or H7402 cells, which resulted in the decrease of the level of nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65. These were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in HepG2 cell. Moreover, the above treatments were able to decrease the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in the cells. The LTB4, one of metabolites of 5-LOX, is responsible for 5-LOX-activated NF-{kappa}B in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Our finding provides new insight into the significance of lipid metabolism in activation of transcription factors in cancer.

  8. Characterization of a new ARID family transcription factor (Brightlike/ARID3C) that co-activates Bright/ARID3A-mediated immunoglobulin gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Josephine A; Schmidt, Christian; Heaton, Phillip; Wilson, Van; Tucker, Philip W

    2011-10-01

    Two members, Bright/ARID3A and Bdp/ARID3B, of the ARID (AT-Rich Interaction Domain) transcription family are distinguished by their ability to specifically bind to DNA and to self-associate via a second domain, REKLES. Bright and Bdp positively regulate immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) transcription by binding to AT-rich motifs within Matrix Associating Regions (MARs) residing within a subset of V(H) promoters and the Eμ intronic enhancer. In addition, REKLES provides Bright nuclear export function, and a small pool of Bright is directed to plasma membrane sub-domains/lipid rafts where it associates with and modulates signaling of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). Here, we characterize a third, highly conserved, physically condensed ARID3 locus, Brightlike/ARID3C. Brightlike encodes two alternatively spliced, SUMO-I-modified isoforms that include or exclude (Δ6) the REKLES-encoding exon 6. Brightlike transcripts and proteins are expressed preferentially within B lineage lymphocytes and coordinate with highest Bright expression in activated follicular B cells. Brightlike, but not BrightlikeΔ6, undergoes nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling with a fraction localizing within lipid rafts following BCR stimulation. Brightlike, but not BrightlikeΔ6, associates with Bright in solution, at common DNA binding sites in vitro, and is enriched at Bright binding sites in chromatin. Although possessing little transactivation capacity of its own, Brightlike significantly co-activates Bright-dependent IgH transcription with maximal activity mediated by the unsumoylated form. In sum, this report introduces Brightlike as an additional functional member of the family of ARID proteins, which should be considered in regulatory circuits, previously ascribed to be mediated by Bright.

  9. Budesonide epimer R or dexamethasone selectively inhibit platelet-activating factor-induced or interleukin 1β-induced DNA binding activity of cis-acting transcription factors and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in human epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.; Pelaez, Ricardo Palacios; Martinez, Jorge; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    1998-01-01

    To further understand the molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid action on gene expression, DNA-binding activities of the cis-acting transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP1), AP2, Egr1 (zif268), NF-κB, the signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins gamma interferon activation site (GAS), Sis-inducible element, and the TATA binding protein transcription factor II D (TFIID) were examined in human epidermal keratinocytes. The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and platelet-activating factor (PAF), both potent mediators of inflammation, were used as triggers for gene expression. Budesonide epimer R (BUDeR) and dexamethasone (DEX) were studied as potential antagonists. BUDeR or DEX before IL-1β- or PAF-mediated gene induction elicited strong inhibition of AP1-, GAS-, and in particular NF-κB-DNA binding (P < 0.001, ANOVA). Only small effects were noted on AP2, Egr1 (zif268), and Sis-inducible element-DNA binding (P > 0.05). No significant effect was noted on the basal transcription factor TFIID recognition of TATA-containing core promoter sequences (P > 0.68). To test the hypothesis that changing cis-acting transcription factor binding activity may be involved in inflammatory-response related gene transcription, RNA message abundance for human cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 (E.C.1.14.99.1) was assessed in parallel by using reverse transcription–PCR. Although the COX-1 gene was found to be expressed at constitutively low levels, the TATA-containing COX-2 gene, which contains AP1-like, GAS, and NF-κB DNA-binding sites in its immediate promoter, was found to be strongly induced by IL-1β or PAF (P < 0.001). BUDeR and DEX both suppressed COX-2 RNA message generation; however, no correlation was associated with TFIID–DNA binding. These results suggest that on stimulation by mediators of inflammation, although the basal transcription machinery remains intact, modulation of cis-activating transcription factor AP1, GAS, and NF-κB-DNA binding by the

  10. Transcription factor ZBED6 mediates IGF2 gene expression by regulating promoter activity and DNA methylation in myoblasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were up regulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels wer...

  11. The transcription factor GATA3 actively represses RUNX3 protein-regulated production of interferon-gamma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcription factor GATA3 is crucial for the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into T helper 2 (Th2) cells. Here, we show that deletion of Gata3 allowed the appearance of interferon-g (IFN-g)-producing cells in the absence of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IFN-g. Such IFN-g production was tra...

  12. Transcription factor AP-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Alterations in activity and expression during Human Papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) region of India. A substantial proportion of esophageal carcinoma is associated with infection of high-risk HPV type 16 and HPV18, the oncogenic expression of which is controlled by host cell transcription factor Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). We, therefore, have investigated the role of DNA binding and expression pattern of AP-1 in esophageal cancer with or without HPV infection. Methods Seventy five histopathologically-confirmed esophageal cancer and an equal number of corresponding adjacent normal tissue biopsies from Kashmir were analyzed for HPV infection, DNA binding activity and expression of AP-1 family of proteins by PCR, gel shift assay and immunoblotting respectively. Results A high DNA binding activity and elevated expression of AP-1 proteins were observed in esophageal cancer, which differed between HPV positive (19%) and HPV negative (81%) carcinomas. While JunB, c-Fos and Fra-1 were the major contributors to AP-1 binding activity in HPV negative cases, Fra-1 was completely absent in HPV16 positive cancers. Comparison of AP-1 family proteins demonstrated high expression of JunD and c-Fos in HPV positive tumors, but interestingly, Fra-1 expression was extremely low or nil in these tumor tissues. Conclusion Differential AP-1 binding activity and expression of its specific proteins between HPV - positive and HPV - negative cases indicate that AP-1 may play an important role during HPV-induced esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:19758438

  13. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. PMID:27284196

  14. Effects of Cigarette Smoke on the Activation of Oxidative Stress-Related Transcription Factors in Female A/J Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tharappel, Job C.; Cholewa, Jill; Espandiari, Parvaneh; Spear, Brett T.; Gairola, C. Gary; Glauert, Howard P.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke contains a high concentration of free radicals and induces oxidative stress in the lung and other tissues. Several transcription factors are known to be activated by oxidative stress, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Studies were therefore undertaken to examine if cigarette smoke could activate these transcription factors, as well as other transcription factors that may be important in lung carcinogenesis. Female A/J mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 42, or 56 days (6 hr/day, 5 days/wk). Cigarette smoke did not increase NF-κB activation at any of these times, but NF-κB DNA binding activity was lower after 15 days and 56 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of AP-1 was lower after 10 days and 56 days but was not changed after 42 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of HIF was quantitatively increased after 42 days of smoke exposure but decreased after 56 days. Whether the activation of other transcription factors in the lung could be altered after exposure to cigarette smoke was subsequently examined. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2, myc-CF1, RORE, and p53 were examined after 10 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53 were quantitatively increased, but those of myc-CF1 and RORE were unaffected. These studies show that cigarette smoke exposure leads to quantitative increases in DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53, while the activations of NF-κB, AP-1, and HIF are largely unaffected or reduced. PMID:20711931

  15. Regulation of the interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) tumor suppressor gene by the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) transcription factor in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Waight, Jeremy D; Banik, Debarati; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Nemeth, Michael J; Abrams, Scott I

    2014-05-30

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib can effectively target the BCR-ABL oncoprotein in a majority of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Unfortunately, some patients are resistant primarily to imatinib and others develop drug resistance, prompting interest in the discovery of new drug targets. Although much of this resistance can be explained by the presence of mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of BCR-ABL, such mutations are not universally identified. Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) is a transcription factor that is essential for myelopoiesis. Depressed IRF-8 levels are observed in a majority of CML patients and Irf-8(-/-) mice exhibit a CML-like disease. The underlying mechanisms of IRF-8 loss in CML are unknown. We hypothesized that BCR-ABL suppresses transcription of IRF-8 through STAT5, a proximal BCR-ABL target. Treatment of primary cells from newly diagnosed CML patients in chronic phase as well as BCR-ABL(+) cell lines with imatinib increased IRF-8 transcription. Furthermore, IRF-8 expression in cell line models was necessary for imatinib-induced antitumor responses. We have demonstrated that IRF-8 is a direct target of STAT5 and that silencing of STAT5 induced IRF-8 expression. Conversely, activating STAT5 suppressed IRF-8 transcription. Finally, we showed that STAT5 blockade using a recently discovered antagonist increased IRF-8 expression in patient samples. These data reveal a previously unrecognized BCR-ABL-STAT5-IRF-8 network, which widens the repertoire of potentially new anti-CML targets.

  16. Transforming growth factor beta 1-responsive element: closely associated binding sites for USF and CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I in the type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Pedone, P V; Lund, L R; Olesen, T; Olsen, H S; Andreasen, P A

    1992-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is the name of a group of closely related polypeptides characterized by a multiplicity of effects, including regulation of extracellular proteolysis and turnover of the extracellular matrix. Its cellular mechanism of action is largely unknown. TGF-beta 1 is a strong and fast inducer of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene transcription. We have identified a TGF-beta 1-responsive element in the 5'-flanking region of the human type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene and shown that it is functional both in its natural context and when fused to a heterologous nonresponsive promoter. Footprinting and gel retardation experiments showed that two different nuclear factors, present in extracts from both TGF-beta 1-treated and nontreated cells, bind to adjacent sequences contained in the responsive unit. A palindromic sequence binds a trans-acting factor(s) of the CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I family. A partially overlapping dyad symmetry interacts with a second protein that much evidence indicates to be USF. USF is a transactivator belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Mutations which abolish the binding of either CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I or USF result in reduction of transcriptional activation upon exposure to TGF-beta 1, thus showing that both elements of the unit are necessary for the TGF-beta 1 response. We discuss the possible relationship of these findings to the complexity of the TGF-beta action. Images PMID:1549130

  17. Evidence for a factor required for transcriptional stimulation by the chimeric acidic activator GAL-VP16 in HeLa cell extracts.

    PubMed Central

    White, J H; Brou, C; Wu, J; Burton, N; Egly, J M; Chambon, P

    1991-01-01

    We provide biochemical evidence for the existence of a transcriptional intermediary factor (TIF) in HeLa whole-cell extracts (WCE) that is distinct from the basic transcription factors and that is required for transcriptional stimulation by the chimeric acidic activator GAL-VP16. We have fractionated HeLa WCE by heparin-agarose chromatography. Of transcriptionally active fractions eluting in a step between 0.24 and 0.6 M KCl, the initial fractions are refractory to GAL-VP16 stimulation, whereas subsequent fractions are strongly stimulated by the activator. Aliquots of GAL-VP16-responsive fractions efficiently complement refractory fractions for transcriptional stimulation. Aliquots of responsive fractions are also far more efficient than those of refractory fractions in overcoming transcriptional inhibition that is brought about by high concentrations of GAL-VP16. Experiments performed with heat-treated WCE support the idea that HeLa cells contain a TIF that is essential for GAL-VP16 stimulation, but that is not required for basal transcription. Addition of recombinant yeast or human transcription factor TFIID (rTFIIDY and rTFIIDH, respectively) to a WCE heated at 48 degrees C for 15 min restores basal transcription, but in neither case is the reconstituted system activated by GAL-VP16. However, a 45 degrees C heat-treated WCE reconstituted with either rTFIIDH or rTFIIDY is stimulated by GAL-VP16, suggesting that a HeLa TIF can be selectively inactivated by heating at 48 degrees C, but not at 45 degrees C. Interestingly, a TFIID fraction partially purified from HeLa cell extracts, but not rTFIIDH, efficiently relieves transcriptional inhibition by GAL-VP16, suggesting that there may be an association between TIF(s) and TFIID and, moreover, that TIF(s) may be the direct target of the acidic domain of GAL-VP16. In summary, our results support the existence of a TIF that is not essential for basal transcription but that is required to mediate the stimulatory activity

  18. Membrane-active Compounds Activate the Transcription Factors Pdr1 and Pdr3 Connecting Pleiotropic Drug Resistance and Membrane Lipid Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, Christoph; Mamnun, Yasmine M.; Wolfger, Hubert; Rockwell, Nathan; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae zinc cluster transcription factors Pdr1 and Pdr3 mediate general drug resistance to many cytotoxic substances also known as pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR). The regulatory mechanisms that activate Pdr1 and Pdr3 in response to the various xenobiotics are poorly understood. In this study, we report that exposure of yeast cells to 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), benzyl alcohol, nonionic detergents, and lysophospholipids causes rapid activation of Pdr1 and Pdr3. Furthermore, Pdr1/Pdr3 target genes encoding the ATP-binding cassette proteins Pdr5 and Pdr15 confer resistance against these compounds. Genome-wide transcript analysis of wild-type and pdr1Δ pdr3Δ cells treated with DCP reveals most prominently the activation of the PDR response but also other stress response pathways. Polyoxyethylene-9-laurylether treatment produced a similar profile with regard to activation of Pdr1 and Pdr3, suggesting activation of these by detergents. The Pdr1/Pdr3 response element is sufficient to confer regulation to a reporter gene by these substances in a Pdr1/Pdr3-dependent manner. Our data indicate that compounds with potential membrane-damaging or -perturbing effects might function as an activating signal for Pdr1 and Pdr3, and they suggest a role for their target genes in membrane lipid organization or remodeling. PMID:17881724

  19. Analysis of the spacing between the two palindromes of activation sequence-1 with respect to binding to different TGA factors and transcriptional activation potential.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Stefanie; Thurow, Corinna; Niggeweg, Ricarda; Gatz, Christiane

    2002-02-01

    In higher plants, activation sequence-1 (as-1) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter mediates both salicylic acid- and auxin-inducible transcriptional activation. Originally found in viral and T-DNA promoters, as-1-like elements are also functional elements of plant promoters activated in the course of a defence response upon pathogen attack. as-1-like elements are characterised by two imperfect palindromes with the palindromic centres being spaced by 12 bp. They are recognised by plant nuclear as-1-binding factor ASF-1, the major component of which is basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein TGA2.2 (approximately 80%) in Nicotiana tabacum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, ASF-1 as well as bZIP proteins TGA2.2, TGA2.1 and TGA1a showed a 3-10-fold reduced binding affinity to mutant as-1 elements encoding insertions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 bp between the palindromes, respectively. This correlated with a 5-10-fold reduction in transcriptional activation from these elements in transient expression assays. Although ASF-1 and TGA factors bound efficiently to a mutant element carrying a 2 bp deletion between the palindromes [as-1/(-2)], the latter was strongly compromised with respect to mediating gene expression in vivo. A fusion protein consisting of TGA2.2 and a constitutive activation domain mediated transactivation from as-1/(-2) demonstrating binding of TGA factors in vivo. We therefore conclude that both DNA binding and transactivation require optimal positioning of TGA factors on the as-1 element.

  20. Analysis of the spacing between the two palindromes of activation sequence-1 with respect to binding to different TGA factors and transcriptional activation potential

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Stefanie; Thurow, Corinna; Niggeweg, Ricarda; Gatz, Christiane

    2002-01-01

    In higher plants, activation sequence-1 (as-1) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter mediates both salicylic acid- and auxin-inducible transcriptional activation. Originally found in viral and T-DNA promoters, as-1-like elements are also functional elements of plant promoters activated in the course of a defence response upon pathogen attack. as-1-like elements are characterised by two imperfect palindromes with the palindromic centres being spaced by 12 bp. They are recognised by plant nuclear as-1-binding factor ASF-1, the major component of which is basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein TGA2.2 (∼80%) in Nicotiana tabacum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, ASF-1 as well as bZIP proteins TGA2.2, TGA2.1 and TGA1a showed a 3–10-fold reduced binding affinity to mutant as-1 elements encoding insertions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 bp between the palindromes, respectively. This correlated with a 5–10-fold reduction in transcriptional activation from these elements in transient expression assays. Although ASF-1 and TGA factors bound efficiently to a mutant element carrying a 2 bp deletion between the palindromes [as-1/(–2)], the latter was strongly compromised with respect to mediating gene expression in vivo. A fusion protein consisting of TGA2.2 and a constitutive activation domain mediated transactivation from as-1/(–2) demonstrating binding of TGA factors in vivo. We therefore conclude that both DNA binding and transactivation require optimal positioning of TGA factors on the as-1 element. PMID:11809891

  1. Rac1/p21-activated kinase pathway controls retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zaldua, Natalia; Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Ras superfamily are capable of activating E2F-dependent transcription leading to cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, using immortalized chicken DT40 B cell lines to investigate the role of the Vav/Rac signalling cascade on B cell proliferation, it is shown that the proliferative response triggered by B cell receptor activation is dramatically reduced in the absence of Vav3 expression. Analysis of this proliferative defect shows that in the absence of Vav3 expression, retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation and the subsequent E2F activation do not take place. By combining pharmacological and genetic approaches, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) were identified as the key regulatory signalling molecules upstream of the Vav3/Rac pathway leading to RB phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation. Additionally, vav3(-/-) and plcγ2(-/-) DT40 B cells were not able to activate the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype when these genetically modified cells were transfected with constitutively active forms of RhoA or Cdc42. However, when these knockout cells were transfected with different constitutively active versions of PLCγ, Vav or Rac1, not only activation of the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype was recovered but also the cellular proliferation. Furthermore, by evaluating the effect of two known effector mutants of Rac1 (Rac1(Q61L/F37A) and Rac1(Q61L/Y40C) ), the RB-E2F complex activation dependency on p21-activated kinase (PAK) and protein kinase Cε (PKCε) activities was established, being independent of both actin cytoskeleton reorganization and Ras activity. These results suggest that PAK1 and PKCε may be potential therapeutic targets to stop uncontrolled B cell proliferation mediated by the Vav/Rac pathway. PMID:26663827

  2. Rac1/p21-activated kinase pathway controls retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zaldua, Natalia; Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Ras superfamily are capable of activating E2F-dependent transcription leading to cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, using immortalized chicken DT40 B cell lines to investigate the role of the Vav/Rac signalling cascade on B cell proliferation, it is shown that the proliferative response triggered by B cell receptor activation is dramatically reduced in the absence of Vav3 expression. Analysis of this proliferative defect shows that in the absence of Vav3 expression, retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation and the subsequent E2F activation do not take place. By combining pharmacological and genetic approaches, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) were identified as the key regulatory signalling molecules upstream of the Vav3/Rac pathway leading to RB phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation. Additionally, vav3(-/-) and plcγ2(-/-) DT40 B cells were not able to activate the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype when these genetically modified cells were transfected with constitutively active forms of RhoA or Cdc42. However, when these knockout cells were transfected with different constitutively active versions of PLCγ, Vav or Rac1, not only activation of the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype was recovered but also the cellular proliferation. Furthermore, by evaluating the effect of two known effector mutants of Rac1 (Rac1(Q61L/F37A) and Rac1(Q61L/Y40C) ), the RB-E2F complex activation dependency on p21-activated kinase (PAK) and protein kinase Cε (PKCε) activities was established, being independent of both actin cytoskeleton reorganization and Ras activity. These results suggest that PAK1 and PKCε may be potential therapeutic targets to stop uncontrolled B cell proliferation mediated by the Vav/Rac pathway.

  3. Nobiletin suppresses adipogenesis by regulating the expression of adipogenic transcription factors and the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK).

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Younghwa; Ham, Hyeonmi; Park, Yooheon; Jeong, Heon-Sang; Lee, Junsoo

    2011-12-28

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the effect of nobiletin (5,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxyflavone) on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. To determine the effect of nobiletin on adipogenesis, preadipocyte differentiation was induced in the presence or absence of nobiletin (10-100 μM) for 4 days. The results revealed that nobiletin markedly inhibited lipid accumulation and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity and blocked the expression of adipogenic transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPα). Moreover, nobiletin significantly increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of cellular energy balance, phosphorylation, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This study also investigated the involvement of AMPK in the expression of a major transcription factor, PPARγ. It was found that pretreatment with compound C, a cell permeable inhibitor of AMPK, abolished the inhibitory effects of nobiletin on PPARγ expression. The results suggest that nobiletin exerts antiadipogenic effects through modulation of the PPARγ and AMPK signaling pathway and, therefore, may be a promising antiobesity agent.

  4. Dax-1 and steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) function as transcriptional coactivators for steroidogenic factor 1 in steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Gerin, Isabelle; Hu, Chang-Deng; Hammer, Gary D; Koenig, Ronald J

    2009-04-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is essential for adrenal development and steroidogenesis. The atypical orphan nuclear receptor Dax-1 binds to SF-1 and represses SF-1 target genes. Paradoxically, however, loss-of-function mutations of Dax-1 also cause adrenal hypoplasia, suggesting that Dax-1 may function as an SF-1 coactivator under some circumstances. Indeed, we found that Dax-1 can function as a dosage-dependent SF-1 coactivator. Both SF-1 and Dax-1 bind to steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a coactivator that functions as an RNA. The coactivator TIF2 also associates with Dax-1 and synergistically coactivates SF-1 target gene transcription. A naturally occurring Dax-1 mutation inhibits this transactivation, and the mutant Dax-1-TIF2 complex mislocalizes in living cells. Coactivation by Dax-1 is abolished by SRA knockdown. The expression of the steroidogenic gene products steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and melanocortin 2 receptor is reduced in adrenal Y1 cells following the knockdown of endogenous SRA. Similarly, the knockdown of endogenous Dax-1 downregulates the expression of the steroidogenic gene products CYP11A1 and StAR in both H295R adrenal and MA-10 Leydig cells. These findings reveal novel functions of SRA and Dax-1 in steroidogenesis and adrenal biology. PMID:19188450

  5. Dax-1 and Steroid Receptor RNA Activator (SRA) Function as Transcriptional Coactivators for Steroidogenic Factor 1 in Steroidogenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Gerin, Isabelle; Hu, Chang-Deng; Hammer, Gary D.; Koenig, Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is essential for adrenal development and steroidogenesis. The atypical orphan nuclear receptor Dax-1 binds to SF-1 and represses SF-1 target genes. Paradoxically, however, loss-of-function mutations of Dax-1 also cause adrenal hypoplasia, suggesting that Dax-1 may function as an SF-1 coactivator under some circumstances. Indeed, we found that Dax-1 can function as a dosage-dependent SF-1 coactivator. Both SF-1 and Dax-1 bind to steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a coactivator that functions as an RNA. The coactivator TIF2 also associates with Dax-1 and synergistically coactivates SF-1 target gene transcription. A naturally occurring Dax-1 mutation inhibits this transactivation, and the mutant Dax-1-TIF2 complex mislocalizes in living cells. Coactivation by Dax-1 is abolished by SRA knockdown. The expression of the steroidogenic gene products steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and melanocortin 2 receptor is reduced in adrenal Y1 cells following the knockdown of endogenous SRA. Similarly, the knockdown of endogenous Dax-1 downregulates the expression of the steroidogenic gene products CYP11A1 and StAR in both H295R adrenal and MA-10 Leydig cells. These findings reveal novel functions of SRA and Dax-1 in steroidogenesis and adrenal biology. PMID:19188450

  6. Induction of Activating Transcription Factor 3 Is Associated with Cisplatin Responsiveness in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bar, Jair; Hasim, Mohamed S; Baghai, Tabassom; Niknejad, Nima; Perkins, Theodore J; Stewart, David J; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Villeneuve, Patrick J; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2016-09-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer deaths, with platin-based combination chemotherapy the most efficacious therapies. Gains in overall survival are modest, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches including the development of next-generation platin combination regimens. The goal of this study was to identify novel regulators of platin-induced cytotoxicity as potential therapeutic targets to further enhance platin cytotoxicity. Employing RNA-seq transcriptome analysis comparing two parental NSCLC cell lines Calu6 and H23 to their cisplatin-resistant sublines, Calu6cisR1 and H23cisR1, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was robustly induced in cisplatin-treated parental sensitive cell lines but not their resistant sublines, and in three of six tumors evaluated, but not in their corresponding normal adjacent lung tissue (0/6). Cisplatin-induced JNK activation was a key regulator of this ATF3 induction. Interestingly, in both resistant sublines, this JNK induction was abrogated, and the expression of an activated JNK construct in these cells enhanced both cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and ATF3 induction. An FDA-approved drug compound screen was employed to identify enhancers of cisplatin cytotoxicity that were dependent on ATF3 gene expression. Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, was identified in this screen and demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity with cisplatin in both the parental Calu6 and H23 cell lines and importantly in their resistant sublines as well that was dependent on ATF3 expression. Thus, we have identified ATF3 as an important regulator of cisplatin cytotoxicity and that ATF3 inducers in combination with platins are a potential novel therapeutic approach for NSCLC. PMID:27659012

  7. The Unfolded Protein Response and the Phosphorylations of Activating Transcription Factor 2 in the trans-Activation of il23a Promoter Produced by β-Glucans*

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mario; Domingo, Esther; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Eiros, José; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Current views on the control of IL-23 production focus on the regulation of il23a, the gene encoding IL-23 p19, by NF-κB in combination with other transcription factors. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), X2-Box-binding protein 1 (XBP1), activator protein 1 (AP1), SMAD, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) have been involved in response to LPS, but no data are available regarding the mechanism triggered by the fungal mimic and β-glucan-containing stimulus zymosan, which produces IL-23 and to a low extent the related cytokine IL-12 p70. Zymosan induced the mobilization of CHOP from the nuclear fractions to phagocytic vesicles. Hypha-forming Candida also induced the nuclear disappearance of CHOP. Assay of transcription factor binding to the il23a promoter showed an increase of Thr(P)-71–Thr(P)-69-activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) binding in response to zymosan. PKC and PKA/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase inhibitors down-regulated Thr(P)-71–ATF2 binding to the il23a promoter and il23a mRNA expression. Consistent with the current concept of complementary phosphorylations on N-terminal Thr-71 and Thr-69 of ATF2 by ERK and p38 MAPK, MEK, and p38 MAPK inhibitors blunted Thr(P)-69–ATF2 binding. Knockdown of atf2 mRNA with siRNA correlated with inhibition of il23a mRNA, but it did not affect the expression of il12/23b and il10 mRNA. These data indicate the following: (i) zymosan decreases nuclear proapoptotic CHOP, most likely by promoting its accumulation in phagocytic vesicles; (ii) zymosan-induced il23a mRNA expression is best explained through coordinated κB- and ATF2-dependent transcription; and (iii) il23a expression relies on complementary phosphorylation of ATF2 on Thr-69 and Thr-71 dependent on PKC and MAPK activities. PMID:24982422

  8. The transcription factor paired-related homeobox 1 (Prrx1) inhibits adipogenesis by activating transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling.

    PubMed

    Du, Baowen; Cawthorn, William P; Su, Alison; Doucette, Casey R; Yao, Yao; Hemati, Nahid; Kampert, Sarah; McCoin, Colin; Broome, David T; Rosen, Clifford J; Yang, Gongshe; MacDougald, Ormond A

    2013-02-01

    Differentiation of adipocytes from preadipocytes contributes to adipose tissue expansion in obesity. Impaired adipogenesis may underlie the development of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Mechanistically, a well defined transcriptional network coordinates adipocyte differentiation. The family of paired-related homeobox transcription factors, which includes Prrx1a, Prrx1b, and Prrx2, is implicated with regulation of mesenchymal cell fate, including myogenesis and skeletogenesis; however, whether these proteins impact adipogenesis remains to be addressed. In this study, we identify Prrx1a and Prrx1b as negative regulators of adipogenesis. We show that Prrx1a and Prrx1b are down-regulated during adipogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Stable knockdown of Prrx1a/b enhances adipogenesis, with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α and FABP4 and increased secretion of the adipokines adiponectin and chemerin. Although stable low-level expression of Prrx1a, Prrx1b, or Prrx2 does not affect 3T3-L1 adipogenesis, transient overexpression of Prrx1a or Prrx1b inhibits peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activity. Prrx1 knockdown decreases expression of Tgfb2 and Tgfb3, and inhibition of TGFβ signaling during adipogenesis mimics the effects of Prrx1 knockdown. These data support the hypothesis that endogenous Prrx1 restrains adipogenesis by regulating expression of TGFβ ligands and thereby activating TGFβ signaling. Finally, we find that expression of Prrx1a or Prrx1b in adipose tissue increases during obesity and strongly correlates with Tgfb3 expression in BL6 mice. These observations suggest that increased Prrx1 expression may promote TGFβ activity in adipose tissue and thereby contribute to aberrant adipocyte function during obesity.

  9. Elevated SP-1 transcription factor expression and activity drives basal and hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Karl; Onion, David; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A; Knox, Alan J

    2012-11-16

    VEGF plays a central role in angiogenesis in cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors have increased microvascular density, localized hypoxia, and high VEGF expression levels; however, there is a lack of understanding of how oncogenic and tumor microenvironment changes such as hypoxia lead to greater VEGF expression in lung and other cancers. We show that NSCLC cells secreted higher levels of VEGF than normal airway epithelial cells. Actinomycin D inhibited all NSCLC VEGF secretion, and VEGF minimal promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were constitutively active until the last 85 base pairs before the transcription start site containing three SP-1 transcription factor-binding sites; mutation of these VEGF promoter SP-1-binding sites eliminated VEGF promoter activity. Furthermore, dominant negative SP-1, mithramycin A, and SP-1 shRNA decreased VEGF promoter activity, whereas overexpression of SP-1 increased VEGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated SP-1, p300, and PCA/F histone acetyltransferase binding and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the VEGF promoter in NSCLC cells. Cultured NSCLC cells expressed higher levels of SP-1 protein than normal airway epithelial cells, and double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry showed a strong correlation between SP-1 and VEGF in human NSCLC tumors. In addition, hypoxia-driven VEGF expression in NSCLC cells was SP-1-dependent, with hypoxia increasing SP-1 activity and binding to the VEGF promoter. These studies are the first to demonstrate that overexpression of SP-1 plays a central role in hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion. PMID:22992725

  10. Red colouration in apple fruit is due to the activity of the MYB transcription factor, MdMYB10.

    PubMed

    Espley, Richard V; Hellens, Roger P; Putterill, Jo; Stevenson, David E; Kutty-Amma, Sumathi; Allan, Andrew C

    2007-02-01

    Anthocyanin concentration is an important determinant of the colour of many fruits. In apple (Malus x domestica), centuries of breeding have produced numerous varieties in which levels of anthocyanin pigment vary widely and change in response to environmental and developmental stimuli. The apple fruit cortex is usually colourless, although germplasm does exist where the cortex is highly pigmented due to the accumulation of either anthocyanins or carotenoids. From studies in a diverse array of plant species, it is apparent that anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled at the level of transcription. Here we report the transcript levels of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in a red-fleshed apple compared with a white-fleshed cultivar. We also describe an apple MYB transcription factor, MdMYB10, that is similar in sequence to known anthocyanin regulators in other species. We further show that this transcription factor can induce anthocyanin accumulation in both heterologous and homologous systems, generating pigmented patches in transient assays in tobacco leaves and highly pigmented apple plants following stable transformation with constitutively expressed MdMYB10. Efficient induction of anthocyanin biosynthesis in transient assays by MdMYB10 was dependent on the co-expression of two distinct bHLH proteins from apple, MdbHLH3 and MdbHLH33. The strong correlation between the expression of MdMYB10 and apple anthocyanin levels during fruit development suggests that this transcription factor is responsible for controlling anthocyanin biosynthesis in apple fruit; in the red-fleshed cultivar and in the skin of other varieties, there is an induction of MdMYB10 expression concurrent with colour formation during development. Characterization of MdMYB10 has implications for the development of new varieties through classical breeding or a biotechnological approach.

  11. Long term environmental tobacco smoke activates nuclear transcription factor-kappa B, activator protein-1, and stress responsive kinases in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Rangasamy, Thirumalai; Wise, Kimberly; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Shishodia, Shishir; Biswal, Shyam; Ramesh, Govindarajan T

    2006-05-28

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is a key mediator of several diseases. Tobacco smoke contains a mixture of over 4700 chemical components many of which are toxic and have been implicated in the etiology of oxidative stress related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Parkinson's disease, asthma, cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism of action of cigarette smoke in the onset of these diseases is still largely unknown. Previous studies have revealed that the free radicals generated by cigarette smoke may contribute to many of these chronic health problems and this study sought to address the role of environmental tobacco smoke in oxidative stress related damage in different regions of the mouse brain. In this study, male mice were exposed for 7h/day, 7 days/week, for 6 months. Our results show that tobacco smoke led to increased generation of reactive oxygen species with an increase in NF-kappaB activation. Gel shift analysis also revealed the elevated level of the oxidative stress sensitive proinflammatory nuclear transcription factor-kappa B and activator protein-1 in different regions of the brain of cigarette smoke exposed mice. Tobacco smoke led to activation of COX-2 in all the regions of the brain. Activation of mitogen activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase were also observed in various regions of brain of ETS exposed mice. Overall our results indicate that exposure to long-term cigarette smoke induces oxidative stress leading to activation of stress induced kinases and activation of proinflammatory transcription factors.

  12. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K and nucleolin as transcriptional activators of the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter through interaction with secondary DNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Diana J.; Guo, Kexiao; Shin, Yoon-Joo; Sun, Daekyu

    2011-01-01

    The human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promoter contains a polypurine/polypyrimidine (pPu/pPy) tract that is known to play a critical role in its transcriptional regulation. This pPu/pPy tract undergoes a conformational transition between B-DNA, single stranded DNA and atypical secondary DNA structures such as G-quadruplexes and i-motifs. We studied the interaction of the cytosine-rich (C-rich) and guanine-rich (G-rich) strands of this tract with transcription factors heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K and nucleolin, respectively, both in vitro and in vivo and their potential role in the transcriptional control of VEGF. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay for our in vivo studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for our in vitro studies, we demonstrated that both nucleolin and hnRNP K bind selectively to the G- and C-rich sequences, respectively, in the pPu/pPy tract of the VEGF promoter. The small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of either nucleolin or hnRNP K resulted in the down-regulation of basal VEGF gene, suggesting that they act as activators of VEGF transcription. Taken together, the identification of transcription factors that can recognize and bind to atypical DNA structures within the pPu/pPy tract will provide new insight into mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the VEGF gene. PMID:21466159

  13. DIFFERENTIAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION AD GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS ON EXPOSURE TO RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM

    EPA Science Inventory


    Differential transcription factor activation and gene expression profiles in human vascular endothelial cells on exposure to residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and vanadium.
    Srikanth S. Nadadur and Daniel L. Costa, US EPA, ORD, NHEERL (ETD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch), Research ...

  14. Protein-energy malnutrition increases activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappaB, in the gerbil hippocampus following global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liang; Nazarali, Adil J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2008-11-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) exacerbates functional impairment caused by brain ischemia. This is correlated with reactive gliosis, which suggests an increased inflammatory response. The objective of the current study was to investigate if PEM increases hippocampal activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB), a transcription factor that amplifies the inflammatory response involved in ischemic brain injury. Mongolian gerbils (11-12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to control diet (12.5% protein) or protein-deficient diet (2%) for 4 weeks. The 2% protein group had a 15% decrease in voluntary food intake (P<.001; unpaired t test), resulting in PEM. Body weight after 4 weeks was 20% lower in the PEM group (P<.001). Gerbils were then exposed to sham surgery or global ischemia induced by 5-min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion. PEM independently increased hippocampal NFkappaB activation detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay at 6 h after surgery (P=.014; 2-factor ANOVA). Ischemia did not significantly affect NFkappaB activation nor was there interaction between diet and ischemia. Serum glucose and cortisol concentrations at 6 h postischemia were unaltered by diet or ischemia. A second experiment using gerbils of the same age and feeding paradigm demonstrated that PEM also increases hippocampal NFkappaB activation in the absence of surgery. These findings suggest that PEM, which exists in 16% of elderly patients at admission for stroke, may worsen outcome by increasing activation of NFkappaB. Since PEM increased NFkappaB activation independent of ischemia or surgery, the data also have implications for the inflammatory response of the many individuals affected globally by PEM.

  15. Transcription factor activity of estrogen receptor α activation upon nonylphenol or bisphenol A treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongda; Yao, Yao; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Liyu; Cheng, Long; Wang, Yiren; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Jia, Hui; Ye, Qinong; Hou, Mingxiao; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Many kinds of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), for example, the environmental estrogens bisphenol A and nonylphenol, may regulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and therefore induce potential disruption of normal endocrine function. However, the involvement of EDCs in human cancers, especially in endocrine-related cancer neuroblastoma regulation, is not very clear. In this work, results showed that upon bisphenol A or nonylphenol treatment, the transcription factor activity of ERα was significantly increased in neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol could enhance ERα activity via recruiting it to the target gene promoter. Furthermore, treatment of bisphenol A and nonylphenol enhanced the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration ability of neuroblastoma cells. By investigating the role of EDC-induced ERα upregulation, our data extend the understanding of the function of EDCs and further suggest that ERα might be a potential therapeutic target in human neuroblastoma treatment. PMID:27366082

  16. Transcription factor activity of estrogen receptor α activation upon nonylphenol or bisphenol A treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongda; Yao, Yao; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Liyu; Cheng, Long; Wang, Yiren; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Jia, Hui; Ye, Qinong; Hou, Mingxiao; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Many kinds of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), for example, the environmental estrogens bisphenol A and nonylphenol, may regulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and therefore induce potential disruption of normal endocrine function. However, the involvement of EDCs in human cancers, especially in endocrine-related cancer neuroblastoma regulation, is not very clear. In this work, results showed that upon bisphenol A or nonylphenol treatment, the transcription factor activity of ERα was significantly increased in neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol could enhance ERα activity via recruiting it to the target gene promoter. Furthermore, treatment of bisphenol A and nonylphenol enhanced the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration ability of neuroblastoma cells. By investigating the role of EDC-induced ERα upregulation, our data extend the understanding of the function of EDCs and further suggest that ERα might be a potential therapeutic target in human neuroblastoma treatment.

  17. STAT3 transcription factor is constitutively activated and is oncogenic in nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, Paul; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Huang, Yenlin; Bouhlal, Hicham; Bouamar, Hakim; Bouchet, Sandrine; Perrot, Christine; Vieillard, Vincent; Dartigues, Peggy; Gaulard, Philippe; Agbalika, Félix; Douay, Luc; Lassoued, Kaiss; Gorin, Norbert-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Nasal-type natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma is an infrequent aggressive malignant disease with very poor prognosis. We aimed to explore the possible role of the transcription factor STAT3 in the pathophysiology of this malignancy, as it was involved in oncogenesis and chemoresistance. For this, we established and characterized a continuous interleukin 2-dependent NK cell line (MEC04) from a patient with a fatal nasal-type NK cell lymphoma. Cells harbored poor cytotoxic activity against K562 cells, and spontaneously secreted interferon-γ, IL-10 and vascular-endothelium growth factor in vitro. STAT3 was phosphorylated in Y705 dimerization residue in MEC04 cells and restricted to the nucleus. Y705 STAT3 phosphorylation involved JAK2, since exposure of cells to AG490 inhibitor inhibited Y705 STAT3 phosphorylation. By using recombinant transducible TAT-STAT3β (βisoform), TAT-STAT3Y705F (a STAT3 protein mutated on Y705 residue which prevents STAT3 dimerization), and peptides inhibiting specifically STAT3 dimerization, we inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and cell growth, with cell death induction. Finally, STAT3 was phosphorylated in Y705 residue in the nuclei of lymphoma cells in 8/9 patients with nasal-type NK/T cell lymphoma and in YT, another NK cell line. Our results suggest that STAT3 protein has a major role in the oncogenic process of nasal-type NK cell lymphomas, and may represent a promising therapeutical target. PMID:19421230

  18. Core promoter-specific gene regulation: TATA box selectivity and Initiator-dependent bi-directionality of serum response factor-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Xu, Muyu; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Martinez, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Gene-specific activation by enhancers involves their communication with the basal RNA polymerase II transcription machinery at the core promoter. Core promoters are diverse and may contain a variety of sequence elements such as the TATA box, the Initiator (INR), and the downstream promoter element (DPE) recognized, respectively, by the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors of the TFIID complex. Core promoter elements contribute to the gene selectivity of enhancers, and INR/DPE-specific enhancers and activators have been identified. Here, we identify a TATA box-selective activating sequence upstream of the human β-actin (ACTB) gene that mediates serum response factor (SRF)-induced transcription from TATA-dependent but not INR-dependent promoters and requires the TATA-binding/bending activity of TBP, which is otherwise dispensable for transcription from a TATA-less promoter. The SRF-dependent ACTB sequence is stereospecific on TATA promoters but activates in an orientation-independent manner a composite TATA/INR-containing promoter. More generally, we show that SRF-regulated genes of the actin/cytoskeleton/contractile family tend to have a TATA box. These results suggest distinct TATA-dependent and INR-dependent mechanisms of TFIID-mediated transcription in mammalian cells that are compatible with only certain stereospecific combinations of activators, and that a TBP-TATA binding mechanism is important for SRF activation of the actin/cytoskeleton-related gene family.

  19. Transcriptional activation is a conserved feature of the early embryonic factor Zelda that requires a cluster of four zinc fingers for DNA binding and a low-complexity activation domain.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Danielle C; Bondra, Eliana R; Harrison, Melissa M

    2015-02-01

    Delayed transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome is a nearly universal phenomenon in metazoans. Immediately following fertilization, development is controlled by maternally deposited products, and it is not until later stages that widespread activation of the zygotic genome occurs. Although the mechanisms driving this genome activation are currently unknown, the transcriptional activator Zelda (ZLD) has been shown to be instrumental in driving this process in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we define functional domains of ZLD required for both DNA binding and transcriptional activation. We show that the C-terminal cluster of four zinc fingers mediates binding to TAGteam DNA elements in the promoters of early expressed genes. All four zinc fingers are required for this activity, and splice isoforms lacking three of the four zinc fingers fail to activate transcription. These truncated splice isoforms dominantly suppress activation by the full-length, embryonically expressed isoform. We map the transcriptional activation domain of ZLD to a central region characterized by low complexity. Despite relatively little sequence conservation within this domain, ZLD orthologs from Drosophila virilis, Anopheles gambiae, and Nasonia vitripennis activate transcription in D. melanogaster cells. Transcriptional activation by these ZLD orthologs suggests that ZLD functions through conserved interactions with a protein cofactor(s). We have identified distinct DNA-binding and activation domains within the critical transcription factor ZLD that controls the initial activation of the zygotic genome.

  20. Insights into transcription enhancer factor 1 (TEF-1) activity from the solution structure of the TEA domain

    PubMed Central

    Anbanandam, Asokan; Albarado, Diana C.; Nguyen, Catherine T.; Halder, Georg; Gao, Xiaolian; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2006-01-01

    Transcription enhancer factor 1 is essential for cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle development and uses its N-terminal TEA domain (TEAD) to bind M-CAT elements. Here, we present the first structure of TEAD and show that it is a three-helix bundle with a homeodomain fold. Structural data reveal how TEAD binds DNA. Using structure-function correlations, we find that the L1 loop is essential for cooperative loading of TEAD molecules on to tandemly duplicated M-CAT sites. Furthermore, using a microarray chip-based assay, we establish that known binding sites of the full-length protein are only a subset of DNA elements recognized by TEAD. Our results provide a model for understanding the regulation of genome-wide gene expression during development by TEA/ATTS family of transcription factors. PMID:17085591

  1. DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF-1) is regulated by cyclin-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, E; Mayr, P; Coda-Zabetta, F; Woodman, P G; Boam, D S

    1999-01-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor (USF) 1 is a member of the bzHLH (leucine zipper-basic-helix-loop-helix) family, which is structurally related to the Myc family of proteins. It plays a role in the regulation of many genes, including the cyclin B1 gene, which is active during the G2/M and M phases of the cell cycle and may also play a role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. We show that the affinity of recombinant USF-1 for DNA is greatly increased by treatment with active cyclin A2-p34(cdc2) or cyclin B1-p34(cdc2) complexes and that its interaction with DNA is dependent on p34(cdc2)-mediated phosphorylation. We have localized the phosphorylation site(s) to a region that lies outside the minimal DNA-binding domain but overlaps with the previously identified USF-specific region. Deletion studies of USF-1 suggest that amino acids 143-197 regulate DNA-binding activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:10548544

  2. Liver specific transcription factors of the HNF3-, C/EBP- and LFB1-families interact with the A-activator binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, T; Klein-Hitpass, L; Ryffel, G U

    1991-01-01

    The A-activator binding site (AABS), present in the Xenopus A2 vitellogenin gene and several mammalian liver specifically expressed genes, interacts with different liver specific transcription factors including LFB1- and C/EBP-isobinders. We have now isolated some additional proteins interacting with AABS and show that they are HNF3-isobinders. The interactions between AABS and members of the HNF3 family are confirmed by binding studies using bacterially made HNF3-alpha protein. Thus a short DNA module of 24 bp is able to bind proteins of three different families of liver specific transcription factors. Competition experiments in the cell free in vitro transcription show that AABS dependent transcriptional activation is mediated by transcription factors belonging to at least two different families, the C/EBP- and the HNF3-isobinders. Being able to mediate the action of several distinct transactivators, AABS may thus be a prototype for a novel kind of tissue specific promoter modules with unique regulatory capacities. Images PMID:1754374

  3. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ is regulated by Krüppel-like transcription factors 6 & 9 under steatotic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Escalona-Nandez, Ivonne; Guerrero-Escalera, Dafne; Estanes-Hernández, Alma; Ortíz-Ortega, Victor; Tovar, Armando R.; Pérez-Monter, Carlos

    2015-03-20

    Liver steatosis is characterised by lipid droplet deposition in hepatocytes that can leads to an inflammatory and fibrotic phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play key roles in energetic homeostasis by regulating lipid metabolism in hepatic tissue. In adipose tissue PPARγ regulates the adipocyte differentiation by promoting the expression of lipid-associated genes. Within the liver PPARγ is up-regulated under steatotic conditions; however, which transcription factors participate in its expression is not completely understood. Krüppel-like transcription factors (KLFs) regulate various cellular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation and differentiation. KLFs are key components of adipogenesis by regulating the expression of PPARγ and other proteins such as the C-terminal enhancer binding protein (C/EBP). Here, we demonstrate that the transcript levels of Klf6, Klf9 and Pparγ are increased in response to a steatotic insult in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIp) experiments showed that klf6 and klf9 are actively recruited to the Pparγ promoter region under these conditions. Accordingly, the loss-of-function experiments reduced cytoplasmic triglyceride accumulation. Here, we demonstrated that KLF6 and KLF9 proteins directly regulate PPARγ expression under steatotic conditions. - Highlights: • Palmitic acid promotes expression of KlF6 & KLF9 in HepG2 cells. • KLF6 and KLF9 promote the expression of PPARγ in response to palmitic acid. • Binding of KLF6 and KLF9 to the PPARγ promoter promotes steatosis in HepG2 cells. • KLF6 and KLF9 loss-of function diminishes the steatosis in HepG2 cells.

  4. Synergistic activation of the HTLV1 LTR Ets-responsive region by transcription factors Ets1 and Sp1.

    PubMed Central

    Gégonne, A; Bosselut, R; Bailly, R A; Ghysdael, J

    1993-01-01

    Ets1 is the prototype of a family of transcriptional activators whose activity depends on the binding to specific DNA sequences characterized by an invariant GGA core sequence. We have previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation by Ets1 of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is strictly dependent on the binding of Ets1 to two sites, ERE-A and ERE-B, localized in a 44 bp long Ets-responsive region (ERR1). We report here that the activity of ERR1 as an efficient Ets1 response element in HeLa cells also depends on the integrity of an Sp1 binding site localized immediately upstream of ERE-A. The response to Ets1 of an element restricted to the SP1/ERE-A binding sites is also strictly dependent on both the Ets1 and Sp1 binding sites. In vitro, Sp1 and Ets1 are shown to cooperate to form a ternary complex with the SP1/ERE-A element. Reconstitution experiments in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider cells show that Ets1 and Sp1 act synergistically to activate transcription from either the ERR1 or the SP1/ERE-A elements and that synergy requires the binding of both Sp1 and Ets1 to their cognate sites. SP1/ERE-A elements are found in the enhancer/promoter region of several cellular genes, suggesting that synergy between Ets1 and Sp1 is not restricted to the ERR1 region of the HTLV1 LTR. These results strengthen the notion that Ets1 as well as other members of the Ets family usually function as components of larger transcription complexes to regulate the activity of a variety of viral and cellular genes. Images PMID:8458329

  5. Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 transcription in squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix: the role of human papillomavirus gene E2 expression and activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Gasparian, A V; Fedorova, M D; Kisselev, F L

    2007-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in initiation and progression of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of human uterine cervix. Regulation of MMP-9 expression in such tumors is insufficiently studied. Involvement of the human papillomavirus (HPV) gene E2 and transcription factor NF-kappaB in the regulation of MMP-9 transcription has been shown in some model systems and types of malignant tumors. The present work was mainly designed to reveal a possible role of the HPV gene E2 and transcription factor NF-kappaB in the induction of MMP-9 expression in SCC. Specimens of tumor and corresponding adjacent normal tissue from 26 patients with SCC of the uterine cervix were studied. The intact E2 frame was observed in 19 of 26 (73.1%), the E2 gene mRNA was expressed in 10 of 15 (66.7%), NF-kappaB was activated in 17 of 23 (73.9%), and the expression of MMP-9 mRNA was recorded in 10 of 20 (50%) of the informative cases. The MMP-9 transcription did not correlate with gene E2 status, but in all cases correlated with the activation of NF-kappaB transcription factor (10 of 10 vs. 5 of 10 MMP-9-negative cases, p = 0.016). Thus, the NF-kappaB role has been proved in the regulation of MMP-9 transcription in SCC. There was no correlation of the E2 status and MMP-9 expression with clinical/morphological characteristics of the tumors: size, local invasiveness, metastasizing into regional lymph nodes, and level of differentiation. The high intensity of NF-kappaB activation correlated with low degree of differentiation of the tumors studied (p = 0.044). These findings suggested that NF-kappaB should be a molecular factor of the poor prognosis of human SCC.

  6. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 Promotes AP-1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zongling; Donaldson, Ian J.; Liu, Jingru; Hayes, Andrew; Zeef, Leo A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional control circuitry in eukaryotic cells is complex and is orchestrated by combinatorially acting transcription factors. Forkhead transcription factors often function in concert with heterotypic transcription factors to specify distinct transcriptional programs. Here, we demonstrate that FOXK2 participates in combinatorial transcriptional control with the AP-1 transcription factor. FOXK2 binding regions are widespread throughout the genome and are often coassociated with AP-1 binding motifs. FOXK2 acts to promote AP-1-dependent gene expression changes in response to activation of the AP-1 pathway. In this context, FOXK2 is required for the efficient recruitment of AP-1 to chromatin. Thus, we have uncovered an important new molecular mechanism that controls AP-1-dependent gene expression. PMID:22083952

  7. Trm1p, a Zn(II)₂Cys₆-type transcription factor, is essential for the transcriptional activation of genes of methanol utilization pathway, in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Umakant; Krishna Rao, Kamisetty; Rangarajan, Pundi N

    2014-08-15

    The zinc finger transcription factors Mxr1p and Rop are key regulators of methanol metabolism in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, while Trm1p and Trm2p regulate methanol metabolism in Candida boidinii. Here, we demonstrate that Trm1p is essential for the expression of genes of methanol utilization (mut) pathway in P. pastoris as well. Expression of AOXI and other genes of mut pathway is severely compromised in P. pastoris ΔTrm1 strain resulting in impaired growth on media containing methanol as the sole source of carbon. Trm1p localizes to the nucleus of cells cultured on glucose or methanol. The zinc finger domain of Mxr1p but not Trm1p binds to AOXI promoter sequences in vitro, indicating that these two positive regulators act by different mechanisms. We conclude that both Trm1p and Mxr1p are essential for the expression of genes of mut pathway in P. pastoris and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of mut pathway may be similar in P. pastoris and C. boidinii.

  8. The intergenic region of maize streak virus contains a GC-rich element that activates rightward transcription and binds maize nuclear factors.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, C; Schwarz, J J; Black, D M; Schneider, M; Howell, S H

    1990-12-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV) is transcribed bidirectionally from an intergenic region and rightward transcription produces an RNA that encodes the coat protein. The intergenic region contains promoter elements required for rightward transcription including an upstream activating sequence (UAS) which endows the promoter with full activity in a maize transient expression system. The UAS contains two GC-rich repeats (GC boxes) and a long inverted repeat or hairpin with a loop harboring a TAATATTAC sequence common to all geminiviruses. Deletions through the UAS demonstrated the presence of an element, called the rightward promoter element (rpe1), which is responsible for transcriptional activation. Rpe1 includes the two GC-rich boxes, which are similar in sequence to Sp1 binding sites in mammalian cells, but not the conserved hairpin loop. Rpe1 binds maize nuclear factors in vitro and the characteristics of the binding interaction have been determined by 1) binding competition with oligonucleotides, 2) methidiumpropyl-EDTA footprinting and 3) methylation interference assays. Binding of maize nuclear factors to the UAS generates two major bands, slow and fast migrating bands, in gel retardation assays. Footprinting and factor titration data suggest that the fast bands arise by the binding of factors to one GC box while the slow bands are generated by factors binding to both boxes. The data further indicate that the factors bind to the two GC-rich boxes with little cooperativity and bind on opposite faces of the DNA helix.

  9. Extending the functions of the homeotic transcription factor Cdx2 in the digestive system through nontranscriptional activities.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jean-Noël; Duluc, Isabelle; Reimund, Jean-Marie; Gross, Isabelle; Domon-Dell, Claire

    2015-02-01

    The homeoprotein encoded by the intestinal-specific Cdx2 gene is a major regulator of gut development and homeostasis, also involved in colon cancer as well as in intestinal-type metaplasias when it is abnormally expressed outside the gut. At the molecular level, structure/function studies have demonstrated that the Cdx2 protein is a transcription factor containing a conserved homeotic DNA-binding domain made of three alpha helixes arranged in a helix-turn-helix motif, preceded by a transcriptional domain and followed by a regulatory domain. The protein interacts with several thousand sites on the chromatin and widely regulates intestinal functions in stem/progenitor cells as well as in mature differentiated cells. Yet, this transcription factor also acts trough original nontranscriptional mechanisms. Indeed, the identification of novel protein partners of Cdx2 and also of a splicing variant revealed unexpected functions in the control of signaling pathways like the Wnt and NF-κB pathways, in double-strand break DNA repair and in premessenger RNA splicing. These novel functions of Cdx2 must be considered to fully understand the complexity of the role of Cdx2 in the healthy intestine and in diseases.

  10. Extending the functions of the homeotic transcription factor Cdx2 in the digestive system through nontranscriptional activities

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jean-Noël; Duluc, Isabelle; Reimund, Jean-Marie; Gross, Isabelle; Domon-Dell, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The homeoprotein encoded by the intestinal-specific Cdx2 gene is a major regulator of gut development and homeostasis, also involved in colon cancer as well as in intestinal-type metaplasias when it is abnormally expressed outside the gut. At the molecular level, structure/function studies have demonstrated that the Cdx2 protein is a transcription factor containing a conserved homeotic DNA-binding domain made of three alpha helixes arranged in a helix-turn-helix motif, preceded by a transcriptional domain and followed by a regulatory domain. The protein interacts with several thousand sites on the chromatin and widely regulates intestinal functions in stem/progenitor cells as well as in mature differentiated cells. Yet, this transcription factor also acts trough original nontranscriptional mechanisms. Indeed, the identification of novel protein partners of Cdx2 and also of a splicing variant revealed unexpected functions in the control of signaling pathways like the Wnt and NF-κB pathways, in double-strand break DNA repair and in premessenger RNA splicing. These novel functions of Cdx2 must be considered to fully understand the complexity of the role of Cdx2 in the healthy intestine and in diseases. PMID:25663763

  11. Homocysteine Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression via Transcription Factor Nrf2 Activation in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Monireh; Golmohammadi, Taghi; Khaghani, Shahnaz; Zamani, Zahra; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Meshkani, Reza; Pasalar, Parvin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elevated level of plasma homocysteine has been related to various diseases. Patients with hyperhomocysteinemia can develop hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. We hypothesized that oxidative stress induced by homocysteine might play an important role in pathogenesis of liver injury. Also, the cellular response designed to combat oxidative stress is primarily controlled by the transcription factor Nrf2, a principal inducer of anti-oxidant and phase II-related genes. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with homocysteine in different time periods. Glutathione content was measured by flowcytometry. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Western-blotting, anti-oxidant response element (ARE)-binding activity of Nrf2 for heme ocygenase-1 (HO-1) was demonstrated. Real time RT-PCR and Western-blotting were performed to evaluate whether homocysteine was able to induce mRNA and protein expression of HO-1. Results: The role of Nrf2 in cellular response to homocysteine is substantiated by the following observations in HepG2 cells exposed to homocysteine (i) Western-blotting revealed that Nrf2 is strongly stabilized and became detectable in nuclear extracts. (ii) EMSA demonstrated increased binding of Nrf2 to oligomers containing HO-1 promoter-specific ARE-binding site. (iii) Real time RT-PCR and Western-blotting revealed increased mRNA and protein expression of inducible gene HO-1 after treatment with homocysteine. Conclusion: Data presented in the current study provide direct evidence that the immediate cellular response to oxidative stress provoked by homocysteine is orchestrated mainly by the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Therefore, induction of Nrf2-ARE-dependent expression of HO-1 could be a therapeutic option for hepatic cells damage induced by homocysteine. PMID:23567851

  12. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Usheva, Anny

    2010-01-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding–DNA contacts. We use this effect to establish the separate contributions of transcription factor binding and DNA dynamics to transcriptional activity. Our results argue against a purely ‘transcription factor-centric’ view of transcription initiation, suggesting that both DNA dynamics and transcription factor binding are necessary conditions for transcription initiation. PMID:20019064

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid Mediates Activating Transcription Factor 3 Expression Which Is a Target for Post-Transcriptional Silencing by miR-30c-2-3p

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha T.; Jia, Wei; Beedle, Aaron M.; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Murph, Mandi M.

    2015-01-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding entities, they have important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of most of the human genome. These small entities generate fine-tuning adjustments in the expression of mRNA, which can mildly or massively affect the abundance of proteins. Previously, we found that the expression of miR-30c-2-3p is induced by lysophosphatidic acid and has an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer cells. The goal here is to confirm that ATF3 mRNA is a target of miR-30c-2-3p silencing, thereby further establishing the functional role of miR-30c-2-3p. Using a combination of bioinformatics, qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and luciferase assays, we uncovered a regulatory pathway between miR-30c-2-3p and the expression of the transcription factor, ATF3. Lysophosphatidic acids triggers the expression of both miR-30c-2-3p and ATF3, which peak at 1 h and are absent 8 h post stimulation in SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 serous ovarian cancer cells. The 3´-untranslated region (3´-UTR) of ATF3 was a predicted, putative target for miR-30c-2-3p, which we confirmed as a bona-fide interaction using a luciferase reporter assay. Specific mutations introduced into the predicted site of interaction between miR-30c-2-3p and the 3´-UTR of ATF3 alleviated the suppression of the luciferase signal. Furthermore, the presence of anti-miR-30c-2-3p enhanced ATF3 mRNA and protein after lysophosphatidic acid stimulation. Thus, the data suggest that after the expression of ATF3 and miR-30c-2-3p are elicited by lysophosphatidic acid, subsequently miR-30c-2-3p negatively regulates the expression of ATF3 through post-transcriptional silencing, which prevents further ATF3-related outcomes as a consequence of lysophosphatidic acid signaling. PMID:26418018

  14. Distal Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Response Element of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) Binds Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) Transcription Factors and Regulates Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Adam C.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2012-01-01

    The collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays an important role in the destruction of cartilage in arthritic joints. MMP-13 expression is strongly up-regulated in arthritis, largely because of stimulation by inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β. Treatment of chondrocytes with IL-1β induces transcription of MMP-13 in vitro. IL-1β signaling converges upon the activator protein-1 transcription factors, which have been shown to be required for IL-1β-induced MMP-13 gene expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we detected activator protein-1 binding within an evolutionarily conserved DNA sequence ∼20 kb 5′ relative to the MMP-13 transcription start site (TSS). Also using ChIP, we detected histone modifications and binding of RNA polymerase II within this conserved region, all of which are consistent with transcriptional activation. Chromosome conformation capture indicates that chromosome looping brings this region in close proximity with the MMP-13 TSS. Finally, a luciferase reporter construct driven by a component of the conserved region demonstrated an expression pattern similar to that of endogenous MMP-13. These data suggest that a conserved region at 20 kb upstream from the MMP-13 TSS includes a distal transcriptional response element of MMP-13, which contributes to MMP-13 gene expression. PMID:22102411

  15. SoxR, a [2Fe-2S] transcription factor, is active only in its oxidized form.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudu, P; Weiss, B

    1996-01-01

    SoxR protein is known to function both as a sensor and as a transcriptional activator for a superoxide response regulon in Escherichia coli. The activity of SoxR was tested by its ability to enable the transcription of its target gene, soxS, in vitro. The activity of the oxidized form was lost when its [2Fe-2S] clusters were reduced by dithionite under anaerobic conditions, and it was rapidly restored by autooxidation. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that induction of the regulon is effected by the univalent oxidation of the Fe-S centers of SoxR. In vivo, this oxidation may be caused by an alteration of the redox balance of electron chain intermediates that normally maintains soxR in an inactive, reduced state. Oxidized SoxR was about twice as effective as reduced SoxR in protecting the soxS operator from endonucleolytic cleavage. However, this difference could not account for a greater than 50-fold difference in their activities and therefore could not support a model in which oxidation activates SoxR by enabling it to bind to DNA. NADPH, ferredoxin, flavodoxin, or ferredoxin (flavodoxin):NADP+ reductase could not reduce SoxR directly in vitro at a measurable rate. The midpoint potential for SoxR was measured at -283 mV. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8816757

  16. ZIP4 Regulates Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by Activating IL-6/STAT3 Pathway via Zinc Finger Transcription Factor CREB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqing; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Logsdon, Craig D.; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies indicate a strong correlation of zinc transporter ZIP4 and pancreatic cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have recently found that ZIP4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway through which ZIP4 regulates pancreatic cancer growth. Experimental Design The expression of cyclin D1, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer xenografts and cells were examined by real time PCR, Bio-Plex cytokine assay, and Western blot, respectively. The activity of CREB is examined by a promoter activity assay. Results Cyclin D1 was significantly increased in the ZIP4 overexpressing MIA PaCa-2 cells (MIA-ZIP4)-injected orthotopic xenografts and was downregulated in the ZIP4 silenced ASPC-1 (ASPC-shZIP4) group. The phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an upstream activator of cyclin D1, was increased in MIA-ZIP4 cells, and decreased in ASPC-shZIP4 cells. IL-6, a known upstream activator for STAT3, was also found to be significantly increased in the MIA-ZIP4 cells and xenografts, and decreased in the ASPC-shZIP4 group. Overexpression of ZIP4 led to a 75% increase of IL-6 promoter activity, and caused increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Conclusions Our study suggest that ZIP4 overexpression causes increased IL-6 transcription via CREB, which in turn activates STAT3, and leads to increased cyclin D1 expression, resulting in increased cell proliferation and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer. These results elucidated a novel pathway in ZIP4-mediated pancreatic cancer growth, and suggest new therapeutic targets including ZIP4, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:20160059

  17. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valmor J.; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  18. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Valmor J; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  19. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15. However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. PMID:27246098

  20. Focal adhesion kinase regulates the activity of the osmosensitive transcription factor TonEBP/NFAT5 under hypertonic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Küper, Christoph; Lichtnekert, Julia; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Fraek, Maria-Luisa; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-Xaver

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 is a major regulator of the urinary concentrating process and is essential for the osmoadaptation of renal medullary cells. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a mechanosensitive non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase expressed abundantly in the renal medulla. Since osmotic stress causes cell shrinkage, the present study investigated the contribution of FAK on TonEBP/NFAT5 activation. Osmotic stress induced time-dependent activation of FAK as evidenced by phosphorylation at Tyr-397, and furosemide reduces FAK Tyr-397 phosphorylation in the rat renal medulla. Both pharmacological inhibition of FAK and siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK drastically reduced TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activity and target gene expression in HEK293 cells. This effect was not mediated by impaired nuclear translocation or by reduced transactivating activity of TonEBP/NFAT5. However, TonEBP/NFAT5 abundance under hypertonic conditions was diminished by 50% by FAK inhibition or siRNA knockdown of FAK. FAK inhibition only marginally reduced transcription of the TonEBP/NFAT5 gene. Rather, TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA stability was diminished significantly by FAK inhibition, which correlated with reduced reporter activity of the TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). In conclusion, FAK is a major regulator of TonEBP/NFAT5 activity by increasing its abundance via stabilization of the mRNA. This in turn, depends on the presence of the TonEBP/NFAT5 3′-UTR. PMID:24772088

  1. The Papaya Transcription Factor CpNAC1 Modulates Carotenoid Biosynthesis through Activating Phytoene Desaturase Genes CpPDS2/4 during Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chang-Chun; Han, Yan-Chao; Fan, Zhong-Qi; Chen, Jian-Ye; Chen, Wei-Xin; Lu, Wang-Jin; Kuang, Jian-Fei

    2016-07-13

    Papaya fruits accumulate carotenoids during fruit ripening. Although many papaya carotenoid biosynthesis pathway genes have been identified, the transcriptional regulators of these genes have not been characterized. In this study, a NAC transcription factor, designated as CpNAC1, was characterized from papaya fruit. CpNAC1 was localized exclusively in nucleus and possessed transcriptional activation activity. Expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes phytoene desaturases (CpPDSs) and CpNAC1 was increased during fruit ripening and by propylene treatment, which correlates well with the elevated carotenoid content in papaya. The gel mobility shift assays and transient expression analyses demonstrated that CpNAC1 directly binds to the NAC binding site (NACBS) motifs in CpPDS2/4 promoters and activates them. Collectively, these data suggest that CpNAC1 may act as a positive regulator of carotenoid biosynthesis during papaya fruit ripening possibly via transcriptional activation of CpPDSs such as CpPDS2/4. PMID:27327494

  2. Id-1 is induced in MDCK epithelial cells by activated Erk/MAPK pathway in response to expression of the Snail and E47 transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, Mireia; Vinyals, Antonia; Marazuela, Anna; Cubillo, Eva; Olmeda, David; Valero, Eva; Cano, Amparo; Fabra, Angels . E-mail: afabra@idibell.org

    2007-07-01

    Id-1, a member of the helix-loop-helix transcription factor family has been shown to be involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion of many types of human cancers. We have previously shown that stable expression of E47 and Snail repressors of the E-cadherin promoter in MDCK epithelial cell line triggers epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) concomitantly with changes in gene expression. We show here that both factors activate the Id-1 gene promoter and induce Id-1 mRNA and protein. The upregulation of the Id-1 gene occurs through the transactivation of the promoter by the Erk/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, oncogenic Ras is also able to activate Id-1 promoter in MDCK cells in the absence of both E47 and Snail transcription factors. Several transcriptionally active regulatory elements have been identified in the proximal promoter, including AP-1, Sp1 and four putative E-boxes. By EMSA, we only detected an increased binding to Sp1 and AP-1 elements in E47- and Snail-expressing cells. Binding is affected by the treatment of cells with PD 98059 MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MAPK/Erk contributes to the recruitment or assembly of proteins to Id-1 promoter. Small interfering RNA directed against Sp1 reduced Id-1 expression and the upregulation of the promoter, indicating that Sp1 is required for Id-1 induction in E47- and Snail-expressing cells. Our results provide new insights into how some target genes are activated during and/or as a consequence of the EMT triggered by both E47 and Snail transcription factors.

  3. The activity of Mblk-1, a mushroom body-selective transcription factor from the honeybee, is modulated by the ras/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Min; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2003-05-16

    We previously identified a gene, termed Mblk-1, that encodes a putative transcription factor with two DNA-binding motifs expressed preferentially in the mushroom body of the honeybee brain, and its preferred binding sequence, termed Mblk-1-binding element (MBE) (Takeuchi, H., Kage, E., Sawata, M., Kamikouchi, A., Ohashi, K., Ohara, M., Fujiyuki, T., Kunieda, T., Sekimizu, K., Natori, S., and Kubo, T. (2001) Insect Mol Biol 10, 487-494; Park, J.-M., Kunieda. T., Takeuchi, H., and Kubo, T. (2002) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 291, 23-28). In the present study, the effect of Mblk-1 on transcription of genes containing MBE in Drosophila Schneider's Line 2 cells was examined using a luciferase assay. Mblk-1 expression transactivated promoters containing MBEs approximately 2-7-fold. Deletion experiments revealed that RHF2, the second DNA-binding domain of Mblk-1, was necessary for the transcriptional activity. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylated Mblk-1 at Ser-444 in vitro, and the Mblk-1-induced transactivation was stimulated by phosphorylation of Ser-444 by the Ras/MAPK pathway in the luciferase assay. These results suggest that Mblk-1 is a transcription factor that might function in the mushroom body neuronal circuits downstream of the Ras/MAPK pathway in the honeybee brain.

  4. Transcription factor abundance controlled by an auto-regulatory mechanism involving a transcription start site switch

    PubMed Central

    Ngondo, Richard Patryk; Carbon, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A transcriptional feedback loop is the simplest and most direct means for a transcription factor to provide an increased stability of gene expression. In this work performed in human cells, we reveal a new negative auto-regulatory mechanism involving an alternative transcription start site (TSS) usage. Using the activating transcription factor ZNF143 as a model, we show that the ZNF143 low-affinity binding sites, located downstream of its canonical TSS, play the role of protein sensors to induce the up- or down-regulation of ZNF143 gene expression. We uncovered that the TSS switch that mediates this regulation implies the differential expression of two transcripts with an opposite protein production ability due to their different 5′ untranslated regions. Moreover, our analysis of the ENCODE data suggests that this mechanism could be used by other transcription factors to rapidly respond to their own aberrant expression level. PMID:24234445

  5. YB-1 gene expression is kept constant during myocyte differentiation through replacement of different transcription factors and then falls gradually under the control of neural activity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Toru; Moue, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Nishikawa, Taishi

    2015-11-01

    We have previously reported that translation of acetylcholine receptor α-subunit (AChR α) mRNA in skeletal muscle cells is regulated by Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) in response to neural activity, and that in the postnatal mouse developmental changes in the amount of YB-1 mRNA are similar to those of AChR α mRNA, which is known to be regulated by myogenic transcription factors. Here, we examined transcriptional regulation of the YB-1 gene in mouse skeletal muscle and differentiating C2C12 myocytes. Although neither YB-1 nor AChR α was detected at either the mRNA or protein level in adult hind limb muscle, YB-1 expression was transiently activated in response to denervation of the sciatic nerve and completely paralleled that of AChR α, suggesting that these genes are regulated by the same transcription factors. However, during differentiation of C2C12 cells to myotubes, the level of YB-1 remained constant even though the level of AChR α increased markedly. Reporter gene, gel mobility shift and ChIP assays revealed that in the initial stage of myocyte differentiation, transcription of the YB-1 gene was regulated by E2F1 and Sp1, and was then gradually replaced under the control of both MyoD and myogenin through an E-box sequence in the proximal region of the YB-1 gene promoter. These results suggest that transcription factors for the YB-1 gene are exchanged during skeletal muscle cell differentiation, perhaps playing a role in translational control of mRNAs by YB-1 in both myotube formation and the response of skeletal muscle tissues to neural stimulation.

  6. HIF Transcription Factors, Inflammation, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palazon, Asis; Goldrath, Ananda; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxic response in cells and tissues is mediated by the family of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors that play an integral role in the metabolic changes that drive cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered by hypoxia, but also by other factors associated with pathological stress: e.g., inflammation, infectious microorganisms, and cancer. HIF induces a number of aspects of host immune function, from boosting phagocyte microbicidal capacity to driving T cell differentiation and cytotoxic activity. Cellular metabolism is emerging as a key regulator of immunity, and it constitutes another layer of fine-tuned immune control by HIF that can dictate myeloid cell and lymphocyte development, fate, and function. Here we discuss how oxygen sensing in the immune microenvironment shapes immunological response and examine how HIF and the hypoxia pathway control innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:25367569

  7. HIF transcription factors, inflammation, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Palazon, Asis; Goldrath, Ananda W; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S

    2014-10-16

    The hypoxic response in cells and tissues is mediated by the family of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors; these play an integral role in the metabolic changes that drive cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered by hypoxia, but also by other factors associated with pathological stress: e.g., inflammation, infectious microorganisms, and cancer. HIF induces a number of aspects of host immune function, from boosting phagocyte microbicidal capacity to driving T cell differentiation and cytotoxic activity. Cellular metabolism is emerging as a key regulator of immunity, and it constitutes another layer of fine-tuned immune control by HIF that can dictate myeloid cell and lymphocyte development, fate, and function. Here we discuss how oxygen sensing in the immune microenvironment shapes immunological response and examine how HIF and the hypoxia pathway control innate and adaptive immunity.

  8. A C-Repeat Binding Factor Transcriptional Activator (CBF/DREB1) from European Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) Induces Freezing Tolerance When Expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Oakenfull, Rachael J.; Baxter, Robert; Knight, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing stress affects all plants from temperate zones to the poles. Global climate change means such freezing events are becoming less predictable. This in turn reduces the ability of plants to predict the approaching low temperatures and cold acclimate. This has consequences for crop yields and distribution of wild plant species. C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are transcription factors previously shown to play a vital role in the acclimation process of Arabidopsis thaliana, controlling the expression of hundreds of genes whose products are necessary for freezing tolerance. Work in other plant species cements CBFs as key determinants in the trait of freezing tolerance in higher plants. To test the function of CBFs from highly freezing tolerant plants species we cloned and sequenced CBF transcription factors from three Vaccinium species (Vaccinium myrtillus, Vaccinium uliginosum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) which we collected in the Arctic. We tested the activity of CBF transcription factors from the three Vaccinium species by producing transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing them. Only the Vaccinium myrtillus CBF was able to substantially activate COR (CBF-target) gene expression in the absence of cold. Correspondingly, only the lines expressing the Vaccinium myrtillus CBF were constitutively freezing tolerant. The basis for the differences in potency of the three Vaccinium CBFs was tested by observing cellular localisation and protein levels. All three CBFs were correctly targeted to the nucleus, but Vaccinium uliginosum CBF appeared to be relatively unstable. The reasons for lack of potency for Vaccinium vitis-idaea CBF were not due to stability or targeting, and we speculate that this was due to altered transcription factor function. PMID:23349799

  9. Transcriptional activation of LON Gene by a new form of mitochondrial stress: A role for the nuclear respiratory factor 2 in StAR overload response (SOR).

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Isaac, Sara; Eden, Amir; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2015-06-15

    High output of steroid hormone synthesis in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal cortex and the gonads requires the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) that facilitates cholesterol mobilization to the mitochondrial inner membrane where the CYP11A1/P450scc enzyme complex converts the sterol to the first steroid. Earlier studies have shown that StAR is active while pausing on the cytosolic face of the outer mitochondrial membrane while subsequent import of the protein into the matrix terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity. Consequently, during repeated activity cycles, high level of post-active StAR accumulates in the mitochondrial matrix. To prevent functional damage due to such protein overload effect, StAR is degraded by a sequence of three to four ATP-dependent proteases of the mitochondria protein quality control system, including LON and the m-AAA membranous proteases AFG3L2 and SPG7/paraplegin. Furthermore, StAR expression in both peri-ovulatory ovarian cells, or under ectopic expression in cell line models, results in up to 3-fold enrichment of the mitochondrial proteases and their transcripts. We named this novel form of mitochondrial stress as StAR overload response (SOR). To better understand the SOR mechanism at the transcriptional level we analyzed first the unexplored properties of the proximal promoter of the LON gene. Our findings suggest that the human nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), also known as GA binding protein (GABP), is responsible for 88% of the proximal promoter activity, including the observed increase of transcription in the presence of StAR. Further studies are expected to reveal if common transcriptional determinants coordinate the SOR induced transcription of all the genes encoding the SOR proteases.

  10. A 10-amino-acid sequence in the N-terminal A/B domain of thyroid hormone receptor alpha is essential for transcriptional activation and interaction with the general transcription factor TFIIB.

    PubMed Central

    Hadzic, E; Desai-Yajnik, V; Helmer, E; Guo, S; Wu, S; Koudinova, N; Casanova, J; Raaka, B M; Samuels, H H

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the thyroid hormone (3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine [T3]) on gene transcription are mediated by nuclear T3 receptors (T3Rs). alpha- and beta-isoform T3Rs (T3R alpha and -beta) are expressed from different genes and are members of a superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors that also includes the receptors for steroid hormones, vitamin D, and retinoids. Although T3 activates transcription by mediating a conformational change in the C-terminal approximately 220-amino-acid ligand-binding domain (LBD), the fundamental mechanisms of T3R-mediated transcriptional activation remain to be determined. We found that deletion of the 50-amino-acid N-terminal A/B domain of chicken T3R alpha (cT3R alpha) decreases T3-dependent stimulation of genes regulated by native thyroid hormone response elements about 10- to 20-fold. The requirement of the A/B region for transcriptional activation was mapped to amino acids 21 to 30, which contain a cluster of five basic amino acids. The A/B region of cT3R alpha is not required for T3 binding or for DNA binding of the receptor as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. In vitro binding studies indicate that the N-terminal region of cT3R alpha interacts efficiently with TFIIB and that this interaction requires amino acids 21 to 30 of the A/B region. In contrast, the LBD interacts poorly with TFIIB. The region of TFIIB primarily involved in the binding of cT3R alpha includes an amphipathic alpha helix contained within residues 178 to 201. Analysis using a fusion protein containing the DNA-binding domain of GAL4 and the entire A/B region of cT3R alpha suggests that this region does not contain an intrinsic activation domain. These and other studies indicate that cT3R alpha mediates at least some of its effects through TFIIB in vivo and that the N-terminal region of DNA-bound cT3R alpha acts to recruit and/or stabilize the binding of TFIIB to the transcription complex. T3 stimulation could then result from ligand

  11. Transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3)-induced activation of AP-1 requires Ca2+ ions and the transcription factors c-Jun, ATF2, and ternary complex factor.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Andrea; Hui, Xin; Lipp, Peter; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    The steroid pregnenolone sulfate activates the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) via stimulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3) channels. Here, we show that the signaling pathway requires an influx of Ca(2+) ions into the cells and a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The upregulation of AP-1 was attenuated in cells that overexpressed mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase-1, indicating that Ca(2+) ions prolong the signaling cascade via activation of mitogen activated protein kinases. On the transcriptional level, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of the basic region leucine zipper protein c-Jun, a major constituent of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, or expression of a c-Jun-specific short hairpin RNA attenuated pregnenolone sulfate-induced AP-1 activation. In addition, stimulation of TRPM3 channels increased the transcriptional activation potential of the basic region leucine zipper protein ATF2. Inhibition of ATF2 target gene expression via expression of a dominant-negative mutant of ATF2 or expression of an ATF2-specific short hairpin RNA interfered with TRPM3-mediated stimulation of AP-1. Moreover, we show that a dominant-negative mutant of the ternary complex factor (TCF) Elk-1 attenuated the upregulation of AP-1 following stimulation of TRPM3 channels. Thus, c-Jun, ATF2, and TCFs are required to connect the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by activation of TRPM3 channels with enhanced transcription of AP-1-regulated genes. We conclude that pregnenolone sulfate-induced TRPM3 channel activation changes the gene expression pattern of the cells by activating transcription of c-Jun-, ATF2-, and TCF-controlled genes.

  12. Protein oxidation mediated by heme-induced active site conversion specific for heme-regulated transcription factor, iron response regulator

    PubMed Central

    Kitatsuji, Chihiro; Izumi, Kozue; Nambu, Shusuke; Kurogochi, Masaki; Uchida, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwai, Kazuhiro; O’Brian, Mark R.; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum transcriptional regulator Irr (iron response regulator) is a key regulator of the iron homeostasis, which is degraded in response to heme binding via a mechanism that involves oxidative modification of the protein. Here, we show that heme-bound Irr activates O2 to form highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the “active site conversion” from heme iron to non-heme iron to degrade itself. In the presence of heme and reductant, the ROS scavenging experiments show that Irr generates H2O2 from O2 as found for other hemoproteins, but H2O2 is less effective in oxidizing the peptide, and further activation of H2O2 is suggested. Interestingly, we find a time-dependent decrease of the intensity of the Soret band and appearance of the characteristic EPR signal at g = 4.3 during the oxidation, showing the heme degradation and the successive formation of a non-heme iron site. Together with the mutational studies, we here propose a novel “two-step self-oxidative modification” mechanism, during which O2 is activated to form H2O2 at the heme regulatory motif (HRM) site and the generated H2O2 is further converted into more reactive species such as ·OH at the non-heme iron site in the His-cluster region formed by the active site conversion. PMID:26729068

  13. Yeast GAL11 protein is a distinctive type transcription factor that enhances basal transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Hiraoka, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The yeast auxiliary transcription factor GAL11, a candidate for the coactivator, was partially purified from yeast cells, and its function was characterized in a cell-free transcription system. The partially purified GAL11 protein stimulated basal transcription from the CYC1 core promoter by a factor of 4-5 at the step of preinitiation complex formation. GAL11 protein also enhanced transcription activated by general regulatory factor 1, GAL4-AH, or GAL4-VP16 to the same extent as the basal transcription. Therefore, the apparent potentiation of the activators by GAL11 was attributable to the stimulation of basal transcription. The wild-type GAL11 protein (but not a mutant-type protein) produced in bacteria stimulated transcription as effectively as GAL11 from yeast. These results suggest that GAL11 functions as a positive cofactor of basal and activator-induced transcription in a cell-free transcription system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378310

  14. A host-factor interaction and localization map for a plant-adapted rhabdovirus implicates cytoplasm-tethered transcription activators in cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Min, Byoung-Eun; Martin, Kathleen; Wang, Renyuan; Tafelmeyer, Petra; Bridges, Max; Goodin, Michael

    2010-11-01

    To identify host factors that play critical roles in processes, including cell-to-cell movement of plant-adapted rhabdoviruses, we constructed and validated a high-resolution Nicotiana benthamiana yeast two-hybrid library. The library was screened with the putative movement protein (sc4), nucleocapsid (N), and matrix (M) proteins of Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV). This resulted in identification of 31 potential host factors. Steady-state localization studies using autofluorescent protein fusions to full-length clones of interactors were conducted in transgenic N. benthamiana marker lines. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays were used to validate two-hybrid interactions. The sc4 interactor, sc4i21, localized to microtubules. The N interactor, Ni67, localized to punctuate loci on the endoplasmic reticulum. These two proteins are 84% identical homologues of the Arabidopsis phloem-associated transcription activator AtVOZ1, and contain functional nuclear localization signals. Sc4i17 is a microtubule-associated motor protein. The M interactor, Mi7, is a nuclear-localized transcription factor. Combined with a binary interaction map for SYNV proteins, our data support a model in which the SYNV nucleocapsids are exported from the nucleus and moved cell-to-cell by transcription activators tethered in the cytoplasm.

  15. Transgenic mice with cardiac-specific expression of activating transcription factor 3, a stress-inducible gene, have conduction abnormalities and contractile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Chaves, A; Chen, J; Kelley, R; Jones, K; Weed, H G; Gardner, K L; Gangi, L; Yamaguchi, M; Klomkleaw, W; Nakayama, T; Hamlin, R L; Carnes, C; Altschuld, R; Bauer, J; Hai, T

    2001-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a member of the CREB/ATF family of transcription factors. Previously, we demonstrated that the expression of the ATF3 gene is induced by many stress signals. In this report, we demonstrate that expression of ATF3 is induced by cardiac ischemia coupled with reperfusion (ischemia-reperfusion) in both cultured cells and an animal model. Transgenic mice expressing ATF3 under the control of the alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter have atrial enlargement, and atrial and ventricular hypertrophy. Microscopic examination showed myocyte degeneration and fibrosis. Functionally, the transgenic heart has reduced contractility and aberrant conduction. Interestingly, expression of sorcin, a gene whose product inhibits the release of calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum, is increased in these transgenic hearts. Taken together, our results indicate that expression of ATF3, a stress-inducible gene, in the heart leads to altered gene expression and impaired cardiac function. PMID:11485922

  16. trans-dominant mutants of E1A provide genetic evidence that the zinc finger of the trans-activating domain binds a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, L C; Ricciardi, R P

    1991-01-01

    The 289R E1A protein of adenovirus stimulates transcription of early viral and certain cellular genes. trans-Activation requires residues 140 to 188, which encompass a zinc finger. Several studies have indicated that trans-activation by E1A is mediated through cellular transcription factors. In particular, the ability of the trans-dominant E1A point mutant hr5 (Ser-185 to Asn) to inhibit wild-type E1A trans-activation was proposed to result from the sequestration of a cellular factor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we individually replaced every residue within and flanking the trans-activating domain with a conservative amino acid, revealing 16 critical residues. Six of the individual substitutions lying in a contiguous stretch C terminal to the zinc finger (carboxyl region183-188) imparted a trans-dominant phenotype. trans-Dominance was even produced by deletion of the entire carboxyl region183-188. Conversely, an intact finger region147-177 was absolutely required for trans-dominance, since second-site substitution of every critical residue in this region abrogated the trans-dominant phenotype of the hr5 protein. These data indicate that the finger region147-177 bind a limiting cellular transcription factor and that the carboxyl region183-188 provides a separate and essential function. In addition, we show that four negatively charged residues within the trans-activating domain do not comprise a distinct acidic activating region. We present a model in which the trans-activating domain of E1A binds to two different cellular protein targets through the finger and carboxyl regions. Images PMID:1831535

  17. Determination of Acetylation of the Gli Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Coni, Sonia; Di Magno, Laura; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) are the final effectors of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling and play a key role in development and cancer. The activity of the Gli proteins is finely regulated by covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Both Gli1 and Gli2 are acetylated at a conserved lysine, and this modification causes the inhibition of their transcriptional activity. Thus, the acetylation status of these proteins represents a useful marker to monitor Hh activation in pathophysiological conditions. Herein we describe the techniques utilized to detect in vitro and intracellular acetylation of the Gli transcription factors. PMID:26179046

  18. A Novel Transcription Mechanism Activated by Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xinghua; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Hongfeng; Zhou, LiChun; Guo, ZhongMao

    2013-01-01

    Solute carrier family 7, member 11 (Slc7a11) is a plasma membrane cystine/glutamate exchanger that provides intracellular cystine to produce glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant. Oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses up-regulate Slc7a11 expression by activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and transcription factor 4. This study examined the effect of ethanol on Slc7a11 expression and the underlying mechanism involved. Treatment of mouse hepatic stellate cells with ethanol significantly increased Slc7a11 mRNA and protein levels. Deletion of a 20-bp DNA sequence between −2044 to −2024 upstream of the transcription start site significantly increased basal activity and completely abolished the ethanol-induced activity of the Slc7a11 promoter. This deletion did not affect Slc7a11 promoter activity induced by oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum stress. DNA sequence analysis revealed a binding motif for octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (OCT-1) in the deleted fragment. Mutation of this OCT-1 binding motif resulted in a similar effect as the deletion experiment, i.e. it increased the basal promoter activity and abolished the response to ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly inhibited OCT-1 binding to the Slc7a11 promoter region, although it did not alter OCT-1 mRNA and protein levels. OCT-1 reportedly functions as either a transcriptional enhancer or repressor, depending on the target genes. Results from this study suggest that OCT-1 functions as a repressor on the Slc7a11 promoter and that ethanol inhibits OCT-1 binding to the Slc7a11 promoter, thereby increasing Slc7a11 expression. Taken together, inhibition of the DNA binding activity of transcriptional repressor OCT-1 is a mechanism by which ethanol up-regulates Slc711 expression. PMID:23592778

  19. Yin Yang 1: a multifaceted protein beyond a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiyong; Cao, Paul; Wan, Mei Mei; Sui, Guangchao

    2010-01-01

    As a transcription factor, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) regulates the transcription of a dazzling list of genes and the number of its targets still mounts. Recent studies revealed that YY1 possesses functions independent of its DNA binding activity and its regulatory role in tumorigenesis has started to emerge.

  20. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine induces pulmonary vascular dysfunction via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha.

    PubMed

    Pekarova, Michaela; Koudelka, Adolf; Kolarova, Hana; Ambrozova, Gabriela; Klinke, Anna; Cerna, Anna; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Trundova, Maria; Sindlerova Svihalkova, Lenka; Kuchta, Radek; Kuchtova, Zdenka; Lojek, Antonin; Kubala, Lukas

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), associated with imbalance in vasoactive mediators and massive remodeling of pulmonary vasculature, represents a serious health complication. Despite the progress in treatment, PH patients typically have poor prognoses with severely affected quality of life. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), also represents one of the critical regulators of pulmonary vascular functions. The present study describes a novel mechanism of ADMA-induced dysfunction in human pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The effect of ADMA was compared with well-established model of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. It was discovered for the first time that ADMA induced the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in both types of cells, associated with drastic alternations in normal cellular functions (e.g., nitric oxide production, cell proliferation/Ca(2+) concentration, production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and expression of eNOS, DDAH1, and ICAM-1). Additionally, ADMA significantly enhanced the hypoxia-mediated increase in the signaling cascades. In summary, increased ADMA may lead to manifestation of PH phenotype in human endothelial and smooth muscle cells via the STAT3/HIF-1α cascade. Therefore this signaling pathway represents the potential pathway for future clinical interventions in PH. PMID:26091577

  1. Distinct mechanism of activation of two transcription factors, AmyR and MalR, involved in amylolytic enzyme production in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kuta; Tanaka, Mizuki; Konno, Yui; Ichikawa, Takanori; Ichinose, Sakurako; Hasegawa-Shiro, Sachiko; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-02-01

    The production of amylolytic enzymes in Aspergillus oryzae is induced in the presence of starch or maltose, and two Zn2Cys6-type transcription factors, AmyR and MalR, are involved in this regulation. AmyR directly regulates the expression of amylase genes, and MalR controls the expression of maltose-utilizing (MAL) cluster genes. Deletion of malR gene resulted in poor growth on starch medium and reduction in α-amylase production level. To elucidate the activation mechanisms of these two transcription factors in amylase production, the expression profiles of amylases and MAL cluster genes under carbon catabolite derepression condition and subcellular localization of these transcription factors fused with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) were examined. Glucose, maltose, and isomaltose induced the expression of amylase genes, and GFP-AmyR was translocated from the cytoplasm to nucleus after the addition of these sugars. Rapid induction of amylase gene expression and nuclear localization of GFP-AmyR by isomaltose suggested that this sugar was the strongest inducer for AmyR activation. In contrast, GFP-MalR was constitutively localized in the nucleus and the expression of MAL cluster genes was induced by maltose, but not by glucose or isomaltose. In the presence of maltose, the expression of amylase genes was preceded by MAL cluster gene expression. Furthermore, deletion of the malR gene resulted in a significant decrease in the α-amylase activity induced by maltose, but had apparently no effect on the expression of α-amylase genes in the presence of isomaltose. These results suggested that activation of AmyR and MalR is regulated in a different manner, and the preceding activation of MalR is essential for the utilization of maltose as an inducer for AmyR activation.

  2. Transcription factor repertoire of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bouffi, Carine; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Schollaert, Kaila L.; Chen, Xiaoting; Bacon, W. Clark; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Barski, Artem; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The production of mature eosinophils is a tightly orchestrated process with the aim to sustain normal eosinophil levels in tissues while also maintaining low numbers of these complex and sensitive cells in the blood. To identify regulators of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis in mice, we took a global approach to identify genome-wide transcriptome and epigenome changes that occur during homeostasis at critical developmental stages, including eosinophil-lineage commitment and lineage maturation. Our analyses revealed a markedly greater number of transcriptome alterations associated with eosinophil maturation (1199 genes) than with eosinophil-lineage commitment (490 genes), highlighting the greater transcriptional investment necessary for differentiation. Eosinophil progenitors (EoPs) were noted to express high levels of granule proteins and contain granules with an ultrastructure distinct from that of mature resting eosinophils. Our analyses also delineated a 976-gene eosinophil-lineage transcriptome that included a repertoire of 56 transcription factors, many of which have never previously been associated with eosinophils. EoPs and eosinophils, but not granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) or neutrophils, expressed Helios and Aiolos, members of the Ikaros family of transcription factors, which regulate gene expression via modulation of chromatin structure and DNA accessibility. Epigenetic studies revealed a distinct distribution of active chromatin marks between genes induced with lineage commitment and genes induced with cell maturation during eosinophil development. In addition, Aiolos and Helios binding sites were significantly enriched in genes expressed by EoPs and eosinophils with active chromatin, highlighting a potential novel role for Helios and Aiolos in regulating gene expression during eosinophil development. PMID:26268651

  3. afsS is a target of AfsR, a transcriptional factor with ATPase activity that globally controls secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping-Chin; Umeyama, Takashi; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2002-03-01

    AfsR is a pleiotropic, global regulator that controls the production of actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin and calcium-dependent antibiotic in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). AfsR, with 993 amino acids, is phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues by a protein serine/threonine kinase AfsK and contains an OmpR-like DNA-binding fold at its N-terminal portion and A- and B-type nucleotide-binding motifs in the middle of the protein. The DNA-binding domain, in-dependently of the nucleotide-binding domain, contributed the binding of AfsR to the upstream region of afsS that locates immediately 3' to afsR and encodes a 63-amino-acid protein. No transcription of afsS in the DeltaafsR background and restoration of afsS transcription by afsR on a plasmid in the same genetic background indicated that afsR served as a transcriptional activator for afsS. Interestingly, the AfsR binding site overlapped the promoter of afsS, as determined by DNase I protection assay and high-resolution S1 nuclease mapping. The nucleotide-binding domain contributed distinct ATPase and GTPase activity. The phosphorylation of AfsR by AfsK greatly enhanced the DNA-binding activity and modulated the ATPase activity. The DNA-binding ability of AfsR was independent of the ATPase activity. However, the ATPase activity was essential for transcriptional activation of afsS, probably because the energy available from ATP hydrolysis is required for the isomerization of the closed complex between AfsR and RNA polymerase to a transcriptionally competent open complex. Thus, AfsR turns out to be a unique transcriptional factor, in that it is modular, in which DNA-binding and ATPase activities are physically separable, and the two functions are modulated by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues.

  4. An Estrogen Receptor-α/p300 Complex Activates the BRCA-1 Promoter at an AP-1 Site That Binds Jun/Fos Transcription Factors: Repressive Effects of p53 on BRCA-1 Transcription1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffy, Brandon D; Hockings, Jennifer K; Kemp, Michael Q; Morgan, Sherif S; Hager, Jill A; Beliakoff, Jason; Whitesell, Luke J; Bowden, G. Timothy; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2005-01-01

    Abstract One of the puzzles in cancer predisposition is that women carrying BRCA-1 mutations preferentially develop tumors in epithelial tissues of the breast and ovary. Moreover, sporadic breast tumors contain lower levels of BRCA-1 in the absence of mutations in the BRCA-1 gene. The problem of tissue specificity requires analysis of factors that are unique to tissues of the breast. For example, the expression of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) is inversely correlated with breast cancer risk, and 90% of BRCA-1 tumors are negative for ERα. Here, we show that estrogen stimulates BRCA-1 promoter activity in transfected cells and the recruitment of ERα and its cofactor p300 to an AP-1 site that binds Jun/Fos transcription factors. The recruitment of ERα/p300 coincides with accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle and is antagonized by the antiestrogen tamoxifen. Conversely, we document that overexpression of wild-type p53 prevents the recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 site and represses BRCA-1 promoter activity. Taken together, our findings support a model in which an ERα/AP-1 complex modulates BRCA-1 transcription under conditions of estrogen stimulation. Conversely, the formation of this transcription complex is abrogated in cells overexpressing p53. PMID:16229810

  5. Phylogenetic and Transcription Analysis of Chrysanthemum WRKY Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Li, Huiyun; Zeng, Jun; Shao, Yafeng; Zhu, Lu; Zhang, Zhaohe; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are known to function in a number of plant processes. Here we have characterized 15 WRKY family genes of the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium). A total of 15 distinct sequences were isolated; initially internal fragments were amplified based on transcriptomic sequence, and then the full length cDNAs were obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. The transcription of these 15 genes in response to a variety of phytohormone treatments and both biotic and abiotic stresses was characterized. Some of the genes behaved as would be predicted based on their homology with Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY genes, but others showed divergent behavior. PMID:25196345

  6. A cluster region of AP-1 responsive elements is required for transcriptional activity of mouse ODC gene by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Tacchini, Lorenza; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2002-05-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is regulated by a variety of mechanisms including transcription, translation, and RNA and protein half-life. Since in mouse B16-F1 melanoma cells an early and remarkable (about 6-fold) increase in steady state mRNA levels was observed after hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) treatment, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of mouse ODC promoter. Transient transfection of various ODC-luciferase promoter constructs into the B16-Fl cells in combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified the HGF-responsive element as a cluster of three AP-1 binding sites (-1660 to -1572). Even if each site differs from the canonical TPA responsive element for one nucleotide, only the first two AP-1 consensus sequences seemed to be functional since allowed DNA-binding activity of nuclear proteins after HGF treatment. Comparison of the results of transfection assays with the pOD2.5-luc (2.5 kb gene fragment) and with the construct deprived of the AP-1 cluster pOD-B-luc showed that this 50 bp region was required for ODC transactivating activity in response to HGF. Since in B16-F1 cells HGF increased AP-1 activity and the mRNA expression of various AP-1 subunits, we may conclude that HGF-induced transcription of mouse ODC was largely due to triggering of AP-1 pathway. PMID:12054494

  7. Methamphetamine activates nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and induces human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcription in human microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Wires, Emily S; Alvarez, David; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Wang, Yun; Morales, Marisela; Karn, Jonathan; Harvey, Brandon K

    2012-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) primarily infects glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent evidence suggests that HIV-infected individuals who abuse drugs such as methamphetamine (METH) have higher viral loads and experience more severe neurological complications than HIV-infected individuals who do not abuse drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of METH on HIV expression from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter and on an HIV integrated provirus in microglial cells, the primary host cells for HIV in the CNS. Primary human microglial cells immortalized with SV40 T antigen (CHME-5 cells) were cotransfected with an HIV LTR reporter and the HIV Tat gene, a key regulator of viral replication and gene expression, and exposed to METH. Our results demonstrate that METH treatment induced LTR activation, an effect potentiated in the presence of Tat. We also found that METH increased the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a key cellular transcriptional regulator of the LTR promoter, and the activity of an NF-κB-specific reporter plasmid in CHME-5 cells. The presence of a dominant-negative regulator of NF-κB blocked METH-related activation of the HIV LTR. Furthermore, treatment of HIV-latently infected CHME-5 (CHME-5/HIV) cells with METH induced HIV expression and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. These results suggest that METH can stimulate HIV gene expression in microglia cells through activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. This mechanism may outline the initial biochemical events leading to the observed increased neurodegeneration in HIV-positive individuals who use METH.

  8. Redox-Active Sensing by Bacterial DksA Transcription Factors Is Determined by Cysteine and Zinc Content

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Tapscott, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Liam F.; Liu, Lin; Reyes, Aníbal M.; Libby, Stephen J.; Trujillo, Madia; Fang, Ferric C.; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four-cysteine zinc finger motif of the bacterial RNA polymerase regulator DksA is essential for protein structure, canonical control of the stringent response to nutritional limitation, and thiol-based sensing of oxidative and nitrosative stress. This interdependent relationship has limited our understanding of DksA-mediated functions in bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we have addressed this challenge by complementing ΔdksA Salmonella with Pseudomonas aeruginosa dksA paralogues that encode proteins differing in cysteine and zinc content. We find that four-cysteine, zinc-bound (C4) and two-cysteine, zinc-free (C2) DksA proteins are able to mediate appropriate stringent control in Salmonella and that thiol-based sensing of reactive species is conserved among C2 and C4 orthologues. However, variations in cysteine and zinc content determine the threshold at which individual DksA proteins sense and respond to reactive species. In particular, zinc acts as an antioxidant, dampening cysteine reactivity and raising the threshold of posttranslational thiol modification with reactive species. Consequently, C2 DksA triggers transcriptional responses in Salmonella at levels of oxidative or nitrosative stress normally tolerated by Salmonella expressing C4 orthologues. Inappropriate transcriptional regulation by C2 DksA increases the susceptibility of Salmonella to the antimicrobial effects of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, and attenuates virulence in macrophages and mice. Our findings suggest that the redox-active sensory function of DksA proteins is finely tuned to optimize bacterial fitness according to the levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress encountered by bacterial species in their natural and host environments. PMID:27094335

  9. Transcription factor Mts1/Mts2 (Atf1/Pcr1, Gad7/Pcr1) activates the M26 meiotic recombination hotspot in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kon, N; Krawchuk, M D; Warren, B G; Smith, G R; Wahls, W P

    1997-12-01

    Homologous recombination hotspots increase the frequency of recombination in nearby DNA. The M26 hotspot in the ade6 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a meiotic hotspot with a discrete, cis-acting nucleotide sequence (5'-ATGACGT-3') defined by extensive mutagenesis. A heterodimeric M26 DNA binding protein, composed of subunits Mts1 and Mts2, has been identified and purified 40,000-fold. Cloning, disruption, and genetic analyses of the mts genes demonstrate that the Mts1/Mts2 heterodimer is essential for hotspot activity. This provides direct evidence that a specific trans-acting factor, binding to a cis-acting site with a unique nucleotide sequence, is required to activate this meiotic hotspot. Intriguingly, the Mts1/Mts2 protein subunits are identical to the recently described transcription factors Atf1 (Gad7) and Pcr1, which are required for a variety of stress responses. However, we report differential dependence on the Mts proteins for hotspot activation and stress response, suggesting that these proteins are multifunctional and have distinct activities. Furthermore, ade6 mRNA levels are equivalent in hotspot and nonhotspot meioses and do not change in mts mutants, indicating that hotspot activation is not a consequence of elevated transcription levels. These findings suggest an intimate but separable link between the regulation of transcription and meiotic recombination. Other studies have recently shown that the Mts1/Mts2 protein and M26 sites are involved in meiotic recombination elsewhere in the S. pombe genome, suggesting that these factors help regulate the timing and distribution of homologous recombination. PMID:9391101

  10. Involvement of a NF-kappa B-like transcription factor in the activation of the interleukin-6 gene by inflammatory lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, H; Mitomo, K; Watanabe, T; Okamoto, S; Yamamoto, K

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is one of the major mediators of inflammation, and its expression is inducible by the other inflammatory lymphokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). We demonstrate that a common IL-6 promoter element, termed inflammatory lymphokine-responsive element (ILRE), is important for induction of IL-6 gene expression by IL-1 and TNF-alpha despite possible differences in the mechanisms of action of these lymphokines. Remarkably, the ILRE sequence, located between -73 to -63 relative to the mRNA cap site, is highly homologous to NF-kappa B transcription factor-binding motifs and binds an IL-1-TNF-alpha-inducible nuclear factor; the sequence specificities, binding characteristics, and subcellular localizations of this factor are indistinguishable from those of NF-kappa B. In addition, mutations of the ILRE sequence which impair the binding of this nuclear factor abolished the induction of IL-6 gene expression by IL-1 and TNF-alpha in vivo. These results indicate that a nuclear factor indistinguishable from NF-kappa B is involved in the transcriptional activation of the IL-6 gene by IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Images PMID:2405250

  11. Transcription factors as targets of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M

    1999-01-01

    Several general and gene- and cell-selective transcription factors are required for specific transcription to occur. Many of them exert their functions through specific contacts either in the promoter region or at distant sequences regulating the initiation. These contacts may be altered by anticancer drugs which form non-covalent complexes with DNA. Covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents may prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences or may constitute multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which attract the factors thus decreasing their availability in the cell. The anticancer drug-transcription factor interplay which is based on specific interactions with DNA may contribute to pharmacological properties of the former and provide a basis for the search for new drugs. PMID:10547027

  12. Transcription factor NF-κB is activated in primary neurons by amyloid β peptides and in neurons surrounding early plaques from patients with Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Uherek, Martin; Volk, Benedikt; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    1997-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide (Aβ)-containing plaques are a hallmark of Alzheimer disease. Here, we show that the neurotoxic Aβ, a major plaque component, is a potent activator of the transcription factor NF-κB in primary neurons. This activation required reactive oxygen intermediates as messengers because an antioxidant prevented Aβ-induced NF-κB activation. Maximal activation of NF-κB was found with 0.1 μM Aβ-(1–40) and 0.1 μM Aβ-(25–35) fragments, making a role for NF-κB in neuroprotection feasible. Using an activity-specific mAb for the p65 NF-κB subunit, activation of NF-κB also was observed in neurons and astroglia of brain sections from Alzheimer disease patients. Activated NF-κB was restricted to cells in the close vicinity of early plaques. Our data suggest that the aberrant gene expression in diseased nervous tissue is at least in part due to Aβ-induced activation of NF-κB, a potent immediate–early transcriptional regulator of numerous proinflammatory genes. PMID:9122249

  13. Transcription factors Sox10 and Sox2 functionally interact with positive transcription elongation factor b in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Arter, Juliane; Wegner, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Sox proteins are mechanistically versatile regulators with established relevance to different developmental processes and crucial impact on chromatin structure, DNA conformation, and transcriptional initiation. Here, we show that Sox2 and Sox10, two Sox proteins important for Schwann cell development, also have the capability to activate transcriptional elongation in a Schwann cell line by recruiting the positive transcription elongation factor b. Recruitment is mediated by physical interaction between the carboxyterminal transactivation domains of the two Sox proteins and the Cyclin T1 subunit of positive transcription elongation factor b, with interaction interfaces for the two Sox proteins being mapped to adjacent regions of the central part of Cyclin T1. Supporting the relevance of this interaction to Schwann cell development, transcription of myelin genes appears regulated at the level of elongation. Our results thus add a new facet to the activity of Sox proteins and expand the functional repertoire of this important group of developmental regulators. Sox transcription factors are important regulators of nervous system development. While they are known to regulate transcription by recruiting and stabilizing the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex directly or with help of the Mediator complex, this study provides evidence that Sox10 and Sox2 additionally influence transcription in glial cells at the elongation stage by recruiting P-TEFb. Cdk9, cyclin-dependent kinase 9; P-TEFb, positive transcription elongation factor b; Pol II, RNA polymerase II; Sox, Sox2 or Sox10 protein.

  14. How Intrinsic Molecular Dynamics Control Intramolecular Communication in Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription Factor STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Arock, Michel; Trouvé, Alain; Tchertanov, Luba

    2015-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription STAT5 is a key mediator of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While STAT5 activity is tightly regulated in normal cells, its constitutive activation directly contributes to oncogenesis and is associated with a broad range of hematological and solid tumor cancers. Therefore the development of compounds able to modulate pathogenic activation of this protein is a very challenging endeavor. A crucial step of drug design is the understanding of the protein conformational features and the definition of putative binding site(s) for such modulators. Currently, there is no structural data available for human STAT5 and our study is the first footprint towards the description of structure and dynamics of this protein. We investigated structural and dynamical features of the two STAT5 isoforms, STAT5a and STAT5b, taken into account their phosphorylation status. The study was based on the exploration of molecular dynamics simulations by different analytical methods. Despite the overall folding similarity of STAT5 proteins, the MD conformations display specific structural and dynamical features for each protein, indicating first, sequence-encoded structural properties and second, phosphorylation-induced effects which contribute to local and long-distance structural rearrangements interpreted as allosteric event. Further examination of the dynamical coupling between distant sites provides evidence for alternative profiles of the communication pathways inside and between the STAT5 domains. These results add a new insight to the understanding of the crucial role of intrinsic molecular dynamics in mediating intramolecular signaling in STAT5. Two pockets, localized in close proximity to the phosphotyrosine-binding site and adjacent to the channel for communication pathways across STAT5, may constitute valid targets to develop inhibitors able to modulate the function-related communication properties of this signaling

  15. Serine Arginine-Rich Splicing Factor 1 (SRSF1) Contributes to the Transcriptional Activation of CD3ζ in Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Vaishali R; Gillooly, Andrew R; Perl, Marcel A; Markopoulou, Anastasia; Tsokos, George C

    2015-01-01

    T lymphocytes from many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express decreased levels of the T cell receptor (TCR)-associated CD3 zeta (ζ) signaling chain, a feature directly linked to their abnormal phenotype and function. Reduced mRNA expression partly due to defective alternative splicing, contributes to the reduced expression of CD3ζ chain. We previously identified by oligonucleotide pulldown and mass spectrometry approaches, the serine arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) binding to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of CD3ζ mRNA. We showed that SRSF1 regulates alternative splicing of the 3'UTR of CD3ζ to promote expression of the normal full length 3`UTR over an unstable splice variant in human T cells. In this study we show that SRSF1 regulates transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Specifically, overexpression and silencing of SRSF1 respectively increases and decreases CD3ζ total mRNA and protein expression in Jurkat and primary T cells. Using promoter-luciferase assays, we show that SRSF1 enhances transcriptional activity of the CD3ζ promoter in a dose dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that SRSF1 is recruited to the CD3ζ promoter. These results indicate that SRSF1 contributes to transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Thus our study identifies a novel mechanism whereby SRSF1 regulates CD3ζ expression in human T cells and may contribute to the T cell defect in SLE.

  16. The Arabidopsis GRAS Protein SCL14 Interacts with Class II TGA Transcription Factors and Is Essential for the Activation of Stress-Inducible Promoters[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fode, Benjamin; Siemsen, Tanja; Thurow, Corinna; Weigel, Ralf; Gatz, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The plant signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) and/or xenobiotic chemicals like the auxin mimic 2,4-D induce transcriptional activation of defense- and stress-related genes that contain activation sequence-1 (as-1)–like cis-elements in their promoters. as-1–like sequences are recognized by basic/leucine zipper transcription factors of the TGA family. Expression of genes related to the SA-dependent defense program systemic acquired resistance requires the TGA-interacting protein NPR1. However, a number of as-1–containing promoters can be activated independently from NPR1. Here, we report the identification of Arabidopsis thaliana SCARECROW-like 14 (SCL14), a member of the GRAS family of regulatory proteins, as a TGA-interacting protein that is required for the activation of TGA-dependent but NPR1-independent SA- and 2,4-D–inducible promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that class II TGA factors TGA2, TGA5, and/or TGA6 are needed to recruit SCL14 to promoters of selected SCL14 target genes identified by whole-genome transcript profiling experiments. The coding regions and the expression profiles of the SCL14-dependent genes imply that they might be involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and possibly endogenous harmful metabolites. Consistently, plants ectopically expressing SCL14 showed increased tolerance to toxic doses of the chemicals isonicotinic acid and 2,4,6-triiodobenzoic acid, whereas the scl14 and the tga2 tga5 tga6 mutants were more susceptible. Hence, the TGA/SCL14 complex seems to be involved in the activation of a general broad-spectrum detoxification network upon challenge of plants with xenobiotics. PMID:18984675

  17. The Arabidopsis GRAS protein SCL14 interacts with class II TGA transcription factors and is essential for the activation of stress-inducible promoters.

    PubMed

    Fode, Benjamin; Siemsen, Tanja; Thurow, Corinna; Weigel, Ralf; Gatz, Christiane

    2008-11-01

    The plant signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) and/or xenobiotic chemicals like the auxin mimic 2,4-D induce transcriptional activation of defense- and stress-related genes that contain activation sequence-1 (as-1)-like cis-elements in their promoters. as-1-like sequences are recognized by basic/leucine zipper transcription factors of the TGA family. Expression of genes related to the SA-dependent defense program systemic acquired resistance requires the TGA-interacting protein NPR1. However, a number of as-1-containing promoters can be activated independently from NPR1. Here, we report the identification of Arabidopsis thaliana SCARECROW-like 14 (SCL14), a member of the GRAS family of regulatory proteins, as a TGA-interacting protein that is required for the activation of TGA-dependent but NPR1-independent SA- and 2,4-D-inducible promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that class II TGA factors TGA2, TGA5, and/or TGA6 are needed to recruit SCL14 to promoters of selected SCL14 target genes identified by whole-genome transcript profiling experiments. The coding regions and the expression profiles of the SCL14-dependent genes imply that they might be involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and possibly endogenous harmful metabolites. Consistently, plants ectopically expressing SCL14 showed increased tolerance to toxic doses of the chemicals isonicotinic acid and 2,4,6-triiodobenzoic acid, whereas the scl14 and the tga2 tga5 tga6 mutants were more susceptible. Hence, the TGA/SCL14 complex seems to be involved in the activation of a general broad-spectrum detoxification network upon challenge of plants with xenobiotics.

  18. Krüppel-like factor 6 is a co-activator of NF-κB that mediates p65-dependent transcription of selected downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Lei, Cao-Qi; Hu, Yun-Hong; Xia, Tian; Li, Mi; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB plays a pivotal role in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including development, inflammation, and immunity. How NF-κB integrates activating signals to expression of specific sets of target genes is of great interest. Here, we identified Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) as a co-activator of NF-κB after TNFα and IL-1β stimulation. Overexpression of KLF6 enhanced TNFα- and IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB and transcription of a subset of downstream genes, whereas knockdown of KLF6 had opposite effects. KLF6 interacted with p65 in the nucleus and bound to the promoters of target genes. Upon IL-1β stimulation, KLF6 was recruited to promoters of a subset of NF-κB target genes in a p65-dependent manner, which was in turn required for the optimal binding of p65 to the target gene promoters. Our findings thus identified KLF6 as a previously unknown but essential co-activator of NF-κB and provided new insight into the molecular regulation of p65-dependent gene expression.

  19. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Modulates the Transcriptional Activity of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Regulates Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D.; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P.; Pant, Harish C.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF. PMID:20357208

  20. Abscisic acid affects transcription of chloroplast genes via protein phosphatase 2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes: repression by guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate and activation by sigma factor 5.

    PubMed

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Zubo, Yan O; Börner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) represses the transcriptional activity of chloroplast genes (determined by run-on assays), with the exception of psbD and a few other genes in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings and mature rosette leaves. Abscisic acid does not influence chloroplast transcription in the mutant lines abi1-1 and abi2-1 with constitutive protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) activity, suggesting that ABA affects chloroplast gene activity by binding to the pyrabactin resistance (PYR)/PYR1-like or regulatory component of ABA receptor protein family (PYR/PYL/RCAR) and signaling via PP2Cs and sucrose non-fermenting protein-related kinases 2 (SnRK2s). Further we show by quantitative PCR that ABA enhances the transcript levels of RSH2, RSH3, PTF1 and SIG5. RelA/SpoT homolog 2 (RSH2) and RSH3 are known to synthesize guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp), an inhibitor of the plastid-gene-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase. We propose, therefore, that ABA leads to an inhibition of chloroplast gene expression via stimulation of ppGpp synthesis. On the other hand, sigma factor 5 (SIG5) and plastid transcription factor 1 (PTF1) are known to be necessary for the transcription of psbD from a specific light- and stress-induced promoter (the blue light responsive promoter, BLRP). We demonstrate that ABA activates the psbD gene by stimulation of transcription initiation at BLRP. Taken together, our data suggest that ABA affects the transcription of chloroplast genes by a PP2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes encoding proteins involved in chloroplast transcription. PMID:25976841

  1. Entinostat up-regulates the CAMP gene encoding LL-37 via activation of STAT3 and HIF-1α transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Miraglia, Erica; Nylén, Frank; Johansson, Katarina; Arnér, Elias; Cebula, Marcus; Farmand, Susan; Ottosson, Håkan; Strömberg, Roger; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Agerberth, Birgitta; Bergman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance against classical antibiotics is a growing problem and the development of new antibiotics is limited. Thus, novel alternatives to antibiotics are warranted. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of innate immunity that can be induced by several compounds, including vitamin D and phenyl-butyrate (PBA). Utilizing a luciferase based assay, we recently discovered that the histone deacetylase inhibitor Entinostat is a potent inducer of the CAMP gene encoding the human cathelicidin LL-37. Here we investigate a mechanism for the induction and also find that Entinostat up-regulates human β-defensin 1. Analysis of the CAMP promoter sequence revealed binding sites for the transcription factors STAT3 and HIF-1α. By using short hairpin RNA and selective inhibitors, we found that both transcription factors are involved in Entinostat-induced expression of LL-37. However, only HIF-1α was found to be recruited to the CAMP promoter, suggesting that Entinostat activates STAT3, which promotes transcription of CAMP by increasing the expression of HIF-1α. Finally, we provide in vivo relevance to our findings by showing that Entinostat-elicited LL-37 expression was impaired in macrophages from a patient with a STAT3-mutation. Combined, our findings support a role for STAT3 and HIF-1α in the regulation of LL-37 expression. PMID:27633343

  2. Entinostat up-regulates the CAMP gene encoding LL-37 via activation of STAT3 and HIF-1α transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Erica; Nylén, Frank; Johansson, Katarina; Arnér, Elias; Cebula, Marcus; Farmand, Susan; Ottosson, Håkan; Strömberg, Roger; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta; Bergman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance against classical antibiotics is a growing problem and the development of new antibiotics is limited. Thus, novel alternatives to antibiotics are warranted. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of innate immunity that can be induced by several compounds, including vitamin D and phenyl-butyrate (PBA). Utilizing a luciferase based assay, we recently discovered that the histone deacetylase inhibitor Entinostat is a potent inducer of the CAMP gene encoding the human cathelicidin LL-37. Here we investigate a mechanism for the induction and also find that Entinostat up-regulates human β-defensin 1. Analysis of the CAMP promoter sequence revealed binding sites for the transcription factors STAT3 and HIF-1α. By using short hairpin RNA and selective inhibitors, we found that both transcription factors are involved in Entinostat-induced expression of LL-37. However, only HIF-1α was found to be recruited to the CAMP promoter, suggesting that Entinostat activates STAT3, which promotes transcription of CAMP by increasing the expression of HIF-1α. Finally, we provide in vivo relevance to our findings by showing that Entinostat-elicited LL-37 expression was impaired in macrophages from a patient with a STAT3-mutation. Combined, our findings support a role for STAT3 and HIF-1α in the regulation of LL-37 expression. PMID:27633343

  3. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene product interacts with and trans-activates the AP1 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Antinore, M J; Birrer, M J; Patel, D; Nader, L; McCance, D J

    1996-01-01

    The E7 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds to the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and dissociates pRb-E2F complexes. However, the observation that the ability of E7 to bind pRb is not required for the HPV16-induced immortalization of primary keratinocytes prompted a search for other cellular factors bound by E7. Using a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein system, we show that E7 complexes with AP1 transcription factors including c-Jun, JunB, JunD and c-Fos. The ability of E7 to complex with c-Jun in vivo is demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and the yeast two-hybrid system. An analysis of E7 point mutants in the GST system indicates that the E7 zinc-finger motif, but not the pRb binding domain, is involved in these interactions. Using c-Jun deletion mutants, E7 binding maps between amino acids 224 and 286 of c-Jun. E7 trans-activates c-Jun-induced transcription from a Jun responsive promoter, and this activity correlates with the ability of E7 mutants to bind Jun proteins. Finally, a transcriptionally inactive c-Jun deletion, which can bind E7, interferes with the E7-induced transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with an activated ras, indicating that the Jun-E7 interaction is physiologically relevant and that Jun factors may be targeted in the E7 transformation pathway. Images PMID:8617242

  4. Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) interrupts signal transduction between the Kss1 MAPK and the Tec1 transcription factor to maintain pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Shock, Teresa R; Thompson, James; Yates, John R; Madhani, Hiten D

    2009-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mating, filamentous growth (FG), and high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways share components and yet mediate distinct responses to different extracellular signals. Cross talk is suppressed between the mating and FG pathways because mating signaling induces the destruction of the FG transcription factor Tec1. We show here that HOG pathway activation results in phosphorylation of the FG MAPK, Kss1, and the MAPKK, Ste7. However, FG transcription is not activated because HOG signaling prevents the activation of Tec1. In contrast to the mating pathway, we find that the mechanism involves the inhibition of DNA binding by Tec1 rather than its destruction. We also find that nuclear accumulation of Tec1 is not affected by HOG signaling. Inhibition by Hog1 is apparently indirect since it does not require any of the consensus S/TP MAPK phosphorylation sites on Tec1, its DNA-binding partner Ste12, or the associated regulators Dig1 or Dig2. It also does not require the consensus MAPK sites of the Ste11 activator Ste50, in contrast to a recent proposal for a role for negative feedback in specificity. Our results demonstrate that HOG signaling interrupts the FG pathway signal transduction between the phosphorylation of Kss1 and the activation of DNA binding by Tec1. PMID:19218425

  5. Protein kinase-A dependent phosphorylation of transcription enhancer factor-1 represses its DNA-binding activity but enhances its gene activation ability

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mahesh P.; Kogut, Paul; Gupta, Madhu

    2000-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent signaling pathway has been implicated in cardiac cell growth/differentiation and muscle gene transcription. Previously, we have identified a cAMP-inducible E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif in the cardiac α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) gene promoter. The two factors, TEF-1 and Max, that bind to this motif are found to physically associate with each other and exert a positive cooperative effect for gene regulation. Here we show that TEF-1, but not Max, is a substrate for protein kinase-A (PK-A)-dependent phosphorylation. TEF-1 is phosphorylated by PK-A at residue serine-102. This post-translational modification of TEF-1 repressed its DNA-binding activity, but not its ability to interact with the Max protein. Replacement of serine-102 in TEF-1 by a neutral or a charged amino acid did not abolish its DNA-binding ability, suggesting that changing a charge at the 102 amino-acid position of TEF-1 was not sufficient to inhibit its DNA-binding activity. We also show that PK-A response of the α-MHC gene is stimulated by the presence of wild-type TEF-1 but not by mutant TEF-1 having serine-102 replaced by alanine, suggesting that phosphorylation at this residue accounts for the cAMP/PK-A response of the gene. Thus, these data demonstrate that TEF-1 is a direct target of cAMP/PK-A signaling in cardiac myocytes. PMID:10931933

  6. The Activity of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Regulator σ(VreI) Is Modulated by the Anti-σ Factor VreR and the Transcription Factor PhoB.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Jose M; Otero-Asman, Joaquín R; Bastiaansen, Karlijn C; Civantos, Cristina; Llamas, María A

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in bacteria is primarily controlled at the level of transcription initiation by modifying the affinity of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) for the promoter. This control often occurs through the substitution of the RNAP sigma (σ) subunit. Next to the primary σ factor, most bacteria contain a variable number of alternative σ factors of which the extracytoplasmic function group (σ(ECF)) is predominant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains nineteen σ(ECF), including the virulence regulator σ(VreI). σ(VreI) is encoded by the vreAIR operon, which also encodes a receptor-like protein (VreA) and an anti-σ factor (VreR). These three proteins form a signal transduction pathway known as PUMA3, which controls expression of P. aeruginosa virulence functions. Expression of the vreAIR operon occurs under inorganic phosphate (Pi) limitation and requires the PhoB transcription factor. Intriguingly, the genes of the σ(VreI) regulon are also expressed in low Pi despite the fact that the σ(VreI) repressor, the anti-σ factor VreR, is also produced in this condition. Here we show that although σ(VreI) is partially active under Pi starvation, maximal transcription of the σ(VreI) regulon genes requires the removal of VreR. This strongly suggests that an extra signal, probably host-derived, is required in vivo for full σ(VreI) activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activity of σ(VreI) is modulated not only by VreR but also by the transcription factor PhoB. Presence of this regulator is an absolute requirement for σ(VreI) to complex the DNA and initiate transcription of the PUMA3 regulon. The potential DNA binding sites of these two proteins, which include a pho box and -10 and -35 elements, are proposed. PMID:27536271

  7. The Activity of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Regulator σVreI Is Modulated by the Anti-σ Factor VreR and the Transcription Factor PhoB

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, Jose M.; Otero-Asman, Joaquín R.; Bastiaansen, Karlijn C.; Civantos, Cristina; Llamas, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in bacteria is primarily controlled at the level of transcription initiation by modifying the affinity of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) for the promoter. This control often occurs through the substitution of the RNAP sigma (σ) subunit. Next to the primary σ factor, most bacteria contain a variable number of alternative σ factors of which the extracytoplasmic function group (σECF) is predominant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains nineteen σECF, including the virulence regulator σVreI. σVreI is encoded by the vreAIR operon, which also encodes a receptor-like protein (VreA) and an anti-σ factor (VreR). These three proteins form a signal transduction pathway known as PUMA3, which controls expression of P. aeruginosa virulence functions. Expression of the vreAIR operon occurs under inorganic phosphate (Pi) limitation and requires the PhoB transcription factor. Intriguingly, the genes of the σVreI regulon are also expressed in low Pi despite the fact that the σVreI repressor, the anti-σ factor VreR, is also produced in this condition. Here we show that although σVreI is partially active under Pi starvation, maximal transcription of the σVreI regulon genes requires the removal of VreR. This strongly suggests that an extra signal, probably host-derived, is required in vivo for full σVreI activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activity of σVreI is modulated not only by VreR but also by the transcription factor PhoB. Presence of this regulator is an absolute requirement for σVreI to complex the DNA and initiate transcription of the PUMA3 regulon. The potential DNA binding sites of these two proteins, which include a pho box and −10 and −35 elements, are proposed. PMID:27536271

  8. Erythropoietin-mediated expression of placenta growth factor is regulated via activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and post-transcriptionally by miR-214 in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Caryn S; Li, Chen; Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine Eiymo Mwa; Pullarkat, Vinod; Malik, Punam; Tahara, Stanley M; Kalra, Vijay K

    2015-06-15

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) plays an important role in various pathological conditions and diseases such as inflammation, cancer, atherosclerosis and sickle cell disease (SCD). Abnormally high PlGF levels in SCD patients are associated with increased inflammation and pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and reactive airway disease; however, the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms regulating PlGF expression are not well defined. Herein, we show that treatment of human erythroid cells and colony forming units with erythropoietin (EPO) increased PlGF expression. Our studies showed EPO-mediated activation of HIF-1α led to subsequent binding of HIF-1α to hypoxia response elements (HREs) within the PlGF promoter, as demonstrated by luciferase transcription reporter assays and ChIP analysis of the endogenous gene. Additionally, we showed miR-214 post-transcriptionally regulated the expression of PlGF as demonstrated by luciferase reporter assays using wild-type (wt) and mutant PlGF-3'-UTR constructs. Furthermore, synthesis of miR-214, located in an intron of DNM3 (dynamin 3), was transcriptionally regulated by transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). These results were corroborated in vivo wherein plasma from SCD patients and lung tissues from sickle mice showed an inverse correlation between PlGF and miR-214 levels. Finally, we observed that miR-214 expression could be induced by fenofibrate, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved PPARα agonist, thus revealing a potential therapeutic approach for reduction in PlGF levels by increasing miR-214 transcription. This strategy has potential clinical implications for several pathological conditions including SCD.

  9. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-09-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. PMID:2143540

  10. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  11. Mammary cell-activating factor regulates the hormone-independent transcription of the early lactation protein (ELP) gene in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Renfree, Marilyn B; Cane, Kylie N

    2016-11-15

    The regulation of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) early lactation protein (ELP) gene is complex. ELP is responsive to the lactogenic hormones; insulin (I), hydrocortisone (HC) and prolactin (PRL) in mammary gland explants but could not be induced with lactogenic hormones in tammar primary mammary gland cells, nor in KIM-2 conditionally immortalised murine mammary epithelial cells. Similarly, ELP promoter constructs transiently-transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells constitutively expressing the prolactin receptor (PRLR) and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)5A were unresponsive to prolactin, unlike the rat and mouse β-casein (CSN2) promoter constructs. Identification of the minimal promoter required for the hormone-independent transcription of tammar ELP in HEK293Ts and comparative analysis of the proximal promoters of marsupial ELP and the orthologous eutherian colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene suggests that mammary cell-activating factor (MAF), an E26 transformation-specific (ETS) factor, may bind to an AGGAAG motif and activate tammar ELP. PMID:27452799

  12. Mammary cell-activating factor regulates the hormone-independent transcription of the early lactation protein (ELP) gene in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Renfree, Marilyn B; Cane, Kylie N

    2016-11-15

    The regulation of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) early lactation protein (ELP) gene is complex. ELP is responsive to the lactogenic hormones; insulin (I), hydrocortisone (HC) and prolactin (PRL) in mammary gland explants but could not be induced with lactogenic hormones in tammar primary mammary gland cells, nor in KIM-2 conditionally immortalised murine mammary epithelial cells. Similarly, ELP promoter constructs transiently-transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells constitutively expressing the prolactin receptor (PRLR) and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)5A were unresponsive to prolactin, unlike the rat and mouse β-casein (CSN2) promoter constructs. Identification of the minimal promoter required for the hormone-independent transcription of tammar ELP in HEK293Ts and comparative analysis of the proximal promoters of marsupial ELP and the orthologous eutherian colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene suggests that mammary cell-activating factor (MAF), an E26 transformation-specific (ETS) factor, may bind to an AGGAAG motif and activate tammar ELP.

  13. Discovery of Orally Available Runt-Related Transcription Factor 3 (RUNX3) Modulators for Anticancer Chemotherapy by Epigenetic Activation and Protein Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jee Sun; Lee, Chulho; Cho, Misun; Kim, Hyuntae; Kim, Jae Hyun; Choi, Seonghwi; Oh, Soo Jin; Kang, Jong Soon; Jeong, Jin-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Gyoonhee

    2015-04-23

    Recently, we identified a novel strategy for anticancer chemotherapy by restoring runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) levels via lactam-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors that stabilize RUNX3. Described here are the synthesis, biological evaluation, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of new synthetic small molecules based on pyridone-based HDAC inhibitors that specifically stabilize RUNX3 by acetylation and regulate its function. Many of the newly synthesized compounds showed favorable RUNX activities, HDAC inhibitory activities, and inhibitory activities on the growth of human cancer cell lines. Notably, one of these new derivatives, (E)-N-hydroxy-3-(2-oxo-1-(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)acrylamide (4l), significantly restored RUNX3 in a dose-dependent manner and showed high metabolic stability, a good pharmacokinetic profile with high oral bioavailability and long half-life, and strong antitumor activity. This study suggests that pyridone-based analogues modulate RUNX3 activity through epigenetic regulation as well as strong transcriptional and post-translational regulation of RUNX3 and could be potential clinical candidates as orally available RUNX3 modulators for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25811792

  14. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early protein EB2 is a posttranscriptional activator expressed under the control of EBV transcription factors EB1 and R.

    PubMed Central

    Buisson, M; Manet, E; Trescol-Biemont, M C; Gruffat, H; Durand, B; Sergeant, A

    1989-01-01

    From the cloning and characterization of cDNAs, we found that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) open reading frame (ORF) BMLF1-BSLF2 coding for the early protein EB2 is present in several mRNAs generated by alternative splicing and expressed in the leftward direction from two promoters PM and PM1. The PM promoter controls the expression of two abundant mRNA species of 1.9 and 2 kilobases (kb), whereas the PM1 promoter controls the expression of at least three mRNAs 3.6, 4.0, and 4.4 kb long. The PM promoter probably overlaps with the PS promoter which controls the transcription of a 3.6-kb mRNA expressed in the rightward direction and containing the ORF BSRF1. Although it increases the amount of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme expressed from the chimeric pMCAT gene, EB2 is not a promiscuous trans-activator of gene expression and does not positively regulate its own expression from promoter PM. The EB2 activation is not promoter dependent but could possibly act by stabilizing mRNAs and increasing their translation. The PM promoter is, however, activated by the two EBV transcription trans-acting factors, EB1 and R, encoded by the EBV ORFs BZLF1 and BRLF1, respectively. EB1 activates the PM promoter from a consensus AP-1 binding site, and R activates the PM promoter from an enhancer. Images PMID:2555554

  15. [The Effect of Transcription on Enhancer Activity in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Erokhin, M M; Davydova, A I; Lomaev, D V; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the level of gene transcription is under the control of DNA regulatory elements, such as promoter, from which transcription is initiated with the participation of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors, as well as the enhancer, which increase the rate of transcription with the involvement of activator proteins and cofactors. It was demonstrated that enhancers are often located in the transcribed regions of the genome. We showed earlier that transcription negatively affected the activity of enhancers in Drosophila in model transgenic systems. In this study, we tested the effect of the distance between the leading promoter, enhancer, and target promoter on the inhibitory effect of transcriptions of different strengths. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of transcription remained, but weakened with increased distance between the leading promoter and enhancer and with decreased distance between the enhancer and target promoter. Thus, transcription can modulate the activity of enhancers by controlling its maximum level.

  16. Differential requirement of the transcription factor Mcm1 for activation of the Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump MDR1 by its regulators Mrr1 and Cap1.

    PubMed

    Mogavero, Selene; Tavanti, Arianna; Senesi, Sonia; Rogers, P David; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2011-05-01

    Overexpression of the multidrug efflux pump Mdr1 causes increased fluconazole resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. The transcription factors Mrr1 and Cap1 mediate MDR1 upregulation in response to inducing stimuli, and gain-of-function mutations in Mrr1 or Cap1, which render the transcription factors hyperactive, result in constitutive MDR1 overexpression. The essential MADS box transcription factor Mcm1 also binds to the MDR1 promoter, but its role in inducible or constitutive MDR1 upregulation is unknown. Using a conditional mutant in which Mcm1 can be depleted from the cells, we investigated the importance of Mcm1 for MDR1 expression. We found that Mcm1 was dispensable for MDR1 upregulation by H2O2 but was required for full MDR1 induction by benomyl. A C-terminally truncated, hyperactive Cap1 could upregulate MDR1 expression both in the presence and in the absence of Mcm1. In contrast, a hyperactive Mrr1 containing a gain-of-function mutation depended on Mcm1 to cause MDR1 overexpression. These results demonstrate a differential requirement for the coregulator Mcm1 for Cap1- and Mrr1-mediated MDR1 upregulation. When activated by oxidative stress or a gain-of-function mutation, Cap1 can induce MDR1 expression independently of Mcm1, whereas Mrr1 requires either Mcm1 or an active Cap1 to cause overexpression of the MDR1 efflux pump. Our findings provide more detailed insight into the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in this important human fungal pathogen. PMID:21343453

  17. Transcription factor Spi-B binds unique sequences present in the tandem repeat promoter/enhancer of JC virus and supports viral activity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Leslie J; Dunham, Lisa; Major, Eugene O

    2010-12-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often fatal demyelinating disease caused by lytic infection of oligodendrocytes with JC virus (JCV). The development of PML in non-immunosuppressed individuals is a growing concern with reports of mortality in patients treated with mAb therapies. JCV can persist in the kidneys, lymphoid tissue and bone marrow. JCV gene expression is restricted by non-coding viral regulatory region sequence variation and cellular transcription factors. Because JCV latency has been associated with cells undergoing haematopoietic development, transcription factors previously reported as lymphoid specific may regulate JCV gene expression. This study demonstrates that one such transcription factor, Spi-B, binds to sequences present in the JCV promoter/enhancer and may affect early virus gene expression in cells obtained from human brain tissue. We identified four potential Spi-B-binding sites present in the promoter/enhancer elements of JCV sequences from PML variants and the non-pathogenic archetype. Spi-B sites present in the promoter/enhancers of PML variants alone bound protein expressed in JCV susceptible brain and lymphoid-derived cell lines by electromobility shift assays. Expression of exogenous Spi-B in semi- and non-permissive cells increased early viral gene expression. Strikingly, mutation of the Spi-B core in a binding site unique to the Mad-4 variant was sufficient to abrogate viral activity in progenitor-derived astrocytes. These results suggest that Spi-B could regulate JCV gene expression in susceptible cells, and may play an important role in JCV activity in the immune and nervous systems.

  18. BjMYB1, a transcription factor implicated in plant defence through activating BjCHI1 chitinase expression by binding to a W-box-like element

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Jia, Shuangwei; Wang, Chunlian; Wang, Fujun; Wang, Fajun; Zhao, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified the W-box-like-4 (Wbl-4) element (GTAGTGACTCAT), one of six Wbl elements in the BjC-P promoter of the unusual chitinase gene BjCHI1 from Brassica juncea, as the core element responsive to fungal infection. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the cognate transcription factor interacting with the Wbl-4 element. Using Wbl-4 as a target, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening of a B. juncea cDNA library and isolated an R2R3-MYB transcription factor designated as BjMYB1. BjMYB1 was localized in the nucleus of plant cells. EMSA assays confirmed that BjMYB1 binds to the Wbl-4 element. Transiently expressed BjMYB1 up-regulated the activity of the BjC-P promoter through its binding to the Wbl-4 element in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves. In B. juncea, BjMYB1 displayed a similar induced expression pattern as that of BjCHI1 upon infection by the fungus Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, heterogeneous overexpression of BjMYB1 significantly elevated the resistance of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana to the fungus B. cinerea. These results suggest that BjMYB1 is potentially involved in host defence against fungal attack through activating the expression of BjCHI1 by binding to the Wbl-4 element in the BjC-P promoter. This finding demonstrates a novel DNA target of plant MYB transcription factors. PMID:27353280

  19. Redox-mediated Mechanisms Regulate DNA Binding Activity of the G-group of Basic Region Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Shaikhali, Jehad; Norén, Louise; de Dios Barajas-López, Juan; Srivastava, Vaibhav; König, Janine; Sauer, Uwe H.; Wingsle, Gunnar; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Strand, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    Plant genes that contain the G-box in their promoters are responsive to a variety of environmental stimuli. Bioinformatics analysis of transcriptome data revealed that the G-box element is significantly enriched in promoters of high light-responsive genes. From nuclear extracts of high light-treated Arabidopsis plants, we identified the AtbZIP16 transcription factor as a component binding to the G-box-containing promoter fragment of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein2.4 (LHCB2.4). AtbZIP16 belongs to the G-group of Arabidopsis basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) type transcription factors. Although AtbZIP16 and its close homologues AtbZIP68 and AtGBF1 bind the G-box, they do not bind the mutated half-sites of the G-box palindrome. In addition, AtbZIP16 interacts with AtbZIP68 and AtGBF1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. A conserved Cys residue was shown to be necessary for redox regulation and enhancement of DNA binding activity in all three proteins. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the wild type version of bZIP16 and T-DNA insertion mutants for bZIP68 and GBF1 demonstrated impaired regulation of LHCB2.4 expression. Finally, overexpression lines for the mutated Cys variant of bZIP16 provided support for the biological significance of Cys330 in redox regulation of gene expression. Thus, our results suggest that environmentally induced changes in the redox state regulate the activity of members of the G-group of bZIP transcription factors. PMID:22718771

  20. Interactions of purified transcription factors: binding of yeast MAT alpha 1 and PRTF to cell type-specific, upstream activating sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S; Ammerer, G; Richmond, T J

    1988-01-01

    Pheromone receptor transcription factor (PRTF) and MAT alpha 1 are protein transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of the alpha-specific genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have expressed MAT alpha 1 as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified it from inclusion bodies in milligram quantities. The MAT alpha 1 protein was obtained after specific cleavage of the fusion protein. Quantitative band shift electrophoresis was used to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants that describe the multicomponent binding equilibrium between the PRTF and MAT alpha 1 proteins, and alpha-specific STE3 upstream activating sequence (UAS) DNA. The dissociation constant for the complex of PRTF and the a-specific UAS of STE2 was also measured and found to be 5.9 X 10(-11) M, only three times less than that for the PRTF-STE3 UAS complex. Analyses of these complexes by DNase I footprinting demonstrate that the PRTF binding site is confined to the palindromic P-box sequence in the case of the STE3 UAS, but extends symmetrically from this central region to cover 28 bp for the STE2 UAS. When MAT alpha 1 is bound to the PRTF-STE3 complex, the region of DNA protected is enlarged to that seen for the PRTF-STE2 complex. Our results using these two purified factors in vitro suggest that PRTF has nearly the same affinity for a- and alpha-specific UAS elements and that transcriptional activation requires a particular conformational state for the PRTF-DNA complex which occurs in the PRTF-STE2 and MAT alpha 1-PRTF-STE3 complexes, but not in the PRTF-STE3 complex. Images PMID:2854061

  1. Transcription factors as targets for DNA-interacting drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2003-06-01

    Gene expression, both tissue specific or inducible, is controlled at the level of transcription by various transcription factors interacting with specific sequences of DNA. Anticancer drugs and other potential therapeutic agents alter interactions of regulatory proteins with DNA by a variety of different mechanisms. The main ones, considered in the review, are: i) competition for the transcription factor DNA binding sequences by drugs that interact non-covalently with DNA (e.g. anthracyclines, acridines, actinomycin D, pyrrole antibiotics and their polyamide derivatives); ii) covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents (e.g. nitrogen mustards, cisplatin) that prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences, or that result in multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which hijack the transcription factors, thus decreasing their availability in the nucleus; iii) competition with binding sites on the transcription factors by synthetic oligonucleotides or peptide nucleic acids in an antigene strategy. The latter compounds may also compete for binding sites on regulatory proteins, acting as decoys to lower their active concentration in the cell. In this review, we have summarized recent advances which have been made towards understanding the above mechanisms by which small molecules interfere with the function of transcription factors. PMID:12678680

  2. Melanin biosynthesis in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus depends on two mitogen-activated protein kinases, Chk1 and Mps1, and the transcription factor Cmr1.

    PubMed

    Eliahu, Noa; Igbaria, Aeid; Rose, Mark S; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Lev, Sophie

    2007-03-01

    The maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus requires two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Chk1 and Mps1, to produce normal pigmentation. Young colonies of mps1 and chk1 deletion mutants have a white and autolytic appearance, which was partially rescued by a hyperosmotic environment. We isolated the transcription factor Cmr1, an ortholog of Colletotrichum lagenarium Cmr1 and Magnaporthe grisea Pig1, which regulates melanin biosynthesis in C. heterostrophus. Deletion of CMR1 in C. heterostrophus resulted in mutants that lacked dark pigmentation and acquired an orange-pink color. In cmr1 deletion strains the expression of putative scytalone dehydratase (SCD1) and hydroxynaphthalene reductase (BRN1 and BRN2) genes involved in melanin biosynthesis was undetectable, whereas expression of PKS18, encoding a polyketide synthase, was only moderately reduced. In chk1 and mps1 mutants expression of PKS18, SCD1, BRN1, BRN2, and the transcription factor CMR1 itself was very low in young colonies, slightly up-regulated in aging colonies, and significantly induced in hyperosmotic conditions, compared to invariably high expression in the wild type. These findings indicate that two MAPKs, Chk1 and Mps1, affect Cmr1 at the transcriptional level and this influence is partially overridden in stress conditions including aging culture and hyperosmotic environment. Surprisingly, we found that the CMR1 gene was transcribed in both sense and antisense directions, apparently producing mRNA as well as a long noncoding RNA transcript. Expression of the antisense CMR1 was also Chk1 and Mps1 dependent. Analysis of chromosomal location of the melanin biosynthesis genes in C. heterostrophus resulted in identification of a small gene cluster comprising BRN1, CMR1, and PKS18. Since expression of all three genes depends on Chk1 and Mps1 MAPKs, we suggest their possible epigenetic regulation. PMID:17237364

  3. Genistein reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 transcription but not urokinase expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Hinsbergh, V W; Vermeer, M; Koolwijk, P; Grimbergen, J; Kooistra, T

    1994-11-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor PAI-1 is markedly elevated in vivo and in vitro upon exposure to the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Here we report that the isoflavone compound genistein prevents the increase in synthesis of PAI-1 induced by these inflammatory mediators in human endothelial cells in vitro, and partially reduces the basal PAI-1 production by these cells. These effects of genistein were accompanied by a decrease in PAI-1 mRNA and in a suppression of the PAI-1 transcription rate as shown by run-on assay. A specific action of genistein, probably by inhibiting a tyrosine protein kinase, is likely, because the structural genistein analogue daidzein, which has a low tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor activity, did not inhibit PAI-1 synthesis. Vanadate, a tyrosine protein phosphatase inhibitor, increased PAI-1 production. The effect of genistein on PAI-1 synthesis was rather selective. Herbimycin A also reduced PAI-1 synthesis, but several other tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors, namely tyrphostin A47, methyl-2,5-dihydroxy-cinnamate, and compound 5, were unable to do so. All these tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors reduced basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells. This indicates that the effect of genistein on PAI-1 transcription proceeds independently of its effect on mitogenesis. In contrast to TNF-alpha-induced PAI-1 production, the transcription and synthesis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was not inhibited by genistein. A TNF-alpha-mutant (Trp32Thr86TNF alpha) that specifically recognizes the 55-kD TNF-receptor, mimicked the effects of TNF alpha on both PAI-1 and u-PA. Because genistein affected PAI-1, but not u-PA induced by this mutant, involvement of different TNF-receptors cannot underlie the difference in the effects of genistein on PAI-1 and u-PA synthesis. Because genistein also

  4. ETS transcription factors in embryonic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael P; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-07-01

    At least thirteen ETS-domain transcription factors are expressed during embryonic hematopoietic or vascular development and potentially function in the formation and maintenance of the embryonic vasculature or blood lineages. This review summarizes our current understanding of the specific roles played by ETS factors in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and the implications of functional redundancies between them.

  5. 2-Methoxystypandrone inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB signaling by inhibiting Janus kinase 2 and IκB kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shan; Qi, Chunting; Liu, Jiawei; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Qing; Sima, Zhenhua; Liu, Jingli; Li, Wuguo; Yu, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) or the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway occurs frequently in cancer cells and contributes to oncogenesis. The activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and IκB kinase (IKK) are key events in STAT3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively. We have identified 2-methoxystypandrone (2-MS) from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb Polygonum cuspidatum as a novel dual inhibitor of JAK2 and IKK. 2-MS inhibits both interleukin-6-induced and constitutively-activated STAT3, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α-induced NF-κB activation. 2-MS specifically inhibits JAK and IKKβ kinase activities but has little effect on activities of other kinases tested. The inhibitory effects of 2-MS on STAT3 and NF-κB signaling can be eliminated by DTT or glutathione and can last for 4 h after a pulse treatment. Furthermore, 2-MS inhibits growth and induces death of tumor cells, particularly those with constitutively-activated STAT3 or NF-κB signaling. We propose that the natural compound 2-MS, as a potent dual inhibitor of STAT3 and NF-κB pathways, is a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:24450414

  6. Intergenic transcriptional interference is blocked by RNA polymerase III transcription factor TFIIIB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korde, Asawari; Rosselot, Jessica M; Donze, David

    2014-02-01

    The major function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase III is to transcribe transfer RNA, 5S ribosomal RNA, and other small non-protein-coding RNA molecules. Assembly of the RNA polymerase III complex on chromosomal DNA requires the sequential binding of transcription factor complexes TFIIIC and TFIIIB. Recent evidence has suggested that in addition to producing RNA transcripts, chromatin-assembled RNA polymerase III complexes may mediate additional nuclear functions that include chromatin boundary, nucleosome phasing, and general genome organization activities. This study provides evidence of another such "extratranscriptional" activity of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes, which is the ability to block progression of intergenic RNA polymerase II transcription. We demonstrate that the RNA polymerase III complex bound to the tRNA gene upstream of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATG31 gene protects the ATG31 promoter against readthrough transcriptional interference from the upstream noncoding intergenic SUT467 transcription unit. This protection is predominately mediated by binding of the TFIIIB complex. When TFIIIB binding to this tRNA gene is weakened, an extended SUT467-ATG31 readthrough transcript is produced, resulting in compromised ATG31 translation. Since the ATG31 gene product is required for autophagy, strains expressing the readthrough transcript exhibit defective autophagy induction and reduced fitness under autophagy-inducing nitrogen starvation conditions. Given the recent discovery of widespread pervasive transcription in all forms of life, protection of neighboring genes from intergenic transcriptional interference may be a key extratranscriptional function of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes and possibly other DNA binding proteins.

  7. Activator- and repressor-type MYB transcription factors are involved in chilling injury induced flesh lignification in loquat via their interactions with the phenylpropanoid pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Yin, Xue-ren; Zeng, Jiao-ke; Ge, Hang; Song, Min; Xu, Chang-jie; Li, Xian; Ferguson, Ian B.; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-01-01

    Lignin biosynthesis and its transcriptional regulatory networks have been studied in model plants and woody trees. However, lignification also occurs in some fleshy fruit and has rarely been considered in this way. Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is one such convenient tissue for exploring the transcription factors involved in regulating fruit flesh lignification. Firmness and lignin content of ‘Luoyangqing’ loquat were fund to increase during low-temperature storage as a typical symptom of chilling injury, while heat treatment (HT) and low-temperature conditioning (LTC) effectively alleviated them. Two novel EjMYB genes, EjMYB1 and EjMYB2, were isolated and were found to be localized in the nucleus. These genes responded differently to low temperature, with EjMYB1 induced and EjMYB2 inhibited at 0 °C. They also showed different temperature responses under HT and LTC conditions, and may be responsible for different regulation of flesh lignification at the transcriptional level. Transactivation assays indicated that EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 are a transcriptional activator and repressor, respectively. EjMYB1 activated promoters of both Arabidopsis and loquat lignin biosynthesis genes, while EjMYB2 countered the inductive effects of EjMYB1. This finding was also supported by transient overexpression in tobacco. Regulation of lignification by EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 is likely to be achieved via their competitive interaction with AC elements in the promoter region of lignin biosynthesis genes such as Ej4CL1. PMID:24860186

  8. Activator- and repressor-type MYB transcription factors are involved in chilling injury induced flesh lignification in loquat via their interactions with the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Yin, Xue-ren; Zeng, Jiao-ke; Ge, Hang; Song, Min; Xu, Chang-Jie; Li, Xian; Ferguson, Ian B; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-08-01

    Lignin biosynthesis and its transcriptional regulatory networks have been studied in model plants and woody trees. However, lignification also occurs in some fleshy fruit and has rarely been considered in this way. Loquat ( Eriobotrya japonica ) is one such convenient tissue for exploring the transcription factors involved in regulating fruit flesh lignification. Firmness and lignin content of 'Luoyangqing' loquat were fund to increase during low-temperature storage as a typical symptom of chilling injury, while heat treatment (HT) and low-temperature conditioning (LTC) effectively alleviated them. Two novel EjMYB genes, EjMYB1 and EjMYB2, were isolated and were found to be localized in the nucleus. These genes responded differently to low temperature, with EjMYB1 induced and EjMYB2 inhibited at 0 °C. They also showed different temperature responses under HT and LTC conditions, and may be responsible for different regulation of flesh lignification at the transcriptional level. Transactivation assays indicated that EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 are a transcriptional activator and repressor, respectively. EjMYB1 activated promoters of both Arabidopsis and loquat lignin biosynthesis genes, while EjMYB2 countered the inductive effects of EjMYB1. This finding was also supported by transient overexpression in tobacco. Regulation of lignification by EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 is likely to be achieved via their competitive interaction with AC elements in the promoter region of lignin biosynthesis genes such as Ej4CL1.

  9. Transcription-Factor-Dependent Control of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Zhang, Chun-Li; Lie, Dieter Chichung

    2015-10-01

    Adult-generated dentate granule neurons have emerged as major contributors to hippocampal plasticity. New neurons are generated from neural stem cells through a complex sequence of proliferation, differentiation, and maturation steps. Development of the new neuron is dependent on the precise temporal activity of transcription factors, which coordinate the expression of stage-specific genetic programs. Here, we review current knowledge in transcription factor-mediated regulation of mammalian neural stem cells and neurogenesis and will discuss potential mechanisms of how transcription factor networks, on one hand, allow for precise execution of the developmental sequence and, on the other hand, allow for adaptation of the rate and timing of adult neurogenesis in response to complex stimuli. Understanding transcription factor-mediated control of neuronal development will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying neurogenesis-dependent plasticity in health and disease.

  10. Identification of the cAMP response element that controls transcriptional activation of the insulin-like growth factor-I gene by prostaglandin E2 in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, M. J.; Umayahara, Y.; Shu, H.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), a multifunctional growth factor, plays a key role in skeletal growth and can enhance bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other agents that increase cAMP activated IGF-I gene transcription in primary rat osteoblast cultures through promoter 1 (P1), the major IGF-I promoter, and found that transcriptional induction was mediated by protein kinase A. We now have identified a short segment of P1 that is essential for full hormonal regulation and have characterized inducible DNA-protein interactions involving this site. Transient transfections of IGF-I P1 reporter genes into primary rat osteoblasts showed that the 328-base pair untranslated region of exon 1 was required for a full 5.3-fold response to PGE2; mutation in a previously footprinted site, HS3D (base pairs +193 to +215), reduced induction by 65%. PGE2 stimulated nuclear protein binding to HS3D. Binding, as determined by gel mobility shift assay, was not seen in nuclear extracts from untreated osteoblast cultures, was detected within 2 h of PGE2 treatment, and was maximal by 4 h. This DNA-protein interaction was not observed in cytoplasmic extracts from PGE2-treated cultures, indicating nuclear localization of the protein kinase A-activated factor(s). Activation of this factor was not blocked by cycloheximide (Chx), and Chx did not impair stimulation of IGF-I gene expression by PGE2. In contrast, binding to a consensus cAMP response element (CRE; 5'-TGACGTCA-3') from the rat somatostatin gene was not modulated by PGE2 or Chx. Competition gel mobility shift analysis using mutated DNA probes identified 5'-CGCAATCG-3' as the minimal sequence needed for inducible binding. All modified IGF-I P1 promoterreporter genes with mutations within this CRE sequence also showed a diminished functional response to PGE2. These results identify the CRE within the 5'-untranslated region of IGF-I exon 1 that is required for hormonal

  11. A Gly145Ser substitution in the transcriptional activator PrfA causes constitutive overexpression of virulence factors in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Ripio, M T; Domínguez-Bernal, G; Lara, M; Suárez, M; Vazquez-Boland, J A

    1997-01-01

    Virulence genes in Listeria monocytogenes are coordinately expressed under the control of the transcriptional activator PrfA, encoded by prfA, a member of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP)/FNR family of bacterial regulators. Strain P14-A is a spontaneous mutant of L. monocytogenes serovar 4b which produces elevated levels of virulence factors (M. T. Ripio, G. Domínguez-Bernal, M. Suárez, K. Brehm, P. Berche, and J. A. Vázquez-Boland, Res. Microbiol. 147:371-384, 1996). Here we report that P14-A and other variant strains with the same phenotype carry a point mutation in codon 145 of prfA, leading to a Gly-->Ser substitution. trans-complementation experiments with PrfA-deficient mutants demonstrated that the Gly145Ser prfA allele causes overexpression of virulence factors in L. monocytogenes, to the levels found in the virulence factor-overexpressing variants. In strain P14-A with a chromosomal Glyl45Ser prfA background, transcription of prfA and of PrfA-dependent virulence genes remained constitutively high under culture conditions in which virulence factor expression is downregulated in wild-type L. monocytogenes. The Glyl45Ser substitution is located in a PrfA stretch (residues 141 to 151) showing high sequence similarity to the D alpha-helix of CRP. Interestingly, well-characterized crp* mutations, which make CRP functionally active in the absence of cAMP, map in this region (i.e., Gly141Ser and Ala144Thr substitutions). By analogy with the CRP model, the phenotype conferred to L. monocytogenes by the Gly145Ser substitution in PrfA could be due to the mutant regulatory protein being locked in a transcriptionally active, cofactor-independent conformational state. Our observations allow the construction of a model for PrfA-dependent virulence gene regulation in which the levels of virulence factor expression depend primarily on the conformational state of the PrfA protein, which alternates between active and inactive forms according to its interaction

  12. The NAD-Dependent Deacetylase Sirtuin-1 Regulates the Expression of Osteogenic Transcriptional Activator Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2) and Production of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in Chondrocytes in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Koh; Kobayashi, Hajime; Yatabe, Kanaka; Yui, Naoko; Fujiya, Hiroto; Niki, Hisateru; Musha, Haruki; Yudoh, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Aging is one of the major pathologic factors associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Recently, numerous reports have demonstrated the impact of sirtuin-1 (Sirt1), which is the NAD-dependent deacetylase, on human aging. It has been demonstrated that Sirt1 induces osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the role of Sirt1 in the OA chondrocytes still remains unknown. We postulated that Sirt1 regulates a hypertrophic chondrocyte lineage and degeneration of articular cartilage through the activation of osteogenic transcriptional activator Runx2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in OA chondrocytes. To verify whether sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) regulates chondrocyte activity in OA, we studied expressions of Sirt1, Runx2 and production of MMP-13, and their associations in human OA chondrocytes. The expression of Sirt1 was ubiquitously observed in osteoarthritic chondrocytes; in contrast, Runx2 expressed in the osteophyte region in patients with OA and OA model mice. OA relating catabolic factor IL-1βincreased the expression of Runx2 in OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, which were pretreated with Sirt1 inhibitor, inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of Runx2 compared to the control. Since the Runx2 is a promotor of MMP-13 expression, Sirt1 inactivation may inhibit the Runx2 expression and the resultant down-regulation of MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our findings suggest thatSirt1 may regulate the expression of Runx2, which is the osteogenic transcription factor, and the production of MMP-13 from chondrocytes in OA. Since Sirt1 activity is known to be affected by several stresses, including inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as aging, SIRT may be involved in the development of OA. PMID:27367673

  13. The nuclear calcium signaling target, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), protects against dendrotoxicity and facilitates the recovery of synaptic transmission after an excitotoxic insult.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Hanna; Bas-Orth, Carlos; Freitag, H Eckehard; Hellwig, Andrea; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Bading, Hilmar

    2014-04-01

    The focal swellings of dendrites ("dendritic beading") are an early morphological hallmark of neuronal injury and dendrotoxicity. They are associated with a variety of pathological conditions, including brain ischemia, and cause an acute disruption of synaptic transmission and neuronal network function, which contribute to subsequent neuronal death. Here, we show that increased synaptic activity prior to excitotoxic injury protects, in a transcription-dependent manner, against dendritic beading. Expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a nuclear calcium-regulated gene and member of the core gene program for acquired neuroprotection, can protect against dendritic beading. Conversely, knockdown of ATF3 exacerbates dendritic beading. Assessment of neuronal network functions using microelectrode array recordings revealed that hippocampal neurons expressing ATF3 were able to regain their ability for functional synaptic transmission and to participate in coherent neuronal network activity within 48 h after exposure to toxic concentrations of NMDA. Thus, in addition to attenuating cell death, synaptic activity and expression of ATF3 render hippocampal neurons more resistant to acute dendrotoxicity and loss of synapses. Dendroprotection can enhance recovery of neuronal network functions after excitotoxic insults.

  14. Advanced glycation end-products induce heparanase expression in endothelial cells by the receptor for advanced glycation end products and through activation of the FOXO4 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    An, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Lei; Jiang, Peng-Jun; Yan, Ming; Huang, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Su-Na; Niu, Yun-Fei; Ten, Shi-Chao; Yu, Jiang-Yi

    2011-08-01

    As an endo-β (1-4)-D: -glucuronidase, heparanase can specifically cleave carbohydrate chains of heparan sulfate (HS) and has been implicated in development of endothelial cells dsyfunction. The advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play a pivotal role in the pathology of diabetic complications. In the present study, we investigated the effect of AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) on heparanase expression in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results indicated that in vitro direct exposure of HMVECs to AGE-BSA (300, 1000, and 3000 μg/ml) could increase heparanase mRNA and protein expression in a dose and time-dependent manner. The effect of 1000 μg/ml AGE-BSA could be abolished by neutralization with antibody of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Moreover, pretreatment with inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or PI3-kinase did not affect heparanase expression induced by AGE-BSA. Nevertheless, small interference RNA (siRNA) for transcriptional factor FOXO4 could reduce the increase of heparanase expression in HMVECs induced by 1000 μg/ml AGE-BSA. These results suggest that AGEs could induce heparanase expression in HMVECs by RAGE and predominantly through activation of the FOXO4 transcription factor.

  15. Lower expression of activating transcription factors 3 and 4 correlates with shorter progression-free survival in multiple myeloma patients receiving bortezomib plus dexamethasone therapy.

    PubMed

    Narita, T; Ri, M; Masaki, A; Mori, F; Ito, A; Kusumoto, S; Ishida, T; Komatsu, H; Iida, S

    2015-12-04

    Bortezomib (BTZ), a proteasome inhibitor, is widely used in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), but a fraction of patients respond poorly to this agent. To identify factors predicting the duration of progression-free survival (PFS) of MM patients on BTZ treatment, the expression of proteasome and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related genes was quantified in primary samples from patients receiving a combination of BTZ and dexamethasone (BD). Fifty-six MM patients were stratified into a group with PFS<6 months (n=33) and a second group with PFS⩾6 months (n=23). Of the 15 genes analyzed, the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and ATF4 was significantly lower in patients with shorter PFS (P=0.0157 and P=0.0085, respectively). Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that these ATFs bind each other and transactivate genes encoding the pro-apoptotic transcription factors, CHOP and Noxa, which promote ER stress-associated apoptosis. When either ATF3 or ATF4 expression was silenced, MM cells partially lost sensitivity to BTZ treatment. This was accompanied by lower levels of Noxa, CHOP and DR5. Thus low basal expression of ATF3 and ATF4 may attenuate BTZ-induced apoptosis. Hence, ATF3 and ATF4 could potentially be used as biomarkers to predict efficacy of BD therapy in patients with MM.

  16. Porins from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Activate the Transcription Factors Activating Protein 1 and NF-κB through the Raf-1-Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Massimiliano; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Sanzari, Emma; D’Isanto, Marina; Tortora, Annalisa; Longanella, Anna; Galdiero, Stefania

    2002-01-01

    In this study we examined the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium porins to activate activating protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and we identified the AP-1-induced protein subunits. Our results demonstrate that these enzymes may participate in cell signaling pathways leading to AP-1 and NF-κB activation following porin stimulation of cells. Raf-1 was phosphorylated in response to the treatment of U937 cells with porins; moreover, the porin-mediated increase in Raf-1 phosphorylation is accompanied by the phosphorylation of MAPK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. We used three different inhibitors of phosphorylation pathways: 2′-amino-3′-methoxyflavone (PD-098059), a selective inhibitor of MEK1 activator and the MAPK cascade; 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB203580), a specific inhibitor of the p38 pathway; and 7β-acetoxy-1α,6β,9α-trihydroxy-8,13-epoxy-labd-14-en-11-one (forskolin), an inhibitor at the level of Raf-1 kinase. PD-098059 pretreatment of cells decreases AP-1 and NF-κB activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by porins, and SB203580 pretreatment of cells decreases mainly AP-1 and NF-κB activation by porins; in contrast, forskolin pretreatment of cells does not affect AP-1 and NF-κB activation following either porin or LPS stimulation. Our data suggest that the p38 signaling pathway mainly regulates AP-1 and NF-κB activation in cells treated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium porins. Antibody electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that JunD and c-Fos binding is found in cells treated with porins, in cells treated with LPS, and in unstimulated cells. However, by 30 to 60 min of stimulation, a different complex including c-Jun appears in cells treated with porins or LPS, while the Fra-2 subunit is present only after porin stimulation

  17. Activation of the Transcription Factor GLI1 by WNT Signaling Underlies the Role of SULFATASE 2 as a Regulator of Tissue Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ikuo; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Ortiz-Ruiz, Maria C.; Almada, Luciana L.; Hu, Chunling; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Mills, Lisa D.; Romecin, Paola A.; Gulaid, Kadra H.; Moser, Catherine D.; Han, Jing-Jing; Vrabel, Anne; Hanse, Eric A.; Akogyeram, Nicholas A.; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.; Sanderson, Schuyler O.; Prieto, Jesus; Roberts, Lewis R.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue regeneration requires the activation of a set of specific growth signaling pathways. The identity of these cascades and their biological roles are known; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the interplay between these pathways remain poorly understood. Here, we define a new role for SULFATASE 2 (SULF2) in regulating tissue regeneration and define the WNT-GLI1 axis as a novel downstream effector for this sulfatase in a liver model of tissue regeneration. SULF2 is a heparan sulfate 6-O-endosulfatase, which releases growth factors from extracellular storage sites turning active multiple signaling pathways. We demonstrate that SULF2-KO mice display delayed regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH). Mechanistic analysis of the SULF2-KO phenotype showed a decrease in WNT signaling pathway activity in vivo. In isolated hepatocytes, SULF2 deficiency blocked WNT-induced β-CATENIN nuclear translocation, TCF activation, and proliferation. Furthermore, we identified the transcription factor GLI1 as a novel target of the SULF2-WNT cascade. WNT induces GLI1 expression in a SULF2- and β-CATENIN-dependent manner. GLI1-KO mice phenocopied the SULF2-KO, showing delayed regeneration and decreased hepatocyte proliferation. Moreover, we identified CYCLIN D1, a key mediator of cell growth during tissue regeneration, as a GLI1 transcriptional target. GLI1 binds to the cyclin d1 promoter and regulates its activity and expression. Finally, restoring GLI1 expression in the liver of SULF2-KO mice after PH rescues CYCLIN D1 expression and hepatocyte proliferation to wild-type levels. Thus, together these findings define a novel pathway in which SULF2 regulates tissue regeneration in part via the activation of a novel WNT-GLI1-CYCLIN D1 pathway. PMID:23740243

  18. Program-specific distribution of a transcription factor dependent on partner transcription factor and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeitlinger, Julia; Simon, Itamar; Harbison, Christopher T; Hannett, Nancy M; Volkert, Thomas L; Fink, Gerald R; Young, Richard A

    2003-05-01

    Specialized gene expression programs are induced by signaling pathways that act on transcription factors. Whether these transcription factors can function in multiple developmental programs through a global switch in promoter selection is not known. We have used genome-wide location analysis to show that the yeast Ste12 transcription factor, which regulates mating and filamentous growth, is bound to distinct program-specific target genes dependent on the developmental condition. This condition-dependent distribution of Ste12 requires concurrent binding of the transcription factor Tec1 during filamentation and is differentially regulated by the MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1. Program-specific distribution across the genome may be a general mechanism by which transcription factors regulate distinct gene expression programs in response to signaling. PMID:12732146

  19. A position-dependent transcription-activating domain in TFIIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, X; Darby, M K

    1993-01-01

    Transcription of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene by RNA polymerase III requires the gene-specific factor TFIIIA. To identify domains within TFIIIA that are essential for transcriptional activation, we have expressed C-terminal deletion, substitution, and insertion mutants of TFIIIA in bacteria as fusions with maltose-binding protein (MBP). The MBP-TFIIIA fusion protein specifically binds to the 5S RNA gene internal control region and complements transcription in a TFIIIA-depleted oocyte nuclear extract. Random, cassette-mediated mutagenesis of the carboxyl region of TFIIIA, which is not required for promoter binding, has defined a 14-amino-acid region that is critical for transcriptional activation. In contrast to activators of RNA polymerase II, the activity of the TFIIIA activation domain is strikingly sensitive to its position relative to the DNA-binding domain. When the eight amino acids that separate the transcription-activating domain from the last zinc finger are deleted, transcriptional activity is lost. Surprisingly, diverse amino acids can replace these eight amino acids with restoration of full transcriptional activity, suggesting that the length and not the sequence of this region is important. Insertion of amino acids between the zinc finger region and the transcription-activating domain causes a reduction in transcription proportional to the number of amino acids introduced. We propose that to function, the transcription-activating domain of TFIIIA must be correctly positioned at a minimum distance from the DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:8246967

  20. The role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling components and the Ste12 transcription factor in germination and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Schamber, Astrid; Leroch, Michaela; Diwo, Janine; Mendgen, Kurt; Hahn, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In all fungi studied so far, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades serve as central signalling complexes that are involved in various aspects of growth, stress response and infection. In this work, putative components of the yeast Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade and the putative downstream transcription factor Ste12 were analysed in the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion mutants of the MAP triple kinase Ste11, the MAP kinase kinase Ste7 and the MAP kinase adaptor protein Ste50 all resulted in phenotypes similar to that of the previously described BMP1 MAP kinase mutant, namely defects in germination, delayed vegetative growth, reduced size of conidia, lack of sclerotia formation and loss of pathogenicity. Mutants lacking Ste12 showed normal germination, but delayed infection as a result of low penetration efficiency. Two differently spliced ste12 transcripts were detected, and both were able to complement the ste12 mutant, except for a defect in sclerotium formation, which was only corrected by the full-sized transcript. Overexpression of the smaller ste12 transcript resulted in delayed germination and strongly reduced infection. Bc-Gas2, a homologue of Magnaporthe grisea Gas2 that is required for appressorial function, was found to be non-essential for growth and infection, but its expression was under the control of both Bmp1 and Ste12. In summary, the role and regulatory connections of the Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade in B. cinerea revealed both common and unique properties compared with those of other plant pathogenic fungi, and provide evidence for a regulatory link between the BMP1 MAP kinase cascade and Ste12. PMID:20078780

  1. Oct-2 transcription factor binding activity and expression up-regulation in rat cerebral ischaemia is associated with a diminution of neuronal damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Camós, Susanna; Gubern, Carme; Sobrado, Mónica; Rodríguez, Rocío; Romera, Víctor G; Moro, María Ángeles; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Serena, Joaquín; Mallolas, Judith; Castellanos, Mar

    2014-06-01

    Brain plasticity provides a mechanism to compensate for lesions produced as a result of stroke. The present study aims to identify new transcription factors (TFs) following focal cerebral ischaemia in rat as potential therapeutic targets. A transient focal cerebral ischaemia model was used for TF-binding activity and TF-TF interaction profile analysis. A permanent focal cerebral ischaemia model was used for the transcript gene analysis and for the protein study. The identification of TF variants, mRNA analysis, and protein study was performed using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), qPCR, and Western blot and immunofluorescence, respectively. Rat cortical neurons were transfected with small interfering RNA against the TF in order to study its role. The TF-binding analysis revealed a differential binding activity of the octamer family in ischaemic brain in comparison with the control brain samples both in acute and late phases. In this study, we focused on Oct-2 TF. Five of the six putative Oct-2 transcript variants are expressed in both control and ischaemic rat brain, showing a significant increase in the late phase of ischaemia. Oct-2 protein showed neuronal localisation both in control and ischaemic rat brain cortical slices. Functional studies revealed that Oct-2 interacts with TFs involved in important brain processes (neuronal and vascular development) and basic cellular functions and that Oct-2 knockdown promotes neuronal injury. The present study shows that Oct-2 expression and binding activity increase in the late phase of cerebral ischaemia and finds Oct-2 to be involved in reducing ischaemic-mediated neuronal injury.

  2. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Peng; Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian; Peng, Hui; Clewell, Rebecca; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shuangqing; Qu, W